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Sample records for anti-malarial drug resistance

  1. Hyperparasitaemia and low dosing are an important source of anti-malarial drug resistance

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    Lee Sue J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preventing the emergence of anti-malarial drug resistance is critical for the success of current malaria elimination efforts. Prevention strategies have focused predominantly on qualitative factors, such as choice of drugs, use of combinations and deployment of multiple first-line treatments. The importance of anti-malarial treatment dosing has been underappreciated. Treatment recommendations are often for the lowest doses that produce "satisfactory" results. Methods The probability of de-novo resistant malaria parasites surviving and transmitting depends on the relationship between their degree of resistance and the blood concentration profiles of the anti-malarial drug to which they are exposed. The conditions required for the in-vivo selection of de-novo emergent resistant malaria parasites were examined and relative probabilities assessed. Results Recrudescence is essential for the transmission of de-novo resistance. For rapidly eliminated anti-malarials high-grade resistance can arise from a single drug exposure, but low-grade resistance can arise only from repeated inadequate treatments. Resistance to artemisinins is, therefore, unlikely to emerge with single drug exposures. Hyperparasitaemic patients are an important source of de-novo anti-malarial drug resistance. Their parasite populations are larger, their control of the infection insufficient, and their rates of recrudescence following anti-malarial treatment are high. As use of substandard drugs, poor adherence, unusual pharmacokinetics, and inadequate immune responses are host characteristics, likely to pertain to each recurrence of infection, a small subgroup of patients provides the particular circumstances conducive to de-novo resistance selection and transmission. Conclusion Current dosing recommendations provide a resistance selection opportunity in those patients with low drug levels and high parasite burdens (often children or pregnant women. Patients with

  2. Co-treatment with the anti-malarial drugs mefloquine and primaquine highly sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells by increasing P-gp inhibition.

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    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Yong Kee; Yoon, Sungpil

    2013-11-22

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that will increase the sensitivity of resistant cancer cells to anti-mitotic drugs. Currently, atovaquine (ATO), chloroquine (CHL), primaquine (PRI), mefloquine (MEF), artesunate (ART), and doxycycline (DOY) are the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Herein, we tested whether anti-malarial drugs can sensitize drug-resistant KBV20C cancer cells. None of the six tested anti-malarial drugs was found to better sensitize the drug-resistant cells compared to the sensitive KB cells. With an exception of DOY, all other anti-malarial drugs tested could sensitize both KB and KBV20C cells to a similar extent, suggesting that anti-malarial drugs could be used for sensitive as well as resistant cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the effects of anti-malarial drugs in combination with an antimitotic drug, vinblastine (VIN) on the sensitisation of resistant KBV20C cells. Using viability assay, microscopic observation, assessment of cleaved PARP, and Hoechst staining, we identified that two anti-malarial drugs, PRI and MEF, highly sensitized KBV20C-resistant cells to VIN treatment. Moreover, PRI- or MEF-induced sensitisation was not observed in VIN-treated sensitive KB parent cells, suggesting that the observed effect is specific to resistant cancer cells. We demonstrated that the PRI and MEF sensitisation mechanism mainly depends on the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp). Our findings may contribute to the development of anti-malarial drug-based combination therapies for patients resistant to anti-mitotic drugs.

  3. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications

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    Chance Michael L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP. Methods Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Results Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9. The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. Conclusion This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum

  4. Prospective strategies to delay the evolution of anti-malarial drug resistance: weighing the uncertainty

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    McKenzie F Ellis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolution of drug resistance in malaria parasites highlights a need to identify and evaluate strategies that could extend the useful therapeutic life of anti-malarial drugs. Such strategies are deployed to best effect before resistance has emerged, under conditions of great uncertainty. Methods Here, the emergence and spread of resistance was modelled using a hybrid framework to evaluate prospective strategies, estimate the time to drug failure, and weigh uncertainty. The waiting time to appearance was estimated as the product of low mutation rates, drug pressure, and parasite population sizes during treatment. Stochastic persistence and the waiting time to establishment were simulated as an evolving branching process. The subsequent spread of resistance was simulated in simple epidemiological models. Results Using this framework, the waiting time to the failure of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT for malaria was estimated, and a policy of multiple first-line therapies (MFTs was evaluated. The models quantify the effects of reducing drug pressure in delaying appearance, reducing the chances of establishment, and slowing spread. By using two first-line therapies in a population, it is possible to reduce drug pressure while still treating the full complement of cases. Conclusions At a global scale, because of uncertainty about the time to the emergence of ACT resistance, there was a strong case for MFTs to guard against early failure. Our study recommends developing operationally feasible strategies for implementing MFTs, such as distributing different ACTs at the clinic and for home-based care, or formulating different ACTs for children and adults.

  5. Development of a TaqMan Allelic Discrimination Assay for detection of Single Nucleotides Polymorphisms associated with anti-malarial drug resistance

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    Kamau Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-malarial drug resistance poses a threat to current global efforts towards control and elimination of malaria. Several methods are used in monitoring anti-malarial drug resistance. Molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP for example are increasingly being used to identify genetic mutations related to anti-malarial drug resistance. Several methods are currently being used in analysis of SNP associated with anti-malarial drug resistance and although each one of these methods has unique strengths and shortcoming, there is still need to improve and/or develop new methods that will close the gap found in the current methods. Methods TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assays for detection of SNPs associated with anti-malarial drug resistance were designed for analysis on Applied Biosystems PCR platform. These assays were designed by submitting SNP sequences associated with anti-malarial drug resistance to Applied Biosystems website. Eleven SNPs associated with resistance to anti-malarial drugs were selected and tested. The performance of each SNP assay was tested by creating plasmid DNAs carrying codons of interests and analysing them for analysis. To test the sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay, 12 clinical samples were sequenced at codons of interest and used in the analysis. Plasmid DNAs were used to establish the Limit of Detection (LoD for each assay. Results Data from genetic profiles of the Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains and sequence data from 12 clinical samples was used as the reference method with which the performance of the SNP assays were compared to. The sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay was establish at 100%. LoD for each assay was established at 2 GE, equivalent to less than 1 parasite/μL. SNP assays performed well in detecting mixed infection and analysis of clinical samples. Conclusion TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assay provides a good alternative tool in

  6. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

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    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  7. Seasonal distribution of anti-malarial drug resistance alleles on the island of Sumba, Indonesia

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    Asih, P.B.; Rogers, W.O.; Susanti, A.I.; Rahmat, A.; Rozi, I.E.; Kusumaningtyas, M.A.; Dewi, R.M.; Coutrier, F.N.; Sutamihardja, A.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.; Syafruddin, D.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug resistant malaria poses an increasing public health problem in Indonesia, especially eastern Indonesia, where malaria is highly endemic. Widespread chloroquine (CQ) resistance and increasing sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance prompted Indonesia to adopt artemisinin-based com

  8. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

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    Sie Ali

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers and illicit (market and street vendors, shops sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50% chloroquine, 10/77 (13% pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12% quinine, 6/77 (8% amodiaquine, 9/77 (12% artesunate, and 4/77 (5% artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42% drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6% and 27/30 (90.0% samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the

  9. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

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    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  10. FlexiChip package: an universal microarray with a dedicated analysis software for high-thoughput SNPs detection linked to anti-malarial drug resistance

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    Dondorp Arjen M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of molecular tools have been developed to monitor the emergence and spread of anti-malarial drug resistance to Plasmodium falciparum. One of the major obstacles to the wider implementation of these tools is the absence of practical methods enabling high throughput analysis. Here a new Zip-code array is described, called FlexiChip, linked to a dedicated software program, which largely overcomes this problem. Methods Previously published microarray probes detecting single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP associated with parasite resistance to anti-malarial drugs (ResMalChip were adapted for a universal microarray FlexiChip format. To evaluate the overall sensitivity of the FlexiChip package (microarray + software, the results of FlexiChip were compared to ResMalChip microarray, using the same extension probes and with the same PCR products. In both cases, sequence results were used as gold standard to calculate sensitivity and specificity. FlexiChip results obtained with a set of field isolates were then compared to those assessed in an independent reference laboratory. Results The FlexiChip package gave results identical to the ResMalChip results in 92.7% of samples (kappa coefficient 0.8491, with a standard error 0.021 and had a sensitivity of 95.88% and a specificity of 97.68% compared to the sequencing as the reference method. Moreover the method performed well compared to the results obtained in the reference laboratories, with 99.7% of identical results (kappa coefficient 0.9923, S.E. 0.0523. Conclusion Microarrays could be employed to monitor P. falciparum drug resistance markers with greater cost effectiveness and the possibility for high throughput analysis. The FlexiChip package is a promising tool for use in poor resource settings of malaria endemic countries.

  11. High prevalence of pfdhfr-pfdhps triple mutations associated with anti-malarial drugs resistance in Plasmodium falciparum isolates seven years after the adoption of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in combination with artesunate as first-line treatment in Iran.

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    Rouhani, Maryam; Zakeri, Sedigheh; Pirahmadi, Sakineh; Raeisi, Ahmad; Djadid, Navid Dinparast

    2015-04-01

    The spread of anti-malarial drug resistance will challenge any malaria control and elimination strategies, and routine monitoring of resistance-associated molecular markers of commonly used anti-malarial drugs is very important. Therefore, in the present investigation, the extent of mutations/haplotypes in dhfr and dhps genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates (n=72) was analyzed seven years after the introduction of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) plus artesunate (AS) as first-line anti-malarial treatment in Iran using PCR-RFLP methods. The results showed that the majority of the patients (97.2%) carried both 59R and 108N mutations in pure form with wild-type genotype at positions N51 and I164. Additionally, a significant increase (Pdrug for treatment of falciparum patients in these malaria-endemic areas of Iran. However, no quintuple mutations associated with treatment failure were detected. In conclusion, the present results along with in vivo assays suggest that seven years after the adoption of SP-AS as the first-line treatment in Iran, this drug remains efficacious for treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria, as a partner drug with AS in these malaria-endemic areas.

  12. Genotyping of Plasmodium falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh

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    Akter Jasmin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past many regions of Bangladesh were hyperendemic for malaria. Malaria control in the 1960s to 1970s eliminated malaria from the plains but in the Chittagong Hill Tracts remained a difficult to control reservoir. The Chittagong Hill Tracts have areas with between 1 and 10% annual malaria rates, predominately 90-95% Plasmodium falciparum. In Southeast Asia, multiplicity of infection for hypo-endemic regions has been approximately 1.5. Few studies on the genetic diversity of P. falciparum have been performed in Bangladesh. Anderson et al. performed a study in Khagrachari, northern Chittagong Hill Tracts in 2002 on 203 patients and found that parasites had a multiplicity of infection of 1.3 by MSP-1, MSP-2 and GLURP genotyping. A total of 94% of the isolates had the K76T Pfcrt chloroquine resistant genotype, and 70% showed the N86Y Pfmdr1 genotype. Antifolate drug resistant genotypes were high with 99% and 73% of parasites having two or more mutations at the dhfr or dhps loci. Methods Nested and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods were used to genotype P. falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh. Results The analysis of polymorphic and drug resistant genotype on 33 paired recrudescent infections after drug treatment in the period 2004 to 2008 in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, which is just prior to countrywide provision of artemisinin combination therapy. Overall the multiplicity of infection for MSP-1 was 2.7 with a slightly smaller parasite diversity post-treatment. The 13 monoclonal infections by both GLURP and MSP-1 were evenly divided between pre- and post-treatment. The MSP-1 MAD block was most frequent in 66 of the samples. The prevalence of the K76T PfCRT chloroquine resistant allele was approximately 82% of the samples, while the resistant Pfmdr1 N86Y was present in 33% of the samples. Interestingly, the post

  13. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania

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    Ringsted, Frank M; Massawe, Isolide S; Lemnge, Martha M;

    2011-01-01

    prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results......: All surveyed drug shops illicitly sold SP and quinine (QN), and legally amodiaquine (AQ). Calculated monthly sale was 4,041 doses, in a town with a population of 15,000 people. Local brands of SP accounted for 74% of sales volume, compared to AQ (13%), QN (11%) and ACT (2%). Conclusions: In community...... resistance remains high, unregulated SP dispensing to people other than pregnant women runs the risk of eventually jeopardizing the effectiveness of the IPTp strategy. Further studies are recommended to find out barriers for ACT utilization and preference for self-medication and to train private drug...

  14. A framework for assessing the risk of resistance for anti-malarials in development

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    Ding Xavier C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Resistance is a constant challenge for anti-infective drug development. Since they kill sensitive organisms, anti-infective agents are bound to exert an evolutionary pressure toward the emergence and spread of resistance mechanisms, if such resistance can arise by stochastic mutation events. New classes of medicines under development must be designed or selected to stay ahead in this vicious circle of resistance control. This involves both circumventing existing resistance mechanisms and selecting molecules which are resilient against the development and spread of resistance. Cell-based screening methods have led to a renaissance of new classes of anti-malarial medicines, offering us the potential to select and modify molecules based on their resistance potential. To that end, a standardized in vitro methodology to assess quantitatively these characteristics in Plasmodium falciparum during the early phases of the drug development process has been developed and is presented here. It allows the identification of anti-malarial compounds with overt resistance risks and the prioritization of the most robust ones. The integration of this strategy in later stages of development, registration, and deployment is also discussed.

  15. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

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    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  16. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a sustainable approach to improve anti-malarial drug production

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    Giuseppe ePulice

    2016-03-01

    way for the synthesis and production of medicines against the malaria parasite. Finally, this article will also discuss two risks factors that already affect the fight against malaria. In first place, the onset and progressive development of anti-malarial drug resistance; secondly, the potential and underestimated impact of migrations and global climate changes on the spread of the disease in currently malaria-free countries.

  17. Recent progress in the development of anti-malarial quinolones.

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    Beteck, Richard M; Smit, Frans J; Haynes, Richard K; N'Da, David D

    2014-08-30

    Available anti-malarial tools have over the ten-year period prior to 2012 dramatically reduced the number of fatalities due to malaria from one million to less than six-hundred and thirty thousand. Although fewer people now die from malaria, emerging resistance to the first-line anti-malarial drugs, namely artemisinins in combination with quinolines and arylmethanols, necessitates the urgent development of new anti-malarial drugs to curb the disease. The quinolones are a promising class of compounds, with some demonstrating potent in vitro activity against the malaria parasite. This review summarizes the progress made in the development of potential anti-malarial quinolones since 2008. The efficacy of these compounds against both asexual blood stages and other stages of the malaria parasite, the nature of putative targets, and a comparison of these properties with anti-malarial drugs currently in clinical use, are discussed.

  18. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania: a baseline study in an era of assumed artemisinin combination therapy (ACT

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    Ringsted Frank M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemether-lumefantrine (ALu replaced sulphadoxine-pymimethamine (SP as the official first-line anti-malarial in Tanzania in November 2006. So far, artemisinin combination therapy (ACT is contra-indicated during pregnancy by the national malaria treatment guidelines, and pregnant women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform a baseline study of the private market for anti-malarials in Muheza town, an area with widespread anti-malarial drug resistance, prior to the implementation of a provider training and accreditation programme that will allow accredited drug shops to sell subsidized ALu. Methods All drug shops selling prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results All surveyed drug shops illicitly sold SP and quinine (QN, and legally amodiaquine (AQ. Calculated monthly sale was 4,041 doses, in a town with a population of 15,000 people. Local brands of SP accounted for 74% of sales volume, compared to AQ (13%, QN (11% and ACT (2%. Conclusions In community practice, the saleability of ACT was negligible. SP was best-selling, and use was not reserved for IPTp, as stipulated in the national anti-malarial policy. It is a major reason for concern that such drug-pressure in the community equals de facto intermittent presumptive treatment. In an area where SP drug resistance remains high, unregulated SP dispensing to people other than pregnant women runs the risk of eventually jeopardizing the effectiveness of the IPTp

  19. Ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal, to seven standard anti-malarial drugs

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    Pradines Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of widespread chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT (which includes artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Since then, there have been very few reports on the ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To examine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the widespread use of ACT, the ex vivo susceptibility of local isolates was assessed at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The ex vivo susceptibility of 93 P. falciparum isolates from Dakar was successfully determined using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH ELISA for the following drugs: chloroquine (CQ, quinine (QN, mefloquine (MQ, monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ, lumefantrine (LMF, dihydroartemisinin (DHA and doxycycline (DOX. Results After transformation of the isolate IC50 in ratio of IC50 according to the susceptibility of the 3D7 reference strain (isolate IC50/3D7 IC50, the prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates with reduced susceptibility was 50% for MQ, 22% for CQ, 12% for DOX, 6% for both QN and MDAQ and 1% for the drugs LMF and DHA. The highest significant positive correlations were shown between responses to CQ and MDAQ (r = 0.569; P r = 0.511; P r = 0.428; P = 0.0001, LMF and MQ (r = 0.413; P = 0.0002, QN and DHA (r = 0.402; P = 0.0003 and QN and MQ (r = 0.421; P = 0.0001. Conclusions The introduction of ACT in 2002 has not induced a decrease in P. falciparum susceptibility to the drugs DHA, MDAQ and LMF, which are common ACT components. However, the prevalence of P. falciparum isolates with reduced susceptibility has increased for both MQ and DOX. Taken together, these data suggest that intensive surveillance of the P. falciparum in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Senegal is required.

  20. The biological and clinical activity of anti-malarial drugs in autoimmune disorders.

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    Taherian, Elham; Rao, Anshul; Malemud, Charles J; Askari, Ali D

    2013-01-01

    Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine are 4-aminoquinoline compounds commonly employed as anti-malarial drugs. Chloroquine and its synthetic analogue, hydroxychloroquine also belong to the disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug class because these drugs are immunosuppressive. The immunosuppressive activity of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine is likely to account for their capacity to reduce T-cell and B-cell hyperactivity as well as pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression. This review evaluated experimental and clinical trials results as well as clinical response data relative to the use of chloroquine and/or hydroxychloroquine as first-line medical therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, primary Sjogren's syndrome, the anti-phospholipid syndrome and in the treatment of sarcoidosis. A primary outcomes measure in these clinical trials was the extent to which chloroquine and/or hydroxychloroquine reduced disease progression or exacerbations and/or the use and dosage of corticosteroids. The relative efficacy of chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine in modifying the clinical course of these autoimmune disorders is balanced against evidence that these drugs induce adverse effects which may reduce their use and effectiveness in the therapy of autoimmune disorders.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of artesunate in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and anti-malarial, drug-resistance marker polymorphisms in populations near the China-Myanmar border

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    Huang Fang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome after seven-day artesunate monotherapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Yingjiang County along the China-Myanmar border and investigate genetic polymorphisms in the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt, multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1, dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr, dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps and ATPase (pfatp6 genes. Methods Patients ≥ one year of age with fever (axillary temperature ≥37.5°C or history of fever and P. falciparum mono-infection were included. Patients received anti-malarial treatment with artesunate (total dose of 16 mg/kg over seven days by directly observed therapy. After a 28-day follow-up, treatment efficacy and effectiveness were assessed based on clinical and parasitological outcomes. Treatment failure was defined as recrudescence of the original parasite and distinguished with new infection confirmed by PCR. Analysis of gene mutation and amplification were performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. Results Sixty-five patients were enrolled; 10 withdrew from the study, and six were lost to follow-up. All but two patients demonstrated adequate clinical and parasitological response; 12 had detectable parasitaemia on day 3. These two patients were confirmed to be new infection by PCR. The efficacy of artesunate was 95.9%. The pfcrt mutation in codon 76 was found in all isolates (100%, and mutations in codons 71 and 72 were found in 4.8% of parasite isolates. No mutation of pfmdr1 (codons 86 or 1246 was found. Among all samples, 5.1% were wild type for pfdhfr, whereas the other samples had mutations in four codons (51, 59, 108 and 164, and mutations in pfdhps (codons 436, 437, 540 and 581 were found in all isolates. No samples had mutations in pfatp6 codons 623 or 769, but two new mutations (N683K and R756K were found in 4.6% and 9.2% of parasite isolates, respectively. Conclusion Plasmodium

  2. In silico and in vivo anti-malarial studies of 18β glycyrrhetinic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Komal; Agarwal, Jyoti; Alam, Sarfaraz; Khan, Feroz; Pal, Anirban; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69 µg/ml) anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock) score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68-100% at doses of 62.5-250 mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress.

  3. Prescription pattern of anti-malarial drugs in a tertiary care hospital

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santoshkumar R Jeevangi; Manjunath S; Sharanabasappa M Awanti

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the prescribing pattern of anti malarial drugs in a tertiary care hospital. Methods:A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted for 6 months of patients visiting in Basaveshwar Teaching and General Hospital, Gulbarga. Data were analyzed for various drug use indicators. Results: A total of 212 prescriptions were collected, with 136 (64.15%) male and 76 (35.85%) female. There were 128 (60.37%) Plasmodium vivax cases and 84 (39.63%) Plasmodium falciparum cases. All Plasmodium vivax cases were treated with chloroquine alone and among these 16 (12.5%) recieved radical treatment with primaquine along with chloroquine. Among 84 patients with Pasmodium falciparum, 40 patients received single drug such as quinine/mefloquinine/artesunate/arteether. Another 44 patients received multidrug regime like, quinine+artesunate (54.54%), quinine+mefloquine (27.27%) and quinine+arteether (18.18%). Chloroquine was not administered to any of the patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The most common adverse effects with chloroquine were anorexia, nausea, vomiting and tinnitus in 9.37%of the cases. With quinine it was nausea and vomiting in 17.64%, tinnitus in 11.76%and hypoglycemia in 2.1%of cases. Conclusions: Our study found the perennial favorites like chloroquine for Plasmodium vivax and quinine for Plasmodium falciparum were the most effective drug. In the severe Plasmodium falciparum cases the artesunate derivatives and combination of artesunate with quinine/mefloquine were most effective with fewer incidences of side effects.

  4. Phase I randomized dose-ascending placebo-controlled trials of ferroquine - a candidate anti-malarial drug - in adults with asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ospina Salazar Carmen L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development and spread of drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum strains is a major concern and novel anti-malarial drugs are, therefore, needed. Ferroquine is a ferrocenic derivative of chloroquine with proven anti-malarial activity against chloroquine-resistant and -sensitive P. falciparum laboratory strains. Methods Adult young male aged 18 to 45 years, asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum, were included in two-dose escalation, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled Phase I trials, a single dose study and a multiple dose study aiming to evaluate oral doses of ferroquine from 400 to 1,600 mg. Results Overall, 54/66 patients (40 and 26 treated in the single and multiple dose studies, respectively experienced at least one adverse event, 15 were under placebo. Adverse events were mainly gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain (16, diarrhoea (5, nausea (13, and vomiting (9, but also headache (11, and dizziness (5. A few patients had slightly elevated liver parameters (10/66 including two patients under placebo. Moderate changes in QTc and morphological changes in T waves were observed in the course of the study. However, no adverse cardiac effects with clinical relevance were observed. Conclusions These phase I trials showed that clinically, ferroquine was generally well-tolerated up to 1,600 mg as single dose and up to 800 mg as repeated dose in asymptomatic young male with P. falciparum infection. Further clinical development of ferroquine, either alone or in combination with another anti-malarial, is highly warranted and currently underway.

  5. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

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    Zaloumis Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50, derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle. The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i

  6. Anti-malarial drug quality in Lagos and Accra - a comparison of various quality assessments

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    Bate Roger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two major cities in West Africa, Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Lagos, the largest city of Nigeria, have significant problems with substandard pharmaceuticals. Both have actively combated the problem in recent years, particularly by screening products on the market using the Global Pharma Health Fund e.V. Minilab® protocol. Random sampling of medicines from the two cities at least twice over the past 30 months allows a tentative assessment of whether improvements in drug quality have occurred. Since intelligence provided by investigators indicates that some counterfeit producers may be adapting products to pass Minilab tests, the results are compared with those from a Raman spectrometer and discrepancies are discussed. Methods Between mid-2007 and early-2010, samples of anti-malarial drugs were bought covertly from pharmacies in Lagos on three different occasions (October 2007, December 2008, February 2010, and from pharmacies in Accra on two different occasions (October 2007, February 2010. All samples were tested using the Minilab® protocol, which includes disintegration and active ingredient assays as well as visual inspection, and most samples were also tested by Raman spectrometry. Results In Lagos, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 29% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 53% using Raman spectrometry, and 46% using visual inspection. In Accra, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 54% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 72% using Raman spectrometry, and 90% using visual inspection. Conclusions The evidence presented shows that drug quality is probably improving in both cities, especially Lagos, since major reductions of failure rates over time occur with all means of assessment. Many more samples failed when examined by Raman spectrometry than by Minilab® protocol. The discrepancy is most likely caused by the two techniques measuring different aspects of the medication

  7. Anti-malarial drug artesunate attenuates experimental allergic asthma via inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway.

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    Chang Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt pathway is linked to the development of asthma. Anti-malarial drug artesunate is a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, the principal active component of a medicinal plant Artemisia annua, and has been shown to inhibit PI3K/Akt activity. We hypothesized that artesunate may attenuate allergic asthma via inhibition of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Female BALB/c mice sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA developed airway inflammation. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was assessed for total and differential cell counts, and cytokine and chemokine levels. Lung tissues were examined for cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion, and the expression of inflammatory biomarkers. Airway hyperresponsiveness was monitored by direct airway resistance analysis. Artesunate dose-dependently inhibited OVA-induced increases in total and eosinophil counts, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 and eotaxin levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. It attenuated OVA-induced lung tissue eosinophilia and airway mucus production, mRNA expression of E-selectin, IL-17, IL-33 and Muc5ac in lung tissues, and airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. In normal human bronchial epithelial cells, artesunate blocked epidermal growth factor-induced phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream substrates tuberin, p70S6 kinase and 4E-binding protein 1, and transactivation of NF-κB. Similarly, artesunate blocked the phosphorylation of Akt and its downstream substrates in lung tissues from OVA-challenged mice. Anti-inflammatory effect of artesunate was further confirmed in a house dust mite mouse asthma model. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Artesunate ameliorates experimental allergic airway inflammation probably via negative regulation of PI3K/Akt pathway and the downstream NF-κB activity. These findings provide a novel therapeutic value for artesunate in the treatment of allergic asthma.

  8. Quality of anti-malarial drugs provided by public and private healthcare providers in south-east Nigeria

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    Uzochukwu Benjamin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little existing knowledge about actual quality of drugs provided by different providers in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. Such information is important for improving malaria treatment that will help in the development and implementation of actions designed to improve the quality of treatment. The objective of the study was to determine the quality of drugs used for the treatment of malaria in a broad spectrum of public and private healthcare providers. Methods The study was undertaken in six towns (three urban and three rural in Anambra state, south-east Nigeria. Anti-malarials (225 samples, which included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP, quinine, and chloroquine, were either purchased or collected from randomly selected providers. The quality of these drugs was assessed by laboratory analysis of the dissolution profile using published pharmacopoeial monograms and measuring the amount of active ingredient using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Findings It was found that 60 (37% of the anti-malarials tested did not meet the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP specifications for the amount of active ingredients, with the suspect drugs either lacking the active ingredients or containing suboptimal quantities of the active ingredients. Quinine (46% and SP formulations (39% were among drugs that did not satisfy the tolerance limits published in USP monograms. A total of 78% of the suspect drugs were from private facilities, mostly low-level providers, such as patent medicine dealers (vendors. Conclusion This study found that there was a high prevalence of poor quality drugs. The findings provide areas for public intervention to improve the quality of malaria treatment services. There should be enforced checks and regulation of drug supply management as well as stiffer penalties for people stocking substandard and counterfeit drugs.

  9. A study of toxicity and differential gene expression in murine liver following exposure to anti-malarial drugs: amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine

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    Rath Srikanta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amodiaquine (AQ along with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP offers effective and cheaper treatment against chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Considering the previous history of hepatitis, agranulocytosis and neutrocytopenia associated with AQ monotherapy, it becomes imperative to study the toxicity of co-administration of AQ and SP. In this study, toxicity and resulting global differential gene expression was analyzed following exposure to these drugs in experimental Swiss mice. Methods The conventional markers of toxicity in serum, oxidative stress parameters in tissue homogenates, histology of liver and alterations in global transcriptomic expression were evaluated to study the toxic effects of AQ and SP in isolation and in combination. Results The combination therapy of AQ and SP results in more pronounced hepatotoxicity as revealed by elevated level of serum ALT, AST with respect to their individual drug exposure regimen. Furthermore, alterations in the activity of major antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, indicating the development of oxidative stress, was more significant in AQ+SP combination therapy. cDNA microarray results too showed considerably more perturbed gene expression following combination therapy of AQ and SP as compared to their individual drug treatment. Moreover, a set of genes were identified whose expression pattern can be further investigated for identifying a good biomarker for potential anti-malarial hepatotoxicity. Conclusion These observations clearly indicate AQ+SP combination therapy is hepatotoxic in experimental Swiss mice. Microarray results provide a considerable number of potential biomarkers of anti-malarial drug toxicity. These findings hence will be useful for future drug toxicity studies, albeit implications of this study in clinical conditions need to be monitored with cautions.

  10. In silico and in vivo anti-malarial studies of 18β glycyrrhetinic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komal Kalani

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69 µg/ml anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68-100% at doses of 62.5-250 mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress.

  11. A population genetic model for the initial spread of partially resistant malaria parasites under anti-malarial combination therapy and weak intrahost competition.

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    Yuseob Kim

    Full Text Available To develop public-health policies that extend the lifespan of affordable anti-malarial drugs as effective treatment options, it is necessary to understand the evolutionary processes leading to the origin and spread of mutations conferring drug resistance in malarial parasites. We built a population-genetic model for the emergence of resistance under combination drug therapy. Reproductive cycles of parasites are specified by their absolute fitness determined by clinical parameters, thus coupling the evolutionary-genetic with population-dynamic processes. Initial mutations confer only partial drug-resistance. Therefore, mutant parasites rarely survive combination therapy and within-host competition is very weak among parasites. The model focuses on the early phase of such unsuccessful recurrent mutations. This ends in the rare event of mutants enriching in an infected individual from which the successful spread of resistance over the entire population is initiated. By computer simulations, the waiting time until the establishment of resistant parasites is analysed. Resistance spreads quickly following the first appearance of a host infected predominantly by mutant parasites. This occurs either through a rare transmission of a resistant parasite to an uninfected host or through a rare failure of drugs in removing "transient" mutant alleles. The emergence of resistance is delayed with lower mutation rate, earlier treatment, higher metabolic cost of resistance, longer duration of high drug dose, and higher drug efficacy causing a stronger reduction in the sensitive and resistant parasites' fitnesses. Overall, contrary to other studies' proposition, the current model based on absolute fitness suggests that aggressive drug treatment delays the emergence of drug resistance.

  12. Assessment of global reporting of adverse drug reactions for anti-malarials, including artemisinin-based combination therapy, to the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring

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    Van Erps Jan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of enhanced control efforts, malaria remains a major public health problem causing close to a million deaths annually. With support from several donors, large amounts of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT are being deployed in endemic countries raising safety concerns as little is known about the use of ACT in several of the settings where they are deployed. This project was undertaken to profile the provenance of the pharmacovigilance reporting of all anti-malarials, including ACT to the WHO adverse drug reaction (ADR database (Vigibase™ over the past 40 years. Methods The WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring, the Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC provided anonymized extracts of Vigibase™ covering the period 1968-2008. All countries in the programme were clustered according to their malaria control phase and income status. The number of individual case safety reports (ICSRs of anti-malarials was analyzed according to those clusters. Results From 1968 to 2008, 21,312 ICSRs suspecting anti-malarials were received from 64 countries. Low-income countries, that are also malaria-endemic (categorized as priority 1 countries submitted only 1.2% of the ICSRs. Only 60 out of 21,312 ICSRs were related to ACT, 51 of which were coming from four sub-Saharan African countries. Although very few ICSRs involved artemisinin-based compounds, many of the adverse events reported were potentially serious. Conclusions This paper illustrates the low reporting of ADRs to anti-malarials in general and ACT in particular. Most reports were submitted by non-endemic and/or high-income countries. Given the current mix of large donor funding, the insufficient information on safety of these drugs, increasing availability of ACT and artemisinin-based monotherapies in public and private sector channels, associated potential for inappropriate use and finally a pipeline of more than 10 new novel anti-malarials in various stages of

  13. Prevalence of molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in two districts of Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjitkar, Samir; Schousboe, Mette L; Thomsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    and P. vivax for CQ (Pfcrt, Pfmdr1, Pvmdr1) and SP (Pfdhfr, Pfdhps, Pvdhfr), using various PCR-based methods. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Positive P. vivax and P. falciparum infections were identified by PCR in 92 and 41 samples respectively. However, some of these were negative in subsequent PCRs. Based...... most likely due to low prevalence of Pvmdr1 Y976F mutation (5%) and absence of triple/quadruple mutations in Pvdhfr. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the limited number of samples, prevalence of CQ and SP resistance at molecular levels in the population in the study area were determined as high in P. falciparum...

  14. The anti-malarial chloroquine overcomes Primary resistance and restores sensitivity to Trastuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cufí, Sílvia; Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Cuyàs, Elisabet; López-Bonet, Eugeni; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Joven, Jorge; Menendez, Javier A.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy may control the de novo refractoriness of HER2 gene-amplified breast carcinomas to the monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin). Tumor cells originally obtained from a patient who rapidly progressed on trastuzumab ab initio display increased cellular levels of the LC3-II protein—a finding that correlates with increased numbers of autophagosomes—and decreased levels of the autophagy receptor p62/SQSTM1, a protein selectively degraded by autophagy. Trastuzumab-refractory cells are in a state of “autophagy addiction” because genetic ablation of autophagy-specific genes (ATG8, ATG5, ATG12) notably reduces intrinsic refractoriness to trastuzumab. When the anti-malarial lysosomotropic drug chloroquine impedes autophagic resolution of the accumulation of autophagolysosomes formed in the presence of trastuzumab, cells commit to die by apoptosis. Accordingly, combination treatment with trastuzumab and chloroquine radically suppresses tumor growth by > 90% in a tumor xenograft completely refractory to trastuzumab. Adding chloroquine to trastuzumab-based regimens may therefore improve outcomes among women with autophagy-addicted HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:23965851

  15. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys

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    Littrell Megan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT. The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Methods Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Results Most public outlets (85% and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%, drug stores (14%, mobile providers (4% and grocery stores (2%. Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61% and private (42% sectors. Conclusions While data on the anti-malarial

  16. CYP450 phenotyping and accurate mass identification of metabolites of the 8-aminoquinoline, anti-malarial drug primaquine

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    Pybus Brandon S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 8-aminoquinoline (8AQ drug primaquine (PQ is currently the only approved drug effective against the persistent liver stage of the hypnozoite forming strains Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale as well as Stage V gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. To date, several groups have investigated the toxicity observed in the 8AQ class, however, exact mechanisms and/or metabolic species responsible for PQ’s haemotoxic and anti-malarial properties are not fully understood. Methods In the present study, the metabolism of PQ was evaluated using in vitro recombinant metabolic enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP and mono-amine oxidase (MAO families. Based on this information, metabolite identification experiments were performed using nominal and accurate mass measurements. Results Relative activity factor (RAF-weighted intrinsic clearance values show the relative role of each enzyme to be MAO-A, 2C19, 3A4, and 2D6, with 76.1, 17.0, 5.2, and 1.7% contributions to PQ metabolism, respectively. CYP 2D6 was shown to produce at least six different oxidative metabolites along with demethylations, while MAO-A products derived from the PQ aldehyde, a pre-cursor to carboxy PQ. CYPs 2C19 and 3A4 produced only trace levels of hydroxylated species. Conclusions As a result of this work, CYP 2D6 and MAO-A have been implicated as the key enzymes associated with PQ metabolism, and metabolites previously identified as potentially playing a role in efficacy and haemolytic toxicity have been attributed to production via CYP 2D6 mediated pathways.

  17. The anti-malarial drug Mefloquine disrupts central autonomic and respiratory control in the working heart brainstem preparation of the rat

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    Lall Varinder K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is an anti-malarial drug that can have neurological side effects. This study examines how mefloquine (MF influences central nervous control of autonomic and respiratory systems using the arterially perfused working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP of the rat. Recordings of nerve activity were made from the thoracic sympathetic chain and phrenic nerve, while heart rate (HR and perfusion pressure were also monitored in the arterially perfused, decerebrate, rat WHBP. MF was added to the perfusate at 1 μM to examine its effects on baseline parameters as well as baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. Results MF caused a significant, atropine resistant, bradycardia and increased phrenic nerve discharge frequency. Chemoreceptor mediated sympathoexcitation (elicited by addition of 0.1 ml of 0.03% sodium cyanide to the aortic cannula was significantly attenuated by the application of MF to the perfusate. Furthermore MF significantly decreased rate of return to resting HR following chemoreceptor induced bradycardia. An increase in respiratory frequency and attenuated respiratory-related sympathetic nerve discharge during chemoreceptor stimulation was also elicited with MF compared to control. However, MF did not significantly alter baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. Conclusions These studies indicate that in the WHBP, MF causes profound alterations in autonomic and respiratory control. The possibility that these effects may be mediated through actions on connexin 36 containing gap junctions in central neurones controlling sympathetic nervous outflow is discussed.

  18. In Silico and In Vivo Anti-Malarial Studies of 18β Glycyrrhetinic Acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalani, Komal; Agarwal, Jyoti; Alam, Sarfaraz; Khan, Feroz; Pal, Anirban; Srivastava, Santosh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69µg/ml) anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock) score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68–100% at doses of 62.5–250mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress. PMID:24086367

  19. Anti-malarial drug quality in Lagos and Accra - a comparison of various quality assessments

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Two major cities in West Africa, Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Lagos, the largest city of Nigeria, have significant problems with substandard pharmaceuticals. Both have actively combated the problem in recent years, particularly by screening products on the market using the Global Pharma Health Fund e.V. Minilab® protocol. Random sampling of medicines from the two cities at least twice over the past 30 months allows a tentative assessment of whether improvements in drug...

  20. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

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    Eberlin Marcos N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7 and -resistant (S20 strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4 and 50% methanolic (F5 fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4.

  1. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dismas Baza

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Methods Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO, a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Results Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9% compared to public (4.2% and NGO (0% outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu. Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu, private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu. Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors

  2. Factors related to compliance to anti-malarial drug combination: example of amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine among children in rural Senegal

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    Sow Diarietou

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of new anti-malarial treatment that is effective, but more expensive, raises questions about whether the high level of effectiveness observed in clinical trials can be found in a context of family use. The objective of this study was to determine the factors related to adherence, when using the amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP association, a transitory strategy before ACT implementation in Senegal. Methods The study was conducted in five rural dispensaries. Children, between two and 10 years of age, who presented mild malaria were recruited at the time of the consultation and were prescribed AQ/SP. The child's primary caretaker was questioned at home on D3 about treatment compliance and factors that could have influenced his or her adherence to treatment. A logistic regression model was used for the analyses. Results The study sample included 289 children. The adherence rate was 64.7%. Two risks factors for non-adherence were identified: the children's age (8–10 years (ORa = 3.07 [1.49–6.29]; p = 0.004; and the profession of the head of household (retailer/employee versus farmer (ORa = 2.71 [1.34–5.48]; p = 0.006. Previously seeking care (ORa = 0.28 [0.105–0.736], p=0.001] satisfaction with received information (ORa = 0.45 [0.24–0.84]; p = 0.013, and the quality of history taking (ORa = 0.38 [0.21–0.69]; p = 0.001 were significantly associated with good compliance. Conclusion The results of the study show the importance of information and communication between caregivers and health center staff. The experience gained from this therapeutic transition emphasizes the importance of information given to the patients at the time of the consultation and drug delivery in order to improve drug use and thus prevent the emergence of rapid drug resistance.

  3. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

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    Newton Paul N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA containing paracetamol (acetaminophen, counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems.

  4. A phase I trial to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of low-dose methotrexate as an anti-malarial drug in Kenyan adult healthy volunteers

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    Oyoo George O

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous investigations indicate that methotrexate, an old anticancer drug, could be used at low doses to treat malaria. A phase I evaluation was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of this drug in healthy adult male Kenyan volunteers. Methods Twenty five healthy adult volunteers were recruited and admitted to receive a 5 mg dose of methotrexate/day/5 days. Pharmacokinetics blood sampling was carried out at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours following each dose. Nausea, vomiting, oral ulcers and other adverse events were solicited during follow up of 42 days. Results The mean age of participants was 23.9 ± 3.3 years. Adherence to protocol was 100%. No grade 3 solicited adverse events were observed. However, one case of transiently elevated liver enzymes, and one serious adverse event (not related to the product were reported. The maximum concentration (Cmax was 160-200 nM and after 6 hours, the effective concentration (Ceff was Conclusion Low-dose methotraxate had an acceptable safety profile. However, methotrexate blood levels did not reach the desirable Ceff of 250-400-nM required to clear malaria infection in vivo. Further dose finding and safety studies are necessary to confirm suitability of this drug as an anti-malarial agent.

  5. Finding parasites and finding challenges: improved diagnostic access and trends in reported malaria and anti-malarial drug use in Livingstone district, Zambia

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    Masaninga Freddie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the impact of malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT use on management of acute febrile disease at a community level, and on the consumption of anti-malarial medicines, is critical to the planning and success of scale-up to universal parasite-based diagnosis by health systems in malaria-endemic countries. Methods A retrospective study of district-wide community-level RDT introduction was conducted in Livingstone District, Zambia, to assess the impact of this programmed on malaria reporting, incidence of mortality and on district anti-malarial consumption. Results Reported malaria declined from 12,186 cases in the quarter prior to RDT introduction in 2007 to an average of 12.25 confirmed and 294 unconfirmed malaria cases per quarter over the year to September 2009. Reported malaria-like fever also declined, with only 4,381 RDTs being consumed per quarter over the same year. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero in the year to September 2009, and all-cause mortality declined. Consumption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT dropped dramatically, but remained above reported malaria, declining from 12,550 courses dispensed by the district office in the quarter prior to RDT implementation to an average of 822 per quarter over the last year. Quinine consumption in health centres also declined, with the district office ceasing to supply due to low usage, but requests for sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP rose to well above previous levels, suggesting substitution of ACT with this drug in RDT-negative cases. Conclusions RDT introduction led to a large decline in reported malaria cases and in ACT consumption in Livingstone district. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero, indicating safety of the new diagnostic regime, although adherence and/or use of RDTs was still incomplete. However, a deficiency is apparent in management of non-malarial fever, with inappropriate use of a low-cost single dose drug, SP

  6. Exposure to anti-malarial drugs and monitoring of adverse drug reactions using toll-free mobile phone calls in private retail sector in Sagamu, Nigeria: implications for pharmacovigilance

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    Ogunwande Isiaka A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs contribute to ill-health or life-threatening outcomes of therapy during management of infectious diseases. The exposure to anti-malarial and use of mobile phone technology to report ADRs following drug exposures were investigated in Sagamu - a peri-urban community in Southwest Nigeria. Methods Purchase of medicines was actively monitored for 28 days in three Community Pharmacies (CP and four Patent and Proprietary Medicine Stores (PPMS in the community. Information on experience of ADRs was obtained by telephone from 100 volunteers who purchased anti-malarials during the 28-day period. Results and Discussion A total of 12,093 purchases were recorded during the period. Antibiotics, analgesics, vitamins and anti-malarials were the most frequently purchased medicines. A total of 1,500 complete courses of anti-malarials were purchased (12.4% of total purchases; of this number, purchases of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ were highest (39.3 and 25.2% respectiuvely. Other anti-malarials purchased were artesunate monotherapy (AS - 16.1%, artemether-lumefantrine (AL 10.0%, amodiaquine (AQ - 6.6%, quinine (QNN - 1.9%, halofantrine (HF - 0.2% and proguanil (PR - 0.2%. CQ was the cheapest (USD 0.3 and halofantrine the most expensive (USD 7.7. AL was 15.6 times ($4.68 more expensive than CQ. The response to mobile phone monitoring of ADRs was 57% in the first 24 hours (day 1 after purchase and decreased to 33% by day 4. Participants in this monitoring exercise were mostly with low level of education (54%. Conclusion The findings from this study indicate that ineffective anti-malaria medicines including monotherapies remain widely available and are frequently purchased in the study area. Cost may be a factor in the continued use of ineffective monotherapies. Availability of a toll-free telephone line may facilitate pharmacovigilance and follow up of response to medicines in a resource

  7. Anti-malarial drug safety information obtained through routine monitoring in a rural district of South-Western Senegal

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    Brasseur Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowing the safety profile of anti-malarial treatments in routine use is essential; millions of patients receive now artemisinin combination therapy (ACT annually, but the return on information through current systems is as yet inadequate. Cohort event monitoring (CEM is a WHO (World Health Organization-recommended practice; testing its performance and feasibility in routine practice in malaria-endemic is important. Methods A nine-year CEM-based study of the safety of artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ at five peripheral health facilities in a rural district of South-western Senegal. Staff (nurses, health workers were trained to collect actively and systematically information on the patient, treatment and events on a purposely designed questionnaire. The occurrence and severity of events was collected before, during and after treatment up to 28 days in order to generate information on all adverse events (AEs as well as treatment-emerging signs/symptoms (TESS. Laboratory tests (haematology, liver and renal was planned for at least 10% of cases. Results During 2001–2009, 3,708 parasitologically-confirmed malaria cases (mean age = 16.0 ± 12.7 years were enrolled (26% and 52% of all and parasitologically-confirmed ASAQ treatments, respectively. Treatment was supervised in 96% of cases. Products changed over time: 49% were a loose combination of individually-packaged products (available 2001–03, 42% co-blistered products (2004–09 and 9% a fixed-dose co-formulation (2006–09; dosing was age-based for 42%, weight-based for 58%. AS and AQ were correctly dosed in 97% and 82% of cases with the loose and 93% and 86% with the fixed combination, but only 50% and 42% with the co-blistered product. Thirty-three per cent (33% of patients had at least one sign/symptom pre-treatment, 12% had at least one AE and 9% a TESS (total events 3,914, 1,144 and 693, respectively. AEs overestimated TESS by 1.2-2 fold (average 1.7. Changes in

  8. Access to Artemisinin-Combination Therapy (ACT) and other Anti-Malarials: National Policy and Markets in Sierra Leone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuasi, John H.; Diap, Graciela; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Karikari, Patrick; Boakye, Isaac; Jambai, Amara; Lahai, Wani Kumba; Louie, Karly S.; Kiechel, Jean-Rene

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains the leading burden of disease in post-conflict Sierra Leone. To overcome the challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve effective treatment, Sierra Leone adopted artemisinin-combination therapy artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other national policy anti-malarials include artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative to AS+AQ, quinine and artemether for treatment of complicated malaria; and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. A cross-sectional survey of 127 medicine outlets (public, private and NGO) was conducted in urban and rural areas. The availability on the day of the survey, median prices, and affordability policy and available non-policy anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in 79% of all outlets surveyed. AS+AQ was widely available in public medicine outlets; AL was only available in the private and NGO sectors. Quinine was available in nearly two-thirds of public and NGO outlets and over one-third of private outlets. SP was widely available in all outlets. Non-policy anti-malarials were predominantly available in the private outlets. AS+AQ in the public sector was widely offered for free. Among the anti-malarials sold at a cost, the same median price of a course of AS+AQ (US$1.56), quinine tablets (US$0.63), were found in both the public and private sectors. Quinine injection had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector and US$0.47 in the private sector, while SP had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector compared to US$ 0.63 in the private sector. Non-policy anti-malarials were more affordable than first-line AS+AQ in all sectors. A course of AS+AQ was affordable at nearly two days’ worth of wages in both the public and private sectors. PMID:23133522

  9. New developments in anti-malarial target candidate and product profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Jeremy N; Duparc, Stephan; Gutteridge, Winston E; Hooft van Huijsduijnen, Rob; Kaszubska, Wiweka; Macintyre, Fiona; Mazzuri, Sébastien; Möhrle, Jörg J; Wells, Timothy N C

    2017-01-13

    A decade of discovery and development of new anti-malarial medicines has led to a renewed focus on malaria elimination and eradication. Changes in the way new anti-malarial drugs are discovered and developed have led to a dramatic increase in the number and diversity of new molecules presently in pre-clinical and early clinical development. The twin challenges faced can be summarized by multi-drug resistant malaria from the Greater Mekong Sub-region, and the need to provide simplified medicines. This review lists changes in anti-malarial target candidate and target product profiles over the last 4 years. As well as new medicines to treat disease and prevent transmission, there has been increased focus on the longer term goal of finding new medicines for chemoprotection, potentially with long-acting molecules, or parenteral formulations. Other gaps in the malaria armamentarium, such as drugs to treat severe malaria and endectocides (that kill mosquitoes which feed on people who have taken the drug), are defined here. Ultimately the elimination of malaria requires medicines that are safe and well-tolerated to be used in vulnerable populations: in pregnancy, especially the first trimester, and in those suffering from malnutrition or co-infection with other pathogens. These updates reflect the maturing of an understanding of the key challenges in producing the next generation of medicines to control, eliminate and ultimately eradicate malaria.

  10. Anti-malarial activities of Andrographis paniculata and Hedyotis corymbosa extracts and their combination with curcumin

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    Swain Bijay K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbal extracts of Andrographis paniculata (AP and Hedyotis corymbosa (HC are known as hepato-protective and fever-reducing drugs since ancient time and they have been used regularly by the people in the south Asian sub-continent. Methanolic extracts of these two plants were tested in vitro on choloroquine sensitive (MRC-pf-20 and resistant (MRC-pf-303 strains of Plasmodium falciparum for their anti-malarial activity. Methods Growth inhibition was determined using different concentrations of these plant extracts on synchronized P. falciparum cultures at the ring stage. The interactions between these two plant extracts and individually with curcumin were studied in vitro. The performance of these two herbal extracts in isolation and combination were further evaluated in vivo on Balb/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA and their efficacy was compared with that of curcumin. The in vivo toxicity of the plant derived compounds as well as their parasite stage-specificity was studied. Results The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of AP (7.2 μg/ml was found better than HC (10.8 μg/ml. Combination of these two herbal drugs showed substantial enhancement in their anti-malarial activity. Combinatorial effect of each of these with curcumin also revealed anti-malarial effect. Additive interaction between the plant extracts (AP + HC and their individual synergism with curcumin (AP+CUR, HC+CUR were evident from this study. Increased in vivo potency was also observed with the combination of plant extracts over the individual extracts and curcumin. Both the plant extracts were found to inhibit the ring stage of the parasite and did not show any in vivo toxicity, whether used in isolation or in combination. Conclusion Both these two plant extracts in combination with curcumin could be an effective, alternative source of herbal anti-malarial drugs.

  11. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

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    Ronn Anita

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1 therapeutic agent. There is a dire need to continue monitoring quality of CQ as there is a major influx of substandard and fake formulations into malaria-endemic countries. The use of fake/substandard drugs will result in sub-therapeutic levels endangering the patient and possibly select for parasite resistance. The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple antibody-based ELISA to measure CQ concentrations in tablets and in plasma. Methods A monoclonal antibody (MAb that reacts with the N-side chain of the CQ molecule was prepared by use of a CQ analogue. A specific and reliable ELISA for detection of CQ was developed. The developed assay was validated by measuring CQ in tablets sold in Denmark, India and Sudan. Furthermore, kinetics of CQ concentrations in plasma of four volunteers, who ingested two tablets of Malarex® containing, 250 mg CQ base, were measured before drug intake, three hours later and thereafter at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. The same plasma samples were simultaneously measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results The ELISA proved an easy-to-handle and very sensitive tool for the detection of CQ with a lower limit of detection at 3.9 ng/ml. ELISA levels of CQ in plasma showed high agreement with the levels obtained by HPLC (r = 0.98. The specificity in the negative control group was 100%. Conclusion The developed ELISA can be used for quality screening of CQ in pharmaceutical formulations and for drug monitoring in malaria and in other infectious diseases, such as HIV, where CQ proved to be an effective therapeutic agent. The methodology has been exploited to develop monoclonal

  12. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, Insaf F; Alifrangis, Michael; Recke, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ) remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1 ...... resistance. The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple antibody-based ELISA to measure CQ concentrations in tablets and in plasma.......In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ) remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1...

  13. Recent progress in the identification and development of anti-malarial agents using virtual screening based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Priyanka; Tiwari, Sunita; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran

    2015-01-01

    Malaria has continued to be one of the most perplexing diseases for biological science community around the world due to its prevalent devastating nature and quick developing resistance against the frontline drugs. Artimisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been so far found to be among the best therapies against Plasmodium pathogens but alarming emergence of resistance in parasites against every known chemotherapy has prompted the scientific community to step up all the efforts towards development of new and affordable anti-malarial drugs. Computer-aided approaches have received enormous attention in recent years in the field of identification and design of novel drugs. In this review, we summarize recently published research concerning the identification and development of anti-malarial compounds using virtual screening approaches. It would be admirable to discern the successful application of in silico studies for anti-malarial drug discovery hitherto and would certainly help in generating new avenues for pursuing integrated studies between the experimentalists and computational chemists in a systematic manner as a time and cost efficient alternative for future antimalarial drug discovery projects.

  14. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak (LECOM); (WSI); (NWU); (MUSC); (WSU)

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  15. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, S.R.; Heuvel, J.J.; Velden, M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.; Russel, F.G.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly involve

  16. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-02-13

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting.

  17. Review of pyronaridine anti-malarial properties and product characteristics

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    Croft Simon L

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pyronaridine was synthesized in 1970 at the Institute of Chinese Parasitic Disease and has been used in China for over 30 years for the treatment of malaria. Pyronaridine has high potency against Plasmodium falciparum, including chloroquine-resistant strains. Studies in various animal models have shown pyronaridine to be effective against strains resistant to other anti-malarials, including chloroquine. Resistance to pyronaridine appears to emerge slowly and is further retarded when pyronaridine is used in combination with other anti-malarials, in particular, artesunate. Pyronaridine toxicity is generally less than that of chloroquine, though evidence of embryotoxicity in rodents suggests use with caution in pregnancy. Clinical pharmacokinetic data for pyronaridine indicates an elimination T1/2 of 13.2 and 9.6 days, respectively, in adults and children with acute uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria in artemisinin-combination therapy. Clinical data for mono or combined pyronaridine therapy show excellent anti-malarial effects against P. falciparum and studies of combination therapy also show promise against Plasmodium vivax. Pyronaridine has been developed as a fixed dose combination therapy, in a 3:1 ratio, with artesunate for the treatment of acute uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria and blood stage P. vivax malaria with the name of Pyramax® and has received Positive Opinion by European Medicines Agency under the Article 58 procedure.

  18. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

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    Rogers William O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study

  19. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

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    Khodakarim Nastaran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain. Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy, Solanum surattense (Burm.f. and Prosopis juliflora (Sw. showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time.

  20. Compliance with a three-day course of artesunate-mefloquine combination and baseline anti-malarial treatment in an area of Thailand with highly multidrug resistant falciparum malaria

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    Na-Bangchang Kesara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is presently recommended by the World Health Organization as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in several countries, as a mean of prolonging the effectiveness of first-line malaria treatment regimens. A three-day course of artesunate-mefloquine (4 mg/kg body weight once daily for three consecutive days, plus 15 and 10 mg/kg body weight mefloquine on the first and second days has been adopted by Malaria Control Programme of Thailand as first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria all over the country since 2008. The gametocytocydal anti-malarial drug primaquine is administered at the dose of 30 mg (0.6 mg/kg on the last day. The aim of the present study was to assess patient compliance of this combination regimen when applied to field condition. Methods A total of 240 patients (196 males and 44 females who were attending the malaria clinics in Mae-Sot, Tak Province and presenting with symptomatic acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria, with no reappearance of Plasmodium vivax parasitaemia during follow-up were included into the study. The first dose of the treatment was given to the patients under direct supervision. All patients were given the medication for self-treatment at home and were requested to come back for follow-up on day 3 of the initial treatment. Baseline (day 0 and day 3 whole blood mefloquine and plasma primaquine concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results Two patients had recrudescence on days 28 and 35. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the 42-day efficacy rate of this combination regimen was 99.2% (238/240. Based on whole blood mefloquine and plasma primaquine concentrations on day 3 of the initial treatment, compliance with mefloquine and primaquine in this three-day artesunate-mefloquine combination regimen were 96.3% (207/215, and 98.5% (197/200, respectively. Baseline mefloquine

  1. Mapping the genome of Plasmodium falciparum on the drug-like chemical space reveals novel anti-malarial targets and potential drug leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper; Plichta, Damian Rafal; Panagiotou, Gianni;

    2012-01-01

    The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is the main agent responsible for malaria. In this study, we exploited a recently published chemical library from GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) that had previously been confirmed to inhibit parasite growth of the wild type (3D7) and the multi-drug resistance (D2d) strains......, in order to uncover the weak links in the proteome of the parasite. We predicted 293 proteins of P. falciparum, including the six out of the seven verified targets for P. falciparum malaria treatment, as targets of 4645 GSK active compounds. Furthermore, we prioritized druggable targets, based on a number...... on integration of available chemical-protein and protein-protein interaction data. Our work suggests that a large number of the P. falciparum proteome is potentially druggable and could therefore serve as novel drug targets in the fight against malaria. At the same time, prioritized compounds from the GSK...

  2. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells Timothy NC

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal

  3. PfMDR2 and PfMDR5 are dispensable for Plasmodium falciparum asexual parasite multiplication but change in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, M. van der; Rijpma, S.R.; Russel, F.G.M.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Membrane-associated ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins hydrolyze ATP in order to translocate a broad spectrum of substrates, from single ions to macromolecules across membranes. In humans, members from this transport family have been linked to drug resistance phenotypes, e.g.,

  4. Discovery of potent, novel, non-toxic anti-malarial compounds via quantum modelling, virtual screening and in vitro experimental validation

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    Kaludov Nikola

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing resistance towards existing anti-malarial therapies emphasize the urgent need for new therapeutic options. Additionally, many malaria drugs in use today have high toxicity and low therapeutic indices. Gradient Biomodeling, LLC has developed a quantum-model search technology that uses quantum similarity and does not depend explicitly on chemical structure, as molecules are rigorously described in fundamental quantum attributes related to individual pharmacological properties. Therapeutic activity, as well as toxicity and other essential properties can be analysed and optimized simultaneously, independently of one another. Such methodology is suitable for a search of novel, non-toxic, active anti-malarial compounds. Methods A set of innovative algorithms is used for the fast calculation and interpretation of electron-density attributes of molecular structures at the quantum level for rapid discovery of prospective pharmaceuticals. Potency and efficacy, as well as additional physicochemical, metabolic, pharmacokinetic, safety, permeability and other properties were characterized by the procedure. Once quantum models are developed and experimentally validated, the methodology provides a straightforward implementation for lead discovery, compound optimizzation and de novo molecular design. Results Starting with a diverse training set of 26 well-known anti-malarial agents combined with 1730 moderately active and inactive molecules, novel compounds that have strong anti-malarial activity, low cytotoxicity and structural dissimilarity from the training set were discovered and experimentally validated. Twelve compounds were identified in silico and tested in vitro; eight of them showed anti-malarial activity (IC50 ≤ 10 μM, with six being very effective (IC50 ≤ 1 μM, and four exhibiting low nanomolar potency. The most active compounds were also tested for mammalian cytotoxicity and found to be non-toxic, with a

  5. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

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    Chapman Steven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the

  6. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part I: a pharmacological evaluation of alkaloids and terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoa Onguéné, Pascal; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Lifongo, Lydia Likowo; Ndom, Jean Claude; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2013-12-13

    Traditional medicine caters for about 80% of the health care needs of many rural populations around the world, especially in developing countries. In addition, plant-derived compounds have played key roles in drug discovery. Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to factors such as chemotherapy faced by resistance, poor hygienic conditions, poorly managed vector control programmes and no approved vaccines. In this review, an attempt has been made to assess the value of African medicinal plants for drug discovery by discussing the anti-malarial virtue of the derived phytochemicals that have been tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. This survey was focused on pure compounds derived from African flora which have exhibited anti-malarial properties with activities ranging from "very active" to "weakly active". However, only the compounds which showed anti-malarial activities from "very active" to "moderately active" are discussed in this review. The activity of 278 compounds, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarines, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids, and lignans have been discussed. The first part of this review series covers the activity of 171 compounds belonging to the alkaloid and terpenoid classes. Data available in the literature indicated that African flora hold an enormous potential for the development of phytomedicines for malaria.

  7. Efficacy comparison between anti-malarial drugs in Africans presenting with mild malaria in the Central Republic of Africa: a preliminary study

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    Nambei W.S.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance to Plasmodium falciparum contributes to major health problems in central Africa and, as a consequence, poverty. We have analyzed the efficacy of three currently available antimalarial drugs to treat symptomatic, uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in semiimmune adults living in Bangui, Central Republic of Africa. 210 consecutive individuals were enrolled in the survey, of which 45 were excluded. Those having received dihydroartemisin proved significantly less parasitemic than those having received quinine per os or sulfadoxin-pyrimethamin (χ2 = 16.93 ; p < 0.05, and 75 % recovered in two days compared to 57 and 44 %, respectively. The 25 % who did not recover benefited from a second cure with dihydroartemisin, which proved 100 % efficient. The most accurate protocol remains to be established by analyzing clinical and parasitological data and taking into account the economics of the country.

  8. The acceptability of mass administrations of anti-malarial drugs as part of targeted malaria elimination in villages along the Thai–Myanmar border

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    Ladda Kajeechiwa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A targeted malaria elimination project, including mass drug administrations (MDA of dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine plus a single low dose primaquine is underway in villages along the Thailand Myanmar border. The intervention has multiple components but the success of the project will depend on the participation of the entire communities. Quantitative surveys were conducted to study reasons for participation or non-participation in the campaign with the aim to identify factors associated with the acceptance and participation in the mass drug administrations. Methods The household heads in four study villages in which MDAs had taken place previously were interviewed between January 2014 and July 2015. Results 174/378 respondents (46 % completed three rounds of three drug doses each, 313/378 (83 % took at least three consecutive doses and 56/378 (15 % did not participate at all in the MDA. The respondents from the two villages (KNH and TPN were much more likely to participate in the MDA than respondents from the other two villages (HKT and TOT. The more compliant villages KNH and TPN had both an appearance of cohesive communities with similar demographic and ethnic backgrounds. By contrast the villages with low participation were unique. One village was fragmented following years of armed conflict and many respondents gave little inclination to cooperate with outsiders. The other village with low MDA coverage was characterised by a high percentage of short-term residents with little interest in community interventions. A universal reason for non-participation in the MDA applicable to all villages was an inadequate understanding of the intervention. Conclusions It is unlikely that community engagement can unite fragmented communities in participating in an intervention, which benefits the community. Understanding the purpose and the reasons underlying the intervention is an important pre-condition for participation. In the

  9. A retrospective analysis of the change in anti-malarial treatment policy: Peru

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    Vincent-Mark Arlene

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background National malaria control programmes must deal with the complex process of changing national malaria treatment guidelines, often without guidance on the process of change. Selecting a replacement drug is only one issue in this process. There is a paucity of literature describing successful malaria treatment policy changes to help guide control programs through this process. Objectives To understand the wider context in which national malaria treatment guidelines were formulated in a specific country (Peru. Methods Using qualitative methods (individual and focus group interviews, stakeholder analysis and a review of documents, a retrospective analysis of the process of change in Peru's anti-malarial treatment policy from the early 1990's to 2003 was completed. Results The decision to change Peru's policies resulted from increasing levels of anti-malarial drug resistance, as well as complaints from providers that the drugs were no longer working. The context of the change occurred in a time in which Peru was changing national governments, which created extreme challenges in moving the change process forward. Peru utilized a number of key strategies successfully to ensure that policy change would occur. This included a having the process directed by a group who shared a common interest in malaria and who had long-established social and professional networks among themselves, b engaging in collaborative teamwork among nationals and between nationals and international collaborators, c respect for and inclusion of district-level staff in all phases of the process, d reliance on high levels of technical and scientific knowledge, e use of standardized protocols to collect data, and f transparency. Conclusion Although not perfectly or fully implemented by 2003, the change in malaria treatment policy in Peru occurred very quickly, as compared to other countries. They identified a problem, collected the data necessary to justify the

  10. Anti-malarial efficacy of pyronaridine and artesunate in combination in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivas, Livia; Rattray, Lauren; Stewart, Lindsay; Bongard, Emily; Robinson, Brian L; Peters, Wallace; Croft, Simon L

    2008-03-01

    Pyronaridine is a Mannich base anti-malarial with demonstrated efficacy against drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale and P. malariae. However, resistance to pyronaridine can develop quickly when it is used alone but can be considerably delayed when it is administered with artesunate in rodent malaria models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pyronaridine in combination with artesunate against P. falciparum in vitro and in rodent malaria models in vivo to support its clinical application. Pyronaridine showed consistently high levels of in vitro activity against a panel of six P. falciparum drug-sensitive and resistant strains (Geometric Mean IC50=2.24 nM, 95% CI=1.20-3.27). In vitro interactions between pyronaridine and artesunate showed a slight antagonistic trend, but in vivo compared to pyronaridine and artesunate administered alone, the 3:1 ratio of the combination, reduced the ED90 of artesunate by approximately 15.6-fold in a pyronaridine-resistant P. berghei line and by approximately 200-fold in an artesunate-resistant line of P. berghei. Complete cure rates were achieved with doses of the combination above or equal to 8 mg/kg per day against P. chabaudi AS. These results indicate that the combination had an enhanced effect over monotherapy and lower daily doses of artesunate could be used to obtain a curative effect. The data suggest that the combination of pyronaridine and artesunate should have potential in areas of multi-drug resistant malaria.

  11. Anti-malarial effect of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one and green tea extract on erythrocyte-stage Plasmodium berghei in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phitsinee; Thipubon; Wachiraporn; Tipsuwan; Chairat; Uthaipibull; Sineenart; Santitherakul; Somdet; Srichiratanakool

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one(CM1) iron chelator and green tea extract(GTE) as anti-malarial activity in Plasmodium berghei(P. berghei) infected mice.Methods: The CM1(0–100 mg/kg/day) and GTE(0–100 mg(-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate equivalent/kg/day) were orally administered to P. berghei infected mice for consecutive 4 days. Parasitized red blood cells(PRBC) were enumerated by using Giemsa staining microscopic method.Results: CM1 lowered percentage of PRBC in dose-dependent manner with an ED50 value of 56.91 mg/kg, when compared with pyrimethamine(PYR)(ED50= 0.76 mg/kg).GTE treatment did not show any inhibition of the malaria parasite growth. In combined treatment, CM1 along with 0.6 mg/kg PYR significantly inhibited the growth of P. berghei in mice while GTE did not enhance the PYR anti-malarial activity.Conclusions: CM1 would be effective per se and synergize with PYR in inhibiting growth of murine malaria parasites, possibly by limiting iron supply from plasma transferrin and host PRBC cytoplasm, and chelating catalytic iron cstitutive in parasites’ mitochondrial cytochromes and cytoplasmic ribonucleotide reductase. CM1 would be a promising adjuvant to enhance PYR anti-malarial activity and minimize the drug resistance.

  12. Anti-malarial effect of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one and green tea extract on erythrocyte-stage Plasmodium berghei in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Phitsinee Thipubon; Wachiraporn Tipsuwan; Chairat Uthaipibull; Sineenart Santitherakul; Somdet Srichiratanakool

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To examine the efficacy of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl)-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one (CM1) iron chelator and green tea extract (GTE) as anti-malarial activity in Plasmodium berghei (P. berghei ) infected mice. Methods:The CM1 (0–100 mg/kg/day) and GTE (0–100 mg (-)-epigallocatechin 3-gallate equivalent/kg/day) were orally administered to P. berghei infected mice for consecutive 4 days. Parasitized red blood cells (PRBC) were enumerated by using Giemsa staining microscopic method. Results: CM1 lowered percentage of PRBC in dose-dependent manner with an ED50 value of 56.91 mg/kg, when compared with pyrimethamine (PYR) (ED50=0.76 mg/kg). GTE treatment did not show any inhibition of the malaria parasite growth. In combined treatment, CM1 along with 0.6 mg/kg PYR significantly inhibited the growth of P. berghei in mice while GTE did not enhance the PYR anti-malarial activity. Conclusions: CM1 would be effective per se and synergize with PYR in inhibiting growth of murine malaria parasites, possibly by limiting iron supply from plasma transferrin and host PRBC cytoplasm, and chelating catalytic iron constitutive in parasites’ mitochondrial cytochromes and cytoplasmic ribonucleotide reductase. CM1 would be a promising adjuvant to enhance PYR anti-malarial activity and minimize the drug resistance.

  13. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  14. CoMFA, CoMSIA, and docking studies on thiolactone-class of potent anti-malarials: identification of essential structural features modulating anti-malarial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kuldeep K; Bhunia, Shome S; Saxena, Anil K

    2011-09-01

    The integrated ligand- and structure-based drug design techniques have been applied on a homogeneous dataset of thiolactone-class of potent anti-malarials, to explore the essential structural features for the inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum. Developed CoMFA (q(2) = 0.716) and CoMSIA (q(2) = 0.632) models well explained structure-activity variation in both the training (CoMFA R(2) = 0.948 & CoMSIA R(2) = 0.849) and test set (CoMFA R(2) (pred) = 0.789 & CoMSIA R(2) (pred) = 0.733) compounds. The docking and scoring of the most active compound 10 into the active site of high-resolution (2.35 Å) structure of FabB-TLM binary complex (PDB-ID: 1FJ4) indicated that thiolactone core of this compound forms bifurcated H-bonding with two catalytic residues His298 and His333, and its saturated decyl side group is stabilized by hydrophobic interactions with the residues of a small hydrophobic groove, illustrating that the active site architecture, including two catalytic histidines and a small hydrophobic groove, is vital for protein-ligand interaction. In particular, the length and flexibility of the side group attached to the position 5 of thiolactone have been observed to play a significant role in the interaction with FabB enzyme. These results present scope for rational design of thiolactone-class of compounds that could furnish improved anti-malarial activity.

  15. Longitudinal in vitro surveillance of Plasmodium falciparum sensitivity to common anti-malarials in Thailand between 1994 and 2010

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    Parker Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug and multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria has existed in Thailand for several decades. Furthermore, Thailand serves as a sentinel for drug-resistant malaria within the Greater Mekong sub-region. However, the drug resistance situation is highly dynamic, changing quickly over time. Here parasite in vitro drug sensitivity is reported for artemisinin derivatives, mefloquine, chloroquine and quinine, across Thailand. Methods Blood was drawn from patients infected with P. falciparum in seven sentinel provinces along Thai international borders with Cambodia, Myanmar, Laos, and Malaysia. In vitro parasite sensitivity was tested using the World Health Organization’s microtest (mark III (between 1994 and 2002 and the histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP2-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (in 2010. Following World Health Organization protocol, at least 30 isolates were collected for each province and year represented in this study. Where possible, t-tests were used to test for significant differences. Results There appears to be little variation across study sites with regard to parasite sensitivity to chloroquine. Quinine resistance appears to have been rising prior to 1997, but has subsequently decreased. Mefloquine sensitivity appears high across the provinces, especially along the north-western border with Myanmar and the eastern border with Cambodia. Finally, the data suggest that parasite sensitivity to artemisinin and its derivatives is significantly higher in provinces along the north-western border with Myanmar. Conclusions Parasite sensitivity to anti-malarials in Thailand is highly variable over time and largely mirrors official drug use policy. The findings with regard to reduced sensitivity to artemisinin derivatives are supported by recent reports of reduced parasite clearance associated with artemisinin. This trend is alarming since artemisinin is considered the last defence against malaria. Continued

  16. Several Human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, Structurally Related to Roscovitine, As New Anti-Malarial Agents

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    Sandrine Houzé

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Africa, malaria kills one child each minute. It is also responsible for about one million deaths worldwide each year. Plasmodium falciparum, is the protozoan responsible for the most lethal form of the disease, with resistance developing against the available anti-malarial drugs. Among newly proposed anti-malaria targets, are the P. falciparum cyclin-dependent kinases (PfCDKs. There are involved in different stages of the protozoan growth and development but share high sequence homology with human cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. We previously reported the synthesis of CDKs inhibitors that are structurally-related to (R-roscovitine, a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine, and they showed activity against neuronal diseases and cancers. In this report, we describe the synthesis and the characterization of new CDK inhibitors, active in reducing the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (3D7 and 7G8 strains. Six compounds are more potent inhibitors than roscovitine, and three exhibited IC50 values close to 1 µM for both 3D7 and 7G8 strains. Although, such molecules do inhibit P. falciparum growth, they require further studies to improve their selectivity for PfCDKs.

  17. Implementation of a reference standard and proficiency testing programme by the World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN

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    Barnes Karen I

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN is a global collaboration to support the objective that anyone affected by malaria receives effective and safe drug treatment. The Pharmacology module aims to inform optimal anti-malarial drug selection. There is an urgent need to define the drug exposure - effect relationship for most anti-malarial drugs. Few anti-malarials have had their therapeutic blood concentration levels defined. One of the main challenges in assessing safety and efficacy data in relation to drug concentrations is the comparability of data generated from different laboratories. To explain differences in anti-malarial pharmacokinetics in studies with different measurement laboratories it is necessary to confirm the accuracy of the assay methods. This requires the establishment of an external quality assurance process to assure results that can be compared. This paper describes this process. Methods The pharmacology module of WWARN has established a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC programme consisting of two separate components: 1. A proficiency testing programme where blank human plasma spiked with certified reference material (CRM in different concentrations is sent out to participating bioanalytical laboratories. 2. A certified reference standard programme where accurately weighed amounts of certified anti-malarial reference standards, metabolites, and internal standards are sent to participating bioanalytical and in vitro laboratories. Conclusion The proficiency testing programme is designed as a cooperative effort to help participating laboratories assess their ability to carry out drug analysis, resolve any potential problem areas and to improve their results - and, in so doing, to improve the quality of anti-malarial pharmacokinetic data published and shared with WWARN. By utilizing the same source of standards for all laboratories, it is possible to minimize bias arising from poor

  18. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    HIV Treatment Drug Resistance (Last updated 3/2/2017; last reviewed 3/2/2017) Key Points As HIV multiplies in the ... the risk of drug resistance. What is HIV drug resistance? Once a person becomes infected with HIV, ...

  19. Anti-Malarial Plants of Jonai, India: an Ethnobotanical Approach

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    Tonlong WANGPAN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available North-East India represents a unique ecosystem with treasured medicinal plant wealth closely related with Folk medicines. A large number of plants having medicinal properties and their folk uses have remained confined to the natives of this region. The tribal community of Jonai, Assam was explored to expose the indigenous herbal remedy for malaria. Sixteen antimalarial plants belonging to 13 families were reported. The analysis revealed highest fidelity level (FL value for Ajuga integrifolia (100% followed by Ricinus communis (94%, Alstonia scholaris (88%, Oroxylum indicum (86% and Achyranthes aspera (82%. The percentage of respondent’s knowledge (PRK about anti-malarial plants showed Alstonia scholaris as the most commonly known antimalarial species (53% within this region. Preference ranking (PR unveiled eight species to be very effective against malarial parasite, which includes Allium sativum, Artemisia indica, Azadirachta indica, Carica papaya, Clerodendrum glandulosum, Ocimum tenuiflorum, Oroxylum indicum, Piper longum and Piper nigrum. All medicine preparations are made using water as the medium and are orally administered in the form of crude extract, powder, juice and decoction. Overall analysis suggested Ajuga integrifolia, Achyranthes aspera, Alstonia scholaris, Artemisia indica, Oroxylum indicum and Ricinus communis to be used for the development of novel, economical, effective and ecofriendly herbal formulations for healthcare management.

  20. Characterization and optimization of the haemozoin-like crystal (HLC) assay to determine Hz inhibiting effects of anti-malarial compounds

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background The haem-haemozoin biocrystallization pathway is an attractive target where several efficacious and safe anti-malarial drugs act. Consequently, in vitro haemozoin (Hz) inhibition assays have been developed to identify novel compounds. However, results may differ between assays and often require complex methods or sophisticated infrastructure. The recently reported growth of haemozoin-like crystals (HLC) appears to be a simple alternative although the endproduct is structurally diff...

  1. Combinatorial pathway engineering for optimized production of the anti-malarial FR900098.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freestone, Todd S; Zhao, Huimin

    2016-02-01

    As resistance to current anti-malarial therapeutics spreads, new compounds to treat malaria are increasingly needed. One promising compound is FR900098, a naturally occurring phosphonate. Due to limitations in both chemical synthesis and biosynthetic methods for FR900098 production, this potential therapeutic has yet to see widespread implementation. Here we applied a combinatorial pathway engineering strategy to improve the production of FR900098 in Escherichia coli by modulating each of the pathway's nine genes with four promoters of different strengths. Due to the large size of the library and the low screening throughput, it was necessary to develop a novel screening strategy that significantly reduced the sample size needed to find an optimal strain. This was done by using biased libraries that localize searching around top hits and home in on high-producing strains. By incorporating this strategy, a significantly improved strain was found after screening less than 3% of the entire library. When coupled with culturing optimization, a strain was found to produce 96 mg/L, a 16-fold improvement over the original strain. We believe the enriched library method developed here can be used on other large pathways that may be difficult to engineer by combinatorial methods due to low screening throughput.

  2. Accessibility, availability and affordability of anti-malarials in a rural district in Kenya after implementation of a national subsidy scheme

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    Simiyu Chrispinus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor access to prompt and effective treatment for malaria contributes to high mortality and severe morbidity. In Kenya, it is estimated that only 12% of children receive anti-malarials for their fever within 24 hours. The first point of care for many fevers is a local medicine retailer, such as a pharmacy or chemist. The role of the medicine retailer as an important distribution point for malaria medicines has been recognized and several different strategies have been used to improve the services that these retailers provide. Despite these efforts, many mothers still purchase ineffective drugs because they are less expensive than effective artemisinin combination therapy (ACT. One strategy that is being piloted in several countries is an international subsidy targeted at anti-malarials supplied through the retail sector. The goal of this strategy is to make ACT as affordable as ineffective alternatives. The programme, called the Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria was rolled out in Kenya in August 2010. Methods In December 2010, the affordability and accessibility of malaria medicines in a rural district in Kenya were evaluated using a complete census of all public and private facilities, chemists, pharmacists, and other malaria medicine retailers within the Webuye Demographic Surveillance Area. Availability, types, and prices of anti-malarials were assessed. There are 13 public or mission facilities and 97 medicine retailers (registered and unregistered. Results The average distance from a home to the nearest public health facility is 2 km, but the average distance to the nearest medicine retailer is half that. Quinine is the most frequently stocked anti-malarial (61% of retailers. More medicine retailers stocked sulphadoxine-pyramethamine (SP; 57% than ACT (44%. Eleven percent of retailers stocked AMFm subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (AL. No retailers had chloroquine in stock and only five were selling artemisinin

  3. Prevalence of molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Dakar, Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wurtz Nathalie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of the widespread resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT (including artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Intermittent preventive treatments with anti-malarial drugs based on sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are also given to children or pregnant women once per month during the transmission season. Since 2006, there have been very few reports on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To estimate the prevalence of resistance to several anti-malarial drugs since the introduction of the widespread use of ACT, the presence of molecular markers associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine was assessed in local isolates at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes associated with anti-malarial drug resistance, i.e., Pfcrt, Pfdhfr, Pfdhps and Pfmdr1, and the copy number of Pfmdr1 were evaluated for a panel of 174 isolates collected from patients recruited at the military hospital of Dakar from 14 October 2009 to 19 January 2010. Results The Pfcrt 76T mutation was identified in 37.2% of the samples. The Pfmdr1 86Y and 184F mutations were found in 16.6% and 67.6% of the tested samples, respectively. Twenty-eight of the 29 isolates with the 86Y mutation were also mutated at codon 184. Only one isolate (0.6% had two copies of Pfmdr1. The Pfdhfr 108N/T, 51I and 59R mutations were identified in 82.4%, 83.5% and 74.1% of the samples, respectively. The double mutant (108N and 51I was detected in 83.5% of the isolates, and the triple mutant (108N, 51I and 59R was detected in 75.3%. The Pfdhps 437G, 436F/A and 613S mutations were found in 40.2%, 35.1% and 1.8% of the samples, respectively. There was no double mutant (437G and 540E or no quintuple mutant (Pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R

  4. Drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, J.A.; Potschka, H.; Noebels, J.L.; Avoli, M.; Rogawski, M.A.; Olsen, R.W.; Delgado-Escueta, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Drug resistance remains to be one of the major challenges in epilepsy therapy. Identification of factors that contribute to therapeutic failure is crucial for future development of novel therapeutic strategies for difficult-to-treat epilepsies. Several clinical studies have shown that high seizure f

  5. Diversity oriented synthesis for novel anti-malarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathula, Chandramohan; Singh, Shailja; Sen, Subhabrata

    2015-12-01

    Malaria a global pandemic has engulfed nearly 0.63 million people globally. It is high time that a cure for malaria is required to stop its ever increasing menace. Our commentary discusses the advent and contribution of diversity oriented synthesis (DOS) in the drug discovery efforts towards developing cure for malaria. DOS based on chemical genetics focusses on design and synthesis of molecular libraries which covers large tracts of biologically relevant chemical space. Herein we will discuss the applications, advantages, disadvantages and future directions of DOS with respect to malaria.

  6. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

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    Evans Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector and unlicensed facilities (informal sector is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58% anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30 and 11% (5/47 respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32 failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45 in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86% were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to

  7. In silico analysis reveals the anti-malarial potential of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thillainayagam, Mahalakshmi; Pandian, Lavanya; Murugan, Kumar Kalavathy; Vijayaparthasarathi, Vijayakumar; Sundaramoorthy, Sarveswari; Anbarasu, Anand; Ramaiah, Sudha

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the correlation between chemical structures and various parameters such as steric effects and electrostatic interactions to the inhibitory activities of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives is derived to identify the key structural elements required in the rational design of potent and novel anti-malarial compounds. The molecular docking simulations and Comparative Molecular Field Analysis (CoMFA) are carried out on 38 chalcones derivatives using Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) as potential target. Surflex-dock is used to determine the probable binding conformations of all the compounds at the active site of pfLDH and to identify the hydrogen bonding interactions which could be used to alter the inhibitory activities. The CoMFA model has provided statistically significant results with the cross-validated correlation coefficient (q(2)) of .850 and the non-cross-validated correlation coefficient (r(2)) of .912. Standard error of estimation (SEE) is .280 and the optimum number of component is five. The predictive ability of the resultant model is evaluated using a test set comprising of 13 molecules and the predicted r(2) value is .885. The results provide valuable insight for optimization of quinolinyl chalcone derivatives for better anti-malarial therapy.

  8. Closing the access barrier for effective anti-malarials in the private sector in rural Uganda: consortium for ACT private sector subsidy (CAPSS) pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), the treatment of choice for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, is unaffordable and generally inaccessible in the private sector, the first port of call for most malaria treatment across rural Africa. Between August 2007 and May 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Medicines for Malaria Venture conducted the Consortium for ACT Private Sector Subsidy (CAPSS) pilot study to test whether access to ACT in the private sector could be improved through the provision of a high level supply chain subsidy. Methods Four intervention districts were purposefully selected to receive branded subsidized medicines - “ACT with a leaf”, while the fifth district acted as the control. Baseline and evaluation outlet exit surveys and retail audits were conducted at licensed and unlicensed drug outlets in the intervention and control districts. A survey-adjusted, multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyse the intervention’s impact on: ACT uptake and price; purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset; ACT availability and displacement of sub-optimal anti-malarial. Results At baseline, ACT accounted for less than 1% of anti-malarials purchased from licensed drug shops for children less than five years old. However, at evaluation, “ACT with a leaf” accounted for 69% of anti-malarial purchased in the interventions districts. Purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset for children under five years rose from 0.8% at baseline to 26.2% (95% CI: 23.2-29.2%) at evaluation in the intervention districts. In the control district, it rose modestly from 1.8% to 5.6% (95% CI: 4.0-7.3%). The odds of purchasing ACT within 24 hours in the intervention districts compared to the control was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.08-2.68, p=0.4) at baseline and significant increased to 6.11 (95% CI: 4.32-8.62, p<0.0001) at evaluation. Children less than five years of age had “ACT with a leaf” purchased for them more often than those

  9. Closing the access barrier for effective anti-malarials in the private sector in rural Uganda: consortium for ACT private sector subsidy (CAPSS pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talisuna Ambrose O

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, the treatment of choice for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, is unaffordable and generally inaccessible in the private sector, the first port of call for most malaria treatment across rural Africa. Between August 2007 and May 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Medicines for Malaria Venture conducted the Consortium for ACT Private Sector Subsidy (CAPSS pilot study to test whether access to ACT in the private sector could be improved through the provision of a high level supply chain subsidy. Methods Four intervention districts were purposefully selected to receive branded subsidized medicines - “ACT with a leaf”, while the fifth district acted as the control. Baseline and evaluation outlet exit surveys and retail audits were conducted at licensed and unlicensed drug outlets in the intervention and control districts. A survey-adjusted, multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyse the intervention’s impact on: ACT uptake and price; purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset; ACT availability and displacement of sub-optimal anti-malarial. Results At baseline, ACT accounted for less than 1% of anti-malarials purchased from licensed drug shops for children less than five years old. However, at evaluation, “ACT with a leaf” accounted for 69% of anti-malarial purchased in the interventions districts. Purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset for children under five years rose from 0.8% at baseline to 26.2% (95% CI: 23.2-29.2% at evaluation in the intervention districts. In the control district, it rose modestly from 1.8% to 5.6% (95% CI: 4.0-7.3%. The odds of purchasing ACT within 24 hours in the intervention districts compared to the control was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.08-2.68, p=0.4 at baseline and significant increased to 6.11 (95% CI: 4.32-8.62, p Conclusions These data demonstrate that a supply-side subsidy and an intensive communications campaign

  10. Anti-malarial activity of leaf-extract of hydrangea macrophylla, a common Japanese plant.

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    Kamei K

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available To find a new anti-malarial medicine derived from natural resources, we examined the leaves of 13 common Japanese plants in vitro. Among them, a leaf-extract of Hydrangea macrophylla, a common Japanese flower, inhibited the parasitic growth of Plasmodium falciparum. The IC50 of Hydrangea macrophylla leaf extract to Plasmodium falciparum was 0.18 microg/ml. The IC50 to NIH 3T3-3 cells, from a normal mouse cell line, was 7.2 microg/ml. Thus, selective toxicity was 40. For the in vivo test, we inoculated Plasmodium berghei, a rodent malaria parasite, to ddY mice and administered the leaf-extract of Hydrangea macrophylla (3.6 mg/0.2 ml orally 3 times a day for 3 days. Malaria parasites did not appear in the blood of in the treated mice, but they did appear in the control group on day 3 or 4 after inoculation with the parasites. When leaf extract was administered to 5 mice 2 times a day for 3 days, malaria parasites did not appear in 4 of the mice but did appear in 1 mouse. In addition, the leaf-extract was administered orally 3 times a day for 3 days to Plasmodium berghei infected mice with a parasitemia of 2.7%. In the latter group, malaria parasites disappeared on day 3 after initiating the treatment, but they appeared again after day 5 or 6. Although we could not cure the mice entirely, we confirmed that the Hydrangea macrophylla leaf extract did contain an anti-malarial substance that can be administered orally.

  11. Determination of metabolic profile of anti-malarial trioxane CDRI 99/411 in rat liver microsomes using HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Smriti; Manickavasagam, Lakshmi; Jain, Girish Kumar

    2012-01-01

    CDRI 99/411 is a potent 1,2,4-trioxane anti-malarial candidate compound of the Central Drug Research Institute, India. This study aimed to conduct comprehensive in vitro metabolic investigations of CDRI 99/411 to corroborate its preclinical investigations. Preliminary in vitro metabolic investigations were performed to assess the metabolic stability [in vitro half-life (t(1/2) ) and in vitro hepatic intrinsic clearance (Cl(int) )] of CDRI 99/411 in male Sprague-Dawley rat and human liver microsomes using validated high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detector. The observed in vitro t(1/2) of the compound in rat and human liver microsomes was 13 min with in vitro Cl(int) 130.7±25.0 μL/min/mg and 19 min with in vitro Cl(int) 89.3 ± 17.40 μL/min/mg. These observations suggested moderate metabolic degradation and in vitro Cl(int) with insignificant difference (p>0.05) in the metabolic stability profile in rat and human. Hence, in vitro metabolic investigations were performed with rat liver microsomes. It was observed that CDRI 99/411 exhibited sigmoidal kinetics. At nonlinear regression (r ≥ 0.99) EC(50) and Hill slope values were 17 µm and 1.50, respectively. The metabolism of CDRI 99/411 was primarily mediated by CYP3A2 and was inferred by CYP reaction phenotyping with known potent inhibitors. Two metabolites of CDRI 99/411 were detected which were undetectable on incubation with 1-aminobenzotriazole and ketoconazole.

  12. Novel Inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum Dihydroorotate Dehydrogenase with Anti-malarial Activity in the Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, Michael L.; Bastos, Cecilia M.; Kramer, Martin L.; Barker, Jr., Robert H.; Skerlj, Renato; Sidhu, Amar Bir; Deng, Xiaoyi; Celatka, Cassandra; Cortese, Joseph F.; Guerrero Bravo, Jose E.; Crespo Llado, Keila N.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Viera, Sara; Garuti, Helen; Wittlin, Sergio; Papastogiannidis, Petros; Lin, Jing-wen; Janse, Chris J.; Khan, Shahid M.; Duraisingh, Manoj; Coleman, Bradley; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.; Phillips, Margaret A.; Munoz, Benito; Wirth, Dyann F.; Klinger, Jeffrey D.; Wiegand, Roger; Sybertz, Edmund (Leiden-MC); (Puerto Rico); (STPHI); (Harvard); (GSK); (Genzyme); (UTSMC)

    2010-11-22

    Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of the most deadly form of human malaria, is unable to salvage pyrimidines and must rely on de novo biosynthesis for survival. Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway and represents a potential target for anti-malarial therapy. A high throughput screen and subsequent medicinal chemistry program identified a series of N-alkyl-5-(1H-benzimidazol-1-yl)thiophene-2-carboxamides with low nanomolar in vitro potency against DHODH from P. falciparum, P. vivax, and P. berghei. The compounds were selective for the parasite enzymes over human DHODH, and x-ray structural data on the analog Genz-667348, demonstrated that species selectivity could be attributed to amino acid differences in the inhibitor-binding site. Compounds from this series demonstrated in vitro potency against the 3D7 and Dd2 strains of P. falciparum, good tolerability and oral exposure in the mouse, and ED{sub 50} values in the 4-day murine P. berghei efficacy model of 13-21 mg/kg/day with oral twice-daily dosing. In particular, treatment with Genz-667348 at 100 mg/kg/day resulted in sterile cure. Two recent analogs of Genz-667348 are currently undergoing pilot toxicity testing to determine suitability as clinical development candidates.

  13. Optimizing the HRP-2 In Vitro Malaria Drug Susceptibility Assay Using a Reference Clone to Improve Comparisons of Plasmodium falciparum Field Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    of practical tools to monitor for resistant parasites . Although in vitro anti-malarial susceptibility tests are widely used, uncertainties remain...AFRIMS), Bangkok, Thailand 2 Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Silver Spring, MD, USA 3 The National Center for Parasitology , Entomology and...for resistant parasites . Although in vitro anti-malarial susceptibility tests are widely used, uncertainties remain regarding interpretation of P

  14. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase as a potential anti-malarial target: inhibition studies using improved methods for enzyme production and assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopitthummakhun Kittipat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need for the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs. Thus, it is essential to explore different potential new targets that are unique to the parasite or that are required for its viability in order to develop new interventions for treating the disease. Plasmodium serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT, an enzyme in the dTMP synthesis cycle, is a potential target for such new drugs, but convenient methods for producing and assaying the enzyme are still lacking, hampering the ability to screen inhibitors. Methods Production of recombinant Plasmodium falciparum SHMT (PfSHMT and Plasmodium vivax SHMT (PvSHMT, using auto-induction media, were compared to those using the conventional Luria Bertani medium with isopropyl thio-β-D-galactoside (LB-IPTG induction media. Plasmodium SHMT activity, kinetic parameters, and response to inhibitors were measured spectrophotometrically by coupling the reaction to that of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD. The identity of the intermediate formed upon inactivation of Plasmodium SHMTs by thiosemicarbazide was investigated by spectrophotometry, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS. The active site environment of Plasmodium SHMT was probed based on changes in the fluorescence emission spectrum upon addition of amino acids and folate. Results Auto-induction media resulted in a two to three-fold higher yield of Pf- and PvSHMT (7.38 and 29.29 mg/L compared to that produced in cells induced in LB-IPTG media. A convenient spectrophotometric activity assay coupling Plasmodium SHMT and MTHFD gave similar kinetic parameters to those previously obtained from the anaerobic assay coupling SHMT and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR; thus demonstrating the validity of the new assay procedure. The improved method was adopted to screen for Plasmodium SHMT inhibitors, of which some were originally designed

  15. Multiple treatment comparisons in a series of anti-malarial trials with an ordinal primary outcome and repeated treatment evaluations

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    Youdom Solange

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT are widely used in African countries, including Cameroon. Between 2005 and 2007, five randomized studies comparing different treatment arms among artesunate-amodiaquine and other ACT were conducted in Cameroonian children aged two to 60 months who had uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In these studies, the categorical criterion proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO to assess the relative effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs was repeatedly evaluated on Days 14, 21 and 28 after treatment initiation. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different treatments on this repeated ordinal outcome, hence using the fully available information. Methods The quantitative synthesis was based on individual patient data. Due to the incomplete block design concerning treatment arms between different trials, a mixed treatment comparison (MTC meta-analysis approach was adopted. The repeated ordinal outcome was modelled through a latent variable, as a proportional odds mixed model with trial, period and treatment arms as covariates. The model was further complexified to account for the variance heterogeneity, and the individual log-residual variance was modelled as a linear mixed model, as well. The effects of individual covariates at inclusion, such as parasitaemia, fever, gender and weight, were also tested. Model parameters were estimated using a Bayesian approach via the WinBUGS software. After selecting the best model using Deviance Information Criterion (DIC, mixed treatment comparisons were based on the estimated treatment effects. Results Modeling the residual variance improved the model ability to adjust the data. The results showed that, compared to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHPP was significantly more efficacious. Artesunate-chlorproguanil-dapsone (ASCD was less efficacious than artesunate

  16. Host candidate gene polymorphisms and clearance of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites

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    Rockett Kirk

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Resistance to anti-malarial drugs is a widespread problem for control programmes for this devastating disease. Molecular tests are available for many anti-malarial drugs and are useful tools for the surveillance of drug resistance. However, the correlation of treatment outcome and molecular tests with particular parasite markers is not perfect, due in part to individuals who are able to clear genotypically drug-resistant parasites. This study aimed to identify molecular markers in the human genome that correlate with the clearance of malaria parasites after drug treatment, despite the drug resistance profile of the protozoan as predicted by molecular approaches. Methods 3721 samples from five African countries, which were known to contain genotypically drug resistant parasites, were analysed. These parasites were collected from patients who subsequently failed to clear their infection following drug treatment, as expected, but also from patients who successfully cleared their infections with drug-resistant parasites. 67 human polymorphisms (SNPs on 17 chromosomes were analysed using Sequenom's mass spectrometry iPLEX gold platform, to identify regions of the human genome, which contribute to enhanced clearance of drug resistant parasites. Results An analysis of all data from the five countries revealed significant associations between the phenotype of ability to clear drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum infection and human immune response loci common to all populations. Overall, three SNPs showed a significant association with clearance of drug-resistant parasites with odds ratios of 0.76 for SNP rs2706384 (95% CI 0.71-0.92, P = 0.005, 0.66 for SNP rs1805015 (95% CI 0.45-0.97, P = 0.03, and 0.67 for SNP rs1128127 (95% CI 0.45-0.99, P = 0.05, after adjustment for possible confounding factors. The first two SNPs (rs2706384 and rs1805015 are within loci involved in pro-inflammatory (interferon-gamma and anti-inflammatory (IL-4

  17. Innovative public-private partnerships to maximize the delivery of anti-malarial medicines: lessons learned from the ASAQ Winthrop experience

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    Sebbag Robert

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This case study describes how a public-private partnership initiated to develop a new anti-malarial combination, ASAQ Winthrop, has evolved over time to address issues posed by its effective deployment in the field. Case description In 2002, DNDi created the FACT project to develop two fixed-dose combinations, artesunate-amodiaquine and artesunate-mefloquine, to meet the WHO anti-malarial treatment recommendations and international regulatory agencies approval standards. In 2002, Sanofi-aventis had started a development programme for a fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine, to replace its co-blister combination. DNDi and sanofi-aventis joined forces in 2004, with the objective of developing within the shortest possible time frame a non-patented, affordable and easy to use fixed-dose combination of artesunate and amodiaquine adapted to the needs of patients, in particular, those of children. The partners developed Coarsucam®/Artesunate Amodiaquine Winthrop® ("ASAQ Winthrop" which was prequalified by the WHO in 2008. Additional partnerships have since been established by DNDi and sanofi-aventis to ensure: 1 the adoption of this new medicine by malaria-endemic countries, 2 its appropriate usage through a broad range of information tools, and 3 the monitoring of its safety and efficacy in the field through an innovative Risk Management Plan. Discussion and evaluation The partnership between DNDi and sanofi-aventis has enabled the development and pre-qualification of ASAQ Winthrop in a short timeframe. As a result of the multiple collaborations established by the two partners, as of late 2010, ASAQ Winthrop was registered in 30 sub-Saharan African countries and in India, with over 80 million treatments distributed in 21 countries. To date, 10 clinical studies, involving 3432 patients with ASAQ Winthrop were completed to document efficacy and safety issues identified in the Risk Management Plan. Conclusions The

  18. Evaluation of anti-malarial activity of Artemisia turcomanica and A. kopetdaghensis by cell-free β-hematin formation assay

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    M. Mojarrab

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives:The plants of genus Artemisia (Asteraceae have been conventionally used for prevention and medication of a number of ailments. In the present research, ten extracts with different polarities from aerial parts of two Artemisia species, A. kopetdaghensis and A. turcomanica were evaluated for their potential anti-malarial properties. Methods: The plant materials were extracted successively with petroleum ether (PE, dichloromethane (DCM, ethyl acetate (EtOAC, ethanol, and ethanol-water (1:1 v/v  by cold maceration method. Cell free β-hematin formation assay were used for assessing anti-malarial activity of obtained extracts. Results: DCM extract of A. kopetdaghensis and PE extract of A. turcomanica showed remarkable anti-malarial activity with IC50 values of 1.04±0.02 mg/mL and 0.90±0.27 mg/mL, respectively, compared to positive control (chloroquine, IC50 0.04±0.01 mg/mL. Conclusion:  It seems that the anti-malarial activity of these extracts might be bound up with the presence of compounds with low or medium polarity; hence, this preliminary test indicated that these potent extracts could be considered for further investigations to find new sources of anti-malarial phytochemicals.

  19. Synthesis, characterization of chitosan-tripolyphosphate conjugated chloroquine nanoparticle and its in vivo anti-malarial efficacy against rodent parasite: a dose and duration dependent approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Satyajit; Das, Sabyasachi; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2012-09-15

    Various strategies to deliver antimalarials using nanocarriers have been evaluated. However, taking into account the peculiarities of malaria parasites, the focus is placed mainly polymer-based chitosan nanocarriers. Our purpose of the study is to develop chitosan-tripolyphosphate (CS-TPP) nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated chloroquine in application for attenuation of Plasmodium berghei infection in Swiss mice. NPs were prepared by ionotropic gelation between CS and sodium TPP. In the study, the interaction of CS and TPP and the presence of chloroquine at the surface of chitosan-TPP NPs have been investigated by means of different methods like FTIR, DLS, and zeta potential. After drug preparation, effective dose of the nanoconjugated chloroquine (Nch) among 100, 250, and 500 mg/kg bw/day, was studied against P. berghei infection in Swiss mice by blood smear staining and biochemical assay of different inflammatory markers, and antioxidant enzyme levels also performed. After evaluating the effective dose, dose-dependent duration study was performed for 5, 10, 15 days. From the present study the maximum effect of Nch was found at 250 mg/kg bw concentration for 15 days treatment. So, this Nch might have potential of application as therapeutic anti-malarial and antioxidant agent.

  20. Reduction of anti-malarial consumption after rapid diagnostic tests implementation in Dar es Salaam: a before-after and cluster randomized controlled study

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    Swai Ndeniria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presumptive treatment of all febrile patients with anti-malarials leads to massive over-treatment. The aim was to assess the effect of implementing malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs on prescription of anti-malarials in urban Tanzania. Methods The design was a prospective collection of routine statistics from ledger books and cross-sectional surveys before and after intervention in randomly selected health facilities (HF in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The participants were all clinicians and their patients in the above health facilities. The intervention consisted of training and introduction of mRDTs in all three hospitals and in six HF. Three HF without mRDTs were selected as matched controls. The use of routine mRDT and treatment upon result was advised for all patients complaining of fever, including children under five years of age. The main outcome measures were: (1 anti-malarial consumption recorded from routine statistics in ledger books of all HF before and after intervention; (2 anti-malarial prescription recorded during observed consultations in cross-sectional surveys conducted in all HF before and 18 months after mRDT implementation. Results Based on routine statistics, the amount of artemether-lumefantrine blisters used post-intervention was reduced by 68% (95%CI 57-80 in intervention and 32% (9-54 in control HF. For quinine vials, the reduction was 63% (54-72 in intervention and an increase of 2.49 times (1.62-3.35 in control HF. Before-and-after cross-sectional surveys showed a similar decrease from 75% to 20% in the proportion of patients receiving anti-malarial treatment (Risk ratio 0.23, 95%CI 0.20-0.26. The cluster randomized analysis showed a considerable difference of anti-malarial prescription between intervention HF (22% and control HF (60% (Risk ratio 0.30, 95%CI 0.14-0.70. Adherence to test result was excellent since only 7% of negative patients received an anti-malarial. However, antibiotic

  1. Trends in chloroquine resistance marker, Pfcrt-K76T mutation ten years after chloroquine withdrawal in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammed, Asia; Ndaro, Arnold; Kalinga, Akili;

    2013-01-01

    , continued to be used in intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) despite reports of high levels of resistance to SP due to the lack of alternatives to SP for IPTp. Recent reports have indicated recovery of CQ-susceptibility in Malawi, Kenya, Mozambique, and Tanzania based......Plasmodium falciparum resistance to anti-malarial drugs remains a major obstacle to the control of malaria. In 2001 Tanzania replaced chloroquine (CQ) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) as first-line drug, which in turn was replaced by artemisinin combination therapy in 2006. SP has however...

  2. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Kathryn A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Methods Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. Results 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT ( Conclusions These standardized, nationally representative results demonstrate the typically low availability, low market share and high prices of ACT, in the private sector where most anti-malarials are accessed, with some exceptions. The results confirm that there is substantial room to improve availability and affordability of ACT treatment in the surveyed countries. The data will also be useful for monitoring the impact of interventions such as the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria.

  3. Injections, cocktails and diviners: therapeutic flexibility in the context of malaria elimination and drug resistance in Northeast Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Gryseels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to effective malaria medication is extremely important in the context of Cambodia's elimination targets and drug resistance containment. Although the public sector health facilities are accessible to the local ethnic minorities of Ratanakiri province (Northeast Cambodia, their illness itineraries often lead them to private pharmacies selling "cocktails" and artemether injections, or to local diviners prescribing animal sacrifices to appease the spirits. METHODS: The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, combining qualitative (in-depth interviews and participant observation and quantitative methods (household and cross-sectional survey. RESULTS: Three broad options for malaria treatment were identified: i the public sector; ii the private sector; iii traditional treatment based on divination and ceremonial sacrifice. Treatment choice was influenced by the availability of treatment and provider, perceived side effects and efficacy of treatments, perceived etiology of symptoms, and patient-health provider encounters. Moreover, treatment paths proved to be highly flexible, changing mostly in relation to the perceived efficacy of a chosen treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Despite good availability of anti-malarial treatment in the public health sector, attendance remained low due to both structural and human behavioral factors. The common use and under-dosage of anti-malaria monotherapy in the private sector (single-dose injections, single-day drug cocktails represents a threat not only for individual case management, but also for the regional plan of drug resistance containment and malaria elimination.

  4. Anti-malarials exert a protective effect while Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing SLE renal disease: data from a Latin-American cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons-Estel, Guillermo J.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Hachuel, Leticia; Boggio, Gabriela; Wojdyla, Daniel; Pascual-Ramos, Virginia; Soriano, Enrique R.; Saurit, Verónica; Cavalcanti, Fernando S.; Guzman, Renato A.; Guibert-Toledano, Marlene; Sauza del Pozo, Maria J.; Amigo, Mary-Carmen; Alva, Magaly; Esteva-Spinetti, Maria H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To examine the role of ethnicity and the use of anti-malarials (protective) on lupus renal disease. Methods. A nested case–control study (1:2 proportion, n = 265 and 530) within GLADEL's (Grupo Latino Americano De Estudio de Lupus) longitudinal inception cohort was carried out. The end-point was ACR renal criterion development after diagnosis. Cases and controls were matched for follow-up time (end-point or a comparable time, respectively). Renal disease predictors were examined by univariable and multivariable analyses. Additional analyses were done to determine if the protective effect of anti-malarials persisted after adjusting for intake-associated confounders. Results. Of the cases, 233 (87.9%) were women; their mean (s.d.) age at diagnosis was 28.0 (11.9) years and their median (Q3–Q1 interquartile range) follow-up time for cases and controls was 8.3 months (Q3–Q1: 23.5); 56.6% of the cases and 74.3% of the controls were anti-malarial users. Mestizo ethnicity [odds ratio (OR) 1.72, 95% CI 1.19, 2.48] and hypertension (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.38, 3.70) were independently associated with a higher risk of renal disease, whereas anti-malarial use (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.26, 0.58), older age at disease onset (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.96, 0.99) and female gender (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32, 0.99) were negatively associated with such occurrence. After adjusting for variables associated with their intake, the protective effect of anti-malarials on renal disease occurrence persisted (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.25, 0.58). Conclusion. Mestizo patients are at increased risk of developing renal disease, whereas anti-malarial use protects patients from such an occurrence. PMID:22389125

  5. Kinetically Controlled Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xin E.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2011-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Penicillium brevicompactum produces the immunosuppressive drug mycophenolic acid (MPA), which is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases (IMPDHs). IMPDH catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP via a covalent enzyme intermediate, E-XMP*; MPA inhibits by trapping E...... of resistance is not apparent. Here, we show that, unlike MPA-sensitive IMPDHs, formation of E-XMP* is rate-limiting for both PbIMPDH-A and PbIMPDH-B. Therefore, MPA resistance derives from the failure to accumulate the drug-sensitive intermediate....

  6. Drug resistance and antiretroviral drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Shafer, Robert W.; Jonathan M Schapiro

    2005-01-01

    As more drugs for treating HIV have become available, drug resistance profiles within antiretroviral drug classes have become increasingly important for researchers developing new drugs and for clinicians integrating new drugs into their clinical practice. In vitro passage experiments and comprehensive phenotypic susceptibility testing are used for the pre-clinical evaluation of drug resistance. Clinical studies are required, however, to delineate the full spectrum of mutations responsible fo...

  7. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum and distribution of drug resistance haplotypes in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite evident success of malaria control in many sites in the Arabian Peninsula, malaria remains endemic in a few spots, in Yemen and south-west of Saudi Arabia. In addition to local transmission, imported malaria sustains an extra source of parasites that can challenge the strengths of local control strategies. This study examined the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Yemen and mutations of drug resistant genes, to elucidate parasite structure and distribution of drug resistance genotypes in the region. Methods Five polymorphic loci (MSP-2, Pfg377 and three microsatellites on chromosome 8) not involved in anti-malarial drug resistance, and four drug resistant genes (pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr and dhps) were genotyped in 108 P. falciparum isolates collected in three sites in Yemen: Dhamar, Hodeidah and Taiz. Results High diversity was seen in non-drug genes, pfg377 (He = 0.66), msp-2 (He = 0.80) and three microsatellites on chr 8, 7.7 kb (He = 0.88), 4.3 kb (He = 0.77) and 0.8 kb (He = 0.71). There was a high level of mixed-genotype infections (57%), with an average 1.8 genotypes per patient. No linkage disequilibrium was seen between drug resistant genes and the non-drug markers (p < 0.05). Genetic differentiation between populations was low (most pair-wise FST values <0.03), indicating extensive gene flow between the parasites in the three sites. There was a high prevalence of mutations in pfmdr1, pfcrt and dhfr; with four mutant pfmdr1 genotypes (NFCDD[57%], NFSND[21%], YFCDD[13%] and YFSND[8% ]), two mutant pfcrt genotypes (CVIET[89%] and SVMNT[4%]) and one mutant dhfr genotype (ICNI[53.7%]). However, no dhps mutations were detected. Conclusion The high diversity of P. falciparum in Yemen is indicative of a large parasite reservoir, which represents a challenge to control efforts. The presence of two distinct pfcrt genotype, CVIET and SVMNT, suggests that chloroquine resistance can possibly be related to a migratory

  8. Drug resistance in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S C Parija

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimalarial chemotherapy is an important component of all malaria control programmes throughout the world. This is especially so in light of the fact that there are no antimalarial vaccines which are available for clinical use at present. Emergence and spread of malaria parasites which are resistant to many of the available antimalarials today is, therefore, a major cause for concern. Till date, resistance to all groups of antimalarials excluding artemisinin has been reported. In recent years, in vitro resistance to even artemisinin has been described. While resistance to antibacterial agents has come to prominence as a clinical problem in recent years, antiparasitic resistance in general and antimalarial resistance in particular has not received much attention, especially in the Indian scenario. The present review deals with commonly used antimalarial drugs and the mechanisms of resistance to them. Various methods of detecting antimalarial resistance and avoiding the same have also been dealt with. Newer parasite targets which can be used in developing newer antimalarial agents and antimalarials obtained from plants have also been mentioned.

  9. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Methods Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. Results 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets) as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT (< 25%). In the public/not-for-profit sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was available for free in all countries except Benin and the DRC (US$1.29 [Inter Quartile Range (IQR): $1.29-$1.29] and $0.52[IQR: $0.00-$1.29] per adult equivalent dose respectively). In the private sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was 5-24 times more expensive than non-artemisinin therapies. The exception was Madagascar where, due to national social marketing of subsidized ACT, the price of first-line quality-assured ACT ($0.14 [IQR: $0.10, $0.57]) was significantly lower than the most popular treatment (chloroquine, $0.36 [IQR: $0.36, $0.36]). Quality-assured ACT accounted for less than 25% of total anti-malarial volumes; private-sector quality-assured ACT volumes represented less than 6% of the total market share

  10. Synthesis and pharmacokinetics of radioisotope labeled anti-malarial agent in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannanpalli, Pradeep; Park, Sang Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Pyro naridine tetraphosphate is a new synthetic drug which is currently being investigated for use in the treatment of malaria. The main objective of this investigation was to synthesize [{sup 14}C]pyro naridine tetraphosphate and to determine its absorption, distribution, excretion and pharmacokinetics in to male and female Sprague-Dawley rats following a single oral administration (10 mg/kg). To overcome the disadvantages posed by the classical method, a novel and efficient method using microwave irradiation was employed for the synthesis of pyro naridine tetraphosphate. Use of microwave irradiation decreased the reaction time considerably, used less of the starting material and also increased the yield when compared with the classical method. [{sup 14}C]Pyro naridine tetraphosphate thus synthesized had a high degree of purity and showed satisfactory {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR, mass spectra (MS), infrared (IR) and elemental analysis data. The distribution of [{sup 14}C]pyro naridine tetraphosphate in various tissues like the blood, plasma, liver, lung, heart, spleen, kidney, brain, stomach, small intestine and large intestine were determined at 1, 4, 8, 24, 48, 96, 144, 192 and 240 h post administration of the drug to rats. Mass balance excretion of [{sup 14}C]pyro naridine tetraphosphate in urine, faeces and in breath as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} were also determined at different time intervals post administration of the drug. We observed that [{sup 14}C]pyro naridine tetraphosphate was readily absorbed and widely distributed within 1 h following oral administration as it was determined by the presence of radioactivity in various tissues investigated. The absorption, distribution and excretion of the drug was found to be gender independent as both male and female rats showed a similar pattern of radioactivity. [{sup 14}C]Pyro naridine tetraphosphate was absorbed mainly from the small intestine upon oral administration. The major route of excretion for [{sup 14}C

  11. Anti-malarial activity of a non-piperidine library of next-generation quinoline methanols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melendez Victor

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical utility for mefloquine has been eroded due to its association with adverse neurological effects. Better-tolerated alternatives are required. The objective of the present study was the identification of lead compounds that are as effective as mefloquine, but exhibit physiochemical properties likely to render them less susceptible to passage across the blood-brain barrier. Methods A library of drug-like non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. These compounds are diverse in structure and physiochemical properties. They were screened in appropriate in vitro assays and evaluated in terms of their potential as lead compounds. The correlation of specific structural attributes and physiochemical properties with activity was assessed. Results The most potent analogs were low molecular weight unconjugated secondary amines with no heteroatoms in their side-chains. However, these compounds were more metabolically labile and permeable than mefloquine. In terms of physiochemical properties, lower polar surface area, lower molecular weight, more freely rotatable bonds and fewer H-bond acceptors were associated with greater potency. There was no such relationship between activity and LogP, LogD or the number of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs. The addition of an H-bond donor to the side-chain yielded a series of active diamines, which were as metabolically stable as mefloquine but showed reduced permeability. Conclusions A drug-like library of non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. From amongst this library an active lead series of less permeable, but metabolically stable, diamines was identified.

  12. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ravindra K; Jain, Amita; Malhotra, Hardeep S; Agrawal, Avinash; Garg, Rajiv

    2013-06-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis, including drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis, is an emerging health problem in many countries. An association with Beijing strains and drug resistance-related mutations, such as mutations in katG and rpoB genes, has been found. The pathology, clinical features and neuroimaging characteristics of drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis are similar to drug-responsive tuberculous meningitis. Detection of mycobacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by conventional methods (smear examination or culture) is often difficult. Nucleic acid amplification assays are better methods owing to their rapidity and high sensitivity. The Xpert MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid, CA, USA) is a fully-automated test that has also been found to be effective for CSF samples. Treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculous meningitis depends on the drug susceptibility pattern of the isolate and/or the previous treatment history of the patient. Second-line drugs with good penetration of the CSF should be preferred. Isoniazid monoresistant disease requires addition of another drug with better CSF penetration. Drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis is associated with a high mortality. HIV infected patients with drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis have severe clinical manifestations with exceptionally high mortality. Prevention of tuberculosis is the key to reduce drug-resistant tuberculous meningitis.

  13. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, David C; Jacoby, George A

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large.

  14. Nonlinear mixed-effects modelling of in vitro drug susceptibility and molecular correlates of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Simpson

    Full Text Available The analysis of in vitro anti-malarial drug susceptibility testing is vulnerable to the effects of different statistical approaches and selection biases. These confounding factors were assessed with respect to pfmdr1 gene mutation and amplification in 490 clinical isolates. Two statistical approaches for estimating the drug concentration associated with 50% effect (EC50 were compared: the commonly used standard two-stage (STS method, and nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. The in vitro concentration-effect relationships for, chloroquine, mefloquine, lumefantrine and artesunate, were derived from clinical isolates obtained from patients on the western border of Thailand. All isolates were genotyped for polymorphisms in the pfmdr1 gene. The EC50 estimates were similar for the two statistical approaches but 15-28% of isolates in the STS method had a high coefficient of variation (>15% for individual estimates of EC50 and these isolates had EC50 values that were 32 to 66% higher than isolates derived with more precision. In total 41% (202/490 of isolates had amplification of pfmdr1 and single nucleotide polymorphisms were found in 50 (10%. Pfmdr1 amplification was associated with an increase in EC50 for mefloquine (139% relative increase in EC50 for 2 copies, 188% for 3+ copies, lumefantrine (82% and 75% for 2 and 3+ copies respectively and artesunate (63% and 127% for 2 and 3+ copies respectively. In contrast pfmdr1 mutation at codons 86 or 1042 were associated with an increase in chloroquine EC50 (44-48%. Sample size calculations showed that to demonstrate an EC50 shift of 50% or more with 80% power if the prevalence was 10% would require 430 isolates and 245 isolates if the prevalence was 20%. In conclusion, although nonlinear mixed-effects modelling did not demonstrate any major advantage for determining estimates of anti-malarial drug susceptibility, the method includes all isolates, thereby, potentially improving confirmation of candidate

  15. A new high-throughput method for simultaneous detection of drug resistance associated mutations in Plasmodium vivax dhfr, dhps and mdr1 genes

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    Siba Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of severe cases and increasing levels of drug resistance highlight the importance of improved Plasmodium vivax case management. Whereas monitoring P. vivax resistance to anti-malarial drug by in vivo and in vitro tests remain challenging, molecular markers of resistance represent a valuable tool for high-scale analysis and surveillance studies. A new high-throughput assay for detecting the most relevant markers related to P. vivax drug resistance was developed and assessed on Papua New Guinea (PNG patient isolates. Methods Pvdhfr, pvdhps and pvmdr1 fragments were amplified by multiplex nested PCR. Then, PCR products were processed through an LDR-FMA (ligase detection reaction - fluorescent microsphere assay. 23 SNPs, including pvdhfr 57-58-61 and 173, pvdhps 382-383, 553, 647 and pvmdr1 976, were simultaneously screened in 366 PNG P. vivax samples. Results Genotyping was successful in 95.4% of the samples for at least one gene. The coexistence of multiple distinct haplotypes in the parasite population necessitated the introduction of a computer-assisted approach to data analysis. Whereas 73.1% of patients were infected with at least one wild-type genotype at codons 57, 58 and 61 of pvdhfr, a triple mutant genotype was detected in 65.6% of the patients, often associated with the 117T mutation. Only one patient carried the 173L mutation. The mutant 647P pvdhps genotype allele was approaching genetic fixation (99.3%, whereas 35.1% of patients were infected with parasites carrying the pvmdr1 976F mutant allele. Conclusions The LDR-FMA described here allows a discriminant genotyping of resistance alleles in the pvdhfr, pvdhps, and pvmdr1 genes and can be used in large-scale surveillance studies.

  16. Artesunate induces ROS-mediated apoptosis in doxorubicin-resistant T leukemia cells.

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    Thomas Efferth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major obstacle for successful cancer treatment often is the development of drug resistance in cancer cells during chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel drugs with improved efficacy against tumor cells and with less toxicity on normal cells. Artesunate (ART, a powerful anti-malarial herbal compound, has been shown to inhibit growth of various tumor cell lines in vitro and of xenografted Kaposi's sarcoma in mice in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ART exerts its cytotoxicity have not been elucidated. The ART-class of anti-malarial compounds is attractive due to their activity against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax strains. Another salient feature of these compounds is the lack of severe side effects in malaria patients. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we used T-cell leukemias as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of ART-induced apoptosis. The most typical anticancer drugs are DNA intercalators such as Doxorubicin. To investigate drug sensitivity and resistance, we chose a Doxorubicin-resistant leukemia cell line and investigated the killing effect of ART on these cells. We show that ART induces apoptosis in leukemic T cells mainly through the mitochondrial pathway via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, a mechanism different from Doxorubicin. This is confirmed by the fact that the antioxidant N-Acetyle-Cysteine (NAC could completely block ROS generation and, consequently, inhibited ART-induced apoptosis. Therefore, ART can overcome the Doxorubicin-resistance and induce the Doxorubicin-resistant leukemia cells to undergo apoptosis. We also show that ART can synergize with Doxorubicin to enhance apoptotic cell death in leukemic T cells. This synergistic effect can be largely explained by the fact that ART and Doxorubicin use different killing mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies raise the possibility to develop ART in

  17. Molecular monitoring of Plasmodium falciparum super-resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavishe, Reginald A; Kaaya, Robert D; Nag, Sidsel;

    2016-01-01

    and in private drug shops in sub-Saharan Africa. This study reports on the prevalence and distribution of Pfdhps mutations A540E and A581G in Tanzania. When found together, these mutations confer high-level SP resistance (sometimes referred to as 'super-resistance'), which is associated with loss in protective......BACKGROUND: Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) is recommended for prophylactic treatment of malaria in pregnancy while artemisinin combination therapy is the recommended first-line anti-malarial treatment. Selection of SP resistance is ongoing since SP is readily available in health facilities...... = 85.3, p resistance. A high prevalence of Pfdhps-581G was observed in Tanga (56.6 %) in northeastern Tanzania and in Kagera (20.4 %) in northwestern Tanzania and the 540-581 EG haplotype was found at 54.5 and 19...

  18. Patterns of chloroquine use and resistance in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review of household survey and molecular data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Meera

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of widespread chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP resistance, 90% of sub-Saharan African countries had adopted policies of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for treatment of uncomplicated malaria by 2007. In Malawi, cessation of chloroquine use was followed by the re-emergence of chloroquine-susceptible malaria. It was expected that introduction of ACT would lead to a return in chloroquine susceptibility throughout Africa, but this has not yet widely occurred. This observation suggests that there is continuing use of ineffective anti-malarials in Africa and that persistent chloroquine-resistant malaria is due to ongoing drug pressure despite national policy changes. Methods To estimate drug use on a national level, 2006-2007 Demographic Health Survey and Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey data from 21 African countries were analysed. Resistance data were compiled by systematic review of the published literature on the prevalence of the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter polymorphism at codon 76, which causes chloroquine resistance. Results Chloroquine was the most common anti-malarial used according to surveys from 14 of 21 countries analysed, predominantly in West Africa. SP was most commonly reported in two of 21 countries. Among eight countries with longitudinal molecular resistance data, the four countries where the highest proportion of children treated for fever received chloroquine (Uganda, Burkina Faso, Guinea Bissau, and Mali also showed no significant declines in the prevalence of chloroquine-resistant infections. The three countries with low or decreasing chloroquine use among children who reported fever treatment (Malawi, Kenya, and Tanzania had statistically significant declines in the prevalence of chloroquine resistance. Conclusions This study demonstrates that in 2006-2007, chloroquine and SP continued to be used at high rates in many African countries. In

  19. Extensively Drug-Resistant TB

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-12-16

    Dr. Charlotte Kvasnovsky, a surgery resident and Ph.D. candidate in biostatistics, discusses various types of drug resistance in TB patients in South Africa.  Created: 12/16/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/16/2016.

  20. Artemisinin resistance containment project in Thailand. II: responses to mefloquine-artesunate combination therapy among falciparum malaria patients in provinces bordering Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satimai Wichai

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The area along the Thai-Cambodian border is considered an epicenter of anti-malarial drug resistance. Recently, parasite resistance to artemisinin-based therapies has been reported in the area. The artemisinin resistance containment project was initiated in November 2008, with the aim to limit resistant parasites and eliminate malaria in this region. This study describes the response to artemisinin-based therapy among falciparum malaria patients in the area, using data from the malaria surveillance programmed under the containment project. Methods The study was conducted in seven provinces of Thailand along the Thai-Cambodian border. Data of Plasmodium falciparum-positive patients during January 2009 to December 2011 were obtained from the electronic malaria information system (eMIS Web-based reporting system. All P. falciparum cases were followed for 42 days, as the routine case follow-up protocol. The demographic characteristics of the patients were described. Statistical analysis was performed to determine the cure rate of the current standard anti-malarial drug regimen--mefloquine-artesunate combination therapy (MAS. The proportion of patients who remained parasite-positive at each follow-up day was calculated. In addition, factors related to the delayed parasite clearance on day-3 post-treatment, were explored. Results A total of 1,709 P. falciparum-positive cases were reported during the study period. Almost 70% of falciparum cases received MAS therapy (n = 1,174. The majority of cases were males, aged between 31 and 50 years. The overall MAS cure rate was >90% over the three-year period. Almost all patients were able to clear the parasite within 7 to 14 days post-treatment. Approximately 14% of patients undergoing MAS remained parasite-positive on day-3. Delayed parasite clearance was not significantly associated with patient gender, age, or citizenship. However, delayed parasite clearance varied across the

  1. 3D structure and immunogenicity of Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite induced associated protein peptides as components of fully-protective anti-malarial vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba, Martha P; Almonacid, Hannia; Calderón, Dayana; Chacón, Edgar A; Poloche, Luis A; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Patarroyo, Manuel E

    2011-12-16

    SIAP-1 and SIAP-2 are proteins which are implicated in early events involving Plasmodium falciparum infection of the Anopheles mosquito vector and the human host. High affinity HeLa and HepG2 cell binding conserved peptides have been previously identified in these proteins, i.e. SIAP-1 34893 ((421)KVQGLSYLLRRKNGTKHPVY(440)) and SIAP-1 34899 ((541)YVLNSKLLNSRSFDKFKWIQ(560)) and SIAP-2 36879 ((181)LLLYSTNSEDNLDISFGELQ(200)). When amino acid sequences have been properly modified (replacements shown in bold) they have induced high antibody titres against sporozoites in Aotus monkeys (assessed by IFA) and in the corresponding recombinant proteins (determined by ELISA and Western blot). (1)H NMR studies of these conserved native and modified high activity binding peptides (HABPs) revealed that all had α-helical structures in different locations and lengths. Conserved and corresponding modified HABPs displayed different lengths between the residues fitting into MHCII molecule pockets 1-9 and different amino acid orientation based on their different HLA-DRβ1(∗) binding motifs and binding registers, suggesting that such modifications were associated with making them immunogenic. The results suggested that these modified HAPBs could be potential targets for inclusion as components of a fully-effective, minimal sub-unit based, multi-epitope, and multistage anti-malarial vaccine.

  2. Drug resistance mechanisms and novel drug targets for tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mahmudul; Hameed, H M Adnan; Mugweru, Julius; Chhotaray, Chiranjibi; Wang, Changwei; Tan, Yaoju; Liu, Jianxiong; Li, Xinjie; Tan, Shouyong; Ojima, Iwao; Yew, Wing Wai; Nuermberger, Eric; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Zhang, Tianyu

    2017-01-20

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) poses a significant challenge to the successful treatment and control of TB worldwide. Resistance to anti-TB drugs has existed since the beginning of the chemotherapy era. New insights into the resistant mechanisms of anti-TB drugs have been provided. Better understanding of drug resistance mechanisms helps in the development of new tools for the rapid diagnosis of drug-resistant TB. There is also a pressing need in the development of new drugs with novel targets to improve the current treatment of TB and to prevent the emergence of drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This review summarizes the anti-TB drug resistance mechanisms, furnishes some possible novel drug targets in the development of new agents for TB therapy and discusses the usefulness using known targets to develop new anti-TB drugs. Whole genome sequencing is currently an advanced technology to uncover drug resistance mechanisms in M. tuberculosis. However, further research is required to unravel the significance of some newly discovered gene mutations in their contribution to drug resistance.

  3. Decreased prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance markers to amodiaquine despite its wide scale use as ACT partner drug in Zanzibar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröberg Gabrielle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zanzibar has recently undergone a rapid decline in Plasmodium falciparum transmission following combined malaria control interventions with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and integrated vector control. Artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ was implemented as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Zanzibar in 2003. Resistance to amodiaquine has been associated with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP alleles pfcrt 76T, pfmdr1 86Y, 184Y and 1246Y. An accumulation of these SNP alleles in the parasite population over time might threaten ASAQ efficacy. The aim of this study was to assess whether prolonged use of ASAQ as first-line anti-malarial treatment selects for P. falciparum SNPs associated with resistance to the ACT partner drug amodiaquine. Methods The individual as well as the combined SNP allele prevalence were compared in pre-treatment blood samples from patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria enrolled in clinical trials conducted just prior to the introduction of ASAQ in 2002–2003 (n = 208 and seven years after wide scale use of ASAQ in 2010 (n = 122. Results There was a statistically significant decrease of pfcrt 76T (96–63%, pfmdr1 86Y (75–52%, 184Y (83–72%, 1246Y (28–16% and the most common haplotypes pfcrt/pfmdr1 TYYD (46–26% and TYYY (17–8%, while an increase of pfcrt/pfmdr1 KNFD (0.4–14% and KNYD (1–12%. Conclusions This is the first observation of a decreased prevalence of pfcrt 76T, pfmdr1 86Y, 184Y and 1246Y in an African setting after several years of extensive ASAQ use as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. This may support sustained efficacy of ASAQ on Zanzibar, although it was unexpected considering that all these SNPs have previously been associated with amodiaquine resistance. The underlying factors of these results are unclear. Genetic dilution by imported P. falciparum parasites from mainland Tanzania, a de-selection by

  4. Therapeutic and prophylactic effect of intermittent preventive anti-malarial treatment in infants (IPTi from Ghana and Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuels Benno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP reduces the incidence of malaria episodes in young children. The exact mechanism by which the protective effect is mediated needs to be defined. This study aimed to investigate therapeutic, prophylactic, and possible exceeding effects of SP-based IPTi in two clinical trials. Methods Protective efficacies from two IPTi trials performed in Kumasi, Ghana, and Lambaréné, Gabon, were assessed for overlapping time series of 61 days. For six-months periods after each of three IPTi doses a multivariate Poisson regression model with the respective cohort as co-variate was generated and effect modification of protective efficacy with time strata was evaluated by log-likelihood tests. Results Protective efficacies were not significantly different between the two study cohorts. Study-cohort corrected protective efficacy was highest for the first 61 days after each IPTi application and decreased continuously. For the first 61 days after IPTi-1, IPTi-2, and IPTi-3 the protective efficacy was 71%, 44%, and 43%, respectively. A reduction of the malaria incidence rate was detectable for the first 60, 30 and 40 days after IPTi-1, IPTi-2 and IPTi-3 drug application, respectively. After IPTi-3 a higher risk for malaria could be seen after day 60. This effect was mainly based on the overwhelming influence of the Kumasi cohort. Conclusion The results suggest that SP-based IPTi mainly works through a therapeutic and prophylactic effect over 30 to 60 days after drug application and that a sustained effect beyond post-treatment prophylaxis might be very low. Trial registration Data analysis from clinical trials NCT ID # 00206739 (Kumasi Trial and NCT ID # 00167843 (Lambaréné Trial, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  5. Understanding drug resistance in human intestinal protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taweel, Hend Aly

    2015-05-01

    Infections with intestinal protozoa continue to be a major health problem in many areas of the world. The widespread use of a limited number of therapeutic agents for their management and control raises concerns about development of drug resistance. Generally, the use of any antimicrobial agent should be accompanied by meticulous monitoring of its efficacy and measures to minimize resistance formation. Evidence for the occurrence of drug resistance in different intestinal protozoa comes from case studies and clinical trials, sometimes with a limited number of patients. Large-scale field-based assessment of drug resistance and drug sensitivity testing of clinical isolates are needed. Furthermore, the association of drug resistance with certain geographic isolates or genotypes deserves consideration. Drug resistance has been triggered in vitro and has been linked to modification of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, nitroreductases, antioxidant defense, or cytoskeletal system. Further mechanistic studies will have important implications in the development of second generation therapeutic agents.

  6. Communicating the AMFm message: exploring the effect of communication and training interventions on private for-profit provider awareness and knowledge related to a multi-country anti-malarial subsidy intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria (AMFm), implemented at national scale in eight African countries or territories, subsidized quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) and included communication campaigns to support implementation and promote appropriate anti-malarial use. This paper reports private for-profit provider awareness of key features of the AMFm programme, and changes in provider knowledge of appropriate malaria treatment. Methods This study had a non-experimental design based on nationally representative surveys of outlets stocking anti-malarials before (2009/10) and after (2011) the AMFm roll-out. Results Based on data from over 19,500 outlets, results show that in four of eight settings, where communication campaigns were implemented for 5–9 months, 76%-94% awareness of the AMFm ‘green leaf’ logo, 57%-74% awareness of the ACT subsidy programme, and 52%-80% awareness of the correct recommended retail price (RRP) of subsidized ACT were recorded. However, in the remaining four settings where communication campaigns were implemented for three months or less, levels were substantially lower. In six of eight settings, increases of at least 10 percentage points in private for-profit providers’ knowledge of the correct first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria were seen; and in three of these the levels of knowledge achieved at endline were over 80%. Conclusions The results support the interpretation that, in addition to the availability of subsidized ACT, the intensity of communication campaigns may have contributed to the reported levels of AMFm-related awareness and knowledge among private for-profit providers. Future subsidy programmes for anti-malarials or other treatments should similarly include communication activities. PMID:24495691

  7. New Drugs and Drug Resistance in Malaria: Molecular Genetic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-26

    heterologous expressions system in yeast for potential drug target enzymes. The yeast expression system should allow rapid screening of new drugs , greatly...medication yet the world faces a crisis-drug resistance is emerging and spreading faster than drugs are being developed and the flow in the pipeline of new ... drugs has all but stopped. This represents a particular threat to the US Military. In a short time there may be parts of the world where no effective

  8. Identification of active Plasmodium falciparum calpain to establish screening system for Pf-calpain-based drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Byoung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing resistance of malaria parasites to available drugs, there is an urgent demand to develop new anti-malarial drugs. Calpain inhibitor, ALLN, is proposed to inhibit parasite proliferation by suppressing haemoglobin degradation. This provides Plasmodium calpain as a potential target for drug development. Pf-calpain, a cysteine protease of Plasmodium falciparum, belongs to calpain-7 family, which is an atypical calpain not harboring Ca2+-binding regulatory motifs. In this present study, in order to establish the screening system for Pf-calpain specific inhibitors, the active form of Pf-calpain was first identified. Methods Recombinant Pf-calpain including catalytic subdomain IIa (rPfcal-IIa was heterologously expressed and purified. Enzymatic activity was determined by both fluorogenic substrate assay and gelatin zymography. Molecular homology modeling was carried out to address the activation mode of Pf-calpain in the aspect of structural moiety. Results Based on the measurement of enzymatic activity and protease inhibitor assay, it was found that the active form of Pf-calpain only contains the catalytic subdomain IIa, suggesting that Pf-calpain may function as a monomeric form. The sequence prediction indicates that the catalytic subdomain IIa contains all amino acid residues necessary for catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asn formation. Molecular modeling suggests that the Pf-calpain subdomain IIa makes an active site, holding the catalytic triad residues in their appropriate orientation for catalysis. The mutation analysis further supports that those amino acid residues are functional and have enzymatic activity. Conclusion The identified active form of Pf-calpain could be utilized to establish high-throughput screening system for Pf-calpain inhibitors. Due to its unique monomeric structural property, Pf-calpain could be served as a novel anti-malarial drug target, which has a high specificity for malaria parasite

  9. Mechanisms of Anticancer Drugs Resistance: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Chorawala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of cancer involves surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Development of chemoresistance is a persistent problem during the chemotherapy treatment. Cytotoxic drugs that selectively, but not exclusively, target actively proliferating cells include such diverse groups as DNA-alkylating agents, anti-metabolites, intercalating agents and mitotic inhibitors. Resistance constitutes a lack of response to drug-induced tumour growth inhibition; it may be inherent in a subpopulation of heterogeneous cancer cells or be acquired as a cellular response to drug exposure. Principle mechanisms may include altered membrane transport involving the p-glycoprotein product of the multidrug resistance (MDR gene as well as other associated proteins, altered target enzyme, decreased drug activation, increased drug degradation due to altered expression of drug metabolising enzymes, drug inactivation due to conjugation with increased glutathione, subcellular redistribution, drug interaction, enhanced DNA repair and failure to apoptosis as a result of mutated cell cycle proteins such as p53. Attempts to overcome resistance involves the use of combination drug therapy using different classes of drugs with minimally overlapping toxicities to allow maximal dosages, necessary for bone marrow recovery. Adjuvant therapy with p-glycoprotein inhibitors and in specific instances, the use of growth factor and protein kinase C inhibitors are newer experimental approaches that may also prove effective in delaying onset of resistance. Gene knockout using antisense molecules may be effective way of blocking drug resistance.

  10. Molecular evidence of increased resistance to anti-folate drugs in Plasmodium falciparum in North-East India: a signal for potential failure of artemisinin plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Pradyumna Kishore; Sarma, Devojit Kumar; Prakash, Anil; Bora, Khukumoni; Ahmed, Md Atique; Sarma, Bibhas; Goswami, Basanta Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Dibya Ranjan; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    North-east India, being a corridor to South-east Asia, is believed to play an important role in transmitting drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria to India and South Asia. North-east India was the first place in India to record the emergence of drug resistance to chloroquine as well as sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Presently chloroquine resistance is widespread all over the North-east India and resistance to other anti-malarials is increasing. In this study both in vivo therapeutic efficacy and molecular assays were used to screen the spectrum of drug resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in the circulating P. falciparum strains. A total of 220 P. falciparum positives subjects were enrolled in the study for therapeutic assessment of chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and assessment of point mutations conferring resistances to these drugs were carried out by genotyping the isolates following standard methods. Overall clinical failures in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and chloroquine were found 12.6 and 69.5% respectively, while overall treatment failures recorded were 13.7 and 81.5% in the two arms. Nearly all (99.0%) the isolates had mutant pfcrt genotype (76 T), while 68% had mutant pfmdr-1 genotype (86 Y). Mutation in dhps 437 codon was the most prevalent one while dhfr codon 108 showed 100% mutation. A total of 23 unique haplotypes at the dhps locus and 7 at dhfr locus were found while dhps-dhfr combined loci revealed 49 unique haplotypes. Prevalence of double, triple and quadruple mutations were common while 1 haplotype was found with all five mutated codons (F/AGEGS/T) at dhps locus. Detection of quadruple mutants (51 I/59 R/108 N/164 L) in the present study, earlier recorded from Car Nicobar Island, India only, indicates the presence of high levels of resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in north-east India. Associations between resistant haplotypes and the clinical outcomes and emerging resistance in sulphadoxine

  11. Multidrug resistant to extensively drug resistant tuberculosis: What is next?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amita Jain; Pratima Dixit

    2008-11-01

    Drug resistant tuberculosis is a man made problem. While tuberculosis is hundred percent curable, multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is difficult to treat. Inadequate and incomplete treatment and poor treatment adherence has led to a newer form of drug resistance known as extensively drug resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB). XDR-TB is defined as tuberculosis caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, which is resistant to at least rifampicin and isoniazid among the first line anti tubercular drugs (MDR-TB) in addition to resistance to any fluroquinolones and at least one of three injectable second line anti tubercular drugs i.e. amikacin, kanamycin and/or capreomycin. Mismanagement of tuberculosis paves the way to drug resistant tuberculosis. Emergence of XDR-TB is reported world wide. Reported prevalence rates of XDR-TB of total MDR cases are; 6.6% overall worldwide, 6.5% in industrialized countries, 13.6% in Russia and Eastern Europe, 1.5% in Asia, 0.6% in Africa and Middle East and 15.4% in Republic of Korea. Better management and control of tuberculosis specially drug resistant TB by experienced and qualified doctors, access to standard microbiology laboratory, co-morbitidy of HIV and tuberculosis, new anti-TB drug regimens, better diagnostic tests, international standards for second line drugs (SLD)-susceptibility testing, invention of newer anti-tubercular molecules and vaccines and knowing the real magnitude of XDR-TB are some of the important issues to be addressed for effective prevention and management of XDR-TB.

  12. Mechanisms of drug resistance: daptomycin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Truc T; Munita, Jose M; Arias, Cesar A

    2015-09-01

    Daptomycin (DAP) is a cyclic lipopeptide with in vitro activity against a variety of Gram-positive pathogens, including multidrug-resistant organisms. Since its introduction into clinical practice in 2003, DAP has become an important key frontline antibiotic for severe or deep-seated infections caused by Gram-positive organisms. Unfortunately, DAP resistance (DAP-R) has been extensively documented in clinically important organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., and Streptococcus spp. Studies on the mechanisms of DAP-R in Bacillus subtilis and other Gram-positive bacteria indicate that the genetic pathways of DAP-R are diverse and complex. However, a common phenomenon emerging from these mechanistic studies is that DAP-R is associated with important adaptive changes in cell wall and cell membrane homeostasis with critical changes in cell physiology. Findings related to these adaptive changes have provided novel insights into the genetics and molecular mechanisms of bacterial cell envelope stress response and the manner in which Gram-positive bacteria cope with the antimicrobial peptide attack and protect vital structures of the cell envelope, such as the cell membrane. In this review, we will examine the most recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms of resistance to DAP in relevant Gram-positive pathogens and discuss the clinical implications for therapy against these important bacteria.

  13. Emerging pathogens: Dynamics, mutation and drug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, A.S.; Goldstein, B.; Korber, B.T. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objectives of this project were to develop models of the spread of pathogens, such as HIV-1 and influenza, in humans, and then to use the models to address the possibility of designing appropriate drug therapies that may limit the ability of the pathogen to escape treatment by mutating into a drug resistant form. We have developed a model of drug-resistance to amantidine and rimantadine, the two major antiviral drugs used to treat influenza, and have used the model to suggest treatment strategies during an epidemic.

  14. A database of antimalarial drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ringwald Pascal

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A large investment is required to develop, license and deploy a new antimalarial drug. Too often, that investment has been rapidly devalued by the selection of parasite populations resistant to the drug action. To understand the mechanisms of selection, detailed information on the patterns of drug use in a variety of environments, and the geographic and temporal patterns of resistance is needed. Currently, there is no publically-accessible central database that contains information on the levels of resistance to antimalaria drugs. This paper outlines the resources that are available and the steps that might be taken to create a dynamic, open access database that would include current and historical data on clinical efficacy, in vitro responses and molecular markers related to drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. The goal is to include historical and current data on resistance to commonly used drugs, like chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and on the many combinations that are now being tested in different settings. The database will be accessible to all on the Web. The information in such a database will inform optimal utilization of current drugs and sustain the longest possible therapeutic life of newly introduced drugs and combinations. The database will protect the valuable investment represented by the development and deployment of novel therapies for malaria.

  15. Potential contribution of prescription practices to the emergence and spread of chloroquine resistance in south-west Nigeria: caution in the use of artemisinin combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogundahunsi Olumide A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prescription practices have been shown to influence the emergence of anti-malarial drug resistance. Thus efforts in this study were devoted to evaluating the prescribing practices prior to introduction of the artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT in Nigeria and its potential contribution to emergence of chloroquine resistant malaria in south-west Nigeria, in order to forestall a similar situation with the ACT. Methods A retrospective quantitative study was designed to examine case records of patients treated for malaria in either a government or a private hospital in Ibadan, south-west Nigeria, over a 20-year period, cutting across three phases of resistance to chloroquine in Nigeria: pre-resistance, emerging resistance and dissemination of resistance. Patient prescriptions were examined for use of anti-malarial drugs, sub-therapeutic doses of chloroquine, co-administration of anti-histamines with chloroquine. Descriptive statistics of frequency and percentage were used to describe trends in the parameters assessed using EPI-info. Results Case record files of 2,529 patients were examined. Chloroquine was the main drug used in treatment of malaria throughout the periods studied, with frequency of prescription at both sites ranging from 91.4% to 98.3% during the pre-resistance years. It was administered as standard doses during the pre resistance years. Anti-histamines, especially promethazine, were routinely co-administered with chloroquine at this period too. However, the practice of prescribing sub-therapeutic doses of chloroquine at the private health care facility coincided with the latter phase of emerging resistance and phase of dissemination of resistance. Frequency of prescription of sub-therapeutic doses increased from 6.7% in 1983 (pre-resistance years to 43.6% in 1997 (dissemination of resistance phase at the private health care facility. Frequency of co-administration of anti-histamines with chloroquine also

  16. Emergence of Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-03-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) outbreaks have been reported in South Africa, and strains have been identified on 6 continents. Dr. Peter Cegielski, team leader for drug-resistant TB with the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination at CDC, comments on a multinational team's report on this emerging global public health threat.  Created: 3/1/2007 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 3/26/2007.

  17. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola

    OpenAIRE

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information ...

  18. Drug resistance in Schistosomiasis: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Bruce

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance associated with the treatment of human schistosomiasis appears to be an emerging problem requiring more attention from the scientific community than the subject currently receives. Drug-resistant strains of Schistosoma mansoni have been isolated by various investigators as a result of laboratory experimentation or from a combination of field and laboratory studies. Review of this data appears to indicate that the lack of susceptibility observed for some of the isolated strains cannot be ascribed solely to previous administration of antischistosome drugs and thus further studies are required to elucidate this phenomena. Strains of S. mansoni have now been identified from Brazil which are resistant to oxamniquine, hycanthone and niridazole; from Puerto Rico which are resistant to hycanthone and oxamniquine; and from Kenya which are resistant to niridazole and probably oxamniquine. Strains derived by in vitro selection and resistant to oxamniquine and possibly to oltipraz are also available. All of these strains are currently maintained in the laboratory in snails and mice, thus providing for the first time an opportunity for indepth comparative studies. Preliminary data indicates that S. haematobium strains resistant to metrifonate may be occurring in Kenya. This problem could poise great difficulty in the eventual development of antischistosomal agents. Biomphalaria glabrata from Puerto Rico and Brazil were found to be susceptible to drug-resistant S. mansoni from each country.

  19. Malaria Epidemic and Drug Resistance, Djibouti

    OpenAIRE

    Rogier, Christophe; Pradines, Bruno; Bogreau, H.; Koeck, Jean-Louis; Kamil, Mohamed-Ali; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of Plasmodium falciparum isolates collected before, during, and after a 1999 malaria epidemic in Djibouti shows that, despite a high prevalence of resistance to chloroquine, the epidemic cannot be attributed to a sudden increase in drug resistance of local parasite populations.

  20. Antifungal Drug Resistance - Concerns for Veterinarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharat B. Bhanderi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, there were increased incidences of fungal infectious diseases in human population which might be due to increase in immunosuppressive diseases. But the major concern was increase in prevalence of resistance to antifungal drugs which were reported both in the fungal isolates of human beings and that of animal origin. In both animals and human beings, resistance to antimicrobial agents has important implications for morbidity, mortality and health care costs, because resistant strains are responsible for bulk of infection in animals and human beings, and large number of antimicrobial classes offers more diverse range of resistance mechanisms to study and resistance determinants move into standard well-characterized strains that facilitates the detailed study of molecular mechanisms of resistance in microorganisms. Studies on resistance to antifungal agents has been lagging behind that of antibacterial resistance for several reasons, the foremost reason might be fungal agents were not recognized as important animal and human pathogens, until relatively in recent past. But the initial studies of antifungal drug resistance in the early 1980s, have accumulated a wealth of knowledge concerning the clinical, biochemical, and genetic aspects of this phenomenon. Presently, exploration of the molecular aspects for antifungal drug resistance has been undertaken. Recently, the focus was on several points like developing a more detailed understanding of the mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance, improved methods to detect resistance when it occurs, methods to prevent the emergence and spread of resistance and new antimicrobial options for the treatment of infections caused by resistant organisms. [Vet. World 2009; 2(5.000: 204-207

  1. Multiple drug resistance and bacterial infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asad U Khan

    2008-01-01

    Drug resistance is becoming a great problem in developing countries due to excessive use and misuse of antibi-otics.The emergence of new pathogenic strains with resistance developed against most of the antibiotics which may cause,difficult to treat infection.To understand the current scenario in different mode of infection is most important for the clinicians and medical practitioners.This article summarized some common infections and an-tibiotic resistance pattern found among these pathogens.

  2. Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Hexose Transporter PfHT by Screening Focused Libraries of Anti-Malarial Compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ortiz

    Full Text Available Development of resistance against current antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for novel drugs that interact with different targets and have distinct mechanisms of action. Malaria parasites depend upon high levels of glucose uptake followed by inefficient metabolic utilization via the glycolytic pathway, and the Plasmodium falciparum hexose transporter PfHT, which mediates uptake of glucose, has thus been recognized as a promising drug target. This transporter is highly divergent from mammalian hexose transporters, and it appears to be a permease that is essential for parasite viability in intra-erythrocytic, mosquito, and liver stages of the parasite life cycle. An assay was developed that is appropriate for high throughput screening against PfHT based upon heterologous expression of PfHT in Leishmania mexicana parasites that are null mutants for their endogenous hexose transporters. Screening of two focused libraries of antimalarial compounds identified two such compounds that are high potency selective inhibitors of PfHT compared to human GLUT1. Additionally, 7 other compounds were identified that are lower potency and lower specificity PfHT inhibitors but might nonetheless serve as starting points for identification of analogs with more selective properties. These results further support the potential of PfHT as a novel drug target.

  3. [Drug resistant epilepsy. Clinical and neurobiological concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Jovel, Camilo A; Sobrino-Mejía, Fidel E

    2015-08-16

    Drug-resistant epilepsy, is a condition defined by the International League Against Epilepsy as persistent seizures despite having used at least two appropriate and adequate antiepileptic drug treatments. Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are going to be resistant to antiepileptic drugs, with different patterns of clinical presentation, which are related to the biological basis of this disease (de novo resistance, relapsing-remitting and progressive). Drug resistant epilepsy, impacts negatively the quality of life and significantly increases the risk of premature death. From the neurobiological point of view, this medical condition is the result of the interaction of multiple variables related to the underlying disease, drug interactions and proper genetic aspects of each patient. Thanks to advances in pharmacogenetics and molecular biology research, currently some hypotheses may explain the cause of this condition and promote the study of new therapeutic options. Currently, overexpression of membrane transporters such as P-glycoprotein, appears to be one of the most important mechanisms in the development of drug resistant epilepsy. The objective of this review is to deepen the general aspects of this clinical condition, addressing the definition, epidemiology, differential diagnosis and the pathophysiological bases.

  4. Transporter protein and drug resistance of Trypanosoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Noraine P; Mingala, Claro N

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma infection is one of the most important infections in livestock and humans. One of the main problems of its therapeutic control and treatment is the resurgence of drug resistance. One of the most studied causes of such resistance is the function of its adenosine transporter gene. A trypanosomal gene TbAT1 from Trypanosoma brucei has been cloned in yeast to demonstrate its function in the transport of adenosine and trypanocidal agents. Drug resistant trypanosomes showed a defective TbAT1 variant; furthermore, deletion of the gene and set point mutations in the transporter gene has been demonstrated from isolates from relapse patients. The molecular understanding of the mechanism of action trypanocidal agents and function of transporter gene can lead to control of drug resistance of Trypanosomes.

  5. Perceptions and Attitudes of Resident Doctors about Malaria Treatment as Per National Drug Policy on Malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam Ahir, D V Bala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The involvement of public and private health care providers in malaria treatment, particularly understanding their knowledge and practices will aid in devising strategies to increase the rational use of antimalarial drugs. They should be aware about rationale and implement national drug policy on malaria to prevent morbidity and mortality of malaria as well as development of antimalarial drug resistance. Therefore, a study was planned on the same issue among resident doctors of a tertiary care teaching hospital. Objective: To study the perceptions and attitudes of resident doctors regarding use of anti malarial drugs for treatment of all types of malaria cases in accordance with national drug policy on malaria-2010. Methodology: This cross-sectional study was conducted at tertiary care teaching hospital with sixty four (64 resident doctors of medicine (24, pediatrics (24 and obstetrics (16 departments with the help of pre tested; semi-structured questionnaire based on national drug policy on malaria-2010 from 15th July to 30th August 2010. Results: Only 12 (18.8% residents were aware about drug policy. Dose and duration and indication of primaquine was known to 21 (32.8% of resident doctors. Artesunate (49.2% and Arteether (16.9% were commonly prescribed in case of uncomplicated P.falciparum and P.vivax malaria. Conclusion: It was noticeable that knowledge and awareness regarding drug policy among resident doctors was unsatisfactory. Regular sensitization programme on malaria drug policy should be conducted.

  6. Antifungal drug resistance to azoles and polyenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiá Canuto, Mar; Gutiérrez Rodero, Félix

    2002-09-01

    There is an increased awareness of the morbidity and mortality associated with fungal infections caused by resistant fungi in various groups of patients. Epidemiological studies have identified risk factors associated with antifungal drug resistance. Selection pressure due to the continuous exposure to azoles seems to have an essential role in developing resistance to fluconazole in Candida species. Haematological malignancies, especially acute leukaemia with severe and prolonged neutropenia, seem to be the main risk factors for acquiring deep-seated mycosis caused by resistant filamentous fungi, such us Fusarium species, Scedosporium prolificans, and Aspergillus terreus. The still unacceptably high mortality rate associated with some resistant mycosis indicates that alternatives to existing therapeutic options are needed. Potential measures to overcome antifungal resistance ranges from the development of new drugs with better antifungal activity to improving current therapeutic strategies with the present antifungal agents. Among the new antifungal drugs, inhibitors of beta glucan synthesis and second-generation azole and triazole derivatives have characteristics that render them potentially suitable agents against some resistant fungi. Other strategies including the use of high doses of lipid formulations of amphotericin B, combination therapy, and adjunctive immune therapy with cytokines are under investigation. In addition, antifungal control programmes to prevent extensive and inappropriate use of antifungals may be needed.

  7. What is Multidrug and Extensively Drug Resistant TB?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Extensively Drug Resistant TB? Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis ( MDR TB ) is a very dangerous form of tuberculosis. Some ... TB medicine so that you will not develop MDR TB. Extensively drug-resistant TB ( XDR TB ) is an ...

  8. Communicating trends in resistance using a drug resistance index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Klugman, Keith P

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a growing problem worldwide, but communicating this challenge to policymakers and non-experts is complicated by the multiplicity of bacterial pathogens and the distinct classes of antibiotics used to treat them. It is difficult, even for experts aware of the pharmacodynamics of antibiotics, to infer the seriousness of resistance without information on how commonly the antibiotic is being used and whether alternative antibiotics are available. Difficulty in aggregating resistance to multiple drugs to assess trends poses a further challenge to quantifying and communicating changes in resistance over time and across locations. Methods We developed a method for aggregating bacterial resistance to multiple antibiotics, creating an index comparable to the composite economic indices that measure consumer prices and stock market values. The resulting drug resistance index (DRI) and various subindices show antibiotic resistance and consumption trends in the USA but can be applied at any geographical level. Findings The DRI based on use patterns in 1999 for Escherichia coli rose from 0.25 (95% CI 0.23 to 0.26) to 0.30 (95% CI 0.29 to 0.32) between 1999 and 2006. However, the adaptive DRI, which includes treatment of baseline resistant strains with alternative agents, climbed from 0.25 to 0.27 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.28) during that period. In contrast, both the static-use and the adaptive DRIs for Acinetobacter spp. rose from 0.41 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.42) to 0.48 (95% CI 0.46 to 0.49) between 1999 and 2006. Interpretation Divergence between the static-use and the adaptive-use DRIs for E coli reflects the ability of physicians to adapt to increasing resistance. However, antibiotic use patterns did not change much in response to growing resistance to Acinetobacter spp. because physicians were unable to adapt; new drugs for Acinetobacter spp. are therefore needed. Composite indices that aggregate resistance to various drugs can be useful for assessing

  9. Death receptor ligands, in particular TRAIL, to overcome drug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, S; Timmer, T; Heijenbrok, FJ; de Vries, EGE

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is hampered by the occurrence of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance. A variety of mechanisms cause drug-resistance. A final common factor, however, is the reduced capacity of drug resistant cells to go into apoptosis following treatment with DNA damaging ag

  10. [Estimation of Probiotic Lactobacilli Drug Resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruslik, N L; Akhatova, D R; Toimentseva, A A; Abdulkhakov, S R; Ilyinskaya, O N; Yarullina, D R

    2015-01-01

    An actual problem of analysis of probiotic lactobacilli resistance to antibiotics and other drugs used in the treatment of gastro-intestinal disturbances has been for the first time solved. The levels of resistance of 19 strains of Lactobacillus (14 strains of L. fermentum, 4 strains of L.plantarum and 1 strain of L.rhamnosus) isolated from commercial probiotics and sour milk products to 14 antibiotics of various nature, i.e. β-lactams, aminoglycosides, macrolides, clindamycin, vancomycin, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline and chloramphenicol were determined. All the isolates were practically susceptible to the drugs of the first line antihelicobacterial therapy, i.e. amoxicillin and clarithromycin, that makes inexpedient the parallel use of the probiotics containing the above lactobacilli in the treatment of gastritis and gastric ulcer, despite the lactobacilli antagonism with respect to Helicobacter pylory. Lactobacilli are as well resistant to mesalazin and can be used for correction of dysbiosis in inflammatory affections of the intestine.

  11. [Travellers and multi-drug resistance bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Nozomi

    2012-02-01

    The number of international travellers has increased. There is enormous diversity in medical backgrounds, purposes of travel, and travelling styles among travellers. Travellers are hospitalized abroad because of exotic and common diseases via medical tourism. This is one way of transporting and importing human bacteria between countries, including multi-drug resistant organisms. In developing countries, the antimicrobial resistance in Shigella sp. and Salmonella sp. have been a problem, because of this trend, the first choice of antibiotics has changed in some countries. Community acquired infections as well as hospital acquired infections with MRSA, multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and ESBL have been a problem. This review will discuss the risk of MDR bacterial infectious diseases for travellers.

  12. Cancer Exosomes as Mediators of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Maria do Rosário; Pedro, Ana; Lyden, David

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, several studies demonstrated that the tumor microenvironment is a critical determinant not only of tumor progression and metastasis, but also of resistance to therapy. Exosomes are small membrane vesicles of endocytic origin, which contain mRNAs, DNA fragments, and proteins, and are released by many different cell types, including cancer cells. Mounting evidence has shown that cancer-derived exosomes contribute to the recruitment and reprogramming of constituents associated with the tumor microenvironment. Understanding how exosomes and the tumor microenvironment impact drug resistance will allow novel and better strategies to overcome drug resistance and treat cancer. Here, we describe a technique for exosome purification from cell culture, and fresh and frozen plasma, and further analysis by electron microscopy, NanoSight microscope, and Western blot.

  13. A review of age-old antimalarial drug to combat malaria:efficacy up-gradation by nanotechnology based drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satyajit Tripathy; Somenath Roy

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is uncontrolled burden in the world till now.Despite of different efforts to develop antimalarial drug for decades, any anti-malarial drug can able to eradicate completely till now. Many anti-malarial substances are practically ineffectual because of their physicochemical limitations, cytotoxicity, chemical instability and degradation, and limited activities against intracellular parasites.Taking into consideration, the amount of research is going to conduct in the field of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems, lead to new ways of improving the treatment of infectious diseases.The study has focused on the progress and advancement of research on nanotechnology based drug delivery to eradicate the malaria.We like to focus the efficacy of nanotechnology based drug applicationfor the opening out of novel chemotherapeutics in laboratory research, which may show the way to better use with age-old antimalarial drug and may draw the attention of pharmaceutical industries for the improvement and designing of effective anti-malarial drugs in future.

  14. Glycosides as possible lead antimalarial in new drug discovery: future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marya; Khan, Haroon; Ahmad, Izhar

    2017-01-15

    Malaria remains one of the major public health problems worldwide and is responsible for a large number of morbidity and mortality. Especially, in the third world countries, it is still alarming. The development of drug-resistant to Plasmodium falciparum strains has further degraded the overall situation. However, a limited number of effective drugs available emphasizes how essential it is to establish new anti-malarial compounds. New antimalarial agents with distinctive structures and mechanism of action from the natural origin are thus immediately required to treat sensitive and drug-resistant strains of malaria. over the years, phytopharmaceuticals have provided numerous lead compounds. Similarly, the success rate of botanicals in terms of clinical significance is also very high. Of them, glycosides is one of the most widely distributed and emerging class of plant secondary metabolites. This review provides an outlook to recently isolated glycosides from plants with marked antimalarial effects in an in-vitro and in-vivo protocols and thus ideal candidates for clinical trials to ascertain their clinical utility and or led compounds.

  15. Management of multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, D C S; Drobniewski, F A; Milburn, H J

    2003-01-01

    There has been a worldwide increase in multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) which has in the past been associated with a poor prognosis. In the U.K., about half of the cases live in the London area and we have set out to obtain further information on their treatment and outcome. We examined the risk factors, drug resistance, drug treatment, sputum conversion, and outcome in patients with MDR-TB at three hospitals in South London and diagnosed during the period June 1995-January 1999. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-positive patients were excluded. There were 760 patients resident in Lambeth, Southwark and Lewisham Health Authority (LSLHA) who were notified as tuberculosis (TB) during the time period and who were of negative or unknown HIV status. (The population of LSLHA is approx.750,000.) There was a total of 13 patients with MDR-TB, known or presumed to be HlV negative. Their median age was 28 years (range 15-53); nine (69%) were born outside the U.K. and 11 had pulmonary disease; they had organisms resistant to a median of two first-line drugs (range 2-4) and to a median of four of all drugs tested (range 2-10). They received treatment with a median of six drugs (range 3-9). Eight were followed up for at least 3 years (range 3-6) after the completion of treatment; at their last assessment none had features of active TB and all were sputum negative (smear and culture). Two returned to their countries of origin during treatment; they were sputum negative at that time. Two patients are well and continue on treatment in the U.K. One patient (known HIV negative) died following treatment failure. In conclusion, we obtained disease-free survival in eight cases of MDR-TB, known or presumed to be HIV negative and followed up for 3 years or more. The prognosis for patients treated at specialised centres is good (and better than is generally believed). We describe a new protocol for the detection and management of MDR-TB.

  16. Drug resistance in Indian visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, S

    2001-11-01

    Throughout the world, pentavalent antimonial compounds (Sb(v)) have been the mainstay of antileishmanial therapy for more than 50 years. Sb(v) has been highly effective in the treatment of Indian visceral leishmaniasis (VL: kala-azar) at a low dose (10 mg/kg) for short durations (6-10 days). But in the early 1980s reports of its ineffectiveness emerged, and the dose of Sb(v) was eventually raised to 20 mg/kg for 30-40 days. This regimen cures most patients with VL except in India, where the proportion of patients unresponsive to Sb(v) has steadily increased. In hyperendemic districts of north Bihar, 50-65% patients fail treatment with Sb(v). Important reasons are rampant use of subtherapeutic doses, incomplete duration of treatment and substandard drugs. In vitro experiments have established emergence of Sb(v) resistant strains of Leishmania donovani, as isolates from unresponsive patients require 3-5 times more Sb(v) to reach similarly effectiveness against the parasite as in Sb(v) responders. Anthroponotic transmission in India has been an important factor in rapid increase in the Sb(v) refractoriness. Pentamidine was the first drug to be used and cured 99% of these refractory patients, but over time even with double the amount of initial doses, it cures only 69-78% patients now and its use has largely been abandoned in India. Despite several disadvantages, amphotericin B is the only drug available for use in these areas and should be used as first-line drug instead of Sb(v). The new oral antileishmanial drug miltefosine is likely to be the first-line drug in future. Unfortunately, development of newer antileishmanial drugs is rare; two promising drugs, aminosidine and sitamaquine, may be developed for use in the treatment of VL. Lipid associated amphotericin B has an excellent safety and efficacy profile, but remains out of reach for most patients because of its high cost.

  17. Predicted levels of HIV drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cambiano, Valentina; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Jordan, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    -term effects. METHODS: The previously validated HIV Synthesis model was calibrated to South Africa. Resistance was modeled at the level of single mutations, transmission potential, persistence, and effect on drug activity. RESULTS: We estimate 652 000 people (90% uncertainty range: 543 000-744 000) are living...... are maintained, in 20 years' time HIV incidence is projected to have declined by 22% (95% confidence interval, CI -23 to -21%), and the number of people carrying NNRTI resistance to be 2.9-fold higher. If enhancements in diagnosis and retention in care occur, and ART is initiated at CD4 cell count less than 500......  cells/μl, HIV incidence is projected to decline by 36% (95% CI: -37 to -36%) and the number of people with NNRTI resistance to be 4.1-fold higher than currently. Prevalence of people with viral load more than 500  copies/ml carrying NRMV is not projected to differ markedly according to future ART...

  18. Alpha-tocopherol transfer protein disruption confers resistance to malarial infection in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeya Motohiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various factors impact the severity of malaria, including the nutritional status of the host. Vitamin E, an intra and extracellular anti-oxidant, is one such nutrient whose absence was shown previously to negatively affect Plasmodium development. However, mechanisms of this Plasmodium inhibition, in addition to means by which to exploit this finding as a therapeutic strategy, remain unclear. Methods α-TTP knockout mice were infected with Plasmodium berghei NK65 or Plasmodium yoelii XL-17, parasitaemia, survival rate were monitored. In one part of the experiments mice were fed with a supplemented diet of vitamin E and then infected. In addition, parasite DNA damage was monitored by means of comet assay and 8-OHdG test. Moreover, infected mice were treated with chloroquine and parasitaemia and survival rate were monitored. Results Inhibition of α-tocopherol transfer protein (α-TTP, a determinant of vitamin E concentration in circulation, confers resistance to malarial infection as a result of oxidative damage to the parasites. Furthermore, in combination with the anti-malarial drug chloroquine results were even more dramatic. Conclusion Considering that these knockout mice lack observable negative impacts typical of vitamin E deficiency, these results suggest that inhibition of α-TTP activity in the liver may be a useful strategy in the prevention and treatment of malaria infection. Moreover, a combined strategy of α-TTP inhibition and chloroquine treatment might be effective against drug resistant parasites.

  19. Drug resistance reversal--are we getting closer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, R D; Kaye, S B

    2003-11-01

    Clinical drug resistance is a major barrier to overcome before chemotherapy can become curative for most patients presenting with metastatic cancer. Rational attempts to tackle clinical drug resistance need to be based on an understanding of the mechanisms involved; these are likely to be complex and multifactorial, and may be due to inadequate drug exposure or alterations in the cancer cell itself. This article reviews a number of strategies used to tackle drug resistance, focussing on work in our institution related to the treatment of ovarian cancer and resistance to platinum and taxane-based chemotherapy. Further progress towards drug resistance reversal will require a three-pronged approach, namely: the development of novel cytotoxics which exploit selectively expressed targets; modulation of resistance to conventional agents and, most importantly, a serious attempt to understand resistance mechanisms in tumour samples taken both pre- and post-chemotherapy.

  20. Discovery: an interactive resource for the rational selection and comparison of putative drug target proteins in malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odendaal Christiaan J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to half a billion human clinical cases of malaria are reported each year, resulting in about 2.7 million deaths, most of which occur in sub-Saharan Africa. Due to the over-and misuse of anti-malarials, widespread resistance to all the known drugs is increasing at an alarming rate. Rational methods to select new drug target proteins and lead compounds are urgently needed. The Discovery system provides data mining functionality on extensive annotations of five malaria species together with the human and mosquito hosts, enabling the selection of new targets based on multiple protein and ligand properties. Methods A web-based system was developed where researchers are able to mine information on malaria proteins and predicted ligands, as well as perform comparisons to the human and mosquito host characteristics. Protein features used include: domains, motifs, EC numbers, GO terms, orthologs, protein-protein interactions, protein-ligand interactions and host-pathogen interactions among others. Searching by chemical structure is also available. Results An in silico system for the selection of putative drug targets and lead compounds is presented, together with an example study on the bifunctional DHFR-TS from Plasmodium falciparum. Conclusion The Discovery system allows for the identification of putative drug targets and lead compounds in Plasmodium species based on the filtering of protein and chemical properties.

  1. Proteomic insights into Acinetobacter baumannii drug resistance and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Quanxin; Huang, Changwu; Liao, Pu; Xie, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunist pathogen, due to severe antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infection. The epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of A.baumannii have been extensively reviewed, but the pathogenesis and virulence remain unclear. Proteomics analysis has been applied to study the mechanism of drug resistance, biofilm, micronutrient acquisition, and the extracellular compartment. This review summarizes applications of proteomics in A. baumannii, aiming to summarize novel insights into the mechanism of A. baumannii pathogenesis and drug resistance.

  2. The challenge of artemisinin resistance can only be met by eliminating Plasmodium falciparum malaria across the Greater Mekong subregion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Gueye, Cara; Newby, Gretchen; Hwang, Jimee; Phillips, Allison A; Whittaker, Maxine; MacArthur, John R; Gosling, Roly D; Feachem, Richard G A

    2014-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combinations are currently the most effective anti-malarials and, in addition to vector control, have led to significant declines in malaria morbidity and mortality. However, foci of artemisinin drug resistance have been identified in the Greater Mekong subregion (GMS) of the Asia Pacific, threatening the major gains made in malaria control and potentially creating a parasite pool that is more difficult to treat and eliminate. Efforts are underway to halt the spread of artemisinin resistance, including coordination of activities and funding, and identification of areas of suspected artemisinin resistance, now using a newly identified molecular marker. However, targeting resources to the containment of resistant parasites is likely inefficient and monitoring impact is challenging. A more sustainable solution is the rapid elimination of all Plasmodium falciparum parasites from the GMS. This strategy is more efficient for several reasons. First, a subregional strategy is in line with current commitment to elimination and will build upon the existing national political support for elimination as well as enhancing collaboration among countries. Second, the challenge of human mobility in the GMS is subregional in scope and requires a harmonized elimination strategy. Third, countries will need to improve and intensify malaria operations to reach elimination, and this will be a singular goal across the subregion. Rallying around the goal of P. falciparum elimination will not only utilize existing regional bodies to catalyze political and funding support, but will also leverage the funding already in place to achieve this subregional goal.

  3. Targeting efflux pumps to overcome antifungal drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Ann R; Cardno, Tony S; Strouse, J Jacob; Ivnitski-Steele, Irena; Keniya, Mikhail V; Lackovic, Kurt; Monk, Brian C; Sklar, Larry A; Cannon, Richard D

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to antifungal drugs is an increasingly significant clinical problem. The most common antifungal resistance encountered is efflux pump-mediated resistance of Candida species to azole drugs. One approach to overcome this resistance is to inhibit the pumps and chemosensitize resistant strains to azole drugs. Drug discovery targeting fungal efflux pumps could thus result in the development of azole-enhancing combination therapy. Heterologous expression of fungal efflux pumps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae provides a versatile system for screening for pump inhibitors. Fungal efflux pumps transport a range of xenobiotics including fluorescent compounds. This enables the use of fluorescence-based detection, as well as growth inhibition assays, in screens to discover compounds targeting efflux-mediated antifungal drug resistance. A variety of medium- and high-throughput screens have been used to identify a number of chemical entities that inhibit fungal efflux pumps.

  4. Drug resistance in Leishmania: similarities and differences to other organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, B; Kündig, C; Singh, A; Ouellette, M

    1998-01-01

    The main line of defense available against parasitic protozoa is chemotherapy. Drug resistance has emerged however, as a primary obstacle to the successful treatment and control of parasitic diseases. Leishmania spp., the causative agents of leishmaniasis, have served as a useful model for studying mechanisms of drug resistance in vitro. Antimonials and amphotericin B are the first line drugs to treat Leishmania followed by pentamidine and a number of other drugs. Parasites resistant against all these classes of drugs have been selected under laboratory conditions. A multiplicity of resistance mechanisms has been detected, the most prevalent being gene amplification and transport mutations. With the tools now available, it should be possible to elucidate the mechanisms that govern drug resistance in field isolates and develop more effective chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. A molecular mechanism of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbengue, Alassane; Bhattacharjee, Souvik; Pandharkar, Trupti; Liu, Haining; Estiu, Guillermina; Stahelin, Robert V; Rizk, Shahir S; Njimoh, Dieudonne L; Ryan, Yana; Chotivanich, Kesinee; Nguon, Chea; Ghorbal, Mehdi; Lopez-Rubio, Jose-Juan; Pfrender, Michael; Emrich, Scott; Mohandas, Narla; Dondorp, Arjen M; Wiest, Olaf; Haldar, Kasturi

    2015-04-30

    Artemisinins are the cornerstone of anti-malarial drugs. Emergence and spread of resistance to them raises risk of wiping out recent gains achieved in reducing worldwide malaria burden and threatens future malaria control and elimination on a global level. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed parasite genetic loci associated with artemisinin resistance. However, there is no consensus on biochemical targets of artemisinin. Whether and how these targets interact with genes identified by GWAS, remains unknown. Here we provide biochemical and cellular evidence that artemisinins are potent inhibitors of Plasmodium falciparum phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PfPI3K), revealing an unexpected mechanism of action. In resistant clinical strains, increased PfPI3K was associated with the C580Y mutation in P. falciparum Kelch13 (PfKelch13), a primary marker of artemisinin resistance. Polyubiquitination of PfPI3K and its binding to PfKelch13 were reduced by the PfKelch13 mutation, which limited proteolysis of PfPI3K and thus increased levels of the kinase, as well as its lipid product phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI3P). We find PI3P levels to be predictive of artemisinin resistance in both clinical and engineered laboratory parasites as well as across non-isogenic strains. Elevated PI3P induced artemisinin resistance in absence of PfKelch13 mutations, but remained responsive to regulation by PfKelch13. Evidence is presented for PI3P-dependent signalling in which transgenic expression of an additional kinase confers resistance. Together these data present PI3P as the key mediator of artemisinin resistance and the sole PfPI3K as an important target for malaria elimination.

  6. Treatment of falciparum malaria in the age of drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanks G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing problem of drug resistance has greatly complicated the treatment for falciparum malaria. Whereaschloroquine and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine could once cure most infections, this is no longer true and requiresexamination of alternative regimens. Not all treatment failures are drug resistant and other issues such asexpired antimalarials and patient compliance need to be considered. Continuation of a failing treatment policyafter drug resistance is established suppresses infections rather than curing them, leading to increasedtransmission of malaria, promotion of epidemics and loss of public confidence in malaria control programs.Antifolate drug resistance (i.e. pyrimethamine means that new combinations are urgently needed particularlybecause addition of a single drug to an already failing regimen is rarely effective for very long. Atovaquone/proguanil and mefloquine have been used against multiple drug resistant falciparum malaria with resistance toeach having been documented soon after drug introduction. Drug combinations delay further transmission ofresistant parasites by increasing cure rates and inhibiting formation of gametocytes. Most currentlyrecommended drug combinations for falciparum malaria are variants of artemisinin combination therapy wherea rapidly acting artemisinin compound is combined with a longer half-life drug of a different class. Artemisininsused include dihydroartemisinin, artesunate, artemether and companion drugs include mefloquine, amodiaquine,sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, lumefantrine, piperaquine, pyronaridine, chlorproguanil/dapsone. The standard ofcare must be to cure malaria by killing the last parasite. Combination antimalarial treatment is vital not only tothe successful treatment of individual patients but also for public health control of malaria.

  7. Prediction of resistance development against drug combinations by collateral responses to component drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munck, Christian; Gumpert, Heidi; Nilsson Wallin, Annika;

    2014-01-01

    Resistance arises quickly during chemotherapeutic selection and is particularly problematic during long-term treatment regimens such as those for tuberculosis, HIV infections, or cancer. Although drug combination therapy reduces the evolution of drug resistance, drug pairs vary in their ability...

  8. Adaptation and evolution of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergval, I.L.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on drug resistance and the evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Notwithstanding, many molecular mechanisms facilitating the emergence, adaptation and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis have yet to be discovered. This thesis reports studies of the adaptive mech

  9. DRUG-RESISTANCE, SUPPORTIVE CARE AND DOSE INTENSITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEVRIES, EGE; HAMILTON, TC; LIND, M; DAUPLAT, J; NEIJT, JP; OZOLS, RF

    1993-01-01

    Background: Both intrinsic and acquired drug resistance occur in ovarian cancer. Much work on in vivo or in vitro, obtained drug resistance has been done and this knowledge is presently being converted into clinical studies. Materials and methods: The review focuses on the detoxifying system, MDR (m

  10. Epidemiological control of drug resistance and compensatory mutation under resistance testing and second-line therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddler, Clare A; Wu, Yue; Valckenborgh, Frank; Tanaka, Mark M

    2013-12-01

    The fitness cost of antibiotic resistance in the absence of treatment raises the possibility that prudent use of drugs may slow or reverse the rise of resistance. Unfortunately, compensatory mutations that lower this cost may lead to entrenched resistance. Here, we develop a mathematical model of resistance evolution and compensatory mutation to determine whether reversion to sensitivity can occur, and how disease control might be facilitated by a second-line therapy. When only a single antibiotic is available, sensitive bacteria reach fixation only under treatment rates so low that hardly any cases are treated. We model a scenario in which drug sensitivity can be accurately tested so that a second-line therapy is administered to resistant cases. Before the rise of resistance to the second drug, disease eradication is possible if resistance testing and second-line treatment are conducted at a high enough rate. However, if double drug resistance arises, the possibility of disease eradication is greatly reduced and compensated resistance prevails in most of the parameter space. The boundary separating eradication from fixation of compensated resistance is strongly influenced by the underlying basic reproductive number of the pathogen and drug efficacy in sensitive cases, but depends less on the resistance cost and compensation. When double resistance is possible, the boundary is affected by the relative strengths of resistance against the two drugs in the double-resistant-compensated strain.

  11. Antituberculosis drug resistance patterns in adults with tuberculous meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senbayrak, Seniha; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Erdem, Hakan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to antituberculosis drugs is an increasingly common clinical problem. This study aimed to evaluate drug resistance profiles of TBM isolates in adult patients in nine European countries involving 32 centers...... to provide insight into the empiric treatment of TBM. METHODS: Mycobacterium tuberculosis was cultured from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 142 patients and was tested for susceptibility to first-line antituberculosis drugs, streptomycin (SM), isoniazid (INH), rifampicin (RIF) and ethambutol (EMB). RESULTS...

  12. Fitness cost of chromosomal drug resistance-conferring mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Peter; Springer, Burkhard; Prammananan, Therdsak; Sturmfels, Antje; Kappler, Martin; Pletschette, Michel; Böttger, Erik C

    2002-05-01

    To study the cost of chromosomal drug resistance mutations to bacteria, we investigated the fitness cost of mutations that confer resistance to different classes of antibiotics affecting bacterial protein synthesis (aminocyclitols, 2-deoxystreptamines, macrolides). We used a model system based on an in vitro competition assay with defined Mycobacterium smegmatis laboratory mutants; selected mutations were introduced by genetic techniques to address the possibility that compensatory mutations ameliorate the resistance cost. We found that the chromosomal drug resistance mutations studied often had only a small fitness cost; compensatory mutations were not involved in low-cost or no-cost resistance mutations. When drug resistance mutations found in clinical isolates were considered, selection of those mutations that have little or no fitness cost in the in vitro competition assay seems to occur. These results argue against expectations that link decreased levels of antibiotic consumption with the decline in the level of resistance.

  13. Molecular monitoring of plasmodium falciparum drug susceptibility at the time of the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy in Yaoundé, Cameroon: Implications for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menard Sandie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular monitoring of the levels of anti-malarial resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is an essential policy to adapt therapy and improve malaria control. This monitoring can be facilitated by using molecular tools, which are easier to implement than the classical determination of the resistance phenotype. In Cameroon, chloroquine (CQ, previously the first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria was officially withdrawn in 2002 and replaced initially by amodiaquine (AQ monotherapy. Then, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, notably artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ or artemether-lumefantrine (AL, was gradually introduced in 2004. This situation raised the question of the evolution of P. falciparum resistance molecular markers in Yaoundé, a highly urbanized Cameroonian city. Methods The genotype of pfcrt 72 and 76 and pfmdr1 86 alleles and pfmdr1 copy number were determined using real-time PCR in 447 P. falciparum samples collected between 2005 and 2009. Results This study showed a high prevalence of parasites with mutant pfcrt 76 (83% and pfmdr1 86 (93% codons. On the contrary, no mutations in the pfcrt 72 codon and no samples with duplication of the pfmdr1 gene were observed. Conclusion The high prevalence of mutant pfcrt 76T and pfmdr1 86Y alleles might be due to the choice of alternative drugs (AQ and AS-AQ known to select such genotypes. Mutant pfcrt 72 codon was not detected despite the prolonged use of AQ either as monotherapy or combined with artesunate. The absence of pfmdr1 multicopies suggests that AL would still remain efficient. The limited use of mefloquine or the predominance of mutant pfmdr1 86Y codon could explain the lack of pfmdr1 amplification. Indeed, this mutant codon is rarely associated with duplication of pfmdr1 gene. In Cameroon, the changes of therapeutic strategies and the simultaneous use of several formulations of ACT or other anti-malarials that are not officially recommended result in a

  14. The evolution of drug-resistant malaria: the role of drug elimination half-life.

    OpenAIRE

    Hastings, Ian M.; Watkins, William M; White, Nicholas J

    2002-01-01

    This paper seeks to define and quantify the influence of drug elimination half-life on the evolution of antimalarial drug resistance. There are assumed to be three general classes of susceptibility of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum to a drug: Res0, the original, susceptible wildtype; Res1, a group of intermediate levels of susceptibility that are more tolerant of the drug but still cleared by treatment; and Res2, which is completely resistant to the drug. Res1 and Res2 resistance ...

  15. A Hybrid Drug Limits Resistance by Evading the Action of the Multiple Antibiotic Resistance Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kathy K; Stone, Laura K; Lieberman, Tami D; Shavit, Michal; Baasov, Timor; Kishony, Roy

    2016-02-01

    Hybrid drugs are a promising strategy to address the growing problem of drug resistance, but the mechanism by which they modulate the evolution of resistance is poorly understood. Integrating high-throughput resistance measurements and genomic sequencing, we compared Escherichia coli populations evolved in a hybrid antibiotic that links ciprofloxacin and neomycin B with populations evolved in combinations of the component drugs. We find that populations evolved in the hybrid gain less resistance than those evolved in an equimolar mixture of the hybrid's components, in part because the hybrid evades resistance mediated by the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) operon. Furthermore, we find that the ciprofloxacin moiety of the hybrid inhibits bacterial growth whereas the neomycin B moiety diminishes the effectiveness of mar activation. More generally, comparing the phenotypic and genotypic paths to resistance across different drug treatments can pinpoint unique properties of new compounds that limit the emergence of resistance.

  16. Drug-resistance mechanisms and prevalence of Enterobacter cloacae resistant to multi-antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张杰; 顾怡明; 俞云松; 周志慧; 杜小玲

    2004-01-01

    @@The main drug-resistance mechanism of gram-negative bacteria is producing β-lactamases. Two kinds of enzymes cause drug resistance by hydrolyzing oxyimino-cephalosporins and aztreonam: one is chromosomally encoded AmpC β-lactamases, the other is plasmid-mediated extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). Enterobacter cloacae can produce both of them, so that these strains are seriously resistance to many antibiotics. In order to study the main drug-resistant mechanism in Enterobacter cloacae, PCR and nucleotide sequencing were performed on 58 multidrug resistant strains.

  17. Exploiting bacterial drug resistance: a single construct for the diagnosis and treatment of drug resistant infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallum, Ulysses W.; Zheng, Xiang; Verma, Sarika; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    β-lactamase enzyme-activated photosensitizer (β-LEAP). We aim to exploit drug resistance mechanisms to selectively release photosensitizers (PSs) for a specific photodynamic antimicrobial effect and reduced host tissue damage. Consequently, the fluorescence emission intensity of the PSs increases and allows for the detection of enzyme activity. In this work we sought to evaluate β-LEAP for use as a sensitive molecular probe. We have reported the enzyme specific antibacterial action of β-LEAP. Here we report the use of β-LEAP for the rapid functional definition of a β-lactamase.

  18. Current Status of Methods to Assess Cancer Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodor H. Lippert, Hans-Jörg Ruoff, Manfred Volm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance is the main cause of the failure of chemotherapy of malignant tumors, resistance being either preexisting (intrinsic resistance or induced by the drugs (acquired resistance. At present, resistance is usually diagnosed during treatment after a long period of drug administration.In the present paper, methods for a rapid assessment of drug resistance are described. Three main classes of test procedures can be found in the literature, i.e. fresh tumor cell culture tests, cancer biomarker tests and positron emission tomography (PET tests. The methods are based on the evaluation of molecular processes, i.e. metabolic activities of cancer cells. Drug resistance can be diagnosed before treatment in-vitro with fresh tumor cell culture tests, and after a short time of treatment in-vivo with PET tests. Cancer biomarker tests, for which great potential has been predicted, are largely still in the development stage. Individual resistance surveillance with tests delivering rapid results signifies progress in cancer therapy management, by providing the possibility to avoid drug therapies that are ineffective and only harmful.

  19. Defeating pathogen drug resistance: guidance from evolutionary theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, John W

    2008-12-01

    Many of the greatest challenges in medicine and public health involve the evolution of drug resistance by pathogens. Recent advances in the theory of natural selection suggest that there are two broad classes of pathogen traits that can be targeted by drugs or vaccines. The first class, consisting of traits that benefit the individual organisms bearing them, causes a strong evolutionary response and the rapid emergence of drug resistance. The second class, consisting of traits that benefit groups of pathogen organisms including the individual provider, causes a weaker evolutionary response and less drug resistance. Although most previous drug development has targeted the first class, it would be advantageous to focus on the second class as targets for drug and vaccine development. Specific examples and test cases are discussed.

  20. Delamanid: A new armor in combating drug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alphienes Stanley Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intense search has been made in the discovery of newer anti-TB drugs to tackle the issues such as drug resistance, HIV co-infection and risk of drug-drug interactions in the management of TB. Delamanid, a newer mycobacterial cell wall synthesis inhibitor, received a conditional approval from European medicines agency (EMA for the treatment of MDR-TB. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that delamanid has high potency, least risk for drug-drug interactions and better tolerability.

  1. Epigenetic strategies to reverse drug resistance in heterogeneous multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Mark E; Takhsha, Farnaz Sedigheh; Chirumamilla, Chandra Sekhar; Perez-Novo, Claudina; Vanden Berghe, Wim; Cuendet, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematological malignancy, which remains incurable because most patients eventually relapse or become refractory to current treatments. Due to heterogeneity within the cancer cell microenvironment, cancer cell populations employ a dynamic survival strategy to chemotherapeutic treatments, which frequently results in a rapid acquisition of therapy resistance. Besides resistance-conferring genetic alterations within a tumor cell population selected during drug treatment, recent findings also reveal non-mutational mechanisms of drug resistance, involving a small population of "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) which are intrinsically more refractory to the effects of a variety of anticancer drugs. Other studies have implicated epigenetic mechanisms in reversible drug tolerance to protect the population from eradication by potentially lethal exposures, suggesting that acquired drug resistance does not necessarily require a stable heritable genetic alteration. Clonal evolution of MM cells and the bone marrow microenvironment changes contribute to drug resistance. MM-CSCs may not be a static population and survive as phenotypically and functionally different cell types via the transition between stem-like and non-stem-like states in local microenvironments, as observed in other types of cancers. Targeting MM-CSCs is clinically relevant, and different approaches have been suggested to target molecular, metabolic and epigenetic signatures, and the self-renewal signaling characteristic of MM CSC-like cells. Here, we summarize epigenetic strategies to reverse drug resistance in heterogeneous multiple myeloma.

  2. Mechanisms of Resistance to Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganzo, Frank; Sung, Matthew; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2016-12-01

    Drug resistance limits the effectiveness of cancer therapies. Despite attempts to develop curative anticancer treatments, tumors evolve evasive mechanisms limiting durable responses. Hence, diverse therapies are used to attack cancer, including cytotoxic and targeted agents. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are biotherapeutics designed to deliver potent cytotoxins to cancer cells via tumor-specific antigens. Little is known about the clinical manifestations of drug resistance to this class of therapy; however, recent preclinical studies reveal potential mechanisms of resistance. Because ADCs are a combination of antibody and small molecule cytotoxin, multifactorial modes of resistance are emerging that are inherent to the structure and function of the ADC. Decreased cell-surface antigen reduces antibody binding, whereas elevated drug transporters such as MDR1 and MRP1 reduce effectiveness of the payload. Inherent to the uniqueness of the ADC, other novel resistance mechanisms are emerging, including altered antibody trafficking, ADC processing, and intracellular drug release. Most importantly, the modular nature of the ADC allows components to be switched and replaced, enabling development of second-generation ADCs that overcome acquired resistance. This review is intended to highlight recent progress in our understanding of ADC resistance, including approaches to create preclinical ADC-refractory models and to characterize their emerging mechanisms of resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2825-34. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance determinant microarray for analysis of multi-drug resistant isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Leski, Tomasz; Stenger, David; Vora, Gary J.; House, Brent; Nicklasson, Matilda; Pimentel, Guillermo; Zurawski, Daniel V.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Craft, David; Waterman, Paige E.; Lesho, Emil P.; Bangurae, Umaru; Ansumana, Rashid

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of multidrug-resistant infections in personnel wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan has made it challenging for physicians to choose effective therapeutics in a timely fashion. To address the challenge of identifying the potential for drug resistance, we have developed the Antimicrobial Resistance Determinant Microarray (ARDM) to provide DNAbased analysis for over 250 resistance genes covering 12 classes of antibiotics. Over 70 drug-resistant bacteria from different geographic regions have been analyzed on ARDM, with significant differences in patterns of resistance identified: genes for resistance to sulfonamides, trimethoprim, chloramphenicol, rifampin, and macrolide-lincosamidesulfonamide drugs were more frequently identified in isolates from sources in Iraq/Afghanistan. Of particular concern was the presence of genes responsible for resistance to many of the last-resort antibiotics used to treat war traumaassociated infections.

  4. The evolution of drug-resistant malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Plowe, Christopher V.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular epidemiological investigations have uncovered the patterns of emergence and global spread of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Malaria parasites highly resistant to chloroquine and pyrimethamine spread from Asian origins to Africa, at great cost to human health and life. If artemisinin-resistant falciparum malaria follows the same pattern, renewed efforts to eliminate and eradicate malaria will be gravely threatened. This paper, adapted f...

  5. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Development Research for Bacterial Diseases; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION.... The workshop will address antibacterial drug resistance, mechanisms of resistance, epidemiology of... Drug Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Office of Antimicrobial Products, 10903...

  6. Structure-based drug design to overcome drug resistance: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Rafaela S; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a common concern for the development of novel antiviral, antimicrobial and anticancer therapies. To overcome this problem, several strategies have been developed, many of which involving the theme of this review, the use of structure-based drug design (SBDD) approaches. These include the successful design of new compounds that target resistant mutant proteins, as well as the development of drugs that target multiple proteins involved in specific biochemical pathways. Finally, drug resistance can also be considered in the early stages of drug discovery, through the use of strategies to delay the development of resistance. The purpose of this brief review is to underline the usefulness of SBDD approaches based on case studies, highlighting present challenges and opportunities in drug design.

  7. Emerging Infections Program as Surveillance for Antimicrobial Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridkin, Scott K; Cleveland, Angela A; See, Isaac; Lynfield, Ruth

    2015-09-01

    Across the United States, antimicrobial drug-resistant infections affect a diverse population, and effective interventions require concerted efforts across various public health and clinical programs. Since its onset in 1994, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Emerging Infections Program has provided robust and timely data on antimicrobial drug-resistant infections that have been used to inform public health action across a spectrum of partners with regard to many highly visible antimicrobial drug-resistance threats. These data span several activities within the Program, including respiratory bacterial infections, health care-associated infections, and some aspects of foodborne diseases. These data have contributed to estimates of national burden, identified populations at risk, and determined microbiological causes of infection and their outcomes, all of which have been used to inform national policy and guidelines to prevent antimicrobial drug-resistant infections.

  8. Drug resistance in cancer: molecular evolution and compensatory proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Ran

    2016-03-15

    Targeted therapies have revolutionized cancer treatment. Unfortunately, their success is limited due to the development of drug resistance within the tumor, which is an evolutionary process. Understanding how drug resistance evolves is a prerequisite to a better success of targeted therapies. Resistance is usually explained as a response to evolutionary pressure imposed by treatment. Thus, evolutionary understanding can and should be used in the design and treatment of cancer. In this article, drug-resistance to targeted therapies is reviewed from an evolutionary standpoint. The concept of apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation (AICP) is developed. It is shown that AICP helps to explain some of the phenomena that are observed experimentally in cancers. Finally, potential drug targets are suggested in light of AICP.

  9. Drug resistance in African trypanosomiasis: the melarsoprol and pentamidine story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nicola; de Koning, Harry P; Mäser, Pascal; Horn, David

    2013-03-01

    Melarsoprol and pentamidine represent the two main classes of drugs, the arsenicals and diamidines, historically used to treat the diseases caused by African trypanosomes: sleeping sickness in humans and Nagana in livestock. Cross-resistance to these drugs was first observed over 60 years ago and remains the only example of cross-resistance among sleeping sickness therapies. A Trypanosoma brucei adenosine transporter is well known for its role in the uptake of both drugs. More recently, aquaglyceroporin 2 (AQP2) loss of function was linked to melarsoprol-pentamidine cross-resistance. AQP2, a channel that appears to facilitate drug accumulation, may also be linked to clinical cases of resistance. Here, we review these findings and consider some new questions as well as future prospects for tackling the devastating diseases caused by these parasites.

  10. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania after switch to artemisinin combination therapy and the introduction of accredited drug dispensing outlets - a provider perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dillip Angel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO was created in Tanzania. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu in 2007. Subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on access to malaria treatment was studied in rural Tanzania. Methods The study was carried out in the villages of Kilombero and Ulanga Demographic Surveillance System (DSS and in Ifakara town. Data collection consisted of: 1 yearly censuses of shops selling drugs; 2 collection of monthly data on availability of anti-malarials in public health facilities; and 3 retail audits to measure anti-malarial sales volumes in all public, mission and private outlets. The data were complemented with DSS population data. Results Between 2004 and 2008 access to malaria treatment greatly improved and the number of anti-malarial treatment doses dispensed increased by 78%. Particular improvements were observed in the availability (from 0.24 shops per 1,000 people in 2004 to 0.39 in 2008 and accessibility (from 71% of households within 5 km of a shop in 2004 to 87% in 2008 of drug shops. Despite no improvements in affordability this resulted in an increase of the market share from 49% of anti-malarial sales 2005 to 59% in 2008. The change of treatment policy from SP to ALu led to severe stock-outs of SP in health facilities in the months leading up to the introduction of ALu (only 40% months in stock, but these were compensated by the wide availability of SP in shops. After the introduction of ALu stock levels of the drug were relatively high in public health facilities (over 80% months in stock, but the drug could only be found in 30% of drug shops and in no general shops. This resulted in a low overall utilization of the drug (19% of all anti-malarial

  11. Prevalence of resistance associated polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from southern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beg Mohammad A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scarce data are available on Plasmodium falciparum anti-malarial drug resistance in Pakistan. The aim of this study was, therefore, to determine the prevalence of P. falciparum resistance associated polymorphisms in field isolates from southern Pakistan. Methods Blood samples from 244 patients with blood-slide confirmed P. falciparum mono-infections were collected between 2005-2007. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt K76T, multi drug resistance (pfmdr1 N86Y, dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr A16V, N51I, C59R, S108N, I164L and dihydropteroate synthetase (pfdhps A436S, G437A and E540K genes and pfmdr1 gene copy numbers were determined using PCR based methods. Results The prevalence of pfcrt 76T and pfmdr1 86Y was 93% and 57%, respectively. The prevalence of pfdhfr double mutations 59R + 108N/51R + 108N was 92%. The pfdhfr triple mutation (51I, 59R, 108N occurred in 3% of samples. The pfdhfr (51I, 59R, 108N and pfdhps (437G, 540E quintuple mutation was found in one isolate. Pfdhps 437G was observed in 51% and 540E in 1% of the isolates. One isolate had two pfmdr1 copies and carried the pfmdr1 86Y and pfcrt 76T alleles. Conclusions The results indicate high prevalence of in vivo resistance to chloroquine, whereas high grade resistance to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine does not appear to be widespread among P. falciparum in southern Pakistan.

  12. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis Lobo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART, artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites.

  13. Highly active ozonides selected against drug resistant malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Lis; de Sousa, Bruno; Cabral, Lília; Cristiano, Maria LS; Nogueira, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Ever increasing multi-drug resistance by Plasmodium falciparum is creating new challenges in malaria chemotherapy. In the absence of licensed vaccines, treatment and prevention of malaria is heavily dependent on drugs. Potency, range of activity, safety, low cost and ease of administration are crucial issues in the design and formulation of antimalarials. We have tested three synthetic ozonides NAC89, LC50 and LCD67 in vitro and in vivo against multidrug resistant Plasmodium. In vitro, LC50 was at least 10 times more efficient inhibiting P. falciparum multidrug resistant Dd2 strain than chloroquine and mefloquine and as efficient as artemisinin (ART), artesunate and dihydroartemisinin. All three ozonides showed high efficacy in clearing parasitaemia in mice, caused by multi-drug resistant Plasmodium chabaudi strains, by subcutaneous administration, demonstrating high efficacy in vivo against ART and artesunate resistant parasites. PMID:27276364

  14. Drug resistance in the sexually transmitted protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REBECCA L DUNNE; LINDA A DUNN; PETER UPCROFT; PETER J O'DONOGHUE; JACQUELINE A UPCROFT

    2003-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is the most common, sexually transmitted infection. It is caused by the flagellated protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. Symptoms include vaginitis and infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight and increased infant mortality, as well as predisposing to HIV/AIDS and cervical cancer. Trichomoniasis has the highest prevalence and incidence of any sexually transmitted infection. The 5-nitroimidazole drugs, of which metronidazole is the most prescribed, are the only approved,effective drugs to treat trichomoniasis. Resistance against metronidazole is frequently reported and crossresistance among the family of 5-nitroimidazole drugs is common, leaving no alternative for treatment, with some cases remaining unresolved. The mechanism of metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis from treatment failures is not well understood, unlike resistance which is developed in the laboratory under increasing metronidazole pressure. In the latter situation, hydrogenosomal function which is involved in activation of the prodrug, metronidazole, is down-regulated. Reversion to sensitivity is incomplete after removal of drug pressure in the highly resistant parasites while clinically resistant strains, so far analysed, maintain their resistance levels in the absence of drug pressure. Although anaerobic resistance has been regarded as a laboratory induced phenomenon, it clearly has been demonstrated in clinical isolates. Pursuit of both approaches will allow dissection of the underlying mechanisms. Many alternative drugs and treatments have been tested in vivo in cases of refractory trichomoniasis, as well as in vitro with some successes including the broad spectrum anti-parasitic drug nitazoxanide. Drug resistance incidence in T. vaginalis appears to be on the increase and improved surveillance of treatment failures is urged.

  15. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: time for visionary political leadership

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar, I; Zignol, M; Falzon, D; Raviglione, M.; Ditiu, L; Masham, S; Adetifa, I; Ford, N.; Cox, H.; Lawn, SD; Marais, BJ; McHugh, TD; Mwaba, P.; Bates, M; M. Lipman

    2013-01-01

    Two decades ago, WHO declared tuberculosis a global emergency, and invested in the highly cost-effective directly observed treatment short-course programme to control the epidemic. At that time, most strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were susceptible to first-line tuberculosis drugs, and drug resistance was not a major issue. However, in 2013, tuberculosis remains a major public health concern worldwide, with prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis rising. WHO estimates rough...

  16. Identifying clinically relevant drug resistance genes in drug-induced resistant cancer cell lines and post-chemotherapy tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Mengsha; Zheng, Weicheng; Lu, Xingrong; Ao, Lu; Li, Xiangyu; Guan, Qingzhou; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Yan, Haidan; Guo, You; Chi, Pan; Guo, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Until recently, few molecular signatures of drug resistance identified in drug-induced resistant cancer cell models can be translated into clinical practice. Here, we defined differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between pre-chemotherapy colorectal cancer (CRC) tissue samples of non-responders and responders for 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin-based therapy as clinically relevant drug resistance genes (CRG5-FU/L-OHP). Taking CRG5-FU/L-OHP as reference, we evaluated the clinical relevance of several types of genes derived from HCT116 CRC cells with resistance to 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin, respectively. The results revealed that DEGs between parental and resistant cells, when both were treated with the corresponding drug for a certain time, were significantly consistent with the CRG5-FU/L-OHP as well as the DEGs between the post-chemotherapy CRC specimens of responders and non-responders. This study suggests a novel strategy to extract clinically relevant drug resistance genes from both drug-induced resistant cell models and post-chemotherapy cancer tissue specimens.

  17. The challenges of multi-drug-resistance in hepatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Javier; Bert, Frédéric; Nicolas-Chanoine, Marie-Hélène

    2016-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has become a major global public health security problem that needs coordinated approaches at regional, national and international levels. Antibiotic overuse and the failure of control measures to prevent the spread of resistant bacteria in the healthcare environment have led to an alarming increase in the number of infections caused by resistant bacteria, organisms that resist many (multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant strains), if not all (pan-drug-resistant bacteria) currently available antibiotics. While Gram-positive cocci resistance (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci) shows a heterogeneous geographical distribution, extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae have become pandemic worldwide and endemic in some parts of the world, respectively. Moreover, currently available therapeutic options for resistant bacteria are very limited, with very few new agents in development. Antimicrobial resistance is especially relevant in decompensated cirrhosis. Firstly, cirrhotic patients are highly susceptible to develop infections caused by resistant bacteria as risk factors of multiresistance concentrate in this population (mainly repeated hospitalizations and antibiotic exposure). Secondly, inappropriate empirical antibiotic schedules easily translate into increased morbidity (acute kidney injury, acute-on-chronic liver failure, septic shock) and hospital mortality in advanced cirrhosis. Therefore, hepatologists must face nowadays a complex clinical scenario that requires new empirical antibiotic strategies that may further spread resistance. Global, regional and local preventive measures should therefore be implemented to combat antimicrobial resistance in cirrhosis including the restriction of antibiotic prophylaxis to high-risk populations, investigation on non-antibiotic prophylaxis, stewardship programs on adequate antibiotic

  18. Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant Bacterial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    COVERED 26 September 2011 25 September 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Identification of New Drug Targets in Multi-Drug Resistant...will be necessary for the fragment based screening and subsequent design of new drug lead compounds. To accompany and validate the structural studies

  19. Drug efflux pump deficiency and drug target resistance masking in growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fange, David; Nilsson, Karin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that drug efflux pump deficiency not only increases the susceptibility of pathogens to antibiotics, but also seems to “mask” the effects of mutations, that decrease the affinities of drugs to their intracellular targets, on the growth rates of drug-exposed bacteria. That is, in the presence of drugs, the growth rates of drug-exposed WT and target mutated strains are the same in a drug efflux pump deficient background, but the mutants grow faster than WT in a drug efflux pump proficient background. Here, we explain the mechanism of target resistance masking and show that it occurs in response to drug efflux pump inhibition among pathogens with high-affinity drug binding targets, low cell-membrane drug-permeability and insignificant intracellular drug degradation. We demonstrate that target resistance masking is fundamentally linked to growth-bistability, i.e., the existence of 2 different steady state growth rates for one and the same drug concentration in the growth medium. We speculate that target resistance masking provides a hitherto unknown mechanism for slowing down the evolution of target resistance among pathogens. PMID:19416855

  20. Treatment of fevers prior to introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria in registered drug shops in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K.; Lal, Sham; Cundill, Bonnie;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since drug shops play an important role in treatment of fever, introducing rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for malaria at drug shops may have the potential of targeting anti-malarial drugs to those with malaria parasites and improve rational drug use. As part of a cluster randomized trial...... shops on presenting symptoms, the consultation process, treatment received, and malaria diagnoses. Malaria diagnosis made by drug shop vendors were confirmed by the study team through microscopy examination of a blood slide to ascertain whether appropriate treatment was received. RESULTS: Among febrile...

  1. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by extensively drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Cheol-In; Baek, Jin Yang; Jeon, Kyeongman; Kim, So Hyun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Lee, Nam Yong; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-12-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance threatens the successful treatment of pneumococcal infections. Here we report a case of bacteremic pneumonia caused by an extremely drug-resistant strain of Streptococcus pneumoniae, nonsusceptible to at least one agent in all classes but vancomycin and linezolid, posing an important new public health threat in our region.

  2. World Health Organization/HIVResNet drug resistance laboratory strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertognolio, Silvio; Derdelinckx, Inge; Parker, Monica; Fitzgibbon, Joseph; Fleury, Herve; Peeters, Martin; Schuurman, Rob; Pillay, Deenan; Morris, Lynn; Tanuri, Amilcar; Gershy-Damet, Guy-Michel; Nkengasong, John; Gilks, Charles F.; Sutherland, Donald; Sandstrom, Paul

    2008-01-01

    With rapidly increasing access to antiretroviral drugs globally, HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) has become a significant public health issue, This requires a coordinated and collaborative response from country level to international level to assess the extent of HIVDR and the establishment of efficient

  3. World Antimalarial Resistance Network I: Clinical efficacy of antimalarial drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olliaro Piero

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proliferation of antimalarial drug trials in the last ten years provides the opportunity to launch a concerted global surveillance effort to monitor antimalarial drug efficacy. The diversity of clinical study designs and analytical methods undermines the current ability to achieve this. The proposed World Antimalarial Resistance Network (WARN aims to establish a comprehensive clinical database from which standardised estimates of antimalarial efficacy can be derived and monitored over time from diverse geographical and endemic regions. The emphasis of this initiative is on five key variables which define the therapeutic response. Ensuring that these data are collected at the individual patient level in a consistent format will facilitate better data management and analytical practices, and ensure that clinical data can be readily collated and made amenable for pooled analyses. Such an approach, if widely adopted will permit accurate and timely recognition of trends in drug efficacy. This will guide not only appropriate interventions to deal with established multidrug resistant strains of malaria, but also facilitate prompt action when new strains of drug resistant plasmodia first emerge. A comprehensive global database incorporating the key determinants of the clinical response with in vitro, molecular and pharmacokinetic parameters will bring together relevant data on host, drug and parasite factors that are fundamental contributors to treatment efficacy. This resource will help guide rational drug policies that optimize antimalarial drug use, in the hope that the emergence and spread of resistance to new drugs can be, if not prevented, at least delayed.

  4. Sphingolipids in neuroblastoma : Their role in drug resistance mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sietsma, H; Dijkhuis, AJ; Kamps, W; Kok, JW

    2002-01-01

    Disseminated neuroblastoma usually calls for chemotherapy as the primary approach for treatment. Treatment failure is often attributable to drug resistance. This involves a variety of cellular mechanisms, including increased drug efflux through expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters (e.g.,

  5. DISTRIBUTION OF PHAGE TYPES AND TRANSFERABLE DRUG RESISTANCE IN SHIGELLAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Badalian

    1981-08-01

    Full Text Available A total of 610 strains of Shigellae isolated from cases of diarrhea in Iran during 1962-73 were studied with respect to their phage type, as well as antibiotic resistance and transferable drug resistance along with serotyping. It was shown that there was some relation between serotypes and phage types but no association could be found between phage types and resistance pattern.

  6. Study on Drug Resistance and Relative Mechanisms of Chlamydia Trachomatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯淑萍; 刘全忠

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Chlamydia Trachomatis (C.T.) is one of the most common pathogens of human sexually transmitted diseases. Treatment of C.T. infection primarily depends on Tetracyclines, Macrolides and Quinolones, but with the wide use of antibiotics an increasing number of drug-resistant Chlamydia trachomatis cases have been reported. This review summarizes the resistant conditions and the possible resistance mechanisms of C.T..

  7. Acquisition of drug resistance and dependence by prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelschlegel, Anja M; Weissmann, Charles

    2013-02-01

    We have reported that properties of prion strains may change when propagated in different environments. For example, when swainsonine-sensitive 22L prions were propagated in PK1 cells in the presence of swainsonine, drug-resistant variants emerged. We proposed that prions constitute quasi- populations comprising a range of variants with different properties, from which the fittest are selected in a particular environment. Prion populations developed heterogeneity even after biological cloning, indicating that during propagation mutation-like processes occur at the conformational level. Because brain-derived 22L prions are naturally swainsonine resistant, it was not too surprising that prions which had become swa sensitive after propagation in cells could revert to drug resistance. Because RML prions, both after propagation in brain or in PK1 cells, are swainsonine sensitive, we investigated whether it was nonetheless possible to select swainsonine-resistant variants by propagation in the presence of the drug. Interestingly, this was not possible with the standard line of PK1 cells, but in certain PK1 sublines not only swainsonine-resistant, but even swainsonine-dependent populations (i.e. that propagated more rapidly in the presence of the drug) could be isolated. Once established, they could be passaged indefinitely in PK1 cells, even in the absence of the drug, without losing swainsonine dependence. The misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) associated with a swainsonine-dependent variant was less rapidly cleared in PK1 cells than that associated with its drug-sensitive counterpart, indicating that likely structural differences of the misfolded PrP underlie the properties of the prions. In summary, propagation of prions in the presence of an inhibitory drug may not only cause the selection of drug-resistant prions but even of stable variants that propagate more efficiently in the presence of the drug. These adaptations are most likely due to conformational changes of

  8. INDUCTION OF DRUG RESISTANCE IN PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM: AN INTERMITTENT DRUG EXPOSURE METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Nateghpour

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of experimentally induced drug resistance in the laboratory provides valuable opportunities for investigators to study the nature and genetics of drug resistance mechanisms to a given agent, patterns of cross resistance and the mode of action of drugs. At the beginning the continuous drug exposure was chosen as a standard procedure to produce drug— resistant strains of P. falciparum,.but later on some other methods were also applied. An intermittent drug exposure method as a novel procedure has been introduced in this study. Intermittent exposure of chloroquine resistant Kl and chloroquine sensitive T9.96 strains of P. falciparum to halofantrine culminated in a relatively rapid reduction in sensitivity to the drug. The response of halofantrifle - resistnat K1HF and T9.96 strains and parent parasites to halofantrifle, inefloquine, quinine and chloroquine was determined. The results indicated that the effectiveness of halofantrine to K1HF and T9.96HF strains decreased 9 and 3 folds respectively, compared to the parent parasites. Cross -resistance occurred among halofantrine. mefloquine and quinine. Halofantrine resistance was associated with enhanced chloroquine sensitivity in the strain derived from chloroquine - resistant K1 strain, hut not in the strain derived from chloroquine - sensitive T9.96 parasites.

  9. Rational drug design approach for overcoming drug resistance: application to pyrimethamine resistance in malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKie, J H; Douglas, K T; Chan, C; Roser, S A; Yates, R; Read, M; Hyde, J E; Dascombe, M J; Yuthavong, Y; Sirawaraporn, W

    1998-04-23

    Pyrimethamine acts by selectively inhibiting malarial dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS). Resistance in the most important human parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, initially results from an S108N mutation in the DHFR domain, with additional mutation (most commonly C59R or N51I or both) imparting much greater resistance. From a homology model of the 3-D structure of DHFR-TS, rational drug design techniques have been used to design and subsequently synthesize inhibitors able to overcome malarial pyrimethamine resistance. Compared to pyrimethamine (Ki 1.5 nM) with purified recombinant DHFR fromP. falciparum, the Ki value of the m-methoxy analogue of pyrimethamine was 1.07 nM, but against the DHFR bearing the double mutation (C59R + S108N), the Ki values for pyrimethamine and the m-methoxy analogue were 71.7 and 14.0 nM, respectively. The m-chloro analogue of pyrimethamine was a stronger inhibitor of both wild-type DHFR (with Ki 0.30 nM) and the doubly mutant (C59R +S108N) purified enzyme (with Ki 2.40 nM). Growth of parasite cultures of P. falciparum in vitro was also strongly inhibited by these compounds with 50% inhibition of growth occurring at 3.7 microM for the m-methoxy and 0.6 microM for the m-chloro compounds with the K1 parasite line bearing the double mutation (S108N + C59R), compared to 10.2 microM for pyrimethamine. These inhibitors were also found in preliminary studies to retain antimalarial activity in vivo in P. berghei-infected mice.

  10. Challenges of drug resistance in the management of pancreatic cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheikh, Rizwan

    2012-02-01

    The current treatment of choice for metastatic pancreatic cancer involves single-agent gemcitabine or a combination of gemcitabine with capecitabine or erlotinib (a tyrosine kinase inhibitor). Only 25–30% of patients respond to this treatment and patients who do respond initially ultimately exhibit disease progression. Median survival for pancreatic cancer patients has reached a plateau due to inherent and acquired resistance to these agents. Key molecular factors implicated in this resistance include: deficiencies in drug uptake, alteration of drug targets, activation of DNA repair pathways, resistance to apoptosis and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. Moreover, for newer agents including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, overexpression of signaling proteins, mutations in kinase domains, activation of alternative pathways, mutations of genes downstream of the target and\\/or amplification of the target represent key challenges for treatment efficacy. Here we will review the contribution of known mechanisms and markers of resistance to key pancreatic cancer drug treatments.

  11. Hsp90 governs dispersion and drug resistance of fungal biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Robbins

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Fungal biofilms are a major cause of human mortality and are recalcitrant to most treatments due to intrinsic drug resistance. These complex communities of multiple cell types form on indwelling medical devices and their eradication often requires surgical removal of infected devices. Here we implicate the molecular chaperone Hsp90 as a key regulator of biofilm dispersion and drug resistance. We previously established that in the leading human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, Hsp90 enables the emergence and maintenance of drug resistance in planktonic conditions by stabilizing the protein phosphatase calcineurin and MAPK Mkc1. Hsp90 also regulates temperature-dependent C. albicans morphogenesis through repression of cAMP-PKA signalling. Here we demonstrate that genetic depletion of Hsp90 reduced C. albicans biofilm growth and maturation in vitro and impaired dispersal of biofilm cells. Further, compromising Hsp90 function in vitro abrogated resistance of C. albicans biofilms to the most widely deployed class of antifungal drugs, the azoles. Depletion of Hsp90 led to reduction of calcineurin and Mkc1 in planktonic but not biofilm conditions, suggesting that Hsp90 regulates drug resistance through different mechanisms in these distinct cellular states. Reduction of Hsp90 levels led to a marked decrease in matrix glucan levels, providing a compelling mechanism through which Hsp90 might regulate biofilm azole resistance. Impairment of Hsp90 function genetically or pharmacologically transformed fluconazole from ineffectual to highly effective in eradicating biofilms in a rat venous catheter infection model. Finally, inhibition of Hsp90 reduced resistance of biofilms of the most lethal mould, Aspergillus fumigatus, to the newest class of antifungals to reach the clinic, the echinocandins. Thus, we establish a novel mechanism regulating biofilm drug resistance and dispersion and that targeting Hsp90 provides a much-needed strategy for improving

  12. Developing artemisinin based drug combinations for the treatment of drug resistant falciparum malaria: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olliaro P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of drug resistant malaria represents a considerable challenge to controlling malaria. To date, malaria control has relied heavily on a comparatively small number of chemically related drugs, belonging to either the quinoline or the antifolate groups. Only recently have the artemisinin derivatives been used but mostly in south east Asia. Experience has shown that resistance eventually curtails the life-span of antimalarial drugs. Controlling resistance is key to ensuring that the investment put into developing new antimalarial drugs is not wasted. Current efforts focus on research into new compounds with novel mechanisms of action, and on measures to prevent or delay resistance when drugs are introduced. Drug discovery and development are long, risky and costly ventures. Antimalarial drug development has traditionally been slow but now various private and public institutions are at work to discover and develop new compounds. Today, the antimalarial development pipeline is looking reasonably healthy. Most development relies on the quinoline, antifolate and artemisinin compounds. There is a pressing need to have effective, easy to use, affordable drugs that will last a long time. Drug combinations that have independent modes of action are seen as a way of enhancing efficacy while ensuring mutual protection against resistance. Most research work has focused on the use of artesunate combined with currently used standard drugs, namely, mefloquine, amodiaquine, sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine, and chloroquine. There is clear evidence that combinations improve efficacy without increasing toxicity. However, the absolute cure rates that are achieved by combinations vary widely and depend on the level of resistance of the standard drug. From these studies, further work is underway to produce fixed dose combinations that will be packaged in blister packs. This review will summarise current antimalarial drug developments and outline recent

  13. HIV resistance testing and detected drug resistance in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Phillips, Andrew N; Paredes, Roger

    2015-01-01

    calculated using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. RESULTS: Compared to 74.2% of ART-experienced individuals in 1997, only 5.1% showed evidence of virological failure in 2012. The odds of resistance testing declined after 2004 (global P 

  14. The action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in intrinsic drug resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi; JIA Wen-xiang; ZENG Wei; YANG Wei-qing; CHENG Xi; LI Xue-ru; WANG Lan-lan; KANG Mei; ZHANG Zai-rong

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a growing interest in studying the relationship between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance to drugs. However, the relationship still remains unclear in the macroscopic bacterial growth. Our study is to illuminate the change of bacterial drug resistance of gyrA mutant and active efflux pump during the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilms. Methods The strains of type Ⅱ topoisomerase gene mutant (gyrA mutant) and multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pump were clinical isolates and detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The process of bacterial biofilms development was observed by scanning electron microscope. Triparental mating experiments were performed to transfer report gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into P. aeruginosa biofilms strains and followed by analysis of bacterial survival rate between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance.Results The fluorescent strains with pGFPuv could develop mature biofilms on Teflon surface. Before a period of 72 hours, the survival rate of biofilms bacteria and intrinsic resistance strains in ciprofloxacin solution was significantly different (P0.05). The carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and azithromycin could significantly reduce the drug resistance of biofilm strains and efflux pump strains.Conclusions In the development of P. aeruginosa biofilms, the strains of gyrA mutation and MDR efflux could be conferred with new level of drug resistance. When co-cultured mutated strains with biofilm strains, biofilms may play a major role in bacterial resistance. But after 72 hours incubation (a mature biofilms had been developed), there was no clearly difference between the number of mutant strains and biofilm strains.

  15. Drug efflux proteins in multidrug resistant bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVeen, HW; Konings, WN

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria contain an array of transport proteins in their cytoplasmic membrane. Many of these proteins play an important role in conferring resistance to toxic compounds. The multidrug efflux systems encountered in prokaryotic cells are very similar to those observed in eukaryotic cells. Therefore, a

  16. Oncolytic Virotherapy Targeting Lung Cancer Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    peptides that bind to and inactivate small molecules such as cisplatin; (3) upregulate DNA repair enzymes that reverse therapy-induced DNA lesions; and...but multidrug-resistant tumor cells still possess clonal potential and after a short period of remission expand further and acquire metastatic

  17. Potential risk for drug resistance globalization at the Hajj.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawfiq, J A; Memish, Z A

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotics were once considered the miracle cure for infectious diseases. The tragedy would be the loss of these miracles as we witness increased antibiotic resistance throughout the world. One of the concerns during mass gatherings is the transmission of antibiotic resistance. Hajj is one of the most common recurring mass gatherings, attracting millions of people from around the world. The transmission of drug-resistant organisms during the Hajj is not well described. In the current review, we summarize the available literature on the transmission and acquisition of antibiotic resistance during the Hajj and present possible solutions.

  18. Drugs resistance and penicillinase activity in skin isolated Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhat K

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out to evaluate the drug resistance pattern and penicillinase production in skin isolated Staphylococcus aurpus. The disk diffusion method showed prevalence of: multidrug resistance among S. aureus, strains, isolated from locafised skin abscesses. method for detection of penicilfinase could detect this enzyme m 98.60/o of the isolates all fo which were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin. C16xacillin resistance as detected by the agar dilution method was found in 1.4% of the isolates. On the whole cloxacillin and gentamy′cin were found to be the most effective ′antistaphylococcal antibotics.

  19. Will Drug Resistance against Dolutegravir in Initial Therapy Ever Occur?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eWainberg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Dolutegravir (DTG is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI and INSTIs are the latest class of potent anti-HIV drugs. Compared to the first generation INSTIs, raltegravir (RAL and elvitegravir (EVG, DTG shows a limited cross-resistance profile. More interestingly, clinical resistance mutations to DTG in treatment-naive patents have not been observed to this date. This review summarizes recent studies on resistance mutations to DTG and on our understanding of the mechanisms of resistance to DTG as well as future directions for research.

  20. Nonradioactive heteroduplex tracking assay for the detection of minority-variant chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum in Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwapasa Victor

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strains of Plasmodium falciparum genetically resistant to chloroquine (CQ due to the presence of pfcrt 76T appear to have been recently introduced to the island of Madagascar. The prevalence of such resistant genotypes is reported to be low (P. falciparum isolates on the island. Previously, minority variant chloroquine resistant parasites were described in Malawian patients using an isotopic heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA, which can detect pfcrt 76T-bearing P. falciparum minority variants in individual patients that were undetectable by conventional PCR. However, as this assay required a radiolabeled probe, it could not be used in many resource-limited settings. Methods This study describes a digoxigenin (DIG-labeled chemiluminescent heteroduplex tracking assay (DIG-HTA to detect pfcrt 76T-bearing minority variant P. falciparum. This assay was compared to restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis and to the isotopic HTA for detection of genetically CQ-resistant parasites in clinical samples. Results Thirty one clinical P. falciparum isolates (15 primary isolates and 16 recurrent isolates from 17 Malagasy children treated with CQ for uncomplicated malaria were genotyped for the pfcrt K76T mutation. Two (11.7% of 17 patients harboured genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum strains after therapy as detected by HTA. RFLP analysis failed to detect any pfcrt K76T-bearing isolates. Conclusion These findings indicate that genetically CQ-resistant P. falciparum are more common than previously thought in Madagascar even though the fitness of the minority variant pfcrt 76T parasites remains unclear. In addition, HTAs for malaria drug resistance alleles are promising tools for the surveillance of anti-malarial resistance. The use of a non-radioactive label allows for the use of HTAs in malaria endemic countries.

  1. Rewired Metabolism in Drug-resistant Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stäubert, Claudia; Bhuiyan, Hasanuzzaman; Lindahl, Anna; Broom, Oliver Jay; Zhu, Yafeng; Islam, Saiful; Linnarsson, Sten; Lehtiö, Janne; Nordström, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells that escape induction therapy are a major cause of relapse. Understanding metabolic alterations associated with drug resistance opens up unexplored opportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we applied a broad spectrum of technologies including RNA sequencing, global untargeted metabolomics, and stable isotope labeling mass spectrometry to identify metabolic changes in P-glycoprotein overexpressing T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, which escaped a therapeutically relevant daunorubicin treatment. We show that compared with sensitive ALL cells, resistant leukemia cells possess a fundamentally rewired central metabolism characterized by reduced dependence on glutamine despite a lack of expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), a higher demand for glucose and an altered rate of fatty acid β-oxidation, accompanied by a decreased pantothenic acid uptake capacity. We experimentally validate our findings by selectively targeting components of this metabolic switch, using approved drugs and starvation approaches followed by cell viability analyses in both the ALL cells and in an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) sensitive/resistant cell line pair. We demonstrate how comparative metabolomics and RNA expression profiling of drug-sensitive and -resistant cells expose targetable metabolic changes and potential resistance markers. Our results show that drug resistance is associated with significant metabolic costs in cancer cells, which could be exploited using new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25697355

  2. Nanoparticles: Alternatives Against Drug-Resistant Pathogenic Microbes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudepalya Renukaiah Rudramurthy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial substances may be synthetic, semisynthetic, or of natural origin (i.e., from plants and animals. Antimicrobials are considered “miracle drugs” and can determine if an infected patient/animal recovers or dies. However, the misuse of antimicrobials has led to the development of multi-drug-resistant bacteria, which is one of the greatest challenges for healthcare practitioners and is a significant global threat. The major concern with the development of antimicrobial resistance is the spread of resistant organisms. The replacement of conventional antimicrobials by new technology to counteract antimicrobial resistance is ongoing. Nanotechnology-driven innovations provide hope for patients and practitioners in overcoming the problem of drug resistance. Nanomaterials have tremendous potential in both the medical and veterinary fields. Several nanostructures comprising metallic particles have been developed to counteract microbial pathogens. The effectiveness of nanoparticles (NPs depends on the interaction between the microorganism and the NPs. The development of effective nanomaterials requires in-depth knowledge of the physicochemical properties of NPs and the biological aspects of microorganisms. However, the risks associated with using NPs in healthcare need to be addressed. The present review highlights the antimicrobial effects of various nanomaterials and their potential advantages, drawbacks, or side effects. In addition, this comprehensive information may be useful in the discovery of broad-spectrum antimicrobial drugs for use against multi-drug-resistant microbial pathogens in the near future.

  3. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis: Principles of Resistance, Diagnosis, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W; Tsukayama, Dean T

    2016-04-01

    Extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) is an unfortunate by-product of mankind's medical and pharmaceutical ingenuity during the past 60 years. Although new drug developments have enabled TB to be more readily curable, inappropriate TB management has led to the emergence of drug-resistant disease. Extensively drug-resistant TB describes Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is collectively resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, a fluoroquinolone, and an injectable agent. It proliferates when established case management and infection control procedures are not followed. Optimized treatment outcomes necessitate time-sensitive diagnoses, along with expanded combinations and prolonged durations of antimicrobial drug therapy. The challenges to public health institutions are immense and most noteworthy in underresourced communities and in patients coinfected with human immunodeficiency virus. A comprehensive and multidisciplinary case management approach is required to optimize outcomes. We review the principles of TB drug resistance and the risk factors, diagnosis, and managerial approaches for extensively drug-resistant TB. Treatment outcomes, cost, and unresolved medical issues are also discussed.

  4. Molecular characterisation of drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum from Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil José

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing levels of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to chloroquine (CQ in Thailand have led to the use of alternative antimalarials, which are at present also becoming ineffective. In this context, any strategies that help improve the surveillance of drug resistance, become crucial in overcoming the problem. Methods In the present study, we have established the in vitro sensitivity to CQ, mefloquine (MF, quinine (QUIN and amodiaquine (AMQ of 52 P. falciparum isolates collected in Thailand, and assessed the prevalence of four putative genetic polymorphisms of drug resistance, pfcrt K76T, pfmdr1 N86Y, pfmdr1 D1042N and pfmdr1 Y1246D, by PCR-RFLP. Results The percentage of isolates resistant to CQ, MF, and AMQ was 96% (50/52, 62% (32/52, and 58% (18/31, respectively, while all parasites were found to be sensitive to QUIN. In addition, 41 (79% of the isolates assayed were resistant simultaneously to more than one drug; 25 to CQ and MF, 9 to CQ and AMQ, and 7 to all three drugs, CQ, MF and AMQ. There were two significant associations between drug sensitivity and presence of particular molecular markers, i CQ resistance / pfcrt 76T (P = 0.001, and ii MF resistance / pfmdr1 86N (P Conclusions i In Thailand, the high levels of CQ pressure have led to strong selection of the pfcrt 76T polymorphism and ii pfmdr1 86N appears to be a good predictor of in vitro MF resistance.

  5. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms of drug resistance in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of our understanding of resistance mechanisms of three major classes of antifungal drugs for systemic use, amphotericin B (AMPH), flucytosine (5-FC) and several azole antifungals, in particular fluconazole (FLCZ), at the molecular and cellular levels. Although the number of reports of AMPH- or 5-FC-resistant fungal species and strains is limited, several mechanisms of resistance have been described. AMPH-resistant Candida have a marked decrease in ergosterol content compared with AMPH-susceptible control isolates. A lesion in the UMP-pyrophosphorylase is the most frequent determinant of 5-FC resistance in C. albicans. Recently resistance of C. albicans to azoles has become an increasing problem. Extensive biochemical studies have highlighted a significant diversity in mechanisms conferring resistance to FLCZ and other azoles, which include alterations in sterol biosynthesis, target site, uptake and efflux. Among them, the most important mechanism clinically is reduced access of the drug to the intracellular P450 14 DM target, probably because of the action of a multidrug resistance efflux pump, and overproduction of that target. However, other possible resistance mechanisms for azoles remain to be identified.

  6. Sunitinib treatment enhances metastasis of innately drug resistant breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wragg, Joseph W; Heath, Victoria L; Bicknell, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Anti-angiogenic therapies have failed to confer survival benefits in patients with metastatic breast cancer (mBC). However, to date there has not been an inquiry into roles for acquired versus innate drug resistance in this setting. In this study, we report roles for these distinct phenotypes in determining therapeutic response in a murine model of mBC resistance to the anti-angiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitor sunitinib. Using tumor measurement and vascular patterning approaches, we differentiated tumors displaying innate versus acquired resistance. Bioluminescent imaging of tumor metastases to the liver, lungs and spleen revealed that sunitinib administration enhances metastasis, but only in tumors displaying innate resistance to therapy. Transcriptomic analysis of tumors displaying acquired versus innate resistance allowed the identification of specific biomarkers, many of which have a role in angiogenesis. In particular, aquaporin-1 upregulation occurred in acquired resistance, mTOR in innate resistance, and pleiotrophin in both settings, suggesting their utility as candidate diagnostics to predict drug response or to design tactics to circumvent resistance. Our results unravel specific features of antiangiogenic resistance, with potential therapeutic implications. PMID:28011623

  7. Antiviral Drug- and Multidrug Resistance in Cytomegalovirus Infected SCT Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Göhring

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In pediatric and adult patients after stem cell transplantation (SCT disseminated infections caused by human cytomegalovirus (HCMV can cause life threatening diseases. For treatment, the three antivirals ganciclovir (GCV, foscarnet (PFA and cidofovir (CDV are approved and most frequently used. Resistance to all of these antiviral drugs may induce a severe problem in this patient cohort. Responsible for resistance phenomena are mutations in the HCMV phosphotransferase-gene (UL97 and the polymerase-gene (UL54. Most frequently mutations in the UL97-gene are associated with resistance to GCV. Resistance against all three drugs is associated to mutations in the UL54-gene. Monitoring of drug resistance by genotyping is mostly done by PCR-based Sanger sequencing. For phenotyping with cell culture the isolation of HCMV is a prerequisite. The development of multidrug resistance with mutation in both genes is rare, but it is often associated with a fatal outcome. The manifestation of multidrug resistance is mostly associated with combined UL97/UL54-mutations. Normally, mutations in the UL97 gene occur initially followed by UL54 mutation after therapy switch. The appearance of UL54-mutation alone without any detection of UL97-mutation is rare. Interestingly, in a number of patients the UL97 mutation could be detected in specific compartments exclusively and not in blood.

  8. Histone modification as a drug resistance driver in brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guifa Xi; Barbara Mania-Farnell; Ting Lei; Tadanori Tomita

    2016-01-01

    Patients with brain tumors, specificaly, malignant forms such as glioblastoma, meduloblas-toma and ependymoma, exhibit dismal survival rates despite advances in treatment strategies. Chemotherapeutics, the primary adjuvant treatment for human brain tumors folowing surgery, commonly lack eficacy due to either intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. New treatments tar-geting epigenetic factors are being explored. Post-translational histone modification provides a critical regulatory platform for processes such as chromosome condensation and segregation, apoptosis, gene transcription, and DNA replication and repair. This work reviews how aberrant histone modifications and alterations in histone-modifying enzymes can drive the acquisition of drug resistance in brain tumors. Elucidating these mechanisms should lead to new treatments for overcoming drug resistance.

  9. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Chen Jiang; Hui Feng; Yu-Chun Lin; Xiu-Rong Guo

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV.

  10. HIV Drug-resistant Strains as Epidemiologic Sentinels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Robert M.; Porco, Travis C.; Getz, Wayne M.

    2006-01-01

    Observed declines in drug resistance to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors among persons recently infected with HIV-1 in monitored subpopulations can be interpreted as a positive sign and lead public health officials to decrease efforts towards HIV prevention. By means of a mathematical model, we identified 3 processes that can account for the observed decline: increase in high-risk behavior, decrease in proportion of acutely infected persons whose conditions are treated, and change in treatment efficacy. These processes, singly or in combination, can lead to increases or decreases in disease and drug-resistance prevalence in the general population. We discuss the most appropriate public health response under each scenario and emphasize how further data collection and analyses are required to more reliably evaluate the observed time trends and the relative importance of forces shaping the epidemic. Our study highlights how drug resistance markers can be used as epidemiologic sentinels to devise public health solutions. PMID:16494741

  11. New strategies against drug resistance to herpes simplex virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yu-Chen; Feng, Hui; Lin, Yu-Chun; Guo, Xiu-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the Herpesviridae family, is a significant human pathogen that results in mucocutaneous lesions in the oral cavity or genital infections. Acyclovir (ACV) and related nucleoside analogues can successfully treat HSV infections, but the emergence of drug resistance to ACV has created a barrier for the treatment of HSV infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. There is an urgent need to explore new and effective tactics to circumvent drug resistance to HSV. This review summarises the current strategies in the development of new targets (the DNA helicase/primase (H/P) complex), new types of molecules (nature products) and new antiviral mechanisms (lethal mutagenesis of Janus-type nucleosides) to fight the drug resistance of HSV. PMID:27025259

  12. Drugs that target pathogen public goods are robust against evolved drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, John W

    2012-11-01

    Pathogen drug resistance is a central problem in medicine and public health. It arises through somatic evolution, by mutation and selection among pathogen cells within a host. Here, we examine the hypothesis that evolution of drug resistance could be reduced by developing drugs that target the secreted metabolites produced by pathogen cells instead of directly targeting the cells themselves. Using an agent-based computational model of an evolving population of pathogen cells, we test this hypothesis and find support for it. We also use our model to explain this effect within the framework of standard evolutionary theory. We find that in our model, the drugs most robust against evolved drug resistance are those that target the most widely shared external products, or 'public goods', of pathogen cells. We also show that these drugs exert a weak selective pressure for resistance because they create only a weak correlation between drug resistance and cell fitness. The same principles apply to design of vaccines that are robust against vaccine escape. Because our theoretical results have crucial practical implications, they should be tested by empirical experiments.

  13. Antimicrobial drug resistance ofStaphylococcus aureus in dairy products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sasidharan S; Prema B; Yoga Latha L

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the prevalence of multidrug resistantStaphylococcus aureus(S. aureus) in dairy products.Methods:Isolation and identification ofS. aureus were performed in3 dairy-based food products. The isolates were tested for their susceptibility to5 different common antimicrobial drugs.Results:Of50 samples examined,5 (10%) were contaminated with S. aureus. Subsequently, the5 isolates were subjected to antimicrobial resistance pattern using five antibiotic discs (methicillin, vancomycin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol and tetracycline). Sample 29 showed resistance to methicillin and vancomycin. Sample18 showed intermediate response to tetracycline. The other samples were susceptible to all the antibiotics tested.Conclusions:The results provide preliminary data on sources of food contamination which may act as vehicles for the transmission of antimicrobial-resistantStaphylococcus.Therefore, it enables us to develop preventive strategies to avoid the emergence of new strains of resistantS. aureus.

  14. Virtual screen for repurposing approved and experimental drugs for candidate inhibitors of EBOLA virus infection [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/53d

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko Veljkovic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing Ebola virus epidemic has presented numerous challenges with respect to control and treatment because there are no approved drugs or vaccines for the Ebola virus disease (EVD. Herein is proposed simple theoretical criterion for fast virtual screening of molecular libraries for candidate inhibitors of Ebola virus infection. We performed a repurposing screen of 6438 drugs from DrugBank using this criterion and selected 267 approved and 382 experimental drugs as candidates for treatment of EVD including 15 anti-malarial drugs and 32 antibiotics. An open source Web server allowing screening of molecular libraries for candidate drugs for treatment of EVD was also established.

  15. Virtual screen for repurposing approved and experimental drugs for candidate inhibitors of EBOLA virus infection [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/51s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko Veljkovic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing Ebola virus epidemic has presented numerous challenges with respect to control and treatment because there are no approved drugs or vaccines for the Ebola virus disease (EVD. Herein is proposed simple theoretical criterion for fast virtual screening of molecular libraries for candidate inhibitors of Ebola virus infection. We performed a repurposing screen of 6438 drugs from DrugBank using this criterion and selected 267 approved and 382 experimental drugs as candidates for treatment of EVD including 15 anti-malarial drugs and 32 antibiotics. An open source Web server allowing screening of molecular libraries for candidate drugs for treatment of EVD was also established.

  16. Multidrug resistance in oncology and beyond : from imaging of drug efflux pumps to cellular drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Dijkers, Eli; Hospers, Geesiena; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to several structurally unrelated classes of natural products, including anthracyclines, taxanes, and epipodophyllotoxines, is often referred as multidrug resistance (MDR). This is associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters, which function as drug efflux pumps such a

  17. A new antihypertensive drug ameliorates insulin resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-xia LIU

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR)is defined as decreased sensitivity and/or responsiveness to insulin that promote glucose disposal.A growing body of clinical and epidemiologic evidence indicates that essential hypertension and IR often coexist[1].Approximately 50 percent of patients with hypertension can be considered to have IR and hyperinsulinemia[1].This inextricable linkage between hypertension and IR has been identified to increase the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD)and new onset of type Ⅱ diabetes that is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in this clinical syndrome[2].However,the driving force linking IR and hypertension remains to be fully elucidated.

  18. Environment-Mediated Drug Resistance in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    cells, including not only monocytes but also regulatory T cells ( Treg ) and non-myeloid stromal cells. Task 2. Role of S1P on STAT3 activation and drug...presence of reciprocal activation of STAT3 between tumor cells and bonemarrow stromal cells including not only monocytes but also regulatory T cells ( Treg ...CD45/GD2 nonmyeloid, nontumor cells, CD45/GD2þ tumor cells, CD45þ/CD14þ monocytes, and CD45þ/CD3þ/ CD4þ/CD25þ/FoxP3þ regulatory T cells ( Treg

  19. RESISTANCE TO ANTIPLATELET DRUGS IN PATIENTS WITH ISCHEMIC HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Aynetdinova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical, cell and genetic factors are distinguished among reasons for resistance to antiplatelet drugs. There are many methods to detect sensitivity to antiplatelet drugs, but they all have disadvantages. Moreover, there is no unified approach for interpretation of received results, and no recommendations for their practical use. It is necessary to work out unified procedure to assess platelet function, to define indications for its usage and to work out unified criteria of resistance. Individualized approach and each patient’s peculiarities consideration are essential when prescribing antiplatelet therapy.

  20. "DRUG RESISTANCE PATTERN IN ISOLATED BACTERIA FROM BLOOD CULTURES"

    OpenAIRE

    A Sobhani; H. Shodjai S. Javanbakht

    2004-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important infectious disease which may lead to death. Common bacteria and pattern of antibiotic resistance in different communities are different and understanding these differences is important. In the present study, relative frequency and pattern of drug resistance have been examined in bacteria isolated from blood cultures in Razi Hospital laboratory. The method of the study was descriptive. Data collection was carried out retrospectively. Total sample consisted of 311 pos...

  1. Determinants of Genetic Diversity of Spontaneous Drug Resistance in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couce, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Rojas, Alexandro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Any pathogen population sufficiently large is expected to harbor spontaneous drug-resistant mutants, often responsible for disease relapse after antibiotic therapy. It is seldom appreciated, however, that while larger populations harbor more mutants, the abundance distribution of these mutants is expected to be markedly uneven. This is because a larger population size allows early mutants to expand for longer, exacerbating their predominance in the final mutant subpopulation. Here, we investigate the extent to which this reduction in evenness can constrain the genetic diversity of spontaneous drug resistance in bacteria. Combining theory and experiments, we show that even small variations in growth rate between resistant mutants and the wild type result in orders-of-magnitude differences in genetic diversity. Indeed, only a slight fitness advantage for the mutant is enough to keep diversity low and independent of population size. These results have important clinical implications. Genetic diversity at antibiotic resistance loci can determine a population's capacity to cope with future challenges (i.e., second-line therapy). We thus revealed an unanticipated way in which the fitness effects of antibiotic resistance can affect the evolvability of pathogens surviving a drug-induced bottleneck. This insight will assist in the fight against multidrug-resistant microbes, as well as contribute to theories aimed at predicting cancer evolution.

  2. Activity of clinically relevant antimalarial drugs on Plasmodium falciparum mature gametocytes in an ATP bioluminescence "transmission blocking" assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Lelièvre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current anti-malarial drugs have been selected on the basis of their activity against the symptom-causing asexual blood stage of the parasite. Which of these drugs also target gametocytes, in the sexual stage responsible for disease transmission, remains unknown. Blocking transmission is one of the main strategies in the eradication agenda and requires the identification of new molecules that are active against gametocytes. However, to date, the main limitation for measuring the effect of molecules against mature gametocytes on a large scale is the lack of a standardized and reliable method. Here we provide an efficient method to produce and purify mature gametocytes in vitro. Based on this new procedure, we developed a robust, affordable, and sensitive ATP bioluminescence-based assay. We then assessed the activity of 17 gold-standard anti-malarial drugs on Plasmodium late stage gametocytes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Difficulties in producing large amounts of gametocytes have limited progress in the development of malaria transmission blocking assays. We improved the method established by Ifediba and Vanderberg to obtain viable, mature gametocytes en masse, whatever the strain used. We designed an assay to determine the activity of antimalarial drugs based on the intracellular ATP content of purified stage IV-V gametocytes after 48 h of drug exposure in 96/384-well microplates. Measurements of drug activity on asexual stages and cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells were also obtained to estimate the specificity of the active drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The work described here represents another significant step towards determination of the activity of new molecules on mature gametocytes of any strain with an automated assay suitable for medium/high-throughput screening. Considering that the biology of the forms involved in the sexual and asexual stages is very different, a screen of our 2 million-compound library may allow us to discover novel anti-malarial

  3. pncA Gene Mutations Associated with Pyrazinamide Resistance in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa and Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allana, Salim; Shashkina, Elena; Mathema, Barun; Bablishvili, Nino; Tukvadze, Nestani; Shah, N Sarita; Kempker, Russell R; Blumberg, Henry M; Moodley, Pravi; Mlisana, Koleka; Brust, James C M; Gandhi, Neel R

    2017-03-01

    Although pyrazinamide is commonly used for tuberculosis treatment, drug-susceptibility testing is not routinely available. We found polymorphisms in the pncA gene for 70% of multidrug-resistant and 96% of extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa and Georgia. Assessment of pyrazinamide susceptibility may be prudent before using it in regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  4. Hepatitis C Virus and Antiviral Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seungtaek; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Ahn, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1989, hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been intensively investigated to understand its biology and develop effective antiviral therapies. The efforts of the previous 25 years have resulted in a better understanding of the virus, and this was facilitated by the development of in vitro cell culture systems for HCV replication. Antiviral treatments and sustained virological responses have also improved from the early interferon monotherapy to the current all-oral regimens using direct-acting antivirals. However, antiviral resistance has become a critical issue in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C, similar to other chronic viral infections, and retreatment options following treatment failure have become important questions. Despite the clinical challenges in the management of chronic hepatitis C, substantial progress has been made in understanding HCV, which may facilitate the investigation of other closely related flaviviruses and lead to the development of antiviral agents against these human pathogens. PMID:27784846

  5. [Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: current epidemiology, therapeutic regimens, new drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ayerbe, C; Vivancos, M J; Moreno, S

    2016-09-01

    Multidrug and extensively resistant tuberculosis are especially severe forms of the disease for which no efficacious therapy exists in many cases. All the countries in the world have registered cases, although most of them are diagnosed in resource-limited countries from Asia, Africa and South America. For adequate treatment, first- and second-line antituberculosis drugs have to be judiciously used, but the development of new drugs with full activity, good tolerability and little toxicity is urgently needed. There are some drugs in development, some of which are already available through expanded-access programs.

  6. Biophysical principles predict fitness landscapes of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João V; Bershtein, Shimon; Li, Anna; Lozovsky, Elena R; Hartl, Daniel L; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-03-15

    Fitness landscapes of drug resistance constitute powerful tools to elucidate mutational pathways of antibiotic escape. Here, we developed a predictive biophysics-based fitness landscape of trimethoprim (TMP) resistance for Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). We investigated the activity, binding, folding stability, and intracellular abundance for a complete set of combinatorial DHFR mutants made out of three key resistance mutations and extended this analysis to DHFR originated from Chlamydia muridarum and Listeria grayi We found that the acquisition of TMP resistance via decreased drug affinity is limited by a trade-off in catalytic efficiency. Protein stability is concurrently affected by the resistant mutants, which precludes a precise description of fitness from a single molecular trait. Application of the kinetic flux theory provided an accurate model to predict resistance phenotypes (IC50) quantitatively from a unique combination of the in vitro protein molecular properties. Further, we found that a controlled modulation of the GroEL/ES chaperonins and Lon protease levels affects the intracellular steady-state concentration of DHFR in a mutation-specific manner, whereas IC50 is changed proportionally, as indeed predicted by the model. This unveils a molecular rationale for the pleiotropic role of the protein quality control machinery on the evolution of antibiotic resistance, which, as we illustrate here, may drastically confound the evolutionary outcome. These results provide a comprehensive quantitative genotype-phenotype map for the essential enzyme that serves as an important target of antibiotic and anticancer therapies.

  7. Clarithromycin, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, can reverse mefloquine resistance in Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis- infected Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Renu; Pandey, Swaroop Kumar; Rizvi, Amber

    2011-08-01

    During the last 2 decades there have been numerous reports of the emergence of mefloquine resistance in Southeast Asia and nearly 50% resistance is reported in Thailand. A World Health Organization report (2001) considers mefloquine as an important component of ACT (artesunate+mefloquine) which is the first line of treatment for the control of uncomplicated/multi-drug resistant (MDR) Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In view of the emergence of resistance towards this drug, it is proposed to develop new drug combinations to prolong the protective life of this drug. Prior studies have suggested that mefloquine resistance can be overcome by a variety of agents such as ketoconazole, cyproheptadine, penfluridol, Icajine and NP30. The present investigation reports that clarithromycin (CLTR), a new macrolide, being a potent inhibitor of Cyt. P450 3A4, can exert significant resistance reversal action against mefloquine resistance of plasmodia. Experiments were carried out to find out the curative dose of CLTR against multi-drug resistant P. yoelii nigeriensis. Mefloquine (MFQ) and clarithromycin (CLTR) combinations have been used for the treatment of this MDR parasite. Different dose combinations of these two drugs were given to the infected mice on day 0 (prophylactic) and day 1 with established infection (therapeutic) to see the combined effect of these combinations against the MDR malaria infection. With a dose of 32 mg/kg MFQ and 225 mg/kg CLTR, 100% cure was observed, while in single drug groups, treated with MFQ or CLTR, the cure was zero and 40% respectively. Therapeutically, MFQ and CLTR combinations 32+300 mg/kg doses cleared the established parasitaemia on day 10. Single treatment with MFQ or CLTR showed considerable suppression of parasitaemia on day 14 but neither was curative. Follow-up of therapeutically treated mice showed enhanced anti-malarial action as reflected by their 100% clearance of parasitaemia. The present study reveals that CLTR is a useful

  8. Recent developments in genomics, bioinformatics and drug discovery to combat emerging drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Soumya; Sundaramurthi, Jagadish Chandrabose; Palaniappan, Alangudi Natarajan; Narayanan, Sujatha

    2016-12-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) is a big challenge in TB control. The delay in diagnosis of DR-TB leads to its increased transmission, and therefore prevalence. Recent developments in genomics have enabled whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) from 3-day-old liquid culture and directly from uncultured sputa, while new bioinformatics tools facilitate to determine DR mutations rapidly from the resulting sequences. The present drug discovery and development pipeline is filled with candidate drugs which have shown efficacy against DR-TB. Furthermore, some of the FDA-approved drugs are being evaluated for repurposing, and this approach appears promising as several drugs are reported to enhance efficacy of the standard TB drugs, reduce drug tolerance, or modulate the host immune response to control the growth of intracellular M. tuberculosis. Recent developments in genomics and bioinformatics along with new drug discovery collectively have the potential to result in synergistic impact leading to the development of a rapid protocol to determine the drug resistance profile of the infecting strain so as to provide personalized medicine. Hence, in this review, we discuss recent developments in WGS, bioinformatics and drug discovery to perceive how they would transform the management of tuberculosis in a timely manner.

  9. "Applied" Aspects of the Drug Resistance Strategies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Michael L.; Miller-Day, Michelle A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the applied aspects of our Drug Resistance Strategies Project. We argue that a new definitional distinction is needed to expand the notion of "applied" from the traditional notion of utilizing theory, which we call "applied.1," in order to consider theory-grounded, theory testing and theory developing applied research. We…

  10. P-Glycoprotein and Drug Resistance in Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Picchianti-Diamanti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, rheumatoid arthritis (RA and psoriatic arthritis (PsA are chronic inflammatory disorders of unknown etiology characterized by a wide range of abnormalities of the immune system that may compromise the function of several organs, such as kidney, heart, joints, brain and skin. Corticosteroids (CCS, synthetic and biologic immunosuppressive agents have demonstrated the capacity to improve the course of autoimmune diseases. However, a significant number of patients do not respond or develop resistance to these therapies over time. P-glycoprotein (P-gp is a transmembrane protein that pumps several drugs out of the cell, including CCS and immunosuppressants; thus, its over-expression or hyper-function has been proposed as a possible mechanism of drug resistance in patients with autoimmune disorders. Recently, different authors have demonstrated that P-gp inhibitors, such as cyclosporine A (CsA and its analogue Tacrolimus, are able to reduce P-gp expression and or function in SLE, RA and PsA patients. These observations suggest that P-gp antagonists could be adopted to revert drug resistance and improve disease outcome. The complex inter-relationship among drug resistance, P-gp expression and autoimmunity still remains elusive.

  11. Leukemia stem cells in drug resistance and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Chao-hua; ZHANG Qiu-ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the central role of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in drug resistance and metastasis, aiming to provide key insights into leukemogenic pathology and developing novel therapeutic strategies against the relapse of leukemia.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained mainly from the studies reported in PubMed using the key terms "tumor-initiating cells", "leukemia stem cells", "drug resistance" and "metastasis".Study selection Relevant articles on studies of leukemia stem cells were selected.Results Increasing numbers of studies have suggested the importance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the initiation and maintenance of cancer, especially in leukemia. This review has summarized the origin, characteristics, isolation and identification of LSCs. It highlights the crucial role of LSCs in drug resistance and metastasis of leukemia by illustrating possible mechanisms and aims to provide novel therapeutic strategies for LSCs-targeted treatment.Conclusion LSCs play a crucial role in drug resistance and metastasis of leukemia and new promising LSCs-targeted therapies warrant investigation in both experimental models and clinical practice.

  12. Alcohol and Other Drug Resistance Strategies Employed by Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Jonathan; Miller-Day, Michelle; Krieger, Janice; Hecht, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    This study seeks to identify how rural adolescents make health decisions and utilize communication strategies to resist influence attempts in offers of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs (ATOD). Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 113 adolescents from rural school districts to solicit information on ATOD norms, past ATOD experiences, and…

  13. Drug-resistant tuberculosis: time for visionary political leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Ibrahim; Zignol, Matteo; Falzon, Dennis; Raviglione, Mario; Ditiu, Lucica; Masham, Susan; Adetifa, Ifedayo; Ford, Nathan; Cox, Helen; Lawn, Stephen D; Marais, Ben J; McHugh, Timothy D; Mwaba, Peter; Bates, Matthew; Lipman, Marc; Zijenah, Lynn; Logan, Simon; McNerney, Ruth; Zumla, Adam; Sarda, Krishna; Nahid, Payam; Hoelscher, Michael; Pletschette, Michel; Memish, Ziad A; Kim, Peter; Hafner, Richard; Cole, Stewart; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Maeurer, Markus; Schito, Marco; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2013-06-01

    Two decades ago, WHO declared tuberculosis a global emergency, and invested in the highly cost-effective directly observed treatment short-course programme to control the epidemic. At that time, most strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were susceptible to first-line tuberculosis drugs, and drug resistance was not a major issue. However, in 2013, tuberculosis remains a major public health concern worldwide, with prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis rising. WHO estimates roughly 630 000 cases of MDR tuberculosis worldwide, with great variation in the frequency of MDR tuberculosis between countries. In the past 8 years, extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis has emerged, and has been reported in 84 countries, heralding the possibility of virtually untreatable tuberculosis. Increased population movement, the continuing HIV pandemic, and the rise in MDR tuberculosis pose formidable challenges to the global control of tuberculosis. We provide an overview of the global burden of drug-resistant disease; discuss the social, health service, management, and control issues that fuel and sustain the epidemic; and suggest specific recommendations for important next steps. Visionary political leadership is needed to curb the rise of MDR and XDR tuberculosis worldwide, through sustained funding and the implementation of global and regional action plans.

  14. Flu Resistance to Antiviral Drug in North Carolina

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-12-19

    Dr. Katrina Sleeman, Associate Service Fellow at CDC, discusses resistance to an antiviral flu drug in North Carolina.  Created: 12/19/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 12/19/2011.

  15. Mechanisms of antifungal drug resistance in Candida dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coleman, David C

    2010-06-01

    Candida dubliniensis was first described in 1995 and is the most closely related species to the predominant human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. C. dubliniensis is significantly less prevalent and less pathogenic than C. albicans and is primarily associated with infections in HIV-infected individuals and other immunocompromised cohorts. The population structure of C. dubliniensis consists of three well-defined major clades and is significantly less diverse than C. albicans. The majority of C. dubliniensis isolates are susceptible to antifungal drugs commonly used to treat Candida infections. To date only two major patterns of antifungal drug resistance have been identified and the molecular mechanisms of these are very similar to the resistance mechanisms that have been described previously in C. albicans. However, significant differences are evident in the predominant antifungal drug mechanisms employed by C. dubliniensis, differences that reflect its more clonal nature, its lower prevalence and characteristics of its genome, the complete sequence of which has only recently been determined.

  16. Modeling mass drug treatment and resistant filaria disease transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuady, A. M.; Nuraini, N.; Soewono, E.; Tasman, H.; Supriatna, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    It has been indicated that a long term application of combined mass drug treatment may contribute to the development of drug resistance in lymphatic filariasis. This phenomenon is not well understood due to the complexity of filaria life cycle. In this paper we formulate a mathematical model for the spread of mass drug resistant in a filaria endemic region. The model is represented in a 13-dimensional Host-Vector system. The basic reproductive ratio of the system which is obtained from the next generation matrix, and analysis of stability of both the disease free equilibrium and the coexistence equilibria are shown. Numerical simulation for long term dynamics for possible field conditions is also shown.

  17. New antimalarial hits from Dacryodes edulis (Burseraceae--part I: isolation, in vitro activity, in silico "drug-likeness" and pharmacokinetic profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Zofou

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to identify the compounds responsible for the anti-malarial activity of Dacryoedes edulis (Burseraceae and to investigate their suitability as leads for the treatment of drug resistant malaria. Five compounds were isolated from ethyl acetate and hexane extracts of D. edulis stem bark and tested against 3D7 (chloroquine-susceptible and Dd2 (multidrug-resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase method. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out on LLC-MK2 monkey kidney epithelial cell-line. In silico analysis was conducted by calculating molecular descriptors using the MOE software running on a Linux workstation. The "drug-likeness" of the isolated compounds was assessed using Lipinski criteria, from computed molecular properties of the geometry optimized structures. Computed descriptors often used to predict absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicity (ADMET were used to assess the pharmacokinetic profiles of the isolated compounds. Antiplasmodial activity was demonstrated for the first time in five major natural products previously identified in D. edulis, but not tested against malaria parasites. The most active compound identified was termed DES4. It had IC50 values of 0.37 and 0.55 µg/mL, against 3D7 and Dd2 respectively. In addition, this compound was shown to act in synergy with quinine, satisfied all criteria of "Drug-likeness" and showed considerable probability of providing an antimalarial lead. The remaining four compounds also showed antiplasmodial activity, but were less effective than DES4. None of the tested compounds was cytotoxicity against LLC-MK2 cells, suggesting their selective activities on malaria parasites. Based on the high in vitro activity, low toxicity and predicted "Drug-likeness" DES4 merits further investigation as a possible drug lead for the treatment of malaria.

  18. Clinically relevant transmitted drug resistance to first line antiretroviral drugs and implications for recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Monge

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim was to analyse trends in clinically relevant resistance to first-line antiretroviral drugs in Spain, applying the Stanford algorithm, and to compare these results with reported Transmitted Drug Resistance (TDR defined by the 2009 update of the WHO SDRM list. METHODS: We analysed 2781 sequences from ARV naive patients of the CoRIS cohort (Spain between 2007-2011. Using the Stanford algorithm "Low-level resistance", "Intermediate resistance" and "High-level resistance" categories were considered as "Resistant". RESULTS: 70% of the TDR found using the WHO list were relevant for first-line treatment according to the Stanford algorithm. A total of 188 patients showed clinically relevant resistance to first-line ARVs [6.8% (95%Confidence Interval: 5.8-7.7], and 221 harbored TDR using the WHO list [7.9% (6.9-9.0]. Differences were due to a lower prevalence in clinically relevant resistance for NRTIs [2.3% (1.8-2.9 vs. 3.6% (2.9-4.3 by the WHO list] and PIs [0.8% (0.4-1.1 vs. 1.7% (1.2-2.2], while it was higher for NNRTIs [4.6% (3.8-5.3 vs. 3.7% (3.0-4.7]. While TDR remained stable throughout the study period, clinically relevant resistance to first line drugs showed a significant trend to a decline (p = 0.02. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of clinically relevant resistance to first line ARVs in Spain is decreasing, and lower than the one expected looking at TDR using the WHO list. Resistance to first-line PIs falls below 1%, so the recommendation of screening for TDR in the protease gene should be questioned in our setting. Cost-effectiveness studies need to be carried out to inform evidence-based recommendations.

  19. Balancing drug resistance and growth rates via compensatory mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Ines; Gabryszewski, Stanislaw J; Johnston, Geoffrey L; Dhingra, Satish K; Ecker, Andrea; Lewis, Rebecca E; de Almeida, Mariana Justino; Straimer, Judith; Henrich, Philipp P; Palatulan, Eugene; Johnson, David J; Coburn-Flynn, Olivia; Sanchez, Cecilia; Lehane, Adele M; Lanzer, Michael; Fidock, David A

    2015-07-01

    The widespread use of chloroquine to treat Plasmodium falciparum infections has resulted in the selection and dissemination of variant haplotypes of the primary resistance determinant PfCRT. These haplotypes have encountered drug pressure and within-host competition with wild-type drug-sensitive parasites. To examine these selective forces in vitro, we genetically engineered P. falciparum to express geographically diverse PfCRT haplotypes. Variant alleles from the Philippines (PH1 and PH2, which differ solely by the C72S mutation) both conferred a moderate gain of chloroquine resistance and a reduction in growth rates in vitro. Of the two, PH2 showed higher IC50 values, contrasting with reduced growth. Furthermore, a highly mutated pfcrt allele from Cambodia (Cam734) conferred moderate chloroquine resistance and enhanced growth rates, when tested against wild-type pfcrt in co-culture competition assays. These three alleles mediated cross-resistance to amodiaquine, an antimalarial drug widely used in Africa. Each allele, along with the globally prevalent Dd2 and 7G8 alleles, rendered parasites more susceptible to lumefantrine, the partner drug used in the leading first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy. These data reveal ongoing region-specific evolution of PfCRT that impacts drug susceptibility and relative fitness in settings of mixed infections, and raise important considerations about optimal agents to treat chloroquine-resistant malaria.

  20. The population genetics of drug resistance evolution in natural populations of viral, bacterial and eukaryotic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin A; Garud, Nandita R; Feder, Alison F; Assaf, Zoe J; Pennings, Pleuni S

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a costly consequence of pathogen evolution and a major concern in public health. In this review, we show how population genetics can be used to study the evolution of drug resistance and also how drug resistance evolution is informative as an evolutionary model system. We highlight five examples from diverse organisms with particular focus on: (i) identifying drug resistance loci in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum using the genomic signatures of selective sweeps, (ii) determining the role of epistasis in drug resistance evolution in influenza, (iii) quantifying the role of standing genetic variation in the evolution of drug resistance in HIV, (iv) using drug resistance mutations to study clonal interference dynamics in tuberculosis and (v) analysing the population structure of the core and accessory genome of Staphylococcus aureus to understand the spread of methicillin resistance. Throughout this review, we discuss the uses of sequence data and population genetic theory in studying the evolution of drug resistance.

  1. Systematic review of the performance of rapid rifampicin resistance testing for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Arentz

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Rapid tests for rifampicin resistance may be useful for identifying isolates at high risk of drug resistance, including multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB. However, choice of diagnostic test and prevalence of rifampicin resistance may both impact a diagnostic strategy for identifying drug resistant-TB. We performed a systematic review to evaluate the performance of WHO-endorsed rapid tests for rifampicin resistance detection. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library through January 1, 2012. For each rapid test, we determined pooled sensitivity and specificity estimates using a hierarchical random effects model. Predictive values of the tests were determined at different prevalence rates of rifampicin resistance and MDR-TB. RESULTS: We identified 60 publications involving six different tests (INNO-LiPA Rif. TB assay, Genotype MTBDR assay, Genotype MTBDRplus assay, Colorimetric Redox Indicator (CRI assay, Nitrate Reductase Assay (NRA and MODS tests: for all tests, negative predictive values were high when rifampicin resistance prevalence was ≤ 30%. However, positive predictive values were considerably reduced for the INNO-LiPA Rif. TB assay, the MTBDRplus assay and MODS when rifampicin resistance prevalence was < 5%. LIMITATIONS: In many studies, it was unclear whether patient selection or index test performance could have introduced bias. In addition, we were unable to evaluate critical concentration thresholds for the colorimetric tests. DISCUSSION: Rapid tests for rifampicin resistance alone cannot accurately predict rifampicin resistance or MDR-TB in areas with a low prevalence of rifampicin resistance. However, in areas with a high prevalence of rifampicin resistance and MDR-TB, these tests may be a valuable component of an MDR-TB management strategy.

  2. Smart doxorubicin nanoparticles with high drug payload for enhanced chemotherapy against drug resistance and cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Caitong; Zhou, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiujuan; Wei, Weijia; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2015-03-01

    Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in previous reports. These PEG stabilized DOX NPs exhibit good biocompatibility and stability, long blood circulation time, fast release in an acidic environment and high accumulation in tumors. Compared with free DOX, DOX NPs display a dramatically enhanced anticancer therapeutic efficacy in the inhibition of cell and tumor growth. Moreover, they can also be readily incorporated with other anticancer drugs for synergistic chemotherapy to overcome the drug resistance of cancers. The fluorescence properties of DOX also endow these NPs with imaging capabilities, thus making it a multifunctional system for diagnosis and treatment. This work demonstrates great potential of DOX NPs for cancer diagnosis, therapy and overcoming drug tolerance.Considering the obvious advantages in efficacy and price, doxorubicin (DOX) has been widely used for a range of cancers, which is usually encapsulated in various nanocarriers for drug delivery. Although effective, in most nanocarrier-based delivery systems, the drug loading capacity of DOX is rather low; this can lead to undesired systemic toxicity and excretion concern. Herein, we report for the first time the usage of pure doxorubicin nanoparticles (DOX NPs) without addition of any carriers for enhanced chemotherapy against drug-resistance. The drug payload reaches as high as 90.47%, which largely surpassed those in

  3. Antimalarial drug resistance in Bangladesh, 1996-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Ubydul; Glass, Gregory E; Haque, Waziul; Islam, Nazrul; Roy, Shyamal; Karim, Jahirul; Noedl, Harald

    2013-12-01

    Malaria remains an important health problem in Bangladesh, with approximately 14 million people at risk. Antimalarial drug resistance is a major obstacle to the control of malaria in endemic countries. In 2012, Bangladesh reported an estimated 29 522 malaria episodes, of which 94% were reported as being caused by Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, we reviewed and summarized antimalarial drug resistance data from Bangladesh published until June 2013. We searched published sources for data referring to any type of P. falciparum drug resistance (in vivo, in vitro, or molecular) and found 169 articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Of these, 143 articles were excluded because they did not meet our inclusion criteria. After detailed review of the remaining 26 articles, 14 were selected for evaluation. Published studies indicate that P. falciparum shows varying levels of resistance to chloroquine, mefloquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Combination therapy of chloroquine and primaquine has proven ineffective and combinations of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine with either quinine or chloroquine have also shown poor efficacy. Recent studies indicate that artemisinin derivatives, such as artesunate, remain highly efficacious in treating P. falciparum malaria. Available data suggest that artemisinins, quinine, doxycyline, mefloquine-artesunate and azithromycin-artesunate combination therapy remain efficacious in the treatment of P. falciparum malaria in Bangladesh.

  4. Modeling HIV-1 drug resistance as episodic directional selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Murrell

    Full Text Available The evolution of substitutions conferring drug resistance to HIV-1 is both episodic, occurring when patients are on antiretroviral therapy, and strongly directional, with site-specific resistant residues increasing in frequency over time. While methods exist to detect episodic diversifying selection and continuous directional selection, no evolutionary model combining these two properties has been proposed. We present two models of episodic directional selection (MEDS and EDEPS which allow the a priori specification of lineages expected to have undergone directional selection. The models infer the sites and target residues that were likely subject to directional selection, using either codon or protein sequences. Compared to its null model of episodic diversifying selection, MEDS provides a superior fit to most sites known to be involved in drug resistance, and neither one test for episodic diversifying selection nor another for constant directional selection are able to detect as many true positives as MEDS and EDEPS while maintaining acceptable levels of false positives. This suggests that episodic directional selection is a better description of the process driving the evolution of drug resistance.

  5. Experience with pulmonary resection for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Yuji; Katsuragi, Naoya; Kita, Hidefumi; Toishi, Masayuki; Onda, Takahito

    2008-12-01

    Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis is becoming a global threat. It is a relatively new phenomenon, and its optimal management remains undetermined. We report our experience in using pulmonary resection for treating patients with this disease. Records were reviewed of 54 consecutive patients undergoing a pulmonary resection for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis at Fukujuji Hospital between 2000 and 2006. These patients were identified using the definition approved by the World Health Organization Global Task Force on extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in October 2006. Five (9%) patients (3 men and 2 women) aged 31-60 years met the definition. None of the patients was HIV-positive. Although the best available multidrug regimens were initiated, no patient could achieve sputum conversion. Adjuvant resectional surgery was considered because the patients had localized disease. Procedures performed included pneumonectomy (2) and upper lobectomy (3). There was no operative mortality or morbidity. All patients attained sputum-negative status after the operation, and they were maintained on multidrug regimens for 12-25 months postoperatively. All patients remained free from disease at the time of follow-up. Pulmonary resection under cover of state-of-the-art chemotherapy is safe and effective for patients with localized extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis.

  6. Magnitude of drug resistant shigellosis: A report from Bangalore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa H

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigella is an important cause of acute invasive diarrhea in children and others. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Shigella spp. isolated from diarrhoeal/ dysenteric patients in Bangalore was studied in our hospital from January 2002 to December 2007. One hundred and thirty-four isolates were identified as Shigella species. S. flexneri, S. sonnei , S. boydii and S. dysenteriae were accounted respectively for 64.9%, 21.6%, 8.2% and 3.7% of the total number of Shigella isolated. Of these 56 (41.8% were from children (0 to 14 years and 78 (58.2% were from adults and elderly patients. Over 70% of Shigella isolates were resistant to two or more drugs including Ampicillin and Co-trimoxazole. During 2002 to 2007, resistance to Ampicillin had increased from 46.7% to 68%. For Co-trimoxazole, though the resistance had gradually decreased from 100% to 72%, but still the resistance is high. Chloramphenicol resistance showed sudden decline from 73.3% to 25% from 2002 to 2003, but gradually has reached 48%. Nalidixic acid resistance was more than 70%. All isolates were sensitive to Ciprofloxacin during the period 2002 to 2004, but over the years the resistance pattern gradually increased up to 48%. Ceftriaxone had shown no resistance. The results of the study revealed the endemicity of Shigellosis with S. flexneri as the predominant serogroup. Children were at a higher risk of severe shigellosis. The results also suggest that Ampicillin, Co-trimoxazole, Chloramphenicol, Nalidixic acid and Ciprofloxacin should not be used empirically as the first line drugs in the treatment of Shigellosis. Periodic analysis and reporting of antibiotic susceptibility is an important measure to guide antibiotic treatment.

  7. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhigang [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Harbor Hospital Baltimore, MD (United States); Yedidi, Ravikiran S. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Wang, Yong [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Dewdney, Tamaria G. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Reiter, Samuel J. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Brunzelle, Joseph S. [Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Kovari, Iulia A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States); Kovari, Ladislau C. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  8. Drug induced superinfection in HIV and the evolution of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Vladimir V; Maury, Wendy J; Hadany, Lilach

    2008-01-01

    The rapid evolution of HIV drug resistance is a major cause of AIDS treatment failure. Superinfection, the infection of an already infected cell by additional virions, can be a major factor contributing to the evolution of drug resistance. However, the pattern and consequences of superinfection in HIV populations are far from fully understood. In this paper we study the implications of the fact that superinfection is regulated by HIV. We propose that superinfection is negatively associated with the success of the virus, so that more successful viruses are less likely to allow superinfection. We use computational models to investigate the effect that regulated superinfection would have on the evolution of drug resistance in HIV population. We find that regulated, fitness-associated superinfection can provide a distinct advantage to the virus in adapting to anti-HIV drugs in comparison with unregulated superinfection. Based on the results of the computational models and on current biological evidence, we suggest that the mechanism of fitness-associated regulation of coinfection in HIV is plausible, and that its investigation can lead to new ways to fight viral drug resistance.

  9. Metabolic engineering of E.coli for the production of a precursor to artemisinin, an anti-malarial drug [Chapter 25 in Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petzold, Christopher; Keasling, Jay

    2011-07-18

    This document is Chapter 25 in the Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology, 3rd edition. Topics covered include: Incorporation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene Biosynthetic Pathway into E. coli; Amorpha-4,11-Diene Pathway Optimization; "-Omics" Analyses for Increased Amorpha-4,11-Diene Production; Biosynthetic Oxidation of Amorpha-4,11-Diene.

  10. "Every drug goes to treat its own disease…" - a qualitative study of perceptions and experiences of taking anti-retrovirals concomitantly with anti-malarials among those affected by HIV and malaria in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangesho, Peter E; Reynolds, Joanna; Lemnge, Martha;

    2014-01-01

    , and in-depth interviews with health workers responsible for HIV care and members of the clinical trial team. Data were analysed inductively to identify themes and develop theoretical narratives. RESULTS: Results suggest that people living with HIV perceived malaria to be more harmful to them due...

  11. Fighting drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum: the challenge of artemisinin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsrichanalai, C; Sibley, C H

    2013-10-01

    Following a decade-long scale up of malaria control through vector control interventions, the introduction of rapid diagnostic tests and highly efficacious Artemisinin-based Combination Therapy (ACT) along with other measures, global malaria incidence declined significantly. The recent development of artemisinin resistance on the Cambodia-Thailand border, however, is of great concern. This review encompasses the background of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum, its situation, especially in the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS), and the responses taken to overcome this resistance. The difficulties in defining resistance are presented, particularly the necessity of measuring the clinical response to artemisinins using the slow parasite-clearance phenotype. Efforts to understand the molecular basis of artemisinin resistance and the search for molecular markers are reviewed. The markers, once identified, can be applied as an efficient tool for resistance surveillance. Despite the limitation of current surveillance methods, it is important to continue vigilance for artemisinin resistance. The therapeutic efficacy "in vivo study" network for monitoring antimalarial resistance in the GMS has been strengthened. GMS countries are working together in response to artemisinin resistance and aim to eliminate all P. falciparum parasites. These efforts are crucial since a resurgence of malaria due to drug and/or insecticide resistance, program cuts, lack of political support and donor fatigue could set back malaria control success in the sub-region and threaten malaria control and elimination if resistance spreads to other regions.

  12. [MOLECULAR MECHANISMS OF DRUG RESISTANCE NEISSERIA GONORRHOEAE HISTORY AND PROSPECTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoev, I N; Il'ina, E N

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococcus) is a strict human pathogen, which causes gonorrhea--an infectious disease, whose origin dates back to more than two thousand years. Due to the unique plasticity of the genetic material, these bacteria have acquired the capacity to adapt to the host immune system, cause repeated infections, as well as withstand antimicrobials. Since the introduction of antibiotics in 1930s, gonococcus has displayed its propensity to develop resistance to all clinically useful antibiotics. It is important to note that the known resistance determinants of N. gonorrhoeae were acquired through horizontal gene transfer, recombination and spontaneous mutagenesis, and may be located both in the chromosome and on the plasmid. After introduction of a new antimicrobial drug, gonococcus becomes resistant within two decades and replaces sensitive bacterial population. Currently Ceftriaxone is the last remaining antibiotic for first-line treatment of gonorrhea. However, the first gonococcus displaying high-level resistance to Ceftriaxone was isolated in Japan a few years ago. Therefore, in the near future, gonorrhea may become untreatable. In the present review, we discuss the chronology of the anti-gonorrhea drugs (antibiotics) replacement, the evolution of resistance mechanisms emergence and future perspectives of N. gonorrhoeae treatment.

  13. Flu channel drug resistance: a tale of two sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielak, Rafal M; Chou, James J

    2010-03-01

    The M2 proteins of influenza A and B virus, AM2 and BM2, respectively, are transmembrane proteins that oligomerize in the viral membrane to form proton-selective channels. Proton conductance of the M2 proteins is required for viral replication; it is believed to equilibrate pH across the viral membrane during cell entry and across the trans-Golgi membrane of infected cells during viral maturation. In addition to the role of M2 in proton conductance, recent mutagenesis and structural studies suggest that the cytoplasmic domains of the M2 proteins also play a role in recruiting the matrix proteins to the cell surface during virus budding. As viral ion channels of minimalist architecture, the membrane-embedded channel domain of M2 has been a model system for investigating the mechanism of proton conduction. Moreover, as a proven drug target for the treatment of influenza A infection, M2 has been the subject of intense research for developing new anti-flu therapeutics. AM2 is the target of two anti-influenza A drugs, amantadine and rimantadine, both belonging to the adamantane class of compounds. However, resistance of influenza A to adamantane is now widespread due to mutations in the channel domain of AM2. This review summarizes the structure and function of both AM2 and BM2 channels, the mechanism of drug inhibition and drug resistance of AM2, as well as the development of new M2 inhibitors as potential anti-flu drugs.

  14. Localization of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins PfMRP1, PfMRP2, and PfMDR5 at the Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavishe, R.A.; Heuvel, J.M.W. van den; Vegte-Bolmer, M. van de; Luty, A.J.; Russel, F.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spread of drug resistance has been a major obstacle to the control of malaria. The mechanisms underlying drug resistance in malaria seem to be complex and multigenic. The current literature on multiple drug resistance against anti-malarials has documented PfMDR1, an ATP-binding casse

  15. Multi drug resistant tuberculosis presenting as anterior mediastinal mass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parmarth Chandane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Enlargement of the mediastinal lymphatic glands is a common presentation of intrathoracic tuberculosis (TB in children. However, usually, the mediastinal TB nodes enlarge to 2.8 ± 1.0 cm. In this report, we describe a case of anterior mediastinal lymphnode TB seen as huge mass (7 cm on computed tomography (CT thorax without respiratory or food pipe compromise despite anterior mediastinum being an enclosed space. CT guided biopsy of the mass cultured Mycobacterium TB complex which was resistant to isoniazide, rifampicin, streptomycin ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and pyrazinamide. Hence, we report primary multi drug resistant TB presenting as anterior mediastinal mass as a rare case report.

  16. Physiological Stress-Induced Drug Resistance and its Reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    resistance but does shift the dose response curve . • Demonstrate that p53 status does not alter sensitization to drug by NFkB inhibitors such as PGA1...Figure 13). The presence of p53 (ON) shifts the dose response curve to the right but the response remains the same. PGA1 pretreatment, sensitizes...shift the dose response curve . • Demonstrate that p53 status does not alter sensitization to drug by NFkB inhibitors such as PGA1. • Demonstrated that

  17. Erythromycin resistance by L4/L22 mutations and resistance masking by drug efflux pump deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovmar, Martin; Nilsson, Karin; Lukk, Eliisa; Vimberg, Vladimir; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2009-01-01

    We characterized the effects of classical erythromycin resistance mutations in ribosomal proteins L4 and L22 of the large ribosomal subunit on the kinetics of erythromycin binding. Our data are consistent with a mechanism in which the macrolide erythromycin enters and exits the ribosome through the nascent peptide exit tunnel, and suggest that these mutations both impair passive transport through the tunnel and distort the erythromycin-binding site. The growth-inhibitory action of erythromycin was characterized for bacterial populations with wild-type and L22-mutated ribosomes in drug efflux pump deficient and proficient backgrounds. The L22 mutation conferred reduced erythromycin susceptibility in the drug efflux pump proficient, but not deficient, background. This ‘masking' of drug resistance by pump deficiency was reproduced by modelling with input data from our biochemical experiments. We discuss the general principles behind the phenomenon of drug resistance ‘masking', and highlight its potential importance for slowing down the evolution of drug resistance among pathogens. PMID:19197244

  18. Analysis of Etiology and Drug Resistance of Biliary Infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欣; 李秋; 邹声泉; 孙自庸; 朱峰

    2004-01-01

    The bile was collected from fro patients with biliary infections, with the bacterium isolated to study the sensitivity of each kind of the bacterium to several antibiotics in common use. Except G- bacterium, we also found some kinds of G+ bacterium in infection bile. G- bacterium were not sensitive to Clindamycin, G+ bacterium were sensitive to Ciprofloxacin. Escherichia coli,Xanthomonas maltophilia, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were sensitive to Ampicillin. G+ bacterium were not sensitive to Azactam. Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus faecium,Enterobacter cloacae were not sensitive to Ceftazidime. Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus coagulase negative, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa were not sensitive to Ceftriaxone Sodium. We didn't found any bacterium resistance Imipenem. The possibility of the existence of G+ bacterium as well as drug resistance should be considered n patients with biliary infections.The value of susceptibility test should be respected to avoid drug abuse of antibiotics.

  19. Clinical Prediction Rule of Drug Resistant Epilepsy in Children

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Clinical prediction rules (CPR) are clinical decision-making tools containing variables such as history, physical examination, diagnostic tests by developing scoring model from potential risk factors. This study is to establish clinical prediction scoring of drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) in children using clinical manifestationa and only basic electroencephalography (EEG). Methods: Retrospective cohort study was conducted. A total of 308 children with diagnosed epileps...

  20. Exploiting Knowledge on Leishmania Drug Resistance to Support the Quest for New Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefnawy, Aya; Berg, Maya; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; De Muylder, Géraldine

    2017-03-01

    New drugs are needed to control leishmaniasis and efforts are currently on-going to counter the neglect of this disease. We discuss here the utility and the impact of associating drug resistance (DR) studies to drug discovery pipelines. We use as paradigm currently used drugs, antimonials and miltefosine, and complement our reflection by interviewing three experts in the field. We suggest DR studies to be involved at two different stages of drug development: (i) the efficiency of novel compounds should be confirmed on sets of strains including recent clinical isolates with DR; (ii) experimental DR should be generated to promising compounds at an early stage of their development, to further optimize them and monitor clinical trials.

  1. Effect of mutation and genetic background on drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Lukas; Egger, Matthias; Bodmer, Thomas; Altpeter, Ekkehardt; Zwahlen, Marcel; Jaton, Katia; Pfyffer, Gaby E; Borrell, Sonia; Dubuis, Olivier; Bruderer, Thomas; Siegrist, Hans H; Furrer, Hansjakob; Calmy, Alexandra; Fehr, Jan; Stalder, Jesica Mazza; Ninet, Béatrice; Böttger, Erik C; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2012-06-01

    Bacterial factors may contribute to the global emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). Only a few studies have reported on the interactions between different bacterial factors. We studied drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from a nationwide study conducted from 2000 to 2008 in Switzerland. We determined quantitative drug resistance levels of first-line drugs by using Bactec MGIT-960 and drug resistance genotypes by sequencing the hot-spot regions of the relevant genes. We determined recent transmission by molecular methods and collected clinical data. Overall, we analyzed 158 isolates that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, or ethambutol, 48 (30.4%) of which were multidrug resistant. Among 154 isoniazid-resistant strains, katG mutations were associated with high-level and inhA promoter mutations with low-level drug resistance. Only katG(S315T) (65.6% of all isoniazid-resistant strains) and inhA promoter -15C/T (22.7%) were found in molecular clusters. M. tuberculosis lineage 2 (includes Beijing genotype) was associated with any drug resistance (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7 to 5.6; P mutations (OR, 6.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 20.7; P = 0.002). We found that the genetic strain background influences the level of isoniazid resistance conveyed by particular mutations (interaction tests of drug resistance mutations across all lineages; P tuberculosis drug resistance mutations were associated with various levels of drug resistance and transmission, and M. tuberculosis lineages were associated with particular drug resistance-conferring mutations and phenotypic drug resistance. Our study also supports a role for epistatic interactions between different drug resistance mutations and strain genetic backgrounds in M. tuberculosis drug resistance.

  2. A Quantitative Model to Estimate Drug Resistance in Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazier N. Baker

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP is an opportunistic infection that occurs in humans and other mammals with debilitated immune systems. These infections are caused by fungi in the genus Pneumocystis, which are not susceptible to standard antifungal agents. Despite decades of research and drug development, the primary treatment and prophylaxis for PCP remains a combination of trimethoprim (TMP and sulfamethoxazole (SMX that targets two enzymes in folic acid biosynthesis, dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS, respectively. There is growing evidence of emerging resistance by Pneumocystis jirovecii (the species that infects humans to TMP-SMX associated with mutations in the targeted enzymes. In the present study, we report the development of an accurate quantitative model to predict changes in the binding affinity of inhibitors (Ki, IC50 to the mutated proteins. The model is based on evolutionary information and amino acid covariance analysis. Predicted changes in binding affinity upon mutations highly correlate with the experimentally measured data. While trained on Pneumocystis jirovecii DHFR/TMP data, the model shows similar or better performance when evaluated on the resistance data for a different inhibitor of PjDFHR, another drug/target pair (PjDHPS/SMX and another organism (Staphylococcus aureus DHFR/TMP. Therefore, we anticipate that the developed prediction model will be useful in the evaluation of possible resistance of the newly sequenced variants of the pathogen and can be extended to other drug targets and organisms.

  3. Molecular Genetics of Drug-resistance in Epilepsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurupath Radhakrishnan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nearly one-third of newly diagnosed patients with epilepsy remain unresponsive to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, etiopathogenesis of which is poorly understood. The genes encoding the proteins that regulate the pharmacokinetics such as P-glycoprotein [ABCBI], major vault protein [MVP gene] and drug metabolizing enzymes [ABCB1, ABCG2, MVP, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, EPHX1, UGT1A1, UGT2B7], and pharmacodynamics such as sodium channels [SCN1A, SCN2A] and GABA receptors [GABRA1, GABRA6, GABRB2, GABRG2] of AEDs are under intense investigation to unravel the mysteries of AED-resistance. However, till today, a consistent and reliable result that could help the clinician either to predict drug resistance or to overcome it has not been forthcoming. The discrepant results may be related to variations in the definition of drug-resistance, heterogeneous patient populations, ethnic variations in the frequency distribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and the selection of SNPs. Understanding of these limitations of existing studies, hopefully, will help in designing better studies. Nearly one-third of newly diagnosed patients with epilepsy remain unresponsive toantiepileptic drugs (AEDs, etiopathogenesis of which is poorly understood. The genesencoding the proteins that regulate the pharmacokinetics such as P-glycoprotein[ABCBI], major vault protein [MVP gene] and drug metabolizing enzymes [ABCB1,ABCG2, MVP, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4, CYP3A5, EPHX1, UGT1A1, UGT2B7],and pharmacodynamics such as sodium channels [SCN1A, SCN2A] and GABAreceptors [GABRA1, GABRA6, GABRB2, GABRG2] of AEDs are under intenseinvestigation to unravel the mysteries of AED-resistance. However, till today, aconsistent and reliable result that could help the clinician either to predict drugresistanceor to overcome it has not been forthcoming. The discrepant results may berelated to variations in the definition of drug-resistance, heterogeneous patientpopulations, ethnic

  4. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  5. Catalysis and Sulfa Drug Resistance in Dihydropteroate Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Mi-Kyung; Wu, Yinan; Li, Zhenmei; Zhao, Ying; Waddell, M. Brett; Ferreira, Antonio M.; Lee, Richard E.; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W. (SJCH)

    2013-04-08

    The sulfonamide antibiotics inhibit dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), a key enzyme in the folate pathway of bacteria and primitive eukaryotes. However, resistance mutations have severely compromised the usefulness of these drugs. We report structural, computational, and mutagenesis studies on the catalytic and resistance mechanisms of DHPS. By performing the enzyme-catalyzed reaction in crystalline DHPS, we have structurally characterized key intermediates along the reaction pathway. Results support an S{sub N}1 reaction mechanism via formation of a novel cationic pterin intermediate. We also show that two conserved loops generate a substructure during catalysis that creates a specific binding pocket for p-aminobenzoic acid, one of the two DHPS substrates. This substructure, together with the pterin-binding pocket, explains the roles of the conserved active-site residues and reveals how sulfonamide resistance arises.

  6. Candidate genes for cross-resistance against DNA-damaging drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittig, Rainer; Nessling, Michelle; Will, Rainer D

    2002-01-01

    Drug resistance of tumor cells leads to major drawbacks in the treatment of cancer. To identify candidate genes for drug resistance, we compared the expression patterns of the drug-sensitive human malignant melanoma cell line MeWo and three derived sublines with acquired resistance to the DNA-dam...

  7. The new concepts on overcoming drug resistance in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang W

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Weisan Zhang,1 Ping Lei,1 Xifeng Dong,2 Cuiping Xu31Department of Geriatrics, 2Department of Hematology-Oncology, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 3Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: Lung cancer is one of the most deadly diseases worldwide. The current first-line therapies include chemotherapy using epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and radiotherapies. With the current progress in identifying new molecular targets, acquired drug resistance stands as an obstacle for good prognosis. About half the patients receiving epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatments develop resistance. Although extensive studies have been applied to elucidate the underlying mechanisms, evidence is far from enough to establish a well-defined picture to correct resistance. In the review, we will discuss four different currently developed strategies that have the potential to overcome drug resistance in lung cancer therapies and facilitate prolonged anticancer effects of the first-line therapies.Keywords: ALK receptors cancer stem cell, chemotherapy, EGFR-TKI, target therapy, pharmacology, molecular biology, biotherapy

  8. Definition of drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antituberculosis drugs in patients with multidrugresistant tuberculosis and TB with extremely drug resistant depending on the case of the disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryzhanovsky D.G.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There was studied the profile of drug resistance to the main (I line and reserve (II line antituberculosis drugs in patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, depending of the case of the disease. According to the randomized retrospective research 200 patients with MDR and XDR tuberculosis, who received treatment in the clinic of hospital Municipal institution «Dnipropetrovsk rigional clinical association «Phthisiology» Dnipropetrovsk regional Council» during the period 2010 – 2012 were involved. Data about patients contained the data on a case of the disease and the results of the test of drug sensitivity to MBT. XDR – TB was revealed in 7.5% of patients with MDR tuberculosis. In patients with MDR tuberculosis as compared with patients with XDR tuberculosis «new cases» were diagnosed in 19.5% against 18.5% (p <0.05. In patients with MDR tuberculosis and with XDR tuberculosis resistance to the antituberculosis drug more commonly developed to S - 88.5%, E - 55% and Z - 24%. The presence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB prevails in patients, who underwent previous courses of treatment with anti-TB drugs in case history as compared with patients with «new cases» of treatment. The development of resistance to anti-TB drugs depends on the availability of these drugs in the previous treatment regimens.

  9. Ethanol-resistant polymeric film coatings for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiaux, Y; Muschert, S; Chokshi, R; Leclercq, B; Siepmann, F; Siepmann, J

    2013-07-10

    The sensitivity of controlled release dosage forms to the presence of ethanol in the gastro intestinal tract is critical, if the incorporated drug is potent and exhibits severe side effects. This is for instance the case for most opioid drugs. The co-ingestion of alcoholic beverages can lead to dose dumping and potentially fatal consequences. For these reasons the marketing of hydromorphone HCl extended release capsules (Palladone) was suspended. The aim of this study was to develop a novel type of controlled release film coatings, which are ethanol-resistant: even the presence of high ethanol concentrations in the surrounding bulk fluid (e.g., up to 40%) should not affect the resulting drug release kinetics. Interestingly, blends of ethylcellulose and medium or high viscosity guar gums provide such ethanol resistance. Theophylline release from pellets coated with the aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion Aquacoat® ECD 30 containing 10 or 15% medium and high viscosity guar gum was virtually unaffected by the addition of 40% ethanol to the release medium. Furthermore, drug release was shown to be long term stable from this type of dosage forms under ambient and stress conditions (without packaging material), upon appropriate curing.

  10. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system.

  11. Impact of fungal drug transporters on fungicide sensitivity, multidrug resistance and virulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, de M.A.; Andrade, A.C.; Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Stergiopoulos, I.; Zwiers, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Drug transporters are membrane proteins that provide protection for organisms against natural toxic products and fungicides. In plant pathogens, drug transporters function in baseline sensitivity to fungicides, multidrug resistance (MDR) and virulence on host plants. This paper describes drug transp

  12. Drug delivery by a self-assembled DNA tetrahedron for overcoming drug resistance in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Ran; Kim, Da-Rae; Lee, Taemin; Yhee, Ji Young; Kim, Byeong-Su; Kwon, Ick Chan; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2013-03-11

    A DNA tetrahedron is employed for efficient delivery of doxorubicin into drug-resistant breast cancer cells. The drug delivered with the DNA nanoconstruct is considerably cytotoxic, whereas free doxorubicin is virtually non-cytotoxic for the drug-resistant cells. Thus, the DNA tetrahedron, made of the inherently natural and biocompatible material, can be a good candidate for the drug carrier to overcome MDR in cancer cells.

  13. Cross-resistance patterns and antigen expression in Vinca alkaloid- and other multiple drug-resistant human leukemic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W T; Danks, M K; Cirtain, M C; van Heiningen, J N

    1986-01-01

    The studies presented in this report demonstrate that Vinca alkaloid-resistant human leukemic lymphoblasts display patterns of cross-resistance to other drugs that differ from those of cell lines selected for primary resistance to anthracyclines or epipodophyllotoxins. These various drug-resistant cell lines also showed differential expression of an antigen recognized by an antibody that distinguishes VLB-resistant from VLB-sensitive cells. Furthermore, comparable levels of resistance or cross-resistance to one drug are not predictive of cross-resistance to other drugs. Our data suggest, then, that the MDR phenotype is complex and may be the result of many and different biochemical lesions. Thus, in order to predict MDR, it may be necessary to document more than one of these changes with specific reagents.

  14. Transmission of extensively drug-resistant and multidrug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in families identified by genotyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Li-ping; QIN Lian-hua; ZHANG Qing; SUN Hua; HAN Min; XIAO He-ping

    2013-01-01

    Background Diagnosis and appropriate treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) remain major challenges.We sought to elucidate that persons who share a household with drug resistance tuberculosis patients are at high risk for primary drug resistance tuberculosis and how to prevent these outbreaks.Methods We used 12-locus mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit and 7-locus variable-number tandem repeat to identify household transmission of extensively drug resistant and multiple drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in three families admitted in Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital affiliated with Tongji University.Drug susceptibility tests were done by the modified proportion method in the MGIT 960 system in the same time.Clinical data were also obtained from the subjects' medical records.Results All of the six strains were defined as Beijing genotype by the deletion-targeted multiplex PCR (DTM-PCR) identification on the genomic deletion RD105.Strains from family-1 had the same minisatellite interspersed repetitive unit (MIRU) pattem (232225172531) and the same MIRU pattern (3677235).Strains from family-2 had the same MIRU pattern (2212261553323) and the same MIRU pattern (3685134).Strains from family-3 did not have the same MIRU pattern and they differed at only one locus (223326173533,223325173533),and did not have the same VNTR pattern with two locus differed (3667233,3677234).Conclusions Household transmission exists in the three families.A clear chain of tuberculosis transmission within family exists.Tuberculosis susceptibility should be considered when there is more than one tuberculosis patients in a family.Household tuberculosis transmission could be prevented with adequate treatment of source patients.

  15. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral.

  16. "DRUG RESISTANCE PATTERN IN ISOLATED BACTERIA FROM BLOOD CULTURES"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sobhani

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia is an important infectious disease which may lead to death. Common bacteria and pattern of antibiotic resistance in different communities are different and understanding these differences is important. In the present study, relative frequency and pattern of drug resistance have been examined in bacteria isolated from blood cultures in Razi Hospital laboratory. The method of the study was descriptive. Data collection was carried out retrospectively. Total sample consisted of 311 positive blood cultures from 1999 to 2001. Variables under study were bacterial strains, antibiotics examined in antibiogram, microbial resistance, and patients' age and sex. The most common isolated bacteria were Salmonella typhi (22.2% and the least common ones were Citrobacter (1.6%. The highest antibiotic resistance was seen against amoxicillin (88.4%. The proportion of males to females was1: 1/1 and the most common age group was 15-44 (47.3%. Common bacteria and pattern of antibiotic resistance were different in some areas and this subject requires further studies in the future.

  17. Definition of drug-resistant epilepsy: is it evidence based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Clinical case definitions are the cornerstone of clinical communication and of clinical and epidemiologic research. The ramifications of establishing a case definition are extensive, including potentially large changes in epidemiologic estimates of frequency, and decisions for clinical management. Yet, defining a condition entails numerous challenges such as defining the scope and purpose, incorporating the strongest evidence base with clinical expertise, accounting for patients' values, and considering impact on care. The clinical case definition of drug-resistant epilepsy, in addition, must address what constitutes an adequate intervention for an individual drug, what are the outcomes of relevance, what period of observation is sufficient to determine success or failure, how many medications should be tried, whether seizure frequency should play a role, and what is the role of side effects and tolerability. On the other hand, the principles of evidence-based medicine (EBM) aim at providing a systematic approach to incorporating the best available evidence into the process of clinical decision for individual patients. The case definition of drug-resistant epilepsy proposed by the the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) in 2009 is evaluated in terms of the principles of EBM as well as the stated goals of the authors of the definition.

  18. Reversal of Vinca alkaloid resistance but not multiple drug resistance in human leukemic cells by verapamil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W T; Cirtain, M C; Look, A T; Ashmun, R A

    1986-02-01

    We examined the ability of verapamil, a Ca2+ channel blocker, to overcome Vinca alkaloid and multiple drug resistance in our CEM/VLB100 and CEM/DOX human leukemic lymphoblasts. Compared with the parent CCRF-CEM cells, CEM/VLB100 cells are approximately equal to 200- to 800-fold resistant to vinblastine and express cross-resistance to vincristine, doxorubicin, and other "natural product" drugs, as determined by comparing 50% inhibitory concentrations in a 48-h growth inhibition assay. Verapamil (10 microM) decreased the 50% inhibitory concentrations for Vinca alkaloids in CEM/VLB100 cells by approximately equal to 75- to 85-fold but caused only slight (approximately equal to 2- to 5-fold) decreases in 50% inhibitory concentrations for anthracyclines, epipodophyllotoxins, and other tubulin-binding drugs (colchicine and podophyllotoxin). Qualitatively similar results were obtained with doxorubicin-resistant cells, termed CEM/DOX; verapamil caused a 19-fold increase in doxorubicin toxicity but 67- and 3500-fold increases in the toxicities of vinblastine and vincristine, respectively. These results indicate that the effect of verapamil is relatively greater for Vinca alkaloids, with less pronounced effects for the other natural product drugs against which these cells express multiple drug resistance. In flow cytometric studies, individually nontoxic or minimally toxic concentrations of vinblastine plus verapamil caused measurable accumulation in the G2 + M phase as early as 4 h after the drug combination was added to cultures of CEM/VLB100 cells; this finding correlated with a comparable increase in the number of cells in mitosis and measurable decreases in the total number of cells. Since similar effects on cell cycle distribution, percentage of cells in mitosis, and cell number were seen when CEM/VLB100 cells were treated with toxic concentrations of vinblastine alone, we conclude that the primary toxicity of the vinblastine-verapamil combination stems from the

  19. Drug sensitivity and drug resistance profiles of human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nisana Tepsiri; Liengchai Chaturat; Banchob Sripa; Wises Namwat; Sopit Wongkham; Vajarabhongsa Bhudhisawasdi; Wichittra Tassaneeyakul

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of a number of chemotherapeutic drugs on five human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cell lines. The expressions of genes that have been proposed to influence the resistance of chemotherapeutic drugs including thymidylate synthase (TS), dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD), glutathione-S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), multidrug resistance protein (MDR1) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) were also determined.METHODS: Five human CCA cell lines (KKU-100, KKU M055, KKU-M156, KKU-M214 and KKU-OCA17) weretreated with various chemotherapeutic drugs and growth inhibition was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) assay. Semi-quantitative levels of gene expression were determined by a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results of IC50 values and the ratios of gene expression were analyzed by linear regression to predict their relationship. RESULTS: Among five CCA cell lines, KKU-M055 was the most sensitive cell line towards all chemotherapeutic drugs investigated, particularly taxane derivatives with IC50 values of 0.02-3 nmol/L, whereas KKU-100 was apparently the least sensitive cell line. When compared to other chemotherapeutic agents, doxorubicin and pirarubicin showed the lowest IC50 values (<5 μmol/L) in all five CCA cell lines. Results from RT-PCR showed that TS, MRP1, MRP3 and GSTP1 were highly expressed in these five CCA cell lines while DPD and MRP2 were only moderately expressed. It should be noted that MDR1 expression was detected only in KKU-OCA17 cell lines. A strong correlation was only found between the level of MRP3 expression and the IC50 values of etoposide, doxorubicin and pirarubicin (r = 0.86-0.98, ,P<0.05). CONCLUSION: Sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents is not associated with the histological type of CCA. Choosing of the appropriate chemotherapeutic regimen for the treatment of CCA requires knowledge of drug

  20. Deficient supplies of drugs for life threatening diseases in an African community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Marit

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Malawi essential drugs are provided free of charge to patients at all public health facilities in order to ensure equitable access to health care. The country thereby spends about 30% of the national health budget on drugs. In order to investigate the level of drug shortages and eventually find the reasons for the drugs shortages in Malawi, we studied the management of the drug supplies for common and life threatening diseases such as pneumonia and malaria in a random selection of health centres. Methods In July and August 2005 we visited eight out of a total of 37 health centres chosen at random in the Lilongwe District, Malawi. We recorded the logistics of eight essential and widely used drugs which according to the treatment guidelines should be available at all health centres. Five drugs are used regularly to treat pneumonia and three others to treat acute malaria. Out-of-stock situations in the course of one year were recorded retrospectively. We compared the quantity of each drug recorded on the Stock Cards with the actual stock of the drug on the shelves at the time of audit. We reviewed 8,968 Patient Records containing information on type and amount of drugs prescribed during one month. Results On average, drugs for treating pneumonia were out of stock for six months during one year of observation (median value 167 days; anti-malarial drugs were lacking for periods ranging from 42 to138 days. The cross-sectional audit was even more negative, but here too the situation was more positive for anti-malarial drugs. The main reason for the shortage of drugs was insufficient deliveries from the Regional Medical Store. Benzyl penicillin was in shortest supply (4% received. The median value for non-availability was 240 days in the course of a year. The supply was better for anti-malarial drugs, except for quinine injections (9 %. Only 66 % of Stock Card records of quantities received were reflected in Patient Records

  1. Drug resistance. K13-propeller mutations confer artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straimer, Judith; Gnädig, Nina F; Witkowski, Benoit; Amaratunga, Chanaki; Duru, Valentine; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Dacheux, Mélanie; Khim, Nimol; Zhang, Lei; Lam, Stephen; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Fairhurst, Rick M; Ménard, Didier; Fidock, David A

    2015-01-23

    The emergence of artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia imperils efforts to reduce the global malaria burden. We genetically modified the Plasmodium falciparum K13 locus using zinc-finger nucleases and measured ring-stage survival rates after drug exposure in vitro; these rates correlate with parasite clearance half-lives in artemisinin-treated patients. With isolates from Cambodia, where resistance first emerged, survival rates decreased from 13 to 49% to 0.3 to 2.4% after the removal of K13 mutations. Conversely, survival rates in wild-type parasites increased from ≤0.6% to 2 to 29% after the insertion of K13 mutations. These mutations conferred elevated resistance to recent Cambodian isolates compared with that of reference lines, suggesting a contemporary contribution of additional genetic factors. Our data provide a conclusive rationale for worldwide K13-propeller sequencing to identify and eliminate artemisinin-resistant parasites.

  2. Chrysin and its emerging role in cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2015-07-05

    This letter illustrates the significant chemosensitizing effects of chrysin to resistance cancer cells and refers to the article on "Combination of chrysin and cisplatin promotes the apoptosis of Hep G2 cells by up-regulating p53" by Li et al., published in your journal recently. Recent studies have demonstrated that chrysin is able to sensitize or kill cancer cells which are resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin, doxorubicin and adriamycin. Owing to its potential anti-cancer effects and devoid of toxicity to non-transformed cells, further research is required to completely explore its chemosensitizing effects in other cancers and also assess and evaluate its safety, before going for possible human application.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Novel Drug Resistance Loci in Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Van Tyne, Daria Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Malaria has plagued mankind for millennia. Antimalarial drug use over the last century has generated highly drug-resistant parasites, which amplify the burden of this disease and pose a serious obstacle to control efforts. This dissertation is motivated by the simple fact that malaria parasites have become resistant to nearly every antimalarial drug that has ever been used, yet the precise genetic mechanisms of parasite drug resistance remain largely unknown. Our work pairs genomics-age techn...

  4. Treatment options for carbapenem-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehman, J Alexander; Nguyen, M Hong; Doi, Yohei

    2014-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections worldwide. Because of various intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of resistance, most β-lactam agents are not effective against many strains, and carbapenems have played an important role in therapy. Recent trends show many infections are caused by carbapenem-resistant or even extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains, for which effective therapy is not well established. Evidence to date suggests that colistin constitutes the backbone of therapy, but the unique pharmacokinetic properties of colistin have led many to suggest the use of combination antimicrobial therapy. However, the combination of agents and dosing regimens that delivers the best clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicity is yet to be defined. Carbapenems, sulbactam, rifampin and tigecycline have been the most studied in the context of combination therapy. Most data regarding therapy for invasive, resistant A. baumannii infections come from uncontrolled case series and retrospective analyses, though some clinical trials have been completed and others are underway. Early institution of appropriate antimicrobial therapy is shown to consistently improve survival of patients with carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii infection, but the choice of empiric therapy in these infections remains an open question. This review summarizes the most current knowledge regarding the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance, and treatment considerations of carbapenem-resistant and XDR A. baumannii.

  5. Antibiotic Restriction Might Facilitate the Emergence of Multi-drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obolski, Uri; Stein, Gideon Y; Hadany, Lilach

    2015-06-01

    High antibiotic resistance frequencies have become a major public health issue. The decrease in new antibiotics' production, combined with increasing frequencies of multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, cause substantial limitations in treatment options for some bacterial infections. To diminish overall resistance, and especially the occurrence of bacteria that are resistant to all antibiotics, certain drugs are deliberately scarcely used--mainly when other options are exhausted. We use a mathematical model to explore the efficiency of such antibiotic restrictions. We assume two commonly used drugs and one restricted drug. The model is examined for the mixing strategy of antibiotic prescription, in which one of the drugs is randomly assigned to each incoming patient. Data obtained from Rabin medical center, Israel, is used to estimate realistic single and double antibiotic resistance frequencies in incoming patients. We find that broad usage of the hitherto restricted drug can reduce the number of incorrectly treated patients, and reduce the spread of bacteria resistant to both common antibiotics. Such double resistant infections are often eventually treated with the restricted drug, and therefore are prone to become resistant to all three antibiotics. Thus, counterintuitively, a broader usage of a formerly restricted drug can sometimes lead to a decrease in the emergence of bacteria resistant to all drugs. We recommend re-examining restriction of specific drugs, when multiple resistance to the relevant alternative drugs already exists.

  6. Ion channels and transporters in the development of drug resistance in cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Else Kay; Lambert, Ian Henry

    2014-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy is the major challenge in the treatment of cancer. MDR can develop by numerous mechanisms including decreased drug uptake, increased drug efflux and the failure to undergo drug-induced apoptosis. Evasion of drug-induced apoptosis through modulation of ion...

  7. Collateral Resistance and Sensitivity Modulate Evolution of High-Level Resistance to Drug Combination Treatment in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Evgrafov, Mari Cristina Rodriguez; Gumpert, Heidi; Munck, Christian

    2015-01-01

    revealed that resistance to drug combinations was mediated largely by mutations in the same genes as single-drug-evolved lineages highlighting the importance of the component drugs in determining the rate of resistance evolution. Results of this work suggest that the mechanisms of resistance to constituent......As drug-resistant pathogens continue to emerge, combination therapy will increasingly be relied upon to treat infections and to help combat further development of multidrug resistance. At present a dichotomy exists between clinical practice, which favors therapeutically synergistic combinations......, and the scientific model emerging from in vitro experimental work, which maintains that this interaction provides greater selective pressure toward resistance development than other interaction types. We sought to extend the current paradigm, based on work below or near minimum inhibitory concentration levels...

  8. Managing drug-resistant epilepsy: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalic L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Linda Dalic,1 Mark J Cook2,3 1Department of Neurology, Austin Health, 2St Vincent’s Hospital, Centre for Clinical Neurosciences and Neurological Research, 3Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia Abstract: Despite the development of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, ~20%–30% of people with epilepsy remain refractory to treatment and are said to have drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE. This multifaceted condition comprises intractable seizures, neurobiochemical changes, cognitive decline, and psychosocial dysfunction. An ongoing challenge to both researchers and clinicians alike, DRE management is complicated by the heterogeneity among this patient group. The underlying mechanism of DRE is not completely understood. Many hypotheses exist, and relate to both the intrinsic characteristics of the particular epilepsy (associated syndrome/lesion, initial response to AED, and the number and type of seizures prior to diagnosis and other pharmacological mechanisms of resistance. The four current hypotheses behind pharmacological resistance are the “transporter”, “target”, “network”, and “intrinsic severity” hypotheses, and these are reviewed in this paper. Of equal challenge is managing patients with DRE, and this requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, pharmacists, dietitians, and specialist nurses. Attention to comorbid psychiatric and other diseases is paramount, given the higher prevalence in this cohort and associated poorer health outcomes. Treatment options need to consider the economic burden to the patient and the likelihood of AED compliance and tolerability. Most importantly, higher mortality rates, due to comorbidities, suicide, and sudden death, emphasize the importance of seizure control in reducing this risk. Overall, resective surgery offers the best rates of seizure control. It is not an option for all patients, and there is

  9. Drug Resistance versus Spiritual Resistance: A Comparative Analysis from the Perspective of Spiritual Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Baqer Mohammadi Laini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Taking into account a few principles concerning human being, it becomes plausible that the human spirit would also have a similar reaction to spiritual “medicine” provided to it. In order to better understand how this is possible, we must consider the means by which the human spirit becomes resistant to spiritual remedies and compare them with the resistance developed by the body against physical drugs. As such, this research aimed at creating a comparative analysis between the elements that cause the human spirit to become resistant against spiritual remedies in comparison to the body’s resistance against physical treatments (e.g. drugs and other physical treatment. Methods: The research at hand highlights the conclusions of an overall study of the Holy Quran, books of Islamic narration, and extensive Internet research concerning this subject. With these resources, the various aspects of the spirit’s resistance against spiritual remedies were discussed in detail. Results: According to Holy Quran and Islamic narrations: Based on the expectations which God has of man, his heart (i.e. spirit has the potential to fall under one of two categories – positive or negative. An afflicted heart may at times, like an afflicted body, become resistant against a remedy designed to cure it. In both cases of physical or metaphysical resistance, the underlying element that causes this resistance as well as the symptoms which accompany it are similar to one another. Having considered the teachings found in religious texts, this research discovered the underlying causes of spiritual resistance, and outlined some solutions which can prevent this issue from arising in the first place. Conclusion: Based on the standards of health and spiritual wellbeing as outlined in Holy Quran, it is said that some hearts are unhealthy and require treatment and healing. In Holy Quran, there is also no doubt in it, guidance to the God wary

  10. Use of collateral sensitivity networks to design drug cycling protocols that avoid resistance development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imamovic, Lejla; Sommer, Morten

    2013-01-01

    New drug deployment strategies are imperative to address the problem of drug resistance, which is limiting the management of infectious diseases and cancers. We evolved resistance in Escherichia coli toward 23 drugs used clinically for treating bacterial infections and mapped the resulting...

  11. Extensively drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, South Korea, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sun Young; Baek, Jin Yang; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, So Hyun; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lee, Nam Yong; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2014-05-01

    To better understand extensively drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, we assessed clinical and microbiological characteristics of 5 extensively drug-resistant pneumococcal isolates. We concluded that long-term care facility residents who had undergone tracheostomy might be reservoirs of these pneumococci; 13- and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccines should be considered for high-risk persons; and antimicrobial drugs should be used judiciously.

  12. [Progress in researches on molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei-hua; Lu, Feng; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi

    2015-06-01

    Effective chemotherapy is the mainstay of malaria control. However, it is undergoing the serious threat by resis- tance of falciparum malaria to antimalarial drugs. In recent years, with the development of molecular biology technology, molec- ular markers have been widely used to monitor antimalarial drug resistance. This paper reviews the researches on the common molecular markers related to Plasmodiumfalciparum drug resistance.

  13. Amplification of a Gene Related to Mammalian mdr Genes in Drug-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Craig M.; Serrano, Adelfa E.; Wasley, Annemarie; Bogenschutz, Michael P.; Shankar, Anuraj H.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    1989-06-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum contains at least two genes related to the mammalian multiple drug resistance genes, and at least one of the P. falciparum genes is expressed at a higher level and is present in higher copy number in a strain that is resistant to multiple drugs than in a strain that is sensitive to the drugs.

  14. Managing drug-resistant epilepsy: challenges and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalic, Linda; Cook, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), ~20%–30% of people with epilepsy remain refractory to treatment and are said to have drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE). This multifaceted condition comprises intractable seizures, neurobiochemical changes, cognitive decline, and psychosocial dysfunction. An ongoing challenge to both researchers and clinicians alike, DRE management is complicated by the heterogeneity among this patient group. The underlying mechanism of DRE is not completely understood. Many hypotheses exist, and relate to both the intrinsic characteristics of the particular epilepsy (associated syndrome/lesion, initial response to AED, and the number and type of seizures prior to diagnosis) and other pharmacological mechanisms of resistance. The four current hypotheses behind pharmacological resistance are the “transporter”, “target”, “network”, and “intrinsic severity” hypotheses, and these are reviewed in this paper. Of equal challenge is managing patients with DRE, and this requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving physicians, surgeons, psychiatrists, neuropsychologists, pharmacists, dietitians, and specialist nurses. Attention to comorbid psychiatric and other diseases is paramount, given the higher prevalence in this cohort and associated poorer health outcomes. Treatment options need to consider the economic burden to the patient and the likelihood of AED compliance and tolerability. Most importantly, higher mortality rates, due to comorbidities, suicide, and sudden death, emphasize the importance of seizure control in reducing this risk. Overall, resective surgery offers the best rates of seizure control. It is not an option for all patients, and there is often a significant delay in referring to epilepsy surgery centers. Optimization of AEDs, identification and treatment of comorbidities, patient education to promote adherence to treatment, and avoidance of triggers should be periodically performed until further

  15. Triclosan Derivatives: Towards Potent Inhibitors of Drug-Sensitive and Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freundlich, Joel S.; Wang, Feng; Vilchèze, Catherine; Gulten, Gulcin; Langley, Robert; Schiehser, Guy A.; Jacobus, David P.; Jacobs, Jr., William R.; Sacchettini, James C.; (Einstein); (TAM); (Jacobus)

    2009-06-30

    Isoniazid (INH) is a frontline antitubercular drug that inhibits the enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase InhA. Novel inhibitors of InhA that are not cross-resistant to INH represent a significant goal in antitubercular chemotherapy. The design, synthesis, and biological activity of a series of triclosan-based inhibitors is reported, including their promising efficacy against INH-resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Triclosan has been previously shown to inhibit InhA, an essential enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis, the inhibition of which leads to the lysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using a structure-based drug design approach, a series of 5-substituted triclosan derivatives was developed. Two groups of derivatives with alkyl and aryl substituents, respectively, were identified with dramatically enhanced potency against purified InhA. The most efficacious inhibitor displayed an IC{sub 50} value of 21 nM, which was 50-fold more potent than triclosan. X-ray crystal structures of InhA in complex with four triclosan derivatives revealed the structural basis for the inhibitory activity. Six selected triclosan derivatives were tested against isoniazid-sensitive and resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Among those, the best inhibitor had an MIC value of 4.7 {mu}g mL{sup -1} (13 {mu}M), which represents a tenfold improvement over the bacteriocidal activity of triclosan. A subset of these triclosan analogues was more potent than isoniazid against two isoniazid-resistant M. tuberculosis strains, demonstrating the significant potential for structure-based design in the development of next generation antitubercular drugs.

  16. Second-line drug resistance in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases of various origins in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingen, J. van; Boeree, M.J.; Wright, A.; Laan, T.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Soolingen, D van

    2008-01-01

    SETTING: The Netherlands. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency of resistance to second-line drugs among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) cases and its correlation with patients' geographic origin. DESIGN: Retrospective laboratory database study of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberc

  17. High Levels of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance in a Study in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavu, Evelyn; Kave, Ellan; Mosoro, Euodia; Markby, Jessica; Aleksic, Eman; Gare, Janet; Elsum, Imogen A.; Nano, Gideon; Kaima, Petronia; Dala, Nick; Gurung, Anup; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Myatt, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Papua New Guinea is a Pacific Island nation of 7.3 million people with an estimated HIV prevalence of 0.8%. ART initiation and monitoring are guided by clinical staging and CD4 cell counts, when available. Little is known about levels of transmitted HIV drug resistance in recently infected individuals in Papua New Guinea. Methods Surveillance of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a total of 123 individuals recently infected with HIV and aged less than 30 years was implemented in Port Moresby (n = 62) and Mount Hagen (n = 61) during the period May 2013-April 2014. HIV drug resistance testing was performed using dried blood spots. Transmitted HIV drug resistance was defined by the presence of one or more drug resistance mutations as defined by the World Health Organization surveillance drug resistance mutations list. Results The prevalence of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 16.1% (95% CI 8.8%-27.4%) and 8.2% (95% CI 3.2%-18.2%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. The prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was 3.2% (95% CI 0.2%-11.7%) and 3.3% (95% CI 0.2%-11.8%) in Port Moresby and Mount Hagen, respectively. No protease inhibitor transmitted HIV drug resistance was observed. Conclusions The level of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor drug resistance in antiretroviral drug naïve individuals recently infected with HIV in Port Moresby is amongst the highest reported globally. This alarming level of transmitted HIV drug resistance in a young sexually active population threatens to limit the on-going effective use of NNRTIs as a component of first-line ART in Papua New Guinea. To support the choice of nationally recommended first-line antiretroviral therapy, representative surveillance of HIV drug resistance among antiretroviral therapy initiators in Papua New Guinea should be urgently implemented. PMID:28146591

  18. Pattern of drug utilization for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in urban Ghana following national treatment policy change to artemisinin-combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenkorang Ofori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Change of first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria to artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT is widespread in Africa. To expand knowledge of safety profiles of ACT, pharmacovigilance activities are included in the implementation process of therapy changes. Ghana implemented first-line therapy of artesunate-amodiaquine in 2005. Drug utilization data is an important component of determining drug safety, and this paper describes how anti-malarials were prescribed within a prospective pharmacovigilance study in Ghana following anti-malarial treatment policy change. Methods Patients with diagnosis of uncomplicated malaria were recruited from pharmacies of health facilities throughout Accra in a cohort-event monitoring study. The main drug utilization outcomes were the relation of patient age, gender, type of facility attended, mode of diagnosis and concomitant treatments to the anti-malarial regimen prescribed. Logistic regression was used to predict prescription of nationally recommended first-line therapy and concomitant prescription of antibiotics. Results The cohort comprised 2,831 patients. Curative regimens containing an artemisinin derivative were given to 90.8% (n = 2,574 of patients, although 33% (n = 936 of patients received an artemisinin-based monotherapy. Predictors of first-line therapy were laboratory-confirmed diagnosis, age >5 years, and attending a government facility. Analgesics and antibiotics were the most commonly prescribed concomitant medications, with a median of two co-prescriptions per patient (range 1–9. Patients above 12 years were significantly less likely to have antibiotics co-prescribed than patients under five years; those prescribed non-artemisinin monotherapies were more likely to receive antibiotics. A dihydroartemisinin-amodiaquine combination was the most used therapy for children under five years of age (29.0%, n = 177. Conclusion This study shows that though first-line therapy

  19. The problem of resistant Trichomonas vaginalis to antiprotozoal drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Poznyak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review presents recent data on the energy metabolism of Trichomonas vaginalis and ways the activation of metronidazole. The sensitivity of microorganisms to the 5-nitroimidazole by the presence of their enzyme systems, generating and transporting electrons, which can then transfer them to the nitro group of the drug. In T.vaginalis these are pyruvate ferredoxin-oxydoreductase, thioredoxin reductase and flavin reductase. The development of resistance T.vaginalis to metronidazole preparations of this multistep process, based on the gradual reduction (up to a loss activity hydrogenosomal enzymes and / or violation of the flavindependent metabolic pathways.

  20. Natural solution to antibiotic resistance: bacteriophages 'The Living Drugs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassim, Sabah A A; Limoges, Richard G

    2014-08-01

    Antibiotics have been a panacea in animal husbandry as well as in human therapy for decades. The huge amount of antibiotics used to induce the growth and protect the health of farm animals has lead to the evolution of bacteria that are resistant to the drug's effects. Today, many researchers are working with bacteriophages (phages) as an alternative to antibiotics in the control of pathogens for human therapy as well as prevention, biocontrol, and therapy in animal agriculture. Phage therapy and biocontrol have yet to fulfill their promise or potential, largely due to several key obstacles to their performance. Several suggestions are shared in order to point a direction for overcoming common obstacles in applied phage technology. The key to successful use of phages in modern scientific, farm, food processing and clinical applications is to understand the common obstacles as well as best practices and to develop answers that work in harmony with nature.

  1. 3-Halo Chloroquine Derivatives Overcome Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter-Mediated Drug Resistance in P. falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edaye, Sonia; Tazoo, Dagobert; Bohle, D Scott; Georges, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Polymorphism in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (PfCRT) was shown to cause chloroquine resistance. In this report, we examined the antimalarial potential of novel 3-halo chloroquine derivatives (3-chloro, 3-bromo, and 3-iodo) against chloroquine-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum. All three derivatives inhibited the proliferation of P. falciparum; with 3-iodo chloroquine being most effective. Moreover, 3-iodo chloroquine was highly effective at potentiating and reversing chloroquine toxicity of drug-susceptible and -resistant P. falciparum.

  2. Disinfectant-susceptibility of multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Shinoda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been an important problem in public health around the world. However, limited information about disinfectant-susceptibility of multi-drug-resistant strain of M. tuberculosis was available. Findings We studied susceptibility of several Japanese isolates of multi-drug-resistant M. tuberculosis against disinfectants, which are commonly used in clinical and research laboratories. We selected a laboratory reference strain (H37Rv and eight Japanese isolates, containing five drug-susceptible strains and three multi-drug-resistant strains, and determined profiles of susceptibility against eight disinfectants. The M. tuberculosis strains were distinguished into two groups by the susceptibility profile. There was no relationship between multi-drug-resistance and disinfectant-susceptibility in the M. tuberculosis strains. Cresol soap and oxydol were effective against all strains we tested, regardless of drug resistance. Conclusions Disinfectant-resistance is independent from multi-drug-resistance in M. tuberculosis. Cresol soap and oxydol were effective against all strains we tested, regardless of drug resistance.

  3. Pattern of primary tuberculosis drug resistance and associated treatment outcomes in Transnistria, Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgusev, O; Obevzenco, N; Padalco, O; Pankrushev, S; Ramsay, A; Van den Bergh, R; Manzi, M; Denisiuk, O; Zachariah, R

    2014-10-21

    This cohort study assessed drug susceptibility testing (DST) patterns and associated treatment outcomes from Transnistria, Moldova, from 2009 to 2012. Of 1089 newly registered tuberculosis (TB) patients with available DST results, 556 (51%) had some form of drug resistance, while 369 (34%) had multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). There were four cases of extensively drug-resistant TB. MDR-TB patients had poor treatment success (45%); human immunodeficiency virus positivity and a history of incarceration were associated with an unfavourable treatment outcome. This first study from Trans-nistria shows a high level of drug-resistant TB, which constitutes a major public health problem requiring urgent attention.

  4. Reversal of multidrug resistance in drug-resistant human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901/VCR by antiprogestin drug mifepristone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Qiang Li; Zhi-Biao Wang; Jin Bai; Jie Zhao; Yuan Wang; Kai Hu; Yong-Hong Du

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the reversal effect of mifepristone on multidrug resistance (MDR) in drug-resistant human gastric cancer cell line SGC7901/VCR and its mechanisms.METHODS: Expression of multidrug resistance-associated protein(MRP) was detected using reverse transcriptionpolymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). Flow cytometry was used to assay the expression of P-glycoprotein(P-gp), Bcl-2,Bax, and the mean fluorescent intensity of intracellular rhodamine 123 in the cells. Meanwhile, the protein levels of Bcl-2 and Bax were also detected by Western blotting analysis. The sensitivity of cells to the anticancer agent,vincrimycin(VCR), and the intracellular [3H]VCR accumulation were determined by tetrazolium blue (MTT) assay and a liquid scintillation counter, respectively.RESULTS: Expression of MRP and P-gp in SGC7901/VCR cells was 6.04-and 8.37-fold higher as compared with its parental SGC7901 cells, respectively. After treatment with 1, 5, 10, and 20 μmol/L mifepristone, SGC7901/VCR cells showed a 1.34-, 2.29-, 3.11-, and 3.71-fold increase in the accumulation of intracellular VCR, a known substrate of MRP,and a 1.03-, 2.04-, 3.08-, and 3.68-fold increase in the retention of rhodamine 123, an indicator of P-gp function, respectively.MTT assay revealed that the resistance of SGC7901/VCR cells to VCR was 11.96-fold higher than that of its parental cells. The chemosensitivity of SGC7901/VCR cells to VCR was enhanced by 1.02-, 7.19-, 12.84-, and 21.17-fold after treatment with mifepristone at above-mentioned dose. After 96 h of incubation with mifepristone 10 μmol/L, a concentration close to plasma concentrations achievable in human, the expression of Bcl-2 protein was decreased to (9.21±0.65)%from (25.32±1.44)%, whereas the expression of Bax protein was increased to (19.69±1.13)% from (1.24±0.78)%(P<0.01). Additionally, the effects of mifepristone on the expression of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins in SGC7901/VCR cells were further demonstrated by Western blotting analysis

  5. Detection of Low Frequency Multi-Drug Resistance and Novel Putative Maribavir Resistance in Immunocompromised Pediatric Patients with Cytomegalovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houldcroft, Charlotte J.; Bryant, Josephine M.; Depledge, Daniel P.; Margetts, Ben K.; Simmonds, Jacob; Nicolaou, Stephanos; Tutill, Helena J.; Williams, Rachel; Worth, Austen J. J.; Marks, Stephen D.; Veys, Paul; Whittaker, Elizabeth; Breuer, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed pediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1–27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analyzed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54) and C480F (UL97). In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of 11 subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome. PMID:27667983

  6. Detection of low frequency multi-drug resistance and novel putative maribavir resistance in immunocompromised paediatric patients with cytomegalovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Jane Houldcroft

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a significant pathogen in immunocompromised individuals, with the potential to cause fatal pneumonitis and colitis, as well as increasing the risk of organ rejection in transplant patients. With the advent of new anti-HCMV drugs there is therefore considerable interest in using virus sequence data to monitor emerging resistance to antiviral drugs in HCMV viraemia and disease, including the identification of putative new mutations. We used target-enrichment to deep sequence HCMV DNA from 11 immunosuppressed paediatric patients receiving single or combination anti-HCMV treatment, serially sampled over 1-27 weeks. Changes in consensus sequence and resistance mutations were analysed for three ORFs targeted by anti-HCMV drugs and the frequencies of drug resistance mutations monitored. Targeted-enriched sequencing of clinical material detected mutations occurring at frequencies of 2%. Seven patients showed no evidence of drug resistance mutations. Four patients developed drug resistance mutations a mean of 16 weeks after starting treatment. In two patients, multiple resistance mutations accumulated at frequencies of 20% or less, including putative maribavir and ganciclovir resistance mutations P522Q (UL54 and C480F (UL97. In one patient, resistance was detected 14 days earlier than by PCR. Phylogenetic analysis suggested recombination or superinfection in one patient. Deep sequencing of HCMV enriched from clinical samples excluded resistance in 7 of eleven subjects and identified resistance mutations earlier than conventional PCR-based resistance testing in 2 patients. Detection of multiple low level resistance mutations was associated with poor outcome.

  7. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in southern Brazil

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    Laynara Katize Grutzmacher

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The aim of this work was to evaluate the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT strains with mutations that could result in resistance to the main drugs used in treatment in a region with one of the highest numbers of tuberculosis (TB cases in southern Brazil. METHODS: Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA from 120 sputum samples from different patients suspicious of pulmonary tuberculosis who attended the Municipal Public Laboratory for Mycobacterium sp. diagnosis was directly amplified and analyzed by PCR-SSCP. The DNA was amplified in known hotspot mutation regions of the genes rpoB, ahpC, embB, katG, inhA, and pncA. RESULTS: The percentage of samples positive by culture was 9.2% (11/120; 5% (6/120 were positive by bacilloscopy and MT-PCR, and DNA fragments of the aforementioned resistance genes could be amplified from seven (7 of the eleven (11 samples with positive results, either by culture or PCR/bacilloscopy. All presented a SSCP pattern similar to a native, nonresistant genotype, with the ATCC strain 25177 as control, except for one sample (0.01%, which presented a SSCP profile demonstrating mutation at the embB gene. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with the empirical observations by physicians treating TB patients in our region of a low occurrence of cases that are refractory to conventional treatment schemes, in contrast to other parts of the country. Continued surveillance, especially molecular, is essential to detect and monitor the outbreak of MT-resistant strains.

  8. Surveillance of artemether-lumefantrine associated Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance protein-1 gene polymorphisms in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kavishe, Reginald A; Paulo, Petro; Kaaya, Robert D;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resistance to anti-malarials is a major public health problem worldwide. After deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) there have been reports of reduced sensitivity to ACT by malarial parasites in South-East Asia. In Tanzania, artemether-lumefantrine (ALu) is the re......BACKGROUND: Resistance to anti-malarials is a major public health problem worldwide. After deployment of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) there have been reports of reduced sensitivity to ACT by malarial parasites in South-East Asia. In Tanzania, artemether-lumefantrine (ALu...... falciparum positive dried blood spots on filter paper and rapid diagnostic test strips collected by finger pricks from patients attending health facilities in six regions of Tanzania mainland between June 2010 and August 2011 were used. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR......-RFLP) technique was used to detect Pfmdr1 SNPs N86Y, Y184F and D1246Y. RESULTS: There were variations in the distribution of Pfmdr1 polymorphisms among regions. Tanga region had exceptionally high prevalence of mutant alleles, while Mbeya had the highest prevalence of wild type alleles. The haplotype YFY...

  9. Clinical implications of molecular drug resistance testing for Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a TBNET/RESIST-TB consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, J; Boettger, E C; Cirillo, D; Cobelens, F; Eisenach, K D; Gagneux, S; Hillemann, D; Horsburgh, R; Molina-Moya, B; Niemann, S; Tortoli, E; Whitelaw, A; Lange, C

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a challenge to global tuberculosis (TB) control. Although culture-based methods have been regarded as the gold standard for drug susceptibility testing (DST), molecular methods provide rapid information on mutations in the M. tuberculosis genome associated with resistance to anti-tuberculosis drugs. We ascertained consensus on the use of the results of molecular DST for clinical treatment decisions in TB patients. This document has been developed by TBNET and RESIST-TB groups to reach a consensus about reporting standards in the clinical use of molecular DST results. Review of the available literature and the search for evidence included hand-searching journals and searching electronic databases. The panel identified single nucleotide mutations in genomic regions of M. tuberculosis coding for katG, inhA, rpoB, embB, rrs, rpsL and gyrA that are likely related to drug resistance in vivo. Identification of any of these mutations in clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis has implications for the management of TB patients, pending the results of in vitro DST. However, false-positive and false-negative results in detecting resistance-associated mutations in drugs for which there is poor or unproven correlation between phenotypic and clinical drug resistance complicate the interpretation. Reports of molecular DST results should therefore include specific information on the mutations identified and provide guidance for clinicians on interpretation and on the choice of the appropriate initial drug regimen.

  10. Higher Desolvation Energy Reduces Molecular Recognition in Multi-Drug Resistant HIV-1 Protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislau C. Kovari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Designing HIV-1 protease inhibitors that overcome drug-resistance is still a challenging task. In this study, four clinical isolates of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases that exhibit resistance to all the US FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors and also reduce the substrate recognition ability were examined. A multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease isolate, MDR 769, was co-crystallized with the p2/NC substrate and the mutated CA/p2 substrate, CA/p2 P1’F. Both substrates display different levels of molecular recognition by the wild-type and multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease. From the crystal structures, only limited differences can be identified between the wild-type and multi-drug resistant protease. Therefore, a wild-type HIV-1 protease and four multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases in complex with the two peptides were modeled based on the crystal structures and examined during a 10 ns-molecular dynamics simulation. The simulation results reveal that the multi-drug resistant HIV-1 proteases require higher desolvation energy to form complexes with the peptides. This result suggests that the desolvation of the HIV-1 protease active site is an important step of protease-ligand complex formation as well as drug resistance. Therefore, desolvation energy could be considered as a parameter in the evaluation of future HIV-1 protease inhibitor candidates.

  11. Epidemiology and patterns of drug resistance among tuberculosis patients in Northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Sahebi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB has emerged as an important global health concern and is on the rise throughout the world. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the epidemiology and pattern of TB drug resistance. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 180 pulmonary TB patients from two Northwestern provinces of Iran were selected. The first and second line drug susceptibility testing was carried out using the 1% proportion method on the Lφwenstein-Jensen medium. Full demographic, environmental and clinical history was evaluated. Results: Prevalence of resistance to any TB drug was 13.8%. Eight (4.4% patients had MDR-TB (2.4% in the province of East Azerbaijan and 9.3% in the province of Ardabil and one patient had extensively drug-resistant TB. Patient resistance to both isoniazid and streptomycin was the most prevalent at a rate of 8.3%. Patients showed the least resistance to ethambutol (2.8%. There was a significant relationship between the previous history of TB drug treatment and TB drug resistance. Migrants from rural to urban areas were in high-risk groups for the occurrence of TB drug resistance. Conclusion: In our study, prevalence of MDR was less than the global average. It is essential to monitor the patients with previous history of TB treatment and migrants by rapid and accurate techniques in terms of drug-resistance odds.

  12. Overcoming of multidrug resistance by introducing the apoptosis gene, bcl-Xs, into MRP-overexpressing drug resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohi, Y; Kim, R; Toge, T

    2000-05-01

    Multidrug resistance associated protein (MRP) is one of drug transport membranes that confer multidrug resistance in cancer cells. Multidrug resistance has been known to be associated with resistance to apoptosis. In this study, using MRP overexpressing multidrug resistant nasopharyngeal cancer cells, we examined the expression of apoptosis related genes including p53, p21WAF1, bax and bcl-Xs between drug sensitive KB and its resistant KB/7D cells. We also examined whether the introduction of apoptosis related gene could increase the sensitivity to anticancer drugs in association with apoptotic cell death. The relative resistances to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells evaluated by IC50 values were 3.6, 61.3, 10.4 and 10.5 to adriamycin (ADM), etoposide (VP-16), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS), respectively. The resistance to anticancer drugs in KB/7D cells was associated with the attenuation of internucleosomal DNA ladder formation in apoptosis. Of important, the mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in KB/7D cells was decreased in one-fourth as compared to that of KB cells among the apoptosis genes. The mRNA expression of bcl-Xs gene in a bcl-Xs transfected clone (KB/7Dbcl-Xs) was increased about 2-fold compared to that of KB/7Dneo cells, while the mRNA expression of MRP gene was not significantly different in KB/7bcl-Xs and KB/7Dneo cells. The sensitivities to anticancer drugs including ADM, VCR and VDS except VP-16 were increased in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells, in turn, the relative resistance in KB/7Dbcl-Xs cells was decreased to 1.4, 4.0, and 3.0 in ADM, VCR and VDS, respectively, as compared to those of KB/7Dneo cells. Of interest, the studies on the accumulation of [3H]VCR showed that the decrease of [3H]VCR accumulation in KB/7Dbcl-Xs was not significantly different from that of KB/7Dneo cells. Collectively, these results indicated that the mechanism(s) of drug resistance in KB/7D cells could be explained at least by two factors: a) reduced drug accumulation mediated by

  13. A reaction-diffusion system modeling the spread of resistance to an antimalarial drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacaer, Nicolas; Sokhna, Cheikh

    2005-04-01

    A mathematical model representing the difusion of resistance to an antimalarial drug is developed. Resistance can spread only when the basic reproduction number of the resistant parasites is bigger than the basic reproduction number of the sensitive parasites (which depends on the fraction of infected people treated with the antimalarial drug). Based on a linearization study and on numerical simulations, an expression for the speed at which resistance spreads is conjectured. It depends on the ratio of the two basic reproduction numbers, on a coefficient representing the difusion of mosquitoes, on the death rate of mosquitoes infected by resistant parasites, and on the recovery rate of nonimmune humans infected by resistant parasites.

  14. Prevalence of Pre-Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (Pre XDR-TB) and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB) among Pulmonary Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) at a Tertiary Care Center in Mumbai

    OpenAIRE

    Unnati D. Desai; Joshi, Jyotsna M

    2016-01-01

    Background: India is a high burden country for Tuberculosis (TB). As per the World Health Organization (WHO) statistics, 24000 cases of Multi Drug Resistant (MDR) TB were diagnosed in India in 2014. MDR-TB patients consist of a heterogeneous cohort and management has its challenges. Aims and objectives: We studied the prevalence of PreExtensively Drug Resistant TB (Pre XDR-TB) and Extensively Drug Resistant TB (XDR-TB) among patients of pulmonary MDR-TB not previous...

  15. Toward genetic transformation of mitochondria in mammalian cells using a recoded drug-resistant selection marker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young Geol Yoon; Michael Duane Koob

    2011-01-01

    Due to technical difficulties, the genetic transformation of mitochondria in mammalian cells is still a challenge. In this report, we described our attempts to transform mammalian mitochondria with an engineered mitochondrial genome based on selection using a drug resistance gene. Because the standard drug-resistant neomycin phosphotransferase confers resistance to high concentrations of G418 when targeted to the mitochondria, we generated a recoded neomycin resistance gene that uses the mammalian mitochondrial genetic code to direct the synthesis of this protein in the mitochondria, but not in the nucleus (mitochondrial version). We also generated a universal version of the recoded neomycin resistance gene that allows synthesis of the drug-resistant proteins both in the mitochondria and nucleus. When we transfected these recoded neomycin resistance genes that were incorporated into the mouse mitochondrial genome clones into mouse tissue culture cells by electroporation, no DNA constructs were delivered into the mitochondria. We found that the universal version of the recoded neomycin resistance gene was expressed in the nucleus and thus conferred drug resistance to G418 selection, while the synthetic mitochondrial version of the gene produced no background drug-resistant cells from nuclear transformation. These recoded synthetic drug-resistant genes could be a useful tool for selecting mitochondrial genetic transformants as a precise technology for mitochondrial transformation is developed.

  16. New drugs to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the case for bedaquiline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibert, Eric; Danckers, Mauricio; Rom, William N

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis develops spontaneous resistance mutants to virtually every drug in use. Courses of therapy select for these mutants and drug-resistant organisms emerge. The development of drug-resistant organisms has reached the point that drug resistance now threatens to undermine global success against tuberculosis (TB). New drugs are needed. The last new class of drugs specifically developed for treatment of TB was the rifamycins over 40 years ago. New funding sources and the development of product development partnerships have energized the TB drug development effort. There are now more TB drugs in development than at any time in the past. The first of these drugs to be developed and marketed was bedaquiline. Bedaquiline has an entirely novel mechanism of action and so should be active against otherwise highly resistant organisms. It acts on the transmembrane component of adenosine triphosphate synthase and acts by preventing electron transport. This raises the exciting possibility that bedaquiline may be active against less metabolically active organisms. Drug-drug interactions between rifamycins and the cytochrome P450-3A system will limit bedaquiline's utility and create complexity in treatment regimens. In clinical trials, treatment with bedaquiline added to a background multidrug-resistant TB regimen was associated with earlier culture conversion and higher cure rates, but there were unexplained excess deaths in the bedaquiline arms of these trials. Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be provided. They required a black box warning about excess deaths and require that a phase III trial be completed. A planned Phase III trial is being reorganized. While bedaquiline is an exciting drug and marks a dramatic moment in the history of TB treatment, its ultimate place in the anti-TB drug armamentarium is unclear pending the Phase III trial and

  17. HIV-1 drug resistance among antiretroviral treatment-naïve Ethiopian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mulu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In many African countries, access to antiretroviral treatment (ART has been significantly scaled up over the last five years. Nevertheless, data on drug resistance mutation are scarce. The objective of the current study was to determine the predominant subtypes of HIV-1 as well as to identify baseline mutations with potential drug resistance among ART-naïve patients from Ethiopia. Methods: Genotypic drug resistance on the entire protease and partial reverse transcriptase (codons 1–335 regions of the pol gene was determined by an in-house protocol in 160 ART-naïve patients. Genotypic drug resistance was defined as the presence of one or more resistance-related mutations, as specified by the consensus of the Stanford University HIV drug resistance database (HIVDB available at http://hivdb.stanford.edu/ and the 2011 International AIDS Society (IAS mutation list (http://www.iasusa.org/resistance-mutations/. Results: A predominance of HIV-1 subtype C (98.7% was observed. According to the IAS mutation list, antiretroviral drug resistance mutations were detected in 20 patients (13%. However, the level of drug resistance is 5.2% (8/155 when the most conservative method, HIVDB algorithms were applied. In both algorithms, none had major PI mutation and mutation-conferring resistance to NRTI and NNRTI were not overlapping. Conclusions: There is strong evidence for clade homogeneity in Ethiopia and low influx of other subtypes to the country. The level of transmitted drug resistance exceeds that of WHO estimates and indicates that many HIV-infected individuals on ART are practicing risk-related behaviours. The results also show that HIV drug resistance testing should be installed in resource limited settings.

  18. Efficacy of verapamil as an adjunctive treatment in children with drug-resistant epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicita, Francesco; Spalice, Alberto; Papetti, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    Verapamil, a voltage-gated calcium channel blocker, has been occasionally reported to have some effect on reducing seizure frequency in drug-resistant epilepsy or status epilepticus. We aimed to investigate the efficacy of verapamil as add-on treatment in children with drug-resistant epilepsy....

  19. Extremely Drug-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serovar Senftenberg Infections in Patients in Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Joensen, Katrine Grimstrup; Lukwesa-Musyani, Chileshe;

    2013-01-01

    Two cases of extremely drug-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Senftenberg isolated from patients in Zambia were investigated by utilizing MIC determinations and whole-genome sequencing. The isolates were resistant to, and harbored genes toward, nine drug classes, including fluoroquinolones...

  20. Transferable and non-transferable drug resistance in enteric bacteria from hospital and from general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, JK; Bak, AL; Bülow, P;

    1976-01-01

    Drug resistance to 8 different antibiotics in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from different hospitals and two groups of general practitioners was studied. Escherichia coli dominated among the 632 strains investigated. Drug resistance was found in 62% of the 512 hospital strains and in 38% of the 120...

  1. Transmission Intensity and Drug Resistance in Malaria Population Dynamics : Implications for Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Artzy-Randrup, Yael; Alonso, David; Pascual, Mercedes

    2010-01-01

    Although the spread of drug resistance and the influence of climate change on malaria are most often considered separately, these factors have the potential to interact through altered levels of transmission intensity. The influence of transmission intensity on the evolution of drug resistance has b

  2. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Primary Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Sheng Fen; ZHOU Yang; PANG Yu; ZHENG Hui Wen; ZHAO Yan Lin

    2016-01-01

    ObjectiveTo investigatetheprevalence of primary drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and associated risk factors in China.We also explored factors contributing tothe transmission of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). MethodsA total of 2794 representative,Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from treatment-naive patients were subjected to drug susceptibility testing, and risk factors for drug-resistant TBwere analyzed. We also analyzed MDR-TB strain sublineages, drug-resistance-conferring mutations, and risk factors associated with clustered primary MDR strains. ResultsAmong 2794Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from treatment-naive patients, the prevalence of any resistance to first-line drugs was 33.2%andthe prevalence of MDR-TB was 5.7%. We did not find any risk factors significantly associated with resistance to first-line drugs.The93 primary MDR-TB isolates were classified into six sublineages, of which, 75 (80.6%) isolates were the RD105-deleted Beijing lineage.The largest sublineage included 65 (69.9%) isolates with concurrent deletions of RD105, RD207, and RD181.Twenty-nine (31.2%) primary MDR strains grouped in clusters;MDR isolates in clusters were more likely to have S531LrpoBmutation. ConclusionThis study indicates that primary drug-resistantTBand MDR-TBstrains are prevalent in China,and multiplemeasures should be taken toaddress drug-resistant TB.

  3. Surveillance of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in Europe, 2003-2007.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devaux, I.; Manissero, D.; Fernandez de la Hoz, K.; Kremer, K.; Soolingen, D. van

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of second-line drug (SLD) susceptibility tests among multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) cases reported in 20 European countries aiming to identify extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) cases. A project on molecular surveillance of MDR TB cases was c

  4. Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in the Netherlands : Personalised treatment and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Altena, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) caused by bacilli that are resistant to the two major drugs, rifampicin and isoniazid is defined as Multi-Drug Resistant TB or MDRTB. MDRTB kills around 50% of people affected around the world. In contrast, treatment results of MDR-TB in the Netherlands (1985-2013) have consistentl

  5. Hospital costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Eva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to assess the hospital economic costs of nosocomial multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa acquisition. Methods A retrospective study of all hospital admissions between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2006 was carried out in a 420-bed, urban, tertiary-care teaching hospital in Barcelona (Spain. All patients with a first positive clinical culture for P. aeruginosa more than 48 h after admission were included. Patient and hospitalization characteristics were collected from hospital and microbiology laboratory computerized records. According to antibiotic susceptibility, isolates were classified as non-resistant, resistant and multi-drug resistant. Cost estimation was based on a full-costing cost accounting system and on the criteria of clinical Activity-Based Costing methods. Multivariate analyses were performed using generalized linear models of log-transformed costs. Results Cost estimations were available for 402 nosocomial incident P. aeruginosa positive cultures. Their distribution by antibiotic susceptibility pattern was 37.1% non-resistant, 29.6% resistant and 33.3% multi-drug resistant. The total mean economic cost per admission of patients with multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa strains was higher than that for non-resistant strains (15,265 vs. 4,933 Euros. In multivariate analysis, resistant and multi-drug resistant strains were independently predictive of an increased hospital total cost in compared with non-resistant strains (the incremental increase in total hospital cost was more than 1.37-fold and 1.77-fold that for non-resistant strains, respectively. Conclusions P. aeruginosa multi-drug resistance independently predicted higher hospital costs with a more than 70% increase per admission compared with non-resistant strains. Prevention of the nosocomial emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms is essential to limit the strong economic impact.

  6. Extraction and identification of exosomes from drug-resistant breast cancer cells and their potential role in cell-to-cell drug-resistance transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许金金

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore whether docetaxel-resistant cells(MCF-7/Doc)and doxorubicin-resistant cells(MCF-7/ADM)can secrete Exosomes and their potential role in cell-cell drug-resistance transfer.Methods Exosomes were extracted from the cell culture supernatants of MCF-7/Doc and MCF-7/ADM cells by fractionation ultracentrifugation,and were identified by transmission

  7. Drug-resistant tuberculosis control in China: progress and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Long; Yan Qu; Henry Lucas

    2016-01-01

    Background:China has the second highest caseload of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in the world.In 2009,the Chinese government agreed to draw up a plan for MDR-TB prevention and control in the context of a comprehensive health system reform launched in the same year.Discussion:China is facing high prevalence rates of drug-resistant TB and MDR-TB.MDR-TB disproportionally affects the poor rural population and the highest rates are in less developed regions largely due to interrupted and/or inappropriate TB treatment.Most households with an affected member suffer a heavy financial burden because of a combination of treatment and other related costs.The influential Global Fund programme for MDR-TB control in China provides technical and financial support for MDR-TB diagnosis and treatment.However,this programme has a fixed timeline and cannot provide a long term solution.In 2009,the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation,in cooperation with the National Health and Family Planning Commission of China,started to develop innovative approaches to TB/MDR-TB management and case-based payment mechanisms for treatment,alongside increased health insurance benefits for patients,in order to contain medical costs and reduce financial barriers to treatment.Although these efforts appear to be in the right direction,they may not be sufficient unless (a) domestic sources are mobilized to raise funding for TB/MDR-TB prevention and control and (b) appropriate incentives are given to both health facilities and their care providers.Summary:Along with the on-going Chinese health system reform,sustained government financing and social health protection schemes will be critical to ensure universal access to appropriate TB treatment in order to reduce risk of developing MDR-TB and systematic MDR-TB treatment and management.

  8. Fitness trade-offs in the evolution of dihydrofolate reductase and drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Marna S Costanzo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patterns of emerging drug resistance reflect the underlying adaptive landscapes for specific drugs. In Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes the most serious form of malaria, antifolate drugs inhibit the function of essential enzymes in the folate pathway. However, a handful of mutations in the gene coding for one such enzyme, dihydrofolate reductase, confer drug resistance. Understanding how evolution proceeds from drug susceptibility to drug resistance is critical if new antifolate treatments are to have sustained usefulness. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use a transgenic yeast expression system to build on previous studies that described the adaptive landscape for the antifolate drug pyrimethamine, and we describe the most likely evolutionary trajectories for the evolution of drug resistance to the antifolate chlorcycloguanil. We find that the adaptive landscape for chlorcycloguanil is multi-peaked, not all highly resistant alleles are equally accessible by evolution, and there are both commonalities and differences in adaptive landscapes for chlorcycloguanil and pyrimethamine. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that cross-resistance between drugs targeting the same enzyme reflect the fitness landscapes associated with each particular drug and the position of the genotype on both landscapes. The possible public health implications of these findings are discussed.

  9. Phylogeny and drug resistance of HIV PR gene among HIV patients receiving RT inhibitors in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazem Baesi; Majedeh Moradbeigi; Mehrdad Ravanshad; Ashrafolnesa Baghban

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey the level and patterns of reverse transcriptase-based drug resistance and subtype distribution among antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected patients receiving only reverse transcriptase inhibitors in Iran. Methods: A total of 25 samples of antiretroviral therapy experienced patients with no history of using protease inhibitors were collected. After RNA extraction, reverse transcriptase-nested PCR was performed. The final products were sequenced and then analysed for drug-resistant mutations and subtypes. Results: No drug resistant mutations were observed among the 25 subjects. The results showed the following subtypes among patients:CRF 35_AD (88%), CRF 28_BF (8%), and CRF 29_BF (4%). Conclusions: A significant increase in drug resistance has been noted in recently-infected patients worldwide. Subtype distributions are needed to perform properly-designed surveillance studies to continuously monitor rates and patterns of transmitted drug resistance and subtypes to help guide therapeutic approaches and limit transmission of these variants.

  10. Functional analysis of a wheat pleiotropic drug resistance gene involved in Fusarium head blight resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gui-ping; KONG Ling-rang; HOU Wen-qian; ZHANG Lei; WU Hong-yan; ZHAO Lan-fei; DU Xu-ye; MA Xin; LI An-fei; WANG Hong-wei

    2016-01-01

    The pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) sub-family of adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter had been reported to participate in diverse biological processes of plant. In this study, we cloned three novelPDR genes in Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistant wheat cultivar Ning 7840, which were located on wheat chromosomes 6A, 6B and 6D. In phylogeny, these genes were members of cluster I together with AePDR7 andBdPDR7. Subcelular localization analysis showed thatTaPDR7 was expressed on the plasmalemma. The quantitative real time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis showed that this gene and its probable orthologues in chromosomes 6B and 6D were both up-regulated sharply at 48 h after infected byFusarium graminearum and trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) in spike. When knocking down the transcripts of alTaPDR7 members by barely stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) system, it could promote the F. graminearum hyphae growth and made larger pathogen inoculation points in Ning 7840, which suggested that TaPDR7 might play an important role in response toF. graminearum. Although salicylic acid (SA), methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and abscisic acid (ABA) had been reported to possibly regulate wheat FHB resistance, here, we found that the three members ofTaPDR7 were negatively regulated by these three hormones but positively regulated by indoleacetic acid (IAA).

  11. Management of patients with multidrug-resistant/extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in Europe : a TBNET consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Christoph; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C.; Bothamley, Graham; Caminero, Jose A.; Carvalho, Anna Cristina C.; Chang, Kwok-Chiu; Codecasa, Luigi; Correia, Ana; Crudu, Valeriu; Davies, Peter; Dedicoat, Martin; Drobniewski, Francis; Duarte, Raquel; Ehlers, Cordula; Erkens, Connie; Goletti, Delia; Guenther, Gunar; Ibraim, Elmira; Kampmann, Beate; Kuksa, Liga; de lange, Wiel; van Leth, Frank; van Lunzen, Jan; Matteelli, Alberto; Menzies, Dick; Monedero, Ignacio; Richter, Elvira; Ruesch-Gerdes, Sabine; Sandgren, Andreas; Scardigli, Anna; Skrahina, Alena; Tortoli, Enrico; Volchenkov, Grigory; Wagner, Dirk; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Williams, Bhanu; Yew, Wing-Wai; Zellweger, Jean-Pierre; Cirillo, Daniela Maria

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB) substantially challenges TB control, especially in the European Region of the World Health Organization, where the highest prevalence of MDR/XDR cases is reported. The current management of patients wit

  12. Molecular diagnosis and treatment of drug-resistant hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Han; Park, Yong Kwang; Park, Eun-Sook; Kim, Kyun-Hwan

    2014-05-21

    Oral antiviral agents have been developed in the last two decades for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). However, antiviral resistance remains an important challenge for long-term CHB therapy. All of the clinically available oral antiviral agents are nucleoside or nucleotide analogues that target the activity of viral reverse transcriptase (RT), and all are reported to have resistant mutations. Since the hepatitis B virus (HBV) RT, like other viral polymerases, lacks proofreading activity, the emergence of drug-resistance occurs readily under selective pressure from the administration of antiviral agents. The molecular diagnosis of drug-resistant HBV is based on sequence variations, and current diagnostic methods include sequencing, restriction fragment polymorphism analysis, and hybridization. Here, we will discuss the currently available molecular diagnosis tools, in vitro phenotypic assays for validation of drug-resistant HBV, and treatment options for drug-resistant HBV.

  13. Clinical and operational value of the extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, G B; Besozzi, G; Girardi, E; Kliiman, K; Lange, C; Toungoussova, O S; Ferrara, G; Cirillo, D M; Gori, A; Matteelli, A; Spanevello, A; Codecasa, L R; Raviglione, M C

    2007-10-01

    Currently, no information is available on the effect of resistance/susceptibility to first-line drugs different from isoniazid and rifampicin in determining the outcome of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients, and whether being XDR-TB is a more accurate indicator of poor clinical outcome than being resistant to all first-line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs. To investigate this issue, a large series of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and XDR-TB cases diagnosed in Estonia, Germany, Italy and the Russian Federation during the period 1999-2006 were analysed. Drug-susceptibility testing for first- and second-line anti-TB drugs, quality assurance and treatment delivery was performed according to World Health Organization recommendations in all study sites. Out of 4,583 culture-positive TB cases analysed, 361 (7.9%) were MDR and 64 (1.4%) were XDR. XDR-TB cases had a relative risk (RR) of 1.58 to have an unfavourable outcome compared with MDR-TB cases resistant to all first-line drugs (isoniazid, rifampicin ethambutol, streptomycin and, when tested, pyrazinamide), and an RR of 2.61 compared with "other" MDR-TB cases (those susceptible to at least one first-line anti-TB drug among ethambutol, pyrazinamide and streptomycin, regardless of resistance to the second-line drugs not defining XDR-TB). The emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis confirms that problems in tuberculosis management are still present in Europe. While waiting for new tools which will facilitate management of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, accessibility to quality diagnostic and treatment services should be urgently ensured and adequate public health policies should be rapidly implemented to prevent further development of drug resistance.

  14. Prevalence and risk factors associated with drug resistant TB in South West, Nigeria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olusoji Daniel; Eltayeb Osman

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with drug resistant tuberculosis(TB) in South West Nigeria.Methods: A retrospective study conducted among pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) patients from Oyo and Osun States in South West Nigeria who had their culture and drug susceptibility test performed at the institute of tropical medicine Antwerp, Belgium between2007 and2009. Data on the patient’s characteristics were retrieved from the TB treatment card. Univariate analysis was performed to assess the risk factors for drug resistant tuberculosis. The Level of significance was atP<0.05.Results:Among the88 patients who had drug-susceptibility test result, there were50 males and38 females. Of the88patients,55 (62.5%) had strains resistant to at least one or more anti-drugs. The proportion ofTBcases with resistance to a single drug was12.7%. The multi-drug resistantTB (MDR-TB) rate was76.4%. The only significant factor for the development of drug resistance andMDR was the history of previous anti TB treatment (P<0.01). Other factors such as age[OR 0.86 (0.35-2.13);P=0.72] and gender[OR 1.24 (0.49-3.14);P=0.62] were not significantly associated with drug resistanceTB.Conclusions: The study highlighted a high prevalence ofMDR-TBamong the study population. History of previous TB treatment was associated withMDR-TB. There is an urgent need to conduct a nationalTB drug resistance survey to determine the actual burden and risk factors associated with drug resistance TB in the country.

  15. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

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    Felix Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1 single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase, and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems. Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients.

  16. Multimodal neuroimaging in presurgical evaluation of drug-resistant epilepsy

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    Jing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial EEG (icEEG monitoring is critical in epilepsy surgical planning, but it has limitations. The advances of neuroimaging have made it possible to reveal epileptic abnormalities that could not be identified previously and improve the localization of the seizure focus and the vital cortex. A frequently asked question in the field is whether non-invasive neuroimaging could replace invasive icEEG or reduce the need for icEEG in presurgical evaluation. This review considers promising neuroimaging techniques in epilepsy presurgical assessment in order to address this question. In addition, due to large variations in the accuracies of neuroimaging across epilepsy centers, multicenter neuroimaging studies are reviewed, and there is much need for randomized controlled trials (RCTs to better reveal the utility of presurgical neuroimaging. The results of multiple studies indicate that non-invasive neuroimaging could not replace invasive icEEG in surgical planning especially in non-lesional or extratemporal lobe epilepsies, but it could reduce the need for icEEG in certain cases. With technical advances, multimodal neuroimaging may play a greater role in presurgical evaluation to reduce the costs and risks of epilepsy surgery, and provide surgical options for more patients with drug-resistant epilepsy.

  17. Drug Resistance Strategies and Substance Use among Adolescents in Monterrey, Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Kulis, Stephen; Marsiglia, Flavio Francisco; Castillo, Jason; Becerra, David; Nieri, Tanya

    2008-01-01

    This study examined drug resistance strategies and substance use among adolescents from Monterrey, Mexico. The focus was strategies that U.S. adolescents use most often to resist using substances, including refuse (saying no), explain (declining with an explanation), avoid (staying away from situations where drugs are offered), and leave (exiting situations where drugs are offered). Using self-administered questionnaire data from a convenience sample of 327 Mexican students enrolled at two se...

  18. Evaluation of efflux pump gene expression among drug susceptible and drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardan Yamchi, Jalil; Haeili, Mehri; Gizaw Feyisa, Seifu; Kazemian, Hossein; Hashemi Shahraki, Abdolrazagh; Zahednamazi, Fatemeh; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-12-01

    Absence of mutations within the genes encoding drug targets in some phenotypically drug resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis suggests possible involvement of alternative mechanisms such as over-expression of efflux pumps. We investigated the expression level of Rv1410c, Rv2459, Rv1218c and Rv1273c efflux pumps gene by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) in 31 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis. Susceptibility to first-line drugs was performed using the proportion method. Twenty one isolates were characterized with drug resistance (DR), and among them 12 showed a significantly elevated level of expression (>4 fold) for at least one of the studied genes encoding for efflux pumps. Point mutations in the katG (codons 315 or 335) and rpoB (codons 456 and 441) genes were found in 42.85% and 66.6% of drug resistant isolates, respectively. Only one isolate showed mutation at position -15 of the inhA promoter region. Among the 7 isolates (33.33%) which had no mutation in the studied regions of drug target genes, 5 isolates showed over-expression for efflux pumps. Our results demonstrated that over-expression of efflux pumps can contribute to drug resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug... OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  20. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Jezmir

    Full Text Available To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS methodology.The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance.This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains.Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints.

  1. Label-free recognition of drug resistance via impedimetric screening of breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Eker

    Full Text Available We present a novel study on label-free recognition and distinction of drug resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7 DOX from their parental cells (MCF-7 WT via impedimetric measurements. Drug resistant cells exhibited significant differences in their dielectric properties compared to wild-type cells, exerting much higher extracellular resistance (Rextra . Immunostaining revealed that MCF-7 DOX cells gained a much denser F-actin network upon acquiring drug resistance indicating that remodeling of actin cytoskeleton is probably the reason behind higher Rextra , providing stronger cell architecture. Moreover, having exposed both cell types to doxorubicin, we were able to distinguish these two phenotypes based on their substantially different drug response. Interestingly, impedimetric measurements identified a concentration-dependent and reversible increase in cell stiffness in the presence of low non-lethal drug doses. Combined with a profound frequency analysis, these findings enabled distinguishing distinct cellular responses during drug exposure within four concentration ranges without using any labeling. Overall, this study highlights the possibility to differentiate drug resistant phenotypes from their parental cells and to assess their drug response by using microelectrodes, offering direct, real-time and noninvasive measurements of cell dependent parameters under drug exposure, hence providing a promising step for personalized medicine applications such as evaluation of the disease progress and optimization of the drug treatment of a patient during chemotherapy.

  2. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

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    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  3. Molecular approaches for detection of the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in Bangladesh.

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    Tafsina Haque Aurin

    Full Text Available The principal obstacles in the treatment of tuberculosis (TB are delayed and inaccurate diagnosis which often leads to the onset of the drug resistant TB cases. To avail the appropriate treatment of the patients and to hinder the transmission of drug-resistant TB, accurate and rapid detection of resistant isolates is critical. Present study was designed to demonstrate the efficacy of molecular techniques inclusive of line probe assay (LPA and GeneXpert MTB/RIF methods for the detection of multi-drug resistant (MDR TB. Sputum samples from 300 different categories of treated and new TB cases were tested for the detection of possible mutation in the resistance specific genes (rpoB, inhA and katG through Genotype MTBDRplus assay or LPA and GeneXpert MTB/RIF tests. Culture based conventional drug susceptibility test (DST was also carried out to measure the efficacy of the molecular methods employed. Among 300 samples, 191 (63.7% and 193 (64.3% cases were found to be resistant against rifampicin in LPA and GeneXpert methods, respectively; while 189 (63% cases of rifampicin resistance were detected by conventional DST methods. On the other hand, 196 (65.3% and 191 (63.7% isolates showed isoniazid resistance as detected by LPA and conventional drug susceptibility test (DST, respectively. Among the drug resistant isolates (collectively 198 in LPA and 193 in conventional DST, 189 (95.6% and 187 (96.9% were considered to be MDR as examined by LPA and conventional DST, respectively. Category-II and -IV patients encountered higher frequency of drug resistance compared to those from category-I and new cases. Considering the higher sensitivity, specificity and accuracy along with the required time to results significantly shorter, our study supports the adoption of LPA and GeneXpert assay as efficient tools in detecting drug resistant TB in Bangladesh.

  4. Molecular characterization of drug-resistant and drug-sensitive Aspergillus isolates causing infectious keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjan Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the susceptibilities of Aspergillus species against amphotericin B in infectious keratitis and to find out if drug resistance had any association with the molecular characteristics of the fungi. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty Aspergillus isolates from the corneal scrapings of patients with keratitis were tested for susceptibilities to amphotericin B by broth microdilution method. These included Aspergillus flavus (64 isolates, A. fumigatus (43 and A. niger (53. Fungal DNA was extracted by glass bead vertexing technique. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay was standardized and used to amplify the 28S rRNA gene. Single-stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP of the PCR product was performed by the standard protocol. Results: Of the 160 isolates, 84 (52.5% showed low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values (≤ 1.56 μg/ml and were designated as amphotercin B-sensitive. Similarly, 76 (47.5% had high MICs (≥ 3.12 μg/ml and were categorized as amphotericin B-resistant. MIC 50 and MIC 90 values ranged between 3.12-6.25 μg/ml and 3.12-12.5 μg/ml respectively. A. flavus and A. niger showed higher MIC 50 and MIC 90 values than A. fumigatus. The SSCP pattern exhibited three extra bands (150 bp, 200 bp and 250 bp each in addition to the 260 bp amplicon. Strains (lanes 1 and 7 lacking the 150 bp band showed low MIC values (≤ 1.56 μg/ml. Conclusion: A. niger and A. flavus isolates had higher MICs compared to A. fumigatus, suggesting a high index of suspicion for amphotericin B resistance. PCR-SSCP was a good molecular tool to characterize Aspergillus phenotypes in fungal keratitis.

  5. Transmission of HIV Drug Resistance and the Predicted Effect on Current First-line Regimens in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Hofstra (L. Marije); N. Sauvageot (Nicolas); J. Albert (Jan); I. Alexiev (Ivailo); F. Garcia (Federico); D. Struck (Daniel); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); B. Asjö (Birgitta); D. Beshkov (Danail); S. Coughlan (Suzie); D. Descamps (Diane); A. Griskevicius (Algis); O. Hamouda (Osamah); A. Horban (Andrzej); M.E.E. van Kasteren (Marjo); T. Kolupajeva (Tatjana); L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); M. Linka (Marek); O. Mor (Orna); C. Nielsen (Claus); D. Otelea (Dan); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); R. Paredes (Roger); M. Poljak (Mario); E. Puchhammer-Stockl E. (E.); A. Sonnerborg (Anders); D. Stanekova (Danica); M. Stanojevic (Maja); K. Van Laethem (Kristel); M. Zazzi (Maurizio); S. Zidovec Lepej (Snjezana); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles A. B.); J.-C. Schmit (Jean-Claude); A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie); E. Puchhammer-Stöckl (Elisabeth); M. Sarcletti (M.); B. Schmied (B.); M. Geit (M.); G. Balluch (G.); A.-M. Vandamme; J. Vercauteren (Jurgen); I. Derdelinckx; A. Sasse; M. Bogaert; H. Ceunen (H.); A. de Roo (Annie); S. De Wit; F. Echahidi (F.); K. Fransen; J.-C. Goffard (J.); P. Goubau; E. Goudeseune (E.); J.-C. Yombi (J.); P. Lacor; C. Liesnard (C.); M. Moutschen; L.A. Pierard; R. Rens (R.); J. Schrooten; D. Vaira; L.P.R. Vandekerckhove; A. van den Heuvel (A.); B. van der Gucht (B.); M. Van Ranst; E. Van Wijngaerden; B. Vandercam; M. Vekemans; C. Verhofstede; N. Clumeck (N.); K. van Laethem (Kristel); D. Beshkov; I. Alexiev; S.Z. Lepej (Snjezana); J. Begovac; L.G. Kostrikis (Leondios); I. Demetriades (I.); I. Kousiappa (Ioanna); V.L. Demetriou (Victoria); J. Hezka (Johana); M. Linka; M. Maly; L. MacHala; C. Nielsen; L.B. Jørgensen; J. Gerstoft (J.); L. Mathiesen (L.); C. Pedersen (Court); H. Nielsen; A. Laursen (A.); B. Kvinesdal (B.); K. Liitsola (Kirsi); M. Ristola (M.); J. Suni; J. Sutinen (J.); D. Descamps; L. Assoumou; G. Castor; M. Grude; P. Flandre; A. Storto; O. Hamouda (Osamah); C. K̈ucherer (C.); T. Berg; P. Braun; G. Poggensee; M. Daumer (Martin); J. Eberle; H. Heiken; R. Kaiser; H. Knechten (H.); K. Korn; H. Müller; S. Neifer; B. Schmidt; H. Walter; B. Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer (B.); T. Harrer (T.); D. Paraskevis (Dimitrios); A. Hatzakis (Angelos); A. Zavitsanou (A.); A. Vassilakis; M. Lazanas; L. Chini; A. Lioni; V. Sakka (V.); S. Kourkounti (S.); V. Paparizos (V.); A. Antoniadou (A.); A. Papadopoulos; G. Poulakou; I. Katsarolis; K. Protopapas; G. Chryssos (G.); S. Drimis (S.); P. Gargalianos; G. Xylomenos; G. Lourida; M. Psichogiou (M.); G.L. Daikos (G.); N.V. Sipsas; A. Kontos (Angelos); M.N. Gamaletsou; G. Koratzanis (G.); H. Sambatakou; H. Mariolis; A. Skoutelis; V. Papastamopoulos; O. Georgiou; P. Panagopoulos (P.); E. Maltezos; S. Coughlan (Suzie); C. de Gascun (Cillian); C. Byrne; M. Duffy; P. Bergin; D. Reidy; G. Farrell; J. Lambert; E. O'Connor; A. Rochford; J. Low; P. Coakely (P.); S. O'Dea; W. Hall; O. Mor; I. Levi (I.); D. Chemtob (D.); Z. Grossman (Zehava); M. Zazzi; A. de Luca (Andrea); C. Balotta (Claudia); C. Riva (Chiara); C. Mussini (C.); I. Caramma (I.); A. Capetti (A.); M. Colombo (Massimo); C. Rossi; F. Prati (Francesco); F. Tramuto; F. Vitale (F.); M. Ciccozzi; G. Angarano (Guiseppe); G. Rezza (G.); T. Kolupajeva; O. Vasins; A. Griskevicius (Algis); V. Lipnickiene; J.C. Schmit; D. Struck (Daniel); N. Sauvageot; R. Hemmer (R.); V. Arendt (V.); C. Michaux; T. Staub (T.); C. Sequin-Devaux; A.M.J. Wensing (Annemarie); C.A. Boucher (Charles); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David); A. Van Kessel; P.H.M. Van Bentum; K. Brinkman; B.J. Connell; M.E. van der Ende (Marchina); I.M. Hoepelman (Ilja Mohandas); M.E.E. van Kasteren (Marjo); M. Kuipers; N. Langebeek (Nienke); C. Richter; R.M.W.J. Santegoets (R. M W J); L. Schrijnders-Gudde (L.); R. Schuurman (Rob); B.J.M. van de Ven (B. J M); B. Åsjö (Birgitta); A.-M.B. Kran (A.-M. Bakken); V. Ormaasen (Vidar); P. Aavitsland (P.); A. Horban (Andrzej); J. Stanczak (J.); G.P. Stanczak (G.); E. Firlag-Burkacka (E.); A. Wiercinska-Drapalo; E. Jablonowska (E.); E. Maolepsza; M. Leszczyszyn-Pynka (M.); W. Szata (W.); R.J. Camacho (Ricardo Jorge); A. de Palma (Andre); F. Borges (F.); T. Paixão; V. Duque (V.); F. Araújo; D. Otelea; C. Paraschiv (Corina); A.M. Tudor; R. Cernat; C. Chiriac; F. Dumitrescu; L.J. Prisecariu; M. Stanojevic (Maja); D.J. Jevtovic (D.); D. Salemovic (D.); D. Stanekova; M. Habekova (M.); Z. Chabadová; T. Drobkova; P. Bukovinova; A. Shunnar; P. Truska; M. Poljak (Mario); M.M. Lunar (Maja M.); D. Babic; J. Tomazic (J.); S. Vidmar (Suzanna); T. Vovko; P. Karner (P.); F. Garcia; R. Paredes (Roger); S. Monge; S. Moreno; J. Del Amo; V. Asensi; J.L. Sirvent; C. de Mendoza (Carmen); R. Delgado; F. Gutiérrez; J. Berenguer; S. Garcia-Bujalance; N. Stella; I. De Los Santos; J.R. Blanco; D. Dalmau; M. Rivero; F. Segura; M.J.P. Elías (M. J. Pcrossed); M. Alvarez; N. Chueca; C. Rodríguez-Martín; C. Vidal; J.C. Palomares; I. Viciana; P. Viciana; J. Cordoba; A. Aguilera; P. Domingo; M.J. Galindo; C. Miralles; M.A. Del Pozo; E. Ribera; C. Iribarren (Carlos); L. Ruiz; J. De La Torre; F. Vidal; B. Clotet (Bonaventura); J. Albert; A. Heidarian; K. Aperia-Peipke (K.); M. Axelsson; M. Mild; A. Karlsson; A. Sonnerborg (Anders); A. Thalme; L. Navénr; G. Bratt (G.); A. Karlsson; A. Blaxhult; M. Gisslénn; B. Svennerholm; I.-M. Bergbrant (I.); P. Bj̈orkman (P.); C. Säll; A. Mellgren; A. Lindholm; N. Kuylenstierna; R. Montelius; F. Azimi; B. Johansson; M. Carlsson; E. Johansson; B. Ljungberg; H. Ekvall; A. Strand; S. Mäkitalo; S. Öberg; P. Holmblad; M. Höfer; H. Holmberg; P. Josefson; U. Ryding

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Numerous studies have shown that baseline drug resistance patterns may influence the outcome of antiretroviral therapy. Therefore, guidelines recommend drug resistance testing to guide the choice of initial regimen. In addition to optimizing individual patient management, the

  6. European recommendations for the clinical use of HIV drug resistance testing: 2011 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo J; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca;

    2011-01-01

    ) consider testing earliest detectable plasma RNA when a successful nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing therapy was inappropriately interrupted; (v) genotype source patient when postexposure prophylaxis is considered; for HIV-2, (vi) consider resistance testing where treatment change......The European HIV Drug Resistance Guidelines Panel, established to make recommendations to clinicians and virologists, felt that sufficient new information has become available to warrant an update of its recommendations, explained in both pocket guidelines and this full paper. The Panel makes...... the following recommendations concerning the indications for resistance testing: for HIV-1 (i) test earliest sample for protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance in drug-naive patients with acute or chronic infection; (ii) test protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance at virologic failure...

  7. Resistance to antimalarial drugs: An endless world war against Plasmodium that we risk losing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severini, Carlo; Menegon, Michela

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this review was to describe the 'state of the art' of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to the main antimalarial drugs. A brief note on Plasmodium vivax is also included. Resistance of P. falciparum to the various antimalarials has a long history of hits and misses. During the last 60 years, the pace at which this parasite has developed resistance to antimalarial drugs has exceeded the pace at which new drugs have been developed. In the last decade, the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) as a first-line drug treatment for non-complicated P. falciparum malaria had led to extraordinary results in disease control, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. However, the emergence and spread of resistance to artemisinin in Southeast Asia jeopardise these results. In conclusion, the possible spread of artemisinin resistance in Africa should be considered as an epochal disaster.

  8. STUDIES ON ANTIBACTERIAL EFFECT OF APAMARGA (ACHYRANTHES ASPERA ON MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT CLINICAL ISOLATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Usha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports on emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria are cause of concern in medical world. Several ayurvedic drugs have been proved to contain the antimicrobial activity. Literature on effect of ayurvedic drugs on multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens is limited. Present study reports the antimicrobial effect of Achyranthes aspera (Apamarga crude extracts on the clinical isolates of multidrug resistant bacteria. The drug was evaluated by using phytochemical tests. Crude extracts of aqueous, methanol, ethanol and chloroform was prepared. Antibacterial activity against clinically isolated multidrug resistant bacteria belonging to groups of bacillus, citrobacter, E.coli, klebsiella, proteus and salmonella was tested. The drug showed highest efficacy against Bacillus organism while least effectiveness on Proteus spp bacteria. Results of the study conclude that the medicinal plant A. aspera might be useful against multidrug resistance in pathogens of clinical importance.

  9. European recommendations for the clinical use of HIV drug resistance testing: 2011 update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Camacho, Ricardo J; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca;

    2011-01-01

    The European HIV Drug Resistance Guidelines Panel, established to make recommendations to clinicians and virologists, felt that sufficient new information has become available to warrant an update of its recommendations, explained in both pocket guidelines and this full paper. The Panel makes...... the following recommendations concerning the indications for resistance testing: for HIV-1 (i) test earliest sample for protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance in drug-naive patients with acute or chronic infection; (ii) test protease and reverse transcriptase drug resistance at virologic failure......) consider testing earliest detectable plasma RNA when a successful nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-containing therapy was inappropriately interrupted; (v) genotype source patient when postexposure prophylaxis is considered; for HIV-2, (vi) consider resistance testing where treatment change...

  10. The emergence of drug resistant HIV variants and novel anti-retroviral therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koosha Paydary; Parisa Khaghani; Sahra Emamzadeh-Fard; SeyedAhmad SeyedAlinaghi; Kazem Baesi

    2013-01-01

    After its identification in 1980s, HIV has infected more than 30 million people worldwide. In the era of highly active anti-retroviral therapy, anti-retroviral drug resistance results from insufficient anti-retroviral pressure, which may lead to treatment failure. Preliminary studies support the idea that anti-retroviral drug resistance has evolved largely as a result of low-adherence of patients to therapy and extensive use of anti-retroviral drugs in the developed world;however, a highly heterogeneous horde of viral quasi-species are currently circulating in developing nations. Thus, the prioritizing of strategies adopted in such two worlds should be quite different considering the varying anti-retroviral drug resistance prevalence. In this article, we explore differences in anti-retroviral drug resistance patterns between developed and developing countries, as they represent two distinct ecological niches of HIV from an evolutionary standpoint.

  11. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Brandon Ogbunugafor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions-drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR to two related inhibitors-pyrimethamine and cycloguanil-across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis influence paths taken at evolutionary "forks in the road" that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  12. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C Brandon; Wylie, C Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M; Hartl, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions-drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors-pyrimethamine and cycloguanil-across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary "forks in the road" that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with regards to their

  13. Adaptive Landscape by Environment Interactions Dictate Evolutionary Dynamics in Models of Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C. Brandon; Wylie, C. Scott; Diakite, Ibrahim; Weinreich, Daniel M.; Hartl, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    The adaptive landscape analogy has found practical use in recent years, as many have explored how their understanding can inform therapeutic strategies that subvert the evolution of drug resistance. A major barrier to applications of these concepts is a lack of detail concerning how the environment affects adaptive landscape topography, and consequently, the outcome of drug treatment. Here we combine empirical data, evolutionary theory, and computer simulations towards dissecting adaptive landscape by environment interactions for the evolution of drug resistance in two dimensions—drug concentration and drug type. We do so by studying the resistance mediated by Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) to two related inhibitors—pyrimethamine and cycloguanil—across a breadth of drug concentrations. We first examine whether the adaptive landscapes for the two drugs are consistent with common definitions of cross-resistance. We then reconstruct all accessible pathways across the landscape, observing how their structure changes with drug environment. We offer a mechanism for non-linearity in the topography of accessible pathways by calculating of the interaction between mutation effects and drug environment, which reveals rampant patterns of epistasis. We then simulate evolution in several different drug environments to observe how these individual mutation effects (and patterns of epistasis) influence paths taken at evolutionary “forks in the road” that dictate adaptive dynamics in silico. In doing so, we reveal how classic metrics like the IC50 and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) are dubious proxies for understanding how evolution will occur across drug environments. We also consider how the findings reveal ambiguities in the cross-resistance concept, as subtle differences in adaptive landscape topography between otherwise equivalent drugs can drive drastically different evolutionary outcomes. Summarizing, we discuss the results with

  14. Prevalenoe of Drug - Resistant Staphylococci in Teheran University Hospital Wards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Shafa

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available 1 Fifty coagulase posittve strains of staphylococc~~ ~folated fr.o~ .the nose"nand wrist of Hospital nurses have been examined for sensltfvlty to pemcilhn, tetracyclines,"nchloramphenicol, dihydrostreptomycin, erythrorriycm, neomycin, kana.n:ycin,"nbacitracin, polymyxin-B and the triple sulfa. The percentages of fully sensittve strains at the present are as followe:                                       Erythromycin                                       100%"nNeomycin                                             78%"nKanamycin                                            78%"nChloramphenicol                                     68%"nDihydrostreptomycin                               52%"nPenicillin                                                18%"nTetracyclines                                         16%"nPolymyxin-B                                            1%"nTriple sulfa                                              0%"n2 The following topics have been discussed:"na The origin anr" mechanism of drug resistance"nb Cross-resistr.nee"nc The hospital epidemiology of Staphylococcus"nd The clinical implications of Staphylococcus drug-resistance

  15. Proteomics for Drug Resistance on the Food Chain? Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli Proteomes from Slaughtered Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Sónia; Silva, Nuno; Hébraud, Michel; Santos, Hugo M; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio Dinis; Pinto, Luís; Pereira, José E; Capelo, José-Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2016-06-01

    Understanding global drug resistance demands an integrated vision, focusing on both human and veterinary medicine. Omics technologies offer new vistas to decipher mechanisms of drug resistance in the food chain. For example, Escherichia coli resistance to major antibiotics is increasing whereas multidrug resistance (MDR) strains are now commonly found in humans and animals. Little is known about the structural and metabolic changes in the cell that trigger resistance to antimicrobial agents. Proteomics is an emerging field that is used to advance our knowledge in global health and drug resistance in the food chain. In the present proteomic analysis, we offer an overview of the global protein expression of different MDR E. coli strains from fecal samples of pigs slaughtered for human consumption. A full proteomic survey of the drug-resistant strains SU60, SU62, SU76, and SU23, under normal growth conditions, was made by two-dimensional electrophoresis, identifying proteins by MALDI-TOF/MS. The proteomes of these four E. coli strains with different genetic profiles were compared in detail. Identical transport, stress response, or metabolic proteins were discovered in the four strains. Several of the identified proteins are essential in bacterial pathogenesis (GAPDH, LuxS, FKBPs), development of bacterial resistance (Omp's, TolC, GroEL, ClpB, or SOD), and potential antibacterial targets (FBPA, FabB, ACC's, or Fab1). Effective therapies against resistant bacteria are crucial and, to accomplish this, a comprehensive understanding of putative resistance mechanisms is essential. Moving forward, we suggest that multi-omics research will further improve our knowledge about bacterial growth and virulence on the food chain, especially under antibiotic stress.

  16. Differential Persistence of Transmitted HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutation Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vivek; Sucupira, Maria C.; Bacchetti, Peter; Hartogensis, Wendy; Diaz, Ricardo S.; Kallas, Esper G.; Janini, Luiz M.; Liegler, Teri; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Grant, Robert M.; Cortes, Rodrigo; Deeks, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance (TDR) mutations can become replaced over time by emerging wild-type viral variants with improved fitness. The impact of class-specific mutations on this rate of mutation replacement is uncertain. Methods. We studied participants with acute and/or early HIV infection and TDR in 2 cohorts (San Francisco, California, and São Paulo, Brazil). We followed baseline mutations longitudinally and compared replacement rates between mutation classes with use of a parametric proportional hazards model. Results. Among 75 individuals with 195 TDR mutations, M184V/I became undetectable markedly faster than did nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations (hazard ratio, 77.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 14.7–408.2; P < .0001), while protease inhibitor and NNRTI replacement rates were similar. Higher plasma HIV-1 RNA level predicted faster mutation replacement, but this was not statistically significant (hazard ratio, 1.71 log10 copies/mL; 95% CI, .90–3.25 log10 copies/mL; P = .11). We found substantial person-to-person variability in mutation replacement rates not accounted for by viral load or mutation class (P < .0001). Conclusions. The rapid replacement of M184V/I mutations is consistent with known fitness costs. The long-term persistence of NNRTI and protease inhibitor mutations suggests a risk for person-to-person propagation. Host and/or viral factors not accounted for by viral load or mutation class are likely influencing mutation replacement and warrant further study. PMID:21451005

  17. Insulin-like growth factor 2 silencing restores taxol sensitivity in drug resistant ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer-Visser, Jurriaan; Lee, Jiyeon; McCullagh, KellyAnne; Cossio, Maria J; Wang, Yanhua; Huang, Gloria S

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is an obstacle to the effective treatment of ovarian cancer. We and others have shown that the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway is a novel potential target to overcome drug resistance. The purpose of this study was to validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and to determine the efficacy of targeting IGF2 in vivo. An analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) data in the serous ovarian cancer cohort showed that high IGF2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with shortened interval to disease progression and death, clinical indicators of drug resistance. In a genetically diverse panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, the IGF2 mRNA levels measured in cell lines resistant to various microtubule-stabilizing agents including Taxol were found to be significantly elevated compared to the drug sensitive cell lines. The effect of IGF2 knockdown on Taxol resistance was investigated in vitro and in vivo. Transient IGF2 knockdown significantly sensitized drug resistant cells to Taxol treatment. A Taxol-resistant ovarian cancer xenograft model, developed from HEY-T30 cells, exhibited extreme drug resistance, wherein the maximal tolerated dose of Taxol did not delay tumor growth in mice. Blocking the IGF1R (a transmembrane receptor that transmits signals from IGF1 and IGF2) using a monoclonal antibody did not alter the response to Taxol. However, stable IGF2 knockdown using short-hairpin RNA in HEY-T30 effectively restored Taxol sensitivity. These findings validate IGF2 as a potential therapeutic target in drug resistant ovarian cancer and show that directly targeting IGF2 may be a preferable strategy compared with targeting IGF1R alone.

  18. Diverse and abundant multi-drug resistant E. coli in Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaderpour, Aziz; Ho, Wing Sze; Chew, Li-Lee; Bong, Chui Wei; Chong, Ving Ching; Thong, Kwai-Lin; Chai, Lay Ching

    2015-01-01

    E.coli, an important vector distributing antimicrobial resistance in the environment, was found to be multi-drug resistant, abundant, and genetically diverse in the Matang mangrove estuaries, Malaysia. One-third (34%) of the estuarine E. coli was multi-drug resistant. The highest antibiotic resistance prevalence was observed for aminoglycosides (83%) and beta-lactams (37%). Phylogenetic groups A and B1, being the most predominant E. coli, demonstrated the highest antibiotic resistant level and prevalence of integrons (integron I, 21%; integron II, 3%). Detection of phylogenetic group B23 downstream of fishing villages indicates human fecal contamination as a source of E. coli pollution. Enteroaggregative E. coli (1%) were also detected immediately downstream of the fishing village. The results indicated multi-drug resistance among E. coli circulating in Matang estuaries, which could be reflective of anthropogenic activities and aggravated by bacterial and antibiotic discharges from village lack of a sewerage system, aquaculture farms and upstream animal husbandry.

  19. Overcoming drug efflux-based multidrug resistance in cancer with nanotechnology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Xue; Xing-Jie Liang

    2012-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR),which significantly decreases the efficacy of anticancer drugs and causes tumor recurrence,has been a major challenge in clinical cancer treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs for decades.Several mechanisms of overcoming drug resistance have been postulated.Well known Pglycoprotein (P-gp) and other drug efflux transporters are considered to be critical in pumping anticancer drugs out of cells and causing chemotherapy failure.Innovative theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic)strategies with nanoparticles are rapidly evolving and are anticipated to offer opportunities to overcome these limits.In this review,we discuss the mechanisms of drug efflux-mediated resistance and the application of multiple nanoparticle-based platforms to overcome chemoresistance and improve therapeutic outcome.

  20. Human therapeutic and agricultural uses of antibacterial drugs and resistance of the enteric flora of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, D; Huber, W G; Drysdale, S

    1975-11-01

    Fecal samples were collected from five groups of people differing in the manner of their exposure to antibacterial drugs. The groups included: (i) people working on farms who were continuously in contact with the predominantly resistant florae of farm animals receiving rations containing antibacterial drugs, (ii) people residing on the same farms with no direct exposure to the farm animals, (iii) people treated with antibacterial drugs, (iv) untreated people residing with treated individuals, and (v) untreated people with no exposure to farm animals or treated individuals. The samples were examined by quantitative plating for proportions of antibiotic-resistant, gram-negative enteric organisms. Individual isolates were also examined for their susceptibility to 11 different antibacterial drugs. The results indicate that enteric florae unexposed directly to the selective effects of antibacterial drugs may be affected by contact with predominantly resistant florae directly exposed to antibacterial drugs.

  1. Multidrug-resistant, extensively drug-resistant and pandrug-resistant bacteria: an international expert proposal for interim standard definitions for acquired resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magiorakos, A-P; Srinivasan, A; Carey, R B; Carmeli, Y; Falagas, M E; Giske, C G; Harbarth, S; Hindler, J F; Kahlmeter, G; Olsson-Liljequist, B; Paterson, D L; Rice, L B; Stelling, J; Struelens, M J; Vatopoulos, A; Weber, J T; Monnet, D L

    2012-03-01

    Many different definitions for multidrug-resistant (MDR), extensively drug-resistant (XDR) and pandrug-resistant (PDR) bacteria are being used in the medical literature to characterize the different patterns of resistance found in healthcare-associated, antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. A group of international experts came together through a joint initiative by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to create a standardized international terminology with which to describe acquired resistance profiles in Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Enterobacteriaceae (other than Salmonella and Shigella), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp., all bacteria often responsible for healthcare-associated infections and prone to multidrug resistance. Epidemiologically significant antimicrobial categories were constructed for each bacterium. Lists of antimicrobial categories proposed for antimicrobial susceptibility testing were created using documents and breakpoints from the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI), the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA). MDR was defined as acquired non-susceptibility to at least one agent in three or more antimicrobial categories, XDR was defined as non-susceptibility to at least one agent in all but two or fewer antimicrobial categories (i.e. bacterial isolates remain susceptible to only one or two categories) and PDR was defined as non-susceptibility to all agents in all antimicrobial categories. To ensure correct application of these definitions, bacterial isolates should be tested against all or nearly all of the antimicrobial agents within the antimicrobial categories and selective reporting and suppression of results should be avoided.

  2. Multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in multi-ethnic region, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Cheng Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The multidrug-resistant (MDR and extensively drug-resistant (XDR tuberculosis (TB has emerged as a global threat. Xinjiang is a multi-ethnic region and suffered second highest incidence of TB in China. However, epidemiological information on MDR and XDR TB is scarcely investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A prospective study was conducted to analyze the prevalence of MDR and XDR TB and the differences of drug resistance TB between Chinese Han and other nationalities population at Chest Hospital of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China. We performed in vitro drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to first- and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs for all 1893 culture confirmed positive TB cases that were diagnosed between June 2009 and June 2011. Totally 1117 (59.0%, 95% CI, 56.8%-61.2% clinical isolates were resistant to ≥1 first-line drugs; the prevalence of MDR TB was 13.2% (95% CI, 11.7%-14.7%, of which, 77 (30.8%; 95% CI, 25.0%-36.6% and 31 (12.8%; 95% CI, 8.6%-17.0% isolates were pre-XDR and XDR TB respectively. Among the MDR/XDR TB, Chinese Han patients were significantly less likely to be younger with an odds ratio 0.42 for age 20-29 years and 0.52 for age 40-49 years; P(trend = 0.004, and Chinese Han patients has a lower prevalence of XDR TB (9.6% than all the other nationality (14.9%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The burden of drug resistance TB cases is sizeable, which highlights an urgent need to reinforce the control, detection and treatment strategies for drug resistance TB. However, the difference of MDR and XDR TB between Chinese Han and other nationalities was not observed.

  3. The culturable soil antibiotic resistome: a community of multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Walsh

    Full Text Available Understanding the soil bacterial resistome is essential to understanding the evolution and development of antibiotic resistance, and its spread between species and biomes. We have identified and characterized multi-drug resistance (MDR mechanisms in the culturable soil antibiotic resistome and linked the resistance profiles to bacterial species. We isolated 412 antibiotic resistant bacteria from agricultural, urban and pristine soils. All isolates were multi-drug resistant, of which greater than 80% were resistant to 16-23 antibiotics, comprising almost all classes of antibiotic. The mobile resistance genes investigated, (ESBL, bla NDM-1, and plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR resistance genes were not responsible for the respective resistance phenotypes nor were they present in the extracted soil DNA. Efflux was demonstrated to play an important role in MDR and many resistance phenotypes. Clinically relevant Burkholderia species are intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin but the soil Burkholderia species were not intrinsically resistant to ciprofloxacin. Using a phenotypic enzyme assay we identified the antibiotic specific inactivation of trimethoprim in 21 bacteria from different soils. The results of this study identified the importance of the efflux mechanism in the soil resistome and variations between the intrinsic resistance profiles of clinical and soil bacteria of the same family.

  4. The skill and style to model the evolution of resistance to pesticides and drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Resistance to pesticides and drugs led to the development of theoretical models aimed at identifying the main factors of resistance evolution and predicting the efficiency of resistance management strategies. We investigated the various ways in which the evolution of resistance has been modelled over the last three decades, by reviewing 187 articles published on models of the evolution of resistance to all major classes of pesticides and drugs. We found that (i) the technical properties of the model were most strongly influenced by the class of pesticide or drug and the target organism, (ii) the resistance management strategies studied were quite similar for the different classes of pesticides or drugs, except that the refuge strategy was mostly used in models of the evolution of resistance to insecticidal proteins, (iii) economic criteria were rarely used to evaluate the evolution of resistance and (iv) the influence of mutation, migration and drift on the speed of resistance development has been poorly investigated. We propose guidelines for the future development of theoretical models of the evolution of resistance. For instance, we stress the potential need to give more emphasis to the three evolutionary forces migration, mutation and genetic drift rather than simply selection.

  5. Update on HIV-1 acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Lihana, Raphael W; Ugoji, Chinenye; Abimiku, Alash'le; Nkengasong, John; Dakum, Patrick; Ndembi, Nicaise

    2015-01-01

    The last ten years have witnessed a significant scale-up and access to antiretroviral therapy in Africa, which has improved patient quality of life and survival. One major challenge associated with increased access to antiretroviral therapy is the development of antiretroviral resistance due to inconsistent drug supply and/or poor patient adherence. We review the current state of both acquired and transmitted drug resistance in Africa over the past ten years (2001-2011) to identify drug resistance associated with the different drug regimens used on the continent and to help guide affordable strategies for drug resistance surveillance. A total of 161 references (153 articles, six reports and two conference abstracts) were reviewed. Antiretroviral resistance data was available for 40 of 53 African countries. A total of 5,541 adult patients from 99 studies in Africa were included in this analysis. The pooled prevalence of drug resistance mutations in Africa was 10.6%, and Central Africa had the highest prevalence of 54.9%. The highest prevalence of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations was in the west (55.3%) and central (54.8%) areas; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutations were highest in East Africa (57.0%) and protease inhibitors mutations highest in Southern Africa (16.3%). The major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor mutation in all four African regions was M184V. Major nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor as well as protease inhibitor mutations varied by region. The prevalence of drug resistance has remained low in several African countries although the emergence of drug resistance mutations varied across countries. Continued surveillance of antiretroviral therapy resistance remains crucial in gauging the effectiveness of country antiretroviral therapy programs and strategizing on effective and affordable strategies for successful treatment.

  6. Relationship between Methylation Status of Multi-drug Resistance Protein(MRP) and Multi-drug Resistance in Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Rui-jun; ZHONG Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the methylation status of multi-drug resistance protein (MRP) gene and the expression of its mRNA and protein in lung cancer cell lines. Methods: Human embryo lung cell line WI-38, lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPCA-1 and its drug-resistant cells induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were treated with restriction endonuclease Eco47Ⅲ. The methylation status of MRP was examined by PCR, and the expressions of its mRNA and protein were evaluated by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Results: MRP gene promoter region of WI-38 cells was in hypermethylation status, but the promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 cells and their resistant derivatives induced by different concentrations of doxorubicin were in hypomethylation status. There were significant differences in the expression of MRP mRNA among WI-38 cell line, SPCA-1 cells and their drug-resistant derivatives induced by different concentration of doxorubicin. Consistently, MRP immunostaining presented similar significant differences. Conclusion: The promoter region of MRP in SPCA-1 lung adenocarcinoma cells was in hypomethylation status. The hypomethylation status of 5' regulatory region of MRP promoter is an important structural basis that can increase the activity of transcription and results in the development of drug resistance in lung cancer.

  7. Potential impact of intermittent preventive treatment (IPT on spread of drug-resistant malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Prudhomme O'Meara

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment of asymptomatic individuals, regardless of their malaria infection status, with regularly spaced therapeutic doses of antimalarial drugs has been proposed as a method for reducing malaria morbidity and mortality. This strategy, called intermittent preventive treatment (IPT, is currently employed for pregnant women and is being studied for infants (IPTi as well. As with any drug-based intervention strategy, it is important to understand how implementation may affect the spread of drug-resistant parasites. This is a difficult issue to address experimentally because of the limited size and duration of IPTi trials as well as the intractability of distinguishing the spread of resistance due to conventional treatment of malaria episodes versus that due to IPTi when the same drug is used in both contexts. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a mathematical model, we evaluated the possible impact of treating individuals with antimalarial drugs at regular intervals regardless of their infection status. We translated individual treatment strategies and drug pharmacokinetics into parasite population dynamic effects and show that immunity, treatment rate, drug decay kinetics, and presumptive treatment rate are important factors in the spread of drug-resistant parasites. Our model predicts that partially resistant parasites are more likely to spread in low-transmission areas, but fully resistant parasites are more likely to spread under conditions of high transmission, which is consistent with some epidemiological observations. We were also able to distinguish between spread of resistance due to treatment of symptomatic infections and that due to IPTi. We showed that IPTi could accelerate the spread of resistant parasites, but this effect was only likely to be significant in areas of low or unstable transmission. CONCLUSIONS: The results presented here demonstrate the importance of considering both the half-life of a drug and the existing level

  8. Selective reversal of drug resistance in drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells by tumor-specific expression of MDR1 ribozyme gene mediated by retrovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高振强; 高志萍; 刘喜富; 张涛

    1997-01-01

    According to the fact that CEA gene expressed only in lung adenocarcinoma and not in normal lung cells, a retroviral vector (pCEAMR) was constructed which carried the CEA promoter coupled to MDR1 ribozyme gene. pCEAMR was introduced into drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells GAOK with CEA expression and HeLaK without CEA expression; the expression of pCEAMR and drug resistance in the infected cells were analyzed in vitro and in vivo ; pCEAMR expressed only in CEA-producing GAOK cells and not in non-CEA-producing HeLa cells. The drug resistance to doxorubicin (DOX) decreased 91.5% in the infected GAOK cells and did not change in the infected HeLa cells. In nude mice, DOX could obviously inhibit the growth of the infected GAOK tumors, and had no effect on the growth of the infected HeLa cells. These results indicated that MDR1 ribozyme gene regulated by CEA promoter expressed only in human adenocarcinoma cells and reversed their drug resistance selectively. This gene-drug therapy might serve as an effe

  9. Longitudinal Detection and Persistence of Minority Drug-Resistant Populations and Their Effect on Salvage Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nishizawa

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant HIV are more prevalent and persist longer than previously demonstrated by bulk sequencing due to the ability to detect low-frequency variants. To clarify a clinical benefit to monitoring minority-level drug resistance populations as a guide to select active drugs for salvage therapy, we retrospectively analyzed the dynamics of low-frequency drug-resistant population in antiretroviral (ARV-exposed drug resistant individuals.Six HIV-infected individuals treated with ARV for more than five years were analyzed. These individuals had difficulty in controlling viremia, and treatment regimens were switched multiple times guided by standard drug resistance testing using bulk sequencing. To detect minority variant populations with drug resistance, we used a highly sensitive allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR with detection thresholds of 0.3-2%. According to ARV used in these individuals, we focused on the following seven reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutations: M41L, K65R, K70R, K103N, Y181C, M184V, and T215F/Y. Results of AS-PCR were compared with bulk sequencing data for concordance and presence of additional mutations. To clarify the genetic relationship between low-frequency and high-frequency populations, AS-PCR amplicon sequences were compared with bulk sequences in phylogenetic analysis.The use of AS-PCR enabled detection of the drug-resistant mutations, M41L, K103N, Y181C, M184V and T215Y, present as low-frequency populations in five of the six individuals. These drug resistant variants persisted for several years without ARV pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that pre-existing K103N and T215I variants had close genetic relationships with high-frequency K103N and T215I observed during treatment.Our results demonstrate the long-term persistence of drug-resistant viruses in the absence of drug pressure. The rapid virologic failures with pre-existing mutant viruses detectable by AS-PCR highlight the clinical importance of

  10. Identifying co-targets to fight drug resistance based on a random walk model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance has now posed more severe and emergent threats to human health and infectious disease treatment. However, wet-lab approaches alone to counter drug resistance have so far still achieved limited success due to less knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance. Our approach apply a heuristic search algorithm in order to extract active network under drug treatment and use a random walk model to identify potential co-targets for effective antibacterial drugs. Results We use interactome network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and gene expression data which are treated with two kinds of antibiotic, Isoniazid and Ethionamide as our test data. Our analysis shows that the active drug-treated networks are associated with the trigger of fatty acid metabolism and synthesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-related processes and those results are consistent with the recent experimental findings. Efflux pumps processes appear to be the major mechanisms of resistance but SOS response is significantly up-regulation under Isoniazid treatment. We also successfully identify the potential co-targets with literature confirmed evidences which are related to the glycine-rich membrane, adenosine triphosphate energy and cell wall processes. Conclusions With gene expression and interactome data supported, our study points out possible pathways leading to the emergence of drug resistance under drug treatment. We develop a computational workflow for giving new insights to bacterial drug resistance which can be gained by a systematic and global analysis of the bacterial regulation network. Our study also discovers the potential co-targets with good properties in biological and graph theory aspects to overcome the problem of drug resistance.

  11. Mechanism of cancer drug resistance and the involvement of noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongping; Hui, Kam M

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is one of the major reasons for the failure of cancer therapies. Although our understanding of resistance to targeted cancer drugs remains incomplete, new and more creative approaches are being exploited to intercept this phenomenon. Considerable advances have been made in our understanding that cancer drug resistance can be caused by alterations of drug efflux, increases in drug metabolism, mutations of drug targets, alterations in DNA repair and cell cycle, changes in cell apoptosis and autophagy, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the generation of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Furthermore, intracellular signalling pathways have been shown to play key physiological roles and the abnormal activation of signalling pathways may be correlated with drug resistance. Recently, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important regulators of gene expression and alternative splicing, which provides cells with yet another mode to greatly increase regulatory complexity and fine-tune their transcriptome and can rapidly adjust their proteome in response to stimuli. Consequently, a wide variety of biological functions have been shown to depend on the coordinated interactions between noncoding RNAs and cellular signalling networks to achieve a concerted desired physiological outcome, whereas mutations and dysregulation of ncRNAs have been linked to diverse human diseases, including cancer drug resistance. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the multiple molecular roles of regulatory ncRNAs on the signalling pathways involved in cancer drug resistance and the therapeutic potential of reverse drug resistance.

  12. Whole animal automated platform for drug discovery against multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajmohan Rajamuthiah

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus, the leading cause of hospital-acquired infections in the United States, is also pathogenic to the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The C. elegans-S. aureus infection model was previously carried out on solid agar plates where the bacteriovorous C. elegans feeds on a lawn of S. aureus. However, agar-based assays are not amenable to large scale screens for antibacterial compounds. We have developed a high throughput liquid screening assay that uses robotic instrumentation to dispense a precise amount of methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA and worms in 384-well assay plates, followed by automated microscopy and image analysis. In validation of the liquid assay, an MRSA cell wall defective mutant, MW2ΔtarO, which is attenuated for killing in the agar-based assay, was found to be less virulent in the liquid assay. This robust assay with a Z'-factor consistently greater than 0.5 was utilized to screen the Biomol 4 compound library consisting of 640 small molecules with well characterized bioactivities. As proof of principle, 27 of the 30 clinically used antibiotics present in the library conferred increased C. elegans survival and were identified as hits in the screen. Surprisingly, the antihelminthic drug closantel was also identified as a hit in the screen. In further studies, we confirmed the anti-staphylococcal activity of closantel against vancomycin-resistant S. aureus isolates and other Gram-positive bacteria. The liquid C. elegans-S. aureus assay described here allows screening for anti-staphylococcal compounds that are not toxic to the host.

  13. Re-sensitizing drug-resistant bacteria to antibiotics by designing Antisense Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Colleen; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2014-03-01

    ``Super-bugs'' or ``multi-drug resistant organisms'' are a serious international health problem, with devastating consequences to patient health care. The Center for Disease Control has identified antibiotic resistance as one of the world's most pressing public health problems as a significant fraction of bacterial infections contracted are drug resistant. Typically, antibiotic resistance is encoded by ``resistance-genes'' which express proteins that carryout the resistance causing functions inside the bacterium. We present a RNA based therapeutic strategy for designing antimicrobials capable of re-sensitizing resistant bacteria to antibiotics by targeting labile regions of messenger RNAs encoding for resistance-causing proteins. We perform in silico RNA secondary structure modeling to identify labile target regions in an mRNA of interest. A synthetic biology approach is then used to administer antisense nucleic acids to our model system of ampicillin resistant Escherichia coli. Our results show a prolonged lag phase and decrease in viability of drug-resistant E. colitreated with antisense molecules. The antisense strategy can be applied to alter expression of other genes in antibiotic resistance pathways or other pathways of interest.

  14. Evaluation of the resistance of a geopolymer-based drug delivery system to tampering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bing; Engqvist, Håkan; Bredenberg, Susanne

    2014-04-25

    Tamper-resistance is an important property of controlled-release formulations of opioid drugs. Tamper-resistant formulations aim to increase the degree of effort required to override the controlled release of the drug molecules from extended-release formulations for the purpose of non-medical use. In this study, the resistance of a geopolymer-based formulation to tampering was evaluated by comparing it with a commercial controlled-release tablet using several methods commonly used by drug abusers. Because of its high compressive strength and resistance to heat, much more effort and time was required to extract the drug from the geopolymer-based formulation. Moreover, in the drug-release test, the geopolymer-based formulation maintained its controlled-release characteristics after milling, while the drug was released immediately from the milled commercial tablets, potentially resulting in dose dumping. Although the tampering methods used in this study does not cover all methods that abuser could access, the results obtained by the described methods showed that the geopolymer matrix increased the degree of effort required to override the controlled release of the drug, suggesting that the formulation has improved resistance to some common drug-abuse tampering methods. The geopolymer matrix has the potential to make the opioid product less accessible and attractive to non-medical users.

  15. Malaria drug resistance: the impact of human movement and spatial heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusto, F B

    2014-07-01

    Human habitat connectivity, movement rates, and spatial heterogeneity have tremendous impact on malaria transmission. In this paper, a deterministic system of differential equations for malaria transmission incorporating human movements and the development of drug resistance malaria in an [Formula: see text] patch system is presented. The disease-free equilibrium of the model is globally asymptotically stable when the associated reproduction number is less than unity. For a two patch case, the boundary equilibria (drug sensitive-only and drug resistance-only boundary equilibria) when there is no movement between the patches are shown to be locally asymptotically stable when they exist; the co-existence equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable whenever the reproduction number for the drug sensitive malaria is greater than the reproduction number for the resistance malaria. Furthermore, numerical simulations of the connected two patch model (when there is movement between the patches) suggest that co-existence or competitive exclusion of the two strains can occur when the respective reproduction numbers of the two strains exceed unity. With slow movement (or low migration) between the patches, the drug sensitive strain dominates the drug resistance strain. However, with fast movement (or high migration) between the patches, the drug resistance strain dominates the drug sensitive strain.

  16. Antitubercular Activity of Disulfiram, an Antialcoholism Drug, against Multidrug- and Extensively Drug-Resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Yasuhiro; Yagi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Kenji; Fujiwara, Nagatoshi; Inagaki, Emi; Kremer, Laurent; Sato, Yasuo; Kuroishi, Ryuji; Lee, YooSa; Makino, Toshiaki; Mizukami, Hajime; Hasegawa, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Ryuji; Onozaki, Kikuo

    2012-01-01

    The antimycobacterial activities of disulfiram (DSF) and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) against multidrug- and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) clinical isolates were evaluated in vitro. Both DSF and DDC exhibited potent antitubercular activities against 42 clinical isolates of M. tuberculosis, including MDR/XDR-TB strains. Moreover, DSF showed remarkable bactericidal activity ex vivo and in vivo. Therefore, DSF might be a drug repurposed for the treatment of MDR/XDR-TB. PMID:22615274

  17. Distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance in Vibrio harveyi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Parvathi, A.; Mendez, D.; Anto, C.

    environments for understanding the distribution of putative virulence genes and antimicrobial drug resistance. The putative genes targeted for PCR detection included four reversible toxin (Rtx)/hemolysin genes, a gene encoding homologue of Vibrio cholerae...

  18. Translational research in ovarian carcinoma : cell biological aspects of drug resistance and tumor aggressiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, Ate Gerard Jan van der

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis diverse cell biological features that in cultured (ovarian) tumor cells have been linked to drug resistance and/or tumor aggressiveness are studied in tumor specimens of epithelial ovarian carcinomas.

  19. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D.; Arias, José L.; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P.; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A.

    2015-01-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs. PMID:26110623

  20. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unciti-Broceta, Juan D; Arias, José L; Maceira, José; Soriano, Miguel; Ortiz-González, Matilde; Hernández-Quero, José; Muñóz-Torres, Manuel; de Koning, Harry P; Magez, Stefan; Garcia-Salcedo, José A

    2015-06-01

    African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  1. Specific Cell Targeting Therapy Bypasses Drug Resistance Mechanisms in African Trypanosomiasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan D Unciti-Broceta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available African trypanosomiasis is a deadly neglected disease caused by the extracellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei. Current therapies are characterized by high drug toxicity and increasing drug resistance mainly associated with loss-of-function mutations in the transporters involved in drug import. The introduction of new antiparasitic drugs into therapeutic use is a slow and expensive process. In contrast, specific targeting of existing drugs could represent a more rapid and cost-effective approach for neglected disease treatment, impacting through reduced systemic toxicity and circumventing resistance acquired through impaired compound uptake. We have generated nanoparticles of chitosan loaded with the trypanocidal drug pentamidine and coated by a single domain nanobody that specifically targets the surface of African trypanosomes. Once loaded into this nanocarrier, pentamidine enters trypanosomes through endocytosis instead of via classical cell surface transporters. The curative dose of pentamidine-loaded nanobody-chitosan nanoparticles was 100-fold lower than pentamidine alone in a murine model of acute African trypanosomiasis. Crucially, this new formulation displayed undiminished in vitro and in vivo activity against a trypanosome cell line resistant to pentamidine as a result of mutations in the surface transporter aquaglyceroporin 2. We conclude that this new drug delivery system increases drug efficacy and has the ability to overcome resistance to some anti-protozoal drugs.

  2. Drug procurement, the Global Fund and misguided competition policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hess Kimberly

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In an effort to increase competition and decrease price, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria recently began asking some grant recipients to use international competitive bidding processes for certain drug purchases. Unfortunately, for countries like Kenya, this request has caused more harm than good. After awarding the tender for its annual supply of the anti-malarial artemether-lumefantrine to the lowest bidder, Ajanta Pharma, Kenya experienced wide stock-outs in part due to the company's inability to supply the order in full and on time. Similar problems could arise in Uganda. Despite Kenya's experience, Uganda has awarded its next tender for artemether-lumefantrine to Ajanta Pharma. Uganda is already facing wide stock-outs and risks exacerbating an already dire situation the longer it takes to fulfil the procurement contract. A tender process based primarily on price cannot account for a company's ability to consistently supply sufficient product in time.

  3. Prevalence of Drug Resistance Mycobacterium Tuberculosis among Patients Seen in Coast Provincial General Hospital, Mombasa, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ombura, Ida Pam; Onyango, Noel; Odera, Susan; Mutua, Florence; Nyagol, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Background Although prevention and control of spread of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis strains is a global challenge, there is paucity of data on the prevalence of DR-TB in patients diagnosed with TB in referral hospitals in Kenya. The present study assessed patients’ characteristics and prevalence of drug resistant TB in sputa smear positive TB patients presenting to Coast Provincial General Hospital (CPGH) in Mombasa, Kenya. Methods Drug resistance was evaluated in 258 randomly selected sputa smear TB positive cases between the periods of November 2011 to February 2012 at the CPGH-Mombasa. Basic demographic data was obtained using administered questionnaires, and clinical history extracted from the files. For laboratory analyses, 2mls of sputum was obtained, decontaminated and subjected to mycobacteria DNA analyses. Detection of first line drug resistance genes was done using MDRTDR plus kit. This was followed with random selection of 83 cases for second line drug resistance genes testing using Genotype MDRTBsl probe assay kit (HAINS Lifesciences, GmbH, Germany), in which ethambutol mutation probes were included. The data was then analyzed using SPSS statistical package version 19.0. Results Male to female ratio was 1:2. Age range was 9 to 75 years, with median of 30 years. New treatment cases constituted 253(98%), among which seven turned out to be PTB negative, and further grouped as 4 (1.6%) PTB negative and 3(1.1%) NTM. 237(91.7%) new cases were fully susceptible to INH and RIF. The remaining, 8 (3.1%) and 1(0.4%) had mono- resistance to INH and RIF, respectively. All the retreatment cases were fully susceptible to the first line drugs. HIV positivity was found in 48 (18.6%) cases, of which 46(17.8%) were co-infected with TB. Of these, 44 (17.1%) showed full susceptibility to TB drugs, while 2 (0.8%) were INH resistant. For the second line drugs, one case each showed mono resistance to both and FQ. Also, one case each showed drug cross poly resistance to

  4. Prevalence and evolution of drug resistance HIV-1 variants in Henan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing; Yun; LI; Han; Ping; LI; Lin; LI; Hong; LI; Zhe; WANG; Kun; YANG; Zuo; Yi; BAO; Dao; Min; ZHUANG; Si; Yang; LIU; Yong; Jian; LIU; Hui; XING; Yi; Ming; SHAO

    2005-01-01

    To understand the prevalence and evolution of drug resistant HIV strains in Henan China after the implementation of free antiretroviral therapy for AIDS patients. 45 drug naive AIDS patients, 118 AIDS patients who received three months antiretroviral therapy and 124 AIDS patients who received six months antiretroviral treatment were recruited in the southern part of Henan province. Information on general condition, antiretroviral medicines, adherence and clinical syndromes were collected by face to face interview. Meanwhile, 14ml EDTA anticoagulant blood was drawn. CD4/CD8 T cell count, viral load and genotypic drug resistance were tested. The rates of clinical improvement were 55.1% and 50.8% respectively three months and six months after antiretroviral therapy. The mean CD4 cell count after antiretroviral therapy was significantly higher than in drug naive patients. The prevalence rate of drug resistant HIV strains were 13.9%, 45.4% and 62.7% in drug naive patients, three month treatment patients and six month treatment patients, respectively.The number of resistance mutation codons and the frequency of mutations increased significantly with continued antiretroviral therapy. The mutation sites were primarily at the 103, 106 and 215 codons in the three-month treatment group and they increased to 15 codon mutations in the six-month treatment group. From this result, the evolution of drug resistant strains was inferred to begin with the high level NNRTI resistant strain, and then develop low level resistant strains to NRTIs. The HIV strains with high level resistance to NVP and low level resistance to AZT and DDI were highly prevalent because of the AZT+DDI+NVP combination therapy. These HIV strains were also cross resistant to DLV, EFV, DDC and D4T. Poor adherence to therapy was believed to be the main reason for the emergence and prevalence of drug resistant HIV strains. The prevalence of drug resistant HIV strains was increased with the continuation of

  5. Drug resistance and adherence to human intestines of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, T; Echeverria, P; Yokota, T

    1992-04-01

    Clinical isolates of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAggEC) were tested for their in vitro susceptibilities to 27 antimicrobial agents. Marked drug resistance was observed with sulfamethoxazole, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol in contrast to such antimicrobial agents as cefixime, sparfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. One of the EAggEC strains carried a plasmid that conferred on its host resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, sulfamethoxazole, streptomycin, and spectinomycin and an ability to adhere to child ileal villi or HeLa cells in the characteristic aggregative pattern. This plasmid also mediated D-mannose-resistant hemagglutinin production and bacterial clump formation (autoagglutination). The data demonstrate appearance of marked drug resistance and an intestine-adherence and drug-resistance plasmid in the newest category of diarrheagenic E. coli.

  6. Interrater reliability of the international consensus definition of drug-resistant epilepsy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiao-ting; Wong, Irina S M; Kwan, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    We evaluated the interrater reliability of the consensus definition of drug-resistant epilepsy proposed by the International League Against Epilepsy. According to the definition framework, outcome of each antiepileptic drug (AED) trial was categorized as "seizure freedom" or "treatment failure." This level 1 assessment was used to determine the level 2 classification, which defined drug-resistant epilepsy as the failure of adequate trials of two or more AED schedules to achieve sustained seizure freedom. Two raters classified treatment outcomes of 150 patients independently. The patients had received a total of 428 trials of AEDs. Categorization of level 1 outcome to individual AED trials by the raters was consistent in 413 (96.5%). For the level 2 classification of drug-resistant or drug-responsive epilepsy, there was absolute agreement between the raters in 141 patients (94%), with a κ index of 0.91 (Pdefinition appeared to have a high degree of interrater reliability in this setting.

  7. Comparison of the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance among HIV, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Shafer

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and hepatitis C virus (HCV are the most prevalent deadly chronic viral diseases. HIV is treated by small molecule inhibitors. HBV is treated by immunomodulation and small molecule inhibitors. HCV is currently treated primarily by immunomodulation but many small molecules are in clinical development. Although HIV is a retrovirus, HBV is a double-stranded DNA virus, and HCV is a single-stranded RNA virus, antiviral drug resistance complicates the development of drugs and the successful treatment of each of these viruses. Although their replication cycles, therapeutic targets, and evolutionary mechanisms are different, the fundamental approaches to identifying and characterizing HIV, HBV, and HCV drug resistance are similar. This review describes the evolution of HIV, HBV, and HCV within individuals and populations and the genetic mechanisms associated with drug resistance to each of the antiviral drug classes used for their treatment.

  8. Tris DBA palladium overcomes hypoxia-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Puente, Pilar; Azab, Feda; Muz, Barbara; Luderer, Micah; Arbiser, Jack; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-07-01

    Despite recent progress in novel and targeted therapies, multiple myeloma (MM) remains a therapeutically challenging incurable disease. The regulation of important cellular processes and its link to cancer presented Src as an attractive target for MM. We suggest a novel strategy to improve the treatment of MM and overcome the drug resistance for the current therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of Src in MM cells by Tris (Dibenzylideneacetone) dipalladium (Tris DBA). Tris DBA reduces proliferation, induces G1 arrest and apoptosis in MM cells. Tris DBA showed additive effect with proteasome inhibitors reducing proliferation, cell cycle signaling, and increasing apoptosis more than each drug alone. Tris DBA overcame hypoxia-induced effects such as enhanced chemotaxis or drug resistance to proteasome inhibitors by inhibition of HIF1α expression. Moreover, we found that Tris DBA is an effective anti-myeloma agent alone or in combination with other targeted drugs and that it reverses hypoxia-induced drug resistance in myeloma.

  9. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Chee Sian; Chan, Chai Ling; Yew, Su Mei; Toh, Yue Fen; Khoo, Jia-Shiun; Chong, Jennifer; Lee, Kok Wei; Tan, Yung-Chie; Yee, Wai-Yan; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Ng, Kee Peng

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia.

  10. Genome Analysis of the First Extensively Drug-Resistant (XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Malaysia Provides Insights into the Genetic Basis of Its Biology and Drug Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Sian Kuan

    Full Text Available The outbreak of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB has become an increasing problem in many TB-burdened countries. The underlying drug resistance mechanisms, including the genetic variation favored by selective pressure in the resistant population, are partially understood. Recently, the first case of XDR-TB was reported in Malaysia. However, the detailed genotype family and mechanisms of the formation of multiple drugs resistance are unknown. We sequenced the whole genome of the UM 1072388579 strain with a 2-kb insert-size library and combined with that from previously sequenced 500-bp-insert paired-end reads to produce an improved sequence with maximal sequencing coverage across the genome. In silico spoligotyping and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that UM 1072388579 strain belongs to an ancestral-like, non-Beijing clade of East Asia lineage. This is supported by the presence of a number of lineage-specific markers, including fadD28, embA, nuoD and pks7. Polymorphism analysis showed that the drug-susceptibility profile is correlated with the pattern of resistance mutations. Mutations in drug-efflux pumps and the cell wall biogenesis pathway such as mmpL, pks and fadD genes may play an important role in survival and adaptation of this strain to its surrounding environment. In this work, fifty-seven putative promoter SNPs were identified. Among them, we identified a novel SNP located at -4 T allele of TetR/acrR promoter as an informative marker to recognize strains of East Asian lineage. Our work indicates that the UM 1072388579 harbors both classical and uncommon SNPs that allow it to escape from inhibition by many antibiotics. This study provides a strong foundation to dissect the biology and underlying resistance mechanisms of the first reported XDR M. tuberculosis in Malaysia.

  11. Personalized prediction of EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance in lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Debby D.; Weiqiang Zhou; Hong Yan; Maria Wong; Victor Lee

    2013-01-01

    EGFR mutation-induced drug resistance has significantly impaired the potency of small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors in lung cancer treatment. Computational approaches can provide powerful and efficient techniques in the investigation of drug resistance. In our work, the EGFR mutation feature is characterized by the energy components of binding free energy (concerning the mutant-inhibitor complex), and we combine it with specific personal features for 168 clinical subjects to construct a...

  12. ABCB1 gene polymorphisms is not associated with drug-resistant epilepsy in Romanian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butila Anamaria Todoran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: P-glycoprotein (P-gp, a drug efflux transporter, encoded by the gene MDR1 ABCB1 multidrug resistant, reduces the penetration through the brain by the AEDs. Overexpression of Pgp in blood-brain barrier in epileptic patients play an important rol in pharmacoresistance. The aim of this study was to evaluate a possible association between C1236T and G2677T ABCB1 gene polymorphisms and drug-resistant epilepsy in Romanian children.

  13. Gene Expression Noise Facilitates Adaptation and Drug Resistance Independently of Mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Charlebois, Daniel A; Kaern, Mads

    2011-01-01

    We show that the effect of stress on the reproductive fitness of noisy cell populations can be modelled as first-passage time problem, and demonstrate that even relatively short-lived fluctuations in gene expression can ensure long-term survival of a drug-resistant population. We examine how this effect contributes to the development of drug-resistant cancer cells, and demonstrate that permanent immunity can arise independently of mutations.

  14. Nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and photodynamic therapy overcomes tumor drug resistance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdair, Ayman; Handa, Hitesh; Mao, Guangzhao; Panyam, Jayanth

    2009-02-01

    Drug resistance limits the success of many anticancer drugs. Reduced accumulation of the drug at its intracellular site of action because of overexpression of efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a major mechanism of drug resistance. In this study, we investigated whether photodynamic therapy (PDT) using methylene blue, also a P-gp inhibitor, can be used to enhance doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in drug-resistant tumor cells. Aerosol OT (AOT)-alginate nanoparticles were used as a carrier for the simultaneous cellular delivery of doxorubicin and methylene blue. Methylene blue was photoactivated using light of 665 nm wavelength. Induction of apoptosis and necrosis following treatment with combination chemotherapy and PDT was investigated in drug-resistant NCI/ADR-RES cells using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Effect of encapsulation in nanoparticles on the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin and methylene blue was investigated qualitatively using fluorescence microscopy and was quantitated using HPLC. Encapsulation in AOT-alginate nanoparticles significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of combination therapy in resistant tumor cells. Nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy resulted in a significant induction of both apoptosis and necrosis. Improvement in cytotoxicity could be correlated with enhanced intracellular and nuclear delivery of the two drugs. Further, nanoparticle-mediated combination therapy resulted in significantly elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production compared to single drug treatment. In conclusion, nanoparticle-mediated combination chemotherapy and PDT using doxorubicin and methylene blue was able to overcome resistance mechanisms and resulted in improved cytotoxicity in drug-resistant tumor cells.

  15. Drug resistance pattern ofMycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients of five provinces of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Javad Nasiri; Faranak Rezaei; Samin Zamani; Davod Darban-Sarokhalil; Abbas Ali Imani Fooladi; Hasan Shojaei; Mohammad Mehdi Feizabadi

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the patterns of resistance to first line anti-tuberculosis(TB) drugs among a collection ofMycobacterium tuberculosis(MTB) isolates from5 provinces ofIran. Methods:A total of the6426 clinical specimens from patients suspected of activeTB were collected fromMarch2010 toJune2012.All specimens were subjected for microscopy and culture tests in theTB centers of studies provinces.Drug susceptibility testing to the first line anti-TB drugs for culture positiveMTB was performed onLöwenstein-Jensen(LJ) medium using proportion method.Results:Of6426 clinical specimens,261 were culture positive for mycobacteria, of which252 wereMTB and9 wereMOTT(mycobacteria other than tuberculosis). Of252MTB isolates,211(83.7%) were pan-susceptible and41(16.3%) were resistant to at least one drug.Resistance was most common to streptomycin,30 isolates(12.0%), followed by isoniazid,20 isolates(8.0%), rifampin,15 isolates(6.0%) and ethambutol,14 isolates(5.5%).Sixteen(6.3%)MTB isolates wereMDR.A clear evidence of heterogeneity amongst the5 provinces in the proportions with resistance to one or more drugs was observed [χ² =12.209(4 degrees of freedom),P values =0.0159].Conclusions:The prevalence of drug resistance in this study area underscoring the need for further enforcement ofTB control strategies in theIran.Drug susceptibility testing for allTB cases to provide optimal treatment, establishing advanced diagnostic facilities for rapid detection ofMDR-TB and continuous monitoring of drug resistance are recommended for prevention and control of drug-resistantTB.

  16. New drugs to treat multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the case for bedaquiline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leibert E

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Eric Leibert, Mauricio Danckers, William N Rom Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Mycobacterium tuberculosis develops spontaneous resistance mutants to virtually every drug in use. Courses of therapy select for these mutants and drug-resistant organisms emerge. The development of drug-resistant organisms has reached the point that drug resistance now threatens to undermine global success against tuberculosis (TB. New drugs are needed. The last new class of drugs specifically developed for treatment of TB was the rifamycins over 40 years ago. New funding sources and the development of product development partnerships have energized the TB drug development effort. There are now more TB drugs in development than at any time in the past. The first of these drugs to be developed and marketed was bedaquiline. Bedaquiline has an entirely novel mechanism of action and so should be active against otherwise highly resistant organisms. It acts on the transmembrane component of adenosine triphosphate synthase and acts by preventing electron transport. This raises the exciting possibility that bedaquiline may be active against less metabolically active organisms. Drug–drug interactions between rifamycins and the cytochrome P450-3A system will limit bedaquiline's utility and create complexity in treatment regimens. In clinical trials, treatment with bedaquiline added to a background multidrug-resistant TB regimen was associated with earlier culture conversion and higher cure rates, but there were unexplained excess deaths in the bedaquiline arms of these trials. Food and Drug Administration approved bedaquiline for the treatment of multidrug-resistant TB when an effective treatment regimen cannot otherwise be provided. They required a black box warning about excess deaths and require that a phase III trial be completed. A planned Phase

  17. Drug resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from tuberculosis lymphadenitis patients in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fantahun Biadglegne

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The emergence of drug resistance tuberculosis (TB is a significant challenge for TB control and prevention programmes, and the major problem is multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB. The present study was carried out to determine the frequency of drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates among newly and retreated TB lymphadenitis patients and risk factors for acquiring this infection. Methods: Two hundred twenty five M. tuberculosis isolates from TB lymphadenitis patients who were diagnosed as new and retreated tuberculosis cases between April 2012 and May 2012 were included in this study. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to isoniazed (INH, rifampicin (RMP, streptomycin (SM, ethambutol (EMB and pyrazinamide (PZA using the BacT/AlerT 3D system protocol. Results: Among 225 isolates, 15 (6.7% were resistant to at least one first line anti-TB drug. Three (1.3% were MDR-TB. Resistance to INH, RMP, SM, and EMB was found in 8 (3.6%, 4 (1.8%, 10 (4.4%, and 4 (1.8% isolates, respectively. Of the 212 new TB lymphadenitis cases three (1.4% were MDR-TB. A rifampicin resistant M. tuberculosis isolate was diagnosed from smear and culture negative newly treated cases. All isolates were susceptible to PZA. Matted cervical lymph nodes were the prominent sites involved. Newly treated TB lymphadenitis patients had a greater risk for presenting resistance to anti-TB drugs ( p =0.046. Interpretation & conclusions: Our study showed that TB lymphadenitis patients harboured drug resistant TB and MDR-TB, although at a low rate. Resistance was not associated with age, sex, patients′ education and contact history. Further research is required to determine transmission dynamics of drug resistant strains.

  18. Leprosy Drug Resistance Surveillance in Colombia: The Experience of a Sentinel Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Alzate, Camilo; López Díaz, Fernando; Romero-Montoya, Marcela; Sakamuri, Rama; Li, Wei; Kimura, Miyako; Brennan, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    An active search for Mycobacterium leprae drug resistance was carried out, 243 multibacillary patients from endemic regions of Colombia were included from 2004 to 2013 in a surveillance program. This program was a World Health Organization initiative for drug resistance surveillance in leprosy, where Colombia is a sentinel country. M. leprae DNA from slit skin smear and/or skin biopsy samples was amplified and sequenced to identify mutations in the drug resistance determining region (DRDR) in rpoB, folP1, gyrA, and gyrB, the genes responsible for rifampicin, dapsone and ofloxacin drug-resistance, respectively. Three isolates exhibited mutations in the DRDR rpoB gene (Asp441Tyr, Ser456Leu, Ser458Met), two in the DRDR folP1 gene (Thr53Ala, Pro55Leu), and one isolate exhibited mutations in both DRDR rpoB (Ser456Met) and DRDR folP1 (Pro55Leu), suggesting multidrug resistance. One isolate had a double mutation in folP1 (Thr53Ala and Thr88Pro). Also, we detected mutations outside of DRDR that required in vivo evaluation of their association or not with drug resistance: rpoB Arg505Trp, folP1 Asp91His, Arg94Trp, and Thr88Pro, and gyrA Ala107Leu. Seventy percent of M. leprae mutations were related to drug resistance and were isolated from relapsed patients; the likelihood of relapse was significantly associated with the presence of confirmed resistance mutations (OR range 20.1–88.7, p < 0.05). Five of these relapsed patients received dapsone monotherapy as a primary treatment. In summary, the current study calls attention to M. leprae resistance in Colombia, especially the significant association between confirmed resistance mutations and relapse in leprosy patients. A high frequency of DRDR mutations for rifampicin was seen in a region where dapsone monotherapy was used extensively. PMID:27706165

  19. Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dissemination of resistance among bacteria has been facilitated by the fact that resistance genes are usually located on a diverse and evolving set of transmissible plasmids. However, the mechanisms generating diversity and enabling adaptation within highly successful resistance plasmids have remained obscure, despite their profound clinical significance. To understand these mechanisms, we have performed a detailed analysis of the mobilome (the entire mobile genetic element content of a set of previously sequenced carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. This analysis revealed that plasmid reorganizations occurring in the natural context of colonization of human hosts were overwhelmingly driven by genetic rearrangements carried out by replicative transposons working in concert with the process of homologous recombination. A more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rearrangements in resistance plasmids may lead to fundamentally new strategies to address the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  20. A Mathematical Model for HIV Drug-Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faedo, Ivan; Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of the transmission of HIV infection here the individuals receive antiretroviral drugs but may not respond to treatment. In such case the latter can be changed to a different therapy, and individuals may or may not respond also to this second set of drugs.

  1. Clinical and epidemiological profiles of individuals with drug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa da Silveira Paro Pedro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB is a growing global threat. Approximately 450,000 people developed multidrug-resistant TB worldwide in 2012 and an estimated 170,000 people died from the disease. This paper describes the sociodemographic, clinical-epidemiological and bacteriological aspects of TB and correlates these features with the distribution of anti-TB drug resistance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT cultures and drug susceptibility testing were performed according to the BACTEC MGIT 960 method. The results demonstrated that MT strains from individuals who received treatment for TB and people who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus were more resistant to TB drugs compared to other individuals (p < 0.05. Approximately half of the individuals received supervised treatment, but most drug-resistant cases were positive for pulmonary TB and exhibited positive acid-fast bacilli smears, which are complicating factors for TB control programs. Primary healthcare is the ideal level for early disease detection, but tertiary healthcare is the most common entry point for patients into the system. These factors require special attention from healthcare managers and professionals to effectively control and monitor the spread of TB drug-resistant cases.

  2. Clinical and epidemiological profiles of individuals with drug-resistant tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Heloisa da Silveira Paro; Nardi, Susilene Maria Tonelli; Pereira, Maria Izabel Ferreira; Oliveira, Rosângela Siqueira; Suffys, Philip Noel; Gomes, Harrison Magdinier; Finardi, Amanda Juliane; de Moraes, Eloise Brasil; Baptista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Machado, Ricardo Luiz Dantas; Castiglioni, Lilian

    2015-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) is a growing global threat. Approximately 450,000 people developed multidrug-resistant TB worldwide in 2012 and an estimated 170,000 people died from the disease. This paper describes the sociodemographic, clinical-epidemiological and bacteriological aspects of TB and correlates these features with the distribution of anti-TB drug resistance. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) cultures and drug susceptibility testing were performed according to the BACTEC MGIT 960 method. The results demonstrated that MT strains from individuals who received treatment for TB and people who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus were more resistant to TB drugs compared to other individuals (p < 0.05). Approximately half of the individuals received supervised treatment, but most drug-resistant cases were positive for pulmonary TB and exhibited positive acid-fast bacilli smears, which are complicating factors for TB control programs. Primary healthcare is the ideal level for early disease detection, but tertiary healthcare is the most common entry point for patients into the system. These factors require special attention from healthcare managers and professionals to effectively control and monitor the spread of TB drug-resistant cases. PMID:25946248

  3. Quantitative predictions of binding free energy changes in drug-resistant influenza neuraminidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Ripoll

    Full Text Available Quantitatively predicting changes in drug sensitivity associated with residue mutations is a major challenge in structural biology. By expanding the limits of free energy calculations, we successfully identified mutations in influenza neuraminidase (NA that confer drug resistance to two antiviral drugs, zanamivir and oseltamivir. We augmented molecular dynamics (MD with Hamiltonian Replica Exchange and calculated binding free energy changes for H274Y, N294S, and Y252H mutants. Based on experimental data, our calculations achieved high accuracy and precision compared with results from established computational methods. Analysis of 15 micros of aggregated MD trajectories provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying drug resistance that are at odds with current interpretations of the crystallographic data. Contrary to the notion that resistance is caused by mutant-induced changes in hydrophobicity of the binding pocket, our simulations showed that drug resistance mutations in NA led to subtle rearrangements in the protein structure and its dynamics that together alter the active-site electrostatic environment and modulate inhibitor binding. Importantly, different mutations confer resistance through different conformational changes, suggesting that a generalized mechanism for NA drug resistance is unlikely.

  4. Low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs in melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Judith; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tsoi, Jennifer; Robert, Lidia; Hugo, Willy; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Possik, Patricia A.; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien D.M.; Foppen, Marnix H. Geukes; Kemper, Kristel; Goding, Colin R.; McDermott, Ultan; Blank, Christian; Haanen, John; Graeber, Thomas G.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of the Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) contributes to melanoma progression and resistance to BRAF pathway inhibition. Here we show that the lack of MITF is associated with more severe resistance to a range of inhibitors, while its presence is required for robust drug responses. Both in primary and acquired resistance, MITF levels inversely correlate with the expression of several activated receptor tyrosine kinases, most frequently AXL. The MITF-low/AXL-high/drug-resistance phenotype is common among mutant BRAF and NRAS melanoma cell lines. The dichotomous behaviour of MITF in drug response is corroborated in vemurafenib-resistant biopsies, including MITF-high and -low clones in a relapsed patient. Furthermore, drug cocktails containing AXL inhibitor enhance melanoma cell elimination by BRAF or ERK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that a low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs, and warrant clinical validation of AXL inhibitors to combat resistance of BRAF and NRAS mutant MITF-low melanomas. PMID:25502142

  5. A better resolution for integrating methods for monitoring Plasmodium falciparum resistance to antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad; Al-Maktari, Mohamed T; Al-Shibani, Latifa A; Allam, Amal F

    2014-09-01

    Effective chemotherapy is the mainstay of malaria control. However, resistance of falciparum malaria to antimalarial drugs compromised the efforts to eliminate the disease and led to the resurgence of malaria epidemics. Three main approaches are used to monitor antimalarial drug efficacy and drug resistance; namely, in vivo trials, in vitro/ex vivo assays and molecular markers of drug resistance. Each approach has its implications of use as well as its advantages and drawbacks. Therefore, there is a need to use an integrated approach that would give the utmost effect to detect resistance as early as its emergence and to track it once spread. Such integration becomes increasingly needed in the era of artemisinin-based combination therapy as a forward action to deter resistance. The existence of regional and global networks for the standardization of methodology, provision of high quality reagents for the assessment of antimalarial drug resistance and dissemination of open-access data would help in approaching an integrated resistance surveillance system on a global scale.

  6. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from hum...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue.......We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...

  7. Antimicrobial drug resistance of Salmonella isolates from meat and humans, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Andersen, Jens Strodl; Aabo, Søren

    2007-01-01

    We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from hum...... humans showed resistance rates lower than those found in imported meat but higher than in domestic meat. These findings indicate that programs for controlling resistant Salmonella spp. are a global issue......We compared 8,144 Salmonella isolates collected from meat imported to or produced in Denmark, as well as from Danish patients. Isolates from imported meat showed a higher rate of antimicrobial drug resistance, including multidrug resistance, than did isolates from domestic meat. Isolates from...

  8. Protease Inhibitors Drug Resistance Mutations in Turkish Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Sargin Altunok

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: We are of the opinion that drug resistance analyses can be beneficial and necessary in revealing which variants are responsible for pre-treatment natural resistance and which mutations are responsible for the viral breakthrough that may develop during the treatment.

  9. Estimating prevalence of accumulated HIV-1 drug resistance in a cohort of patients on antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Kjær, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    Estimating the prevalence of accumulated HIV drug resistance in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is difficult due to lack of resistance testing at all occasions of virological failure and in patients with undetectable viral load. A method to estimate this for 6498 EuroSIDA patients...

  10. Enzastaurin inhibits tumours sensitive and resistant to anti-EGFR drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelardi, T; Caputo, R; Damiano, V; Daniele, G; Pepe, S; Ciardiello, F; Lahn, M; Bianco, R; Tortora, G

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the antitumour effect and ability to overcome the resistance to anti-EGFR drugs of enzastaurin, an inhibitor of VEGFR-dependent PKCβ signalling. Enzastaurin was evaluated alone and in combination with the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib, on growth and signalling protein expression in human cancer cells sensitive and resistant to anti-EGFR drugs, both in vitro and in nude mice. We demonstrated the marked inhibitory activity of enzastaurin against GEO colon and PC3 prostate cancer cells and their gefitinib-resistant counterparts GEO-GR and PC3-GR, accompanied by inhibition of pAkt and its effector pp70S6K, pGSK3β and VEGF expression and secretion. Moreover, enzastaurin showed a cooperative effect with gefitinib in parental and in gefitinib-resistant cells. Remarkably, these results were confirmed in vivo, where enzastaurin showed antitumour activity and cooperativity with gefitinib in mice grafted with GEO and GEO-GR tumours, incrementing their median survival and inhibiting the aforesaid protein expression and secretion in tumour specimens. In conclusion, enzastaurin by interfering with signalling proteins implicated in EGFR drug resistance markedly cooperates with gefitinib in sensitive and gefitinib-resistant tumours, thus overcoming and reverting such resistance and providing a rational basis for its development in patients resistant to anti-EGFR drugs. PMID:18665191

  11. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction of h...

  12. [From the discovery of antibiotics to emerging highly drug-resistant bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotics has enabled serious infections to be treated. However, bacteria resistant to several families of antibiotics and the emergence of new highly drug-resistant bacteria constitute a public health issue in France and across the world. Actions to prevent their transmission are being put in place.

  13. Genomic insights into intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongfei; Zhu, Yuying; Ma, Yanan; Liu, Fei; Lu, Na; Yang, Xi; Luan, Chunguang; Yi, Yong; Zhu, Baoli

    2015-02-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen known to be resistant to a wide range of antibiotics; however, the knowledge about the drug resistance mechanisms is limited. We used a high-throughput sequencing approach to sequence the genomes of the A. xylosoxidans type strain ATCC 27061 and a clinical isolate, A. xylosoxidans X02736, and then we used different bioinformatics tools to analyze the drug resistance genes in these bacteria. We obtained the complete genome sequence for A. xylosoxidans ATCC 27061 and the draft sequence for X02736. We predicted a total of 50 drug resistance-associated genes in the type strain, including 5 genes for β-lactamases and 17 genes for efflux pump systems; these genes are also conserved among other A. xylosoxidans genomes. In the clinical isolate, except for the conserved resistance genes, we also identified several acquired resistance genes carried by a new transposon embedded in a novel integrative and conjugative element. Our study provides new insights into the intrinsic and acquired drug resistance mechanisms in A. xylosoxidans, which will be helpful for better understanding the physiology of A. xylosoxidans and the evolution of antibiotic resistance in this bacterium.

  14. Parallel selection of chemotherapy-resistant cell lines to illuminate mechanisms of drug resistance in human tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krzystanek, Marcin; Eklund, Aron Charles; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of cancer often involves the use of chemotherapeutic agents that preferentially target tumor cells. The idea behind personalized medicine is to characterize differences between individual cancer cases that will and to direct the therapy to those most likely to respond. This will require....... Our findings are validated on already existing gene expression profiles of patient cohorts treated with the drugs in question, and the most promising ones will be chosen for functional validation by RNAi knock down. Successful validation will improve understanding of drug resistance mechanisms......, suggest future drug targets, and enable more efficacious treatment of cancer patients....

  15. Resistance to anticoccidial drugs : Alternative strategies to control coccidiosis in broilers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peek, H.W.

    2010-01-01

    Manuscripts documenting the occurrence of resistance against all commonly used anticoccidial drugs abroad, together with the high incidence of clinical coccidiosis in the field (60-90% of flocks) in the Netherlands, were the reasons to start investigations on the occurrence of anticoccidial drug res

  16. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance of Vibrio cholerae, Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwanda, Berthe; Moore, Sandra; Muyembe, Jean-Jacques; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Kabangwa, Ickel Kakongo; Ndjakani, Daniel Yassa; Mutreja, Ankur; Thomson, Nicholas; Thefenne, Helene; Garnotel, Eric; Tshapenda, Gaston; Kakongo, Denis Kandolo; Kalambayi, Guy; Piarroux, Renaud

    2015-05-01

    We analyzed 1,093 Vibrio cholerae isolates from the Democratic Republic of the Congo during 1997-2012 and found increasing antimicrobial drug resistance over time. Our study also demonstrated that the 2011-2012 epidemic was caused by an El Tor variant clonal complex with a single antimicrobial drug susceptibility profile.

  17. Prophylactic activity of mefloquine hydrochloride (WR 142 490) in drug-resistant malaria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckmann, K. H.; Trenholme, G. M.; Williams, R. L.; Carson, P. E.; Frischer, H.; Desjardins, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    In preliminary studies with mefloquine (WR 142 490) a single dose exerted prolonged suppressive activity against a drug-resistant strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Development of patent parasitaemia was prevented when nonimmune persons were exposed to infected mosquitos 2 weeks after medication, and it was delayed when exposure occurred 3 weeks after drug administration. PMID:4619059

  18. Fluoroquinolones, the cornerstone of treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis: a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pranger, A.D.; Alffenaar, J.W.C.; Aarnoutse, R.E.

    2011-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are important drugs to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this review we integrated pharmacokinetic properties (PK) and microbiological susceptibility against M. tuberculosis and eventually evaluated the pharmcodynamic (PD) properties, as well as the influence of co-adminis

  19. Imperfect drug penetration leads to spatial monotherapy and rapid evolution of multidrug resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno-Gamez, Stefany; Hill, Alison L.; Rosenbloom, Daniel I. S.; Petrov, Dmitri A.; Nowak, Martin A.; Pennings, Pleuni S.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with rapidly evolving pathogens are often treated using combinations of drugs with different mechanisms of action. One of the major goal of combination therapy is to reduce the risk of drug resistance emerging during a patient's treatment. Although this strategy generally has significant

  20. Fluoroquinolones, the Cornerstone of Treatment of Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis : A Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pranger, A. D.; Alffenaar, J. W. C.; Aarnoutse, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are important drugs to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis. In this review we integrated pharmacokinetic properties (PK) and microbiological susceptibility against M. tuberculosis and eventually evaluated the pharmcodynamic (PD) properties, as well as the influence of co-adminis

  1. Beauvericin counteracted multi-drug resistant Candida albicans by blocking ABC transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, Yaojun; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    screening and whole-cell based mechanism study, identified a natural product, beauvericin (BEA) as a drug efflux pump modulator, which can reverse the multi-drug resistant phenotype of Candida albicans by specifically blocking the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters; meantime, BEA alone has fungicidal...

  2. A Short-Term Evaluation of Project DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education): Preliminary Indications of Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, William

    1987-01-01

    Assessed impact of Project DARE (Drug Abuse Resistance Education) on knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported behavior of seventh graders who received DARE curriculum in sixth grade. Compared to controls, DARE students reported significantly lower use of alcohol, cigarettes, and other drugs. Findings were especially strong for boys. (Author/NB)

  3. Signaling to P-glycoprotein-A new therapeutic target to treat drug-resistant epilepsy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartz, A.M.; Notenboom, S.; Bauer, B.

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy affects more than 60 million people worldwide. While most patients can be treated with antiepileptic drugs, up to 40% of patients respond poorly to pharmacotherapy. This drug resistance is not well understood and presents a major clinical problem. In this short review we provide background

  4. Sequence and gene expression of chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt in the association of in vitro drugs resistance of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Patrick G

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance (CQR transporter protein (PfCRT is known to be the important key of CQR. Recent studies have definitively demonstrated a link between mutations in the gene pfcrt and resistance to chloroquine in P. falciparum. Although these mutations are predictive of chloroquine resistance, they are not quantitatively predictive of the degree of resistance. Methods In this study, a total of 95 recently adapted P. falciparum isolates from Thailand were included in the analysis. Parasites were characterized for their drug susceptibility phenotypes and genotypes with respect to pfcrt. From the original 95 isolates, 20 were selected for complete pfcrt sequence analysis. Results Almost all of the parasites characterized carried the previously reported mutations K76T, A220S, Q271E, N326S, I356T and R371I. On complete sequencing, isolates were identified with novel mutations at K76A and E198K. There was a suggestion that parasites carrying E198K were less resistant than those that did not. In addition, pfcrt and pfmdr1 gene expression were investigated by real-time PCR. No relationship between the expression level of either of these genes and response to drug was observed. Conclusion Data from the present study suggest that other genes must contribute to the degree of resistance once the resistance phenotype is established through mutations in pfcrt.

  5. Rapid detection of drug resistance and mutational patterns of extensively drug-resistant strains by a novel GenoType® MTBDRsl assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB is a major concern in the India. The burden of XDR-TB is increasing due to inadequate monitoring, lack of proper diagnosis, and treatment. The GenoType ® Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance second line (MTBDRsl assay is a novel line probe assay used for the rapid detection of mutational patterns conferring resistance to XDR-TB. Aim: The aim of this study was to study the rapid detection of drug resistance and mutational patterns of the XDR-TB by a novel GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 98 multidrug-resistant (MDR M. tuberculosis isolates for second line drugs susceptibility testing by 1% proportion method (BacT/ALERT 3D system and GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay for rapid detection of conferring drug resistance to XDR-TB. Results: A total of seven (17.4% were identified as XDR-TB by using standard phenotypic method. The concordance between phenotypic and GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay was 91.7-100% for different antibiotics. The sensitivity and specificity of the MTBDRsl assay were 100% and 100% for aminoglycosides; 100% and 100% for fluoroquinolones; 91.7% and 100% for ethambutol. The most frequent mutations and patterns were gyrA MUT1 (A90V in seven (41.2% and gyrA + WT1-3 + MUT1 in four (23.5%; rrs MUT1 (A1401G in 11 (64.7%, and rrs WT1-2 + MUT1 in eight (47.1%; and embB MUT1B (M306V in 11 (64.7% strains. Conclusions: These data suggest that the GenoType ® MTBDRsl assay is rapid, novel test for detection of resistance to second line anti-tubercular drugs. This assay provides additional information about the frequency and mutational patterns responsible for XDR-TB resistance.

  6. Glutamate-gated chloride channels of Haemonchus contortus restore drug sensitivity to ivermectin resistant Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K Glendinning

    Full Text Available Anthelmintic resistance is a major problem in livestock farming, especially of small ruminants, but our understanding of it has been limited by the difficulty in carrying out functional genetic studies on parasitic nematodes. An important nematode infecting sheep and goats is Haemonchus contortus; in many parts of the world this species is resistant to almost all the currently available drugs, including ivermectin. It is extremely polymorphic and to date it has proved impossible to relate any sequence polymorphisms to its ivermectin resistance status. Expression of candidate drug-resistance genes in Caenorhabditis elegans could provide a convenient means to study the effects of polymorphisms found in resistant parasites, but may be complicated by differences between the gene families of target and model organisms. We tested this using the glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl gene family, which forms the ivermectin drug target and are candidate resistance genes. We expressed GluCl subunits from C. elegans and H. contortus in a highly resistant triple mutant C. elegans strain (DA1316 under the control of the avr-14 promoter; expression of GFP behind this promoter recapitulated the pattern previously reported for avr-14. Expression of ivermectin-sensitive subunits from both species restored drug sensitivity to transgenic worms, though some quantitative differences were noted between lines. Expression of an ivermectin-insensitive subunit, Hco-GLC-2, had no effect on drug sensitivity. Expression of a previously uncharacterised parasite-specific subunit, Hco-GLC-6, caused the transgenic worms to become ivermectin sensitive, suggesting that this subunit also encodes a GluCl that responds to the drug. These results demonstrate that both orthologous and paralogous subunits from C. elegans and H. contortus are able to rescue the ivermectin sensitivity of mutant C. elegans, though some quantitative differences were observed between transgenic lines in

  7. Glutamate-gated chloride channels of Haemonchus contortus restore drug sensitivity to ivermectin resistant Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, Susan K; Buckingham, Steven D; Sattelle, David B; Wonnacott, Susan; Wolstenholme, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance is a major problem in livestock farming, especially of small ruminants, but our understanding of it has been limited by the difficulty in carrying out functional genetic studies on parasitic nematodes. An important nematode infecting sheep and goats is Haemonchus contortus; in many parts of the world this species is resistant to almost all the currently available drugs, including ivermectin. It is extremely polymorphic and to date it has proved impossible to relate any sequence polymorphisms to its ivermectin resistance status. Expression of candidate drug-resistance genes in Caenorhabditis elegans could provide a convenient means to study the effects of polymorphisms found in resistant parasites, but may be complicated by differences between the gene families of target and model organisms. We tested this using the glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) gene family, which forms the ivermectin drug target and are candidate resistance genes. We expressed GluCl subunits from C. elegans and H. contortus in a highly resistant triple mutant C. elegans strain (DA1316) under the control of the avr-14 promoter; expression of GFP behind this promoter recapitulated the pattern previously reported for avr-14. Expression of ivermectin-sensitive subunits from both species restored drug sensitivity to transgenic worms, though some quantitative differences were noted between lines. Expression of an ivermectin-insensitive subunit, Hco-GLC-2, had no effect on drug sensitivity. Expression of a previously uncharacterised parasite-specific subunit, Hco-GLC-6, caused the transgenic worms to become ivermectin sensitive, suggesting that this subunit also encodes a GluCl that responds to the drug. These results demonstrate that both orthologous and paralogous subunits from C. elegans and H. contortus are able to rescue the ivermectin sensitivity of mutant C. elegans, though some quantitative differences were observed between transgenic lines in some assays. C

  8. MULTI DRUG RESISTANT ACINETOBACTER BAUMANNII: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW FOR MICROBIAL AND CLINICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Buddha Bahadur Basnet; Til Bahadur Basnet; Bishnu Joshi; Rajan Kumar Dahal; Rajani Malla

    2013-01-01

    Infections due to Mutli Drug Resistant A. baumannii (MDRAB) is now recognized as a major public health problem worldwide. The nosocomial infection due to MDRAB has leaded to increased in morbidity and mortality which has added noticeably to significant challenge to modern antibiotic therapy system. This is due to rapid phenomenon of A. baumannii to acquire antibiotic resistance. Thus, in this review the overview of current knowledge on epidemiology, infections, mechanism of resistance and eff...

  9. EMERGENCE OF MULTI DRUG RESISTANT STRAINS OF E. COLI ISOLATED FROM URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN NAMAKKAL

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In this study we evaluated the multi drug resistant strains of Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infection in different age groups in Namakkal. Totally 153 isolates of E.coli were obtained from 700 urine samples. Present study indicates that there is a high prevalence of multidrug resistant E. coli in female 24.34% followed by male 18.14%. After confirmation, isolates were performed to resistance patterns of different antibiotics were determined by standard disk diffusion method. T...

  10. High prevalence of drug-resistance mutations in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax in southern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Schunk, Mirjam; Kumma, Wondimagegn P.; Barreto Miranda, Isabel; Maha E. Osman; Roewer, Susanne; Alano, Abraham; Loescher, Thomas; Bienzle, Ulrich; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2006-01-01

    Background: In Ethiopia, malaria is caused by both Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Drug resistance of P. falciparum to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and chloroquine (CQ) is frequent and intense in some areas. Methods: In 100 patients with uncomplicated malaria from Dilla, southern Ethiopia, P. falciparum dhfr and dhps mutations as well as P. vivax dhfr polymorphisms associated with resistance to SP and P. falciparum pfcrt and pfmdr1 mutations conferring CQ resistance were assesse...

  11. MRP- and BCL-2-mediated drug resistance in human SCLC: effects of apoptotic sphingolipids in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadian, M; Leroux, M E; Auzenne, E; Ghosh, S C; Farquhar, D; Evans, R; Spohn, W; Zou, Y; Klostergaard, J

    2009-10-01

    Multidrug-resistance-associated protein (MRP) and BCL-2 contribute to drug resistance expressed in SCLC. To establish whether MRP-mediated drug resistance affects sphingolipid (SL)-induced apoptosis in SCLC, we first examined the human SCLC cell line, UMCC-1, and its MRP over-expressing, drug-resistant subline, UMCC-1/VP. Despite significantly decreased sensitivity to doxorubicin (Dox) and to the etoposide, VP-16, the drug-selected line was essentially equally as sensitive to treatment with exogenous ceramide (Cer), sphingosine (Sp) or dimethyl-sphingosine (DMSP) as the parental line. Next, we observed that high BCL-2-expressing human H69 SCLC cells, that were approximately 160-fold more sensitive to Dox than their combined BCL-2 and MRP-over-expressing (H69AR) counterparts, were only approximately 5-fold more resistant to DMSP. Time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of either UMCC cell line treated with DMSP-Coumarin revealed comparable extents and kinetics of SL uptake, further ruling out MRP-mediated effects on drug uptake. DMSP potentiated the cytotoxic activity of VP-16 and Taxol, but not Dox, in drug-resistant UMCC-1/VP cells. However, this sensitization did not appear to involve DMSP-mediated effects on the function of MRP in drug export; nor did DMSP strongly shift the balance of pro-apoptotic Sps and anti-apoptotic Sp-1-Ps in these cells. We conclude that SL-induced apoptosis markedly overcomes or bypasses MRP-mediated drug resistance relevant to SCLC and may suggest a novel therapeutic approach to chemotherapy for these tumors.

  12. Drug-resistant tuberculosis among HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy in Durban, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey K Hom

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB and describe the resistance patterns in patients commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART in an HIV clinic in Durban, South Africa. DESIGN: Cross-sectional cohort study. METHODS: Consecutive HIV-infected adults (≥ 18y/o initiating HIV care were enrolled from May 2007-May 2008, regardless of signs or symptoms of active TB. Prior TB history and current TB treatment status were self-reported. Subjects expectorated sputum for culture (MGIT liquid and 7H11 solid medium. Positive cultures were tested for susceptibility to first- and second-line anti-tuberculous drugs. The prevalence of drug-resistant TB, stratified by prior TB history and current TB treatment status, was assessed. RESULTS: 1,035 subjects had complete culture results. Median CD4 count was 92/µl (IQR 42-150/µl. 267 subjects (26% reported a prior history of TB and 210 (20% were receiving TB treatment at enrollment; 191 (18% subjects had positive sputum cultures, among whom the estimated prevalence of resistance to any antituberculous drug was 7.4% (95% CI 4.0-12.4. Among those with prior TB, the prevalence of resistance was 15.4% (95% CI 5.9-30.5 compared to 5.2% (95% CI 2.1-8.9 among those with no prior TB. 5.1% (95% CI 2.4-9.5 had rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of TB resistance to at least one drug was 7.4% among adults with positive TB cultures initiating ART in Durban, South Africa, with 5.1% having rifampin or rifampin plus INH resistance. Improved tools for diagnosing TB and drug resistance are urgently needed in areas of high HIV/TB prevalence.

  13. [Benefits of spironolactone as the optimal treatment for drug resistant hypertension. Pathway-2 trial review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, J C; Ruilope, L M; Segura, J

    Pathway-2 is the first randomised, double-blind and crossover trial that compares spironolactone as a fourth drug with alfa-blocker, beta-blocker and placebo. This study shows that spironolactone is the drug with more possibilities of success for the management of patients with difficult-to-treat hypertension in patients with a combination of three drugs and poor control. The results validate the widespread treatment with mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in resistant hypertension.

  14. Recent highlights in anti-protozoan drug development and resistance research

    OpenAIRE

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Waters, Norman C; Avery, Vicky M.

    2012-01-01

    This article summarizes the highlights of research presented in January, 2012, at the Keystone Symposium on “Drug Discovery for Protozoan Parasites” held in Santa Fe, New Mexico. This symposium which convenes approximately every 2 years provides a forum for leading investigators around the world to present data covering basic sciences to clinical trials relating to anti-protozoan drug development and drug resistance. Many talks focused on malaria, but other protozoan diseases receiving attent...

  15. Antiretroviral drug resistance in HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Lissette; Kourí, Vivian; Alemán, Yoan; Abrahantes, Yeisel; Correa, Consuelo; Aragonés, Carlos; Martínez, Orlando; Pérez, Jorge; Fonseca, Carlos; Campos, Jorge; Álvarez, Delmis; Schrooten, Yoeri; Dekeersmaeker, Nathalie; Imbrechts, Stijn; Beheydt, Gertjan; Vinken, Lore; Soto, Yudira; Álvarez, Alina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2013-06-01

    In Cuba, antiretroviral therapy rollout started in 2001 and antiretroviral therapy coverage has reached almost 40% since then. The objectives of this study were therefore to analyze subtype distribution, and level and patterns of drug resistance in therapy-naive HIV-1 patients. Four hundred and one plasma samples were collected from HIV-1 therapy-naive patients in 2003 and in 2007-2011. HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping was performed in the pol gene and drug resistance was interpreted according to the WHO surveillance drug-resistance mutations list, version 2009. Potential impact on first-line therapy response was estimated using genotypic drug resistance interpretation systems HIVdb version 6.2.0 and Rega version 8.0.2. Phylogenetic analysis was performed using Neighbor-Joining. The majority of patients were male (84.5%), men who have sex with men (78.1%) and from Havana City (73.6%). Subtype B was the most prevalent subtype (39.3%), followed by CRF20-23-24_BG (19.5%), CRF19_cpx (18.0%) and CRF18_cpx (10.3%). Overall, 29 patients (7.2%) had evidence of drug resistance, with 4.0% (CI 1.6%-4.8%) in 2003 versus 12.5% (CI 7.2%-14.5%) in 2007-2011. A significant increase in drug resistance was observed in recently HIV-1 diagnosed patients, i.e. 14.8% (CI 8.0%-17.0%) in 2007-2011 versus 3.8% (CI 0.9%-4.7%) in 2003 (OR 3.9, CI 1.5-17.0, p=0.02). The majority of drug resistance was restricted to a single drug class (75.8%), with 55.2% patients displaying nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI), 10.3% non-NRTI (NNRTI) and 10.3% protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations. Respectively, 20.7% and 3.4% patients carried viruses containing drug resistance mutations against NRTI+NNRTI and NRTI+NNRTI+PI. The first cases of resistance towards other drug classes than NRTI were only detected from 2008 onwards. The most frequent resistance mutations were T215Y/rev (44.8%), M41L (31.0%), M184V (17.2%) and K103N (13.8%). The median genotypic susceptibility score for the

  16. Differentiation and the multiple drug resistance phenotype in human leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W T; Cirtain, M C; Ashmun, R A; Mirro, J

    1986-09-01

    A common feature of mammalian cell lines selected for multiple drug resistance is the overexpression of a high-molecular-weight surface membrane glycoprotein(s). While its amount has been shown to be related to the degree of resistance of such cells, its function in this phenomenon remains obscure. Because there are some biochemical and functional similarities between drug-resistant cells and differentiated cells, we asked if resistance-associated glycoproteins were also associated with cellular differentiation. Using three monoclonal antibodies against antigens known to be associated with differentiation and three monoclonal antibodies that distinguish our multiple drug-resistant human leukemic CEM/VLB100 cells from their drug-sensitive counterparts, we found that the resistant cells were neither altered in their apparent state of differentiation nor were they altered in their ability to respond to a differentiation stimulus with the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. We did find, however, that one antibody that recognizes the resistance-associated glycoprotein, Mr 180,000 glycoprotein (gp180), was only minimally altered in amount bound after treatment with the phorbol ester, but two other resistance-associated glycoproteins, Mr 155,000 glycoprotein (gp155) and, to a lesser extent, Mr 130,000 glycoprotein (gp130), were reduced in expression after this treatment. We suggest that the function of the previously described "marker" glycoprotein associated with multiple drug resistance remains unknown, but that the expression of two other resistance-associated glycoproteins also appears to be related to cellular differentiation or maturation in these cells.

  17. Stability Analysis of an HIV/AIDS Dynamics Model with Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of HIV/AIDS transmission incorporating treatment and drug resistance was built in this study. We firstly calculated the threshold value of the basic reproductive number (R0 by the next generation matrix and then analyzed stability of two equilibriums by constructing Lyapunov function. When R0<1, the system was globally asymptotically stable and converged to the disease-free equilibrium. Otherwise, the system had a unique endemic equilibrium which was also globally asymptotically stable. While an antiretroviral drug tried to reduce the infection rate and prolong the patients’ survival, drug resistance was neutralizing the effects of treatment in fact.

  18. Primary drug-resistant tuberculosis in Hanoi, Viet Nam: present status and risk factors.

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    Nguyen Thi Le Hang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB to anti-tuberculosis (TB drugs presents a serious challenge to TB control worldwide. We investigated the status of drug resistance, including multidrug-resistant (MDR TB, and possible risk factors among newly diagnosed TB patients in Hanoi, the capital of Viet Nam. METHODS: Clinical and epidemiological information was collected from 506 newly diagnosed patients with sputum smear- and culture-positive TB, and 489 (96.6% MTB isolates were subjected to conventional drug susceptibility testing, spoligotyping, and 15-locus variable numbers of tandem repeats typing. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs were calculated to analyze the risk factors for primary drug resistance. RESULTS: Of 489 isolates, 298 (60.9% were sensitive to all drugs tested. Resistance to isoniazid, rifampicin, streptomycin, ethambutol, and MDR accounted for 28.2%, 4.9%, 28.2%, 2.9%, and 4.5%, respectively. Of 24 isolates with rifampicin resistance, 22 (91.7% were MDR and also resistant to streptomycin, except one case. Factors associated with isoniazid resistance included living in old urban areas, presence of the Beijing genotype, and clustered strains [aOR = 2.23, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.15-4.35; 1.91, 1.18-3.10; and 1.69, 1.06-2.69, respectively. The Beijing genotype was also associated with streptomycin resistance (aOR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.29-3.40. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV coinfection was associated with rifampicin resistance and MDR (aOR = 5.42, 95% CI 2.07-14.14; 6.23, 2.34-16.58, respectively. CONCLUSION: Isoniazid and streptomycin resistance was observed in more than a quarter of TB patients without treatment history in Hanoi. Transmission of isoniazid-resistant TB among younger people should be carefully monitored in urban areas, where Beijing strains and HIV coinfection are prevalent. Choosing an optimal treatment regimen on the basis of the results of drug susceptibility tests and monitoring of treatment

  19. Differential expression of putative drug resistance genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Escalante, Laura; Peñuelas-Urquides, Katia; Said-Fernández, Salvador; Silva-Ramírez, Beatriz; Bermúdez de León, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Understanding drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires an integrated analysis of strain lineages, mutations and gene expression. Previously, we reported the differential expression of esxG, esxH, infA, groES, rpmI, rpsA and lipF genes in a sensitive M. tuberculosis strain and in a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate. Here, we have evaluated the expression of these genes in 24 clinical isolates that belong to different lineages and have different drug resistance profiles. In vitro, growth kinetics analysis showed no difference in the growth of the clinical isolates, and thus drug resistance occurred without a fitness cost. However, a quantitative reverse transcription PCR analysis of gene expression revealed high variability among the clinical isolates, including those with similar drug resistance profiles. Due to the complexity of gene regulation pathways and the wide diversity of M. tuberculosis lineages, the use of gene expression as a molecular signature for drug resistance is not straightforward. Therefore, we recommend that the expression of M. tuberculosis genes be performed individually, and baseline expression levels should be verified among several different clinical isolates, before any further applications of these findings.

  20. HIV-1 drug resistance among untreated patients in India: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pachamuthu Balakrishnan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available HAART has dramatically improved survival and quality of life among people living with HIV and AIDS globally. However, drug resistant mutations of HIV are a great challenge to the benefits of HAART.