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Sample records for anti-malarial drug quality

  1. Assessing the quality of anti-malarial drugs from Gabonese pharmacies using the MiniLab®: a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Benjamin J.; Meerveld-Gerrits, Janneke; Kroon, Daniëlle; Mougoula, Judith; Vingerling, Rieke; Bache, Emmanuel; Boersma, Jimmy; van Vugt, Michèle; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Kaur, Harparkash; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies alluded to the alarming scale of poor anti-malarial drug quality in malaria-endemic countries, but also illustrated the major geographical gaps in data on anti-malarial drug quality from endemic countries. Data are particularly scarce from Central Africa, although it carries the

  2. Anti-malarial drug quality in Lagos and Accra - a comparison of various quality assessments

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    Bate Roger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two major cities in West Africa, Accra, the capital of Ghana, and Lagos, the largest city of Nigeria, have significant problems with substandard pharmaceuticals. Both have actively combated the problem in recent years, particularly by screening products on the market using the Global Pharma Health Fund e.V. Minilab® protocol. Random sampling of medicines from the two cities at least twice over the past 30 months allows a tentative assessment of whether improvements in drug quality have occurred. Since intelligence provided by investigators indicates that some counterfeit producers may be adapting products to pass Minilab tests, the results are compared with those from a Raman spectrometer and discrepancies are discussed. Methods Between mid-2007 and early-2010, samples of anti-malarial drugs were bought covertly from pharmacies in Lagos on three different occasions (October 2007, December 2008, February 2010, and from pharmacies in Accra on two different occasions (October 2007, February 2010. All samples were tested using the Minilab® protocol, which includes disintegration and active ingredient assays as well as visual inspection, and most samples were also tested by Raman spectrometry. Results In Lagos, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 29% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 53% using Raman spectrometry, and 46% using visual inspection. In Accra, the failure rate in the 2010 sampling fell to 54% of the 2007 finding using the Minilab® protocol, 72% using Raman spectrometry, and 90% using visual inspection. Conclusions The evidence presented shows that drug quality is probably improving in both cities, especially Lagos, since major reductions of failure rates over time occur with all means of assessment. Many more samples failed when examined by Raman spectrometry than by Minilab® protocol. The discrepancy is most likely caused by the two techniques measuring different aspects of the medication

  3. Poisoning by anti-malarial drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had taken chloroquine: no other anti-malarial drugs were involved [1]. ... and angio-oedema have been described. Itching without a ... 15mg/L the risk of permanent visual damage and cardiac dysrhythmias is ... to use an alternative method.

  4. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

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    Sie Ali

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers and illicit (market and street vendors, shops sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50% chloroquine, 10/77 (13% pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12% quinine, 6/77 (8% amodiaquine, 9/77 (12% artesunate, and 4/77 (5% artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42% drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6% and 27/30 (90.0% samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the

  5. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

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    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  6. Quality assessment of some selected brands of anti malarial drugs used in Ghana: A case study of Agona West Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asare, Aquisman Ebenezer

    2016-07-01

    The availability of numerous brands of artesunate in our drug market today places clinicians and pharmacists in a difficult situation of choice of a suitable brand or the possibility of alternative use. Fake artesunate could compromise the hope that ACT (artemisinin combination therapy) offers for malaria control in Africa. In this study, quality of some selected brands of anti - malarial drugs used in the communities of Agona west Municipality, Ghana was determined. Blister or packs of anti – malarial tablets were randomly sampled. The Protocols of the International Pharmacopeia and Global Pharma Health Fund Minilab were used to assess the quality of anti – malarial tablets per blister pack manufactured by Bliss Gvs Pharma Ltd. India, Letap Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. Ghana and Guilin Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. China and sold in chemical sales outlets at the farming communities of Agona West Municipality, Ghana. The identification test was used to confirm the presence of active ingredients in the tablets. A confirmatory test for the active ingredient was achieved with artesunate (ICRS 1302) reference standards and Gsunate reference standard (ICRS4061). The friability test was used to confirm the hardness of the tablets to determine the drug ability to withstand abrasion in packaging, handling and shipping. The disintegration test was used to confirm the time required for the tablets to disintegrate into particles. Titrimetric analysis confirmed the amount of artesunate found in tablets.The results of the study are as follows for Artesunate by GPCL, LPL and Gsunate by BGPL; the identification test confirmed the presence of the active ingredient in all the brands. Based on the International Pharmacopoeia acceptable range of 1 to 15 min for genuine artesunate per tablet, 93.75 % of field selected artesunate blister pack tablets manufactured by GPCL passed the disintegration test and 6.25% failed. Also 85.57% of the sampled artesunate blister pack manufactured by

  7. Poor quality vital anti-malarials in Africa - an urgent neglected public health priority

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    Newton Paul N

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains a major public health problem. A vital component of malaria control rests on the availability of good quality artemisinin-derivative based combination therapy (ACT at the correct dose. However, there are increasing reports of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Methods Seven collections of artemisinin derivative monotherapies, ACT and halofantrine anti-malarials of suspicious quality were collected in 2002/10 in eleven African countries and in Asia en route to Africa. Packaging, chemical composition (high performance liquid chromatography, direct ionization mass spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry, stable isotope analysis and botanical investigations were performed. Results Counterfeit artesunate containing chloroquine, counterfeit dihydroartemisinin (DHA containing paracetamol (acetaminophen, counterfeit DHA-piperaquine containing sildenafil, counterfeit artemether-lumefantrine containing pyrimethamine, counterfeit halofantrine containing artemisinin, and substandard/counterfeit or degraded artesunate and artesunate+amodiaquine in eight countries are described. Pollen analysis was consistent with manufacture of counterfeits in eastern Asia. These data do not allow estimation of the frequency of poor quality anti-malarials in Africa. Conclusions Criminals are producing diverse harmful anti-malarial counterfeits with important public health consequences. The presence of artesunate monotherapy, substandard and/or degraded and counterfeit medicines containing sub-therapeutic amounts of unexpected anti-malarials will engender drug resistance. With the threatening spread of artemisinin resistance to Africa, much greater investment is required to ensure the quality of ACTs and removal of artemisinin monotherapies. The International Health Regulations may need to be invoked to counter these serious public health problems.

  8. A qualitative assessment of the challenges of WHO prequalification for anti-malarial drugs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangmu; Pan, Ke; Peng, Danlu; Stergachis, Andy

    2018-04-03

    While China is a major manufacturer of artemisinin and its derivatives, it lags as a global leader in terms of the total export value of anti-malarial drugs as finished pharmaceutical products ready for marketing and use by patients. This may be due to the limited number of World Health Organization (WHO) prequalified anti-malarial drugs from China. Understanding the reasons for the slow progress of WHO prequalification (PQ) in China can help improve the current situation and may lead to greater efforts in malaria eradication by Chinese manufacturers. In-depth interviews were conducted in China between November 2014 and December 2016. A total of 26 key informants from central government agencies, pharmaceutical companies, universities, and research institutes were interviewed, all of which had current or previous experience overseeing or implementing anti-malarial research and development in China. Chinese anti-malarial drugs that lack WHO PQ are mainly exported for use in the African private market. High upfront costs with unpredictable benefits, as well as limited information and limited technical support on WHO PQ, were reported as the main barriers to obtain WHO PQ for anti-malarial drugs by respondents from Chinese pharmaceutical companies. Potential incentives identified by respondents included tax relief, human resource training and consultation, as well as other incentives related to drug approval, such as China's Fast Track Channel. Government support, as well as innovative incentives and collaboration mechanisms are needed for further adoption of WHO PQ for anti-malarial drugs in China.

  9. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

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    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  10. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Frank M; Massawe, Isolide S; Lemnge, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp) during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform...... practice, the saleability of ACT was negligible. SP was best-selling, and use was not reserved for IPTp, as stipulated in the national anti-malarial policy. It is a major reason for concern that such drug-pressure in the community equals de facto intermittent presumptive treatment. In an area where SP drug...

  11. Identifying rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs using a simple and reliable in vitro parasite viability fast assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, María; Viera, Sara; Crespo, Benigno; Franco, Virginia; Gómez-Lorenzo, María G; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Angulo-Barturen, Íñigo; Sanz, Laura María; Gamo, Francisco-Javier

    2015-11-05

    The emergence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinins threatens to undermine the effectiveness of artemisinin-based combination anti-malarial therapy. Developing suitable drugs to replace artemisinins requires the identification of new compounds that display rapid parasite killing kinetics. However, no current methods fully meet the requirements to screen large compound libraries for candidates with such properties. This study describes the development and validation of an in vitro parasite viability fast assay for identifying rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs. Parasite killing kinetics were determined by first culturing unlabelled erythrocytes with P. falciparum in the presence of anti-malarial drugs for 24 or 48 h. After removing the drug, samples were added to erythrocytes pre-labelled with intracellular dye to allow their subsequent identification. The ability of viable parasites to re-establish infection in labelled erythrocytes could then be detected by two-colour flow cytometry after tagging of parasite DNA. Thus, double-stained erythrocytes (with the pre-labelled intracellular dye and the parasite DNA dye) result only after establishment of new infections by surviving parasites. The capacity of the test anti-malarial drugs to eliminate viable parasites within 24 or 48 h could, therefore, be determined. The parasite viability fast assay could be completed within 48 h following drug treatment and distinguished between rapidly parasiticidal anti-malarial drugs versus those acting more slowly. The assay was validated against ten standard anti-malarial agents with known properties and results correlated well with established methods. An abbreviated assay, suitable for adaption to medium-high throughput screening, was validated and applied against a set of 20 compounds retrieved from the publically available Medicines for Malaria Venture 'Malaria Box'. The quantification of new infections to determine parasite viability offers important

  12. Spread of anti-malarial drug resistance: Mathematical model with implications for ACT drug policies

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    Dondorp Arjen M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most malaria-endemic countries are implementing a change in anti-malarial drug policy to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT. The impact of different drug choices and implementation strategies is uncertain. Data from many epidemiological studies in different levels of malaria endemicity and in areas with the highest prevalence of drug resistance like borders of Thailand are certainly valuable. Formulating an appropriate dynamic data-driven model is a powerful predictive tool for exploring the impact of these strategies quantitatively. Methods A comprehensive model was constructed incorporating important epidemiological and biological factors of human, mosquito, parasite and treatment. The iterative process of developing the model, identifying data needed, and parameterization has been taken to strongly link the model to the empirical evidence. The model provides quantitative measures of outcomes, such as malaria prevalence/incidence and treatment failure, and illustrates the spread of resistance in low and high transmission settings. The model was used to evaluate different anti-malarial policy options focusing on ACT deployment. Results The model predicts robustly that in low transmission settings drug resistance spreads faster than in high transmission settings, and treatment failure is the main force driving the spread of drug resistance. In low transmission settings, ACT slows the spread of drug resistance to a partner drug, especially at high coverage rates. This effect decreases exponentially with increasing delay in deploying the ACT and decreasing rates of coverage. In the high transmission settings, however, drug resistance is driven by the proportion of the human population with a residual drug level, which gives resistant parasites some survival advantage. The spread of drug resistance could be slowed down by controlling presumptive drug use and avoiding the use of combination therapies containing drugs with

  13. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

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    Evans Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector and unlicensed facilities (informal sector is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58% anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30 and 11% (5/47 respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32 failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45 in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86% were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to

  14. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lawrence; Coignez, Veerle; Barojas, Adrian; Bempong, Daniel; Bradby, Sanford; Dijiba, Yanga; James, Makeida; Bretas, Gustavo; Adhin, Malti; Ceron, Nicolas; Hinds-Semple, Alison; Chibwe, Kennedy; Lukulay, Patrick; Pribluda, Victor

    2012-06-15

    Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector) and unlicensed facilities (informal sector) is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58%) anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30) and 11% (5/47) respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32) failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45) in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86%) were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. The findings of the studies in both countries point to significant problems with the quality of anti-malarial medicines

  15. The effect of malaria and anti-malarial drugs on skeletal and cardiac muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelli, Mauro Toledo; Brotto, Marco

    2016-11-02

    Malaria remains one of the most important infectious diseases in the world, being a significant public health problem associated with poverty and it is one of the main obstacles to the economy of an endemic country. Among the several complications, the effects of malaria seem to target the skeletal muscle system, leading to symptoms, such as muscle aches, muscle contractures, muscle fatigue, muscle pain, and muscle weakness. Malaria cause also parasitic coronary artery occlusion. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the effect of malaria disease and the anti-malarial drugs on skeletal and cardiac muscles. Research articles and case report publications that addressed aspects that are important for understanding the involvement of malaria parasites and anti-malarial therapies affecting skeletal and cardiac muscles were analysed and their findings summarized. Sequestration of red blood cells, increased levels of serum creatine kinase and reduced muscle content of essential contractile proteins are some of the potential biomarkers of the damage levels of skeletal and cardiac muscles. These biomarkers might be useful for prevention of complications and determining the effectiveness of interventions designed to protect cardiac and skeletal muscles from malaria-induced damage.

  16. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications

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    Chance Michael L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP. Methods Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Results Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9. The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. Conclusion This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum

  17. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubjer, Reem A; Adeel, Ahmed A; Chance, Michael L; Hassan, Amir A

    2011-08-21

    This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ) against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP). Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt)-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr)-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps)-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9). The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African) CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum parasites from Yemen. Mutant pfcrtT76 is highly prevalent but it

  18. In vitro studies on the sensitivity pattern of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs and local herbal extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasehinde, Grace I; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Adeyeba, Adegboyega O; Fagade, Obasola E; Valecha, Neena; Ayanda, Isaac O; Ajayi, Adesola A; Egwari, Louis O

    2014-02-20

    The resistance of human malaria parasites to anti-malarial compounds has become considerable concern, particularly in view of the shortage of novel classes of anti-malarial drugs. One way to prevent resistance is by using new compounds that are not based on existing synthetic antimicrobial agents. Sensitivity of 100 Plasmodium falciparum isolates to chloroquine, quinine, amodiaquine, mefloquine, sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, artemisinin, Momordica charantia ('Ejirin') Diospyros monbuttensis ('Egun eja') and Morinda lucida ('Oruwo') was determined using the in vitro microtest (Mark III) technique to determine the IC50 of the drugs. All the isolates tested were sensitive to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate. Fifty-one percent of the isolates were resistant to chloroquine, 13% to amodiaquine and 5% to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Highest resistance to chloroquine (68.9%) was recorded among isolates from Yewa zone while highest resistance to amodiaquine (30%) was observed in Ijebu zone. Highest resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine was recorded in Yewa and Egba zones, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between the responses to artemisinin and mefloquine (P0.05). Highest anti-plasmodial activity was obtained with the ethanolic extract of D. monbuttensis (IC50 = 3.2 nM) while the lowest was obtained from M. lucida (IC50 = 25 nM). Natural products isolated from plants used in traditional medicine, which have potent anti-plasmodial action in vitro, represent potential sources of new anti-malarial drugs.

  19. Development of a TaqMan Allelic Discrimination Assay for detection of Single Nucleotides Polymorphisms associated with anti-malarial drug resistance

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    Kamau Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-malarial drug resistance poses a threat to current global efforts towards control and elimination of malaria. Several methods are used in monitoring anti-malarial drug resistance. Molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP for example are increasingly being used to identify genetic mutations related to anti-malarial drug resistance. Several methods are currently being used in analysis of SNP associated with anti-malarial drug resistance and although each one of these methods has unique strengths and shortcoming, there is still need to improve and/or develop new methods that will close the gap found in the current methods. Methods TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assays for detection of SNPs associated with anti-malarial drug resistance were designed for analysis on Applied Biosystems PCR platform. These assays were designed by submitting SNP sequences associated with anti-malarial drug resistance to Applied Biosystems website. Eleven SNPs associated with resistance to anti-malarial drugs were selected and tested. The performance of each SNP assay was tested by creating plasmid DNAs carrying codons of interests and analysing them for analysis. To test the sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay, 12 clinical samples were sequenced at codons of interest and used in the analysis. Plasmid DNAs were used to establish the Limit of Detection (LoD for each assay. Results Data from genetic profiles of the Plasmodium falciparum laboratory strains and sequence data from 12 clinical samples was used as the reference method with which the performance of the SNP assays were compared to. The sensitivity and specificity of each SNP assay was establish at 100%. LoD for each assay was established at 2 GE, equivalent to less than 1 parasite/μL. SNP assays performed well in detecting mixed infection and analysis of clinical samples. Conclusion TaqMan Allelic Discrimination assay provides a good alternative tool in

  20. SMS for Life: a pilot project to improve anti-malarial drug supply management in rural Tanzania using standard technology

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    Mwafongo Winfred

    2010-10-01

    the potential to alleviate restricted availability of anti-malarial drugs or other medicines in rural or under-resourced areas.

  1. SMS for Life: a pilot project to improve anti-malarial drug supply management in rural Tanzania using standard technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    restricted availability of anti-malarial drugs or other medicines in rural or under-resourced areas. PMID:20979633

  2. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

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    Zaloumis Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50, derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle. The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i

  3. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Central, West and East African children with severe malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Nguetse, Christian N.; Adegnika, Ayola Akim; Agbenyega, Tsiri; Ogutu, Bernhards R.; Krishna, Sanjeev; Kremsner, Peter G.; Velavan, Thirumalaisamy P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (PfMDR1), P. falciparum Ca(2+)-ATPase (PfATP6) and Kelch-13 propeller domain (PfK13) loci are molecular markers of parasite susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs. Their frequency distributions were determined in the isolates collected from children with severe malaria originating from three African countries. METHODS: Samples from 287 children with severe malaria [(Gabon: n = 114); (Ghana: n = 89); (Kenya: n = 84)] were genotyped fo...

  4. Malavefes: A computational voice-enabled malaria fuzzy informatics software for correct dosage prescription of anti-malarial drugs

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    Olugbenga O. Oluwagbemi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the infectious diseases consistently inherent in many Sub-Sahara African countries. Among the issues of concern are the consequences of wrong diagnosis and dosage administration of anti-malarial drugs on sick patients; these have resulted into various degrees of complications ranging from severe headaches, stomach and body discomfort, blurred vision, dizziness, hallucinations, and in extreme cases, death. Many expert systems have been developed to support different infectious disease diagnoses, but not sure of any yet, that have been specifically designed as a voice-based application to diagnose and translate malaria patients’ symptomatic data for pre-laboratory screening and correct prescription of proper dosage of the appropriate medication. We developed Malavefes, (a malaria voice-enabled computational fuzzy expert system for correct dosage prescription of anti-malarial drugs using Visual Basic.NET., and Java programming languages. Data collation for this research was conducted by survey from existing literature and interview from public health experts. The database for this malaria drug informatics system was implemented using Microsoft Access. The Root Sum Square (RSS was implemented as the inference engine of Malavefes to make inferences from rules, while Centre of Gravity (CoG was implemented as the defuzzification engine. The drug recommendation module was voice-enabled. Additional anti-malaria drug expiration validation software was developed using Java programming language. We conducted a user-evaluation of the performance and user-experience of the Malavefes software. Keywords: Informatics, Bioinformatics, Fuzzy, Anti-malaria, Voice computing, Dosage prescription

  5. Major Reduction in Anti-Malarial Drug Consumption in Senegal after Nation-Wide Introduction of Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Sylla; Thior, Moussa; Faye, Babacar; Ndiop, Médoune; Diouf, Mamadou Lamine; Diouf, Mame Birame; Diallo, Ibrahima; Fall, Fatou Ba; Ndiaye, Jean Louis; Albertini, Audrey; Lee, Evan; Jorgensen, Pernille; Gaye, Oumar; Bell, David

    2011-01-01

    Background While WHO recently recommended universal parasitological confirmation of suspected malaria prior to treatment, debate has continued as to whether wide-scale use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can achieve this goal. Adherence of health service personnel to RDT results has been poor in some settings, with little impact on anti-malarial drug consumption. The Senegal national malaria control programme introduced universal parasite-based diagnosis using malaria RDTs from late 2007 in all public health facilities. This paper assesses the impact of this programme on anti-malarial drug consumption and disease reporting. Methods and Findings Nationally-collated programme data from 2007 to 2009 including malaria diagnostic outcomes, prescription of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and consumption of RDTs in public health facilities, were reviewed and compared. Against a marked seasonal variation in all-cause out-patient visits, non-malarial fever and confirmed malaria, parasite-based diagnosis increased nationally from 3.9% of reported malaria-like febrile illness to 86.0% over a 3 year period. The prescription of ACT dropped throughout this period from 72.9% of malaria-like febrile illness to 31.5%, reaching close equivalence to confirmed malaria (29.9% of 584873 suspect fever cases). An estimated 516576 courses of inappropriate ACT prescription were averted. Conclusions The data indicate high adherence of anti-malarial prescribing practice to RDT results after an initial run-in period. The large reduction in ACT consumption enabled by the move from symptom-based to parasite-based diagnosis demonstrates that effective roll-out and use of malaria RDTs is achievable on a national scale through well planned and structured implementation. While more detailed information on management of parasite-negative cases is required at point of care level to assess overall cost-benefits to the health sector, considerable cost-savings were achieved in ACT

  6. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania: a baseline study in an era of assumed artemisinin combination therapy (ACT

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    Ringsted Frank M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemether-lumefantrine (ALu replaced sulphadoxine-pymimethamine (SP as the official first-line anti-malarial in Tanzania in November 2006. So far, artemisinin combination therapy (ACT is contra-indicated during pregnancy by the national malaria treatment guidelines, and pregnant women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform a baseline study of the private market for anti-malarials in Muheza town, an area with widespread anti-malarial drug resistance, prior to the implementation of a provider training and accreditation programme that will allow accredited drug shops to sell subsidized ALu. Methods All drug shops selling prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results All surveyed drug shops illicitly sold SP and quinine (QN, and legally amodiaquine (AQ. Calculated monthly sale was 4,041 doses, in a town with a population of 15,000 people. Local brands of SP accounted for 74% of sales volume, compared to AQ (13%, QN (11% and ACT (2%. Conclusions In community practice, the saleability of ACT was negligible. SP was best-selling, and use was not reserved for IPTp, as stipulated in the national anti-malarial policy. It is a major reason for concern that such drug-pressure in the community equals de facto intermittent presumptive treatment. In an area where SP drug resistance remains high, unregulated SP dispensing to people other than pregnant women runs the risk of eventually jeopardizing the effectiveness of the IPTp

  7. Availability and quality of anti-malarials among private sector outlets in Myanmar in 2012: results from a large, community-based, cross-sectional survey before a large-scale intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khin, Hnin Su Su; Chen, Ingrid; White, Chris; Sudhinaraset, May; McFarland, Willi; Littrell, Megan; Montagu, Dominic; Aung, Tin

    2015-07-14

    Global malaria control efforts are threatened by the spread and emergence of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites. In 2012, the widespread sale of partial courses of artemisinin-based monotherapy was suspected to take place in the highly accessed, weakly regulated private sector in Myanmar, posing potentially major threats to drug resistance. This study investigated the presence of artemisinin-based monotherapies in the Myanmar private sector, particularly as partial courses of therapy, to inform the targeting of future interventions to stop artemisinin resistance. A large cross-sectional survey comprised of a screening questionnaire was conducted across 26 townships in Myanmar between March and May, 2012. For outlets that stocked anti-malarials at the time of survey, a stock audit was conducted, and for outlets that stocked anti-malarials within 3 months of the survey, a provider survey was conducted. A total of 3,658 outlets were screened, 83% were retailers (pharmacies, itinerant drug vendors and general retailers) and 17% were healthcare providers (private facilities and health workers). Of the 3,658 outlets screened, 1,359 outlets (32%) stocked at least one anti-malarial at the time of study. Oral artemisinin-based monotherapy comprised of 33% of self-reported anti-malarials dispensing volumes found. The vast majority of artemisinin-based monotherapy was sold by retailers, where 63% confirmed that they sold partial courses of therapy by cutting blister packets. Very few retailers (5%) had malaria rapid diagnostic tests available, and quality-assured artemisinin-based combination therapy was virtually nonexistent among retailers. Informal private pharmacies, itinerant drug vendors and general retailers should be targeted for interventions to improve malaria treatment practices in Myanmar, particularly those that threaten the emergence and spread of artemisinin resistance.

  8. Stability-indicating HPLC-DAD/UV-ESI/MS impurity profiling of the anti-malarial drug lumefantrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeken, Mathieu; Suleman, Sultan; Baert, Bram; Vangheluwe, Elien; Van Dorpe, Sylvia; Burvenich, Christian; Duchateau, Luc; Jansen, Frans H; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2011-02-28

    Lumefantrine (benflumetol) is a fluorene derivative belonging to the aryl amino alcohol class of anti-malarial drugs and is commercially available in fixed combination products with β-artemether. Impurity characterization of such drugs, which are widely consumed in tropical countries for malaria control programmes, is of paramount importance. However, until now, no exhaustive impurity profile of lumefantrine has been established, encompassing process-related and degradation impurities in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and finished pharmaceutical products (FPPs). Using HPLC-DAD/UV-ESI/ion trap/MS, a comprehensive impurity profile was established based upon analysis of market samples as well as stress, accelerated and long-term stability results. In-silico toxicological predictions for these lumefantrine related impurities were made using Toxtree® and Derek®. Several new impurities are identified, of which the desbenzylketo derivative (DBK) is proposed as a new specified degradant. DBK and the remaining unspecified lumefantrine related impurities are predicted, using Toxtree® and Derek®, to have a toxicity risk comparable to the toxicity risk of the API lumefantrine itself. From unstressed, stressed and accelerated stability samples of lumefantrine API and FPPs, nine compounds were detected and characterized to be lumefantrine related impurities. One new lumefantrine related compound, DBK, was identified and characterized as a specified degradation impurity of lumefantrine in real market samples (FPPs). The in-silico toxicological investigation (Toxtree® and Derek®) indicated overall a toxicity risk for lumefantrine related impurities comparable to that of the API lumefantrine itself.

  9. CYP450 phenotyping and accurate mass identification of metabolites of the 8-aminoquinoline, anti-malarial drug primaquine

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    Pybus Brandon S

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 8-aminoquinoline (8AQ drug primaquine (PQ is currently the only approved drug effective against the persistent liver stage of the hypnozoite forming strains Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium ovale as well as Stage V gametocytes of Plasmodium falciparum. To date, several groups have investigated the toxicity observed in the 8AQ class, however, exact mechanisms and/or metabolic species responsible for PQ’s haemotoxic and anti-malarial properties are not fully understood. Methods In the present study, the metabolism of PQ was evaluated using in vitro recombinant metabolic enzymes from the cytochrome P450 (CYP and mono-amine oxidase (MAO families. Based on this information, metabolite identification experiments were performed using nominal and accurate mass measurements. Results Relative activity factor (RAF-weighted intrinsic clearance values show the relative role of each enzyme to be MAO-A, 2C19, 3A4, and 2D6, with 76.1, 17.0, 5.2, and 1.7% contributions to PQ metabolism, respectively. CYP 2D6 was shown to produce at least six different oxidative metabolites along with demethylations, while MAO-A products derived from the PQ aldehyde, a pre-cursor to carboxy PQ. CYPs 2C19 and 3A4 produced only trace levels of hydroxylated species. Conclusions As a result of this work, CYP 2D6 and MAO-A have been implicated as the key enzymes associated with PQ metabolism, and metabolites previously identified as potentially playing a role in efficacy and haemolytic toxicity have been attributed to production via CYP 2D6 mediated pathways.

  10. Donor support for quality assurance and pharmacovigilance of anti-malarials in malaria-endemic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Stephanie D; Mills, Brianna M; Stergachis, Andy

    2017-07-11

    Malaria control efforts have been strengthened by funding from donor groups and government agencies. The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and the Malaria (Global Fund), the US President's Malaria Initiative (PMI) account for the majority of donor support for malaria control and prevention efforts. Pharmacovigilance (PV), which encompasses all activities relating to the detection, assessment, understanding, and prevention of adverse effects or any other drug-related problem, is a necessary part of efforts to reduce drug resistance and improve treatment outcomes. This paper reports on an analysis of PV plans in the Global Fund and PMI and World Bank's grants for malaria prevention and control. All active malaria grants as of September 2015 funded by the Global Fund and World Bank, and fiscal year 2015 and 2016 PMI Malaria Operational Plans (MOP) were identified. The total amount awarded for PV-related activities and drug quality assurance was abstracted. A Key-Word-in-Context (KWIC) analysis was conducted for the content of each grant. Specific search terms consisted of pharmacovigilance, pregn*, registry, safety, adverse drug, mass drug administration, primaquine, counterfeit, sub-standard, and falsified. Grants that mentioned PV activities identified in the KWIC search, listed PV in their budgets, or included the keywords: counterfeit, sub-standard, falsified, mass drug administration, or adverse event were thematically coded using Dedoose software version 7.0. The search identified 159 active malaria grants including 107 Global Fund grants, 39 fiscal year 2015 and 2016 PMI grants and 13 World Bank grants. These grants were primarily awarded to low-income countries (57.2%) and in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) (70.4%). Thirty-seven (23.3%) grants included a budget line for PV- or drug quality assurance-related activities, including 21 PMI grants and 16 Global Fund grants. Only 23 (14.5%) grants directly mentioned PV. The primary focus area was improving drug

  11. Operational strategies of anti-malarial drug campaigns for malaria elimination in Zambia's southern province: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Erin M; Miller, John M; Littrell, Megan; Chitnis, Nakul; Steketee, Rick

    2016-03-09

    Malaria elimination requires reducing both the potential of mosquitoes to transmit parasites to humans and humans to transmit parasites to mosquitoes. To achieve this goal in Southern province, Zambia a mass test and treat (MTAT) campaign was conducted from 2011-2013 to complement high coverage of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLIN). To identify factors likely to increase campaign effectiveness, a modelling approach was applied to investigate the simulated effect of alternative operational strategies for parasite clearance in southern province. OpenMalaria, a discrete-time, individual-based stochastic model of malaria, was parameterized for the study area to simulate anti-malarial drug administration for interruption of transmission. Simulations were run for scenarios with a range of artemisinin-combination therapies, proportion of the population reached by the campaign, targeted age groups, time between campaign rounds, Plasmodium falciparum test protocols, and the addition of drugs aimed at preventing onward transmission. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to assess uncertainty of simulation results. Scenarios were evaluated based on the reduction in all-age parasite prevalence during the peak transmission month one year following the campaign, compared to the currently-implemented strategy of MTAT 19 % population coverage at pilot and 40 % coverage during the first year of implementation in the presence of 56 % LLIN use and 18 % indoor residual spray coverage. Simulation results suggest the most important determinant of success in reducing prevalence is the population coverage achieved in the campaign, which would require more than 1 year of campaign implementation for elimination. The inclusion of single low-dose primaquine, which acts as a gametocytocide, or ivermectin, which acts as an endectocide, to the drug regimen did not further reduce parasite prevalence one year following the campaign compared to the currently-implemented strategy

  12. Determinants of price setting decisions on anti-malarial drugs at retail shops in Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Patouillard, Edith; Hanson, Kara; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Palafox, Benjamin; Tougher, Sarah; Pok, Sochea; O?Connell, Kate; Goodman, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Background In many low-income countries, the private commercial sector plays an important role in the provision of malaria treatment. However, the quality of care it provides is often poor, with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) generally being too costly for consumers. Decreasing ACT prices is critical for improving private sector treatment outcomes and reducing the spread of artemisinin resistance. Yet limited evidence exists on the factors influencing retailers? pricing decisions. This...

  13. Anti-malarial drug safety information obtained through routine monitoring in a rural district of South-Western Senegal

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    Brasseur Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowing the safety profile of anti-malarial treatments in routine use is essential; millions of patients receive now artemisinin combination therapy (ACT annually, but the return on information through current systems is as yet inadequate. Cohort event monitoring (CEM is a WHO (World Health Organization-recommended practice; testing its performance and feasibility in routine practice in malaria-endemic is important. Methods A nine-year CEM-based study of the safety of artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ at five peripheral health facilities in a rural district of South-western Senegal. Staff (nurses, health workers were trained to collect actively and systematically information on the patient, treatment and events on a purposely designed questionnaire. The occurrence and severity of events was collected before, during and after treatment up to 28 days in order to generate information on all adverse events (AEs as well as treatment-emerging signs/symptoms (TESS. Laboratory tests (haematology, liver and renal was planned for at least 10% of cases. Results During 2001–2009, 3,708 parasitologically-confirmed malaria cases (mean age = 16.0 ± 12.7 years were enrolled (26% and 52% of all and parasitologically-confirmed ASAQ treatments, respectively. Treatment was supervised in 96% of cases. Products changed over time: 49% were a loose combination of individually-packaged products (available 2001–03, 42% co-blistered products (2004–09 and 9% a fixed-dose co-formulation (2006–09; dosing was age-based for 42%, weight-based for 58%. AS and AQ were correctly dosed in 97% and 82% of cases with the loose and 93% and 86% with the fixed combination, but only 50% and 42% with the co-blistered product. Thirty-three per cent (33% of patients had at least one sign/symptom pre-treatment, 12% had at least one AE and 9% a TESS (total events 3,914, 1,144 and 693, respectively. AEs overestimated TESS by 1.2-2 fold (average 1.7. Changes in

  14. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewchuk, Tanya; O'Connell, Kathryn A; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Chapman, Steven; Chavasse, Desmond

    2011-10-31

    Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012.ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the project aims to disseminate findings widely for decision

  15. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

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    Chapman Steven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the

  16. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the project aims to disseminate

  17. Factors related to compliance to anti-malarial drug combination: example of amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine among children in rural Senegal

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    Sow Diarietou

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of new anti-malarial treatment that is effective, but more expensive, raises questions about whether the high level of effectiveness observed in clinical trials can be found in a context of family use. The objective of this study was to determine the factors related to adherence, when using the amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP association, a transitory strategy before ACT implementation in Senegal. Methods The study was conducted in five rural dispensaries. Children, between two and 10 years of age, who presented mild malaria were recruited at the time of the consultation and were prescribed AQ/SP. The child's primary caretaker was questioned at home on D3 about treatment compliance and factors that could have influenced his or her adherence to treatment. A logistic regression model was used for the analyses. Results The study sample included 289 children. The adherence rate was 64.7%. Two risks factors for non-adherence were identified: the children's age (8–10 years (ORa = 3.07 [1.49–6.29]; p = 0.004; and the profession of the head of household (retailer/employee versus farmer (ORa = 2.71 [1.34–5.48]; p = 0.006. Previously seeking care (ORa = 0.28 [0.105–0.736], p=0.001] satisfaction with received information (ORa = 0.45 [0.24–0.84]; p = 0.013, and the quality of history taking (ORa = 0.38 [0.21–0.69]; p = 0.001 were significantly associated with good compliance. Conclusion The results of the study show the importance of information and communication between caregivers and health center staff. The experience gained from this therapeutic transition emphasizes the importance of information given to the patients at the time of the consultation and drug delivery in order to improve drug use and thus prevent the emergence of rapid drug resistance.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum resistance to anti-malarial drugs in Papua New Guinea: evaluation of a community-based approach for the molecular monitoring of resistance

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    Reeder John C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular monitoring of parasite resistance has become an important complementary tool in establishing rational anti-malarial drug policies. Community surveys provide a representative sample of the parasite population and can be carried out more rapidly than accrual of samples from clinical cases, but it is not known whether the frequencies of genetic resistance markers in clinical cases differ from those in the overall population, or whether such community surveys can provide good predictions of treatment failure rates. Methods Between 2003 and 2005, in vivo drug efficacy of amodiaquine or chloroquine plus sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine was determined at three sites in Papua New Guinea. The genetic drug resistance profile (i.e., 33 single nucleotide polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum crt, mdr1, dhfr, dhps, and ATPase6 was concurrently assessed in 639 community samples collected in the catchment areas of the respective health facilities by using a DNA microarray-based method. Mutant allele and haplotype frequencies were determined and their relationship with treatment failure rates at each site in each year was investigated. Results PCR-corrected in vivo treatment failure rates were between 12% and 28% and varied by site and year with variable longitudinal trends. In the community samples, the frequencies of mutations in pfcrt and pfmdr1 were high and did not show significant changes over time. Mutant allele frequencies in pfdhfr were moderate and those in pfdhps were low. No mutations were detected in pfATPase6. There was much more variation between sites than temporal, within-site, variation in allele and haplotype frequencies. This variation did not correlate well with treatment failure rates. Allele and haplotype frequencies were very similar in clinical and community samples from the same site. Conclusions The relationship between parasite genetics and in vivo treatment failure rate is not straightforward. The

  19. A phase I trial to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of low-dose methotrexate as an anti-malarial drug in Kenyan adult healthy volunteers

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    Oyoo George O

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous investigations indicate that methotrexate, an old anticancer drug, could be used at low doses to treat malaria. A phase I evaluation was conducted to assess the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of this drug in healthy adult male Kenyan volunteers. Methods Twenty five healthy adult volunteers were recruited and admitted to receive a 5 mg dose of methotrexate/day/5 days. Pharmacokinetics blood sampling was carried out at 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 hours following each dose. Nausea, vomiting, oral ulcers and other adverse events were solicited during follow up of 42 days. Results The mean age of participants was 23.9 ± 3.3 years. Adherence to protocol was 100%. No grade 3 solicited adverse events were observed. However, one case of transiently elevated liver enzymes, and one serious adverse event (not related to the product were reported. The maximum concentration (Cmax was 160-200 nM and after 6 hours, the effective concentration (Ceff was Conclusion Low-dose methotraxate had an acceptable safety profile. However, methotrexate blood levels did not reach the desirable Ceff of 250-400-nM required to clear malaria infection in vivo. Further dose finding and safety studies are necessary to confirm suitability of this drug as an anti-malarial agent.

  20. Exposure to anti-malarial drugs and monitoring of adverse drug reactions using toll-free mobile phone calls in private retail sector in Sagamu, Nigeria: implications for pharmacovigilance

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    Ogunwande Isiaka A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs contribute to ill-health or life-threatening outcomes of therapy during management of infectious diseases. The exposure to anti-malarial and use of mobile phone technology to report ADRs following drug exposures were investigated in Sagamu - a peri-urban community in Southwest Nigeria. Methods Purchase of medicines was actively monitored for 28 days in three Community Pharmacies (CP and four Patent and Proprietary Medicine Stores (PPMS in the community. Information on experience of ADRs was obtained by telephone from 100 volunteers who purchased anti-malarials during the 28-day period. Results and Discussion A total of 12,093 purchases were recorded during the period. Antibiotics, analgesics, vitamins and anti-malarials were the most frequently purchased medicines. A total of 1,500 complete courses of anti-malarials were purchased (12.4% of total purchases; of this number, purchases of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ were highest (39.3 and 25.2% respectiuvely. Other anti-malarials purchased were artesunate monotherapy (AS - 16.1%, artemether-lumefantrine (AL 10.0%, amodiaquine (AQ - 6.6%, quinine (QNN - 1.9%, halofantrine (HF - 0.2% and proguanil (PR - 0.2%. CQ was the cheapest (USD 0.3 and halofantrine the most expensive (USD 7.7. AL was 15.6 times ($4.68 more expensive than CQ. The response to mobile phone monitoring of ADRs was 57% in the first 24 hours (day 1 after purchase and decreased to 33% by day 4. Participants in this monitoring exercise were mostly with low level of education (54%. Conclusion The findings from this study indicate that ineffective anti-malaria medicines including monotherapies remain widely available and are frequently purchased in the study area. Cost may be a factor in the continued use of ineffective monotherapies. Availability of a toll-free telephone line may facilitate pharmacovigilance and follow up of response to medicines in a resource

  1. The anti-malarial drug Mefloquine disrupts central autonomic and respiratory control in the working heart brainstem preparation of the rat

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    Lall Varinder K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is an anti-malarial drug that can have neurological side effects. This study examines how mefloquine (MF influences central nervous control of autonomic and respiratory systems using the arterially perfused working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP of the rat. Recordings of nerve activity were made from the thoracic sympathetic chain and phrenic nerve, while heart rate (HR and perfusion pressure were also monitored in the arterially perfused, decerebrate, rat WHBP. MF was added to the perfusate at 1 μM to examine its effects on baseline parameters as well as baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. Results MF caused a significant, atropine resistant, bradycardia and increased phrenic nerve discharge frequency. Chemoreceptor mediated sympathoexcitation (elicited by addition of 0.1 ml of 0.03% sodium cyanide to the aortic cannula was significantly attenuated by the application of MF to the perfusate. Furthermore MF significantly decreased rate of return to resting HR following chemoreceptor induced bradycardia. An increase in respiratory frequency and attenuated respiratory-related sympathetic nerve discharge during chemoreceptor stimulation was also elicited with MF compared to control. However, MF did not significantly alter baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. Conclusions These studies indicate that in the WHBP, MF causes profound alterations in autonomic and respiratory control. The possibility that these effects may be mediated through actions on connexin 36 containing gap junctions in central neurones controlling sympathetic nervous outflow is discussed.

  2. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, Insaf F; Alifrangis, Michael; Recke, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ) remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1...... therapeutic agent. There is a dire need to continue monitoring quality of CQ as there is a major influx of substandard and fake formulations into malaria-endemic countries. The use of fake/substandard drugs will result in sub-therapeutic levels endangering the patient and possibly select for parasite...

  3. Mechanochemical Synthesis, In vivo Anti-malarial and Safety Evaluation of Amodiaquine-zinc Complex

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    Arise Rotimi Olusanya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available So far, some prospective metal-based anti-malarial drugs have been developed. The mechanochemical synthesis and characterization of Zn (II complex with amodiaquine and its anti-malarial efficacy on Plasmodium berghei-infected mice and safety evaluation were described in this study.

  4. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

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    Ronn Anita

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1 therapeutic agent. There is a dire need to continue monitoring quality of CQ as there is a major influx of substandard and fake formulations into malaria-endemic countries. The use of fake/substandard drugs will result in sub-therapeutic levels endangering the patient and possibly select for parasite resistance. The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple antibody-based ELISA to measure CQ concentrations in tablets and in plasma. Methods A monoclonal antibody (MAb that reacts with the N-side chain of the CQ molecule was prepared by use of a CQ analogue. A specific and reliable ELISA for detection of CQ was developed. The developed assay was validated by measuring CQ in tablets sold in Denmark, India and Sudan. Furthermore, kinetics of CQ concentrations in plasma of four volunteers, who ingested two tablets of Malarex® containing, 250 mg CQ base, were measured before drug intake, three hours later and thereafter at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. The same plasma samples were simultaneously measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results The ELISA proved an easy-to-handle and very sensitive tool for the detection of CQ with a lower limit of detection at 3.9 ng/ml. ELISA levels of CQ in plasma showed high agreement with the levels obtained by HPLC (r = 0.98. The specificity in the negative control group was 100%. Conclusion The developed ELISA can be used for quality screening of CQ in pharmaceutical formulations and for drug monitoring in malaria and in other infectious diseases, such as HIV, where CQ proved to be an effective therapeutic agent. The methodology has been exploited to develop monoclonal

  5. Genotyping of Plasmodium falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh

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    Akter Jasmin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past many regions of Bangladesh were hyperendemic for malaria. Malaria control in the 1960s to 1970s eliminated malaria from the plains but in the Chittagong Hill Tracts remained a difficult to control reservoir. The Chittagong Hill Tracts have areas with between 1 and 10% annual malaria rates, predominately 90-95% Plasmodium falciparum. In Southeast Asia, multiplicity of infection for hypo-endemic regions has been approximately 1.5. Few studies on the genetic diversity of P. falciparum have been performed in Bangladesh. Anderson et al. performed a study in Khagrachari, northern Chittagong Hill Tracts in 2002 on 203 patients and found that parasites had a multiplicity of infection of 1.3 by MSP-1, MSP-2 and GLURP genotyping. A total of 94% of the isolates had the K76T Pfcrt chloroquine resistant genotype, and 70% showed the N86Y Pfmdr1 genotype. Antifolate drug resistant genotypes were high with 99% and 73% of parasites having two or more mutations at the dhfr or dhps loci. Methods Nested and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods were used to genotype P. falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh. Results The analysis of polymorphic and drug resistant genotype on 33 paired recrudescent infections after drug treatment in the period 2004 to 2008 in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, which is just prior to countrywide provision of artemisinin combination therapy. Overall the multiplicity of infection for MSP-1 was 2.7 with a slightly smaller parasite diversity post-treatment. The 13 monoclonal infections by both GLURP and MSP-1 were evenly divided between pre- and post-treatment. The MSP-1 MAD block was most frequent in 66 of the samples. The prevalence of the K76T PfCRT chloroquine resistant allele was approximately 82% of the samples, while the resistant Pfmdr1 N86Y was present in 33% of the samples. Interestingly, the post

  6. "Every drug goes to treat its own disease…" - a qualitative study of perceptions and experiences of taking anti-retrovirals concomitantly with anti-malarials among those affected by HIV and malaria in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangesho, Peter E; Reynolds, Joanna; Lemnge, Martha

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about how people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) experience malaria and the concomitant use of anti-malarial treatments with anti-retrovirals (ARVs). An understanding of how patients make sense of these experiences is important to consider in planning......, perceptions of drug strength appeared to compel some people not enrolled in the clinical study to take the drugs at separate times to avoid anticipated harm to the body. CONCLUSIONS: Management of HIV and malaria concurrently often requires individuals to cross the domains of different disease programmes...

  7. QSAR models for anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Vijay H; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Mahajan, Devidas T

    2014-03-01

    In the present study, predictive quantitative structure - activity relationship (QSAR) models for anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines have been developed. CORAL, which is freely available on internet (http://www.insilico.eu/coral), has been used as a tool of QSAR analysis to establish statistically robust QSAR model of anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoquinolines. Six random splits into the visible sub-system of the training and invisible subsystem of validation were examined. Statistical qualities for these splits vary, but in all these cases, statistical quality of prediction for anti-malarial activity was quite good. The optimal SMILES-based descriptor was used to derive the single descriptor based QSAR model for a data set of 112 aminoquinolones. All the splits had r(2)> 0.85 and r(2)> 0.78 for subtraining and validation sets, respectively. The three parametric multilinear regression (MLR) QSAR model has Q(2) = 0.83, R(2) = 0.84 and F = 190.39. The anti-malarial activity has strong correlation with presence/absence of nitrogen and oxygen at a topological distance of six.

  8. Plasmodium falciparum in vitro continuous culture conditions: A comparison of parasite susceptibility and tolerance to anti-malarial drugs throughout the asexual intra-erythrocytic life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M

    2017-12-01

    The continuous culture of Plasmodium falciparum is often seen as a means to an end, that end being to probe the biology of the parasite in question, and ultimately for many in the malaria drug discovery arena, to identify means of killing the parasite in order to treat malaria. In vitro continuous culture of Plasmodium falciparum is a fundamental requirement when undertaking malaria research where the primary objectives utilise viable parasites of a desired lifecycle stage. This investigation, and resulting data, compared the impact culturing Plasmodium falciparum long term (4 months) in different environmental conditions had on experimental outcomes and thus conclusions. The example presented here focused specifically on the effect culture conditions had on the in vitro tolerance of Plasmodium falciparum to standard anti-malarial drugs, including artemisinin and lumefantrine. Historical data from an independent experiment for 3D7-ALB (5% O 2 ) was also compared with that obtained from this study. We concluded that parasites cultured for several months in media supplemented with a serum substitute such as Albumax II ® or within hyperoxic conditions (21% O 2 ), demonstrate highly variable responses to artemisinin and lumefantrine but not all anti-malarial drugs, when compared to those cultured in human serum in combination with Albumax II ® under normoxic conditions (5% O 2 ) for the parasite. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. In silico and in vivo anti-malarial studies of 18β glycyrrhetinic acid from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

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    Komal Kalani

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the most prevailing fatal diseases causing between 1.2 and 2.7 million deaths all over the world each year. Further, development of resistance against the frontline anti-malarial drugs has created an alarming situation, which requires intensive drug discovery to develop new, more effective, affordable and accessible anti-malarial agents possessing novel modes of action. Over the past few years triterpenoids from higher plants have shown a wide range of anti-malarial activities. As a part of our drug discovery program for anti-malarial agents from Indian medicinal plants, roots of Glycyrrhizaglabra were chemically investigated, which resulted in the isolation and characterization of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA as a major constituent. The in vitro studies against P. falciparum showed significant (IC50 1.69 µg/ml anti-malarial potential for GA. Similarly, the molecular docking studies showed adequate docking (LibDock score of 71.18 for GA and 131.15 for standard anti-malarial drug chloroquine. Further, in silico pharmacokinetic and drug-likeness studies showed that GA possesses drug-like properties. Finally, in vivo evaluation showed a dose dependent anti-malarial activity ranging from 68-100% at doses of 62.5-250 mg/kg on day 8. To the best of our knowledge this is the first ever report on the anti-malarial potential of GA. Further work on optimization of the anti-malarial lead is under progress.

  10. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys

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    Littrell Megan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT. The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Methods Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Results Most public outlets (85% and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%, drug stores (14%, mobile providers (4% and grocery stores (2%. Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61% and private (42% sectors. Conclusions While data on the anti-malarial

  11. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

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    Eberlin Marcos N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7 and -resistant (S20 strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4 and 50% methanolic (F5 fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4.

  12. Do anti-malarials in Africa meet quality standards? The market penetration of non quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy in eight African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul N; Hanson, Kara; Goodman, Catherine

    2017-05-25

    Quality of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is important for ensuring malaria parasite clearance and protecting the efficacy of artemisinin-based therapies. The extent to which non quality-assured ACT (non-QAACT), or those not granted global regulatory approval, are available and used to treat malaria in endemic countries is poorly documented. This paper uses national and sub-national medicine outlet surveys conducted in eight study countries (Benin, Kinshasa and Kantanga [Democratic Republic of the Congo, DRC], Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) between 2009 and 2015 to describe the non-QAACT market and to document trends in availability and distribution of non-QAACT in the public and private sector. In 2014/15, non-QAACT were most commonly available in Kinshasa (83%), followed by Katanga (53%), Nigeria (48%), Kenya (42%), and Uganda (33%). Non-QAACT accounted for 20% of the market share in the private sector in Kenya, followed by Benin and Uganda (19%), Nigeria (12%) and Zambia (8%); this figure was 27% in Katanga and 40% in Kinshasa. Public sector non-QAACT availability and distribution was much lower, with the exception of Zambia (availability, 85%; market share, 32%). Diverse generics and formulations were available, but non-QAACT were most commonly artemether-lumefantrine (AL) or dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA PPQ), in tablet formulation, imported, and distributed in urban areas at either pharmacies or drug stores. The number of unique manufacturers supplying non-QAACT to each country ranged from 9 in Uganda to 92 in Nigeria. Addressing the availability and distribution of non-QAACT will require effective private sector engagement and evidence-based strategies to address provider and consumer demand for these products. Given the variation in non-QAACT markets observed across the eight study countries, active efforts to limit registration, importation and distribution of non-QAACT must be tailored to the country context

  13. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuasi, John H; Diap, Graciela; Blay-Nguah, Samuel; Boakye, Isaac; Karikari, Patrick E; Dismas, Baza; Karenzo, Jeanne; Nsabiyumva, Lievin; Louie, Karly S; Kiechel, Jean-René

    2011-02-10

    Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO) retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO), a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO) medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment) of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9%) compared to public (4.2%) and NGO (0%) outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu) for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu). Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu), private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu). Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors, whereas, it was equivalent to 1.5 days worth

  14. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  15. Increased pfmdr1 gene copy number and the decline in pfcrt and pfmdr1 resistance alleles in Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates after the change of anti-malarial drug treatment policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duah, Nancy O; Matrevi, Sena A; de Souza, Dziedzom K; Binnah, Daniel D; Tamakloe, Mary M; Opoku, Vera S; Onwona, Christiana O; Narh, Charles A; Quashie, Neils B; Abuaku, Benjamin; Duplessis, Christopher; Kronmann, Karl C; Koram, Kwadwo A

    2013-10-30

    With the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2005, monitoring of anti-malarial drug efficacy, which includes the use of molecular tools to detect known genetic markers of parasite resistance, is important for first-hand information on the changes in parasite susceptibility to drugs in Ghana. This study investigated the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr1) copy number, mutations and the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) mutations in Ghanaian isolates collected in seven years to detect the trends in prevalence of mutations. Archived filter paper blood blots collected from children aged below five years with uncomplicated malaria in 2003-2010 at sentinel sites were used. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), 756 samples were assessed for pfmdr1 gene copy number. PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to detect alleles of pfmdr1 86 in 1,102 samples, pfmdr1 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246 in 832 samples and pfcrt 76 in 1,063 samples. Merozoite surface protein 2 (msp2) genotyping was done to select monoclonal infections for copy number analysis. The percentage of isolates with increased pfmdr1 copy number were 4, 27, 9, and 18% for 2003-04, 2005-06, 2007-08 and 2010, respectively. Significant increasing trends for prevalence of pfmdr1 N86 (×(2) = 96.31, p resistance has been reported. The decreasing trend in the prevalence of chloroquine resistance markers after change of treatment policy presents the possibility for future introduction of chloroquine as prophylaxis for malaria risk groups such as children and pregnant women in Ghana.

  16. New molecular settings to support in vivo anti-malarial assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamontes-Rosa, Noemí; Alejandre, Ane Rodriguez; Gomez, Vanesa; Viera, Sara; Gomez-Lorenzo, María G; Sanz-Alonso, Laura María; Mendoza-Losana, Alfonso

    2016-03-08

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is now commonly used as a method to confirm diagnosis of malaria and to differentiate recrudescence from re-infection, especially in clinical trials and in reference laboratories where precise quantification is critical. Although anti-malarial drug discovery is based on in vivo murine efficacy models, use of molecular analysis has been limited. The aim of this study was to develop qPCR as a valid methodology to support pre-clinical anti-malarial models by using filter papers to maintain material for qPCR and to compare this with traditional methods. FTA technology (Whatman) is a rapid and safe method for extracting nucleic acids from blood. Peripheral blood samples from mice infected with Plasmodium berghei, P. yoelii, or P. falciparum were kept as frozen samples or as spots on FTA cards. The extracted genetic material from both types of samples was assessed for quantification by qPCR using sets of specific primers specifically designed for Plasmodium 18S rRNA, LDH, and CytB genes. The optimal conditions for nucleic acid extraction from FTA cards and qPCR amplification were set up, and were confirmed to be suitable for parasite quantification using DNA as template after storage at room temperature for as long as 26 months in the case of P. berghei samples and 52 months for P. falciparum and P. yoelii. The quality of DNA extracted from the FTA cards for gene sequencing and microsatellite amplification was also assessed. This is the first study to report the suitability of FTA cards and qPCR assay to quantify parasite load in samples from in vivo efficacy models to support the drug discovery process.

  17. Therapeutic indications and other use-case-driven updates in the drug ontology: anti-malarials, anti-hypertensives, opioid analgesics, and a large term request

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, William R.; Hanna, Josh; Hicks, Amanda; Amirova, Samira; Bramblett, Baxter; Diller, Matthew; Enderez, Rodel; Modzelewski, Timothy; Vasconcelos, Mirela; Delcher, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Background The Drug Ontology (DrOn) is an OWL2-based representation of drug products and their ingredients, mechanisms of action, strengths, and dose forms. We originally created DrOn for use cases in comparative effectiveness research, primarily to identify historically complete sets of United States National Drug Codes (NDCs) that represent packaged drug products, by the ingredient(s), mechanism(s) of action, and so on contained in those products. Although we had designed DrOn from the outs...

  18. Therapeutic indications and other use-case-driven updates in the drug ontology: anti-malarials, anti-hypertensives, opioid analgesics, and a large term request.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, William R; Hanna, Josh; Hicks, Amanda; Amirova, Samira; Bramblett, Baxter; Diller, Matthew; Enderez, Rodel; Modzelewski, Timothy; Vasconcelos, Mirela; Delcher, Chris

    2017-03-03

    The Drug Ontology (DrOn) is an OWL2-based representation of drug products and their ingredients, mechanisms of action, strengths, and dose forms. We originally created DrOn for use cases in comparative effectiveness research, primarily to identify historically complete sets of United States National Drug Codes (NDCs) that represent packaged drug products, by the ingredient(s), mechanism(s) of action, and so on contained in those products. Although we had designed DrOn from the outset to carefully distinguish those entities that have a therapeutic indication from those entities that have a molecular mechanism of action, we had not previously represented in DrOn any particular therapeutic indication. In this work, we add therapeutic indications for three research use cases: resistant hypertension, malaria, and opioid abuse research. We also added mechanisms of action for opioid analgesics and added 108 classes representing drug products in response to a large term request from the Program for Resistance, Immunology, Surveillance and Modeling of Malaria in Uganda (PRISM) project. The net result is a new version of DrOn, current to May 2016, that represents three major therapeutic classes of drugs and six new mechanisms of action. A therapeutic indication of a drug product is represented as a therapeutic function in DrOn. Adverse effects of drug products, as well as other therapeutic uses for which the drug product was not designed are dispositions. Our work provides a framework for representing additional therapeutic indications, adverse effects, and uses of drug products beyond their design. Our work also validated our past modeling decisions for specific types of mechanisms of action, namely effects mediated via receptor and/or enzyme binding. DrOn is available at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dron.owl . A smaller version without NDCs is available at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dron/dron-lite.owl.

  19. PfMDR2 and PfMDR5 are dispensable for Plasmodium falciparum asexual parasite multiplication but change in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, M. van der; Rijpma, S.R.; Russel, F.G.M.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Membrane-associated ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins hydrolyze ATP in order to translocate a broad spectrum of substrates, from single ions to macromolecules across membranes. In humans, members from this transport family have been linked to drug resistance phenotypes, e.g.,

  20. Evaluation of chloroquine as a potent anti-malarial drug: issues of public health policy and healthcare delivery in post-war Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaquoi, Moses B F; Kennedy, Stephen B

    2003-02-01

    Chloroquine-resistant plasmodium falciparum malaria is a serious public health threat that is spreading rapidly across Sub-Saharan Africa. It affects over three quarters (80%) of malarial endemic countries. Of the estimated 300-500 million cases of malaria reported annually, the vast majority of malarial-related morbidities occur among young children in Africa, especially those concentrated in the remote rural areas with inadequate access to appropriate health care services. In Liberia, in vivo studies conducted between 1993 and 2000 observed varying degrees of plasmodium falciparum malaria infections that were resistant to chloroquine, including sulfadiazine-pyrimethamine. As the country emerges from a prolonged civil war, the health care delivery system may not be adequately prepared to implement an effective nation-wide malarial control strategy. As a result, the management of uncomplicated malaria in Liberia poses a significant public health challenge for the government-financed health care delivery system. Therefore, based on extensive literature review, we report the failure of chloroquine as an effective first-line drug for the treatment of uncomplicated plasmodium falciparum malaria in Liberia and recommend that national health efforts be directed at identifying alternative drug(s) to replace it.

  1. The acceptability of mass administrations of anti-malarial drugs as part of targeted malaria elimination in villages along the Thai–Myanmar border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladda Kajeechiwa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A targeted malaria elimination project, including mass drug administrations (MDA of dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine plus a single low dose primaquine is underway in villages along the Thailand Myanmar border. The intervention has multiple components but the success of the project will depend on the participation of the entire communities. Quantitative surveys were conducted to study reasons for participation or non-participation in the campaign with the aim to identify factors associated with the acceptance and participation in the mass drug administrations. Methods The household heads in four study villages in which MDAs had taken place previously were interviewed between January 2014 and July 2015. Results 174/378 respondents (46 % completed three rounds of three drug doses each, 313/378 (83 % took at least three consecutive doses and 56/378 (15 % did not participate at all in the MDA. The respondents from the two villages (KNH and TPN were much more likely to participate in the MDA than respondents from the other two villages (HKT and TOT. The more compliant villages KNH and TPN had both an appearance of cohesive communities with similar demographic and ethnic backgrounds. By contrast the villages with low participation were unique. One village was fragmented following years of armed conflict and many respondents gave little inclination to cooperate with outsiders. The other village with low MDA coverage was characterised by a high percentage of short-term residents with little interest in community interventions. A universal reason for non-participation in the MDA applicable to all villages was an inadequate understanding of the intervention. Conclusions It is unlikely that community engagement can unite fragmented communities in participating in an intervention, which benefits the community. Understanding the purpose and the reasons underlying the intervention is an important pre-condition for participation. In the

  2. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamoorthi, Kaliyaperumal

    2014-06-02

    The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change. Further, responsible stakeholders in

  3. Anti-malarial activities of Andrographis paniculata and Hedyotis corymbosa extracts and their combination with curcumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swain Bijay K

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herbal extracts of Andrographis paniculata (AP and Hedyotis corymbosa (HC are known as hepato-protective and fever-reducing drugs since ancient time and they have been used regularly by the people in the south Asian sub-continent. Methanolic extracts of these two plants were tested in vitro on choloroquine sensitive (MRC-pf-20 and resistant (MRC-pf-303 strains of Plasmodium falciparum for their anti-malarial activity. Methods Growth inhibition was determined using different concentrations of these plant extracts on synchronized P. falciparum cultures at the ring stage. The interactions between these two plant extracts and individually with curcumin were studied in vitro. The performance of these two herbal extracts in isolation and combination were further evaluated in vivo on Balb/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA and their efficacy was compared with that of curcumin. The in vivo toxicity of the plant derived compounds as well as their parasite stage-specificity was studied. Results The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of AP (7.2 μg/ml was found better than HC (10.8 μg/ml. Combination of these two herbal drugs showed substantial enhancement in their anti-malarial activity. Combinatorial effect of each of these with curcumin also revealed anti-malarial effect. Additive interaction between the plant extracts (AP + HC and their individual synergism with curcumin (AP+CUR, HC+CUR were evident from this study. Increased in vivo potency was also observed with the combination of plant extracts over the individual extracts and curcumin. Both the plant extracts were found to inhibit the ring stage of the parasite and did not show any in vivo toxicity, whether used in isolation or in combination. Conclusion Both these two plant extracts in combination with curcumin could be an effective, alternative source of herbal anti-malarial drugs.

  4. Anti-malarial activities of Andrographis paniculata and Hedyotis corymbosa extracts and their combination with curcumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Kirti; Dash, Aditya P; Swain, Bijay K; Dey, Nrisingha

    2009-01-01

    Background Herbal extracts of Andrographis paniculata (AP) and Hedyotis corymbosa (HC) are known as hepato-protective and fever-reducing drugs since ancient time and they have been used regularly by the people in the south Asian sub-continent. Methanolic extracts of these two plants were tested in vitro on choloroquine sensitive (MRC-pf-20) and resistant (MRC-pf-303) strains of Plasmodium falciparum for their anti-malarial activity. Methods Growth inhibition was determined using different concentrations of these plant extracts on synchronized P. falciparum cultures at the ring stage. The interactions between these two plant extracts and individually with curcumin were studied in vitro. The performance of these two herbal extracts in isolation and combination were further evaluated in vivo on Balb/c mice infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA and their efficacy was compared with that of curcumin. The in vivo toxicity of the plant derived compounds as well as their parasite stage-specificity was studied. Results The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of AP (7.2 μg/ml) was found better than HC (10.8 μg/ml). Combination of these two herbal drugs showed substantial enhancement in their anti-malarial activity. Combinatorial effect of each of these with curcumin also revealed anti-malarial effect. Additive interaction between the plant extracts (AP + HC) and their individual synergism with curcumin (AP+CUR, HC+CUR) were evident from this study. Increased in vivo potency was also observed with the combination of plant extracts over the individual extracts and curcumin. Both the plant extracts were found to inhibit the ring stage of the parasite and did not show any in vivo toxicity, whether used in isolation or in combination. Conclusion Both these two plant extracts in combination with curcumin could be an effective, alternative source of herbal anti-malarial drugs. PMID:19216765

  5. Access to artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) and other anti-malarials: national policy and markets in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amuasi, John H; Diap, Graciela; Nguah, Samuel Blay; Karikari, Patrick; Boakye, Isaac; Jambai, Amara; Lahai, Wani Kumba; Louie, Karly S; Kiechel, Jean-Rene

    2012-01-01

    Malaria remains the leading burden of disease in post-conflict Sierra Leone. To overcome the challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve effective treatment, Sierra Leone adopted artemisinin-combination therapy artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria. Other national policy anti-malarials include artemether-lumefantrine (AL) as an alternative to AS+AQ, quinine and artemether for treatment of complicated malaria; and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) for intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp). This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. A cross-sectional survey of 127 medicine outlets (public, private and NGO) was conducted in urban and rural areas. The availability on the day of the survey, median prices, and affordability policy and available non-policy anti-malarials were calculated. Anti-malarials were stocked in 79% of all outlets surveyed. AS+AQ was widely available in public medicine outlets; AL was only available in the private and NGO sectors. Quinine was available in nearly two-thirds of public and NGO outlets and over one-third of private outlets. SP was widely available in all outlets. Non-policy anti-malarials were predominantly available in the private outlets. AS+AQ in the public sector was widely offered for free. Among the anti-malarials sold at a cost, the same median price of a course of AS+AQ (US$1.56), quinine tablets (US$0.63), were found in both the public and private sectors. Quinine injection had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector and US$0.47 in the private sector, while SP had a median cost of US$0.31 in the public sector compared to US$ 0.63 in the private sector. Non-policy anti-malarials were more affordable than first-line AS+AQ in all sectors. A course of AS+AQ was affordable at nearly two days' worth of wages in both the public and private sectors.

  6. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakarim Nastaran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain. Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy, Solanum surattense (Burm.f. and Prosopis juliflora (Sw. showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time.

  7. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain) and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain), using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain). Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy), Solanum surattense (Burm.f.) and Prosopis juliflora (Sw.) showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml) and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time. PMID:20462416

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of artesunate in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and anti-malarial, drug-resistance marker polymorphisms in populations near the China-Myanmar border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Fang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome after seven-day artesunate monotherapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Yingjiang County along the China-Myanmar border and investigate genetic polymorphisms in the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt, multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1, dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr, dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps and ATPase (pfatp6 genes. Methods Patients ≥ one year of age with fever (axillary temperature ≥37.5°C or history of fever and P. falciparum mono-infection were included. Patients received anti-malarial treatment with artesunate (total dose of 16 mg/kg over seven days by directly observed therapy. After a 28-day follow-up, treatment efficacy and effectiveness were assessed based on clinical and parasitological outcomes. Treatment failure was defined as recrudescence of the original parasite and distinguished with new infection confirmed by PCR. Analysis of gene mutation and amplification were performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. Results Sixty-five patients were enrolled; 10 withdrew from the study, and six were lost to follow-up. All but two patients demonstrated adequate clinical and parasitological response; 12 had detectable parasitaemia on day 3. These two patients were confirmed to be new infection by PCR. The efficacy of artesunate was 95.9%. The pfcrt mutation in codon 76 was found in all isolates (100%, and mutations in codons 71 and 72 were found in 4.8% of parasite isolates. No mutation of pfmdr1 (codons 86 or 1246 was found. Among all samples, 5.1% were wild type for pfdhfr, whereas the other samples had mutations in four codons (51, 59, 108 and 164, and mutations in pfdhps (codons 436, 437, 540 and 581 were found in all isolates. No samples had mutations in pfatp6 codons 623 or 769, but two new mutations (N683K and R756K were found in 4.6% and 9.2% of parasite isolates, respectively. Conclusion Plasmodium

  9. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

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    Wells Timothy NC

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal

  10. Differences in anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline enantiomers and investigation of the presumed underlying mechanism of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mullié Catherine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better anti-malarial efficiency and lower neurotoxicity have been reported for mefloquine (MQ (+- enantiomer. However, the importance of stereoselectivity remains poorly understood as the anti-malarial activity of pure enantiomer MQ analogues has never been described. Building on these observations, a series of enantiopure 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives has previously been synthesized to optimize the efficiency and reduce possible adverse effects. Their in vitro activity on Plasmodium falciparum W2 and 3D7 strains is reported here along with their inhibition of β-haematin formation and peroxidative degradation of haemin, two possible mechanisms of action of anti-malarial drugs. Results The (S-enantiomers of this series of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives were found to be at least as effective as both chloroquine (CQ and MQ. The derivative with a 5-carbon side-chain length was the more efficient on both P. falciparum strains. (R -enantiomers displayed an activity decreased by 2 to 15-fold as compared to their (S counterparts. The inhibition of β-haematin formation was significantly stronger with all tested compounds than with MQ, irrespective of the stereochemistry. Similarly, the inhibition of haemin peroxidation was significantly higher for both (S and (R-enantiomers of derivatives with a side-chain length of five or six carbons than for MQ and CQ. Conclusions The prominence of stereochemistry in the anti-malarial activity of 4-aminoalcohol quinoline derivatives is confirmed. The inhibition of β-haematin formation and haemin peroxidation can be put forward as presumed mechanisms of action but do not account for the stereoselectivity of action witnessed in vitro.

  11. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Kathryn A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Methods Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. Results 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT ( Conclusions These standardized, nationally representative results demonstrate the typically low availability, low market share and high prices of ACT, in the private sector where most anti-malarials are accessed, with some exceptions. The results confirm that there is substantial room to improve availability and affordability of ACT treatment in the surveyed countries. The data will also be useful for monitoring the impact of interventions such as the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria.

  12. Prevalence of molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in two districts of Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjitkar, Samir; Schousboe, Mette L; Thomsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) and chloroquine (CQ) have been used in treatment of falciparum and vivax malaria in Nepal. Recently, resistance to both drugs have necessitated a change towards artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) against Plasmodium falciparum in highly...... endemic areas. However, SP is still used against P. falciparum infections in low endemic areas while CQ is used in suspected cases in areas with lack of diagnostic facilities. This study examines the prevalence of molecular markers of P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax CQ and SP resistance to determine...... and P. vivax for CQ (Pfcrt, Pfmdr1, Pvmdr1) and SP (Pfdhfr, Pfdhps, Pvdhfr), using various PCR-based methods. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Positive P. vivax and P. falciparum infections were identified by PCR in 92 and 41 samples respectively. However, some of these were negative in subsequent PCRs. Based...

  13. A retrospective analysis of the change in anti-malarial treatment policy: Peru

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    Vincent-Mark Arlene

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background National malaria control programmes must deal with the complex process of changing national malaria treatment guidelines, often without guidance on the process of change. Selecting a replacement drug is only one issue in this process. There is a paucity of literature describing successful malaria treatment policy changes to help guide control programs through this process. Objectives To understand the wider context in which national malaria treatment guidelines were formulated in a specific country (Peru. Methods Using qualitative methods (individual and focus group interviews, stakeholder analysis and a review of documents, a retrospective analysis of the process of change in Peru's anti-malarial treatment policy from the early 1990's to 2003 was completed. Results The decision to change Peru's policies resulted from increasing levels of anti-malarial drug resistance, as well as complaints from providers that the drugs were no longer working. The context of the change occurred in a time in which Peru was changing national governments, which created extreme challenges in moving the change process forward. Peru utilized a number of key strategies successfully to ensure that policy change would occur. This included a having the process directed by a group who shared a common interest in malaria and who had long-established social and professional networks among themselves, b engaging in collaborative teamwork among nationals and between nationals and international collaborators, c respect for and inclusion of district-level staff in all phases of the process, d reliance on high levels of technical and scientific knowledge, e use of standardized protocols to collect data, and f transparency. Conclusion Although not perfectly or fully implemented by 2003, the change in malaria treatment policy in Peru occurred very quickly, as compared to other countries. They identified a problem, collected the data necessary to justify the

  14. Discovery of potent, novel, non-toxic anti-malarial compounds via quantum modelling, virtual screening and in vitro experimental validation

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    Kaludov Nikola

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developing resistance towards existing anti-malarial therapies emphasize the urgent need for new therapeutic options. Additionally, many malaria drugs in use today have high toxicity and low therapeutic indices. Gradient Biomodeling, LLC has developed a quantum-model search technology that uses quantum similarity and does not depend explicitly on chemical structure, as molecules are rigorously described in fundamental quantum attributes related to individual pharmacological properties. Therapeutic activity, as well as toxicity and other essential properties can be analysed and optimized simultaneously, independently of one another. Such methodology is suitable for a search of novel, non-toxic, active anti-malarial compounds. Methods A set of innovative algorithms is used for the fast calculation and interpretation of electron-density attributes of molecular structures at the quantum level for rapid discovery of prospective pharmaceuticals. Potency and efficacy, as well as additional physicochemical, metabolic, pharmacokinetic, safety, permeability and other properties were characterized by the procedure. Once quantum models are developed and experimentally validated, the methodology provides a straightforward implementation for lead discovery, compound optimizzation and de novo molecular design. Results Starting with a diverse training set of 26 well-known anti-malarial agents combined with 1730 moderately active and inactive molecules, novel compounds that have strong anti-malarial activity, low cytotoxicity and structural dissimilarity from the training set were discovered and experimentally validated. Twelve compounds were identified in silico and tested in vitro; eight of them showed anti-malarial activity (IC50 ≤ 10 μM, with six being very effective (IC50 ≤ 1 μM, and four exhibiting low nanomolar potency. The most active compounds were also tested for mammalian cytotoxicity and found to be non-toxic, with a

  15. interventional studies of anti-malarial drugs utilization in public

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    MATERIALS AND METHODS. Study Design. The study was a cross ... Muhammadu Sanusi General Hospital (SMSGH) and ... regimens, guided focus group presentations and one .... to the optimal theoretical value of 17.2% proposed in.

  16. Anti-malarial activity of 6-(8'Z-pentadecenyl-salicylic acid from Viola websteri in mice

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    Park Won-Hwan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Petroleum ether extracts of Viola websteri Hemsl (Violaceae were reported to have anti-plasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum in vitro, with this activity being largely attributable to 6-(8'Z-pentadecenyl-salicylic acid (6-SA. Methods The schizontocidal activity of 6-SA on early Plasmodium berghei infections was evaluated in a four-day test. The possible 'repository' activity of 6-SA was assessed using the method described by Peters. The median lethal dose (LD50 of 6-SA, when given intraperitoneally, was also determined using uninfected ICR mice and the method of Lorke. Results In the present study, 6-SA was found to have anti-malarial activity in vivo, when tested against P. berghei in mice. 6-SA at 5, 10 and 25 mg/kg·day exhibited a significant blood schizontocidal activity in four-day early infections, repository evaluations and established infections with a significant mean survival time comparable to that of the standard drug, chloroquine (5 mg/kg·day. Conclusion 6-SA possesses a moderate anti-malarial activity that could be exploited for malaria therapy.

  17. An ethnobotanical study of anti-malarial plants among indigenous people on the upper Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frausin, Gina; Hidalgo, Ari de Freitas; Lima, Renata Braga Souza; Kinupp, Valdely Ferreira; Ming, Lin Chau; Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Milliken, William

    2015-11-04

    material available, the patient's age (children and adults) and the local expert. The treatment time varies from a single dose to up to several weeks. Most anti-malarial plants are domesticated or grow spontaneously. They are grown in home gardens, open areas near the communities, clearings and secondary forests, and wild species grow in areas of seasonally flooded wetlands and terra firme ('solid ground') forest, in some cases in locations that are hard to access. Traditional knowledge of plants was found to be falling into disuse presumably as a consequence of the local official health services that treat malaria in the communities using commercial drugs. Despite this, some species are used in the prevention of this disease and also in the recovery after using conventional anti-malarial drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The association between price, competition, and demand factors on private sector anti-malarial stocking and sales in western Kenya: considerations for the AMFm subsidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Households in sub-Saharan Africa are highly reliant on the retail sector for obtaining treatment for malaria fevers and other illnesses. As donors and governments seek to promote the use of artemisinin combination therapy in malaria-endemic areas through subsidized anti-malarials offered in the retail sector, understanding the stocking and pricing decisions of retail outlets is vital. Methods A survey of all medicine retailers serving Bungoma East District in western Kenya was conducted three months after the launch of the AMFm subsidy in Kenya. The survey obtained information on each anti-malarial in stock: brand name, price, sales volume, outlet characteristics and GPS co-ordinates. These data were matched to household-level data from the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance System, from which population density and fever prevalence near each shop were determined. Regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with retailers’ likelihood of stocking subsidized artemether lumefantrine (AL) and the association between price and sales for AL, quinine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP). Results Ninety-seven retail outlets in the study area were surveyed; 11% of outlets stocked subsidized AL. Size of the outlet and having a pharmacist on staff were associated with greater likelihood of stocking subsidized AL. In the multivariable model, total volume of anti-malarial sales was associated with greater likelihood of stocking subsidized AL and competition was important; likelihood of stocking subsidized AL was considerably higher if the nearest neighbour stocked subsidized AL. Price was a significant predictor of sales volume for all three types of anti-malarials but the relationship varied, with the largest price sensitivity found for SP drugs. Conclusion The results suggest that helping small outlets overcome the constraints to stocking subsidized AL should be a priority. Competition between retailers and prices can play an important

  19. Anti-malarial effect of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one and green tea extract on erythrocyte-stage Plasmodium berghei in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phitsinee Thipubon

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: CM1 would be effective per se and synergize with PYR in inhibiting growth of murine malaria parasites, possibly by limiting iron supply from plasma transferrin and host PRBC cytoplasm, and chelating catalytic iron cstitutive in parasites’ mitochondrial cytochromes and cytoplasmic ribonucleotide reductase. CM1 would be a promising adjuvant to enhance PYR anti-malarial activity and minimize the drug resistance.

  20. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Kathryn A; Gatakaa, Hellen; Poyer, Stephen; Njogu, Julius; Evance, Illah; Munroe, Erik; Solomon, Tsione; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Zinsou, Cyprien; Akulayi, Louis; Raharinjatovo, Jacky; Arogundade, Ekundayo; Buyungo, Peter; Mpasela, Felton; Adjibabi, Chérifatou Bello; Agbango, Jean Angbalu; Ramarosandratana, Benjamin Fanomezana; Coker, Babajide; Rubahika, Denis; Hamainza, Busiku; Chapman, Steven; Shewchuk, Tanya; Chavasse, Desmond

    2011-10-31

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets) as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT (sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was available for free in all countries except Benin and the DRC (US$1.29 [Inter Quartile Range (IQR): $1.29-$1.29] and $0.52[IQR: $0.00-$1.29] per adult equivalent dose respectively). In the private sector, first-line quality-assured ACT was 5-24 times more expensive than non-artemisinin therapies. The exception was Madagascar where, due to national social marketing of subsidized ACT, the price of first-line quality-assured ACT ($0.14 [IQR: $0.10, $0.57]) was significantly lower than the most popular treatment (chloroquine, $0.36 [IQR: $0.36, $0.36]). Quality-assured ACT accounted for less than 25% of total anti-malarial volumes; private-sector quality-assured ACT volumes represented less than 6% of the total market share. Most anti-malarials were distributed through the private sector

  1. Accessibility, availability and affordability of anti-malarials in a rural district in Kenya after implementation of a national subsidy scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simiyu Chrispinus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor access to prompt and effective treatment for malaria contributes to high mortality and severe morbidity. In Kenya, it is estimated that only 12% of children receive anti-malarials for their fever within 24 hours. The first point of care for many fevers is a local medicine retailer, such as a pharmacy or chemist. The role of the medicine retailer as an important distribution point for malaria medicines has been recognized and several different strategies have been used to improve the services that these retailers provide. Despite these efforts, many mothers still purchase ineffective drugs because they are less expensive than effective artemisinin combination therapy (ACT. One strategy that is being piloted in several countries is an international subsidy targeted at anti-malarials supplied through the retail sector. The goal of this strategy is to make ACT as affordable as ineffective alternatives. The programme, called the Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria was rolled out in Kenya in August 2010. Methods In December 2010, the affordability and accessibility of malaria medicines in a rural district in Kenya were evaluated using a complete census of all public and private facilities, chemists, pharmacists, and other malaria medicine retailers within the Webuye Demographic Surveillance Area. Availability, types, and prices of anti-malarials were assessed. There are 13 public or mission facilities and 97 medicine retailers (registered and unregistered. Results The average distance from a home to the nearest public health facility is 2 km, but the average distance to the nearest medicine retailer is half that. Quinine is the most frequently stocked anti-malarial (61% of retailers. More medicine retailers stocked sulphadoxine-pyramethamine (SP; 57% than ACT (44%. Eleven percent of retailers stocked AMFm subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (AL. No retailers had chloroquine in stock and only five were selling artemisinin

  2. Synthesis and exploration of novel curcumin analogues as anti-malarial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Satyendra; Karmodiya, Krishanpal; Surolia, Namita; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2008-03-15

    Curcumin, a major yellow pigment and active component of turmeric, has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. Recent studies have indicated that curcumin inhibits chloroquine-sensitive (CQ-S) and chloroquine-resistant (CQ-R) Plasmodium falciparum growth in culture with an IC(50) of approximately 3.25 microM (MIC=13.2 microM) and IC(50) 4.21 microM (MIC=14.4 microM), respectively. In order to expand their potential as anti-malarials a series of novel curcumin derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their ability to inhibit P. falciparum growth in culture. Several curcumin analogues examined show more effective inhibition of P. falciparum growth than curcumin. The most potent curcumin compounds 3, 6, and 11 were inhibitory for CQ-S P. falciparum at IC(50) of 0.48, 0.87, 0.92 microM and CQ-R P. falciparum at IC(50) of 0.45 microM, 0.89, 0.75 microM, respectively. Pyrazole analogue of curcumin (3) exhibited sevenfold higher anti-malarial potency against CQ-S and ninefold higher anti-malarial potency against CQ-R. Curcumin analogues described here represent a novel class of highly selective P. falciparum inhibitors and promising candidates for the design of novel anti-malarial agents.

  3. Anti-malarial landscape in Myanmar: results from a nationally representative survey among community health workers and the private sector outlets in 2015/2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Si Thu; Khin, Hnin Su Su; Thi, Aung

    2017-04-25

    In 2015/2016, an ACTwatch outlet survey was implemented to assess the anti-malarial and malaria testing landscape in Myanmar across four domains (Eastern, Central, Coastal, Western regions). Indicators provide an important benchmark to guide Myanmar's new National Strategic Plan to eliminate malaria by 2030. This was a cross-sectional survey, which employed stratified cluster-random sampling across four regions in Myanmar. A census of community health workers (CHWs) and private outlets with potential to distribute malaria testing and/or treatment was conducted. An audit was completed for all anti-malarials, malaria rapid diagnostic tests. A total of 28,664 outlets were approached and 4416 met the screening criteria. The anti-malarial market composition comprised CHWs (41.5%), general retailers (27.9%), itinerant drug vendors (11.8%), pharmacies (10.9%), and private for-profit facilities (7.9%). Availability of different anti-malarials and diagnostic testing among anti-malarial-stocking CHWs was as follows: artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) (81.3%), chloroquine (67.0%), confirmatory malaria test (77.7%). Less than half of the anti-malarial-stocking private sector had first-line treatment in stock: ACT (41.7%) chloroquine (41.8%), and malaria diagnostic testing was rare (15.4%). Oral artemisinin monotherapy (AMT) was available in 27.7% of private sector outlets (Western, 54.1%; Central, 31.4%; Eastern; 25.0%, Coastal; 15.4%). The private-sector anti-malarial market share comprised ACT (44.0%), chloroquine (26.6%), and oral AMT (19.6%). Among CHW the market share was ACT (71.6%), chloroquine (22.3%); oral AMT (3.8%). More than half of CHWs could correctly state the national first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria (59.2 and 56.9%, respectively) compared to the private sector (15.8 and 13.2%, respectively). Indicators on support and engagement were as follows for CHWs: reportedly received training on malaria diagnosis (60.7%) or

  4. Mass anti-malarial administration in western Cambodia: a qualitative study of factors affecting coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Christopher; Tripura, Rupam; Nguon, Chea; Cheah, Phaikyeong; Davoeung, Chan; Heng, Chhouen; Dara, Lim; Sareth, Ma; Dondorp, Arjen; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Peto, Thomas J

    2017-05-19

    Mass anti-malarial administration has been proposed as a key component of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategy in the Greater Mekong sub-Region. Its effectiveness depends on high levels of coverage in the target population. This article explores the factors that influenced mass anti-malarial administration coverage within a clinical trial in Battambang Province, western Cambodia. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with villagers, in-depth interviews with study staff, trial drop-outs and refusers, and observations in the communities. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and translated from Khmer to English for qualitative content analysis using QSR NVivo. Malaria was an important health concern and villagers reported a demand for malaria treatment. This was in spite of a fall in incidence over the previous decade and a lack of familiarity with asymptomatic malaria. Participants generally understood the overall study aim and were familiar with study activities. Comprehension of the study rationale was however limited. After the first mass anti-malarial administration, seasonal health complaints that participants attributed to the anti-malarial as "side effects" contributed to a decrease of coverage in round two. Staff therefore adapted the community engagement approach, bringing to prominence local leaders in village meetings. This contributed to a subsequent increase in coverage. Future mass anti-malarial administration must consider seasonal disease patterns and the importance of local leaders taking prominent roles in community engagement. Further research is needed to investigate coverage in scenarios that more closely resemble implementation i.e. without participation incentives, blood sampling and free healthcare.

  5. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard Alan E; Dorsey Grant; Gupta Vinay; Rosenthal Philip J; Greenhouse Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary elec...

  6. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds | Das ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A PubMed search of about 127 papers on anti‑cancer effects of antimalarials has revealed that this class of drug, including other antimalarials, have several biological characteristics that include anticancer properties. ... Keywords: Anticancer agents, Antimalarials, Antitumor activity, Artemisinins, Novel chemotherapy ...

  7. Effects of the anti-malarial compound cryptolepine and its analogues in human lymphocytes and sperm in the Comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Rajendran C; Emerce, Esra; Wright, Colin W; Karahalil, Bensu; Karakaya, Ali E; Anderson, Diana

    2011-12-15

    Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by the genus Plasmodium. It causes one million deaths per year in African children under the age of 5 years. There is an increasing development of resistance of malarial parasites to chloroquine and other currently used anti-malarial drugs. Some plant products such as the indoloquinoline alkaloid cryptolepine have been shown to have potent activity against P. falciparum in vitro. On account of its toxicity, cryptolepine is not suitable for use as an antimalarial drug but a number of analogues of cryptolepine have been synthesised in an attempt to find compounds that have reduced cytotoxicity and these have been investigated in the present study in human sperm and lymphocytes using the Comet assay. The results suggest that cryptolepine and the analogues cause DNA damage in lymphocytes, but appear to have no effect on human sperm at the assessed doses. In the context of antimalarial drug development, the data suggest that all cryptolepine compounds and in particular 2,7-dibromocryptolepine cause DNA damage and therefore may not be suitable for pre clinical development as antimalarial agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Closing the access barrier for effective anti-malarials in the private sector in rural Uganda: consortium for ACT private sector subsidy (CAPSS) pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talisuna, Ambrose O; Daumerie, Penny Grewal; Balyeku, Andrew; Egan, Timothy; Piot, Bram; Coghlan, Renia; Lugand, Maud; Bwire, Godfrey; Rwakimari, John Bosco; Ndyomugyenyi, Richard; Kato, Fred; Byangire, Maria; Kagwa, Paul; Sebisubi, Fred; Nahamya, David; Bonabana, Angela; Mpanga-Mukasa, Susan; Buyungo, Peter; Lukwago, Julius; Batte, Allan; Nakanwagi, Grace; Tibenderana, James; Nayer, Kinny; Reddy, Kishore; Dokwal, Nilesh; Rugumambaju, Sylvester; Kidde, Saul; Banerji, Jaya; Jagoe, George

    2012-10-29

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), the treatment of choice for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, is unaffordable and generally inaccessible in the private sector, the first port of call for most malaria treatment across rural Africa. Between August 2007 and May 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Medicines for Malaria Venture conducted the Consortium for ACT Private Sector Subsidy (CAPSS) pilot study to test whether access to ACT in the private sector could be improved through the provision of a high level supply chain subsidy. Four intervention districts were purposefully selected to receive branded subsidized medicines - "ACT with a leaf", while the fifth district acted as the control. Baseline and evaluation outlet exit surveys and retail audits were conducted at licensed and unlicensed drug outlets in the intervention and control districts. A survey-adjusted, multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyse the intervention's impact on: ACT uptake and price; purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset; ACT availability and displacement of sub-optimal anti-malarial. At baseline, ACT accounted for less than 1% of anti-malarials purchased from licensed drug shops for children less than five years old. However, at evaluation, "ACT with a leaf" accounted for 69% of anti-malarial purchased in the interventions districts. Purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset for children under five years rose from 0.8% at baseline to 26.2% (95% CI: 23.2-29.2%) at evaluation in the intervention districts. In the control district, it rose modestly from 1.8% to 5.6% (95% CI: 4.0-7.3%). The odds of purchasing ACT within 24 hours in the intervention districts compared to the control was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.08-2.68, p=0.4) at baseline and significant increased to 6.11 (95% CI: 4.32-8.62, psupply-side subsidy and an intensive communications campaign significantly increased the uptake and use of ACT in the private sector in Uganda.

  9. Closing the access barrier for effective anti-malarials in the private sector in rural Uganda: consortium for ACT private sector subsidy (CAPSS pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talisuna Ambrose O

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, the treatment of choice for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, is unaffordable and generally inaccessible in the private sector, the first port of call for most malaria treatment across rural Africa. Between August 2007 and May 2010, the Uganda Ministry of Health and the Medicines for Malaria Venture conducted the Consortium for ACT Private Sector Subsidy (CAPSS pilot study to test whether access to ACT in the private sector could be improved through the provision of a high level supply chain subsidy. Methods Four intervention districts were purposefully selected to receive branded subsidized medicines - “ACT with a leaf”, while the fifth district acted as the control. Baseline and evaluation outlet exit surveys and retail audits were conducted at licensed and unlicensed drug outlets in the intervention and control districts. A survey-adjusted, multivariate logistic regression model was used to analyse the intervention’s impact on: ACT uptake and price; purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset; ACT availability and displacement of sub-optimal anti-malarial. Results At baseline, ACT accounted for less than 1% of anti-malarials purchased from licensed drug shops for children less than five years old. However, at evaluation, “ACT with a leaf” accounted for 69% of anti-malarial purchased in the interventions districts. Purchase of ACT within 24 hours of symptom onset for children under five years rose from 0.8% at baseline to 26.2% (95% CI: 23.2-29.2% at evaluation in the intervention districts. In the control district, it rose modestly from 1.8% to 5.6% (95% CI: 4.0-7.3%. The odds of purchasing ACT within 24 hours in the intervention districts compared to the control was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.08-2.68, p=0.4 at baseline and significant increased to 6.11 (95% CI: 4.32-8.62, p Conclusions These data demonstrate that a supply-side subsidy and an intensive communications campaign

  10. Identification and reconstitution of the polyketide synthases responsible for biosynthesis of the anti-malarial agent, cladosporin

    OpenAIRE

    Cochrane, Rachel V. K.; Sanichar, Randy; Lambkin, Gareth R.; Reiz, Béla; Xu, Wei; Tang, Yi; Vederas, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The anti-malarial agent cladosporin is a nanomolar inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum lysyl-tRNA synthetase, and exhibits activity against both blood and liver stage infection. Cladosporin can be isolated from the fungus Cladosporium cladosporioides, where it was believed to be biosynthesized by a highly reducing (HR) and non-reducing (NR) iterative type I polyketide synthase (PKS) pair. Genome sequencing of the host organism, and subsequent heterologous expression of these enzymes in Sacchar...

  11. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Alan E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary electrophoresis from randomized trials of artemether-lumefantrine (AL vs. dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP performed in two areas of Uganda: Kanungu, where transmission is moderate, and Apac, where transmission is very high. Both gel and capillary methods evaluated polymorphic regions of the merozoite surface protein 1 and 2 and glutamine rich protein genes. Results Capillary electrophoresis detected more alleles and provided higher discriminatory power than agarose gel electrophoresis at both study sites. There was only moderate agreement between classification of outcomes with the two methods in Kanungu (kappa = 0.66 and poor agreement in Apac (kappa = 0.24. Overall efficacy results were similar when using gel vs. capillary methods in Kanungu (42-day risk of treatment failure for AL: 6.9% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.4; DP 2.4% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.5. However, the measured risk of recrudescence was significantly higher when using gel vs. capillary electrophoresis in Apac (risk of treatment failure for AL: 17.0% vs. 10.7%, p = 0.02; DP: 8.5% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.03. Risk differences between AL and DP were not significantly different whether gel or capillary methods were used. Conclusions Genotyping with gel electrophoresis overestimates the risk of recrudescence in anti-malarial trials performed in areas of high transmission intensity. Capillary electrophoresis provides more accurate outcomes for such trials and should be performed when possible. In areas of moderate transmission

  12. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay; Dorsey, Grant; Hubbard, Alan E; Rosenthal, Philip J; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2010-01-15

    Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary electrophoresis from randomized trials of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) vs. dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) performed in two areas of Uganda: Kanungu, where transmission is moderate, and Apac, where transmission is very high. Both gel and capillary methods evaluated polymorphic regions of the merozoite surface protein 1 and 2 and glutamine rich protein genes. Capillary electrophoresis detected more alleles and provided higher discriminatory power than agarose gel electrophoresis at both study sites. There was only moderate agreement between classification of outcomes with the two methods in Kanungu (kappa = 0.66) and poor agreement in Apac (kappa = 0.24). Overall efficacy results were similar when using gel vs. capillary methods in Kanungu (42-day risk of treatment failure for AL: 6.9% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.4; DP 2.4% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.5). However, the measured risk of recrudescence was significantly higher when using gel vs. capillary electrophoresis in Apac (risk of treatment failure for AL: 17.0% vs. 10.7%, p = 0.02; DP: 8.5% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.03). Risk differences between AL and DP were not significantly different whether gel or capillary methods were used. Genotyping with gel electrophoresis overestimates the risk of recrudescence in anti-malarial trials performed in areas of high transmission intensity. Capillary electrophoresis provides more accurate outcomes for such trials and should be performed when possible. In areas of moderate transmission, gel electrophoresis appears adequate to estimate comparative

  13. Reduction of anti-malarial consumption after rapid diagnostic tests implementation in Dar es Salaam: a before-after and cluster randomized controlled study

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    Swai Ndeniria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presumptive treatment of all febrile patients with anti-malarials leads to massive over-treatment. The aim was to assess the effect of implementing malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs on prescription of anti-malarials in urban Tanzania. Methods The design was a prospective collection of routine statistics from ledger books and cross-sectional surveys before and after intervention in randomly selected health facilities (HF in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The participants were all clinicians and their patients in the above health facilities. The intervention consisted of training and introduction of mRDTs in all three hospitals and in six HF. Three HF without mRDTs were selected as matched controls. The use of routine mRDT and treatment upon result was advised for all patients complaining of fever, including children under five years of age. The main outcome measures were: (1 anti-malarial consumption recorded from routine statistics in ledger books of all HF before and after intervention; (2 anti-malarial prescription recorded during observed consultations in cross-sectional surveys conducted in all HF before and 18 months after mRDT implementation. Results Based on routine statistics, the amount of artemether-lumefantrine blisters used post-intervention was reduced by 68% (95%CI 57-80 in intervention and 32% (9-54 in control HF. For quinine vials, the reduction was 63% (54-72 in intervention and an increase of 2.49 times (1.62-3.35 in control HF. Before-and-after cross-sectional surveys showed a similar decrease from 75% to 20% in the proportion of patients receiving anti-malarial treatment (Risk ratio 0.23, 95%CI 0.20-0.26. The cluster randomized analysis showed a considerable difference of anti-malarial prescription between intervention HF (22% and control HF (60% (Risk ratio 0.30, 95%CI 0.14-0.70. Adherence to test result was excellent since only 7% of negative patients received an anti-malarial. However, antibiotic

  14. Phytochemical analysis of essential oil of Anthriscus nemorosa and evaluation of antioxidant and anti-malarial activity

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    S. Naeini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: This investigation was performed in order to analyze the composition of the essential oil (EO of Anthriscus nemorosa and evaluation of its anti-oxidant and anti-malarial activity of its extracts and determination of the total phenolics content (TPC and total flavonoid content (TFC. Methods: One hundred g dried powder of Anthriscus nemorosa was submitted to hydro-distillation and also was extracted (with n-hexane, dichloromethane (DCM and methanol (MeOH, by using Clevenger and Soxhlet apparatus, respectively. Moreover, extracted essential oil (EO was analyzed by GC-MS. Furthermore, the anti-oxidant, anti- malaria, Total phenolics content (TPC and total flavonoid content (TFC of EO and the extracts were investigated by DPPH, cell free -hematin formation, Folin- Ciocalteau and colorimetric methods, respectively. Results: Fifty nine compounds, representing 94% of total oil were identified High content of terpenoids (60.02% were identified in the essential oil with isogeranol (28.86%, crystathenyl acetate  (13.86% and farnesene (10.39% as the most dominant compounds.. Methanol extract demonstrated free radical scavenging activity (RC50 0.192±0.133.Total phenol contents was (325.82±2.72 mg/g. Total flavonoid content was (140.4096±2.4 mg/g. None of the extracts showed anti-malaria effect. Conclusion: Main constituents of A. nemorosa were terpenoids. In comparison with other species of Anthriscus, antioxidant activity of A. nemorosa essential oil was less noticeable.

  15. A pilot study on quality of artesunate and amodiaquine tablets used in the fishing community of Tema, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affum, Andrews O; Lowor, Samuel; Osae, Shiloh D; Dickson, Adomako; Gyan, Benjamin A; Tulasi, Delali

    2013-06-28

    The ineffectiveness of artesunate and amodiaquine tablets in malaria treatment remains a health burden to WHO and governments of malaria-endemic countries, including Ghana. The proliferation of illegitimate anti-malarial drugs and its use by patients is of primary concern to international and local drug regulatory agencies because such drugs are known to contribute to the development of the malaria-resistant parasites in humans. No data exist on quality of these drugs in the fishing village communities in Ghana although the villagers are likely users of such drugs. A pilot study on the quality of anti-malarial tablets in circulation during the major fishing season at a malarious fishing village located along the coast of Tema in southern Ghana was determined. Blisterpacks of anti-malarial tablets were randomly sampled. The International Pharmacopoeia and Global Pharma Health Fund Minilab protocols were used to assess the quality of anti-malarial tablets per blisterpacks allegedly manufactured by Guilin Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, China (GPCL) and Letap Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Ghana (LPL) and sold in chemical sales outlets at Kpone-on-Sea. Ferric chloride and cobaltous thiocyanate tests confirmed the presence of active ingredients in the tablets. A confirmatory test for the active ingredient was achieved with artesunate (ICRS1409) and amodiaquine (ICRS0209) reference standards. A high performance liquid chromatography analysis confirmed the amount of artesunate found in tablets. Based on the International Pharmacopoeia acceptable range of 96/98 to 102% for genuine artesunate per tablet, 10% [relative standard deviation (RSD): 3.2%] of field-selected artesunate blisterpack per tablets manufactured by GPCL, and 50% (RSD: 5.1%) of a similar package per tablet by LPL, passed the titrimetric test. However, 100% (RSD: 2.2%) of amodiaquine blisterpack per tablet by GPCL were found to be within the International Pharmacopeia acceptable range of 90 to 110% for genuine amodiaquine in

  16. The challenge to avoid anti-malarial medicine stock-outs in an era of funding partners: the case of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen-Lopez, Inez; Shango, Winna; Barrington, Jim; Ziegler, Rene; Smith, Tom; deSavigny, Don

    2014-05-11

    Between 2007 and 2013, the Tanzanian public sector received 93.1 million doses of first-line anti-malarial artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in the form of artemether-lumefantrine entirely supplied by funding partners. The introduction of a health facility ACT stock monitoring system using SMS technology by the National Malaria Control Programme in mid 2011 revealed a high frequency of stock-outs of ACT in primary care public health facilities. The objective of this study was to determine the pattern of availability of ACT and possible causes of observed stock-outs across public health facilities in Tanzania since mid-2011. Data were collected weekly by the mobile phone reporting tool SMS for Life on ACT availability from over 5,000 public health facilities in Tanzania starting from September 2011 to December 2012. Stock data for all four age-dose levels of ACT across health facilities were summarized and supply of ACT at the national level was also documented. Over the period of 15 months, on average 29% of health facilities in Tanzania were completely stocked out of all four-age dose levels of the first-line anti-malarial with a median duration of total stock-out of six weeks. Patterns of total stock-out by region ranged from a low of 9% to a high of 52%. The ACT stock-outs were most likely caused by: a) insufficient ACT supplies entering Tanzania (e.g. in 2012 Tanzania received 10.9 million ACT doses compared with a forecast demand of 14.4 million doses); and b) irregular pattern of ACT supply (several months with no ACT stock). The reduced ACT availability and irregular pattern of supply were due to cumbersome bureaucratic processes and delays both within the country and from the main donor, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Tanzania should invest in strengthening both the supply system and the health information system using mHealth solutions such as SMS for Life. This will continue to assist in tracking ACT availability across

  17. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study

  18. What happened to anti-malarial markets after the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria pilot? Trends in ACT availability, price and market share from five African countries under continuation of the private sector co-payment mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougher, Sarah; Hanson, Kara; Goodman, Catherine

    2017-04-25

    The private sector supplies anti-malarial treatment for large proportions of patients in sub-Saharan Africa. Following the large-scale piloting of the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria (AMFm) from 2010 to 2011, a private sector co-payment mechanism (CPM) provided continuation of private sector subsidies for quality-assured artemisinin combination therapies (QAACT). This article analyses for the first time the extent to which improvements in private sector QAACT supply and distribution observed during the AMFm were maintained or intensified during continuation of the CPM through 2015 in Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda using repeat cross-sectional outlet survey data. QAACT market share in all five countries increased during the AMFm period (p private sector QAACT availability were maintained or improved. In 2014/15, private sector QAACT availability was greater than 70% in Nigeria (84.3%), Kenya (70.5%), Tanzania (83.0%) and Uganda (77.1%), but only 11.2% in Madagascar. QAACT market share was maintained or improved post-AMFm in Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda, but statistically significant declines were observed in Kenya and Madagascar. In 2014/5, QAACT market share was highest in Kenya and Uganda (48.2 and 47.5%, respectively) followed by Tanzania (39.2%), Nigeria (35.0%), and Madagascar (7.0%). Four of the five countries experienced significant decreases in median QAACT price during the AMFm period. Private sector QAACT prices were maintained or further reduced in Tanzania, Nigeria and Uganda, but prices increased significantly in Kenya and Madagascar. SP prices were consistently lower than those of QAACT in the AMFm period, with the exception of Kenya and Tanzania in 2011, where they were equal. In 2014/5 QAACT remained two to three times more expensive than the most popular non-artemisinin therapy in all countries except Tanzania. Results suggest that a private sector co-payment mechanism for QAACT implemented at national scale for 5 years was

  19. Therapeutic and prophylactic effect of intermittent preventive anti-malarial treatment in infants (IPTi from Ghana and Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreuels Benno

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent preventive treatment in infants (IPTi with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP reduces the incidence of malaria episodes in young children. The exact mechanism by which the protective effect is mediated needs to be defined. This study aimed to investigate therapeutic, prophylactic, and possible exceeding effects of SP-based IPTi in two clinical trials. Methods Protective efficacies from two IPTi trials performed in Kumasi, Ghana, and Lambaréné, Gabon, were assessed for overlapping time series of 61 days. For six-months periods after each of three IPTi doses a multivariate Poisson regression model with the respective cohort as co-variate was generated and effect modification of protective efficacy with time strata was evaluated by log-likelihood tests. Results Protective efficacies were not significantly different between the two study cohorts. Study-cohort corrected protective efficacy was highest for the first 61 days after each IPTi application and decreased continuously. For the first 61 days after IPTi-1, IPTi-2, and IPTi-3 the protective efficacy was 71%, 44%, and 43%, respectively. A reduction of the malaria incidence rate was detectable for the first 60, 30 and 40 days after IPTi-1, IPTi-2 and IPTi-3 drug application, respectively. After IPTi-3 a higher risk for malaria could be seen after day 60. This effect was mainly based on the overwhelming influence of the Kumasi cohort. Conclusion The results suggest that SP-based IPTi mainly works through a therapeutic and prophylactic effect over 30 to 60 days after drug application and that a sustained effect beyond post-treatment prophylaxis might be very low. Trial registration Data analysis from clinical trials NCT ID # 00206739 (Kumasi Trial and NCT ID # 00167843 (Lambaréné Trial, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  20. Mapping the genome of Plasmodium falciparum on the drug-like chemical space reveals novel anti-malarial targets and potential drug leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper; Plichta, Damian Rafal; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    , in order to uncover the weak links in the proteome of the parasite. We predicted 293 proteins of P. falciparum, including the six out of the seven verified targets for P. falciparum malaria treatment, as targets of 4645 GSK active compounds. Furthermore, we prioritized druggable targets, based on a number...... of factors, such as essentiality for growth, lack of homology with human proteins, and availability of experimental data on ligand activity with a non-human homologue of a parasite protein. We have additionally prioritized predicted ligands based on their polypharmacology profile, with focus on validated...

  1. Antimalarial drug quality in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, A A; Kokwaro, G O

    2007-10-01

    There are several reports of sub-standard and counterfeit antimalarial drugs circulating in the markets of developing countries; we aimed to review the literature for the African continent. A search was conducted in PubMed in English using the medical subject headings (MeSH) terms: 'Antimalarials/analysis'[MeSH] OR 'Antimalarials/standards'[MeSH] AND 'Africa'[MeSH]' to include articles published up to and including 26 February 2007. Data were augmented with reports on the quality of antimalarial drugs in Africa obtained from colleagues in the World Health Organization. We summarized the data under the following themes: content and dissolution; relative bioavailability of antimalarial products; antimalarial stability and shelf life; general tests on pharmaceutical dosage forms; and the presence of degradation or unidentifiable impurities in formulations. The search yielded 21 relevant peer-reviewed articles and three reports on the quality of antimalarial drugs in Africa. The literature was varied in the quality and breadth of data presented, with most bioavailability studies poorly designed and executed. The review highlights the common finding in drug quality studies that (i) most antimalarial products pass the basic tests for pharmaceutical dosage forms, such as the uniformity of weight for tablets, (ii) most antimalarial drugs pass the content test and (iii) in vitro product dissolution is the main problem area where most drugs fail to meet required pharmacopoeial specifications, especially with regard to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine products. In addition, there are worryingly high quality failure rates for artemisinin monotherapies such as dihydroartemisinin (DHA); for instance all five DHA sampled products in one study in Nairobi, Kenya, were reported to have failed the requisite tests. There is an urgent need to strengthen pharmaceutical management systems such as post-marketing surveillance and the broader health systems in Africa to ensure populations in the

  2. Within-host selection of drug resistance in a mouse model of repeated interrupted treatment of Plasmodium yoelii infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuralitha, Suci; Siregar, Josephine E; Syafruddin, Din; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Marzuki, Sangkot

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To study within-host selection of resistant parasites, an important factor in the development of resistance to anti-malarial drugs, a mouse model of repeated interrupted malaria treatment (RIT) has been developed. The characteristics of within host selection of resistance to atovaquone

  3. Specific Stereoisomeric Conformations Determine the Drug Potency of Cladosporin Scaffold against Malarial Parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Pronay; Babbar, Palak; Malhotra, Nipun; Sharma, Manmohan; Jachak, Gorakhnath R; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Shanmugam, Dhanasekaran; Harlos, Karl; Yogavel, Manickam; Sharma, Amit; Reddy, D Srinivasa

    2018-05-21

    The dependence of drug potency on diastereomeric configurations is a key facet. Using a novel general divergent synthetic route for a three-chiral centre anti-malarial natural product cladosporin, we built its complete library of stereoisomers (cladologs) and assessed their inhibitory potential using parasite-, enzyme- and structure-based assays. We show that potency is manifest via tetrahyropyran ring conformations that are housed in the ribose binding pocket of parasite lysyl tRNA synthetase (KRS). Strikingly, drug potency between top and worst enantiomers varied 500-fold, and structures of KRS-cladolog complexes reveal that alterations at C3 and C10 are detrimental to drug potency where changes at C3 are sensed by rotameric flipping of Glutamate332. Given that scores of anti-malarial and anti-infective drugs contain chiral centers, this work provides a new foundation for focusing on inhibitor stereochemistry as a facet of anti-microbial drug development.

  4. [Animal drugs quality status and reason analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qing; Qiu, Ya-jing; Fang, Ke-hui; Hu, Hao-bin; Wu, Yue

    2015-11-01

    In order to reaction the quality present situation, problems on the current quality of animal sources of drugs are summed up by using test data analysis, literature search and marketing research. This paper can also help the improvement of the quality management, the revision of the relevant department policy system and the improvement of standards.

  5. Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Hexose Transporter PfHT by Screening Focused Libraries of Anti-Malarial Compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Ortiz

    Full Text Available Development of resistance against current antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for novel drugs that interact with different targets and have distinct mechanisms of action. Malaria parasites depend upon high levels of glucose uptake followed by inefficient metabolic utilization via the glycolytic pathway, and the Plasmodium falciparum hexose transporter PfHT, which mediates uptake of glucose, has thus been recognized as a promising drug target. This transporter is highly divergent from mammalian hexose transporters, and it appears to be a permease that is essential for parasite viability in intra-erythrocytic, mosquito, and liver stages of the parasite life cycle. An assay was developed that is appropriate for high throughput screening against PfHT based upon heterologous expression of PfHT in Leishmania mexicana parasites that are null mutants for their endogenous hexose transporters. Screening of two focused libraries of antimalarial compounds identified two such compounds that are high potency selective inhibitors of PfHT compared to human GLUT1. Additionally, 7 other compounds were identified that are lower potency and lower specificity PfHT inhibitors but might nonetheless serve as starting points for identification of analogs with more selective properties. These results further support the potential of PfHT as a novel drug target.

  6. Flow cytometry for the evaluation of anti-plasmodial activity of drugs on Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipy Bernard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of promising anti-malarial drugs against Plasmodium gametocytes is hard to evaluate even in vitro. This is because visual examination of stained smears, which is commonly used, is not totally convenient. In the current study, flow cytometry has been used to study the effect of established anti-malarial drugs against sexual stages obtained from W2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Gametocytes were treated for 48 h with different drug concentrations and the gametocytaemia was then determined by flow cytometry and compared with visual estimation by microscopy. Results and conclusions Initially gametocytaemia was evaluated either using light microscopy or flow cytometry. A direct correlation (r2 = 0.9986 was obtained. Two distinct peaks were observed on cytometry histograms and were attributed to gametocyte populations. The activities of established anti-malarial compounds were then measured by flow cytometry and the results were equivalent to those obtained using light microscopy. Primaquine and artemisinin had IC50 of 17.6 μM and 1.0 μM, respectively. Gametocyte sex was apparently distinguishable by flow cytometry as evaluated after induction of exflagellation by xanthurenic acid. These data form the basis of further studies for developing new methods in drug discovery to decrease malaria transmission.

  7. Population Genetics and Drug Resistance Markers: An Essential for Malaria Surveillance in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, A.; Beg, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium (P.) vivax is the prevalent malarial species accounting for 70% of malaria cases in Pakistan. However, baseline epidemiological data on P. vivax population structure and drug resistance are lacking from Pakistan. For population structure studies, molecular genetic markers, circumsporozoite protein (csp) and merozoite surface protein-1 (msp-1) are considered useful as these play an important role in P. vivax survival under immune and environmental pressure. Furthermore, these genes have also been identified as suitable candidates for vaccine development. While efforts for effective vaccine are underway, anti-malarial agents remain the mainstay for control. Evidence of resistance against commonly used anti-malarial agents, particularly Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is threatening to make this form of control defunct. Therefore, studies on drug resistance are necessary so that anti-malarial treatment strategies can be structured and implemented accordingly by the Malaria Control Program, Pakistan. This review aims to provide information on genetic markers of P. vivax population structure and drug resistance and comment on their usefulness in molecular surveillance and control. (author)

  8. Within-host selection of drug resistance in a mouse model of repeated interrupted treatment of Plasmodium yoelii infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nuralitha, Suci; Siregar, Josephine E; Syafruddin, Din; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Marzuki, Sangkot

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To study within-host selection of resistant parasites, an important factor in the development of resistance to anti-malarial drugs, a mouse model of repeated interrupted malaria treatment (RIT) has been developed. The characteristics of within host selection of resistance to atovaquone and pyrimethamine in Plasmodium yoelii was examined in such a model. METHODS: Treatment of P. yoelii infected mice, with atovaquone or pyrimethamine, was started at parasitaemia level of 3-5%, inter...

  9. Psychoactive Drugs and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed on a representative sample of the Danish population in order to investigate the connection to the use of psychoactive drugs and quality of life (QOL by way of a questionnaire-based survey. The questionnaire was mailed in February 1993 to 2,460 persons aged between 18 and 88, randomly selected from the CPR (Danish Central Register, and 7,222 persons from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959–61.A total of 1,501 persons between the ages 18 and 88 years and 4,626 persons between the ages 31 and 33 years returned the questionnaire (response rates of 61.0% and 64.1%, respectively. Variables investigated in this study were ten different psychotropic drugs and quality of life.Our study showed that over half the Danish population had used illegal psychotropic drugs. The most commonly used was cannabis (marijuana though experience of this drug appeared not to co-vary with QOL to any significant extent. Cocaine, amphetamine, and psilocybin had been used by 1.2 to 3.3% of the population and this varied with QOL to a clear albeit small extent. LSD has been used by 1.2% of the population and the users had a QOL score 10% lower than those who had never used psychotropic drugs. The group with the lowest quality of life was found to be persons who had used heroin, morphine, methadone, and a mixture of alcohol and tranquilizers (10–20% below the group with the highest quality of life.

  10. Working towards consensus on methods used to elicit participant-reported safety data in uncomplicated malaria clinical drug studies: a Delphi technique study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandimika, Nyaradzo; Barnes, Karen I; Chandler, Clare I R; Pace, Cheryl; Allen, Elizabeth N

    2017-01-28

    Eliciting adverse event (AE) and non-study medication data reports from clinical research participants is integral to evaluating drug safety. However, using different methods to question participants yields inconsistent results, compromising the interpretation, comparison and pooling of data across studies. This is particularly important given the widespread use of anti-malarials in vulnerable populations, and their increasing use in healthy, but at-risk individuals, as preventive treatment or to reduce malaria transmission. Experienced and knowledgeable anti-malarial drug clinical researchers were invited to participate in a Delphi technique study, to facilitate consensus on what are considered optimal (relevant, important and feasible) methods, tools, and approaches for detecting participant-reported AE and non-study medication data in uncomplicated malaria treatment studies. Of 72 invited, 25, 16 and 10 panellists responded to the first, second and third rounds of the Delphi, respectively. Overall, 68% (68/100) of all questioning items presented for rating achieved consensus. When asking general questions about health, panellists agreed on the utility of a question/concept about any change in health, taking care to ensure that such questions/concepts do not imply causality. Eighty-nine percent (39/44) of specific signs and symptoms questions were rated as optimal. For non-study medications, a general question and most structured questioning items were considered an optimal approach. The use of mobile phones, patient diaries, rating scales as well as openly engaging with participants to discuss concerns were also considered optimal complementary data-elicitation tools. This study succeeded in reaching consensus within a section of the anti-malarial drug clinical research community about using a general question concept, and structured questions for eliciting data about AEs and non-study medication reports. The concepts and items considered in this Delphi to be

  11. Evaluation of Drug Quality (III): Determination of Ciprofloxacin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Evaluation of Drug Quality (III): Determination of Ciprofloxacin Hydrochloride ... two methods were interpreted in terms of differences in sensitivities of the methods. It was ..... Agency for Food, Drug Administration and. Control ... regulatory standards and specified identity. Therefore drug analysis requires that drugs meet their.

  12. Quality of drug prescription in primary health care facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Marwa

    north-western Tanzania. GIVENESS ... Background: Drug therapy can improve a patient's quality of life and health outcomes if only used properly. .... Irrational use of drugs occurs in all countries and causes harm to people (El Mahalli 2012).

  13. A genome wide association study of Plasmodium falciparum susceptibility to 22 antimalarial drugs in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason P Wendler

    Full Text Available Drug resistance remains a chief concern for malaria control. In order to determine the genetic markers of drug resistant parasites, we tested the genome-wide associations (GWA of sequence-based genotypes from 35 Kenyan P. falciparum parasites with the activities of 22 antimalarial drugs.Parasites isolated from children with acute febrile malaria were adapted to culture, and sensitivity was determined by in vitro growth in the presence of anti-malarial drugs. Parasites were genotyped using whole genome sequencing techniques. Associations between 6250 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and resistance to individual anti-malarial agents were determined, with false discovery rate adjustment for multiple hypothesis testing. We identified expected associations in the pfcrt region with chloroquine (CQ activity, and other novel loci associated with amodiaquine, quinazoline, and quinine activities. Signals for CQ and primaquine (PQ overlap in and around pfcrt, and interestingly the phenotypes are inversely related for these two drugs. We catalog the variation in dhfr, dhps, mdr1, nhe, and crt, including novel SNPs, and confirm the presence of a dhfr-164L quadruple mutant in coastal Kenya. Mutations implicated in sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance are at or near fixation in this sample set.Sequence-based GWA studies are powerful tools for phenotypic association tests. Using this approach on falciparum parasites from coastal Kenya we identified known and previously unreported genes associated with phenotypic resistance to anti-malarial drugs, and observe in high-resolution haplotype visualizations a possible signature of an inverse selective relationship between CQ and PQ.

  14. Activity of clinically relevant antimalarial drugs on Plasmodium falciparum mature gametocytes in an ATP bioluminescence "transmission blocking" assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Lelièvre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current anti-malarial drugs have been selected on the basis of their activity against the symptom-causing asexual blood stage of the parasite. Which of these drugs also target gametocytes, in the sexual stage responsible for disease transmission, remains unknown. Blocking transmission is one of the main strategies in the eradication agenda and requires the identification of new molecules that are active against gametocytes. However, to date, the main limitation for measuring the effect of molecules against mature gametocytes on a large scale is the lack of a standardized and reliable method. Here we provide an efficient method to produce and purify mature gametocytes in vitro. Based on this new procedure, we developed a robust, affordable, and sensitive ATP bioluminescence-based assay. We then assessed the activity of 17 gold-standard anti-malarial drugs on Plasmodium late stage gametocytes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Difficulties in producing large amounts of gametocytes have limited progress in the development of malaria transmission blocking assays. We improved the method established by Ifediba and Vanderberg to obtain viable, mature gametocytes en masse, whatever the strain used. We designed an assay to determine the activity of antimalarial drugs based on the intracellular ATP content of purified stage IV-V gametocytes after 48 h of drug exposure in 96/384-well microplates. Measurements of drug activity on asexual stages and cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells were also obtained to estimate the specificity of the active drugs. CONCLUSIONS: The work described here represents another significant step towards determination of the activity of new molecules on mature gametocytes of any strain with an automated assay suitable for medium/high-throughput screening. Considering that the biology of the forms involved in the sexual and asexual stages is very different, a screen of our 2 million-compound library may allow us to discover novel anti-malarial

  15. 76 FR 50741 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality and...: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in cosponsorship with Parenteral...

  16. 76 FR 25358 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food...

  17. Quality Performance of Drugs Analyzed in the Drug Analysis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ICT TEAM

    performance of drug samples analyzed therein. Previous reports have ... wholesalers, non-governmental organizations, hospitals, analytical ..... a dispute concerning discharge of waste water ... Healthcare Industry in Kenya, December. 2008.

  18. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  19. Implementation of a reference standard and proficiency testing programme by the World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Karen I

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN is a global collaboration to support the objective that anyone affected by malaria receives effective and safe drug treatment. The Pharmacology module aims to inform optimal anti-malarial drug selection. There is an urgent need to define the drug exposure - effect relationship for most anti-malarial drugs. Few anti-malarials have had their therapeutic blood concentration levels defined. One of the main challenges in assessing safety and efficacy data in relation to drug concentrations is the comparability of data generated from different laboratories. To explain differences in anti-malarial pharmacokinetics in studies with different measurement laboratories it is necessary to confirm the accuracy of the assay methods. This requires the establishment of an external quality assurance process to assure results that can be compared. This paper describes this process. Methods The pharmacology module of WWARN has established a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC programme consisting of two separate components: 1. A proficiency testing programme where blank human plasma spiked with certified reference material (CRM in different concentrations is sent out to participating bioanalytical laboratories. 2. A certified reference standard programme where accurately weighed amounts of certified anti-malarial reference standards, metabolites, and internal standards are sent to participating bioanalytical and in vitro laboratories. Conclusion The proficiency testing programme is designed as a cooperative effort to help participating laboratories assess their ability to carry out drug analysis, resolve any potential problem areas and to improve their results - and, in so doing, to improve the quality of anti-malarial pharmacokinetic data published and shared with WWARN. By utilizing the same source of standards for all laboratories, it is possible to minimize bias arising from poor

  20. Drug use in the management of uncomplicated malaria in public health facilities in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntamabyaliro, Nsengi Y; Burri, Christian; Nzolo, Didier B; Engo, Aline B; Lula, Yves N; Mampunza, Samuel M; Nsibu, Célestin N; Mesia, Gauthier K; Kayembe, Jean-Marie N; Likwela, Joris L; Kintaudi, Leon M; Tona, Gaston L

    2018-05-03

    Malaria the first causes of death from parasitic infection worldwide. Interventions to reduce the burden of malaria have produced a tremendous drop in malaria morbidity and mortality. However, progress is slower in DRC, which shares with Nigeria 39% of deaths related to malaria globally. Inappropriate use of drugs may be one of the factors of this below-average performance. The aim of this study was to describe the use of drugs in the management of uncomplicated malaria in public health facilities in DRC. A drug use study was carried out in DRC from January to March 2014. In each of the former 11 provinces of DRC, one Rural Health Centre, one Urban Health Centre and one General Hospital were selected. In each of them, 100 patient's files containing prescription of anti-malarials from January to December 2013 were randomly selected. Among them, all of the files with diagnosis of uncomplicated malaria were included in this study. Prescribed anti-malarials, co-prescribed drugs and their indications were collected. Descriptive analyses were performed. A total of 2300 files out of 3300 (69.7%) concerned uncomplicated malaria and were included in analysis. Malaria treatment was initiated after a positive RDT or microscopy in 51.5% of cases, upon suspicion without requesting biological confirmation in 37% and despite negative results in 11%. Twenty-nine (29) different treatment regimens were used. The drugs recommended by the National Malaria Control Programme were used in 54.3% of cases (artesunate-amodiaquine 37.4% or artemether-lumefantrine 16.9%). The second most used anti-malarial was quinine (32.4%). Apart from anti-malarials, an average of 3.1 drugs per patient were prescribed, among which antibiotics (67.9%), analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs) (all abbreviations to be explicated on first use) (70.6%), vitamins (29.1%), anaemia drugs, including blood transfusion (9.1%) and corticosteroids (5.7%), In 51.4% of cases there was no indication for

  1. Indicators for the automated analysis of drug prescribing quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, J; Séné, B; Milstein, C; Bouée, S; Venot, A

    1998-01-01

    Irrational and inconsistent drug prescription has considerable impact on morbidity, mortality, health service utilization, and community burden. However, few studies have addressed the methodology of processing the information contained in these drug orders used to study the quality of drug prescriptions and prescriber behavior. We present a comprehensive set of quantitative indicators for the quality of drug prescriptions which can be derived from a drug order. These indicators were constructed using explicit a priori criteria which were previously validated on the basis of scientific data. Automatic computation is straightforward, using a relational database system, such that large sets of prescriptions can be processed with minimal human effort. We illustrate the feasibility and value of this approach by using a large set of 23,000 prescriptions for several diseases, selected from a nationally representative prescriptions database. Our study may result in direct and wide applications in the epidemiology of medical practice and in quality control procedures.

  2. Quality assurance of herbal drug valerian by chemotaxonomic markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality assurance of valerian (Balchur), a traditional herbal drug of global importance mainly used for nervous disorders, was studied. At global, regional, national and local levels the end users of this drug face the problems of adulteration. Two different botanical sources are commercially marketed in the Indo-Pak ...

  3. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    have an effective means of monitoring the quality of generic drug products in the market. This results in widespread ... countries. Marketing of such drugs has been widely reported in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. © CNCS .... three-fourth of the plate. The plate was dried in air for 15 minutes and examined under UV-light,.

  4. Assessing website pharmacy drug quality: safer than you think?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bate

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internet-sourced drugs are often considered suspect. The World Health Organization reports that drugs from websites that conceal their physical address are counterfeit in over 50 percent of cases; the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA works with the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP to regularly update a list of websites likely to sell drugs that are illegal or of questionable quality. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This study examines drug purchasing over the Internet, by comparing the sales of five popular drugs from a selection of websites stratified by NABP or other ratings. The drugs were assessed for price, conditions of purchase, and basic quality. Prices and conditions of purchase varied widely. Some websites advertised single pills while others only permitted the purchase of large quantities. Not all websites delivered the exact drugs ordered, some delivered no drugs at all; many websites shipped from multiple international locations, and from locations that were different from those advertised on the websites. All drug samples were tested against approved U.S. brand formulations using Raman spectrometry. Many (17 websites substituted drugs, often in different formulations from the brands requested. These drugs, some of which were probably generics or perhaps non-bioequivalent copy versions, could not be assessed accurately. Of those drugs that could be assessed, none failed from "approved", "legally compliant" or "not recommended" websites (0 out of 86, whereas 8.6% (3 out of 35 failed from "highly not recommended" and unidentifiable websites. CONCLUSIONS: Of those drugs that could be assessed, all except Viagra(R passed spectrometry testing. Of those that failed, few could be identified either by a country of manufacture listed on the packaging, or by the physical location of the website pharmacy. If confirmed by future studies on other drug samples, then U.S. consumers should be able to reduce their risk by

  5. New Analytical Monographs on TCM Herbal Drugs for Quality Proof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Hildebert; Bauer, Rudolf; Melchart, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Regardless of specific national drug regulations there is an international consensus that all TCM drugs must meet stipulated high quality standards focusing on authentication, identification and chemical composition. In addition, safety of all TCM drugs prescribed by physicians has to be guaranteed. During the 25 years history of the TCM hospital Bad Kötzting, 171 TCM drugs underwent an analytical quality proof including thin layer as well as high pressure liquid chromatography. As from now mass spectroscopy will also be available as analytical tool. The findings are compiled and already published in three volumes of analytical monographs. One more volume will be published shortly, and a fifth volume is in preparation. The main issues of the analytical procedure in TCM drugs like authenticity, botanical nomenclature, variability of plant species and parts as well as processing are pointed out and possible ways to overcome them are sketched. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  6. Refractometry for quality control of anesthetic drug mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabenow, Jennifer M; Maske, Mindy L; Vogler, George A

    2006-07-01

    Injectable anesthetic drugs used in rodents are often mixed and further diluted to increase the convenience and accuracy of dosing. We evaluated clinical refractometry as a simple and rapid method of quality control and mixing error detection of rodent anesthetic or analgesic mixtures. Dilutions of ketamine, xylazine, acepromazine, and buprenorphine were prepared with reagent-grade water to produce at least 4 concentration levels. The refraction of each concentration then was measured with a clinical refractometer and plotted against the percentage of stock concentration. The resulting graphs were linear and could be used to determine the concentration of single-drug dilutions or to predict the refraction of drug mixtures. We conclude that refractometry can be used to assess the concentration of dilutions of single drugs and can verify the mixing accuracy of drug combinations when the components of the mixture are known and fall within the detection range of the instrument.

  7. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    Department of Nursing Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia. ABSTRACT ... it is individually, socially and culturally determined. .... concept that is a semantic representation which .... antiretroviral drugs enhances quality of life and is clearly in keeping with the philosophy of palliative. 19 care .

  8. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The safety and efficacy of drug products can be guaranteed when their quality ... required to test their products during and after manufacturing and at various intervals during the ... of this fact that the World Health Organization (WHO) issued guidelines for .... (CLASS VP Version 5.02) all from Shimadzu Instruments (Japan).

  9. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Angeli-Greaves, M.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments

  10. Prescription drugs: issues of cost, coverage, and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, C

    1999-04-01

    This Issue Brief closely examines expenditures on prescription drugs, and discusses their potential to substitute for other types of health care services. In addition, it describes employer coverage of prescription drugs, direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs, and potential legislation affecting the prescription drug market. Prescription drug expenditures grew at double-digit rates during almost every year since 1980, accelerating to 14.1 percent in 1997. In contrast, total national health expenditures, hospital service expenditures, and physician service expenditures growth rates decreased from approximately 13 percent in 1980 to less than 5 percent in 1997. Private insurance payments for prescription drugs increased 17.7 percent in 1997, after growing 22.1 percent in 1995 and 18.3 percent in 1996. This growth in prescription drug payments compares with 4 percent or less overall annual growth in private insurance payments for each of those three years. From 1993 to 1997, the overwhelming majority of the increases in expenditures on prescription drugs were attributable to increased volume, mix, and availability of pharmaceutical products. In 1997, these factors accounted for more than 80 percent of the growth in prescription drug expenditures. A leading explanation for the sharp growth in drug expenditures is that prescription drugs are a substitute for other forms of health care. While it is difficult to determine the extent to which this substitution occurs, various studies have associated cost savings with the use of pharmaceutical products in treating specific diseases. Evidence suggests that more appropriate utilization of prescription drugs has the potential to lower total expenditures and improve the quality of care. Also, some studies indicate the U.S. health care system needs to improve the way patients use and physicians prescribe current medications. Prescription drug plans offered by employers are likely to undergo changes to ensure that

  11. Structure of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase-Halofuginone Complex Provides Basis for Development of Drugs against Malaria and Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vitul; Yogavel, Manickam; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Touquet, Bastien; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Sharma, Amit

    2015-05-05

    The Chinese herb Dichroa febrifuga has traditionally treated malaria-associated fever. Its active component febrifugine (FF) and derivatives such as halofuginone (HF) are potent anti-malarials. Here, we show that FF-based derivatives arrest parasite growth by direct interaction with and inhibition of the protein translation enzyme prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PRS). Dual administration of inhibitors that target different tRNA synthetases suggests high utility of these drug targets. We reveal the ternary complex structure of PRS-HF and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate where the latter facilitates HF integration into the PRS active site. Structural analyses also highlight spaces within the PRS architecture for HF derivatization of its quinazolinone, but not piperidine, moiety. We also show a remarkable ability of HF to kill the related human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, suggesting wider HF efficacy against parasitic PRSs. Hence, our cell-, enzyme-, and structure-based data on FF-based inhibitors strengthen the case for their inclusion in anti-malarial and anti-toxoplasmosis drug development efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo anti-malarial activity of hydroalcoholic extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    There is, thus, the need to initiate further in-depth investigation by using different experimental ... antiprotozoal compounds, a sapogenin (muzanzagenin) and lignan ((+) .... The microscope had an. Ehrlich's ... 100 red blood cells per field.

  13. Lead Optimization of Anti-Malarial Propafenone Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, David; Pradhan, Anupam; Iyer, Lalitha V.; Parman, Toufan; Gow, Jason; Zhu, Fangyi; Furimsky, Anna; Lemoff, Andrew; Guiguemde, W. Armand; Sigal, Martina; Clark, Julie A.; Wilson, Emily; Tang, Liang; Connelly, Michele C.; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Mirsalis, Jon; Guy, R. Kiplin

    2015-01-01

    Previously reported studies identified analogs of propafenone that had potent antimalarial activity, reduced cardiac ion channel activity, and properties that suggested the potential for clinical development for malaria. Careful examination of the bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and efficacy of this series of compounds using rodent models revealed orally bioavailable compounds that are non-toxic and suppress parasitemia in vivo. Although these compounds possess potential for further preclinical development, they also carry some significant challenges. PMID:22708838

  14. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artemisinin is a naturally occurring antimalarial showing anticancer properties. ..... Artemisinins usually promote apoptosis rather than necrosis in most cases ... artemisinin-mediated inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C).

  15. Ethnobotanical study of some Ghanaian anti-malarial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asase, Alex; Oteng-Yeboah, Alfred A; Odamtten, George T; Simmonds, Monique S J

    2005-06-03

    An ethnobotanical study was conducted in the Wechiau Community Hippopotamus Sanctuary area in Ghana, through interviews and quadrate studies, to investigate the range and abundance of species used in the treatment of malaria. Forty-one species belonging to 17 families were encountered during the study. Of the 17 families studied Leguminosae and Anacardiaceae predominated in terms of number of species used to treat malaria. Eight plant species namely, Afraegle paniculata (Rutaceae), Haematostaphis barteri (Anacardiaceae), Indigo era pulchra (Leguminosae), Monanthotaxis sp. (Annonaceae), Ozoroa insignis (Anacardiaceae), Strychnos innocua (Loganiaceae), Strychnos spinosa (Loganiaceae) and Xeroderris stuhlmannii (Leguminosae) have not previously been documented for the treatment of malaria in Ghana. The results are discussed and recommendations made for future research to support the conservation and sustainable harvesting of the species reported to have medicinal properties.

  16. Malaria in South America: a drug discovery perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luiza R; Spangenberg, Thomas; Lacerda, Marcus V G; Wells, Timothy N C

    2013-05-24

    The challenge of controlling and eventually eradicating malaria means that new tools are urgently needed. South America's role in this fight spans both ends of the research and development spectrum: both as a continent capable of discovering and developing new medicines, and also as a continent with significant numbers of malaria patients. This article reviews the contribution of groups in the South American continent to the research and development of new medicines over the last decade. Therefore, the current situation of research targeting malaria control and eradication is discussed, including endemicity, geographical distribution, treatment, drug-resistance and diagnosis. This sets the scene for a review of efforts within South America to discover and optimize compounds with anti-malarial activity.

  17. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Cost Control and Quality Improvement Requirements § 423.153 Drug utilization... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). 423.153 Section 423.153 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE...

  18. Liposomal Drug Product Development and Quality: Current US Experience and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Mamta; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-05-01

    Research in the area of liposomes has grown substantially in the past few decades. Liposomes are lipid bilayer structures that can incorporate drug substances to modify the drug's pharmacokinetic profile thereby improving drug delivery. The agency has received over 400 liposomal drug product submissions (excluding combination therapies), and there are currently eight approved liposomal drug products on the US market. In order to identify the pain points in development and manufacturing of liposomal drug products, a retrospective analysis was performed from a quality perspective on submissions for new and generic liposomal drug products. General analysis on liposomal drug product submissions was also performed. Results indicated that 96% of the submissions were Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, 3% were New Drug Applications (NDAs), and the remaining 1% was Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDAs). Doxorubicin hydrochloride was the most commonly used drug substance incorporated into the liposomes (31%). The majority of the liposomal products were administered via intravenous route (84%) with cancer (various types) being the most common indication (63%). From a quality perspective, major challenges during the development of liposomal drug products included identification and (appropriate) characterization of critical quality attributes of liposomal drug products and suitable control strategies during product development. By focusing on these areas, a faster and more efficient development of liposomal drug products may be achieved. Additionally, in this way, the drug review process for such products can be streamlined.

  19. Active site similarity between human and Plasmodium falciparum phosphodiesterases: considerations for antimalarial drug design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Brittany L.; Thompson, Philip E.; Manallack, David T.

    2011-08-01

    The similarity between Plasmodium falciparum phosphodiesterase enzymes ( PfPDEs) and their human counterparts have been examined and human PDE9A was found to be a suitable template for the construction of homology models for each of the four PfPDE isoforms. In contrast, the architecture of the active sites of each model was most similar to human PDE1. Molecular docking was able to model cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) substrate binding in each case but a docking mode supporting cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding could not be found. Anticipating the potential of PfPDE inhibitors as anti-malarial drugs, a range of reported PDE inhibitors including zaprinast and sildenafil were docked into the model of PfPDEα. The results were consistent with their reported biological activities, and the potential of PDE1/9 inhibitor analogues was also supported by docking.

  20. Identification of active Plasmodium falciparum calpain to establish screening system for Pf-calpain-based drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Byoung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing resistance of malaria parasites to available drugs, there is an urgent demand to develop new anti-malarial drugs. Calpain inhibitor, ALLN, is proposed to inhibit parasite proliferation by suppressing haemoglobin degradation. This provides Plasmodium calpain as a potential target for drug development. Pf-calpain, a cysteine protease of Plasmodium falciparum, belongs to calpain-7 family, which is an atypical calpain not harboring Ca2+-binding regulatory motifs. In this present study, in order to establish the screening system for Pf-calpain specific inhibitors, the active form of Pf-calpain was first identified. Methods Recombinant Pf-calpain including catalytic subdomain IIa (rPfcal-IIa was heterologously expressed and purified. Enzymatic activity was determined by both fluorogenic substrate assay and gelatin zymography. Molecular homology modeling was carried out to address the activation mode of Pf-calpain in the aspect of structural moiety. Results Based on the measurement of enzymatic activity and protease inhibitor assay, it was found that the active form of Pf-calpain only contains the catalytic subdomain IIa, suggesting that Pf-calpain may function as a monomeric form. The sequence prediction indicates that the catalytic subdomain IIa contains all amino acid residues necessary for catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asn formation. Molecular modeling suggests that the Pf-calpain subdomain IIa makes an active site, holding the catalytic triad residues in their appropriate orientation for catalysis. The mutation analysis further supports that those amino acid residues are functional and have enzymatic activity. Conclusion The identified active form of Pf-calpain could be utilized to establish high-throughput screening system for Pf-calpain inhibitors. Due to its unique monomeric structural property, Pf-calpain could be served as a novel anti-malarial drug target, which has a high specificity for malaria parasite

  1. The newest miracle drug: quality circles in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, M M

    1984-01-01

    In recent years, a number of hospitals throughout the United States have been exploring the use of Japanese-style quality circles to reduce their operating expenses, improve productivity, and enhance the quality of work life for hospital employees. This article examines the organizational climate necessary for quality circles, methods used to implement quality circles, and management's role in guiding and responding to circle activities. Ideas for building and maintaining staff support are presented along with a cost/benefit analysis of quality circle programs. The author concludes that quality circles are most successful in hospitals where they are part of a larger organizational development effort. When administrators believe in their employees' ability to contribute to the institution and are willing to invest necessary time and resources in employee education and the measurement of quality circle achievements, quality circles can produce creative solutions to perplexing institutional problems.

  2. [Does implementation of benchmarking in quality circles improve the quality of care of patients with asthma and reduce drug interaction?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann-Kolle, Petra; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Broge, Björn; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Schneider, Antonius

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this cluster-randomised controlled trial was to evaluate the efficacy of quality circles (QCs) working either with general data-based feedback or with an open benchmark within the field of asthma care and drug-drug interactions. Twelve QCs, involving 96 general practitioners from 85 practices, were randomised. Six QCs worked with traditional anonymous feedback and six with an open benchmark. Two QC meetings supported with feedback reports were held covering the topics "drug-drug interactions" and "asthma"; in both cases discussions were guided by a trained moderator. Outcome measures included health-related quality of life and patient satisfaction with treatment, asthma severity and number of potentially inappropriate drug combinations as well as the general practitioners' satisfaction in relation to the performance of the QC. A significant improvement in the treatment of asthma was observed in both trial arms. However, there was only a slight improvement regarding inappropriate drug combinations. There were no relevant differences between the group with open benchmark (B-QC) and traditional quality circles (T-QC). The physicians' satisfaction with the QC performance was significantly higher in the T-QCs. General practitioners seem to take a critical perspective about open benchmarking in quality circles. Caution should be used when implementing benchmarking in a quality circle as it did not improve healthcare when compared to the traditional procedure with anonymised comparisons. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Is the quality of brief motivational interventions for drug use in primary care associated with subsequent drug use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfai, Tibor P; Cheng, Debbie M; Bernstein, Judith A; Palmisano, Joseph; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine A; Goodness, Tracie; Saitz, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although a number of brief intervention approaches for drug use are based on motivational interviewing (MI), relatively little is known about whether the quality of motivational interviewing skills is associated with intervention outcomes. The current study examined whether indices of motivational interviewing skill were associated with subsequent drug use outcomes following two different MI-based brief interventions delivered in primary care; a 15 min Brief Negotiated Interview (BNI) and a 45 min adaptation of motivational interviewing (MOTIV). Audio recordings from 351 participants in a randomized controlled trial for drug use in primary care were coded using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Scale, (MITI Version 3.1.1). Separate negative binomial regression analyses, stratified by intervention condition, were used to examine the associations between six MITI skill variables and the number of days that the participant used his/her main drug 6 weeks after study entry. Only one of the MITI variables (% reflections to questions) was significantly associated with the frequency of drug use in the MOTIV condition and this was opposite to the hypothesized direction (global p=0.01, adjusted IRR 1.50, 95%CI: 1.03-2.20 for middle vs. lowest tertile [higher skill, more drug use]. None were significantly associated with drug use in the BNI condition. Secondary analyses similarly failed to find consistent predictors of better drug outcomes. Overall, this study provides little evidence to suggest that the level of MI intervention skills are linked with better drug use outcomes among people who use drugs and receive brief interventions in primary care. Findings should be considered in light of the fact that data from the study are from negative trial of SBI and was limited to primary care patients. Future work should consider alternative ways of examining these process variables (i.e., comparing thresholds of proficient versus non-proficient skills) or

  4. Drug quality in South Africa: perceptions of key players involved in medicines distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aarti; Norris, Pauline; Gauld, Robin; Rades, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Substandard medicines contribute to poor public health and affect development, especially in the developing world. However knowledge of how manufacturers, distributors and providers understand the concept of drug quality and what strategies they adopt to ensure drug quality is limited, particularly in the developing world. The purpose of this paper is to explore pharmaceutical manufacturers', distributors' and providers' perceptions of drug quality in South Africa and how they ensure the quality of drugs during the distribution process. The approach taken was qualitative data collection through key informant interviews using a semi-structured interview guide. Transcripts were analysed thematically in Johannesburg, Pretoria and Durban, South Africa. Participants were recruited purposefully from a South African pharmaceutical manufacturer, SA subsidiaries of international manufacturers, national distribution companies, national wholesaler, public and private sector pharmacists, and a dispensing doctor. In total, ten interviews were conducted. Participants described drug quality in terms of the product and the processes involved in manufacturing and handling the product. Participants identified purchasing registered medicines from licensed suppliers, use of standard operating procedures, and audits between manufacturer and distributor and/or provider as key strategies employed to protect medicine quality. Effective communication amongst all stakeholders, especially in terms of providing feedback regarding complaints about medicine quality, appears as a potential area of concern, which would benefit from further research. The paper hightlights that ensuring medicine quality should be a shared responsibility amongst all involved in the distribution process to prevent medicines moving from one distribution system (public) into another (private).

  5. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety......-line drug for treatment of pneumonia in children according to the guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: There is urgent need to regulate drug shop practices of prescribing and selling antibiotics, for the safety of patients seeking care at these outlets....

  6. Formulation, quality control and shelf life of the experimental cytostatic drug cyclopentenyl cytosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, Kirsten; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; van Kan, Erik

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation and quality control of an aqueous sterilized formulation of the experimental cytostatic drug cyclopentenyl cytosine (CPEC) to be used in Phase I/II clinical trials. The raw drug substance was extensively tested. A High Pressure Liquid Chromotography (HPLC) method

  7. Review of Drug Quality and Security Act of 2013: The Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elona Gjini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA signed into law in November 27, 2013 by president Obama creates a uniform national standard for tracing drug products through the supply chain. The goal of DQSA is to enhance FDA’s ability to help protect consumers by detecting and removing potential dangerous products from the pharmaceutics distribution supply chain. A new electronic, interoperable system will identify and trace only prescription drugs in the finished form for human use while distributed in the United States. The purpose of this review was to shed light on a complex and complicated process that it will require cooperation between FDA and drug manufactures, wholesale drug distributors, repackagers and dispensers. The implementation of the DSCSA is based on several law requirements and FDA has developed a schedule with time frames for each of them to be executed over a 10-year period. From this review, FDA recommendations are provided through the FDA Guidance on Identifying Suspect Product document to help trading partners and provide information about the risk of suspect drugs entering the supply chain. Moreover, FDA organized on April 5-6, 2016 in Silver Spring, MD a public workshop to gather valuable feedback from stakeholders who shared their input about the implementation of the new electronic system and its requirements. By the end of 2023, a unified system will provide easier data exchange and less errors, and will increase the safety and security of the pharmaceutical distribution supply chain.   Type: Student Project

  8. Quality of drug label information on QT interval prolongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam J; Holtkamp, Frank A; Rutten, Frans H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information regarding QT-prolongation in the drug label may vary between products. This could lead to suboptimal risk minimization strategies. OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess the variation in the extent and content of information on QT prolongation in the summary of product......-prolongation'/'QT-prolongation') and the advice on cautionary measures pertaining to QT-prolongation in the label were examined, as well as their association. RESULTS: Of the 175 screened products, 44 contained information on QT in the SPC ('no QT-prolongation': 23%, 'unclear drug-QT association': 43%, 'possibly QT-prolongation': 16%, 'QT......-prolongation': 18%). 62% contained advices to act with caution in patients with additional risk factors for QT-prolongation. Products that more likely to have QT-prolonging properties according to the SPC provided more information on QT-prolongation in the SPC ('no prolongation': 10% and for the category 'QT...

  9. Aberrant use and poor quality of trypanocides: a risk for drug resistance in south western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekle, T; Terefe, G; Cherenet, T; Ashenafi, H; Akoda, K G; Teko-Agbo, A; Van Den Abbeele, J; Gari, G; Clausen, P-H; Hoppenheit, A; Mattioli, R C; Peter, R; Marcotty, T; Cecchi, G; Delespaux, V

    2018-01-05

    Trypanocidal drugs have been used to control African animal trypanosomosis for several decades. In Ethiopia, these drugs are available from both authorized (legal) and unauthorized (illegal) sources but documentation on utilization practices and quality of circulating products is scanty. This study looked at the practices of trypanocidal drug utilization by farmers and the integrity of active ingredient in trypanocides sold in Gurage zone, south western Ethiopia. The surveys were based on a structured questionnaire and drug quality determination of commonly used brands originating from European and Asian companies and sold at both authorized and unauthorized markets. One hundred farmers were interviewed and 50 drug samples were collected in 2013 (Diminazene aceturate = 33 and Isometamidium chloride = 17; 25 from authorized and 25 from unauthorized sources). Samples were tested at the OIE-certified Veterinary Drug Control Laboratory (LACOMEV) in Dakar, Senegal, by using galenic standards and high performance liquid chromatography. Trypanosomosis was found to be a major threat according to all interviewed livestock keepers in the study area. Diminazene aceturate and isometamidium chloride were preferred by 79% and 21% of the respondents respectively, and 85% of them indicated that an animal receives more than six treatments per year. About 60% of these treatments were reported to be administered by untrained farmers. Trypanocidal drug sources included both unauthorized outlets (56%) and authorized government and private sources (44%). A wide availability and usage of substandard quality drugs was revealed. Twenty eight percent of trypanocidal drugs tested failed to comply with quality requirements. There was no significant difference in the frequency of non-compliance between diminazene-based and isometamidium chloride products (P = 0.87) irrespective of the marketing channel (official and unofficial). However, higher rates of non-compliant trypanocides

  10. Use of a colorimetric (DELI) test for the evaluation of chemoresistance of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Riccio, Lilian R; Chehuan, Yonne F; Siqueira, Maria José; das Graças Alecrim, Maria; Bianco-Junior, Cesare; Druilhe, Pierre; Brasseur, Philippe; de Fátima Ferreira-da-Cruz, Maria; Carvalho, Leonardo J M; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio T

    2013-08-12

    The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax resistance to available anti-malarial drugs represents a major drawback in the control of malaria and its associated morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoresistance profile of P. falciparum and P. vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in a malaria-endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon. The study was carried out in Manaus (Amazonas state), in the Brazilian Amazon. A total of 88 P. falciparum and 178 P. vivax isolates was collected from 2004 to 2007. The sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates was determined to chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine and artesunate and the sensitivity of P. vivax isolates was determined to chloroquine and mefloquine, by using the colorimetric DELI test. As expected, a high prevalence of P. falciparum isolates resistant to chloroquine (78.1%) was observed. The prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance or decreased sensitivity for quinine, mefloquine and artesunate was 12.7, 21.2 and 11.7%, respectively. In the case of P. vivax, the prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance for chloroquine and mefloquine was 9.8 and 28%, respectively. No differences in the frequencies of isolates with profile of resistance or geometric mean IC50s were seen when comparing the data obtained in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, for all tested anti-malarials. The great majority of P. falciparum isolates in the Brazilian malaria-endemic area remain resistant to chloroquine, and the decreased sensitivity to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate observed in 10-20% of the isolates must be taken with concern, especially for artesunate. Plasmodium vivax isolates also showed a significant proportion of isolates with decreased sensitivity to chloroquine (first-line drug) and mainly to mefloquine. The data presented here also confirm the usefulness of the DELI test to generate results able to impact on public health policies.

  11. Drug utilization research in primary health care as exemplified by physicians' quality assessment groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ferber, L; Luciano, A; Köster, I; Krappweis, J

    1992-11-01

    Drugs in primary health care are often prescribed for nonrational reasons. Drug utilization research investigates the prescription of drugs with an eye to medical, social and economic causes and consequences of the prescribed drug's utilization. The results of this research show distinct differences in drug utilization in different age groups and between men and women. Indication and dosage appear irrational from a textbook point of view. This indicates nonpharmacological causes of drug utilization. To advice successfully changes for the better quality assessment groups of primary health care physicians get information about their established behavior by analysis of their prescriptions. The discussion and the comparisons in the group allow them to recognize their irrational prescribing and the social, psychological and economic reasons behind it. Guidelines for treatment are worked out which take into account the primary health care physician's situation. After a year with 6 meetings of the quality assessment groups the education process is evaluated by another drug utilization analysis on the basis of the physicians prescription. The evaluation shows a remarkable improvement of quality and cost effectiveness of the drug therapy of the participating physicians.

  12. Prescription drugs in nursing homes: managing costs and quality in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Dan; Ramchand, Rajeev; Abramson, Richard; Tumlinson, Anne

    2002-11-12

    This brief provides a description of prescription drug use in nursing homes and a summary of current policy issues in this area. The brief first profiles the nursing home pharmaceutical market, outlining the major trends in demographics and drug utilization, the supply chain by which drugs go from manufacturers to pharmacies to nursing home residents, and the alternative arrangements by which prescription drugs in nursing homes are financed. The brief then provides a synopsis of current policy issues, focusing in turn on cost containment and quality improvement initiatives.

  13. A multiple biomarker assay for quality assessment of botanical drugs using a versatile microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Hao; Ai, Ni; Yu, Lawrence X; Qian, Zhong-Zhi; Cheng, Yi-Yu

    2017-09-25

    Quality control is critical for ensuring the safety and effectiveness of drugs. Current quality control method for botanical drugs is mainly based on chemical testing. However, chemical testing alone may not be sufficient as it may not capture all constituents of botanical drugs. Therefore, it is necessary to establish a bioassay correlating with the drug's known mechanism of action to ensure its potency and activity. Herein we developed a multiple biomarker assay to assess the quality of botanicals using microfluidics, where enzyme inhibition was employed to indicate the drug's activity and thereby evaluate biological consistency. This approach was exemplified on QiShenYiQi Pills using thrombin and angiotensin converting enzyme as "quality biomarkers". Our results demonstrated that there existed variations in potency across different batches of the intermediates and preparations. Compared with chromatographic fingerprinting, the bioassay provided better discrimination ability for some abnormal samples. Moreover, the chip could function as "affinity chromatography" to identify bioactive phytochemicals bound to the enzymes. This work proposed a multiple-biomarker strategy for quality assessment of botanical drugs, while demonstrating for the first time the feasibility of microfluidics in this field.

  14. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. An attempt was made to assess the quality and compare the physicochemical equivalence of six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets marketed in Tigray, Ethiopia. Six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets were used in the study. Identity, weight uniformity test, disintegration test, dissolution test and assay for the content of ...

  15. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs | Mweemba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of antiretroviral treatment in HIV/AIDS is showing inhibition of viral replication and reduction of viral load to a point where viral particles are undetectable in the blood of infected individuals. ... Quality of life is a complex broad ranging multidimensional concept defined in terms of individual's subjective experiences.

  16. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt was made to assess the quality and compare the physicochemical equivalence of six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets marketed in Tigray, Ethiopia. Six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets were used in the study. Identity, weight uniformity test, disintegration test, dissolution test and assay for the content of active ...

  17. Quality medicines for the poor: experience of the Delhi programme on rational use of drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, R Roy; Parameswar, R; Gupta, U; Sharma, S; Tekur, U; Bapna, J S

    2005-03-01

    Prior to 1994, most Delhi hospitals and dispensaries experienced constant shortages of essential medicines. There was erratic prescribing of expensive branded products, frequent complaints about poor drug quality and low patient satisfaction. Delhi took the lead in developing a comprehensive Drug Policy in 1994 and was the only Indian state to have such a comprehensive policy. The policy's main objective is to improve the availability and accessibility of quality essential drugs for all those in need. The Delhi Society for the Promotion of Rational Use of Drugs (DSPRUD), a non-governmental organization, worked in close collaboration with the Delhi Government and with universities to implement various components of the policy. The first Essential Drugs List (EDL) was developed, a centralized pooled procurement system was set up and activities promoting rational use of drugs were initiated. In 1997, the Delhi Programme was designated the INDIA-WHO Essential Drugs Programme by the World Health Organization. The EDL was developed by a committee consisting of a multidisciplinary group of experts using balanced criteria of efficacy, safety, suitability and cost. The first list contained 250 drugs for hospitals and 100 drugs for dispensaries; the list is revised every 2 years. The pooled procurement system, including the rigorous selection of suppliers with a minimum annual threshold turnover and the introduction of Good Manufacturing Practice inspections, resulted in the supply of good quality drugs and in holding down the procurement costs of many drugs. Bulk purchasing of carefully selected essential drugs was estimated to save nearly 30% of the annual drugs bill for the Government of Delhi, savings which were mobilized for procuring more drugs, which in turn improved availability of drugs (more than 80%) at health facilities. Further, training programmes for prescribers led to a positive change in prescribing behaviour, with more than 80% of prescriptions being from

  18. Use of refractometry and colorimetry as field methods to rapidly assess antimalarial drug quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael D; Nettey, Henry; Villalva Rojas, Ofelia; Pamanivong, Chansapha; Khounsaknalath, Lamphet; Grande Ortiz, Miguel; Newton, Paul N; Fernández, Facundo M; Vongsack, Latsamy; Manolin, Ot

    2007-01-04

    The proliferation of counterfeit and poor-quality drugs is a major public health problem; especially in developing countries lacking adequate resources to effectively monitor their prevalence. Simple and affordable field methods provide a practical means of rapidly monitoring drug quality in circumstances where more advanced techniques are not available. Therefore, we have evaluated refractometry, colorimetry and a technique combining both processes as simple and accurate field assays to rapidly test the quality of the commonly available antimalarial drugs; artesunate, chloroquine, quinine, and sulfadoxine. Method bias, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy relative to high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of drugs collected in the Lao PDR were assessed for each technique. The HPLC method for each drug was evaluated in terms of assay variability and accuracy. The accuracy of the combined method ranged from 0.96 to 1.00 for artesunate tablets, chloroquine injectables, quinine capsules, and sulfadoxine tablets while the accuracy was 0.78 for enterically coated chloroquine tablets. These techniques provide a generally accurate, yet simple and affordable means to assess drug quality in resource-poor settings.

  19. Strengthening of national capacity in implementation of antimalarial drug quality assurance in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykadga, Saowanit; Cholpol, Sawat; Sitthimongkol, Saipin; Pawaphutanan, Anusorn; Pinyoratanachot, Arunya; Rojanawatsirivet, Chaiporn; Kovithvattanapong, Rojana; Thimasarn, Krongthong

    2006-01-01

    Substandard and counterfeit pharmaceutical products, including antimalarial drugs, appear to be widespread internationally and affect both the developing and developed countries. The aim of the study was to investigate the quality of antimalarial drugs, ie, artesunate (ART), chloroquine (CHL), mefloquine (MEF), quinine (QUI), sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (S/P) and tetracycline (TT) obtained from the government sector and private pharmacies in 4 Thai provinces: Mae Hong Son, Kanchanaburi, Ranong, and Chanthaburi. Three hundred sixty-nine samples of 6 antimalarial drugs from 27 government hospitals, 27 malaria clinics, and 53 drugstores, were collected. Drug quality was assessed by simple disintegration test and semi-quantitative thin-layer chromatography in each province; 10% passed, 100% failed and doubtful samples were sent to be verified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at the Thai National Drug Analysis Laboratory, (NL). Fifteen point four percent of ART, 11.1% of CHL and 29.4% of QUI were substandard. Based on the finding, drug regulatory authorities in the country took appropriate action against violators to ensure that antimalarial drugs consumed by malaria patients are of good quality.

  20. Quality assurance of malaria case management in an urban and in sub-rural health centres in Goma, Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosper M. Lutala

    2011-10-01

    Objectives: Our aim was to assess the quality of malaria case management in two primary health care centres in the Goma health district. Specific objectives were the assessment of quality accuracy in the dosage, the duration of treatment, the intervals between administrations, and the routes of administration of anti-malarial medication in two health centres, as well as the subsequent comparison of those two sites. Method: A descriptive retrospective study was conducted using the malaria register’s review to assess two health centres in the Goma health district. Socio-demographical and clinical data were recorded and the quality was assessed against the national guidelines. Descriptive statistics with percentages and Chi-square values were computed. Results: Under-dosage was more common in CCLK (Centre Chrétien du Lac Kivu [Lake Kivu Christian Centre] with 55 patients (62.5%; 95% CI, 52% – 71.8% patients, whilst the over-dosage was present in 64 patients (80%; 95% CI, 69.9% – 87.2% in CASOP (Caisse de Solidarité Ouvrière et Paysanne [Fund of Solidarity Workers and Peasants]. The duration of treatment was shorter in CCLK in 15 patients (93.7%; 95% CI, 71.6% – 98.8%; CASOP had a high rate of inappropriate intervals between the administration of drugs in 14 patients (82.3%; 95% CI, 58.9% – 93.8%. Intravenous administration rates were high in both sites with respectively 102 patients in CASOP (62.5%; 95% CI, 54.9% – 69.6% and 61 patients in CCLK (37.4%; 95% CI, 30.3% – 45.0%. Significant differences were found between the two sites with regard to intervals of administration (χ2 = 7.11, p = 0.007, duration of treatment (χ2 = 8.51, p = 0.003, dosage (χ2 = 3.91, p = 0.05. The routes of administration were used in a similar manner, however, in the two sites (χ2 = 0.78, p = 0.37. Conclusion: Abnormalities in dosage, in the duration of treatment, in the intervals between administration and in the routes of administration were found in both sites

  1. Quality assurance of malaria case management in an urban and in sub-rural health centres in Goma, Congo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasereka, Claude M.; Kasagila, Eric K.; Inipavudu, John B.; Toranke, Suleiman I.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Every year, up to three million deaths throughout the world occur as a result of malaria, 90% of which occur in Africa. Despite training providers in malaria case management and the availability of appropriate medical suppliers, there are still weaknesses in the management chain of malaria. Objectives Our aim was to assess the quality of malaria case management in two primary health care centres in the Goma health district. Specific objectives were the assessment of quality accuracy in the dosage, the duration of treatment, the intervals between administrations, and the routes of administration of anti-malarial medication in two health centres, as well as the subsequent comparison of those two sites. Method A descriptive retrospective study was conducted using the malaria register's review to assess two health centres in the Goma health district. Socio-demographical and clinical data were recorded and the quality was assessed against the national guidelines. Descriptive statistics with percentages and Chi-square values were computed. Results Under-dosage was more common in CCLK (Centre Chrétien du Lac Kivu [Lake Kivu Christian Centre]) with 55 patients (62.5%; 95% CI, 52% – 71.8%) patients, whilst the over-dosage was present in 64 patients (80%; 95% CI, 69.9% – 87.2%) in CASOP (Caisse de Solidarité Ouvrière et Paysanne [Fund of Solidarity Workers and Peasants]). The duration of treatment was shorter in CCLK in 15 patients (93.7%; 95% CI, 71.6% – 98.8%); CASOP had a high rate of inappropriate intervals between the administration of drugs in 14 patients (82.3%; 95% CI, 58.9% – 93.8%). Intravenous administration rates were high in both sites with respectively 102 patients in CASOP (62.5%; 95% CI, 54.9% – 69.6%) and 61 patients in CCLK (37.4%; 95% CI, 30.3% – 45.0%). Significant differences were found between the two sites with regard to intervals of administration (χ2 = 7.11, p = 0.007), duration of treatment (χ2 = 8.51, p = 0

  2. The method of quality marker research and quality evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine based on drug properties and effect characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiejun; Bai, Gang; Han, Yanqi; Xu, Jun; Gong, Suxiao; Li, Yazhuo; Zhang, Hongbing; Liu, Changxiao

    2018-05-15

    Quality of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plays a critical role in industry of TCM. Rapid development of TCM pharmaceutical areas is, however, greatly limited, since there are many issues not been resolved, concerning the quality study of TCM. Core concept of TCM quality as well as the characteristics of TCM was discussed, in order to guide the quality research and evaluation of TCM, further improve the level of TCM quality control. In this review, on the basis of systematic analysis of fundamental property and features of TCM in clinical application, the approaches and methods of quality marker (Q-marker) study were proposed through combination of transitivity and traceability of essentials of quality, correlation between chemical ingredients and drug property/efficacy, as well as analysis of endemicity of ingredients sharing similar pharmacophylogenetic and biosynthetic approaches. The approaches and methods of Q-marker study were proposed and the novel integrated pattern for quality assessment and control of TCM was established. The core concept of Q-marker has helped to break through the bottleneck of the current fragmented quality research of TCM and improved the scientificity, integrity and systematicness of quality control. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Report of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Quality Assurance of Essential Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drs. R. Pandjaitan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available National Quality Control Laboratory of Drugs and Food (NQCL DF is a central quality control laboratory for pharmaceuticals and food commodities under the supervision of the Director General of Drug and Food Control, Ministry of Health.Based on the Ministry of Health Act.No. 145/Menkes/SK/IV/1978, in 1978, NQCL DF was established. In the same year 27 Provincial Quality Control Laboratory of Drug and Food (PQCL DF, in each province in Indonesia were also established based on the Ministry of Health Act.No. 146/Menkes/ SK/IV/1978. The objective of NQCL DF are: To protect the consumers from adulterated or misbranded pharmaceutical and food commodities.To evaluated and to accrediate the quality control laboratories of pharmaceuticals and food commoditities.To control and give guidance to all quality control laboratories of drug and food.To stimulate the quality of domestic pro­ducts of pharmaceuticals and food com­modities to promote the volume of exports.

  4. Relationship Between Time Consumption and Quality of Responses to Drug-related Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda; Lydersen, Stian; Schjøtt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    in score, –0.05 per hour of work; 95% CI, –0.08 to –0.01; P = 0.005). No such associations were found for the internal experts’ assessment. Implications To our knowledge, this is the first study of the association between time consumption and quality of responses to drug-related queries in DICs......Purpose The aims of this study were to assess the quality of responses produced by drug information centers (DICs) in Scandinavia, and to study the association between time consumption processing queries and the quality of the responses. Methods We posed six identical drug-related queries to seven...... DICs in Scandinavia, and the time consumption required for processing them was estimated. Clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and general practitioners (external experts) reviewed responses individually. We used mixed model linear regression analyses to study the associations between time...

  5. Quality assurance of chemical ingredient classification for the National Drug File - Reference Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling; Yumak, Hasan; Chen, Ling; Ochs, Christopher; Geller, James; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Perl, Yehoshua

    2017-09-01

    The National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT) is a large and complex drug terminology consisting of several classification hierarchies on top of an extensive collection of drug concepts. These hierarchies provide important information about clinical drugs, e.g., their chemical ingredients, mechanisms of action, dosage form and physiological effects. Within NDF-RT such information is represented using tens of thousands of roles connecting drugs to classifications. In previous studies, we have introduced various kinds of Abstraction Networks to summarize the content and structure of terminologies in order to facilitate their visual comprehension, and support quality assurance of terminologies. However, these previous kinds of Abstraction Networks are not appropriate for summarizing the NDF-RT classification hierarchies, due to its unique structure. In this paper, we present the novel Ingredient Abstraction Network (IAbN) to summarize, visualize and support the audit of NDF-RT's Chemical Ingredients hierarchy and its associated drugs. A common theme in our quality assurance framework is to use characterizations of sets of concepts, revealed by the Abstraction Network structure, to capture concepts, the modeling of which is more complex than for other concepts. For the IAbN, we characterize drug ingredient concepts as more complex if they belong to IAbN groups with multiple parent groups. We show that such concepts have a statistically significantly higher rate of errors than a control sample and identify two especially common patterns of errors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. ANTIMICROBIAL, PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL QUALITIES OF MEDICINAL ANTISEPTIC DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliy D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our research results of the study of antimicrobial, physical and chemical qualities of antiseptic medicines of decamethoxin (DCM. Antimicrobial activity of DCM, palisan, decasan, deseptol against srains of S.aureus (n 56, S.epidermidis (n 26, E.coli (n 24, P.mirabilis (n 11, P.vulgaris (n 8 was studied by means of method of serial dilutions. Obtained data of mass spectrometry study of antimicrobial compositions with constant concentrations of DCM have shown that medicinal forms of DCM are complex physical and chemical systems, because of different origin and number of adjuvant ingredients used during their fabrication. Among synthetic quaternary ammonium agents there have been found the substance (commercial name of medicine is decamethoxin to have high antimicrobial activity against strains of grampositive and gram-negative microorganisms, an also C.albicans. There was found that antimicrobial activity of antiseptic palisan had been higher comparably to DCM in equivalent concentration. The composition and concentrations of acting agents and the methodology of preparation of palisan have been substantiated on the basis of microbiological, mass spectrometry characteristics of antiseptics DCM, palisan.

  7. Effect of quality chronic disease management for alcohol and drug dependence on addiction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Theresa W; Saitz, Richard; Cheng, Debbie M; Winter, Michael R; Witas, Julie; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2012-12-01

    We examined the effect of the quality of primary care-based chronic disease management (CDM) for alcohol and/or other drug (AOD) dependence on addiction outcomes. We assessed quality using (1) a visit frequency based measure and (2) a self-reported assessment measuring alignment with the chronic care model. The visit frequency based measure had no significant association with addiction outcomes. The self-reported measure of care-when care was at a CDM clinic-was associated with lower drug addiction severity. The self-reported assessment of care from any healthcare source (CDM clinic or elsewhere) was associated with lower alcohol addiction severity and abstinence. These findings suggest that high quality CDM for AOD dependence may improve addiction outcomes. Quality measures based upon alignment with the chronic care model may better capture features of effective CDM care than a visit frequency measure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study

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    Spurling Geoffrey K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Results Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements, but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few

  9. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Brett D; Mansfield, Peter R; Spurling, Geoffrey K; Ward, Alison M

    2008-05-20

    Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements), but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few advertisements (2.7%) promoted the assessment of cardiovascular risk

  10. A new roadmap for biopharmaceutical drug product development: Integrating development, validation, and quality by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Moe, Sheryl; Lim, Fredric J; Wong, Rita L; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Sundaram, Jagannathan; Sane, Samir U

    2011-08-01

    Quality by design (QbD) is a science- and risk-based approach to drug product development. Although pharmaceutical companies have historically used many of the same principles during development, this knowledge was not always formally captured or proactively submitted to regulators. In recent years, the US Food and Drug Administration has also recognized the need for more controls in the drug manufacturing processes, especially for biological therapeutics, and it has recently launched an initiative for Pharmaceutical Quality for the 21st Century to modernize pharmaceutical manufacturing and improve product quality. In the biopharmaceutical world, the QbD efforts have been mainly focused on active pharmaceutical ingredient processes with little emphasis on drug product development. We present a systematic approach to biopharmaceutical drug product development using a monoclonal antibody as an example. The approach presented herein leverages scientific understanding of products and processes, risk assessments, and rational experimental design to deliver processes that are consistent with QbD philosophy without excessive incremental effort. Data generated using these approaches will not only strengthen data packages to support specifications and manufacturing ranges but hopefully simplify implementation of postapproval changes. We anticipate that this approach will positively impact cost for companies, regulatory agencies, and patients, alike. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. The quality of Dutch hospital drug formularies : Evaluation of technical features and organisational information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; de Vries, CS; Engles, SAG; Brouwers, JRBJ; de Blaey, CJ; de Jong-van den Berg, LTW

    Introduction: Hospital drug formularies (HDFs) are widely used tools to help influence clinicians' prescribing behaviour. Besides the therapeutic quality of HDFs, the available information and the way in which this is presented are key factors in HDFs' success or failure to influence prescribing

  12. Assessment of drug treatment quality in two Danish health-care centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Edfors, Kajsa

    2011-01-01

    Bridging the primary and secondary sector, health-care centres aim to reduce morbidity and prevent further hospitalization in patients with chronic heart diseases. The aim of this study was to describe the quality of drug treatment in patients with chronic heart diseases in two Copenhagen health-care...

  13. Comparison of indicators assessing the quality of drug prescribing for asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veninga, C.C.M.; Denig, P.; Pont, L.G.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.

    Objective. To compare different indicators for assessing the quality of drug prescribing and establish their agreement in identifying doctors who may not adhere to treatment guidelines. Data Sources/Study Setting. Data from 181 general practitioners (GPs) from The Netherlands. The case of asthma is

  14. Concepts of illicit drug quality among darknet market users: Purity, embodied experience, craft and chemical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Angus; Scott Reid, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Users of darknet markets refer to product quality as one of the motivations for buying drugs there, and vendors present quality as a selling point. However, what users understand by quality and how they evaluate it is not clear. This article investigates how users established and compared drug quality. We used a two-stage method for investigating users' assessments. The user forum of a darknet market that we called 'Merkat' was analysed to develop emergent themes. Qualitative interviews with darknet users were conducted, then forum data was analysed again. To enhance the applicability of the findings, the forum was sampled for users who presented as dependent as well as recreational. Quality could mean reliability, purity, potency, and predictability of effect. We focused on the different kinds of knowledge users drew on to assess quality. These were: embodied; craft; and chemical. Users' evaluations of quality depended on their experience, the purpose of use, and its context. Market forums are a case of indigenous harm reduction where users share advise and experiences and can be usefully engaged with on these terms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A review on the status of quality control and standardization of herbal drugs in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Dhiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the herbal medicines in the world originate from the developing countries. There are ample opportunities for these countries to expand their global export. The world market for botanical medicines including drug products and raw materials has been estimated to have an annual growth rate between 5% and 15%. Total global botanical drug market is estimated at US$62 billion and is expected to grow to the tune of US$5 trillion by the year 2050. In the USA alone, the usage of botanicals has been increased by 380% between the years 1990 and 1997. Materials and Methods: Ayurveda, the Indian system of medicine, is one of the ancient, yet living traditions that face a typical Western bias. Widespread and growing use of botanicals has created public health challenges globally in terms of quality, safety, and efficacy. Results and Discussion: The development of parameters for standardization and quality control of botanicals is a challenging task. Various regulatory authorities, research organizations, and botanical drug manufacturers have contributed in developing guiding principles and addressing issues related to the quality, safety, and efficacy. Conclusions: The present review describes the regulatory aspects of herbal drugs in India and various other countries.

  16. Assessing the quality of pharmacist answers to telephone drug information questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, C T; Stevenson, J G; Poremba, A

    1990-04-01

    A quality assurance (QA) program is described in which frontline pharmacists were asked test drug information questions via anonymous telephone calls. The program was instituted at a university hospital that began providing decentralized pharmaceutical services in 1985. Questions were developed on the basis of a pilot study conducted to determine the types and complexity of drug information questions received by frontline pharmacists at the hospital. Data on departmental clinical productivity were used to determine the number of questions that would be posed during each shift in the various service areas. The questions were posed during a 10-day period; the pharmacists were aware of the program, but the callers did not identify their affiliation with it. In response to 105 questions asked, 86 were judged to have been answered correctly, 13 answers were deemed incomplete, and 6 were judged incorrect. Pharmacists were more likely to respond incorrectly to complex questions and questions posed during the night shift. As a result of the audit, staff members with advanced clinical knowledge were asked to help less experienced pharmacists, the position of assistant director for drug information and staff development was created, and educational programs were instituted. The QA audit has been repeated twice. Posing test drug information questions via anonymous telephone calls is effective in assessing the quality of drug information provided by pharmacists in patient-care areas.

  17. Phylogenetic profiles of all membrane transport proteins of the malaria parasite highlight new drug targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    January Weiner 3rd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to combat the on-going malaria epidemic, discovery of new drug targets remains vital. Proteins that are essential to survival and specific to malaria parasites are key candidates. To survive within host cells, the parasites need to acquire nutrients and dispose of waste products across multiple membranes. Additionally, like all eukaryotes, they must redistribute ions and organic molecules between their various internal membrane bound compartments. Membrane transport proteins mediate all of these processes and are considered important mediators of drug resistance as well as drug targets in their own right. Recently, using advanced experimental genetic approaches and streamlined life cycle profiling, we generated a large collection of Plasmodium berghei gene deletion mutants and assigned essential gene functions, highlighting potential targets for prophylactic, therapeutic, and transmission-blocking anti-malarial drugs. Here, we present a comprehensive orthology assignment of all Plasmodium falciparum putative membrane transport proteins and provide a detailed overview of the associated essential gene functions obtained through experimental genetics studies in human and murine model parasites. Furthermore, we discuss the phylogeny of selected potential drug targets identified in our functional screen. We extensively discuss the results in the context of the functional assignments obtained using gene targeting available to date.

  18. Comparison quality of life patients treated with insulin and oral hypoglycemic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, A. W.; Nasution, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of chronic metabolic diseases with characteristic hyperglycemia that occurs due to abnormalities in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. Improved quality of life is one of the goals of DM management. This study aims to compare thequality of life in40 patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin therapy and 40 patients using oral hypoglycemic drugs in H. Adam Malik Hospital year 2015. This study is an observational study with cross-sectionalstudy designand consecutive sampling method. Evaluation of the patient’s quality of life taken through interviews and questionnaires using the Short Form-36 questionnaire consistingof8 domains of quality of life. Statistical analysis using unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results of the quality of life-based on patient characteristics showed significant differences in education factor (p=0.005) and employment factor (p=0.001). Quality of life-based on therapy showed significant differences in domain role of physical (p=0.005) and domain role of emotional (p=0.038).The quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin better than using hypoglycemic drug significantly in domain role of physical and domain role of emotions.

  19. Implications of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act on the quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals used in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, R.; Sheinin, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    The drug sections of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (Title 21 U.S.C.) are intended to assure the consumer that drugs are safe and effective for their intended use. The Act requires that new drugs be approved by the FDA before they go on the market. The regulations for the new drug review process, are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 21, sections 312 for Investigational New Drugs (INDs), 314 for New Drug Applications (NDAs). Section 361 deals with radioactive drugs for certain research (RDR) uses. The regulations require that sufficient information be provided on the acceptable limits and the analytical methods used for the assurance of the identity, strength, quality, purity and the stability of the new drug as well as the raw materials used in the preparation of the new drug. The impact of the Act on the control of radiopharmaceutical products will be discussed

  20. [Drug users' quality of life, self-esteem and self-image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Camila da; Meyer, Carolina; Souza, Gabriel Renaldo de; Ramos, Manoella de Oliveira; Souza, Melissa de Carvalho; Monte, Fernanda Guidarini; Guimarães, Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo; Parcias, Sílvia Rosane

    2013-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the quality of life, self-esteem and self-image among drug users of São José Institute in São José in the State of Santa Catarina. The accessibility sample was comprised of 100 male patients with a mean age of 43.0 ± 10.7, who had studied for a mean period of 8.4 ± 3.7 years. 48% of them were married and had been hospitalized or treated for a minimum period of seven days. When the participants were not hospitalized they lived with wives and children (23%), were married (48%), employed (72%), were part of income level B (58%), had done something they regret in their lives (57%) and perceived their health as good (57%). Regarding quality of life, the highest scores were found in the environmental domain (65%) and the lowest scores were in the psychological domain (58%). All patients were taking medication and had low self-esteem and self-image (77% and 96% respectively). The absence of interference of the quality of life on self-esteem and self-image of the drug users was observed by means of logistic regression. Positive quality of life did not interfere in changes in low self-esteem and self-image of drug users.

  1. Benefits of Exercise for the Quality of Life of Drug-Dependent Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Meseguer, Jorge; Tortosa-Martínez, Juan; de los Remedios Fernández-Valenciano, María

    2015-01-01

    This study combined quantitative and qualitative research methods to evaluate quality-of-life changes in drug-dependent patients after participation in a group-based exercise program. Quality of life (SF-36) and physical fitness (six-minute Walk Test, Timed Get Up and Go Test, and Chair Stand Test) were quantitatively determined in a group (n=37) of drug-dependent patients before and after a 12-week group exercise program (n=18) or routine care (n=19). Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted at the end of the program with a subsample of 11 participants from the exercise group. Quantitative results showed improvements in fitness and different aspects of quality of life, such as physical function, mental health, vitality, social function, and general health perception. Qualitative results showed specific physical benefits (decreased injuries and muscle pain, decreased weight, and increased vitality with improvement in activities of daily living), psychological benefits (forgetting about everyday problems, improved mood, decreased stress and anxiety), social benefits, and a reduction in craving. The results of this study provide insight into the importance of exercise for the quality of life and recovery process of drug-dependent patients.

  2. Selection of drug resistant mutants from random library of Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase in Plasmodium berghei model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuthavong Yongyuth

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of drug resistance amongst the human malaria Plasmodium species has most commonly been associated with genomic mutation within the parasites. This phenomenon necessitates evolutionary predictive studies of possible resistance mutations, which may occur when a new drug is introduced. Therefore, identification of possible new Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase (PfDHFR mutants that confer resistance to antifolate drugs is essential in the process of antifolate anti-malarial drug development. Methods A system to identify mutations in Pfdhfr gene that confer antifolate drug resistance using an animal Plasmodium parasite model was developed. By using error-prone PCR and Plasmodium transfection technologies, libraries of Pfdhfr mutant were generated and then episomally transfected to Plasmodium berghei parasites, from which pyrimethamine-resistant PfDHFR mutants were selected. Results The principal mutation found from this experiment was S108N, coincident with the first pyrimethamine-resistance mutation isolated from the field. A transgenic P. berghei, in which endogenous Pbdhfr allele was replaced with the mutant PfdhfrS108N, was generated and confirmed to have normal growth rate comparing to parental non-transgenic parasite and also confer resistance to pyrimethamine. Conclusion This study demonstrated the power of the transgenic P. berghei system to predict drug-resistant Pfdhfr mutations in an in vivo parasite/host setting. The system could be utilized for identification of possible novel drug-resistant mutants that could arise against new antifolate compounds and for prediction the evolution of resistance mutations.

  3. Differences in quality of life of women and men with drug-resistant epilepsy in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Aleksandra; Szantroch, Marta; Gleinert, Alicja; Rysz, Andrzej; Marchel, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the differences in health-related quality of life in groups of men and women suffering with drug-resistant epilepsy and to determine which factors influence quality of life. The examined group consisted of 64 subjects with drug-resistant epilepsy - 31 men and 33 women. The mean duration of epilepsy was 17.56±8.92 and 19±9.56years, respectively. The following diagnostic tools were used: QOLIE-31-P, Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale - Revised (WAIS-R (PL)), and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD). Scores in QOLIE-31-P did not differ significantly between groups of men and women with drug-resistant epilepsy; however, a more detailed analysis revealed certain disparities. Multiple regression analyses indicated that some distinct factors were associated with quality of life in each sex. In the group of women, there were no significant predictors of their quality of life. Among the group of men, depression intensity was the only statistically significant QoL predictor, explaining 16% of the variance (adjusted R(2)=0.16, F(6, 24)=19.7, pEmotional Well-Being and Energy/Fatigue subscales, regardless of the sex. The study revealed that, despite similar scores in QOLIE-31-P, specific factors may differentially affect the quality of life of men and women with drug-resistant epilepsy in Poland. Nevertheless, replication of these results with a larger number of participants is needed for a more definitive conclusion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The application of the drug user quality of life scale (DUQOL in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaran Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of quality of life relates to the perceptions of individuals about their mental and physical health as well as non-health related areas. The evaluation of quality of life in the context of substance abuse has been conducted using generic instruments. The Drug Users Quality of Life Scale (DUQOL is a specific assessment tool in which the most pertinent and salient areas to drug abusers are taken into consideration. In this study, the authors report the results of a validation study in which the DUQOL was used for the first time in Australia. Methods A sample of 120 participants from inpatient and outpatient treatment facilities completed a series of questionnaires, including the DUQOL and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF. Parameters investigated in this study included the demographic characteristics of the sample, internal structure, and convergent validity. Correlations between the DUQOL scale scores and the scores of the WHOQOL-Bref test were investigated via Pearson product-moment correlation analyses. Results The English version of the DUQOL attained a significant overall Cronbach's alpha of 0.868. The factorial analysis of the DUQOL identified one principal factor that accounted for 28.499% of the variance. Convergent validity analyses demonstrate significant correlations (p Conclusions This study demonstrates that the DUQOL constitutes a reliable research instrument for evaluating quality of life of substance users in Australia.

  5. Batch-to-Batch Quality Consistency Evaluation of Botanical Drug Products Using Multivariate Statistical Analysis of the Chromatographic Fingerprint

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Haoshu; Yu, Lawrence X.; Qu, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    Botanical drug products have batch-to-batch quality variability due to botanical raw materials and the current manufacturing process. The rational evaluation and control of product quality consistency are essential to ensure the efficacy and safety. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an important and widely used tool to characterize the chemical composition of botanical drug products. Multivariate statistical analysis has showed its efficacy and applicability in the quality evaluation of many ...

  6. Analyses of marketplace tacrolimus drug product quality: bioactivity, NMR and LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Cynthia D; Pang, Eric S; Ghasriani, Houman; Berendt, Robert T; Vilker, Vincent L; Keire, David A; Boyne, Michael T

    2013-11-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506) is a potent, narrow therapeutic index, immunosuppressive drug used to avoid organ rejection in patients that have undergone organ transplantation. Recent clinical reports suggested a significant reduction in the tacrolimus concentration/dose ratio in the plasma of liver and kidney recipients when the reference listed drug was substituted with a generic drug. In response to these concerns about switching between tacrolimus from different approved manufacturers during treatment, the FDA initiated purity, potency and quality studies of the innovator and generic tacrolimus products available in the US marketplace. A combination of analytical methods, including mass spectrometry (LC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and bioactivity assay were developed and validated to assess the quality of tacrolimus. These tests measured the identity, impurities and activity of tacrolimus from active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) sources and with formulated drug product from five different approved manufactures. In addition, some testing was performed on tacrolimus capsules obtained from a non US approved Indian source. The data obtained showed no discernible difference in the impurity profiles and potency between the generic and innovator tacrolimus products. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Combined Transcriptomics and Metabolomics in a Rhesus Macaque Drug Administration Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multi-omic approach to understanding the effects that the anti-malarial drug pyrimethamine has on immune physiology in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Whole blood and bone marrow RNA-Seq and plasma metabolome profiles (each with over 15,000 features have been generated for five naïve individuals at up to seven time-points before, during and after three rounds of drug administration. Linear modelling and Bayesian network analyses are both considered, alongside investigations of the impact of statistical modeling strategies on biological inference. Individual macaques were found to be a major source of variance for both omic data types, and factoring individuals into subsequent modelling increases power to detect temporal effects. A major component of the whole blood transcriptome follows the bone marrow with a time-delay, while other components of variation are unique to each compartment. We demonstrate that pyrimethamine administration does impact both compartments throughout the experiment, but very limited perturbation of transcript or metabolite abundance following each round of drug exposure is observed. New insights into the mode of action of the drug are presented in the context of pyrimethamine’s predicted effect on suppression of cell division and metabolism in the immune system.

  8. Equilibrium solubility measurement of ionizable drugs – consensus recommendations for improving data quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avdeef

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This commentary addresses data quality in equilibrium solubility measurement in aqueous solution. Broadly discussed is the “gold standard” shake-flask (SF method used to measure equilibrium solubility of ionizable drug-like molecules as a function of pH. Many factors affecting the quality of the measurement are recognized. Case studies illustrating the analysis of both solution and solid state aspects of solubility measurement are presented. Coverage includes drug aggregation in solution (sub-micellar, micellar, complexation, use of mass spectrometry to assess aggregation in saturated solutions, solid state characterization (salts, polymorphs, cocrystals, polymorph creation by potentiometric method, solubility type (water, buffer, intrinsic, temperature, ionic strength, pH measurement, buffer issues, critical knowledge of the pKa, equilibration time (stirring and sedimentation, separating solid from saturated solution, solution handling and adsorption to untreated surfaces, solubility units, and tabulation/graphic presentation of reported data. The goal is to present cohesive recommendations that could lead to better assay design, to result in improved quality of measurements, and to impart a deeper understanding of the underlying solution chemistry in suspensions of drug solids.

  9. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Jezmir

    Full Text Available To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS methodology.The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance.This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains.Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints.

  10. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezmir, Julia; Cohen, Ted; Zignol, Matteo; Nyakan, Edwin; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Gardner, Adrian; Kamle, Lydia; Injera, Wilfred; Carter, E Jane

    2016-01-01

    To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance. This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains. Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints.

  11. Assessment of the effects of antihistamine drugs on mood, sleep quality, sleepiness, and dream anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Pinar Guzel; Karadag, Ayşe Serap; Selvi, Yavuz; Boysan, Murat; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Aydin, Adem; Onder, Sevda

    2014-08-01

    There are limited comparative studies on classic and new-generation antihistamines that affect sleep quality and mood. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the effects of classic and new-generation antihistamines on sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, dream anxiety, and mood. Ninety-two patients with chronic pruritus completed study in the dermatology outpatient clinic. Treatments with regular recommended therapeutic doses were administered. The effects of antihistaminic drugs on mood, daytime sleepiness, dream anxiety, and sleep quality were assessed on the first day and 1 month after. Outpatients who received cetirizine and hydroxyzine treatments reported higher scores on the depression, anxiety, and fatigue sub-scales than those who received desloratadine, levocetirizine, and rupatadine. Pheniramine and rupatadine were found to be associated with daytime sleepiness and better sleep quality. UKU side effects scale scores were significantly elevated among outpatients receiving pheniramine. Classic antihistamines increased daytime sleepiness and decreased the sleep quality scores. New-generation antihistamines reduced sleep latency and dream anxiety, and increased daytime sleepiness and sleep quality. Both antihistamines, significantly increased daytime sleepiness and nocturnal sleep quality. Daytime sleepiness was significantly predicted by rupadatine and pheniramine treatment. Cetirizine and hydroxyzine, seem to have negative influences on mood states. Given the extensive use of antihistamines in clinical settings, these results should be more elaborately examined in further studies.

  12. Nurses' perception of the quality of care they provide to hospitalized drug addicts: testing the theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natan, Merav Ben; Beyil, Valery; Neta, Okev

    2009-12-01

    A correlational design was used to examine nursing staff attitudes and subjective norms manifested in intended and actual care of drug users based on the Theory of Reasoned Action. One hundred and thirty-five nursing staff from three central Israeli hospitals completed a questionnaire examining theory-based variables as well as sociodemographic and professional characteristics. Most respondents reported a high to very high level of actual or intended care of drug users. Nurses' stronger intentions to provide quality care to drug users were associated with more positive attitudes. Nursing staff members had moderately negative attitudes towards drug users. Nurses were found to hold negative stereotypes of drug addict patients and most considered the management of this group difficult. Positive attitudes towards drug users, perceived expectations of others and perceived correctness of the behaviour are important in their effect on the intention of nurses to provide high-quality care to hospitalized patients addicted to drugs.

  13. Cytotoxic Drugs Departments as a precondition for high-quality product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Głuszek

    2014-06-01

    a pharmacy becomes the producer and distributor of oncologic drugs. This is related with high requirements concerning the production of drugs (high quality, safety of the engaged staff, as well as participation in a rational management of medicines. According to the FIP, a pharmacy is a public health care facility where work is performed by authorised persons: Masters of Pharmacy and pharmacy technicians. At present the task of a clinical pharmacist also includes the supervision of activities in the area of clinical pharmacy. This is a new task for pharmacists, who are obliged to constantly expand their knowledge and actively participate in the activities of the medical team.

  14. Injection Drug Use Quality of Life scale (IDUQOL: A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palepu Anita

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing measures of injection drug users' quality of life have focused primarily on health and health-related factors. Clearly, however, quality of life among injection drug users is impacted by a range of unique cultural, socioeconomic, medical, and geographic factors that must also be considered in any measure. The Injection Drug User Quality of Life (IDUQOL scale was designed to capture the unique and individual circumstances that determine quality of life among injection drug users. The overall purpose of the present study was to examine the validity of inferences made from the IDUQOL by examining the (a dimensionality, (b reliability of scores, (c criterion-related validity evidence, and (d both convergent and discriminant validity evidence. Methods An exploratory factor analysis using principal axis factoring in SPSS 12.0 was conducted to determine whether the use of a total score on the IDUQOL was advisable. Reliability of scores from the IDUQOL was obtained using internal consistency and one-week test-retest reliability estimates. Criterion-related validity evidence was gathered using variables such as stability of housing, sex trade involvement, high-risk injection behaviours, involvement in treatment programs, emergency treatment or overdose over the previous six months, hospitalization and emergency treatment over the subsequent six month period post data collection. Convergent and discriminant validity evidence was gathered using measures of life satisfaction, self-esteem, and social desirability. Results The sample consisted of 241 injection drug users ranging in age from 19 to 61 years. Factor analysis supports the use of a total score. Both internal consistency (alpha = .88 and one-week test-retest reliability (r = .78 for IDUQOL total scores were good. Criterion-related, convergent, and discriminant validity evidence supports the interpretation of IDUQOL total scores as measuring a construct consistent with

  15. National indicators for quality of drug therapy in older persons: the Swedish experience from the first 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fastbom, Johan; Johnell, Kristina

    2015-03-01

    Inappropriate drug use is an important health problem in elderly persons. Beginning with the Beers' criteria in the early 1990s, explicit criteria have been extensively used to measure and improve quality of drug use in older people. This article describes the Swedish indicators for quality of drug therapy in the elderly, introduced in 2004 and updated in 2010. These indicators were designed to be applied to people aged 75 years and over, regardless of residence and other characteristics. The indicators are divided into drug specific, covering choice, indication and dosage of drugs, polypharmacy, drug-drug interactions (DDIs), drug use in decreased renal function and in some symptoms; and diagnosis specific, covering the rational, irrational and hazardous drug use in common disorders in elderly people. During the 10 years since introduction, the Swedish indicators have several applications. They form the basis for recommendations for drug therapy in older people, are implemented in prescribing supports and drug utilisation reviews, are used in national benchmarking of the quality of Swedish healthcare and have contributed to initiatives from pensioner organisations. The indicators have also been used in several pharmacoepidemiological studies. Since 2005, there have been signs of improvement of the quality of drug prescribing to elderly persons in Sweden. For example, the prescribing of drugs that should be avoided in older persons decreased by 36 % between 2006 and 2012 in persons aged 80 years and older. Similarly, drug combinations that may cause DDIs decreased by 26 % and antipsychotics by 41 %. The indicators have likely contributed to this.

  16. Monitoring quality and coverage of harm reduction services for people who use drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiessing, Lucas; Ferri, Marica; Běláčková, Vendula

    2017-01-01

    indicators and to present a framework for extending them with additional indicators of coverage and quality of harm reduction services, for monitoring and evaluation at international, national or subnational levels. The ultimate aim is to improve these services in order to reduce health and social problems......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Despite advances in our knowledge of effective services for people who use drugs over the last decades globally, coverage remains poor in most countries, while quality is often unknown. This paper aims to discuss the historical development of successful epidemiological...... before their scaling up and routine implementation, to evaluate their effectiveness in comparing service coverage and quality across countries. CONCLUSIONS: The establishment of an improved set of validated and internationally agreed upon best practice indicators for monitoring harm reduction service...

  17. Prescribing quality for older people in Norwegian nursing homes and home nursing services using multidose dispensed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, Kjell H; Granas, Anne Gerd; Engeland, Anders; Ruths, Sabine

    2012-09-01

    To examine and compare the quality of drug prescribing for older patients in nursing homes and home nursing services. Cross-sectional study comprising 11,254 patients aged ≥ 65 years in nursing homes (n = 2986) and home nursing services (n = 8268). Potentially inappropriate medications were identified by using the Norwegian General Practice criteria and drug-drug interactions through a Norwegian Web-based tool. The impact of care setting on exposure to selected drug groups, potentially inappropriate medications, and drug interactions was calculated, adjusting for patients' age, gender, and number of drugs used. Patients in nursing homes and home nursing services used on average 5.7 (SD = 2.6) multidose dispensed regular drugs. Twenty-six percent used at least one potentially inappropriate medication, 31% in nursing homes and 25% in home nursing services, p nursing homes (18%) and home nursing services (9%), p nursing homes, more patients in home nursing services used cardiovascular drugs and fewer patients used psychotropic drugs. Altogether, 8615 drug-drug interactions were identified in 55% of patients, 48% in nursing homes and 57% in home nursing services, p quality of drug prescribing in nursing homes compared with home nursing services. Explanations as to why these differences exist need to be further explored. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Quality of Online Pharmacies and Websites Selling Prescription Drugs: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merla, Anna; Schulz, Peter J; Gelatti, Umberto

    2011-01-01

    Background Online pharmacies are companies that sell pharmaceutical preparations, including prescription-only drugs, on the Internet. Very little is known about this phenomenon because many online pharmacies operate from remote countries, where legal bases and business practices are largely inaccessible to international research. Objective The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the scientific literature focusing on the broader picture of online pharmacies by scanning several scientific and institutional databases, with no publication time limits. Methods We searched 4 electronic databases up to January 2011 and the gray literature on the Internet using the Google search engine and its tool Google Scholar. We also investigated the official websites of institutional agencies (World Health Organization, and US and European centers for disease control and drug regulation authorities). We focused specifically on online pharmacies offering prescription-only drugs. We decided to analyze and report only articles with original data, in order to review all the available data regarding online pharmacies and their usage. Results We selected 193 relevant articles: 76 articles with original data, and 117 articles without original data (editorials, regulation articles, or the like) including 5 reviews. The articles with original data cover samples of online pharmacies in 47 cases, online drug purchases in 13, consumer characteristics in 15, and case reports on adverse effects of online drugs in 12. The studies show that random samples with no specific limits to prescription requirements found that at least some websites sold drugs without a prescription and that an online questionnaire was a frequent tool to replace prescription. Data about geographical characteristics show that this information can be concealed in many websites. The analysis of drug offer showed that online a consumer can get virtually everything. Regarding quality of drugs

  19. Quality of online pharmacies and websites selling prescription drugs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orizio, Grazia; Merla, Anna; Schulz, Peter J; Gelatti, Umberto

    2011-09-30

    Online pharmacies are companies that sell pharmaceutical preparations, including prescription-only drugs, on the Internet. Very little is known about this phenomenon because many online pharmacies operate from remote countries, where legal bases and business practices are largely inaccessible to international research. The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the scientific literature focusing on the broader picture of online pharmacies by scanning several scientific and institutional databases, with no publication time limits. We searched 4 electronic databases up to January 2011 and the gray literature on the Internet using the Google search engine and its tool Google Scholar. We also investigated the official websites of institutional agencies (World Health Organization, and US and European centers for disease control and drug regulation authorities). We focused specifically on online pharmacies offering prescription-only drugs. We decided to analyze and report only articles with original data, in order to review all the available data regarding online pharmacies and their usage. We selected 193 relevant articles: 76 articles with original data, and 117 articles without original data (editorials, regulation articles, or the like) including 5 reviews. The articles with original data cover samples of online pharmacies in 47 cases, online drug purchases in 13, consumer characteristics in 15, and case reports on adverse effects of online drugs in 12. The studies show that random samples with no specific limits to prescription requirements found that at least some websites sold drugs without a prescription and that an online questionnaire was a frequent tool to replace prescription. Data about geographical characteristics show that this information can be concealed in many websites. The analysis of drug offer showed that online a consumer can get virtually everything. Regarding quality of drugs, researchers very often found

  20. Quality assurance of rifampicin-containing fixed-drug combinations in South Africa: dosing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, R; Chirehwa, M T; Wiesner, L; Wright, B; Smythe, W; Kramer, N; McIlleron, H

    2018-05-01

    Rifampicin (RMP) drives treatment response in drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Low RMP concentrations increase the risk of poor outcomes, and drug quality needs to be excluded as a contributor to low RMP exposure. We performed an open-label, three-way cross-over study of three licensed RMP-containing formulations widely used in South Africa to evaluate the bioavailability of RMP in a two-drug fixed-dose combination tablet (2FDC) and a four-drug FDC (4FDC) against a single-drug reference. RMP dosed at 600 mg was administered 2 weeks apart in random sequence. Plasma RMP concentrations were measured pre-dose and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 h post-dose. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-12) of the FDCs was compared to the single drug reference. Simulations were used to predict the impact of our findings. Twenty healthy volunteers (median age 22.8 years, body mass index 24.2 kg/m2) completed the study. The AUC0-12 of the 4FDC/reference (geometric mean ratio [GMR] 78%, 90%CI 69-89) indicated an average 20% reduction in RMP bioavailability in the 4FDC. The 2FDC/reference (GMR 104%, 90%CI 97-111) was bioequivalent. Simulations suggested dose adjustments to compensate for the poor bioavailability of RMP with the 4FDC, and revised weight-band doses to prevent systematic underdosing of low-weight patients. Post-marketing surveillance of in vivo bioavailability of RMP and improved weight band-based dosing are recommended.

  1. Pharmaceutical quality of "party pills" raises additional safety concerns in the use of illicit recreational drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Simon A; Thrimawithana, Thilini R; Antia, Ushtana; Fredatovich, John D; Na, Yonky; Neale, Peter T; Roberts, Amy F; Zhou, Huanyi; Russell, Bruce

    2013-06-14

    To determine the content and release kinetics of 1-benzylpiperazine (BZP) and 1-(3-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)piperazine (TFMPP) from "party pill" formulations. From these data, the possible impact of pharmaceutical quality upon the safety of such illicit formulations may be inferred. The amount of BZP and TFMPP in party pill formulations was determined using a validated HPLC method. The in-vitro release kinetics of selected party pill brands were determined using a USP dissolution apparatus (75 rpm, 37.5 degrees Celsius). The release data were then fitted to a first order release model using PLOT software and the time taken to achieve 90% release reported. Many of the tested party pill brands contained amounts of BZP and TFMPP that varied considerably from that stated on the packaging; including considerable TFMPP content in some brands not labelled to contain this drug. Dissolution studies revealed that there was considerable variability in the release kinetics between brands; in one case 90% release required >30 minutes. Lack of quality control in party pill manufacture may have led to the toxic effects reported by users unaware of the true content and release of drug from pills. More stringent regulation in the manufacture and quality control of "new generation party pills" is essential to the harm reduction campaign.

  2. The lay user perspective on the quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services--results of focus group discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Marie; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland.......This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland....

  3. Injection Drug User Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL: Findings from a content validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palepu Anita

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life studies among injection drug users have primarily focused on health-related measures. The chaotic life-style of many injection drug users (IDUs, however, extends far beyond their health, and impacts upon social relationships, employment opportunities, housing, and day to day survival. Most current quality of life instruments do not capture the realities of people living with addictions. The Injection Drug Users' Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL was developed to reflect the life areas of relevance to IDUs. The present study examined the content validity of the IDUQOL using judgmental methods based on subject matter experts' (SMEs ratings of various elements of this measure (e.g., appropriateness of life areas or items, names and descriptions of life areas, instructions for administration and scoring. Methods Six SMEs were provided with a copy of the IDUQOL and its administration and scoring manual and a detailed content validation questionnaire. Two commonly used judgmental measures of inter-rater agreement, the Content Validity Index (CVI and the Average Deviation Mean Index (ADM, were used to evaluate SMEs' agreement on ratings of IDUQOL elements. Results A total of 75 elements of the IDUQOL were examined. The CVI results showed that all elements were endorsed by the required number of SMEs or more. The ADM results showed that acceptable agreement (i.e., practical significance was obtained for all elements but statistically significant agreement was missed for nine elements. For these elements, SMEs' feedback was examined for ways to improve the elements. Open-ended feedback also provided suggestions for other revisions to the IDUQOL. Conclusion The results of the study provided strong evidence in support of the content validity of the IDUQOL and direction for the revision of some IDUQOL elements.

  4. Quality of the cardiovascular drugs prescribing in Zagreb during the period 2001- 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Stojanović

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To investigate the outpatient utilisation of cardiovasculardrugs in Zagreb, during the 2001-2004 period, and to identify thepossible association between the increase in the utilisation of particulardrug groups and decrease in the number of hospital admissions.Methods The number of DDD per thousand inhabitants per day(DDDs/TID was calculated from data on the number and size ofdispensed drug packages, obtained from the Zagreb Pharmacies.Drug Utilisation 90% (DU90% method was used on assessmentof drug prescribing quality.Results Total utilisation of the cardiovascular drugs was high inZagreb during the 2001-2004 period (between 402.9 DDDs/TIDand 406.9 DDDs/TID. Agents acting on the renin-angiotensinsystem (C09 (121.3 DDDs/TID and calcium channel blockers(C08 (87.5 DDDs/TID accounted for more than 50% of drugsused for the treatment of hypertension in 2004. The greatest utilisationincrease was observed for statins (78.3%. Comparison ofDU90% segment between 2001 and 2004 revealed pentoxifyllineand amiodarone to be absent, whereas cilazapril and ramipril intheir combination with HCTZ, bisoprolol, valsartan and losartanalone or in their combination with HCTZ were added in 2004,DU90% segment still contain doxazosin and propafenone, whichhad no grounds in therapeutic guidelines.Conclusion The outpatient utilisation of cardiovascular drugs washigh during the 2001-2004 period. The utilization pattern was improved.The result was a decrease in the number of hospital admissionsfor main cardiovascular events.

  5. Quality of antiepileptic drugs in sub-Saharan Africa: A study in Gabon, Kenya, and Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Jeremy; Ratsimbazafy, Voa; Nguyen, Thu Trang; Nguyen, Thuy Linh; Dufat, Hanh; Dugay, Annabelle; Ba, Alassane; Sivadier, Guilhem; Mafilaza, Yattussia; Jousse, Cyril; Traïkia, Mounir; Leremboure, Martin; Auditeau, Emilie; Raharivelo, Adeline; Ngoungou, Edgard; Kariuki, Symon M; Newton, Charles R; Preux, Pierre-Marie

    2018-06-12

    Epilepsy is a major public health issue in low- and middle-income countries, where the availability and accessibility of quality treatment remain important issues, the severity of which may be aggravated by poor quality antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). The primary objective of this study was to measure the quality of AEDs in rural and urban areas in 3 African countries. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Gabon, Kenya, and Madagascar. Both official and unofficial supply chains in urban and rural areas were investigated. Samples of oral AEDs were collected in areas where a patient could buy or obtain them. Pharmacological analytical procedures and Medicine Quality Assessment Reporting Guidelines were used to assess quality. In total, 102 batches, representing 3782 units of AEDs, were sampled. Overall, 32.3% of the tablets were of poor quality, but no significant difference was observed across sites: 26.5% in Gabon, 37.0% in Kenya, and 34.1% in Madagascar (P = .7). The highest proportions of substandard medications were found in the carbamazepine (38.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 21.8-57.8) and phenytoin (83.3%; 95% CI 35.8-99.5) batches, which were mainly flawed by their failure to dissolve. Sodium valproate was the AED with the poorest quality (32.1%; 95% CI 15.8-42.3). The phenobarbital (94.1%; 95% CI 80.3-99.2) and diazepam (100.0%) batches were of better quality. The prevalence of substandard quality medications increased in samples supplied by public facilities (odds ratio [OR] 9.9; 95% CI 1.2-84.1; P < .04) and manufacturers located in China (OR 119.8; 95% CI 8.7-1651.9; P < .001). The prevalence of AEDs of bad quality increased when they were stored improperly (OR 5.4; 95% CI 1.2-24.1; P < .03). No counterfeiting was observed. However, inadequate AED storage conditions are likely to lead to ineffective and possibly dangerous AEDs, even when good-quality AEDs are initially imported. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 International League Against

  6. "This body does not want free medicines": South African consumer perceptions of drug quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Aarti; Gauld, Robin; Norris, Pauline; Rades, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Like many other developing countries, South Africa provides free medicines through its public health care facilities. Recent policies encourage generic substitution in the private sector. This study explored South African consumer perceptions of drug quality and whether these perceptions influenced how people procured and used their medicines. METHODS The study was undertaken in Durban, Cape Town and Johannesburg in South Africa between December 2005 and January 2006. A combination of purposive and snowball sampling was used to recruit participants from low and middle socio-economic groups as well as the elderly and teenagers. Data were collected through 12 focus group discussions involving a total of 73 participants. Interviews were tape-recorded. Thematic analysis was performed on the transcripts. RESULTS Irrespective of socio-economic status, respondents described medicine quality in terms of the effect the medicine produced on felt symptoms. Generic medicines, as well as medicines supplied without charge by the state, were considered to be poor quality and treated with suspicion. Respondents obtained medicines from three sources: public sector hospitals and/or clinics, dispensing doctors and community pharmacies. Cost, avoidance of feeling 'second-class', receiving individualized care and choice in drug selection were the main determinants influencing their procurement behaviour. Selection of over-the-counter medicines was influenced by prior knowledge of products, through advertising and previous use. Participants perceived that they had limited influence on selection of prescription medicines. Generic substitution would be supported if the doctor, rather than the pharmacist, recommended it. CONCLUSIONS Our findings emphasize the importance of meaningful consumer involvement in the development of national medicines policies, and strategic campaigns targeting consumers and prescribers regarding the quality of generic and essential medicines. Where

  7. Quality control of the paracetamol drug by chemometrics and imaging spectroscopy in the near infrared region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptistao, Mariana; Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2011-09-01

    In this work, it was used imaging spectroscopy and chemometric tools for the development and analysis of paracetamol and excipients in pharmaceutical formulations. It was also built concentration maps to study the distribution of the drug in the tablets surface. Multivariate models based on PLS regression were developed for paracetamol and excipients concentrations prediction. For the construction of the models it was used 31 samples in the tablet form containing the active principle in a concentration range of 30.0-90.0% (w/w) and errors below to 5% were obtained for validation samples. Finally, the study of the distribution in the drug was performed through the distribution maps of concentration of active principle and excipients. The analysis of maps showed the complementarity between the active principle and excipients in the tablets. The region with a high concentration of a constituent must have, necessarily, absence or low concentration of the other one. Thus, an alternative method for the paracetamol drug quality monitoring is presented.

  8. Eliciting the Intension of Drug Value Sets – Principles and Quality Assurance Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Nathan J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Winnenburg, Rainer; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Value sets (VSs) used in electronic clinical quality measures are lists of codes from standard terminologies (“extensional” VSs), whose purpose (“intension”) is not always explicitly stated. We elicited the intension for the 09/01/2014 release of extensional medication value sets by comparison to drug classes from the October 2014 release of RxClass. Value sets matched drug classes if they shared common ingredients, as evidenced by Jaccard similarity score. We elicited the intension of 80 extensional value sets. The average Jaccard similarity was 0.65 for single classes and 0.80 for combination classes, with 34% (27/80) of the value sets having high similarity scores. Manual review by a pharmacist indicated 51% (41/80) of the drug classes selected as the best mapping for a value set matched the intension reflected in that value set name. This approach has the potential for facilitating the development and maintenance of medication value sets. PMID:29295218

  9. Application of Absorption Modeling in Rational Design of Drug Product Under Quality-by-Design Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Mitra, Amitava

    2015-09-01

    Physiologically based absorption models can be an important tool in understanding product performance and hence implementation of Quality by Design (QbD) in drug product development. In this report, we show several case studies to demonstrate the potential application of absorption modeling in rational design of drug product under the QbD paradigm. The examples include application of absorption modeling—(1) prior to first-in-human studies to guide development of a formulation with minimal sensitivity to higher gastric pH and hence reduced interaction when co-administered with PPIs and/or H2RAs, (2) design of a controlled release formulation with optimal release rate to meet trough plasma concentrations and enable QD dosing, (3) understanding the impact of API particle size distribution on tablet bioavailability and guide formulation design in late-stage development, (4) assess impact of API phase change on product performance to guide specification setting, and (5) investigate the effect of dissolution rate changes on formulation bioperformance and enable appropriate specification setting. These case studies are meant to highlight the utility of physiologically based absorption modeling in gaining a thorough understanding of the product performance and the critical factors impacting performance to drive design of a robust drug product that would deliver the optimal benefit to the patients.

  10. The effectiveness of group selection theory on the quality of drug addicted life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sodani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and aim: Increase in addiction in the community and the plight of its people demand for improving the problems of addicts, indicate a need for individuals to interventions and training expertise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of group selection theory on the quality of drug addicted life.  .  Methods: This study is an quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest and follow up with the control group. The study population included: all addicted people who referred to ahvaz addiction treatment center in 2015. 50 addicts were selected by using of  available sampling and randomly divided into  two experimental group (number=25 and control group (number=25. The participants were completed the quality of life inventory in three stages (pre-test, post-test and follow-up after 60 days. The experimental group was received group training of the concepts of selection theory of 10 sessions of 90 minutes per week.Statistical data were analyzed  using of covariance(ANCOVA analysis. Results: Group training theory led to a significant difference among pretest, posttest, and follow-up of quality of addicted people life (p <0.001. In this case, the post-test and follow-up, after controlling of pre-test score, the experimental group compared to the control group higher quality of life was reported. Conclusion: Group training of selected theory about the role of choosing a behavior, five senses  the importance of self control, the role of effective behavior, the way of need fulfilment, responsibility, self worth, Quality world, seven destructive behavior, seven caring behavior, faiure identification and success identification can result in increasing the quality of life for addicted people.

  11. Pharmaceutical quality of docetaxel generics versus originator drug product: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vial, Jérôme; Cohen, Mélanie; Sassiat, Patrick; Thiébaut, Didier

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of 31 commercially available generic formulations of docetaxel purchased in 14 countries by comparing their docetaxel content, impurity levels and pH versus those of the proprietary product Taxotere (Tx). Generic formulations were purchased in 14 countries in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and Latin America. Levels of docetaxel and impurities (chromatographic peaks above 0.05%) were obtained for each sample using reverse-phase liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. The pH of aqueous solutions of generic docetaxel formulations and Tx was also measured. A global evaluation of quality was conducted on each product using a multicriteria desirability analysis based on standards defined by the International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines and the US Pharmacopeia paclitaxel injection monograph. Most generic formulations contained a lower than expected amount of docetaxel and/or a high level of impurities: 21 generic docetaxel formulations had an average mass of docetaxel that was generic docetaxel formulations had a total impurity content of >3.0%, almost twice the level of impurities in Tx 20 mg. In total, 33 impurities not present in Tx were detected in the generic samples. Desirability analysis demonstrated that none of the generic docetaxel formulations had composition characteristics similar to those of Tx. This study demonstrated that from an analytical point of view, 90% of the generic docetaxel formulations evaluated contained insufficient active drug, high levels of impurities or both. This has the potential to affect both efficacy and safety of the drug.

  12. A Synthetic Biology Project - Developing a single-molecule device for screening drug-target interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Keith; Evans, Luke; Youell, James

    2012-07-16

    This review describes a European-funded project in the area of Synthetic Biology. The project seeks to demonstrate the application of engineering techniques and methodologies to the design and construction of a biosensor for detecting drug-target interactions at the single-molecule level. Production of the proteins required for the system followed the principle of previously described "bioparts" concepts (a system where a database of biological parts - promoters, genes, terminators, linking tags and cleavage sequences - is used to construct novel gene assemblies) and cassette-type assembly of gene expression systems (the concept of linking different "bioparts" to produce functional "cassettes"), but problems were quickly identified with these approaches. DNA substrates for the device were also constructed using a cassette-system. Finally, micro-engineering was used to build a magnetoresistive Magnetic Tweezer device for detection of single molecule DNA modifying enzymes (motors), while the possibility of constructing a Hall Effect version of this device was explored. The device is currently being used to study helicases from Plasmodium as potential targets for anti-malarial drugs, but we also suggest other potential uses for the device. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of Psychotropic Drug Prescribing Quality between Zagreb, Croatia and Sarajevo, B&H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polić-Vižintin, Marina; Štimac, Danijela; Čatić, Tarik; Šostar, Zvonimir; Zelić, Ana; Živković, Krešimir; Draganić, Pero

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to compare outpatient consumption and quality of psychotropic drug prescribing between Croatia and Bosnia & Herzegovina 2006-2010. Data on drug utilization from Zagreb Municipal Pharmacy and Sarajevo Public Pharmacy were used to calculate the number of defined daily doses (DDD) and DDD per 1000 inhabitants per day (DDD/TID) using the WHO Anatomical-Therapeutic-Chemical methodology. Total utilization of psychopharmaceuticals increased in both cities; however, it was higher in Zagreb than in Sarajevo throughout the study period. The utilization of psycholeptics increased in Zagreb by 2.4% (from 74.5 to 76.3 DDD/TID) and in Sarajevo by 3.8% (from 62.4 to 64.8 DDD/TID). The utilization of anxiolytics decreased in Zagreb by 2.1% and in Sarajevo by even 18.7%. The utilization of antidepressants increased in both cities with predominance of SSRI over TCA utilization, greater in Sarajevo (96.6%) than in Zagreb (10.2%). The anxiolytic/antidepressant ratio decreased by 11.1% in Zagreb (from 2.87 to 2.55) and by 58.7% in Sarajevo (from 5.66 to 2.34). Outpatient utilization of antipsychotics increased significantly in Sarajevo, predominated by typical ones, whereas in Zagreb the utilization of antipsychotics was stable, predominated by atypical ones. In Croatia and Bosnia & Herzegovina, there was an obvious tendency to follow western trends in drug prescribing, as demonstrated by the increased use of antidepressants and reduced use of anxiolytics. Despite some improvement observed in the prescribing quality, high use of antipsychotics with dominance of typical antipsychotics in Sarajevo points to the need of prescribing guidelines for antipsychotics.

  14. Batch-to-batch quality consistency evaluation of botanical drug products using multivariate statistical analysis of the chromatographic fingerprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Haoshu; Yu, Lawrence X; Qu, Haibin

    2013-06-01

    Botanical drug products have batch-to-batch quality variability due to botanical raw materials and the current manufacturing process. The rational evaluation and control of product quality consistency are essential to ensure the efficacy and safety. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an important and widely used tool to characterize the chemical composition of botanical drug products. Multivariate statistical analysis has showed its efficacy and applicability in the quality evaluation of many kinds of industrial products. In this paper, the combined use of multivariate statistical analysis and chromatographic fingerprinting is presented here to evaluate batch-to-batch quality consistency of botanical drug products. A typical botanical drug product in China, Shenmai injection, was selected as the example to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. The high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint data of historical batches were collected from a traditional Chinese medicine manufacturing factory. Characteristic peaks were weighted by their variability among production batches. A principal component analysis model was established after outliers were modified or removed. Multivariate (Hotelling T(2) and DModX) control charts were finally successfully applied to evaluate the quality consistency. The results suggest useful applications for a combination of multivariate statistical analysis with chromatographic fingerprinting in batch-to-batch quality consistency evaluation for the manufacture of botanical drug products.

  15. Analysis of the importance of drug packaging quality for end users and pharmaceutical industry as a part of the quality management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Irma M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we collected and analyzed information on the importance of drug packaging quality to end users and pharmaceutical industry, as an indicator of the process of traceability and originality of drugs. Two surveys were conducted: one among the end users of drugs (252 patients and the other among professionals working in seven pharmaceutical companies in Serbia. For most end users (82.5% quality on the packaging of drugs was important, but only 41.8% of them thought that the appearance of the packaging could be an indicator of genuinity of drugs. The existence of the control marks (KM on drug packaging was not of great importance, since most of them (86.9% know, its function, but majority (60.2% would nevertheless decide to buy the drug without KM. Regarding the experts from the pharmaceutical industry, more then two-thirds of them (68.4% believed that the existence of KM did not contribute to efficient operations. Although a great number of pharmaceutical industry professionals (84.2% answered that the introduction of GS1 DataMatrix system would allow for complete traceability of the drug from the manufacturer to the end user, only 22.2% of them introduced this system to their products. This study also showed that domestic producers did not have a great interest for additional protection (special inks, holograms, special graphics, smart multicolor design, watermark, chemically labeled paper and cardboard etc.. on their products, given that only 15.8 % of them had some kind of additional protection against counterfeiting. Monitoring drug traceability from a manufacturer to end user is achieved by many complex activities regulated by law. A high percentage of responders said they were satisfied with the functionality of traceability systems used in their companies. As a way to increase the quality of drug packaging and business performance most responders saw in the continuous improvement of the system of traceability within the company

  16. Quality of life of multi drug resistant tuberculosis patients: a study of north India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Sharma

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is still one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity. Besides clinical impact, the disease affects the quality of life (QOL too. With the rise of 21st century, multi-drug-resistant TB (MDR TB has risen as a significant public health problem due to emergence of resistance to anti-tuberculosis therapy (ATT drugs. This study was planned to analyze the impact of MDRTB on QOL. It was a six month analysis, with a sample size of 60 cases each of MDRTB and PTB. It was based on a pre-designed, pre-tested questionnaire using WHOQOL BREF scale.  Out of each group, 38 (63.33% and 36 (60.0% were in the 21-40 years of age groups, more than 60% married and were residing in the urban/urban slums. It was found that QoL of MDRTB patients was worse than PTB counterparts. The psychological and environmental domains (MDRTB vs. PTB 17.46 vs. 15.23 and 22.00 vs 18.91 were more affected as compared to physical and social domains (19.03 vs 20.05 and 7.88 vs 9.61 in MDRTB and PTB. Financially, MDRTB patients were worst suffers as compared to PTB as former were not being covered under any program, while both groups are affected socially due to social stigma attached with the disease. Thus, there is a need to design an applicable, reliable measure to better address the quality issues methodologically. This would further enable the health care professionals and management to devise relevant interventions to improve the quality of the patients, as well as the programme.

  17. USE OF DRUGS AND PATIENT’S QUALITY OF LIFE IN HEART FAILURE CLINIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Lainščak

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Heart failure is associated with poor quality of life and frequent hospitalizations. Implementation of the clinical trials results, especially prescription of adequate daily doses, is regarded as insufficient. In Slovenia there is no data on quality of life in patients treated in heart failure clinic.Aim. This study assessed the effects of heart failure clinic on patients pharmacological treatment, number of hospitalisations and quality of life.Methods. Patients with established heart failure were enrolled on a basis of the European Society of Cardiology guidelines.Results. During seven months 48 patients (28 men and 20 women, aged 68.4 ± 11.9 years were included. Half of the patients referred after heart failure hospitalisation. After mean of 3.8 ± 1.5 visits in mean time of 2.9 ± 2.6 months more patients received angiotenzin converting enzyme inhibitors and beta adrenergic blockers (90 vs. 100%, p < 0.05 and 42% vs. 88%, p < 0.001, respectively. There was also an increase in mean daily dose of both drugs: from 60% to 86% for angiotenzin converting enzyme inhibitors and from 26% to 44% for beta adrenergic blockers (p < 0.001 for both. Hospital admissions were reduced by 79%. Quality of life, health, MLHFQ result and NYHA class all significantly improved (p < 0.001.Conclusions. Heart failure clinic can significantly improve patient’s quality of life and pharmacological treatment as well as reduce number of admissions due to heart failure.

  18. Quality of drug information on the World Wide Web and strategies to improve pages with poor information quality. An intervention study on pages about sildenafil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Facklam, Meret; Kostrzewa, Michael; Martin, Peter; Haefeli, Walter E

    2004-01-01

    The generally poor quality of health information on the world wide web (WWW) has caused preventable adverse outcomes. Quality management of information on the internet is therefore critical given its widespread use. In order to develop strategies for the safe use of drugs, we scored general and content quality of pages about sildenafil and performed an intervention to improve their quality. The internet was searched with Yahoo and AltaVista for pages about sildenafil and 303 pages were included. For assessment of content quality a score based on accuracy and completeness of essential drug information was assigned. For assessment of general quality, four criteria were evaluated and their association with high content quality was determined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The pages were randomly allocated to either control or intervention group. Evaluation took place before, as well as 7 and 22 weeks after an intervention which consisted of two letters with individualized feedback information on the respective page which were sent electronically to the address mentioned on the page. Providing references to scientific publications or prescribing information was significantly associated with high content quality (odds ratio: 8.2, 95% CI 3.2, 20.5). The intervention had no influence on general or content quality. To prevent adverse outcomes caused by misinformation on the WWW individualized feedback to the address mentioned on the page was ineffective. It is currently probably the most straight-forward approach to inform lay persons about indicators of high information quality, i.e. the provision of references.

  19. Injections, cocktails and diviners: therapeutic flexibility in the context of malaria elimination and drug resistance in Northeast Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Gryseels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to effective malaria medication is extremely important in the context of Cambodia's elimination targets and drug resistance containment. Although the public sector health facilities are accessible to the local ethnic minorities of Ratanakiri province (Northeast Cambodia, their illness itineraries often lead them to private pharmacies selling "cocktails" and artemether injections, or to local diviners prescribing animal sacrifices to appease the spirits. METHODS: The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, combining qualitative (in-depth interviews and participant observation and quantitative methods (household and cross-sectional survey. RESULTS: Three broad options for malaria treatment were identified: i the public sector; ii the private sector; iii traditional treatment based on divination and ceremonial sacrifice. Treatment choice was influenced by the availability of treatment and provider, perceived side effects and efficacy of treatments, perceived etiology of symptoms, and patient-health provider encounters. Moreover, treatment paths proved to be highly flexible, changing mostly in relation to the perceived efficacy of a chosen treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Despite good availability of anti-malarial treatment in the public health sector, attendance remained low due to both structural and human behavioral factors. The common use and under-dosage of anti-malaria monotherapy in the private sector (single-dose injections, single-day drug cocktails represents a threat not only for individual case management, but also for the regional plan of drug resistance containment and malaria elimination.

  20. Quality of Life in Arthritis Patients Using Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingela Wiklund

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a painful and disabling condition. To suppress the pain and the inflammatory process, patients are often chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID users. Chronic use of NSAIDs may induce peptic ulcer, dyspeptic problems and heartburn. Therefore, these patients are often provided with treatment to relieve and/or protect against gastrointestinal problems. Rheumatic disorders also affect a range of health-related quality of life domains. In one study, patients with NSAID-associated gastroduodenal lesions complained about lack of energy, sleep disturbances, emotional distress and social isolation in addition to pain and mobility limitations. The degree of distress and dysfunction differed markedly from scores in an unselected population. Clinical trial data suggest that acid-suppressing therapy with omeprazole is superior to therapy with misoprostol and ranitidine in healing gastroduodenal lesions and preventing abdominal pain, heartburn and indigestion symptoms during continued NSAID treatment. Because arthritic patients are severely incapacitated by their condition regarding most aspects of health-related quality of life, it is important to offer a treatment that is effective in healing and preventing NSAID-induced ulcers and gastrointestinal symptoms during continued NSAID treatment without further compromising the patients’ quality of life. Treatment with omeprazole once daily has been shown to be superior to that with ranitidine and misoprostol in this respect.

  1. Increasing the use of 'smart' pump drug libraries by nurses: a continuous quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    The use of infusion pumps that incorporate "smart" technology (smart pumps) can reduce the risks associated with receiving IV therapies. Smart pump technology incorporates safeguards such as a list of high-alert medications, soft and hard dosage limits, and a drug library that can be tailored to specific patient care areas. Its use can help to improve patient safety and to avoid potentially catastrophic harm associated with medication errors. But when one independent community hospital in Massachusetts switched from older mechanical pumps to smart pumps, it neglected to assign an "owner" to oversee the implementation process. One result was that nurses were using the smart pump library for only 37% of all infusions.To increase pump library usage percentage-thereby reducing the risks associated with infusion and improving patient safety-the hospital undertook a continuous quality improvement project over a four-month period in 2009. With the involvement of direct care nurses, and using quantitative data available from the smart pump software, the nursing quality and pharmacy quality teams identified ways to improve pump and pump library use. A secondary goal was to calculate the hospital's return on investment for the purchase of the smart pumps. Several interventions were developed and, on the first of each month, implemented. By the end of the project, pump library usage had nearly doubled; and the hospital had completely recouped its initial investment.

  2. Effects of anti-malarial alkaloids on the sperm properties and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous blood and masturbation specimens of semen were obtained from the subjects before treatment, immediately post-treatment and by the 65th day from commencement of treatment. Blood levels of follicle stimulating hormones, leutinizing hormone and testosterone were determined by Enzyme Linked Imuno Assay.

  3. In vivo anti-malarial potentials of some plants extracts on ICR-mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five medicinal plants, Acacia nilotica (Fabaceae), Citrus aurantifolia (Rutaceae), Mangifera indica (Anacardiaceae) Carica papaya (Caricaceae), and Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae) used for the treatment of malaria/ fever by the Hausa people of Kano-Nigeria were selected based on their traditional claims. These were ...

  4. Avidity of anti-malarial antibodies inversely related to transmission intensity at three sites in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssewanyana, Isaac; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Nankabirwa, Joaniter I; Yeka, Adoke; Sullivan, Richard; Kamya, Moses R; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Drakeley, Chris; Greenhouse, Bryan; Tetteh, Kevin K A

    2017-02-10

    People living in malaria endemic areas acquire protection from severe malaria quickly, but protection from clinical disease and control of parasitaemia is acquired only after many years of repeated infections. Antibodies play a central role in protection from clinical disease; however, protective antibodies are slow to develop. This study sought to investigate the influence of Plasmodium falciparum exposure on the acquisition of high-avidity antibodies to P. falciparum antigens, which may be associated with protection. Cross-sectional surveys were performed in children and adults at three sites in Uganda with varied P. falciparum transmission intensity (entomological inoculation rates; 3.8, 26.6, and 125 infectious bites per person per year). Sandwich ELISA was used to measure antibody responses to two P. falciparum merozoite surface antigens: merozoite surface protein 1-19 (MSP1-19) and apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1). In individuals with detectable antibody levels, guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl) was added to measure the relative avidity of antibody responses by ELISA. Within a site, there were no significant differences in median antibody levels between the three age groups. Between sites, median antibody levels were generally higher in the higher transmission sites, with differences more apparent for AMA-1 and in ≥5 year group. Similarly, median avidity index (proportion of high avidity antibodies) showed no significant increase with increasing age but was significantly lower at sites of higher transmission amongst participants ≥5 years of age. Using 5 M GuHCl, the median avidity indices in the ≥5 year group at the highest and lowest transmission sites were 19.9 and 26.8, respectively (p = 0.0002) for MSP1-19 and 12.2 and 17.2 (p = 0.0007) for AMA1. Avidity to two different P. falciparum antigens was lower in areas of high transmission intensity compared to areas with lower transmission. Appreciation of the mechanisms behind these findings as well as their clinical consequences will require additional investigation, ideally utilizing longitudinal data and investigation of a broader array of responses.

  5. Anti-malarial activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Piliostigma thonningii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... Key words: Piliostigma thonningii, anti plasmodial, Plasmodium berghei berghei NK65. ... predicted that a reliable malaria vaccine is several years away. The global ... nature and its petals are white to pinkish colour produced between ... randomized into three groups of three mice each and were given.

  6. Effects of anti-malarial alkaloids on the sperm properties and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... 2Department of Physiology, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria. ... sperm count, percentage sperm forward motility and blood levels of testosterone were ... be associated with fertility changes as a result of their inherent ...

  7. Effects of anti-malarial alkaloids on the sperm properties and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... Malaria is caused by any of the four protozoan species of the genus plasmodium. ... intervention for malaria therapy in patients living in areas of high level of resistance. ..... need for assisted conception. The observation that ...

  8. Dried blood spots as a source of anti-malarial antibodies for epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corran, Patrick H; Cook, Jackie; Lynch, Caroline; Leendertse, Heleen; Manjurano, Alphaxard; Griffin, Jamie; Cox, Jonathan; Abeku, Tarekegn; Bousema, Teun; Ghani, Azra C; Drakeley, Chris; Riley, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    Background Blood spots collected onto filter paper are an established and convenient source of antibodies for serological diagnosis and epidemiological surveys. Although recommendations for the storage and analysis of small molecule analytes in blood spots exist, there are no published systematic studies of the stability of antibodies under different storage conditions. Methods Blood spots, on filter paper or glass fibre mats and containing malaria-endemic plasma, were desiccated and stored at various temperatures for different times. Eluates of these spots were assayed for antibodies against two Plasmodium falciparum antigens, MSP-119 and MSP2, and calculated titres used to fit an exponential (first order kinetic) decay model. The first order rate constants (k) for each spot storage temperature were used to fit an Arrhenius equation, in order to estimate the thermal and temporal stability of antibodies in dried blood spots. The utility of blood spots for serological assays was confirmed by comparing antibodies eluted from blood spots with the equivalent plasma values in a series of samples from North Eastern Tanzania and by using blood spot-derived antibodies to estimate malaria transmission intensity in this site and for two localities in Uganda. Results Antibodies in spots on filter paper and glass fibre paper had similar stabilities but blood was more easily absorbed onto filter papers than glass fibre, spots were more regular and spot size was more closely correlated with blood volume for filter paper spots. Desiccated spots could be stored at or below 4°C for extended periods, but were stable for only very limited periods at ambient temperature. When desiccated, recoveries of antibodies that are predominantly of IgG1 or IgG3 subclasses were similar. Recoveries of antibodies from paired samples of serum and of blood spots from Tanzania which had been suitably stored showed similar recoveries of antibodies, but spots which had been stored for extended periods at ambient humidity and temperature showed severe loss of recoveries. Estimates of malaria transmission intensity obtained from serum and from blood spots were similar, and values obtained using blood spots agreed well with entomologically determined values. Conclusion This study has demonstrated the suitability of filter paper blood spots paper for collection of serum antibodies, and provided clear guidelines for the treatment and storage of filter papers which emphasize the importance of desiccation and minimisation of time spent at ambient temperatures. A recommended protocol for collecting, storing and assaying blood spots is provided. PMID:18826573

  9. Hypothesis driven drug design: improving quality and effectiveness of the design-make-test-analyse cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plowright, Alleyn T; Johnstone, Craig; Kihlberg, Jan; Pettersson, Jonas; Robb, Graeme; Thompson, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    In drug discovery, the central process of constructing and testing hypotheses, carefully conducting experiments and analysing the associated data for new findings and information is known as the design-make-test-analyse cycle. Each step relies heavily on the inputs and outputs of the other three components. In this article we report our efforts to improve and integrate all parts to enable smooth and rapid flow of high quality ideas. Key improvements include enhancing multi-disciplinary input into 'Design', increasing the use of knowledge and reducing cycle times in 'Make', providing parallel sets of relevant data within ten working days in 'Test' and maximising the learning in 'Analyse'. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. "Product on Stopper" in a Lyophilized Drug Product: Cosmetic Defect or a Product Quality Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shyam B; Roy, Shouvik; Yang, Han-Chang Cathy

    2018-06-01

    During manufacturing of a lyophilized drug product, operator errors in product handling during loading of product filled vials onto the lyophilizer can lead to a seemingly cosmetic defect which can impact certain critical quality attributes of finished product. In this study, filling of a formulated monoclonal antibody in vials was performed using a peristaltic pump filling unit, and subsequently, the product was lyophilized. After lyophilization, upon visual inspection, around 40% of vials had cosmetic defect with residual product around stopper of the vial and were categorized as "product on stopper" vials, whereas remaining 60% vials with no cosmetic defect were called "acceptable vials." Both groups of vials from 1 single batch were tested for critical quality attributes including protein concentration (ultraviolet absorbance at 280), residual moisture (Karl Fischer), sterility (membrane filtration), and container closure integrity (CCI) (blue dye ingress). Analysis of protein quality attributes such as aggregation, protein concentration, residual moisture showed no significant difference between vials with "product on stopper" and "acceptable vials." However, CCI of the "product on stopper" vials was compromised due to the presence of product around stopper of the vial. The results from this case study demonstrate the following 2 important findings: (1) that a seemingly cosmetic defect may impact product quality, compromising the integrity of the product and (2) that CCI test method can be used as an orthogonal method to sterility testing to evaluate sterility assurance of the product. The corrective action proposed to mitigate this defect is use of a larger sized vial that can potentially minimize this defect that arises because of product handling errors. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Quality of Selected Essential Medicines Sold in Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets and Pharmacies in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliangiringa Kaale

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality of a select group of medicines sold in accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDOs and pharmacies in different regions of Tanzania as part of an in-depth cross-sectional assessment of community access to medicines and community use of medicines.We collected 242 samples of amoxicillin trihydrate, artemether-lumefantrine (ALu, co-trimoxazole, ergometrine maleate, paracetamol, and quinine from selected ADDOs and pharmacies in Mbeya, Morogoro, Singida, and Tanga regions. The analysis included physical examination and testing with validated analytical techniques. Assays for eight of nine products were conducted using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC. For ALu tablets, we used a two-tiered approach, where tier 1 was a semi-quantitative Global Pharma Health Fund-Minilab® method and tier 2 was high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC as described in The International Pharmacopoeia's monograph for artemether-lumefantrine.The physical examination of samples revealed no defects in the solid and oral liquid dosage forms, but unusual discoloration in an injectable solution, ergometrine maleate. For ALu, the results showed that of 38 samples, 31 (81.6% passed tier 1 testing and 7 (18.4% gave inconclusive drug content results. The inconclusive ALu samples were submitted for tier 2 testing and all met the quality standards. The pass rate using the HPTLC and TLC/HPLC assays was 93.8%; the failures were the ergometrine maleate samples purchased from both ADDOs and pharmacies. The disintegration testing of the solid dosage forms was conducted in accordance with US Pharmacopeia monographs. Only two samples of paracetamol, 1.2% of the solid dosage forms, failed to comply to standards. The study revealed a high overall rate of 92.6% of samples that met the quality standards. Although the overall failure rate was 7.4%, it is important to note that this was largely limited to one product and

  12. The Quality of Selected Essential Medicines Sold in Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets and Pharmacies in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaale, Eliangiringa; Manyanga, Vicky; Chambuso, Mhina; Liana, Jafary; Rutta, Edmund; Embrey, Martha; Layloff, Thomas; Johnson, Keith

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality of a select group of medicines sold in accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDOs) and pharmacies in different regions of Tanzania as part of an in-depth cross-sectional assessment of community access to medicines and community use of medicines. We collected 242 samples of amoxicillin trihydrate, artemether-lumefantrine (ALu), co-trimoxazole, ergometrine maleate, paracetamol, and quinine from selected ADDOs and pharmacies in Mbeya, Morogoro, Singida, and Tanga regions. The analysis included physical examination and testing with validated analytical techniques. Assays for eight of nine products were conducted using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC). For ALu tablets, we used a two-tiered approach, where tier 1 was a semi-quantitative Global Pharma Health Fund-Minilab® method and tier 2 was high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) as described in The International Pharmacopoeia's monograph for artemether-lumefantrine. The physical examination of samples revealed no defects in the solid and oral liquid dosage forms, but unusual discoloration in an injectable solution, ergometrine maleate. For ALu, the results showed that of 38 samples, 31 (81.6%) passed tier 1 testing and 7 (18.4%) gave inconclusive drug content results. The inconclusive ALu samples were submitted for tier 2 testing and all met the quality standards. The pass rate using the HPTLC and TLC/HPLC assays was 93.8%; the failures were the ergometrine maleate samples purchased from both ADDOs and pharmacies. The disintegration testing of the solid dosage forms was conducted in accordance with US Pharmacopeia monographs. Only two samples of paracetamol, 1.2% of the solid dosage forms, failed to comply to standards. The study revealed a high overall rate of 92.6% of samples that met the quality standards. Although the overall failure rate was 7.4%, it is important to note that this was largely limited to one product and likely due to

  13. Quality by design case study: an integrated multivariate approach to drug product and process development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Kaul, Goldi; Cai, Chunsheng; Chatlapalli, Ramarao; Hernandez-Abad, Pedro; Ghosh, Krishnendu; Nagi, Arwinder

    2009-12-01

    To facilitate an in-depth process understanding, and offer opportunities for developing control strategies to ensure product quality, a combination of experimental design, optimization and multivariate techniques was integrated into the process development of a drug product. A process DOE was used to evaluate effects of the design factors on manufacturability and final product CQAs, and establish design space to ensure desired CQAs. Two types of analyses were performed to extract maximal information, DOE effect & response surface analysis and multivariate analysis (PCA and PLS). The DOE effect analysis was used to evaluate the interactions and effects of three design factors (water amount, wet massing time and lubrication time), on response variables (blend flow, compressibility and tablet dissolution). The design space was established by the combined use of DOE, optimization and multivariate analysis to ensure desired CQAs. Multivariate analysis of all variables from the DOE batches was conducted to study relationships between the variables and to evaluate the impact of material attributes/process parameters on manufacturability and final product CQAs. The integrated multivariate approach exemplifies application of QbD principles and tools to drug product and process development.

  14. Prescribing quality for older people in Norwegian nursing homes and home nursing services using multidose dispensed drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Halvorsen, Kjell H.; Granås, Anne Gerd; Engeland, Anders; Ruths, Sabine

    2012-01-01

    Tverrsnittstudie, undersøker og sammenligner forskrivningskvaliteten hos eldre som bor i sykehjem og hjemme. Purpose: to examine and compare the quality of drug prescribing for older patients in nursing homes and home nursing services. Methods: Cross-sectional study comprising 11 254 patients aged ≥65 years in nursing homes (n = 2986) and home nursing services (n = 8268). Potentially inappropriate medications were identified by using the Norwegian General Practice criteria and drug–drug in...

  15. Analysis of the physico-chemical quality Enalapril and Simvastatin drugs manipulated in magistral pharmacies from Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Tatiana Cristina Bomfim

    2013-01-01

    The increasing expansion of compounding pharmacy associated with several reports on variances in the quality of compounded drugs demonstrates the need for verification of quality, safety and efficacy of these products. In this work, physical and chemical analyzes were performed to evaluate the quality of some capsules manipulated enalapril and simvastatin, acquired in five pharmacies in Belo Horizonte /Brazil. Among the analyzes are pharmacopoeial tests for appearance, identification, determination of weight, content, related compounds and uniformity of dosage units, and was also performed neutron activation analysis for the determination of inorganic impurities in drugs sampled. The results showed that 60% of the samples were unsatisfactory for pharmacopoeial tests. The contents of the capsules sampled for individual testing unit dose uniformity between 0% and 136.2%. This test is important in evaluating the quality, which influences the safety and efficacy of drug treatment, since it allows you to check if the product contains the proper dosage and necessary for successful pharmacotherapy. On the other hand, underdosing can lead to reduced or absent desired therapeutic response, and overdoses can provide an undesirable effects and even toxic. The concentration of inorganic impurities was considered to be relatively small. However, no specific limits for some chemical elements in medicine hamper a better thread. In addition, further studies must be performed to assess chronic exposure to low concentrations of inorganic impurities, since drugs can be continuously used, and other sources of exposure must also be considered in order to evaluate the risk. The problems related to the quality and safety of compounded drugs are still reality in the country and reveal a serious public health problem, especially regarding the lack of uniformity between the unit doses of medications. It is suggested that the competent authorities to sanitary products, propose changes in

  16. When Quality Beats Quantity: Decision Theory, Drug Discovery, and the Reproducibility Crisis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack W Scannell

    Full Text Available A striking contrast runs through the last 60 years of biopharmaceutical discovery, research, and development. Huge scientific and technological gains should have increased the quality of academic science and raised industrial R&D efficiency. However, academia faces a "reproducibility crisis"; inflation-adjusted industrial R&D costs per novel drug increased nearly 100 fold between 1950 and 2010; and drugs are more likely to fail in clinical development today than in the 1970s. The contrast is explicable only if powerful headwinds reversed the gains and/or if many "gains" have proved illusory. However, discussions of reproducibility and R&D productivity rarely address this point explicitly. The main objectives of the primary research in this paper are: (a to provide quantitatively and historically plausible explanations of the contrast; and (b identify factors to which R&D efficiency is sensitive. We present a quantitative decision-theoretic model of the R&D process. The model represents therapeutic candidates (e.g., putative drug targets, molecules in a screening library, etc. within a "measurement space", with candidates' positions determined by their performance on a variety of assays (e.g., binding affinity, toxicity, in vivo efficacy, etc. whose results correlate to a greater or lesser degree. We apply decision rules to segment the space, and assess the probability of correct R&D decisions. We find that when searching for rare positives (e.g., candidates that will successfully complete clinical development, changes in the predictive validity of screening and disease models that many people working in drug discovery would regard as small and/or unknowable (i.e., an 0.1 absolute change in correlation coefficient between model output and clinical outcomes in man can offset large (e.g., 10 fold, even 100 fold changes in models' brute-force efficiency. We also show how validity and reproducibility correlate across a population of simulated

  17. Identifying and assessing highly hazardous drugs within quality risk management programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Robert G; Schatz, Anthony R; Kimmel, Tracy A; Ader, Allan; Naumann, Bruce D; Weideman, Patricia A

    2016-08-01

    Historically, pharmaceutical industry regulatory guidelines have assigned certain active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) to various categories of concern, such as "cytotoxic", "hormones", and "steroids". These categories have been used to identify APIs requiring segregation or dedication in order to prevent cross-contamination and protect the quality and safety of drug products. Since these terms were never defined by regulatory authorities, and many novel pharmacological mechanisms challenge these categories, there is a recognized need to modify the historical use of these terms. The application of a risk-based approach using a health-based limit, such as an acceptable daily exposure (ADE), is more appropriate for the development of a Quality Risk Management Program (QRMP) than the use of categories of concern. The toxicological and pharmacological characteristics of these categories are discussed to help identify and prioritize compounds requiring special attention. Controlling airborne concentrations and the contamination of product contact surfaces in accordance with values derived from quantitative risk assessments can prevent adverse effects in workers and patients, regardless of specific categorical designations to which these APIs have been assigned. The authors acknowledge the movement away from placing compounds into categories and, while not yet universal, the importance of basing QRMPs on compound-specific ADEs and risk assessments. Based on the results of a risk assessment, segregation and dedication may also be required for some compounds to prevent cross contamination during manufacture of APIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Could a revision of the current guidelines for cancer drug use improve the quality of cancer treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert TH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Theodor H Lippert,1 Hans-Jörg Ruoff,1 Manfred Volm2 1Medical Faculty, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; 2Medical Faculty, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Abstract: Clinical practice guidelines are indispensable for such a variable disease as malignant solid tumors, with the complex possibilities of drug treatment. The current guidelines may be criticized on several points, however. First, there is a lack of information on the outcome of treatment, such as the expected success and failure rates. Treating not only drug responders but also nonresponders, that is, patients with drug resistance, must result in failures. There is no mention of the possibility of excluding the drug nonresponders, identifiable by special laboratory tests and no consideration is given to the different side effects of the recommended drug regimens. Nor are there any instructions concerning tumor cases for which anticancer drug treatment is futile. In such cases, early palliative care may lead to significant improvements in both life quality and life expectancy. Not least, there is no transparency concerning the preparation of the guidelines: persons cannot be identified who could give a statement of conflicts of interest, and responsibility is assumed only by anonymous medical associations. A revision of the current guidelines could considerably improve cancer treatment. Keywords: anticancer drugs, quality of guidelines, critical remarks

  19. Correlates of health-related quality of life in children with drug resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lauryn; Smith, Mary Lou; Ferro, Mark A; Speechley, Kathy N; Connoly, Mary B; Snead, O Carter; Widjaja, Elysa

    2016-08-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is compromised in children with epilepsy. The current study aimed to identify correlates of HRQL in children with drug resistant epilepsy. Data came from 115 children enrolled in the Impact of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery on Health-Related Quality of Life Study (PEPSQOL), a multicenter prospective cohort study. Individual, clinical, and family factors were evaluated. HRQL was measured using the Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE), a parent-rated epilepsy-specific instrument, with composite scores ranging from 0 to 100. A series of univariable linear regression analyses were conducted to identify significant associations with HRQL, followed by a multivariable regression analysis. Children had a mean age of 11.85 ± 3.81 years and 65 (56.5%) were male. The mean composite QOLCE score was 60.18 ± 16.69. Child age, sex, age at seizure onset, duration of epilepsy, caregiver age, caregiver education, and income were not significantly associated with HRQL. Univariable regression analyses revealed that a higher number of anti-seizure medications (p = 0.020), lower IQ (p = 0.002), greater seizure frequency (p = 0.048), caregiver unemployment (p = 0.010), higher caregiver depressive and anxiety symptoms (p < 0.001 for both), poorer family adaptation, fewer family resources, and a greater number of family demands (p < 0.001 for all) were associated with lower HRQL. Multivariable regression analysis showed that lower child IQ (β = 0.20, p = 0.004), fewer family resources (β = 0.43, p = 0.012), and caregiver unemployment (β = 6.53, p = 0.018) were associated with diminished HRQL in children. The results emphasize the importance of child cognition and family variables in the HRQL of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. The findings speak to the importance of offering comprehensive care to children and their families to address the nonmedical features that impact on HRQL. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016

  20. Private sector role, readiness and performance for malaria case management in Uganda, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, Henry; Buyungo, Peter; Opigo, Jimmy

    2017-05-25

    survey illustrate that the majority of anti-malarials were distributed through the private sector (54.3%), with 31.4% of all anti-malarials distributed through drug stores and 14.4% through private for-profit health facilities. Availability of different anti-malarials and diagnostic testing in the private sector was: ACT (80.7%), quality-assured (QA) ACT (72.0%), sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) (47.1%), quinine (73.2%) and any malaria blood testing (32.9%). Adult QAACT ($1.62) was three times more expensive than SP ($0.48). The results from the fever case management study found 44.4% of respondents received a malaria test, and among those who tested positive for malaria, 60.0% received an ACT, 48.5% received QAACT; 14.4% a non-artemisinin therapy; 14.9% artemether injection, and 42.5% received an antibiotic. The private sector plays an important role in malaria case management in Uganda. While several private sector initiatives have improved availability of QAACT, there are gaps in malaria diagnosis and distribution of non-artemisinin monotherapies persists. Further private sector strategies, including those focusing on drug stores, are needed to increase coverage of parasitological testing and removal of non-artemisinin therapies from the marketplace.

  1. Single-item measure for assessing quality of life in children with drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lauryn; Widjaja, Elysa; Smith, Mary Lou

    2018-03-01

    The current study investigated the psychometric properties of a single-item quality of life (QOL) measure, the Global Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy question (G-QOLCE), in children with drug-resistant epilepsy. Data came from the Impact of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery on Health-Related Quality of Life Study (PESQOL), a multicenter prospective cohort study (n = 118) with observations collected at baseline and at 6 months of follow-up on children aged 4-18 years. QOL was measured with the QOLCE-76 and KIDSCREEN-27. The G-QOLCE was an overall QOL question derived from the QOLCE-76. Construct validity and reliability were assessed with Spearman's correlation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Responsiveness was examined through distribution-based and anchor-based methods. The G-QOLCE showed moderate (r ≥ 0.30) to strong (r ≥ 0.50) correlations with composite scores, and most subscales of the QOLCE-76 and KIDSCREEN-27 at baseline and 6-month follow-up. The G-QOLCE had moderate test-retest reliability (ICC range: 0.49-0.72) and was able to detect clinically important change in patients' QOL (standardized response mean: 0.38; probability of change: 0.65; Guyatt's responsiveness statistics: 0.62 and 0.78). Caregiver anxiety and family functioning contributed most strongly to G-QOLCE scores over time. Results offer promising preliminary evidence regarding the validity, reliability, and responsiveness of the proposed single-item QOL measure. The G-QOLCE is a potentially useful tool that can be feasibly administered in a busy clinical setting to evaluate clinical status and impact of treatment outcomes in pediatric epilepsy.

  2. Functional interrogation of Plasmodium genus metabolism identifies species- and stage-specific differences in nutrient essentiality and drug targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa M Abdel-Haleem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several antimalarial drugs exist, but differences between life cycle stages among malaria species pose challenges for developing more effective therapies. To understand the diversity among stages and species, we reconstructed genome-scale metabolic models (GeMMs of metabolism for five life cycle stages and five species of Plasmodium spanning the blood, transmission, and mosquito stages. The stage-specific models of Plasmodium falciparum uncovered stage-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism and predicted potential targets that could affect several life cycle stages. The species-specific models further highlight differences between experimental animal models and the human-infecting species. Comparisons between human- and rodent-infecting species revealed differences in thiamine (vitamin B1, choline, and pantothenate (vitamin B5 metabolism. Thus, we show that genome-scale analysis of multiple stages and species of Plasmodium can prioritize potential drug targets that could be both anti-malarials and transmission blocking agents, in addition to guiding translation from non-human experimental disease models.

  3. Functional interrogation of Plasmodium genus metabolism identifies species- and stage-specific differences in nutrient essentiality and drug targeting

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.

    2018-01-04

    Several antimalarial drugs exist, but differences between life cycle stages among malaria species pose challenges for developing more effective therapies. To understand the diversity among stages and species, we reconstructed genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism for five life cycle stages and five species of Plasmodium spanning the blood, transmission, and mosquito stages. The stage-specific models of Plasmodium falciparum uncovered stage-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism and predicted potential targets that could affect several life cycle stages. The species-specific models further highlight differences between experimental animal models and the human-infecting species. Comparisons between human- and rodent-infecting species revealed differences in thiamine (vitamin B1), choline, and pantothenate (vitamin B5) metabolism. Thus, we show that genome-scale analysis of multiple stages and species of Plasmodium can prioritize potential drug targets that could be both anti-malarials and transmission blocking agents, in addition to guiding translation from non-human experimental disease models.

  4. Adverse events and the relation with quality of life in adults with intellectual disability and challenging behaviour using psychotropic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheifes, Arlette; Walraven, Sanne; Stolker, Joost Jan; Nijman, Henk L I; Egberts, Toine C G; Heerdink, Eibert R

    2016-01-01

    Psychotropic drugs are prescribed to approximately 30-40% of adults with intellectual disability (ID) and challenging behaviour, despite the limited evidence of effectiveness and the potential of adverse events. To assess the prevalence of adverse events in association with psychotropic drug use in adults with ID and challenging behaviour and to examine the relation of these adverse events with the person's quality of life. The presence of adverse events was measured with a questionnaire that had to be filled in by the physicians of the participants. Movement disorders were measured separately with a standardised protocol. The strength of the association between adverse events and Intellectual Disability Quality of Life-16 (IDQOL-16), and daily functioning was investigated using linear regression analyses, taking into account the severity of disease (CGI-S) as potential confounder. Virtually all of 103 adults with ID and challenging behaviour had at least one adverse event (84.4%) and almost half had ≥3 adverse events (45.6%) across different subclasses. Using psychotropic drugs increased the prevalence of adverse events significantly. Respectively 13% of the patients without psychotropic drugs and 61% of the patients with ≥2 psychotropic drugs had ≥3 adverse events. Having adverse events had a significantly negative influence on the quality of life. A large majority of all patients had at least one adverse event associated with psychotropic drug use. More attention is needed for these adverse events and their negative influence on the quality of life of these patients, taking into account the lack of evidence of effectiveness of psychotropic drugs for challenging behaviour. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. A knowledge-based approach for identification of drugs against vivapain-2 protein of Plasmodium vivax through pharmacophore-based virtual screening with comparative modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Manoj Kumar; Singh, Amisha; Swati, D

    2014-08-01

    Malaria is one of the most infectious diseases in the world. Plasmodium vivax, the pathogen causing endemic malaria in humans worldwide, is responsible for extensive disease morbidity. Due to the emergence of resistance to common anti-malarial drugs, there is a continuous need to develop a new class of drugs for this pathogen. P. vivax cysteine protease, also known as vivapain-2, plays an important role in haemoglobin hydrolysis and is considered essential for the survival of the parasite. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of vivapain-2 is not predicted experimentally, so its structure is modelled by using comparative modelling approach and further validated by Qualitative Model Energy Analysis (QMEAN) and RAMPAGE tools. The potential binding site of selected vivapain-2 structure has been detected by grid-based function prediction method. Drug targets and their respective drugs similar to vivapain-2 have been identified using three publicly available databases: STITCH 3.1, DrugBank and Therapeutic Target Database (TTD). The second approach of this work focuses on docking study of selected drug E-64 against vivapain-2 protein. Docking reveals crucial information about key residues (Asn281, Cys283, Val396 and Asp398) that are responsible for holding the ligand in the active site. The similarity-search criterion is used for the preparation of our in-house database of drugs, obtained from filtering the drugs from the DrugBank database. A five-point 3D pharmacophore model is generated for the docked complex of vivapain-2 with E-64. This study of 3D pharmacophore-based virtual screening results in identifying three new drugs, amongst which one is approved and the other two are experimentally proved. The ADMET properties of these drugs are found to be in the desired range. These drugs with novel scaffolds may act as potent drugs for treating malaria caused by P. vivax.

  6. Information on the quality of substance for the preparation of pharmaceutical drugs in terms of hospital pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovović Marija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic The pharmaceutical activity is the activity of public or social and special interest, because it is a direct function of health care. Topic positioning and discussion The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of ensuring the quality of pharmaceutical substances that supplies hospitals, which are used for production of galenic and magistral drugs. Conclusion Compliance with national legislation, as well as establishing compliance prescribed by the European legislation in the field of drug development is binding. Therefore, all manufacturers of drugs and/or active pharmaceutical ingredients must apply quality standards prescribed by the European Pharmacopoeia in order to develop, manufacture and sales of medicines. When it comes to the quality of pharmaceutical ingredients for the production of drugs in the pharmacy, pharmacies especially in residential institutions in our country is permanently done by harmonizing national legislation in order to improve conditions for the preparation and production of galenic drugs in terms of inpatient health institutions performed in a manner that is prescribed by international regulations. This requires the adaptation of institutions, including fundamental changes in competence as national professional and administrative and regulatory rules that apply to state- and private sectors.

  7. Quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among men who inject drugs in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and suicide represent an important public health problem in India. Elsewhere in the world a high prevalence of symptoms of common mental disorders have been found among people who inject drugs (PWID). Research in India has largely overlooked symptoms of common mental disorders among this high risk group. This paper reports on the results of a survey examining quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among adult males who inject drugs living in Delhi. Methods Participants (n = 420) were recruited from needle and syringe programs using time location sampling and were interviewed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Self-report symptom scales were used to measure the severity of symptoms of depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-2) within the preceding 2 weeks. We assessed the presence of suicidal thoughts and attempts within the past 12 months. Results The mean length of injecting career was 20.9 years indicating a sample of chronic injecting drug users, of whom only one-third (38%) were born in Delhi. The level of illiteracy was very high (62%), and just 2% had completed class 12. Scavenging / rag picking was the main form of income for 48%, and many were homeless (69%). One-third (33%) had been beaten up at least twice during the preceding 6 months, and many either never (45%) or rarely (27%) attended family events. We found a high prevalence of depressive (84%, cut-off ≥10) and anxiety (71%, cut-off score of ≥3) symptoms. Fifty-three percent thought about killing themselves in the past 12 months, and 36% had attempted to kill themselves. Conclusions Our findings revealed a socially excluded population of PWID in Delhi who have minimal education and are often homeless, leaving them vulnerable to physical violence, poverty, poor health, imprisonment and disconnection from family. The high prevalence of psychological distress found in this study has implications for

  8. The prevalence and degree of resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to first-line antimalarial drugs: an in vitro study from a malaria endemic region in Yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shamahy, H.; Al-Harazy, Abdulilah Hussein; Harmal, Nabil S.; Al-Kabsi, Abdulgudos N.

    2007-01-01

    Unpublished studies on antimalarial drug efficacy have found low levels of chloroquine resistance in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the current prevalence of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum in Yemen to the main anti-malarial drugs and to determine the effective concentration (EC) values. The WHO standard protocol was used for the selection of subjects, collection of blood samples, culture techniques, examination of post-culture blood slides and interpretation of results. The in vitro micro-test Mark III was used for assessing susceptibility of P. falciparum isolates. The criteria for blood parasite density was met by 219 P. falciparum malaria patients. Chloroquine resistance was found in 47% of isolated P. falciparum schizonts. Mefloquine resistance was found in 5.2%. In addition, the EC50 and EC95 values in blood that inhibited schizont maturation in resistant isolates were higher than the normal therapeutic level for mefloquine. No resistance occurred against quinine or artemisinin, with no growth at the cut off level for quinine and inhibition at low concentrations of artemisinin. Our study confirmed the occurrence of chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum and a slow increase in the rate of this resistance will increase further and spread over all the foci of malaria in Yemen. The low rate of chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum was lower than that reported in Africa or Southeast Asia, but is the first report of the mefloquine resistance in Yemen. Finally, the isolates were sensitive to low concentrations of quinine and artemisinin. (author)

  9. Indicators of prescribing quality in drug utilisation research : report of a European meeting (DURQUIM, 13-15 May 2004)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoven, JL; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM; Vander Stichele, RH

    An invitational expert meeting on indicators of prescribing quality was held on 13-15 May 2004, bringing together-from 19 European countries, the US, Canada, and Australia-40 researchers specialized in the development and application of indicators. The meeting was organized by the European Drug

  10. Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis : Impact of Disease-Modifying Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongen, Peter Joseph

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has a profound impact on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), a comprehensive subjective measure of the patient's health status. Assessment of HRQoL informs on the potential advantages and disadvantages of disease-modifying drugs (DMDs) beyond their effects on

  11. An Exploration of Quality of Life and Its Predictors in Patients with Addictive Disorders: Gambling, Alcohol and Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Victoria; Gomez, Brenda; Guo, Song; Low, Yee Deng; Koh, Puay Kee; Wong, Kim Eng

    2012-01-01

    The study set out to examine Quality of Life (QoL), specifically subjective well being in three different addiction populations (260 alcohol-dependent, 282 drug-dependent, and 132 pathological gambling outpatients) at their first visit to treatment, using the Personal Well being Index (PWI). The mean PWI score for all patients was significantly…

  12. In vitro anti-plasmodial activity of Dicoma anomala subsp. gerrardii (Asteraceae): identification of its main active constituent, structure-activity relationship studies and gene expression profiling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Becker, JVW

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Anti-malarial drug resistance threatens to undermine efforts to eliminate this deadly disease. The resulting omnipresent requirement for drugs with novel modes of action prompted a national consortium initiative to discover new anti...

  13. The use of crack and other illicit drugs impacts oral health-related quality of life in Brazilians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniazzi, R P; Zanatta, F B; Ardenghi, T M; Feldens, C A

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the use of crack and other illicit drugs on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in young adults. This cross-sectional study evaluated 106 crack users at a public treatment center for drug addiction and 106 controls matched for gender, age, and use of tobacco. Clinical examinations were performed for dental caries and periodontal disease. The outcome was OHRQoL, which was determined using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). The association between OHRQoL and illicit drugs was modeled using conditional Poisson regression. Users of crack and other illicit drugs had a poorer OHRQoL than the controls (p illicit drugs. Users of crack and other illicit drugs exerted a negative impact on OHRQoL independently of socio-demographic characteristics and tobacco use, suggesting the need for special attention regarding the specific oral health needs of this population as well as drug prevention and treatment strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) Leachables and Extractables Working Group Initiatives for Parenteral and Ophthalmic Drug Product (PODP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskiet, Diane; Jenke, Dennis; Ball, Douglas; Houston, Christopher; Norwood, Daniel L; Markovic, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) is a non-profit consortium of organizations working together to generate and share timely, relevant, and impactful information that advances drug product quality and development. The collaborative activities of PQRI participants have, in the case of orally inhaled and nasal drug products (OINDPs), resulted in comprehensive and widely-accepted recommendations for leachables assessments to help ensure patient safety with respect to this class of packaged drug products. These recommendations, which include scientifically justified safety thresholds for leachables, represent a significant milestone towards establishing standardized approaches for safety qualification of leachables in OINDP. To build on the success of the OINDP effort, PQRI's Parenteral and Ophthalmic Drug Products (PODP) Leachables and Extractables Working Group was formed to extrapolate the OINDP threshold concepts and best practice recommendations to other dosage forms with high concern for interaction with packaging/delivery systems. This article considers the general aspects of leachables and their safety assessment, introduces the PODP Work Plan and initial study Protocol, discusses the laboratory studies being conducted by the PODP Chemistry Team, outlines the strategy being developed by the PODP Toxicology Team for the safety qualification of PODP leachables, and considers the issues associated with application of the safety thresholds, particularly with respect to large-volume parenterals. Lastly, the unique leachables issues associated with biologics are described. The Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) is a non-profit consortium involving industry organizations, academia, and regulatory agencies that together provide recommendations in support of regulatory guidance to advance drug product quality. The collaborative activities of the PQRI Orally Inhaled and Nasal Drug Products Leachables and Extractables Working Group resulted in a

  15. Quality Evaluation of Ayurvedic Crude Drug Daruharidra, Its Allied Species, and Commercial Samples from Herbal Drug Markets of India

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    Sharad Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberis aristata known as “Daruharidra” in Ayurveda is a versatile medicinal plant used singly or in combination with other medicinal plants for treating a variety of ailments like jaundice, enlargement of spleen, leprosy, rheumatism, fever, morning/evening sickness, snakebite, and so forth. A major bioactive marker of this genus is an alkaloid berberine, which is known for its activity against cholera, acute diarrhea, amoebiasis, and latent malaria and for the treatment of oriental sore caused by Leishmania tropica. Although the roots of B. aristata are considered as the official drug (Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India, the study revealed that different species of Berberis, namely. B. asiatica, B. chitria, and B. lycium are also used under the name of Daruharidra in different parts of the country. Detailed physicochemical and phytochemical studies of subjects like total ash, acid insoluble ash, tannins, and total alkaloids were calculated from the shade dried powdered material according to the recommended procedures. Further, heavy metal studies and quantitative estimation of berberine through HPTLC have also been performed as per ICH guidelines. A detailed study of four Berberis species, namely B. aristata, B. asiatica, B. chitria, and B. lycium, which are implicated as Daruharidra and collected from wild and ten commercial samples procured from various important drug markets in India has been carried out, which may be useful to pharmaceutical industries for the authentication of the commercial samples and exploring the possibilities of using other species as a substitute of B. aristata.

  16. Towards an in vitro model of Plasmodium hypnozoites suitable for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembele, Laurent; Gego, Audrey; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Franetich, Jean-François; Silvie, Olivier; Rametti, Armelle; Le Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Sauerwein, Robert; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Vaillant, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, Alan W; Snounou, Georges; Kocken, Clemens H M; Mazier, Dominique

    2011-03-31

    Amongst the Plasmodium species in humans, only P. vivax and P. ovale produce latent hepatic stages called hypnozoites, which are responsible for malaria episodes long after a mosquito bite. Relapses contribute to increased morbidity, and complicate malaria elimination programs. A single drug effective against hypnozoites, primaquine, is available, but its deployment is curtailed by its haemolytic potential in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient persons. Novel compounds are thus urgently needed to replace primaquine. Discovery of compounds active against hypnozoites is restricted to the in vivo P. cynomolgi-rhesus monkey model. Slow growing hepatic parasites reminiscent of hypnozoites had been noted in cultured P. vivax-infected hepatoma cells, but similar forms are also observed in vitro by other species including P. falciparum that do not produce hypnozoites. P. falciparum or P. cynomolgi sporozoites were used to infect human or Macaca fascicularis primary hepatocytes, respectively. The susceptibility of the slow and normally growing hepatic forms obtained in vitro to three antimalarial drugs, one active against hepatic forms including hypnozoites and two only against the growing forms, was measured. The non-dividing slow growing P. cynomolgi hepatic forms, observed in vitro in primary hepatocytes from the natural host Macaca fascicularis, can be distinguished from similar forms seen in P. falciparum-infected human primary hepatocytes by the differential action of selected anti-malarial drugs. Whereas atovaquone and pyrimethamine are active on all the dividing hepatic forms observed, the P. cynomolgi slow growing forms are highly resistant to treatment by these drugs, but remain susceptible to primaquine. Resistance of the non-dividing P. cynomolgi forms to atovaquone and pyrimethamine, which do not prevent relapses, strongly suggests that these slow growing forms are hypnozoites. This represents a first step towards the development of a practical medium

  17. Towards an in vitro model of Plasmodium hypnozoites suitable for drug discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Dembele

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Amongst the Plasmodium species in humans, only P. vivax and P. ovale produce latent hepatic stages called hypnozoites, which are responsible for malaria episodes long after a mosquito bite. Relapses contribute to increased morbidity, and complicate malaria elimination programs. A single drug effective against hypnozoites, primaquine, is available, but its deployment is curtailed by its haemolytic potential in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient persons. Novel compounds are thus urgently needed to replace primaquine. Discovery of compounds active against hypnozoites is restricted to the in vivo P. cynomolgi-rhesus monkey model. Slow growing hepatic parasites reminiscent of hypnozoites had been noted in cultured P. vivax-infected hepatoma cells, but similar forms are also observed in vitro by other species including P. falciparum that do not produce hypnozoites.P. falciparum or P. cynomolgi sporozoites were used to infect human or Macaca fascicularis primary hepatocytes, respectively. The susceptibility of the slow and normally growing hepatic forms obtained in vitro to three antimalarial drugs, one active against hepatic forms including hypnozoites and two only against the growing forms, was measured.The non-dividing slow growing P. cynomolgi hepatic forms, observed in vitro in primary hepatocytes from the natural host Macaca fascicularis, can be distinguished from similar forms seen in P. falciparum-infected human primary hepatocytes by the differential action of selected anti-malarial drugs. Whereas atovaquone and pyrimethamine are active on all the dividing hepatic forms observed, the P. cynomolgi slow growing forms are highly resistant to treatment by these drugs, but remain susceptible to primaquine.Resistance of the non-dividing P. cynomolgi forms to atovaquone and pyrimethamine, which do not prevent relapses, strongly suggests that these slow growing forms are hypnozoites. This represents a first step towards the development of a

  18. Effectiveness of combinations of Ayurvedic drugs in alleviating drug toxicity and improving quality of life of cancer patients treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Vineeta; Kulkarni, Arvind; Bhargava, Sudhir; Patil, Tushar; Ramdasi, Vijay; Gangal, Sudha; Godse, Vasanti; Datar, Shrinivas; Gujar, Shweta; Sardeshmukh, Sadanand

    2014-11-01

    This study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of combinations of Ayurvedic drugs in alleviating the toxicity of chemotherapy and improving the quality of life of cancer patients. The following was the research question: Can Ayurvedic drugs be used to alleviate the side effects of chemotherapy and improve the quality of life of cancer patients? Random patients with malignancies of different tissues, grades, and stages were divided into two groups according to their treatment modality. Group 1 consisted of 15 patients treated with six cycles of chemotherapy alone and who did not receive any Ayurvedic drugs (control group). Group 2 consisted of patients (divided into three arms) who received Ayurvedic drugs during chemotherapy and after chemotherapy. Nineteen patients in arm 1 received the Ayurvedic drugs Mauktikyukta Kamdudha (MKD) and Mauktikyukta Praval Panchamruta (MPP) along with a full course of chemotherapy. Fifteen patients in arm 2 received the same Ayurvedic treatment, but the treatment was started after completing the sixth cycle of chemotherapy. Eighteen patients in arm 3 received the Suvarnabhasmadi formulation (SBD) in addition to MKD and MPP after completing the sixth cycle of chemotherapy. Treatment was given for 16 weeks in all three arms. Patients from both groups were observed for a period of 6 months. The assessment criteria depended on Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC designed by NIH and NCI): haemogram; weight; physical examination including Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ designed by the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)) for functional, symptom and global scores; and Karnofsky score for assessment of general well-being and activities of daily life. ECOG (Eastern Cooperation Oncology Group) score was also additionally included for assessment of symptoms. From amongst the symptomatic criteria, there was significant improvement in all the three arms compared with the control group in nausea, loss of appetite

  19. Quality of antimalarial drugs and antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: a survey of the health facility supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Manuel W; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M E; Lavu, Evelyn K

    2014-01-01

    Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory mechanisms. Measures to stop the availability of

  20. A high efficiency, high quality and low cost internal regulated bioanalytical laboratory to support drug development needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Dhodda, Raj; Zhang, Jun; Sydor, Jens

    2014-05-01

    In the recent past, we have seen an increase in the outsourcing of bioanalysis in pharmaceutical companies in support of their drug development pipeline. This trend is largely driven by the effort to reduce internal cost, especially in support of late-stage pipeline assets where established bioanalytical assays are used to analyze a large volume of samples. This article will highlight our perspective of how bioanalytical laboratories within pharmaceutical companies can be developed into the best partner in the advancement of drug development pipelines with high-quality support at competitive cost.

  1. Could a revision of the current guidelines for cancer drug use improve the quality of cancer treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, Theodor H; Ruoff, Hans-Jörg; Volm, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines are indispensable for such a variable disease as malignant solid tumors, with the complex possibilities of drug treatment. The current guidelines may be criticized on several points, however. First, there is a lack of information on the outcome of treatment, such as the expected success and failure rates. Treating not only drug responders but also nonresponders, that is, patients with drug resistance, must result in failures. There is no mention of the possibility of excluding the drug nonresponders, identifiable by special laboratory tests and no consideration is given to the different side effects of the recommended drug regimens. Nor are there any instructions concerning tumor cases for which anticancer drug treatment is futile. In such cases, early palliative care may lead to significant improvements in both life quality and life expectancy. Not least, there is no transparency concerning the preparation of the guidelines: persons cannot be identified who could give a statement of conflicts of interest, and responsibility is assumed only by anonymous medical associations. A revision of the current guidelines could considerably improve cancer treatment.

  2. Quality by design for herbal drugs: a feedforward control strategy and an approach to define the acceptable ranges of critical quality attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Binjun; Li, Yao; Guo, Zhengtai; Qu, Haibin

    2014-01-01

    The concept of quality by design (QbD) has been widely accepted and applied in the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry. There are still two key issues to be addressed in the implementation of QbD for herbal drugs. The first issue is the quality variation of herbal raw materials and the second issue is the difficulty in defining the acceptable ranges of critical quality attributes (CQAs). To propose a feedforward control strategy and a method for defining the acceptable ranges of CQAs for the two issues. In the case study of the ethanol precipitation process of Danshen (Radix Salvia miltiorrhiza) injection, regression models linking input material attributes and process parameters to CQAs were built first and an optimisation model for calculating the best process parameters according to the input materials was established. Then, the feasible material space was defined and the acceptable ranges of CQAs for the previous process were determined. In the case study, satisfactory regression models were built with cross-validated regression coefficients (Q(2) ) all above 91 %. The feedforward control strategy was applied successfully to compensate the quality variation of the input materials, which was able to control the CQAs in the 90-110 % ranges of the desired values. In addition, the feasible material space for the ethanol precipitation process was built successfully, which showed the acceptable ranges of the CQAs for the concentration process. The proposed methodology can help to promote the implementation of QbD for herbal drugs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Analysis of Gap in Service Quality in Drug Addiction Treatment Centers of Kerman, Iran, Using SERVQUAL Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqavi, Mohammad Reza; Refaiee, Raheleh; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of drug addicts is one of the main strategies of drug control in Iran. Client satisfaction strongly influences the success of any treatment program. This study aimed to explore the difference between customer expectations and perceptions in drug addiction treatment centers of Kerman, Iran, using SERVQUAL model. Using a cross-sectional design 260 clients referring to drug addiction treatment centers of Kerman, were enrolled in 2012. From among 84 clinics, 20 centers were selected randomly. Based on the number of clients registered in each center, a random sample proportional to the size was selected and 290 subjects were invited for interviews. A well validated 22-item questionnaire, which measured the 5 dimensions of service quality (reliability, assurance, tangibility, empathy, and responsiveness), was completed by participants. Each item measured 2 aspects of service quality; expectations and perceptions. Mean ± SD (Standard deviation) age of the subjects was 37.7 ± 9.4. Most of them were male (87.7%). Less than half of them had an educational level lower than diploma. The total score of clients` expectations was higher than their perceptions (P addiction treatment clinics.

  4. Purely in silico BCS classification: science based quality standards for the world's drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Wolk, Omri; Kim, Young Hoon; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Crippen, Gordon M; Takagi, Toshihide; Bermejo, Marival; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-11-04

    BCS classification is a vital tool in the development of both generic and innovative drug products. The purpose of this work was to provisionally classify the world's top selling oral drugs according to the BCS, using in silico methods. Three different in silico methods were examined: the well-established group contribution (CLogP) and atom contribution (ALogP) methods, and a new method based solely on the molecular formula and element contribution (KLogP). Metoprolol was used as the benchmark for the low/high permeability class boundary. Solubility was estimated in silico using a thermodynamic equation that relies on the partition coefficient and melting point. The validity of each method was affirmed by comparison to reference data and literature. We then used each method to provisionally classify the orally administered, IR drug products found in the WHO Model list of Essential Medicines, and the top-selling oral drug products in the United States (US), Great Britain (GB), Spain (ES), Israel (IL), Japan (JP), and South Korea (KR). A combined list of 363 drugs was compiled from the various lists, and 257 drugs were classified using the different in silico permeability methods and literature solubility data, as well as BDDCS classification. Lastly, we calculated the solubility values for 185 drugs from the combined set using in silico approach. Permeability classification with the different in silico methods was correct for 69-72.4% of the 29 reference drugs with known human jejunal permeability, and for 84.6-92.9% of the 14 FDA reference drugs in the set. The correlations (r(2)) between experimental log P values of 154 drugs and their CLogP, ALogP and KLogP were 0.97, 0.82 and 0.71, respectively. The different in silico permeability methods produced comparable results: 30-34% of the US, GB, ES and IL top selling drugs were class 1, 27-36.4% were class 2, 22-25.5% were class 3, and 5.46-14% were class 4 drugs, while ∼8% could not be classified. The WHO list

  5. Evaluation Management of Drugs and Relations with Quality of Outpatient Pharmacy Services in One of Hospital Pontianak City

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    Enggy Erwansani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays government policy which embodies the National Social Security System (SJSN where the presence of this system that every Indonesian people entitled to social security to be able to meet the basic needs of living. This study aims to describe the pharmaceutical drug outpatient management Hospital X Pontianak City and analyze the relationship management with the quality of pharmaceutical care medicine outpatient Hospital X Pontianak. This medication management including planning, organizing, directing, and monitoring. This study uses a quantitative approach which is an observational analytic research using cross sectional study with a sample of outpatient pharmacy customer research in Hospital X Pontianak. Collecting data using questionnaires from 100 customers outpatient with consecutive sampling method. The results using Pearson Correlation analysis showed the drug management relationship with the quality of outpatient pharmacy services which means the value of aspects planning (r=0.626; p<0,001, organizing (r=0.409; p<0,001, directing (r=0.359; p<0,001, and controlling (r=0.426; p<0,001 with R2 multiple 66.80%. The description of pharmaceutical drug management in outpatient Hospital X produce an average value 96.90% so as to be in very good category, there by proving the existence of a strong relationship between the four functions of management of the quality of pharmaceutical care medicine outpatient Hospital X.

  6. Pilot study of essential drug quality in two major cities in India.

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    Roger Bate

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: India is an increasingly influential player in the global pharmaceutical market. Key parts of the drug regulatory system are controlled by the states, each of which applies its own standards for enforcement, not always consistent with others. A pilot study was conducted in two major cities in India, Delhi and Chennai, to explore the question/hypothesis/extent of substandard and counterfeit drugs available in the market and to discuss how the Indian state and federal governments could improve drug regulation and more importantly regulatory enforcement to combat these drugs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Random samples of antimalarial, antibiotic, and antimycobacterial drugs were collected from pharmacies in urban and peri-urban areas of Delhi and Chennai, India. Semi-quantitative thin-layer chromatography and disintegration testing were used to measure the concentration of active ingredients against internationally acceptable standards. 12% of all samples tested from Delhi failed either one or both tests, and were substandard. 5% of all samples tested from Chennai failed either one or both tests, and were substandard. Spatial heterogeneity between pharmacies was observed, with some having more or less substandard drugs (30% and 0% respectively, as was product heterogeneity, with some drugs being more or less frequently substandard (12% and 7% respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In a study using basic field-deployable techniques of lesser sensitivity rather than the most advanced laboratory-based techniques, the prevalence of substandard drugs in Delhi and Chennai is confirmed to be roughly in accordance with the Indian government's current estimates. However, important spatial and product heterogeneity exists, which suggests that India's substandard drug problem is not ubiquitous, but driven by a subset of manufacturers and pharmacies which thrive in an inadequately regulated environment. It is likely that the drug regulatory

  7. Pilot Study of Essential Drug Quality in Two Major Cities in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Roger; Tren, Richard; Mooney, Lorraine; Hess, Kimberly; Mitra, Barun; Debroy, Bibek; Attaran, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background India is an increasingly influential player in the global pharmaceutical market. Key parts of the drug regulatory system are controlled by the states, each of which applies its own standards for enforcement, not always consistent with others. A pilot study was conducted in two major cities in India, Delhi and Chennai, to explore the question/hypothesis/extent of substandard and counterfeit drugs available in the market and to discuss how the Indian state and federal governments could improve drug regulation and more importantly regulatory enforcement to combat these drugs. Methodology/Principal Findings Random samples of antimalarial, antibiotic, and antimycobacterial drugs were collected from pharmacies in urban and peri-urban areas of Delhi and Chennai, India. Semi-quantitative thin-layer chromatography and disintegration testing were used to measure the concentration of active ingredients against internationally acceptable standards. 12% of all samples tested from Delhi failed either one or both tests, and were substandard. 5% of all samples tested from Chennai failed either one or both tests, and were substandard. Spatial heterogeneity between pharmacies was observed, with some having more or less substandard drugs (30% and 0% respectively), as was product heterogeneity, with some drugs being more or less frequently substandard (12% and 7% respectively). Conclusions/Significance In a study using basic field-deployable techniques of lesser sensitivity rather than the most advanced laboratory-based techniques, the prevalence of substandard drugs in Delhi and Chennai is confirmed to be roughly in accordance with the Indian government's current estimates. However, important spatial and product heterogeneity exists, which suggests that India's substandard drug problem is not ubiquitous, but driven by a subset of manufacturers and pharmacies which thrive in an inadequately regulated environment. It is likely that the drug regulatory system in India needs

  8. Influence Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction towards Drug Purchase Intention in Anggrek Outpatient Pharmacy Depo at Hasan Sadikin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiwi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The quality of service is an evaluation which focused on customer’s awareness about a structural construction of a service or product that involves 5 main aspects which are tangibility, empathy, responsiveness, reliability and assurance. Based on monthly reports of pharmacy installation only about 30% of patients buy drugs in the Anggrek out patient depo out off patients visiting Anggrek out patient specialist clinic in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of service quality and customer satisfaction to purchase intention in the Anggrek out patient depo Hasan Sadikin hospital at Bandung. The method used in this study is analytical survey with cross sectional design. The samples used were 200 patients, consist of 104 customers who have visited more than one times and 96 first visit costumer to this clinic. Data was collected using a questionnaire and analyzed using Smart PLS V 2.0 software. The results of this study showed that the service quality with tangible dimensions, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy are affecting the customer satisfaction with a score of 12.755 t-count (greater than t-table 1.983 and a positive value of the original sample of 0.800. Customer satisfaction affecting the customer purchase intentions with t-count is greater than t-table values of 5.012 and 0.726 of the original positive sample. While the service quality does not directly influence customer purchase intention with the t-test is smaller than t-table is 1.455 and the negative of the original sample -0.287. Some of service quality influence customers that causes not purchasing drugs from the out patient depo there are effect of unavailability of counseling, long waiting time of service, the need for special counseling room, a spacious waiting room, and the completeness of drug availability.

  9. Influence Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction towards Drug Purchase Intention in Anggrek Outpatient Pharmacy Depo at Hasan Sadikin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiwi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The quality of service is an evaluation which focused on customer’s awareness about a structural construction of a service or product that involves 5 main aspects which are tangibility, empathy, responsiveness, reliability and assurance. Based on monthly reports of pharmacy installation only about 30% of patients buy drugs in the Anggrek out patient depo out off patients visiting Anggrek out patient specialist clinic in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of service quality and customer satisfaction to purchase intention in the Anggrek out patient depo Hasan Sadikin hospital at Bandung. The method used in this study is analytical survey with cross sectional design. The samples used were 200 patients, consist of 104 customers who have visited more than one times and 96 first visit costumer to this clinic. Data was collected using a questionnaire and analyzed using Smart PLS V 2.0 software. The results of this study showed that the service quality with tangible dimensions, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy are affecting the customer satisfaction with a score of 12.755 t-count (greater than t-table 1.983 and a positive value of the original sample of 0.800. Customer satisfaction affecting the customer purchase intentions with t-count is greater than t-table values of 5.012 and 0.726 of the original positive sample. While the service quality does not directly influence customer purchase intention with the t-test is smaller than t-table is 1.455 and the negative of the original sample -0.287. Some of service quality influence customers that causes not purchasing drugs from the out patient depo there are effect of unavailability of counseling, long waiting time of service, the need for special counseling room, a spacious waiting room, and the completeness of drug availability.

  10. Metabolic Engineering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Considering its advantages over the other chemical synthesis routes ... such as an anti-malarial drug (artemesinin), chemicals required as the raw ... Assistant Professor at. Symbiosis ... research interests are in ... Synthetic biology, commodity.

  11. Effect of drug utilization reviews on the quality of in-hospital prescribing: a quasi-experimental study

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    Chabot Isabelle

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug utilization review (DUR programs are being conducted in Canadian hospitals with the aim of improving the appropriateness of prescriptions. However, there is little evidence of their effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of both a retrospective and a concurrent DUR programs on the quality of in-hospital prescribing. Methods We conducted an interrupted time series quasi-experimental study. Using explicit criteria for quality of prescribing, the natural history of cisapride prescription was established retrospectively in three university-affiliated hospitals. A retrospective DUR was implemented in one of the hospitals, a concurrent DUR in another, whereas the third hospital served as a control. An archivist abstracted records of all patients who were prescribed cisapride during the observation period. The effect of DURs relative to the control hospital was determined by comparing estimated regression coefficients from the time series models and by testing the statistical significance using a 2-tailed Student's t test. Results The concurrent DUR program significantly improved the appropriateness of prescriptions for the indication for use whereas the retrospective DUR brought about no significant effect on the quality of prescribing. Conclusion Results suggest a retrospective DUR approach may not be sufficient to improve the quality of prescribing. However, a concurrent DUR strategy, with direct feedback to prescribers seems effective and should be tested in other settings with other drugs.

  12. Prescription drug samples--does this marketing strategy counteract policies for quality use of medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, K E M; Sketris, I; Tett, S E

    2003-08-01

    Prescription drug samples, as used by the pharmaceutical industry to market their products, are of current interest because of their influence on prescribing, and their potential impact on consumer safety. Very little research has been conducted into the use and misuse of prescription drug samples, and the influence of samples on health policies designed to improve the rational use of medicines. This is a topical issue in the prescription drug debate, with increasing costs and increasing concerns about optimizing use of medicines. This manuscript critically evaluates the research that has been conducted to date about prescription drug samples, discusses the issues raised in the context of traditional marketing theory, and suggests possible alternatives for the future.

  13. Extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement in antimicrobial drug development research: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Bird, Emma; Gibson, Andy; Grier, Sally; Chin, Teh Li; Stoddart, Margaret; MacGowan, Alasdair

    2018-02-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is increasingly recognized as bringing a range of benefits to clinical and health services research. Recent systematic reviews have identified and synthesized many benefits (eg higher recruitment rates) and some costs (eg extra time need). Much of the literature focuses on PPI in long-term conditions rather than more acute health care in which the majority of microbiological research is undertaken. The aim was to identify the extent, quality and impact of PPI in antimicrobial drug development research. Objectives were to identify any relevant reporting of PPI in antimicrobial research; appraise the quality of reporting on PPI using recognized PPI reporting and critical appraisal tools; and extract and synthesize data on the impact of PPI. A systematic review was undertaken with a search strategy based on four word groups (PPI, patients, antimicrobial drug development and outcomes). Eight online databases were searched. English language publication, publication between 1996 and 2016 and studies describing PPI in antimicrobial drug development research. No studies were found through online searching that met the search strategy and inclusion criteria. One relevant protocol paper with a brief mention of PPI was identified through expert recommendation. Commentary papers recommending PPI were identified through website searching and expert opinion. Despite strong policy guidance encouraging PPI at the international and national levels, and anecdotal accounts of PPI taking place, evidence for the extent, quality and impact of PPI in antimicrobial drug development research has not yet appeared in the peer-reviewed literature. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Extent and quality of drug use in community-dwelling people aged ≥75 years: A Swedish nationwide register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerin, Annica; Törnkvist, Lena; Nilsson, Gunnar; Johnell, Kristina; Fastbom, Johan

    2017-12-01

    It is important for district nurses and other health professionals in primary care to gain more insight into the patterns and quality of drug use in community-dwelling older people, particularly in 75-year-olds, who have been the target of preventive home visits. This study aimed to examine the extent and quality of drug use in community-dwelling older people and to compare drug use in 75-year-olds with that of older age groups. Data from 2013 on people aged ≥75 years were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Those living in the community (671,940/739,734 people aged ≥75 years) were included in the study. Quality of drug use was assessed by using a selection of indicators issued by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. The prevalence of polypharmacy and of many drug groups increased with age, as did several indicators of inappropriate drug use. However some drug groups, as well as inappropriate drugs, were prevalent in 75-year-olds and declined with age, for example diabetes drugs, drugs with major anticholinergic effects and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The substantial use of some drugs as early as 75 years of age confirms the value of including drug use as a topic in preventive home visits to 75-year-olds. The finding that polypharmacy and many measures of inappropriate drug use increased with age in community-dwelling older people also underscores the importance of district nurses' role in continuing to promote safe medication management at higher ages.

  15. Using rapid diagnostic tests as source of malaria parasite DNA for molecular analyses in the era of declining malaria prevalence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishengoma, Deus S; Lwitiho, Sudi; Madebe, Rashid A

    2011-01-01

    was conducted to examine if sufficient DNA could be successfully extracted from malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), used and collected as part of routine case management services in health facilities, and thus forming the basis for molecular analyses, surveillance and quality control (QC) testing of RDTs....... continued molecular surveillance of malaria parasites is important to early identify emerging anti-malarial drug resistance, it is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain parasite samples from ongoing studies, such as routine drug efficacy trials. To explore other sources of parasite DNA, this study...

  16. Quality assessment of structure and language elements of written responses given by seven Scandinavian drug information centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reppe, Linda Amundstuen; Spigset, Olav; Kampmann, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to identify structure and language elements affecting the quality of responses from Scandinavian drug information centres (DICs). METHODS: Six different fictitious drug-related queries were sent to each of seven Scandinavian DICs. The centres were blinded for wh...... on drug-related queries with respect to language and text structure. Giving specific advice and precise conclusions and avoiding too compressed language and non-standard abbreviations may aid to reach this goal....... of responses was generally judged as satisfactory to good. Presenting specific advice and conclusions were considered to improve the quality of the responses. However, small nuances in language formulations could affect the individual judgments of the experts, e.g. on whether or not advice was given. Some...... and explaining pharmacological terms to ensure that enquirers understand the response as intended. In addition, more use of active voice and less compressed text structure would be desirable. CONCLUSIONS: This evaluation of responses to DIC queries may give some indications on how to improve written responses...

  17. The Suitability of P. falciparum Merozoite Surface Proteins 1 and 2 as Genetic Markers for In Vivo Drug Trials in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abd, Nazeh M.; Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M. Q.; Snounou, Georges; Abdul-Majid, Nazia B.; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Fong, Mun Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The accuracy of the conclusions from in vivo efficacy anti-malarial drug trials depends on distinguishing between recrudescences and re-infections which is accomplished by genotyping genes coding P. falciparum merozoite surface 1 (MSP1) and MSP2. However, the reliability of the PCR analysis depends on the genetic markers’ allelic diversity and variant frequency. In this study the genetic diversity of the genes coding for MSP1 and MSP2 was obtained for P. falciparum parasites circulating in Yemen. Methods Blood samples were collected from 511 patients with fever and screened for malaria parasites using Giemsa-stained blood films. A total 74 samples were infected with P. falciparum, and the genetic diversity was assessed by nested PCR targeting Pfmsp1 (Block2) and Pfmsp2 (block 3). Results Overall, 58%, 28% and 54% of the isolates harboured parasites of the Pfmsp1 K1, MAD20 and RO33 allelic families, and 55% and 89% harboured those of the Pfmsp2 FC27 and 3D7 allelic families, respectively. For both genetic makers, the multiplicity of the infection (MOI) was significantly higher in the isolates from the foothills/coastland areas as compared to those from the highland (PYemen Pfmsp1 should not be used for PCR correction of in vivo clinical trials outcomes, and that caution should be exercised when employing Pfmsp2. PMID:23861823

  18. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    associated with HbA1c monitoring and treatment was determined using logistic regression. The fourth step in the model was a health economic evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of shifting patients from inadequate to adequate medical treatment. The database used for the AMI indicator study formed...... the database for this study. Five post AMI treatment scenarios were analysed, and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios calculated. Results: The systematic literature review (Article 1) revealed that preventable adverse drug The systematic literature review (Article 1) revealed that preventable adverse drug......, that from a public health care systems' point of view, providing intensive cardioprotective treatment according to already accepted guidelines to type 2 diabetes patients is cost-effective. The HbA1c study demonstrated how diabetes-related hospital admissions are frequent, and how preventable adverse drug...

  19. [HERA-QUEST: HTA evaluation of generic pharmaceutical products to improve quality, economic efficiency, patient safety and transparency in drug product changes in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalrong-Steur, Miriam; Kellermann, Anita; Bernard, Rudolf; Berndt, Georg; Bindemann, Meike; Nusser-Rothermundt, Elfriede; Amann, Steffen; Brakebusch, Myga; Brüggmann, Jörg; Tydecks, Eva; Müller, Markus; Dörje, Frank; Kochs, Eberhard; Riedel, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    In view of the rising cost pressure and an increasing number of drug shortages, switches between generic drug preparations have become a daily routine in hospitals. To ensure consistently high treatment quality and best possible patient safety, the equivalence of the new and the previous drug preparation must be ensured before any change in the purchase of pharmaceutical products takes place. So far, no easily usable, transparent and standardized instrument for this kind of comparison between generic drug products has been available. A group of pharmaceutical experts has developed the drug HTA (health technology assessment) model "HERA" (HTA Evaluation of geneRic phArmaceutical products) through a multi-step process. The instrument is designed to perform both a qualitative and economic comparison of equivalent drug preparations ("aut idem" substitution) before switching products. The economic evaluation does not only consider unit prices and consumption quantity, but also the processing costs associated with a product change process. The qualitative comparison is based on the evaluation of 34 quality criteria belonging to six evaluation fields (e.g., approval status, practical handling, packaging design). The objective evaluation of the quality criteria is complemented by an assessment of special features of the individual hospital for complex drug switches, including the feedback of the physicians utilizing the drug preparation. Thus potentially problematic switches of pharmaceutical products can be avoided at the best possible rate, contributing to the improvement of patient safety. The novel drug HTA model HERA is a tool used in clinical practice that can add to an increase in quality, therapeutic safety and transparency of drug use while simultaneously contributing to the economic optimization of drug procurement in hospitals. Combining these two is essential for hospitals facing the tension between rising cost pressure and at the same time increasing demands

  20. PFCRT and DHFR-TS Sequences for Monitoring Drug Resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    from falciparum malaria isolates collected in Adzopé City, Côte d'Ivoire in 2007. Methods: Blood ... performed using specific primers of pfcrt and dhfr-ts. During the study .... The following mixture was prepared to a final volume of 50 ..... following the withdrawal of these anti- malarials as ... Malaria vaccines in Africa. Acta Trop.

  1. An assessment of factorial structure and health-related quality of life in problem drug users using the Short Form 36 Health Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buchholz, Angela; Krol, Anneke; Rist, Fred; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Schippers, Gerard M.

    2008-01-01

    AIMS: To confirm the factorial structure of the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) in problem drug users and to compare their health-related quality of life (HRQOL) with general Dutch population norms. METHOD: Data of 394 participants from the Amsterdam Cohort Study among drug users, who had

  2. Have VET Reforms Resulted in Improvements in Quality? Illustrations from the Alcohol and Other Drugs Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Ann; Kostadinov, Victoria; White, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Australian vocational education and training (VET) has undergone major reforms since the 1990s, including the introduction of competency based training (CBT) and the "streamlining" of qualifications. This paper examines the impact of these reforms, using the alcohol and other drugs sector as a case illustration. A survey of alcohol and…

  3. Appropriate experimental approaches for predicting abuse potential and addictive qualities in preclinical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Andy N

    2014-11-01

    Drug abuse is an increasing social and public health issue, putting the onus on drug developers and regulatory agencies to ensure that the abuse potential of novel drugs is adequately assessed prior to product launch. This review summarizes the core preclinical data that frequently contribute to building an understanding of abuse potential for a new molecular entity, in addition to highlighting models that can provide increased resolution regarding the level of risk. Second, an important distinction between abuse potential and addiction potential is drawn, with comments on how preclinical models can inform on each. While the currently adopted preclinical models possess strong predictive validity, there are areas for future refinement and research. These areas include a more refined use of self-administration models to assess relative reinforcement; and the need for open innovation in pursuing improvements. There is also the need for careful scientifically driven application of models rather than a standardization of methodologies, and the need to explore the opportunities that may exist for enhancing the value of physical dependence and withdrawal studies by focusing on withdrawal-induced drug seeking, rather than broad symptomology.

  4. Nanosystem trends in drug delivery using quality-by-design concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Qiao, Yanjiang; Wu, Zhisheng

    2017-06-28

    Quality by design (QbD) has become an inevitable trend because of its benefits for product quality and process understanding. Trials have been conducted using QbD in nanosystems' optimization. This paper reviews the application of QbD for processing nanosystems and summarizes the application procedure. It provides prospective guidelines for future investigations that apply QbD to nanosystem manufacturing processes. Employing the QbD concept in this way is a novel area in nanosystem quality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. [European Union regulatory and quality requirements for botanical drugs and their implications for Chinese herbal medicinal products development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, You-Ping

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces regulatory pathways and characteristic quality requirements for marketing authorization of herbal medicinal products in the European Union(EU), and the legal status and applications of "European Union list of herbal substances, preparations and combinations" and "European Union herbal monographs". Also introduced are Chinese herbs that have been granted the EU list entry, those with EU herbal monographs, and registered EU traditional herbal medicinal products with Chinese herbs as active ingredients. Special attention is paid to the technical details of three authorized EU herbal medicinal products (Veregen, Sativex and Episalvan) in comparison with Andrographis paniculata extract HMPL-004 that failed the phase Ⅲ clinical trial for ulcerative colitis. The paper further emphasizes the importance of enriching active fractions of herbal extracts and taking regulatory and quality considerations into account in early stage of botanical drug development. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  6. Natural products to improve quality of life targeting for colon drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunjo

    2012-03-01

    The colon is largely being investigated as a site for administration of protein and peptides, which are degraded by digestive enzymes in the upper GIT. Also for local diseases of the colon such as inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer and ameobiasis, drug administration to the site of action can not only reduce the dose to be administered, but also decrease the side effects. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) such as Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are characterized by chronic intestinal inflammation. Intestinal bacteria initiate the activation of intestinal inflammatory processes, which are mediated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine. Increased chemokine expression has also been observed in epithelial cells, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle cells. Future trials of specific agents capable of inhibiting chemokine synthesis and secretion or blocking chemokine-chemokine receptor interaction will be important to study in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. Many important bioactive compounds have been discovered from natural sources using bioactivity directed fractionation and isolation (BDFl) Continuing discovery has also been facilitated by the recent development of new bioassay methods. These bioactive compounds are mostly plant secondary metabolites, and many naturally occurring pure compounds have become medicines, dietary supplements, and other useful commercial products. The present review includes various approaches investigated for colon drug delivery and their site specificity. To achieve successful colonic delivery, a drug needs to be protected from absorption and the environment of the upper gastrointestinal tract and then be abruptly released into the proximal colon, which is considered the optimum site for colon targeted delivery of drugs.

  7. Mixing monoclonal antibody formulations using bottom-mounted mixers: impact of mechanism and design on drug product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikanga, Benson; Chen, Yufei; Stauch, Oliver B; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2015-01-01

    Using bottom-mounted mixers, particularly those that are magnetically driven, is becoming increasingly common during the mixing process in pharmaceutical and biotechnology manufacturing because of their associated low risk of contamination, ease of use, and ability to accommodate low minimum mixing volumes. Despite these benefits, the impact of bottom-mounted mixers on biologic drug product is not yet fully understood and is scarcely reported. This study evaluated four bottom-mounted mixers to assess their impact on monoclonal antibody formulations. Changes in product quality (size variants, particles, and turbidity) and impact on process performance (sterile filtration) were evaluated after mixing. The results suggested that mixers that are designed to function with no contact between the impeller and the drive unit are the most favorable and gentle to monoclonal antibody molecules. Designs with contact or a narrow clearance tended to shear and grind the protein and resulted in high particle count in the liquid, which would subsequently foul a filter membrane during sterile filtration using a 0.22 μm pore size filter. Despite particle formation, increases in turbidity of the protein solution and protein aggregation/fragmentation were not detected. Further particle analysis indicated particles in the range of 0.2-2 μm are responsible for filter fouling. A small-scale screening model was developed using two types of magnetic stir bars mimicking the presence or absence of contact between the impeller and drive unit in the bottom-mounted mixers. The model is capable of differentiating the sensitivity of monoclonal antibody formulations to bottom-mounted mixers with a small sample size. This study fills an important gap in understanding a critical bioprocess unit operation. Mixing is an important unit operation in drug product manufacturing for compounding (dilution, pooling, homogenization, etc.). The current trend in adopting disposable bottom-mounted mixers has

  8. [Development of biphasic drug-loading lipid emulsion of Salvia miltiorrhiza and its quality evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin-Yan; Li, Xi; Lai, Xiu-Jun; Li, Wei; Yang, Ya-Jing; Chu, Ting; Mao, Sheng-Jun

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of simultaneously loading both liposoluble and water-soluble components of Salvia miltiorrhiza in emulsion was discussed, in order to provide new ideas in comprehensive application of effective components in S. miltiorrhiza in terms of technology of pharmaceutics. With tanshinone II (A) and salvianolic acid B as raw materials, soybean phospholipid and poloxamer 188 as emulsifiers, and glycerin as isoosmotic regulator, the central composite design-response surface method was employed to optimize the prescription. The coarse emulsion was prepared with the high-speed shearing method and then homogenized in the high pressure homogenizer. The biphasic drug-loading intravenous emulsion was prepared to investigate its pharmaceutical properties and stability. The prepared emulsion is orange-yellow, with the average diameter of 241 nm and Zeta potential of -35.3 mV. Specifically, the drug loading capacity of tanshinone II (A) and salvianolic acid B were 0.5 g x L(-1) and 1 g x L(-1), respectively, with a good stability among long-term retention samples. According to the results, the prepared emulsion could load liposoluble tanshinone II (A) and water-soluble salvianolic acid B simultaneously, which lays a pharmaceutical foundation for giving full play to the efficacy of S. miltiorrhiza.

  9. Laboratory automation of high-quality and efficient ligand-binding assays for biotherapeutic drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Patel, Vimal; Burns, Daniel; Laycock, John; Pandya, Kinnari; Tsoi, Jennifer; DeSilva, Binodh; Ma, Mark; Lee, Jean

    2013-07-01

    Regulated bioanalytical laboratories that run ligand-binding assays in support of biotherapeutics development face ever-increasing demand to support more projects with increased efficiency. Laboratory automation is a tool that has the potential to improve both quality and efficiency in a bioanalytical laboratory. The success of laboratory automation requires thoughtful evaluation of program needs and fit-for-purpose strategies, followed by pragmatic implementation plans and continuous user support. In this article, we present the development of fit-for-purpose automation of total walk-away and flexible modular modes. We shared the sustaining experience of vendor collaboration and team work to educate, promote and track the use of automation. The implementation of laboratory automation improves assay performance, data quality, process efficiency and method transfer to CRO in a regulated bioanalytical laboratory environment.

  10. Comparative study of the pharmacopeial quality and dissolution profiles of generic and other drug forms of sodium metamizole (dipyrone sold in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morenna Alana Giordani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, in order for a pharmaceutical company to register a drug form as generic or ‘similar’ with the Brazilian food and drug agency (Anvisa, it must be proved bioequivalent to its innovatory branded form (reference drug. This requires comparative trials, carried out in conformity with official compendia (Brazilian Pharmacopeia or another officially recognized code. Additionally, according to the Anvisa resolution RDC 31/2010, the dissolution profile of the drug must be tested and compared with that of the branded reference, as a benchmark of quality. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of 500 mg sodium metamizole (dipyrone tablets produced by seven different laboratories in Brazil: three generic drugs (G1, G2, G3, three (branded similar drugs (S1, S2,S3 and their reference branded product (Novalgina®, Sanofi-Aventis, drug R. All tests were carried out by methods specified in the Brazilian Pharmacopeia 4th edition (Farmacopeia Brasileira IV. The following tests were performed: uniformity of mass, friability, disintegration time, hardness, assay, uniformity of dosage units, salicylic acid limit assay, dissolution and identification. The dissolution profile was also recorded, as recommended in RDC 31/2010. Whereas every sample was approved in all the Farmacopeia Brasileira IV tests, the results in the dissolution profile test showed that four of the test drugs (G1, G2, S1 and S2 were notpharmaceutically equivalent to drug R. Thus, only drugs G3 and S3 showed dissolution profiles similar to that of drug R and the other four drugs could not be considered equivalent to it and were not approved.

  11. Quality improvement in breast cancer project: compliance with antiresorptive agents and changing patterns of drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Charles P; Shapiro, Charles L; Ramirez, Maria Teresa; Kotur, Linda; Farrar, William

    2014-02-01

    The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute participated in NCCN's Quality Improvement in Breast Cancer initiative. The Opportunities for Improvement (OFI) team elected to improve concordance with the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer recommendation that all patients diagnosed with skeletal metastases receive bisphosphonates. Assembling a multidisciplinary team of clinicians, researchers, and administrative stakeholders, the OFI team followed Six Sigma's approach to problem-solving known as DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control). Baseline concordance was 79%, which was below the recommended target range. Initial analysis quickly revealed that 5 cases were concordant, resulting in a new baseline of 89%. The key root cause identified for the remaining gap was lack of documentation. The solution included education regarding documentation for existing staff, in addition to hard-wiring the material into new physician orientation, discussion of all patients with bone disease at tumor board meetings, and improved consistency with use of the new electronic medical record system. After implementation, the reported concordance was 92%, and the lack of documentation problem decreased from 11% in the baseline study to 6%. The team concluded that use of the NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database as an opportunity for clinical quality improvement initiatives not only is possible but also should be an essential element of any clinical program looking to continuously improve.

  12. Who continues to stock oral artemisinin monotherapy? Results of a provider survey in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Si Thu; Sudhinaraset, May; Khin, Hnin Su Su; McFarland, Willi; Aung, Tin

    2016-06-22

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is a key strategy for global malaria elimination efforts. However, the development of artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites threatens progress and continued usage of oral artemisinin monotherapies (AMT) predisposes the selection of drug resistant strains. This is particularly a problem along the Myanmar/Thailand border. The artemisinin monotherapy replacement programme (AMTR) was established in 2012 to remove oral AMT from stocks in Myanmar, specifically by replacing oral AMT with quality-assured ACT and conducting behavioural change communication activities to the outlets dispensing anti-malarial medications. This study attempts to quantify the characteristics of outlet providers who continue to stock oral AMT despite these concerted efforts. A cross-sectional survey of all types of private sector outlets that were stocking anti-malarial drugs in 13 townships of Eastern Myanmar was implemented from July to August 2014. A total of 573 outlets were included. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regressions were conducted to assess outlet and provider-level characteristics associated with stocking oral AMT. In total, 2939 outlets in Eastern Myanmar were screened for presence of any anti-malarial drugs in August 2014. The study found that 573 (19.5 %) had some kind of oral anti-malarial drug in stock at the time of survey and among them, 96 (16.8 %) stocked oral AMT. In bivariate analyses, compared to health care facilities, itinerant drug vendors, retailers and health workers were less likely to stock oral AMT (33.3 vs 12.9, 10.0, 8.1 %, OR = 0.30, 0.22, 0.18, respectively). Providers who cut blister pack or sell partial courses (40.6 vs 11.7 %, OR 5.18, CI 3.18-8.44) and those who based their stock decision on consumer demand (32.8 vs 12.1 %, OR 3.54, CI 2.21-5.63) were more likely to stock oAMT. Multivariate logistic regressions produced similar significant associations. Private healthcare facilities and drug

  13. Variability in the quality of overdose advice in Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) documents: gut decontamination recommendations for CNS drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Andrew J B; Bateman, D N; Waring, W S

    2009-01-01

    Deliberate self-poisoning is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The Summary of Product Characteristics (SPC) document is a legal requirement for all drugs, and Section 4.9 addresses the features of toxicity and clinical advice on management of overdose. The quality and appropriateness of this advice have received comparatively little attention. Section 4.9 of the SPC was examined for all drugs in the central nervous system (CNS) category of the British National Formulary. Advice concerning gut decontamination was examined with respect to specific interventions: induced vomiting, oral activated charcoal, gastric lavage, and other interventions. Data were compared with standard reference sources for clinical management advice in poisoning. These were graded 'A' if no important differences existed, 'B' if differences were noted but not thought clinically important, and 'C' if differences were thought to be clinically significant. SPC documents were examined for 258 medications from 67 manufacturers. The overall agreement was 'A' in 23 (8.9%), 'B' in 28 (10.9%) and 'C' in 207 (80.2%). Discrepancies were due to inappropriate recommendation of induced emesis in 21.7% (95% confidence interval 17.1, 27.1), gastric lavage in 38.4% (32.7, 44.4), other gut decontamination in 5.8% (3.6, 9.4) and failure to recommend oral activated charcoal in 57.4% (51.1, 63.4). Gut decontamination advice in SPC documents with respect to CNS drugs was inadequate. Possible reasons for the observed discrepancies and ways of improving the consistency of advice are proposed.

  14. Nuclear attitudes and reactions: associations with depression, drug use, and quality of life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newcomb, M.D.

    1986-05-01

    For 40 years the world has lived with the threat of nuclear war and, recently, with the possibility of nuclear power plant accidents. Although virtually every generation must confront various national or international crises, the threat of nuclear war is unprecedented in its destructive potential. This study is an attempt to assess attitudes and amount of distress associated with the ever-present threat of nuclear war and the possibility of accidents at nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Attitudes Questionnaire (NAQ) consists of 15 items and was administered to 722 young adults who have grown up in the nuclear age. The items were found to reflect four latent factors of nuclear concern, nuclear support, fear of the future, and nuclear denial, all of which in turn represent a second-order construct of nuclear anxiety. Women reported significantly more nuclear concern, less nuclear support, more fear of the future, and less nuclear denial than did men. In latent-variable models, nuclear anxiety was found to be significantly associated with less purpose in life, less life satisfaction, more powerlessness, more depression, and more drug use. It is concluded that the threat of nuclear war and accidents is significantly related to psychological distress and may disturb normal maturational development.

  15. Nuclear attitudes and reactions: associations with depression, drug use, and quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newcomb, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    For 40 years the world has lived with the threat of nuclear war and, recently, with the possibility of nuclear power plant accidents. Although virtually every generation must confront various national or international crises, the threat of nuclear war is unprecedented in its destructive potential. This study is an attempt to assess attitudes and amount of distress associated with the ever-present threat of nuclear war and the possibility of accidents at nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Attitudes Questionnaire (NAQ) consists of 15 items and was administered to 722 young adults who have grown up in the nuclear age. The items were found to reflect four latent factors of nuclear concern, nuclear support, fear of the future, and nuclear denial, all of which in turn represent a second-order construct of nuclear anxiety. Women reported significantly more nuclear concern, less nuclear support, more fear of the future, and less nuclear denial than did men. In latent-variable models, nuclear anxiety was found to be significantly associated with less purpose in life, less life satisfaction, more powerlessness, more depression, and more drug use. It is concluded that the threat of nuclear war and accidents is significantly related to psychological distress and may disturb normal maturational development

  16. The strategic relevance of manufacturing technology: An overall quality concept to promote innovation preventing drug shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzitta, Michele; Ponti, Mauro; Bruno, Giorgio; Cois, Giancarlo; D'Arpino, Alessandro; Minghetti, Paola; Mendicino, Francesca Romana; Perioli, Luana; Ricci, Maurizio

    2017-01-10

    Manufacturing is the bridge between research and patient: without product, there is no clinical outcome. Shortage has a variety of causes, in this paper we analyse only causes related to manufacturing technology and we use shortage as a paradigm highliting the relevance of Pharmaceutical Technology. Product and process complexity and capacity issues are the main challenge for the Pharmaceutical Industry Supply chain. Manufacturing Technology should be acknowledged as a R&D step and as a very important matter during University degree in Pharmacy and related disciplines, promoting collaboration between Academia and Industry, measured during HTA step and rewarded in terms of price and reimbursement. The above elements are not yet properly recognised, and manufacturing technology is taken in to consideration only when a shortage is in place. In a previous work, Panzitta et al. proposed to perform a full technology assessment at the Health Technological Assessment stage, evaluating three main technical aspects of a medicine: manufacturing process, physicochemical properties, and formulation characteristics. In this paper, we develop the concept of manufacturing appraisal, providing a technical overview of upcoming challenges, a risk based approach and an economic picture of shortage costs. We develop also an overall quality concept, not limited to GMP factors but broaden to all elements leading to a robust supply and promoting technical innovation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum and distribution of drug resistance haplotypes in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Hashami, Zainab; Al-Farsi, Hissa; Al-mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Idris, Mohamed A; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Babiker, Hamza A

    2013-07-15

    Despite evident success of malaria control in many sites in the Arabian Peninsula, malaria remains endemic in a few spots, in Yemen and south-west of Saudi Arabia. In addition to local transmission, imported malaria sustains an extra source of parasites that can challenge the strengths of local control strategies. This study examined the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Yemen and mutations of drug resistant genes, to elucidate parasite structure and distribution of drug resistance genotypes in the region. Five polymorphic loci (MSP-2, Pfg377 and three microsatellites on chromosome 8) not involved in anti-malarial drug resistance, and four drug resistant genes (pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr and dhps) were genotyped in 108 P. falciparum isolates collected in three sites in Yemen: Dhamar, Hodeidah and Taiz. High diversity was seen in non-drug genes, pfg377 (He = 0.66), msp-2 (He = 0.80) and three microsatellites on chr 8, 7.7 kb (He = 0.88), 4.3 kb (He = 0.77) and 0.8 kb (He = 0.71). There was a high level of mixed-genotype infections (57%), with an average 1.8 genotypes per patient. No linkage disequilibrium was seen between drug resistant genes and the non-drug markers (p Yemen is indicative of a large parasite reservoir, which represents a challenge to control efforts. The presence of two distinct pfcrt genotype, CVIET and SVMNT, suggests that chloroquine resistance can possibly be related to a migratory path from Africa and Asia. The absence of the triple mutant dhfr genotype (IRN) and dhps mutations supports the use of artesunate + sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine as first-line therapy. However, the prevalent pfmdr1 genotype NFSND [21%] has previously been associated with tolerance/resistance response to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT). Regular surveys are, therefore, important to monitor spread of pfmdr1 and dhfr mutations and response to ACT.

  18. Estimating the Impact of Means-tested Subsidies under Treatment Externalities with Application to Anti-Malarial Bednets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Debopam; Dupas, Pascaline; Kanaya, Shin

    and its neighbors. Using experimental data from Kenya where subsidies were randomized, coupled with GPS-based location information, we show how to estimate aggregate ITN use resulting from means-tested subsidies in the presence of such spatial spillovers. Accounting for spillovers introduces infinite......-dimensional estimated regressors corresponding to continuously distributed location coordinates and makes the inference problem novel. We show that even if individual ITN use unambiguously increases with increasing incidence of subsidy in the neighborhood, ignoring spillovers may over- or under-predict overall ITN use...... resulting from a specific targeting rule, depending on the resulting aggregate incidence of subsidy. Applying our method to the Kenyan data, we find that (i) individual ITN use rises with neighborhood subsidy-rates, (ii) under means-testing, predicted ITN use is a convex increasing function of the subsidy...

  19. Association between severity of illicit drug dependence and quality of life in a psychosocial care center in BRAZIL: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campêlo, Selva Rios; Barbosa, Maria Alves; Dias, Danilo Rocha; Caixeta, Camila Cardoso; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Porto, Celmo Celeno

    2017-11-17

    Quality of life must be one of the main purposes for the treatment of drug users, requiring a better understanding of the association between the quality of life and the severity of dependency. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between severity of substance use in various areas of human functioning and quality of life of illicit drug users in a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs. This cross-sectional study included 60 participants - illicit drug users - treated at a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs. Participants were evaluated with the short version of World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-Bref) instrument to measure the quality of life, the 6th version of Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6) to assess the severity of dependence in several areas and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to identify the presence of psychiatric disorders. Pearson and Spearman correlation tests and linear regression were applied to verify the association between the severity of dependence and the quality of life, and Student's t-test to compare the mean quality of life between individuals with and without psychiatric comorbidities. Negative correlation was found between the severity of dependence on the drugs dimensions: alcohol, psychiatric, medical, legal, family/social support and family/social problems of ASI-6, and the quality of life domains measured by the WHOQOL-Bref. The evidence was strongest in the psychiatric and medical dimensions. There was a significant difference in the quality of life mean among participants presenting or not presenting psychiatric comorbidities, for the psychological domain in anxiety disorders, and for the physical and psychological domains in mood disorders. The quality of life decreased as the severity of dependence increased, with different results in the various areas of the participant's life. This result emphasizes the need for training the professional team which works in the

  20. The challenges of changing national malaria drug policy to artemisinin-based combinations in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otieno Dorothy N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound Sulphadoxine/sulphalene-pyrimethamine (SP was adopted in Kenya as first line therapeutic for uncomplicated malaria in 1998. By the second half of 2003, there was convincing evidence that SP was failing and had to be replaced. Despite several descriptive investigations of policy change and implementation when countries moved from chloroquine to SP, the different constraints of moving to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT in Africa are less well documented. Methods A narrative description of the process of anti-malarial drug policy change, financing and implementation in Kenya is assembled from discussions with stakeholders, reports, newspaper articles, minutes of meetings and email correspondence between actors in the policy change process. The narrative has been structured to capture the timing of events, the difficulties and hurdles faced and the resolutions reached to the final implementation of a new treatment policy. Results Following a recognition that SP was failing there was a rapid technical appraisal of available data and replacement options resulting in a decision to adopt artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the recommended first-line therapy in Kenya, announced in April 2004. Funding requirements were approved by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM and over 60 million US$ were agreed in principle in July 2004 to procure AL and implement the policy change. AL arrived in Kenya in May 2006, distribution to health facilities began in July 2006 coincidental with cascade in-service training in the revised national guidelines. Both training and drug distribution were almost complete by the end of 2006. The article examines why it took over 32 months from announcing a drug policy change to completing early implementation. Reasons included: lack of clarity on sustainable financing of an expensive therapeutic for a common disease, a delay in release of funding, a lack of comparative efficacy data

  1. The influence of maternal drinking and drug use on the quality of the home environment of school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, J M; Jacobson, S W; Sokol, R J; Tuttle, B S; Jacobson, J L

    2000-08-01

    Although many studies have examined the development of children of male alcoholics, few studies have considered substance use by the female caregiver. This study evaluated the relationship between substance use by female caregivers and factors that affect the child-rearing environment. A total of 480 inner-city African-American women were recruited during pregnancy for a longitudinal study of the effects of prenatal alcohol use and substance use by caregivers on the development of their children. All women were screened for alcohol consumption at their first prenatal visit to a large urban maternity hospital. Those who averaged seven or more drinks per week (0.5 oz absolute alcohol per day) at the time of conception were invited to participate in the study, as was a 5% random sample of lighter drinkers and abstainers. At the 7.5-year follow-up assessment, the quantity and frequency of alcohol consumption and drug use, as well as several measures of the child-rearing environment, were assessed for 231 of the caregivers. Current alcohol use was uncorrelated with standard demographic factors, such as socioeconomic status, but was related to poorer family functioning, lower quality of parental intellectual stimulation, and higher levels of domestic violence. There were independent effects of illicit drug use on family environment, domestic violence, and caregiver depression. History of drinking during pregnancy, however, was not related to the current child-rearing environment. Poorer parental functioning generally was found only among the caregivers who currently drank both heavily (six or more drinks/occasion) and frequently (three or more days/week). After controlling for lifetime alcohol problems, current drinking still predicted a less cohesive and organized family environment and higher levels of domestic violence. Current heavy, frequent drinking in this relatively homogenous, economically disadvantaged sample was unrelated to demographics and seemed to have an

  2. A simultaneous determination of related substances by high performance liquid chromatography in a drug product using quality by design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Trupti; Kadam, Nilesh; Raotole, Nilesh; Desai, Anita; Samanta, Gautam

    2016-02-05

    The combination of Abacavir, Lamivudine and Dolutegravir is an anti-retroviral formulation that displays high efficacy and superiority in comparison to other anti-retroviral combinations. Analysis of related substances in this combination drug product was very challenging due to the presence of nearly thirty peaks including the three active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), eleven known impurities and other pharmaceutical excipients. Objective of this study was to develop a single, selective, and robust high performance liquid chromatography method for the efficient separation of all peaks. Initially, one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) approach was adopted to develop the method. But, it could not resolve all the critical peaks in such complex matrix. This led to the advent of two different HPLC methods for the determination of related substances, one for Abacavir and Lamivudine and the other for Dolutegravir. But, since analysis of a single sample using two methods instead of one is time and resource consuming and thus expensive, an attempt was made to develop a single and robust method by adopting quality by design (QbD) principles. Design of Experiments (DoE) was applied as a tool to achieve the optimum conditions through Response surface methodology with three method variables, pH, temperature, and mobile phase composition. As the study progressed, it was discovered that establishment of the design space was not viable due to the completely distant pH requirements of the two responses, i.e. (i) retention time for Lamivudine carboxylic acid and (ii) resolution between Abacavir impurity B and unknown impurity. Eventually, neglecting one of these two responses each time, two distinguished design spaces have been established and verified. Edge of failures at both design spaces indicate high probability of failure. It therefore, becomes very important to identify the most robust zone or normal operating range (NOR) within the design space with low risk of failure and high

  3. Using supply side evidence to inform oral artemisinin monotherapy replacement in Myanmar: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khin, Hnin Su Su; Aung, Tin; Aung, Moe; Thi, Aung; Boxshall, Matt; White, Chris

    2016-08-18

    In 2012, alarmingly high rates of oral artemisinin monotherapy availability and use were detected along Eastern Myanmar, threatening efforts to halt the spread of artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS), and globally. The aim of this paper is to exemplify how the use of supply side evidence generated through the ACTwatch project shaped the artemisinin monotherapy replacement malaria (AMTR) project's design and interventions to rapidly displace oral artemisinin monotherapy with subsidized, quality-assured ACT in the private sector. The AMTR project was implemented as part of the Myanmar artemisinin resistance containment (MARC) framework along Eastern Myanmar. Guided by outlet survey and supply chain evidence, the project implemented a high-level subsidy, including negotiations with a main anti-malarial distributor, with the aim of squeezing oral artemisinin monotherapy out of the market through price competition and increased availability of quality-assured artemisinin-based combinations. This was complemented with a plethora of demand-creation activities targeting anti-malarial providers and consumers. Priority outlet types responsible for the distribution of oral artemisinin monotherapy were identified by the outlet survey, and this evidence was used to target the AMTR project's supporting interventions. The widespread availability and use of oral artemisinin monotherapy in Myanmar has been a serious threat to malaria control and elimination in the country and across the region. Practical anti-malarial market evidence was rapidly generated and used to inform private sector approaches to address these threats. The program design approach outlined in this paper is illustrative of the type of evidence generation and use that will be required to ensure effective containment of artemisinin drug resistance and progress toward regional and global malaria elimination goals.

  4. The Impact of Experiencing Adverse Drug Reactions on the Patient's Quality of Life : A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolfes, Leàn; van Hunsel, Florence; Taxis, Katja; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    INTRODUCTION: There is little information as to what extent adverse drug reactions (ADRs) influence patients' health-related quality of life (HR-QOL). From a pharmacovigilance perspective, capturing and making the best use of this information remains a challenge. The Netherlands Pharmacovigilance

  5. The impact of quality-of-life data in relative effectiveness assessments of new anti-cancer drugs in European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Sarah; Meneses Leonardo Alves, Teresa; Meijboom, Kim; Lipska, Iga; De Boer, Anthonius; Leufkens, Hubertus G; Goettsch, Wim G

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to investigate the role of health-related quality-of-life (QoL) data in relative effectiveness assessments (REAs) of new anti-cancer drugs across European jurisdictions, during health technology assessment procedures. METHODS: Comparative analysis of guidelines and

  6. Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, N.; Jeffries, J.; Mach, J.; Robson, M.; Pajot, D.; Harrigan, J.; Lebsack, T.; Mullen, D.; Rat, F.; Theys, P.

    1993-01-01

    What is quality? How do you achieve it? How do you keep it once you have got it. The answer for industry at large is the three-step hierarchy of quality control, quality assurance and Total quality Management. An overview is given of the history of quality movement, illustrated with examples from Schlumberger operations, as well as the oil industry's approach to quality. An introduction of the Schlumberger's quality-associated ClientLink program is presented. 15 figs., 4 ills., 16 refs

  7. The use of paediatric artemisinin combinations in sub-Saharan Africa: a snapshot questionnaire survey of health care personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnandji Selidji T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paediatric drug formulations for artemisinin combination therapy (P-ACT have been developed over the past few years and have been shown to improve the therapeutic management of young children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. This process was however not equally paralleled by a timely adoption of P-ACT in national and international treatment recommendations. National malaria programmes in sub-Saharan Africa have not yet widely embraced this new therapeutic tool. To which extent P-ACT is used in the field in sub-Saharan Africa is not known to date. Methods This snapshot questionnaire survey aimed to provide an overview on the current routine practices for the availability and use of P-ACT as anti-malarial treatment for young children in sub-Saharan Africa. Health care personnel in seven countries in West-, Central, and East-Africa were invited to answer a structured questionnaire assessing use and availability of P-ACT. Results A total of 71 respondents including doctors, nurses and pharmacy personnel responsible for the anti-malarial treatment of young children were interviewed. P-ACT was used by 83% (95% confidence interval: 73-90%; n = 59 as first-line treatment for young children. Use of 15 different P-ACT products was reported among which only two have received WHO prequalification status and approval by a stringent registration authority. Use of a specific P-ACT product was not linked to consumer prices or availability of supporting clinical trial data, but may depend more on the marketing capacity of the manufacturer. Major differences in frequency and dosing of anti-malarial regimens with identical anti-malarial compounds and the marketing of loose combinations were recorded. Conclusion Paediatric ACT is widely used for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in young children. However, the majority of P-ACT formulations in use do not meet highest international quality standards evoking concerns for patients

  8. The application of the Accelerated Stability Assessment Program (ASAP) to quality by design (QbD) for drug product stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Kenneth Craig

    2011-09-01

    An isoconversion paradigm, where times in different temperature and humidity-controlled stability chambers are set to provide a fixed degradant level, is shown to compensate for the complex, non-single order kinetics of solid drug products. A humidity-corrected Arrhenius equation provides reliable estimates for temperature and relative humidity effects on degradation rates. A statistical protocol is employed to determine best fits for chemical stability data, which in turn allows for accurate estimations of shelf life (with appropriate confidence intervals) at any storage condition including inside packaging (based on the moisture vapor transmission rate of the packaging and moisture sorption isotherms of the internal components). These methodologies provide both faster results and far better predictions of chemical stability limited shelf life (expiry) than previously possible. Precise shelf-life estimations are generally determined using a 2-week, product-specific protocol. Once the model for a product is developed, it can play a critical role in providing the product understanding necessary for a quality by design (QbD) filing for product approval and enable rational control strategies to assure product stability. Moreover, this Accelerated Stability Assessment Program (ASAP) enables the coupling of product attributes (e.g., moisture content, packaging options) to allow for flexibility in how control strategies are implemented to provide a balance of cost, speed, and other factors while maintaining adequate stability.

  9. A quality-by-design study for an immediate-release tablet platform: examining the relative impact of active pharmaceutical ingredient properties, processing methods, and excipient variability on drug product quality attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Joseph; Langdon, Beth A; Hicks, Ian; Song, Daniel; Li, Fasheng; Kathiria, Lalji; Kane, Anil; Ranade, Gautam; Agarwal, Kam

    2014-02-01

    The impact of filler-lubricant particle size ratio variation (3.4-41.6) on the attributes of an immediate-release tablet was compared with the impacts of the manufacturing method used (direct compression or dry granulation) and drug loading (1%, 5%, and 25%), particle size (D[4,3]: 8-114 μm), and drug type (theophylline or ibuprofen). All batches were successfully manufactured, except for direct compression of 25% drug loading of 8 μm (D[4,3]) drug, which exhibited very poor flow properties. All manufactured tablets possessed adequate quality attributes: tablet weight uniformity 1 MPa, friability ≤ 0.2% weight loss, and disintegration time impact on blend and granulation particle size and granulation flow, whereas drug property variation dominated blend flow, ribbon solid fraction, and tablet quality attributes. Although statistically significant effects were observed, the results of this study suggest that the manufacturability and performance of this immediate-release tablet formulation is robust to a broad range of variation in drug properties, both within-grade and extra-grade excipient particle size variations, and the choice of manufacturing method. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. Quality assurance and quality improvement using supportive supervision in a large-scale STI intervention with sex workers, men who have sex with men/transgenders and injecting-drug users in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogasale, V.; Wi, T.C.; Das, A.; Kane, S.; Singh, A.K.; George, B.; Steen, R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Documentation of the long-term impact of supportive supervision using a monitoring tool in STI intervention with sex workers, men who have sex with men and injection-drug users is limited. The authors report methods and results of continued quality monitoring in a large-scale STI services

  11. [Investigation on pattern of quality control for Chinese materia medica based on famous-region drug and bioassay--the work reference].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dan; Xiao, Xiaohe

    2011-05-01

    Selection and standardization of the work reference are the technical issues to be faced with in the bioassay of Chinese materia medica. Taking the bioassay of Coptis chinensis. as an example, the manufacture process of the famous-region drugs extraction was explained from the aspects of original identification, routine examination, component analysis and bioassay. The common technologies were extracted, and the selection and standardization procedures of the work reference for the bioassay of Chinese materia medica were drawn up, so as to provide technical support for constructing a new mode and method of the quality control of Chinese materia medica based on the famous-region drugs and bioassay.

  12. Quality Control and Complication Screening Programme of Chinese Medicinal Drugs at the First German Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine - A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchart, Dieter; Hager, Stefan; Dai, Jingzhang; Weidenhammer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The use of drugs derived from plants is a cornerstone of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Yet, too little is known about risk and safety of Chinese medicinal drugs (CMD). Therefore, the TCM hospital Bad Kötzting has developed a quality control and complication screening programme in order to ensure a safe administration of TCM drugs to their patients. All Chinese medicinal drugs delivered to the hospital between September 1, 2012 and December 31, 2013 entered the quality control program and were screened for microbial contamination, aflatoxin, pesticides and heavy metals. A routinely applied complication screening programme monitored liver enzymes in all patients. Case causality assessment by CIOMS scale and identification of admitted herbs were conducted. Additionally, side effects of patients were identified by a routinely performed web-based documentation system. In 5 of 23 investigated samples (21.7%) the initial testing showed microbial contamination (2), pesticide (2) and heavy metals (1). The drugs were tested for authenticity and adulterations, respectively. All 994 patients (mean age 52.6 years; 72.6% female) admitted were available for analysis. 448 (45.1%) of all patients reported having perceived at least one side effect of treatment. They experienced mainly gastrointestinal symptoms (13.6%), neurovegetative symptoms (10.8 %), temporary deteriorations of pain (8.8%), diarrhoea (5.9%), nausea (1.6%) and vomiting (0.5%). Further, 6 patients with a more than 2-fold elevation (compared to maximum normal value or elevated admission values) of ALT were found in the systematic laboratory control with a non-conclusive causality assessment for TCM-drugs. Approximate incidence rates and analysed drugs associated with liver damage revealed a low rate of liver injury. Patients should be informed of the gastrointestinal symptoms caused by and potential hepatotoxicity of TCM herbs. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  13. Assessing the quality of service of village malaria workers to strengthen community-based malaria control in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ly Po

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria continues to be a major public health problem in remote forested areas in Cambodia. As a national strategy to strengthen community-based malaria control, the Cambodian government has been running the Village Malaria Worker (VMW project since 2001. This study sought to examine the nature and quality of the VMWs' services. Methods Data collection was carried out in February and March 2008 through interviews with one of the two VMWs who takes the lead in malaria control activities in each of the 315 VMW villages (n = 251. The questionnaire addressed 1 the sociodemographic characteristics of VMWs, 2 service quality, 3 actions for malaria prevention and vector control, and 4 knowledge of malaria epidemiology and vector ecology. Results VMWs were effective in conducting diagnosis with Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs and prescribing anti-malarials to those who had positive RDT results, skills that they had acquired through their training programmes. However, most other services, such as active detection, explanations about compliance, and follow-up of patients, were carried out by only a small proportion of VMWs. The variety of actions that VMWs took for malaria prevention and vector control was small (average action index score 12.8/23, and their knowledge was very limited with less than 20% of the VMWs giving correct answers to six out of seven questions on malaria epidemiology and vector ecology. Knowledge of vector breeding places and malaria transmission were significant determinants of both the quality of VMWs' services and the variety of their actions for malaria prevention and vector control. Conclusions VMWs' services focused primarily on diagnosis and treatment. Their focus needs to be broadened to cover other aspects of malaria control in order to further strengthen community-based malaria control. VMWs' actions and knowledge also need substantial improvement. Strengthening training programmes can help achieve better

  14. Integrated Application of Quality-by-Design Principles to Drug Product Development: A Case Study of Brivanib Alaninate Film-Coated Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif I F; Narang, Ajit S; LaMarche, Keirnan R; Subramanian, Ganeshkumar A; Varia, Sailesh A; Lin, Judy; Stevens, Tim; Shah, Pankaj A

    2016-01-01

    Modern drug product development is expected to follow quality-by-design (QbD) paradigm. At the same time, although there are several issue-specific examples in the literature that demonstrate the application of QbD principles, a holistic demonstration of the application of QbD principles to drug product development and control strategy, is lacking. This article provides an integrated case study on the systematic application of QbD to product development and demonstrates the implementation of QbD concepts in the different aspects of product and process design for brivanib alaninate film-coated tablets. Using a risk-based approach, the strategy for development entailed identification of product critical quality attributes (CQAs), assessment of risks to the CQAs, and performing experiments to understand and mitigate identified risks. Quality risk assessments and design of experiments were performed to understand the quality of the input raw materials required for a robust formulation and the impact of manufacturing process parameters on CQAs. In addition to the material property and process parameter controls, the proposed control strategy includes use of process analytical technology and conventional analytical tests to control in-process material attributes and ensure quality of the final product. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. The relationship between the quality of drug user treatment and program completion: understanding the perceptions of women in a prison-based program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, S M; Falkin, G P

    2000-01-01

    To determine why some women offenders complete prison-based drug user treatment and others leave early, clients' (N = 101) perceptions of various aspects of the quality of the treatment experience were compared. Analyses of both quantitative and qualitative data indicate that clients who completed the program had a more favorable perception of staff and felt empowered by the experience in treatment. Most of the clients who left early did so because of conflicts or disagreements with the program's rules. We discuss how a supportive approach to personal development may enhance client perceptions of program quality and increase retention rates.

  16. A Cluster Randomised Trial Introducing Rapid Diagnostic Tests into Registered Drug Shops in Uganda: Impact on Appropriate Treatment of Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonye, Anthony K.; Magnussen, Pascal; Lal, Sham; Hansen, Kristian S.; Cundill, Bonnie; Chandler, Clare; Clarke, Siân E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Inappropriate treatment of malaria is widely reported particularly in areas where there is poor access to health facilities and self-treatment of fevers with anti-malarial drugs bought in shops is the most common form of care-seeking. The main objective of the study was to examine the impact of introducing rapid diagnostic tests for malaria (mRDTs) in registered drug shops in Uganda, with the aim to increase appropriate treatment of malaria with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in patients seeking treatment for fever in drug shops. Methods A cluster-randomized trial of introducing mRDTs in registered drug shops was implemented in 20 geographical clusters of drug shops in Mukono district, central Uganda. Ten clusters were randomly allocated to the intervention (diagnostic confirmation of malaria by mRDT followed by ACT) and ten clusters to the control arm (presumptive treatment of fevers with ACT). Treatment decisions by providers were validated by microscopy on a reference blood slide collected at the time of consultation. The primary outcome was the proportion of febrile patients receiving appropriate treatment with ACT defined as: malaria patients with microscopically-confirmed presence of parasites in a peripheral blood smear receiving ACT or rectal artesunate, and patients with no malaria parasites not given ACT. Findings A total of 15,517 eligible patients (8672 intervention and 6845 control) received treatment for fever between January-December 2011. The proportion of febrile patients who received appropriate ACT treatment was 72·9% versus 33·7% in the control arm; a difference of 36·1% (95% CI: 21·3 – 50·9), pshop vendors adhered to the mRDT results, reducing over-treatment of malaria by 72·6% (95% CI: 46·7– 98·4), pshop vendors using presumptive diagnosis (control arm). Conclusion Diagnostic testing with mRDTs compared to presumptive treatment of fevers implemented in registered drug shops substantially improved appropriate

  17. A novel approach to support formulation design on twin screw wet granulation technology: Understanding the impact of overarching excipient properties on drug product quality attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willecke, N; Szepes, A; Wunderlich, M; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C; De Beer, T

    2018-04-21

    The overall objective of this work is to understand how excipient characteristics influence the drug product quality attributes and process performance of a continuous twin screw wet granulation process. The knowledge gained in this study is intended to be used for Quality by Design (QbD)-based formulation design and formulation optimization. Three principal components which represent the overarching properties of 8 selected pharmaceutical fillers were used as factors, whereas factors 4 and 5 represented binder type and binder concentration in a design of experiments (DoE). The majority of process parameters were kept constant to minimize their influence on the granule and drug product quality. 27 DoE batches consisting of binary filler/binder mixtures were processed via continuous twin screw wet granulation followed by tablet compression. Multiple linear regression models were built providing understanding of the impact of filler and binder properties on granule and tablet quality attributes (i.e. 16 DoE responses). The impact of fillers on the granule and tablet responses was more dominant compared to the impact of binder type and concentration. The filler properties had a relevant effect on granule characteristics, such as particle size, friability and specific surface area. Binder type and concentration revealed a relevant influence on granule flowability and friability as well as on the compactability (required compression force during tableting to obtain target hardness). In order to evaluate the DoE models' validity, a verification of the DoE models was performed with new formulations (i.e. a new combination of filler, binder type and binder concentration) which were initially not included in the dataset used to build the DoE models. The combined PCA (principle component analysis)/DoE approach allowed to link the excipient properties with the drug product quality attributes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The mediating effects of depressive symptoms and sleep quality on the relationship between the non-medical use of prescription drugs and suicidal behaviors among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Yan; Guo, Lan; Deng, Jian-Xiong; Huang, Jing-Hui; Huang, Guo-Liang; Gao, Xue; Wu, Hong; Pan, Si-Yuan; Lu, Ci-Yong

    2017-09-01

    The nature of the relationship between the non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) and suicide has not been clearly elucidated. Some studies have suggested that the relationship between substance use and suicidal ideation may be spurious and could be explained by other variables. A school-based cross-sectional study was performed in Guangzhou. A total of 5853 students completed questionnaires and were included in the study. NMUPD, alcohol use, illicit drug use, depressive symptoms, sleep quality, and suicidal behaviors were assessed. The mediating effects of depressive symptoms and sleep quality on the relationship between NMUPD and suicidal behaviors were examined using a structural equation model. In the simple model without mediation, a positive relationship between NMUPD and suicidal behaviors in adolescents was found, which was independent of effects from the use of other substances. Both depressive symptoms and sleep quality were significant mediators of this relationship. Public health and educational professionals should survey depressive symptoms and sleep quality and provide interventions when managing suicidal behaviors among adolescents engaging in NMUPD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of the quality and pharmacoeconomics of some generic drugs versus their reputed counterpart brands in the Saudi market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farouk M Sakr

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Pharmacopeial examinations showed that generic tablets are quantitatively and qualitatively equivalent to their internationally reputed brands within the tested tablet groups with the advantage for the generic drugs being significantly the cheapest.

  20. 'You've got m@il: fluoxetine coming soon!': accessibility and quality of a prescription drug sold on the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelatti, U; Pedrazzani, R; Marcantoni, C; Mascaretti, S; Repice, C; Filippucci, L; Zerbini, I; Dal Grande, M; Orizio, G; Feretti, D

    2013-09-01

    The increasing phenomenon of online pharmacies has potential for serious public health problems. This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of accessing a prescription drug in the absence of a prescription for an Italian purchaser. Fluoxetine pills were ordered from several online pharmacies. The study included website analysis, and the quality of the received product including packaging, chemical and microbiological analyses. Orders could be placed correctly on 61 of the 98 selected websites, and a sales transaction was concluded successfully on 17 websites. Thirteen drug samples were eventually received. In one case it was necessary to fill in a questionnaire before ordering the drugs. All websites displayed aggressive marketing strategies. There was wide variation in terms of domain registration, company base (when declared) and manufacturer's location (mostly India). All pills were delivered in sealed blister packs showing the lot number and manufacturer's details. A leaflet was enclosed in one case only. In three cases we received more pills than ordered, and in one case Viagra pills as a free gift. Pharmacopoeia microbiological requirements were satisfied. Chemical analysis revealed that the active principle was always present, although many samples did not meet the Pharmacopoeia "other impurities" or "total impurities" criteria. Heavy metals and solvents regulated by the Pharmacopoeia did not exceed the set limits; some of the non-regulated ones were also assessed, in some cases with a positive result (e.g. styrene). About 20% of purchase attempts resulted in delivery of the drugs, even in the absence of a medical prescription. Traceability was poor and drug quality was generally worse compared to conventional pharmacy-purchased products. Based on all these broad-spectrum results, user safety appears not to be globally guaranteed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Orphan drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golocorbin Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojsa; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in "adopting" them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of drugs meant to treat diseases whose pathogenesis has not yet been clarified in majority of cases. The aim of this paper is to present previous and present status of orphan drugs in Serbia and other countries. THE BEGINNING OF ORPHAN DRUGS DEVELOPMENT: This problem was first recognized by Congress of the United States of America in January 1983, and when the "Orphan Drug Act" was passed, it was a turning point in the development of orphan drugs. This law provides pharmaceutical companies with a series of reliefs, both financial ones that allow them to regain funds invested into the research and development and regulatory ones. Seven years of marketing exclusivity, as a type of patent monopoly, is the most important relief that enables companies to make large profits. There are no sufficient funds and institutions to give financial support to the patients. It is therefore necessary to make health professionals much more aware of rare diseases in order to avoid time loss in making the right diagnosis and thus to gain more time to treat rare diseases. The importance of discovery, development and production of orphan drugs lies in the number of patients whose life quality can be improved significantly by administration of these drugs as well as in the number of potential survivals resulting from the treatment with these drugs.

  2. RELATIONSHIP OF ASSESS SELF-ESTEEM AND LOCUS OF CONTROL WITH QUALITY OF LIFE DURING TREATMENT STAGES IN PATIENTS REFERRING TO DRUG ADDICTION REHABILITATION CENTERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2016-07-24

    Thus, the present research was carried out aimed at determining the relationship between self-esteem and locus of control and quality of life during treatment stages in the patients referring to drug addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city, Iran. The current study was a sectional research of descriptive correlation type. The research sample was 150 individuals of patients referring to addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city. For data gathering, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, and SF36 Quality of Life Questionnaire were used. Following collection of questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS/16 software. According to the results, in the 12 th day of treatment, 96 patients exhibited moderate self-esteem, 102 patients had internal locus of control, and the score of their overall quality of life was 40.43±12.71. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation coefficient indicated that a significant and positive relationship was observed between locus of control and quality of life during different treatment stages. It seems that quality of life improves during addiction treatment stages due to improvement of personality traits including locus of control and self-esteem. Therefore, consultation methods as a very crucial priority in addiction rehabilitation centers shall be taken into account by the health sector authorities and managers and can play an essential role in enhancing quality of life.

  3. RELATIONSHIP OF ASSESS SELF-ESTEEM AND LOCUS OF CONTROL WITH QUALITY OF LIFE DURING TREATMENT STAGES IN PATIENTS REFERRING TO DRUG ADDICTION REHABILITATION CENTERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Thus, the present research was carried out aimed at determining the relationship between self-esteem and locus of control and quality of life during treatment stages in the patients referring to drug addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city, Iran. Methods: The current study was a sectional research of descriptive correlation type. The research sample was 150 individuals of patients referring to addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city. For data gathering, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Rotter’s Locus of Control Scale, and SF36 Quality of Life Questionnaire were used. Following collection of questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS/16 software. Results: According to the results, in the 12th day of treatment, 96 patients exhibited moderate self-esteem, 102 patients had internal locus of control, and the score of their overall quality of life was 40.43±12.71. Furthermore, Pearson’s correlation coefficient indicated that a significant and positive relationship was observed between locus of control and quality of life during different treatment stages. Conclusion: It seems that quality of life improves during addiction treatment stages due to improvement of personality traits including locus of control and self-esteem. Therefore, consultation methods as a very crucial priority in addiction rehabilitation centers shall be taken into account by the health sector authorities and managers and can play an essential role in enhancing quality of life. PMID:27698598

  4. Effects of a clinical pharmacist service on health-related quality of life and prescribing of drugs: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladh, Lina; Ottosson, Ellinor; Karlsson, John; Klintberg, Lars; Wallerstedt, Susanna M

    2011-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of a clinical pharmacist service on health-related quality of life (HRQL) and prescribing of drugs. METHODS A randomised controlled study was performed in two internal medicine wards. The intervention consisted of medication reviews with feedback to the physicians, drug treatment discussion with patients at discharge and medication reports. HRQL was evaluated at inclusion and after six months by self-rated global health (1: very poor; 5: very good) and by the EuroQol 5-dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D). Prescribing of drugs was analysed regarding three established drug-specific quality indicators (intervention and control patients) and potential drug-related problems (DRPs) during in-hospital care (intervention patients). RESULTS 345 patients (61% female; median age: 82) were analysed, 204 of whom (59%) completed the six-month HRQL follow-up. A total of 87 patients (53% of the intervention patients) received all parts of the intervention. Intention-to-treat analysis revealed no significant findings for any of the HRQL measures. Per-protocol analysis revealed significantly better HRQL in the intervention group at six-month follow-up as measured by global health (mean: 3.14 (SD: 0.87) vs 2.77 (0.94), p=0.020), but not as measured by summarised EQ-5D index (0.48 (0.36) vs 0.43 (0.37), p=0.57). The number of potentially inappropriate prescribings per patient according to the quality indicators (admission vs discharge) was 0.35 (0.73) versus 0.38 (0.72), p=0.47 (control patients), and 0.39 (0.83) versus 0.26 (0.56), p=0.039 (intervention patients who received the intervention). In the intervention group, 133 relevant potential DRPs were identified in 81 patients, 55 of which (41%) were acted upon by the attending physician. CONCLUSION A clinical pharmacist service during inpatient care may improve quality of prescribing and patients' HRQL. Trial registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01016301.

  5. Microbiological quality of water from the rivers of Curitiba, Paraná State, Brazil, and the susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs and pathogenicity of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giowanella, Melissa; Bozza, Angela; do Rocio Dalzoto, Patricia; Dionísio, Jair Alves; Andraus, Sumaia; Guimarães, Edson Luiz Gomes; Pimentel, Ida Chapaval

    2015-11-01

    Water safety is determined by several markers, and Escherichia coli is one of the most important indicators of water quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological parameters in environmental samples of fresh water from rivers of Curitiba and its metropolitan area in Paraná State, Brazil. In addition, we evaluated the pathogenicity and susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs in E. coli. These evaluations were performed by quantitative and qualitative methods employing selective media for isolating thermotolerant coliforms and biochemical tests for identifying E. coli. Pathogenic strains of E. coli were detected by PCR multiplex using specific primers. From the water samples, 494 thermotolerant coliforms were obtained, of which 96 (19.43%) isolates were characterized as E. coli. Three isolates were identified as enteroaggregative E. coli, one as enterotoxigenic E. coli, one as enteropathogenic E. coli, and two carried the Eae virulence gene. E. coli susceptibility to commonly employed antimicrobial drugs was analyzed by the disc diffusion method. The results showed 49 (51.04%) isolates resistant to all the drugs assayed, 16 (16.67%) with an intermediate resistance to all drugs, and 31 (32.29%) intermediately or fully resistant to one or more drugs tested. The highest rate of resistance was observed for tetracycline 30 μg, streptomycin 10 μg, and ceftazidime 30 μg. Detection of E. coli is associated with water contamination by fecal material from humans and warm-blooded animals. The occurrence of resistant strains can be the result of the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor sanitation in the areas assayed.

  6. Comparing subjective well-being and health-related quality of life of Australian drug users in treatment in regional and rural Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter G; Hyder, Shannon; Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Droste, Nicolas; Harris, Jane B

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the self-reported subjective well-being and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of alcohol and other drug users and to examine whether subjective well-being in this sample would be predicted by either HRQOL and/or severity of dependence. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 201 Victorian substance users in individual targeted outpatient treatment for a variety of types of substance use. Participants were administered an interview, including the personal well-being index, the SF-8 health survey and the severity of dependence scale, in order to assess subjective well-being, the mental health component of HRQOL and severity of drug dependence respectively. Subjective well-being was predicted by mental health aspects of HRQOL (sr(2)  = 0.03) and by employment (sr(2)  = 0.05), rather than by severity of dependence [F(5, 146) = 5.60, P well-being than do the general population. Subjective well-being was predicted by mental aspects of HRQOL and not by severity of drug dependence or by physical aspects of HRQOL. Treatment which aims to improve substance users' well-being should include mental health interventions and pathways to employment. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  7. Quality Assessment of Serially Ultradiluted and Agitated Drug Digitalis purpurea by Emission Spectroscopy and Clinical Analysis of Its Effect on the Heart Rate of Indian Bufo melanostictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of ultradiluted (homeopathic drugs is extremely interesting and challenging, and from that point of view this study shows novelty. A study of in vivo changes in heart rate of the Indian Bufo melanostictus caused by commercially available serially ultra-diluted and agitated extract of Digitalis purpurea has been tried in order to understand their pharmacological role. RR interval (of ECG was compared after intraperitoneal administration of serially diluted and agitated Digitalis purpurea extract, diluent rectified spirit, and Digoxin in anesthetized animals. The study revealed statistically significant changes in the heart rate after application of these drugs except in case of Digoxin and the 200th serial dilution of Digitalis purpurea. The duration of RR intervals after application of the drugs was corroborative of the effect of Digoxin and Digitalis purpurea extract up to 30th dilution. Emission spectra were obtained for the experimental ultra-diluted Digitalis purpurea extract and Digoxin to identify and characterize them. The observed RR pattern and emission spectra show an association. The quality assessment of the commercial ultra-diluted organic drugs obtained from natural products may be initiated by monitoring in vivo studies on animal models.

  8. Quality of Artemisinin-Based Combination Formulations for Malaria Treatment: Prevalence and Risk Factors for Poor Quality Medicines in Public Facilities and Private Sector Drug Outlets in Enugu, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harparkash; Allan, Elizabeth Louise; Mamadu, Ibrahim; Hall, Zoe; Ibe, Ogochukwu; El Sherbiny, Mohamed; van Wyk, Albert; Yeung, Shunmay; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Culzoni, Maria Julia; Clarke, Siân; Schellenberg, David; Fernández, Facundo M.; Onwujekwe, Obinna

    2015-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies are recommended by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria, yet medication must be of good quality for efficacious treatment. A recent meta-analysis reported 35% (796/2,296) of antimalarial drug samples from 21 Sub-Saharan African countries, purchased from outlets predominantly using convenience sampling, failed chemical content analysis. We used three sampling strategies to purchase artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) in Enugu metropolis, Nigeria, and compared the resulting quality estimates. Methods ACAs were purchased using three sampling approaches - convenience, mystery clients and overt, within a defined area and sampling frame in Enugu metropolis. The active pharmaceutical ingredients were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography and confirmed by mass spectrometry at three independent laboratories. Results were expressed as percentage of APIs stated on the packaging and used to categorise each sample as acceptable quality, substandard, degraded, or falsified. Results Content analysis of 3024 samples purchased from 421 outlets using convenience (n=200), mystery (n=1,919) and overt (n=905) approaches, showed overall 90.8% ACAs to be of acceptable quality, 6.8% substandard, 1.3% degraded and 1.2% falsified. Convenience sampling yielded a significantly higher prevalence of poor quality ACAs, but was not evident by the mystery and overt sampling strategies both of which yielded results that were comparable between each other. Artesunate (n=135; 4 falsified) and dihydroartemisinin (n=14) monotherapy tablets, not recommended by WHO, were also identified. Conclusion Randomised sampling identified fewer falsified ACAs than previously reported by convenience approaches. Our findings emphasise the need for specific consideration to be given to sampling frame and sampling approach if representative information on drug quality is to be obtained

  9. International drug price comparisons: quality assessment Comparación internacional de precios de medicamentos: evaluación de la calidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Machado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively summarize results (i.e., prices and affordability reported from international drug price comparison studies and assess their methodological quality. METHODS: A systematic search of the most relevant databases-Medline, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA, and Scopus, from their inception to May 2009-was conducted to identify original research comparing international drug prices. International drug price information was extracted and recorded from accepted papers. Affordability was reported as drug prices adjusted for income. Study quality was assessed using six criteria: use of similar countries, use of a representative sample of drugs, selection of specific types of prices, identification of drug packaging, different weights on price indices, and the type of currency conversion used. RESULTS: Of the 1 828 studies identified, 21 were included. Only one study adequately addressed all quality issues. A large variation in study quality was observed due to the many methods used to conduct the drug price comparisons, such as different indices, economic parameters, price types, basket of drugs, and more. Thus, the quality of published studies was considered poor. Results varied across studies, but generally, higher income countries had higher drug prices. However, after adjusting drug prices for affordability, higher income countries had more affordable prices than lower income countries. CONCLUSIONS: Differences between drug prices and affordability in different countries were found. Low income countries reported less affordability of drugs, leaving room for potential problems with drug access, and consequently, a negative impact on health. The quality of the literature on this topic needs improvement.OBJETIVO: Resumir cuantitativamente los resultados (p. ej., precios y asequibilidad presentados en estudios de comparación internacional de precios de medicamentos y evaluar su calidad metodológica. M

  10. Quality risk management of top spray fluidized bed process for antihypertensive drug formulation with control strategy engendered by Box-behnken experimental design space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukharya, Amit; Patel, Paresh U; Shenoy, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Shivang

    2013-01-01

    Lacidipine (LCDP) is a very low soluble and highly biovariable calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of hypertension. To increase its apparent solubility and to reduce its biovariability, solid dispersion fluid bed processing technology was explored, as it produces highly dispersible granules with a characteristic porous structure that enhances dispersibility, wettability, blend uniformity (by dissolving and spraying a solution of actives), flow ability and compressibility of granules for tableting and reducing variability by uniform drug-binder solution distribution on carrier molecules. Main object of this quality risk management (QRM) study is to provide a sophisticated "robust and rugged" Fluidized Bed Process (FBP) for the preparation of LCDP tablets with desired quality (stability) and performance (dissolution) by quality by design (QbD) concept. THIS STUDY IS PRINCIPALLY FOCUSING ON THOROUGH MECHANISTIC UNDERSTANDING OF THE FBP BY WHICH IT IS DEVELOPED AND SCALED UP WITH A KNOWLEDGE OF THE CRITICAL RISKS INVOLVED IN MANUFACTURING PROCESS ANALYZED BY RISK ASSESSMENT TOOLS LIKE: Qualitative Initial Risk-based Matrix Analysis (IRMA) and Quantitative Failure Mode Effective Analysis (FMEA) to identify and rank parameters with potential to have an impact on In Process/Finished Product Critical Quality Attributes (IP/FP CQAs). These Critical Process Parameters (CPPs) were further refined by DoE and MVDA to develop design space with Real Time Release Testing (RTRT) that leads to implementation of a control strategy to achieve consistent finished product quality at lab scale itself to prevent possible product failure at larger manufacturing scale.

  11. Factors associated with health-related quality of life among injection drug users at methadone clinics in Taipei, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Feng Yen

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: Poor HRQOL was associated with a number of factors among IDUs at methadone clinics in Taipei, Taiwan. To improve HRQOL in this population, future programs should focus on IDUs with a history of drug overdose. In addition, methadone programs and social support should be integrated to improve HRQOL among this socially marginalized population.

  12. Effective non-drug interventions for improving outcomes and quality of maternal health care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekesah, Frederick M; Mbada, Chidozie E; Muula, Adamson S; Kabiru, Caroline W; Muthuri, Stella K; Izugbara, Chimaraoke O

    2016-08-15

    Many interventions have been implemented to improve maternal health outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Currently, however, systematic information on the effectiveness of these interventions remains scarce. We conducted a systematic review of published evidence on non-drug interventions that reported effectiveness in improving outcomes and quality of care in maternal health in SSA. African Journals Online, Bioline, MEDLINE, Ovid, Science Direct, and Scopus databases were searched for studies published in English between 2000 and 2015 and reporting on the effectiveness of interventions to improve quality and outcomes of maternal health care in SSA. Articles focusing on interventions that involved drug treatments, medications, or therapies were excluded. We present a narrative synthesis of the reported impact of these interventions on maternal morbidity and mortality outcomes as well as on other dimensions of the quality of maternal health care (as defined by the Institute of Medicine 2001 to comprise safety, effectiveness, efficiency, timeliness, patient centeredness, and equitability). Seventy-three studies were included in this review. Non-drug interventions that directly or indirectly improved quality of maternal health and morbidity and mortality outcomes in SSA assumed a variety of forms including mobile and electronic health, financial incentives on the demand and supply side, facility-based clinical audits and maternal death reviews, health systems strengthening interventions, community mobilization and/or peer-based programs, home-based visits, counseling and health educational and promotional programs conducted by health care providers, transportation and/or communication and referrals for emergency obstetric care, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and task shifting interventions. There was a preponderance of single facility and community-based studies whose effectiveness was difficult to assess. Many non-drug interventions have been

  13. A unique drug distribution process for radium Ra 223 dichloride injection and its implication for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansereau, Raymond N

    2014-11-01

    On May 15, 2013, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals announced that it had received marketing approval for the therapeutic radioactive medication radium Ra 223 dichloride injection (Xofigo; Ra 223). The product acquisition and distribution process for hospital-based nuclear pharmacies and nuclear medicine services is unlike any other. The product is distributed as a low-risk compounded sterile preparation through a single compounding nuclear pharmacy located in Denver, Colorado, pursuant to a prescription. This model for drug distribution and delivery to the user institution has implications for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Characteristics, Quality and Contribution to Signal Detection of Spontaneous Reports of Adverse Drug Reactions Via the WEB-RADR Mobile Application: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, Ingrid; Taavola, Henric; Tregunno, Philip M; Mas, Petar; Gama, Sara; Newbould, Victoria; Caster, Ola; Härmark, Linda

    2018-05-14

    Spontaneous reporting of suspected adverse drug reactions is key for efficient post-marketing safety surveillance. To increase usability and accessibility of reporting tools, the Web-Recognising Adverse Drug Reactions (WEB-RADR) consortium developed a smartphone application (app) based on a simplified reporting form. The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics, quality and contribution to signals of reports submitted via the WEB-RADR app. The app was launched in the UK, the Netherlands and Croatia between July 2015 and May 2016. Spontaneous reports submitted until September 2016 with a single reporter were included. For each country, app reports and reports received through conventional means in the same time period were compared to identify characteristic features. A random subset of reports was assessed for clinical quality and completeness. The contribution to signal detection was assessed by a descriptive analysis. Higher proportions of app reports were submitted by patients in the UK (28 vs. 18%) and Croatia (32 vs. 7%); both p < 0.01. In the Netherlands, the difference was small (60 vs. 57%; p = 0.5). The proportion of female patients and the median patient ages in app reports submitted by patients were similar to the reference. The proportion of reports of at least moderate quality was high in both samples (app: 78-85%, reference: 78-98%), for all countries. App reports contributed to detecting eight potential safety signals at the national level, four of which were eventually signalled. The WEB-RADR app offers a new route of spontaneous reporting that shows promise in attracting reports from patients and that could become an important tool in the future. Patient demographics are similar to conventional routes, report quality is sufficient despite a simplified reporting form, and app reports show potential in contributing to signal detection.

  15. Avaliação da qualidade do uso de medicamentos em idosos Quality assessment of drug use in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela B G Mosegui

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade do uso de medicamentos através da análise do padrão do uso, do grau de concordância com listas de medicamentos essenciais, do valor terapêutico e das interações medicamentosas encontradas entre mulheres com mais de 60 anos. MÉTODOS: Foram pesquisadas 634 mulheres que freqüentam a Universidade Aberta da Terceira Idade da Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Os dados foram coletados através de questionário padronizado e testado. As variáveis utilizadas foram relativas aos medicamentos e a seu modo de utilização. As unidades de análise foram o medicamento e o indivíduo. RESULTADOS: Das 634 mulheres estudadas, 9,1% não tomam qualquer tipo de medicamento. A média de medicamentos consumidos foi de 4,0 por mulher. Das 2.510 especialidades farmacêuticas citadas, há 538 princípios ativos diferentes. Cerca de 26% dos medicamentos são concordantes com as recomendações da Organização Mundial da Saúde, e 17%, com as da Relação Nacional de Medicamentos Essenciais. Cerca de 17% dos medicamentos são inadequados para o uso. No que diz respeito a redundâncias, 14,1% das mulheres podem sofrer conseqüências decorrentes desse evento. Quanto às interações medicamentosas, 15,5% das entrevistadas estão expostas às principais interações. CONCLUSÕES: Os dados sugerem que o padrão do uso dos medicamentos entre as idosas é bastante influenciado pela prescrição médica e que sua qualidade é prejudicada pela baixa seletividade do mercado farmacêutico.INTRODUCTION: The objective is to evaluate the quality of medication utilization through the analysis of the pattern of usage, the degree of compliance to essential drug lists, therapeutic value and by drug interactions found among women over 60 years of age. METHODS: Six hundred thirty-four women enrolled at the Open University of the Third Age were studied. Data was collected through pattern-oriented, tested questionnaires. The variables examined

  16. Diffusion of subsidized ACTs in accredited drug shops in Tanzania: determinants of stocking and characteristics of early and late adopters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Peter S; Yadav, Prashant; Alphs, Sarah; Arkedis, Jean; Massaga, Julius; Sabot, Oliver; Cohen, Jessica L

    2013-12-18

    Many households in sub-Saharan Africa utilize the private sector as a primary source of treatment for malaria episodes. Expanding access to effective treatment in private drug shops may help reduce incidence of severe disease and mortality. This research leveraged a longitudinal survey of stocking of subsidized artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), an effective anti-malarial, in Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDOs) in two regions of Tanzania. This provided a unique opportunity to explore shop and market level determinants of product diffusion in a developing country retail market. 356 ADDOs in the Rukwa and Mtwara regions of Tanzania were surveyed at seven points between Feb 2011 and May 2012. Shop level audits were used to measure the availability of subsidized ACTs at each shop. Data on market and shop level factors were collected during the survey and also extracted from GIS layers. Regression and network based methodologies were used. Shops classified as early and late adopters, following Rogers' model of product diffusion, were compared. The Bass model of product diffusion was applied to determine whether shops stocked ACTs out of a need to imitate market competitors or a desire to satisfy customer needs. Following the introduction of a subsidy for ACTs, stocking increased from 12% to nearly 80% over the seven survey rounds. Stocking was influenced by higher numbers of proximal shops and clinics, larger customer traffic and the presence of a licensed pharmacist. Early adopters were characterized by a larger percentage of customers seeking care for malaria, a larger catchment and sourcing from specific wholesalers/suppliers. The Bass model of product diffusion indicated that shops were adopting products in response to competitor behavior, rather than customer demand. Decisions to stock new pharmaceutical products in Tanzanian ADDOs are influenced by a combination of factors related to both market competition and customer demand, but are particularly

  17. The Application of the Accelerated Stability Assessment Program (ASAP) to Quality by Design (QbD) for Drug Product Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Waterman, Kenneth Craig

    2011-01-01

    An isoconversion paradigm, where times in different temperature and humidity-controlled stability chambers are set to provide a fixed degradant level, is shown to compensate for the complex, non-single order kinetics of solid drug products. A humidity-corrected Arrhenius equation provides reliable estimates for temperature and relative humidity effects on degradation rates. A statistical protocol is employed to determine best fits for chemical stability data, which in turn allows for accurate...

  18. Practical guidelines for the characterization and quality control of pure drug nanoparticles and nano-cocrystals in the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Leena

    2018-06-16

    The number of poorly soluble drug candidates is increasing, and this is also seen in the research interest towards drug nanoparticles and (nano-)cocrystals; improved solubility is the most important application of these nanosystems. In order to confirm the functionality of these nanoparticles throughout their lifecycle, repeatability of the formulation processes, functional performance of the formed systems in pre-determined way and system stability, a thorough physicochemical understanding with the aid of necessary analytical techniques is needed. Even very minor deviations in for example particle size or size deviation in nanoscale can alter the product bioavailability, and the effect is even more dramatic with the smallest particle size fractions. Also, small particle size sets special requirements for the analytical techniques. In this review most important physicochemical properties of drug nanocrystals and nano-cocrystals are presented, suitable analytical techniques, their pros and cons, are described with the extra input on practical point of view. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug ... Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug ...

  20. Influence of Different Container Closure Systems and Capping Process Parameters on Product Quality and Container Closure Integrity (CCI) in GMP Drug Product Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Roggo, Yves; Huwyler, Joerg; Eder, Juergen; Fritsch, Kamila; Posset, Tobias; Mohl, Silke; Streubel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Capping equipment used in good manufacturing practice manufacturing features different designs and a variety of adjustable process parameters. The overall capping result is a complex interplay of the different capping process parameters and is insufficiently described in literature. It remains poorly studied how the different capping equipment designs and capping equipment process parameters (e.g., pre-compression force, capping plate height, turntable rotating speed) contribute to the final residual seal force of a sealed container closure system and its relation to container closure integrity and other drug product quality parameters. Stopper compression measured by computer tomography correlated to residual seal force measurements.In our studies, we used different container closure system configurations from different good manufacturing practice drug product fill & finish facilities to investigate the influence of differences in primary packaging, that is, vial size and rubber stopper design on the capping process and the capped drug product. In addition, we compared two large-scale good manufacturing practice manufacturing capping equipment and different capping equipment settings and their impact on product quality and integrity, as determined by residual seal force.The capping plate to plunger distance had a major influence on the obtained residual seal force values of a sealed vial, whereas the capping pre-compression force and the turntable rotation speed showed only a minor influence on the residual seal force of a sealed vial. Capping process parameters could not easily be transferred from capping equipment of different manufacturers. However, the residual seal force tester did provide a valuable tool to compare capping performance of different capping equipment. No vial showed any leakage greater than 10(-8)mbar L/s as measured by a helium mass spectrometry system, suggesting that container closure integrity was warranted in the residual seal force range

  1. Short peptide based nanotubes capable of effective curcumin delivery for treating drug resistant malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Panda, Jiban Jyoti; Mukherjee, Tapan Kumar; Chauhan, Virander Singh

    2016-04-05

    Curcumin (Ccm) has shown immense potential as an antimalarial agent; however its low solubility and less bioavailability attenuate the in vivo efficacy of this potent compound. In order to increase Ccm's bioavailability, a number of organic/inorganic polymer based nanoparticles have been investigated. However, most of the present day nano based delivery systems pose a conundrum with respect to their complex synthesis procedures, poor in vivo stability and toxicity issues. Peptides due to their high biocompatibility could act as excellent materials for the synthesis of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Here, we have investigated dehydrophenylalanine (ΔPhe) di-peptide based self-assembled nanoparticles for the efficient delivery of Ccm as an antimalarial agent. The self-assembly and curcumin loading capacity of different ΔPhe dipeptides, phenylalanine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine (FΔF), arginine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine (RΔF), valine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine (VΔF) and methonine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine (MΔF) were investigated for achieving enhanced and effective delivery of the compound for potential anti-malarial therapy. FΔF, RΔF, VΔF and MΔF peptides formed different types of nanoparticles like nanotubes and nanovesicles under similar assembling conditions. Out of these, F∆F nanotubes showed maximum curcumin loading capacity of almost 68 % W/W. Ccm loaded F∆F nanotubes (Ccm-F∆F) showed comparatively higher (IC50, 3.0 µM) inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum (Indo strain) as compared to free Ccm (IC50, 13 µM). Ccm-F∆F nano formulation further demonstrated higher inhibition of parasite growth in malaria infected mice as compared to free Ccm. The dipeptide nanoparticles were highly biocompatible and didn't show any toxic effect on mammalian cell lines and normal blood cells. This work provides a proof of principle of using highly biocompatible short peptide based nanoparticles for entrapment and in vivo delivery of Ccm leading to an

  2. The Quality of Clinical Information in Adverse Drug Reaction Reports by Patients and Healthcare Professionals: A Retrospective Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfes, Leàn; van Hunsel, Florence; van der Linden, Laura; Taxis, Katja; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    2017-07-01

    Clinical information is needed to assess the causal relationship between a drug and an adverse drug reaction (ADR) in a reliable way. Little is known about the level of relevant clinical information about the ADRs reported by patients. The aim was to determine to what extent patients report relevant clinical information about an ADR compared with their healthcare professional. A retrospective analysis of all ADR reports on the same case, i.e., cases with a report from both the patient and the patient's healthcare professional, selected from the database of the Dutch Pharmacovigilance Center Lareb, was conducted. The extent to which relevant clinical information was reported was assessed by trained pharmacovigilance assessors, using a structured tool. The following four domains were assessed: ADR, chronology, suspected drug, and patient characteristics. For each domain, the proportion of reported information in relation to information deemed relevant was calculated. An average score of all relevant domains was determined and categorized as poorly (≤45%), moderately (from 46 to 74%) or well (≥75%) reported. Data were analyzed using a paired sample t test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. A total of 197 cases were included. In 107 cases (54.3%), patients and healthcare professionals reported a similar level of clinical information. Statistical analysis demonstrated no overall differences between the groups (p = 0.126). In a unique study of cases of ADRs reported by patients and healthcare professionals, we found that patients report clinical information at a similar level as their healthcare professional. For an optimal pharmacovigilance, both healthcare professionals and patient should be encouraged to report.

  3. Water quality in coastal wetlands: illicit drugs in surface waters of L'Albufera Natural Park (Valencia, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Roig, P.; Blasco, C.; Andreu, V.; Pascual, J. A.; Rubio, J. L.; Picó, Y.

    2010-05-01

    A wide range of emerging pollutants have been identified in environment: antibiotics, hormones, personal care products, etc. But quite recently a new class of ecological threat has been reported: the presence in waters of abuse drugs coming from human consumption [1,2]. Treatment of wastewaters may remove a portion of these compounds, but sometimes, these treatments are insufficient or nonexistent, residues can reach into the aquatic environment. ĹAlbufera Natural Park (Valencia, Spain) is a marsh area of a great interest because it is the habitat of a large quantity of unique species of flora and fauna, and a zone of refuge, feeding and breeding for a large number of migratory birds. However, this area is threatened by urban, industrial and agricultural pressures. The aim of this work has been to develop a fast and sensitive multi-residue analytical method for to establish the occurrence and distribution of commonly consumed illicit drugs in surface waters of ĹAlbufera lake. A representative set of abuse drugs with different mode of action was chosen for this purpose, including: amphetaminics, opiates, cocainics and cannabinoids (THC and nor-9-carboxy-THC). In April 2008 and October 2008 a total of 16 samples of water were collected, corresponding to different sampling points previously designed, and covering the most important channels that flow in to the lake. Samples of 250 mL of water were concentrated by Solid Phase Extraction through an Oasis HLB cartridge and extracted subsequently with methanol as solvent. Quantification was carried out by LC-MS/MS with an ESI interface. Performance characteristics of the PLE-SPE followed by LC-MS/MS were established by validation procedure. Selectivity, linearity, precision, recoveries and limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were studied. Our search shows that current sewage treatment systems do not completely remove illicit drug residues from urban wastewater. Benzoylecgonine, the main metabolite from

  4. Improving titer while maintaining quality of final formulated drug substance via optimization of CHO cell culture conditions in low-iron chemically defined media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianlin; Rehmann, Matthew S; Xu, Xuankuo; Huang, Chao; Tian, Jun; Qian, Nan-Xin; Li, Zheng Jian

    2018-04-01

    During biopharmaceutical process development, it is important to improve titer to reduce drug manufacturing costs and to deliver comparable quality attributes of therapeutic proteins, which helps to ensure patient safety and efficacy. We previously reported that relative high-iron concentrations in media increased titer, but caused unacceptable coloration of a fusion protein during early-phase process development. Ultimately, the fusion protein with acceptable color was manufactured using low-iron media, but the titer decreased significantly in the low-iron process. Here, long-term passaging in low-iron media is shown to significantly improve titer while maintaining acceptable coloration during late-phase process development. However, the long-term passaging also caused a change in the protein charge variant profile by significantly increasing basic variants. Thus, we systematically studied the effect of media components, seed culture conditions, and downstream processing on productivity and quality attributes. We found that removing β-glycerol phosphate (BGP) from basal media reduced basic variants without affecting titer. Our goals for late-phase process development, improving titer and matching quality attributes to the early-phase process, were thus achieved by prolonging seed culture age and removing BGP. This process was also successfully scaled up in 500-L bioreactors. In addition, we demonstrated that higher concentrations of reactive oxygen species were present in the high-iron Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures compared to that in the low-iron cultures, suggesting a possible mechanism for the drug substance coloration caused by high-iron media. Finally, hypotheses for the mechanisms of titer improvement by both high-iron and long-term culture are discussed.

  5. Evaluating the Properties of Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Nanoparticle Formulations Encapsulating a Hydrophobic Drug by Using the Quality by Design Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Masato; Kobayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Goda, Yukihiro; Okuda, Haruhiro; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko

    2017-01-01

    We applied the Quality by Design (QbD) approach to the development of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticle formulations encapsulating triamcinolone acetonide, and the critical process parameters (CPPs) were identified to clarify the correlations between critical quality attributes and CPPs. Quality risk management was performed by using an Ishikawa diagram and experiments with a fractional factorial design (ANOVA). The CPPs for particle size were PLGA concentration and rotation speed, and the CPP for relative drug loading efficiency was the poor solvent to good solvent volume ratio. By assessing the mutually related factors in the form of ratios, many factors could be efficiently considered in the risk assessment. We found a two-factor interaction between rotation speed and rate of addition of good solvent by using a fractional factorial design with resolution V. The system was then extended by using a central composite design, and the results obtained were visualized by using the response surface method to construct a design space. Our research represents a case study of the application of the QbD approach to pharmaceutical development, including formulation screening, by taking actual production factors into consideration. Our findings support the feasibility of using a similar approach to nanoparticle formulations under development. We could establish an efficient method of analyzing the CPPs of PLGA nanoparticles by using a QbD approach.

  6. The influence of psychological variables on health-related quality of life among HIV-positive individuals with a history of intravenous drug use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psaros, Christina; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Bullis, Jacqueline R; Markowitz, Sarah M; Safren, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous drug use (IDU) remains a prominent pathway of HIV transmission in the United States, though little is known about modifiable factors influencing quality of life among IDUs. The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of psychological variables (e.g., depression and anxiety) on health-related quality of life among HIV-positive individuals with a history of IDU who were enrolled in outpatient treatment for opioid dependence. 108 HIV-positive individuals with a history of IDU and participating in current outpatient treatment for opiate dependence who were screened for participation in a depression and adherence study reported sociodemographic data, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL; Multidimensional Health Assessment using the ACTG-SF 21). Multiple regression models controlling for disease stage and background characteristics identified significant negative relationships between General Health Perception and Functioning without Pain for anxiety and depression, and between Role Functioning and Physical Functioning for anxiety. CD4 cell count was significantly related to Physical Functioning only. Results indicate that distress (both depression and anxiety) contribute significantly to variation in HRQoL over and above the effects of disease variables. Effective depression and anxiety treatment may result in improved overall functioning.

  7. Methadone dosage and its relationship to quality of life, satisfaction, psychopathology, cognitive performance and additional consumption of non-prescribed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero-Pérez, Eduardo J; MethaQoL, Grupo

    2016-06-14

    The effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment is beyond any doubt, but there remains some incertitude about the appropriate and effective dosage and the objectives that should be achieved by this therapy. Some authors maintain that only doses higher than 50-60 mg/day ought to be considered effective, since only these block all the opioid receptors. But others propose the use of doses adjusted to the needs of the patient, based on their recovery process. Quality of life, satisfaction with treatment, psychopathological symptoms, cognitive performance and additional intake of illegal and unprescribed drugs were evaluated in a representative sample of all patients treated with opioid agonists in the Addiction Institute of Madrid (N = 1898, n = 450) and the Junta de Extremadura (N = 100, n = 65). The results revealed a negative relationship between dose and quality of life, psychopathological symptoms and cognitive performance. Satisfaction with treatment, based on doses negotiated together by doctor and patient, was very high, regardless of the dose. To establish hypothetical causal dependencies among the studied variables structural equation modelling was performed. The results reject the need for high dosage if not required by the patient, and highlight the benefits of other psychosocial interventions that lead to recovery, despite the chronification that could imply the use of high doses. Whereas high dosage programmes provide better indicators of social control, the patient's quality of life must be one of the main indicators of a successful treatment, as in any other health problem.

  8. Health-related quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs at National Referral Hospitals in Uganda: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabukenya, Anne M; Matovu, Joseph K B; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Wanyenze, Rhoda K; Makumbi, Fredrick

    2014-04-12

    Epilepsy is a devastating disorder that impacts on patients' quality of life, irrespective of use of anti epileptic drugs (AEDs). This study estimates the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and its associated predictors among epilepsy patients receiving AEDs. A total of 175 epilepsy patients already receiving AED for at least 3 months were randomly selected and interviewed from mental clinics at Mulago and Butabika national referral hospitals in Uganda between May - July 2011. A HRQOL index, the primary outcome, was constructed using items from Quality Of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaires. The internal consistency and adequacy of these items was also computed using Cronbach's alpha and Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests. Partial correlations were used to evaluate the contribution of the health dimensions (mental, psychological, social, physical functioning and emotional well being) and, multiple linear regressions to determine factors independently associated with HRQOL. Just about half of the respondents (54%) were males, and nearly two thirds (62%) had received AEDs for at least 12 months. The average age was 26.6 years (SD = 11.1). The overall HRQOL mean score was 58 (SD = 13) on a scale of 0-100. The average scores of different dimensions or subscales ranged from 41 (physical) to 65 (psychological). At least three quarters (75%) of all subscales had good internal consistency and adequacy. The largest variations in the overall HRQOL were explained by social and mental functioning; each accounting for about 30% of the difference in the HRQOL but seizure control features explained a little (6%) variation. Factors negatively associated with HRQOL were poly-therapy (-1.16, p = 0.01) and frequency of seizures (-2.29, p = 0.00). Other factors associated with overall HRQOL included drug side effects, sex, marital status and education. Duration on AEDs was not a significant predictor of HRQOL. The HRQOL

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? ... Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn ...

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, ... Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and ... Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What to Say if You Used ...

  12. Drug procurement and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhotra, V S

    2003-03-01

    A strong drug procurement and management system under the RNTCP is critical to programme success. Significant improvements in manufacturing, inspection, supply, storage and quality control practices and procedures have been achieved due to an intensive RNTCP network. Drugs used in RNTCP are rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, pyrazinamide and streptomycin. Patients of TB are categorised into I, II and III and each category has a different standarised treatment. Procurement, distribution system and quality assurance of drugs are narrated in brief in this article.

  13. Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide Sanitization of an Isolator for Aseptic Filling of Monoclonal Antibody Drug Product - Hydrogen Peroxide Uptake and Impact on Protein Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Aaron; Reodl, Thomas; Hui, Ada; Knueppel, Stephanie; Eppler, Kirk; Lehnert, Siegfried; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2018-03-15

    A monoclonal antibody drug product (DP) manufacturing process was transferred to a different production site, where aseptic filling took place within an isolator that was sanitized using vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP). A quality-by-design approach was applied for study design to understand the impact of VPHP uptake in the isolator on DP quality. A combination of small-scale and manufacturing-scale studies was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of the monoclonal antibody to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as VPHP uptake mechanisms during the filling process. The acceptable H2O2 level was determined to be 100 ng/mL for the antibody in the H2O2 spiking study; protein oxidation was observed above this threshold. The most prominent sources of VPHP uptake were identified to be via the silicone tubing assembly (associated with the peristaltic pumps) and open, filled vials. Silicone tubing, an effective depot to H2O2, could absorb VPHP during different stages of the filling process and discharge H2O2 into the DP solution during filling interruptions. A small-scale isolator model, established to simulate manufacturing-scale conditions, was a useful tool in understanding H2O2 uptake in relation to tubing dimensions and VPHP concentration in the isolator air (or atmosphere). Although the tubing assembly had absorbed a substantial amount of VPHP during the decontamination phase, the majority of H2O2 could be removed during tubing cleaning and sterilization in the subsequent isolator aeration phase, demonstrating that H2O2 in the DP solution is taken up primarily via atmospheric VPHP residues in the isolator during filling. Picarro sensor monitoring suggested that the validated VPHP aeration process generates reproducible residual VPHP profiles in isolator air, thus allowing small-scale studies to provide more relevant recommendations on tubing size and interruption time limits for commercial manufacturing. The recommended process parameters were demonstrated to be

  14. Validating the shortened Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE-55) in a sample of children with drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lauryn; Widjaja, Elysa; Smith, Mary Lou; Speechley, Kathy N; Ferro, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to validate the newly developed shortened Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy Questionnaire (QOLCE-55) in a sample of children with drug-resistant epilepsy. Data came from 136 children enrolled in the Impact of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery on Health-Related Quality of Life Study (PEPSQOL), a multicenter prospective cohort study. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the higher-order factor structure of the QOLCE-55. Convergent and divergent validity was assessed by correlating subscales of the KIDSCREEN-27 with the QOLCE-55. Measurement equivalence of the QOLCE-55 was evaluated using multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis of children with drug-resistant epilepsy from PEPSQOL versus children with new-onset epilepsy from HERQULES (Health-Related Quality of Life in Children with Epilepsy Study). The higher-order factor structure of the QOLCE-55 demonstrated adequate fit: Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = 0.948; Tucker-Lewis Index (TLI) = 0.946; Root Mean Square of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.060 (90% confidence interval [CI] 0.054-0.065); Weighted Root Mean Square Residuals (WRMR) = 1.247. Higher-order factor loadings were strong, ranging from λ = 0.74 to 0.81. Internal consistency reliability was excellent (α = 0.97, subscales α > 0.82). QOLCE-55 subscales demonstrated moderate to strong correlations with similar subscales of the KIDSCREEN-27 (ρ = 0.43-0.75) and weak to moderate correlations with dissimilar subscales (ρ = 0.25-0.42). The QOLCE-55 demonstrated partial measurement equivalence at the level of strict invariance - χ 2 (2,823) = 3,727.9, CFI = 0.961, TLI = 0.962, RMSEA = 0.049 (0.044, 0.053), WRMR = 1.834. The findings provide support for the factor structure of the QOLCE-55 and contribute to its robust psychometric profile as a reliable and valid measure. Researchers and health practitioners should consider the QOLCE-55 as a viable option for reducing respondent burden when assessing health-related quality of life

  15. Investigation of drug polymorphism: Case of artemisinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horosanskaia, E.; Seidel-Morgenstern, A.; Lorenz, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The Artemisinin dimorphic system was found to be enantiotropic. • The Orthorhombic modification is the form stable at low-temperatures and the triclinic modification the form stable at high-temperatures. • The polymorphic phase transition occurs at ∼130 °C. - Abstract: The polymorphism of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin was examined. The phase behavior of solid artemisinin has experimentally been investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and temperature-resolved X-Ray powder diffraction. In addition, complementary solution studies and suspension experiments were performed. The results clearly confirm the existence of two modifications of artemisinin, which are related enantiotropically. The orthorhombic modification is the thermodynamically stable form at low temperatures, while the triclinic form is the stable one at higher temperatures with a transition temperature of ∼130 °C. Problems associated with analysis of the polymorphic phase behavior are comprehensively addressed

  16. The adverse drug reaction reporting assignment for specialist oncology nurses: a preliminary evaluation of quality, relevance and educational value in a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Tim; van Eekeren, Rike; Richir, Milan; van Staveren, Jojanneke; van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    In a new prescribing qualification course for specialist oncology nurses, we thought that it is important to emphasize pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting. We aimed to develop and evaluate an ADR reporting assignment for specialist oncology nurses. The quality of report documentation was assessed with the "Clinical Documentation tool to assess Individual Case Safety Reports" (ClinDoc). The relevance of the reports was evaluated in terms of ADR seriousness, the listing for additional monitoring of the drug by European Medicines Agency (EMA), and lack of labelling information about the ADR. Nurses' opinions of the assignment were evaluated using an E-survey. Thirty-three ADRs were reported, 32 (97%) of which were well documented according to ClinDoc. Thirteen ADRs (39%) were "serious" according to CIOMS criteria. In five cases (15%), the suspect drugs were listed for additional monitoring by EMA and in seven cases (21%), the ADR was not mentioned in the Summary of Product Characteristics. Twenty-five (78.1%) of the 32 enrolled nurses completed the E-survey. Most were > 45 years of age (68%), female (92%) and had extensive clinical experience (6-33 years). All agreed or completely agreed that the reporting assignment was useful, that it fitted in daily practice and that it increased their attention for medication/patient safety. A large majority (84.0%) agreed the assignment changed how they dealt with ADRs. Specialist oncology nurses are capable of reporting ADRs, and they considered the assignment useful. The assignment yielded valuable, relevant, and well-documented ADR reports for pharmacovigilance practice.

  17. Quality Control Guidelines for Disk Diffusion and Broth Microdilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests with Seven Drugs for Veterinary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odland, Brant A.; Erwin, Meredith E.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2000-01-01

    This multicenter study proposes antimicrobial susceptibility (MIC and disk diffusion methods) quality control (QC) parameters for seven compounds utilized in veterinary health. Alexomycin, apramycin, tiamulin, tilmicosin, and tylosin were tested by broth microdilution against various National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS)-recommended QC organisms (Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Streptococcus pneumoniae ATCC 49619, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853). In addition, disk diffusion zone diameter QC limits were determined for apramycin, enrofloxacin, and premafloxacin by using E. coli ATCC 25922, P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853, and S. aureus ATCC 25923. The results from five or six participating laboratories produced ≥99.0% of MICs and ≥95.0% of the zone diameters within suggested guidelines. The NCCLS Subcommittee for Veterinary Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing has recently approved these ranges for publication in the next M31 document. PMID:10618141

  18. Military Medical Research in Support of National Instruments of Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-26

    diseases. Military sponsored research in the U.S. and abroad has produced antibiotic cures for typhoid and scrub typhus, new anti-malarial drugs, and...ARV drugs to Kenyan tea plantation workers has directly resulted in the reduction of absenteeism , maintenance of highly developed skill sets

  19. Effects of Ethanolic Extract of Hyptis Suavoelens on the Food, Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Plasmodium(P.) species to hitherto widely used anti-malarial drugs such as chloroquine and more recently quinine. Resistance to these drugs which occurs with increasing frequency consequently underlies the necessity to develop new agents for malaria chemotherapy, (family Labiatae) a plant traditionally used in the ...

  20. Analysis of the physico-chemical quality Enalapril and Simvastatin drugs manipulated in magistral pharmacies from Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Analise da qualidade fisico-quimica dos medicamentos Enalapril e Sinvastatina manipulados em farmacias magistrais de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Tatiana Cristina Bomfim

    2013-07-01

    The increasing expansion of compounding pharmacy associated with several reports on variances in the quality of compounded drugs demonstrates the need for verification of quality, safety and efficacy of these products. In this work, physical and chemical analyzes were performed to evaluate the quality of some capsules manipulated enalapril and simvastatin, acquired in five pharmacies in Belo Horizonte /Brazil. Among the analyzes are pharmacopoeial tests for appearance, identification, determination of weight, content, related compounds and uniformity of dosage units, and was also performed neutron activation analysis for the determination of inorganic impurities in drugs sampled. The results showed that 60% of the samples were unsatisfactory for pharmacopoeial tests. The contents of the capsules sampled for individual testing unit dose uniformity between 0% and 136.2%. This test is important in evaluating the quality, which influences the safety and efficacy of drug treatment, since it allows you to check if the product contains the proper dosage and necessary for successful pharmacotherapy. On the other hand, underdosing can lead to reduced or absent desired therapeutic response, and overdoses can provide an undesirable effects and even toxic. The concentration of inorganic impurities was considered to be relatively small. However, no specific limits for some chemical elements in medicine hamper a better thread. In addition, further studies must be performed to assess chronic exposure to low concentrations of inorganic impurities, since drugs can be continuously used, and other sources of exposure must also be considered in order to evaluate the risk. The problems related to the quality and safety of compounded drugs are still reality in the country and reveal a serious public health problem, especially regarding the lack of uniformity between the unit doses of medications. It is suggested that the competent authorities to sanitary products, propose changes in

  1. The successful binomium of multivariate strategies and electrophoresis for the Quality by Design separation of a class of drugs: the case of triptans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Benedetta; Orlandini, Serena; Del Bubba, Massimo; Bertol, Elisabetta; Furlanetto, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    Quality by Design (QbD) approach was followed having as analytical target profile the determination of different antimigraine drugs (seven triptans, TRP) available on the market. Multivariate strategies were used for defining the design space and solvent-modified MEKC was the selected analytical method. The versatility of electrophoretic technique, allowing a fine modulation of experimental parameters, made it possible to define the design space (DS). The DS limited a suitable range of experimental parameters in which all possible combinations of variables led to an electrokinetic method able to determine all the considered analytes with a predefined quality. Design of experiments and risk analysis fully assisted the method development from the initial investigation of MEKC knowledge space to the DS definition and finally to the control strategy. Applying the working operative conditions, the baseline separation of TRP was obtained in less than 9 min. The method was finally used for the quantification of three TRP in different pharmaceutical products. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Boosting Quality Registries with Clinical Decision Support Functionality*. User Acceptance of a Prototype Applied to HIV/TB Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannheden, Carolina; Hvitfeldt-Forsberg, Helena; Eftimovska, Elena; Westling, Katarina; Ellenius, Johan

    2017-08-11

    The care of HIV-related tuberculosis (HIV/TB) is complex and challenging. Clinical decision support (CDS) systems can contribute to improve quality of care, but more knowledge is needed on factors determining user acceptance of CDS. To analyze physicians' and nurses' acceptance of a CDS prototype for evidence-based drug therapy recommendations for HIV/TB treatment. Physicians and nurses were involved in designing a CDS prototype intended for future integration with the Swedish national HIV quality registry. Focus group evaluation was performed with ten nurses and four physicians, respectively. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) was used to analyze acceptance. We identified several potential benefits with the CDS prototype as well as some concerns that could be addressed by redesign. There was also concern about dependence on physician attitudes, as well as technical, organizational, and legal issues. Acceptance evaluation at a prototype stage provided rich data to improve the future design of a CDS prototype. Apart from design and development efforts, substantial organizational efforts are needed to enable the implementation and maintenance of a future CDS system.

  3. GC-C-IRMS in routine doping control practice: 3 years of drug testing data, quality control and evolution of the method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polet, Michael; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2015-06-01

    In order to detect the misuse of endogenous anabolic steroids, doping control laboratories require methods that allow differentiation between endogenous steroids and their synthetic copies. Gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) is capable of measuring the carbon isotope ratio of urinary steroids and this allows differentiation between both. GC-C-IRMS and its application to doping control has evolved a lot during the last decade and so have the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) technical documents that describe how GC-C-IRMS should be applied. Especially the WADA technical document of 2014 introduced a number of obligatory quality controls and a fixed methodology that should be used by all the doping control laboratories. This document imposed more uniform methods between the laboratories in order to decrease the interlaboratory standard deviation and acquire similar results for the analysis of the same urine samples. In this paper, 3 years of drug testing data of our GC-C-IRMS method in routine doping control practice is described, with an emphasis on the new WADA technical document and its implementation. Useful data for other doping control laboratories is presented focussing on general method setup, quality control and data collected from routine samples. The paper concentrates on how IRMS results shift or remain similar by switching to the 2014 WADA technical document and gives insight in a straightforward approach to calculate the measurement uncertainty.

  4. The removal of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, endocrine disruptors and illicit drugs during wastewater treatment and its impact on the quality of receiving waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara; Dinsdale, Richard M; Guwy, Alan J

    2009-02-01

    A 5-month monitoring program was undertaken in South Wales in the UK to determine the fate of 55 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, endocrine disruptors and illicit drugs (PPCPs) in two contrasting wastewater plants utilising two different wastewater treatment technologies: activated sludge and trickling filter beds. The impact of treated wastewater effluent on the quality of receiving waters was also assessed. PPCPs were found to be present at high loads reaching 10kgday(-1) in the raw sewage. Concentrations of PPCPs in raw sewage were found to correlate with their usage/consumption patterns in Wales and their metabolism. The efficiency of the removal of PPCPs was found to be strongly dependent on the technology implemented in the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). In general, the WWTP utilising trickling filter beds resulted in, on average, less than 70% removal of all 55 PPCPs studied, while the WWTP utilising activated sludge treatment gave a much higher removal efficiency of over 85%. The monitoring programme revealed that treated wastewater effluents were the main contributors to PPCPs concentrations (up to 3kg of PPCPsday(-1)) in the rivers studied. Bearing in mind that in the cases examined here the WWTP effluents were also major contributors to rivers' flows (dilution factor for the studied rivers did not exceed 23 times) the effect of WWTP effluent on the quality of river water is significant and cannot be underestimated.

  5. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  6. Quality assessment of observational studies in a drug-safety systematic review, comparison of two tools: the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale and the RTI item bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margulis AV

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Andrea V Margulis,1 Manel Pladevall,1 Nuria Riera-Guardia,1 Cristina Varas-Lorenzo,1 Lorna Hazell,2,3 Nancy D Berkman,4 Meera Viswanathan,4 Susana Perez-Gutthann,1 1RTI Health Solutions, Barcelona, Spain; 2Drug Safety Research Unit, Southampton, UK; 3Associate Department of the School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK; 4RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA Background: The study objective was to compare the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS and the RTI item bank (RTI-IB and estimate interrater agreement using the RTI-IB within a systematic review on the cardiovascular safety of glucose-lowering drugs. Methods: We tailored both tools and added four questions to the RTI-IB. Two reviewers assessed the quality of the 44 included studies with both tools, (independently for the RTI-IB and agreed on which responses conveyed low, unclear, or high risk of bias. For each question in the RTI-IB (n=31, the observed interrater agreement was calculated as the percentage of studies given the same bias assessment by both reviewers; chance-adjusted interrater agreement was estimated with the first-order agreement coefficient (AC1 statistic. Results: The NOS required less tailoring and was easier to use than the RTI-IB, but the RTI-IB produced a more thorough assessment. The RTI-IB includes most of the domains measured in the NOS. Median observed interrater agreement for the RTI-IB was 75% (25th percentile [p25] =61%; p75 =89%; median AC1 statistic was 0.64 (p25 =0.51; p75 =0.86. Conclusion: The RTI-IB facilitates a more complete quality assessment than the NOS but is more burdensome. The observed agreement and AC1 statistic in this study were higher than those reported by the RTI-IB's developers. Keywords: systematic review, meta-analysis, quality assessment, AC1

  7. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-11-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction.

  8. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Ernesto Nicolás Gulin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%. Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction.

  9. [Designer drugs in Jutland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, K W; Kaa, E

    2001-04-16

    The aim of this investigation was to examine illegal tablets and capsules seized in Jutland, the western part of Denmark, during the period 1995-1999. The drugs are described according to technical appearance (colour, logo, score, diameter) and content of synthetic drugs. All illegal tablets and capsules received during the period 1995-1999 (109 cases containing 192 different samples) were examined. MDMA was the most common drug and was seen during the entire period. Amphetamine was the second most common drug and has been frequently detected during the the last two years. Drugs like MDE, MBDB, BDB, and 2-CB were rarely seen and they disappeared quickly from the illegal market. MDA appeared on the market at the end of 1999. Only 53% of the tablets contained MDMA as the sole drug. Eighty-one percent of the tablets/capsules contained only one synthetic drug, whereas 13% contained a mixture of two or more synthetic drugs. Six per cent of the samples did not contain a euphoric drug/designer drug. The content of MDMA, MDE, and amphetamine in the tablets varied greatly. MDMA is apparently the drug preferred by the users, but still only half of the tablets contained MDMA as the only drug. The rest of the tablets contained either another synthetic drug or a mixture of drugs. In conclusion, the increasing supply of various drugs with different and unpredictable effects and of miscellaneous quality brings about the risk of serious and complicated intoxications.

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment and Recovery Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What to Say if You Used Drugs in the Past Drug Use ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol ...

  11. Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days or ... you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can cause an allergic reaction, ...

  12. Challenges in implementing uncomplicated malaria treatment in children: a health facility survey in rural Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabaghe, Alinune N; Phiri, Mphatso D; Phiri, Kamija S; van Vugt, Michèle

    2017-10-18

    Prompt and effective malaria treatment are key in reducing transmission, disease severity and mortality. With the current scale-up of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) coverage, there is need to focus on challenges affecting implementation of the intervention. Routine indicators focus on utilization and coverage, neglecting implementation quality. A health system in rural Malawi was assessed for uncomplicated malaria treatment implementation in children. A cross-sectional health facility survey was conducted in six health centres around the Majete Wildlife Reserve in Chikwawa district using a health system effectiveness approach to assess uncomplicated malaria treatment implementation. Interviews with health facility personnel and exit interviews with guardians of 120 children under 5 years were conducted. Health workers appropriately prescribed an ACT and did not prescribe an ACT to 73% (95% CI 63-84%) of malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) positive and 98% (95% CI 96-100%) RDT negative children, respectively. However, 24% (95% CI 13-37%) of children receiving artemisinin-lumefantrine had an inappropriate dose by weight. Health facility findings included inadequate number of personnel (average: 2.1 health workers per 10,000 population), anti-malarial drug stock-outs or not supplied, and inconsistent health information records. Guardians of 59% (95% CI 51-69%) of children presented within 24 h of onset of child's symptoms. The survey presents an approach for assessing treatment effectiveness, highlighting bottlenecks which coverage indicators are incapable of detecting, and which may reduce quality and effectiveness of malaria treatment. Health service provider practices in prescribing and dosing anti-malarial drugs, due to drug stock-outs or high patient load, risk development of drug resistance, treatment failure and exposure to adverse effects.

  13. Quality of evidence considered by Health Canada in granting full market authorisation to new drugs with a conditional approval: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lexchin, Joel

    2018-04-28

    This study examines the characteristics of studies that Health Canada uses to grant full marketing authorisation for products given a conditional approval between 1 January 1998 and 30 June 2017. Cohort study. Journal articles listing drugs that fulfilled their conditions and received full marketing authorisation, Notice of Compliance database, Notice of Compliance with conditions website, Qualifying Notices listing required confirmatory studies, clinicaltrials.gov, PubMed, Embase, companies making products being analysed, journal articles resulting from confirmatory studies. None. Characteristics of studies-study design (randomised controlled trials, observational), primary outcome used (clinical, surrogate), blinding, number of patients in studies, patient median age, number of men and women. Eleven companies confirmed 36 publications for 19 products (21 indications). Twenty-nine out of the 36 studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) but only 10 stated if they were blinded. Twenty used surrogate outcomes. The median age of patients was 56 (IQR 44-61). The median number of men per study/trial was 184 (IQR 58-514) versus women 141 (IQR 46-263). Postmarket studies required by Health Canada had more rigorous methodology than those required by either the Food and Drug Administration or the European Medicines Agency. There were still deficiencies in these studies. The absence of blinding in the majority of RCTs may introduce bias in their results. The use of surrogate outcomes especially in oncology trials means that improvements in survival are not available. The relatively young age of patients, even for products for cancer, means that predicting how the elderly will respond is often unknown. The almost universal finding that men outnumbered women may make it hard to differentiate responses by sex. These results raise potential concerns about the quality of evidence that Health Canada accepts. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  14. Patient-reported adverse drug reactions and their influence on adherence and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia patients on per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekäle M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meri Kekäle,1 Marikki Peltoniemi,2 Marja Airaksinen1 1Clinical Pharmacy Group, Division of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, 2Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Purpose: To evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs experienced by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients during per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment and correlation of ADR symptoms with medication adherence and perceived quality of life (QoL.Patients and methods: Eighty-six adult, chronic-phase CML patients who had been on TKI treatment (79% on imatinib, 10.5% dasatinib, and 10.5% nilotinib for at least 6 months participated in the study (mean age: 57.8 years, 52% males. The mean time from diagnosis was 5.1 years. All patients were interviewed, and patient-reported ADRs were obtained using a structured list. Adherence was assessed using Morisky’s 8-item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS. The symptoms’ interference with patient’s daily QoL was measured by asking patients about the influence of symptom(s on their mood, general condition, enjoyment of life, walking, relationships, and work.Results: Ninety-seven percent of the patients were suffering from at least one ADR. The mean number of different symptoms was seven (range: 0–15, median 6. The most commonly perceived ADRs were muscle soreness or cramp (69/86, 80%; swelling of hands, legs, feet, or around the eyes (59/86, 69%; and fatigue (43/86, 50%. No correlation was found between adherence and ADRs, because symptoms were equally common in each MMAS adherence class. Half of the patients felt that the ADRs had a negative influence on their daily QoL. A quarter of the patients reported that ADRs affected either their mood, general condition, or enjoyment of life. The incidence of almost all ADRs was much higher among patients reporting negative influence of ADRs on their daily life compared to total study population (P=0.016.Conclusion

  15. Molecular Evidence of Increased Resistance to Anti-Folate Drugs in Plasmodium falciparum in North-East India: A Signal for Potential Failure of Artemisinin Plus Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Pradyumna Kishore; Sarma, Devojit Kumar; Prakash, Anil; Bora, Khukumoni; Ahmed, Md. Atique; Sarma, Bibhas; Goswami, Basanta Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Dibya Ranjan; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    North-east India, being a corridor to South-east Asia, is believed to play an important role in transmitting drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria to India and South Asia. North-east India was the first place in India to record the emergence of drug resistance to chloroquine as well as sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Presently chloroquine resistance is widespread all over the North-east India and resistance to other anti-malarials is increasing. In this study both in vivo therapeutic efficacy and molecular assays were used to screen the spectrum of drug resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in the circulating P. falciparum strains. A total of 220 P. falciparum positives subjects were enrolled in the study for therapeutic assessment of chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and assessment of point mutations conferring resistances to these drugs were carried out by genotyping the isolates following standard methods. Overall clinical failures in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and chloroquine were found 12.6 and 69.5% respectively, while overall treatment failures recorded were 13.7 and 81.5% in the two arms. Nearly all (99.0%) the isolates had mutant pfcrt genotype (76T), while 68% had mutant pfmdr-1 genotype (86Y). Mutation in dhps 437 codon was the most prevalent one while dhfr codon 108 showed 100% mutation. A total of 23 unique haplotypes at the dhps locus and 7 at dhfr locus were found while dhps-dhfr combined loci revealed 49 unique haplotypes. Prevalence of double, triple and quadruple mutations were common while 1 haplotype was found with all five mutated codons (F/AGEGS/T) at dhps locus. Detection of quadruple mutants (51I/59R/108N/164L) in the present study, earlier recorded from Car Nicobar Island, India only, indicates the presence of high levels of resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in north-east India. Associations between resistant haplotypes and the clinical outcomes and emerging resistance in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in

  16. Quality-by-design based development of a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system to reduce the effect of food on Nelfinavir mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Sunil; Rana, Vikas

    2016-03-30

    Poor aqueous solubility and moderate permeability of Nelfinavir mesylate (NFM) leads to high variability in absorption after oral administration. To improve the solubility and bioavailability of NFM, the self microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) was developed. For this purpose, Quality by design (QbD) approach employing D-optimal mixture design was used to prepare SMEDDS of NFM. Further, the software generated numerically optimized SMEDDS were developed by utilizing desirability function. Maisine 35-1, Tween 80, and Transcutol HP were identified as oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant that had best solubility for NFM. Ternary phase diagrams were plotted to identify the self-emulsification region. Dissolution of putative NFM in simulated fasted or fed small intestinal conditions, respectively, predicted that there is a positive food effect. However, NFM loaded SMEDDS showed absence of food effect with no significant difference in dissolution performance either in Fasted or fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF or FeSSIF) biorelevent dissolution media. The prepared SMEDDS were thermodynamically stable with droplet size (121 nm), poly dispersity index (PDI) (0.198) and emulsification time (food effect on pure NFM suspension. However, absence of food effect and 3.5-3.6 fold enhancement in the oral bioavailability was observed when NFM was formulated into SMEDDS. Thus, it could be envisaged that development of SMEDDS formulation of NFM could be one of the best alternative to enhance oral bioavailability of NFM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Characteristic Motor and Nonmotor Symptoms Related to Quality of Life in Drug-Naïve Patients with Late-Onset Parkinson Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hea Ree; Youn, Jinyoung; Cho, Jin Whan; Oh, Eung-Seok; Kim, Ji Sun; Park, Suyeon; Jang, Wooyoung; Park, Jin Se

    2018-01-01

    Unlike young-onset Parkinson disease (YOPD), characteristics of late-onset PD (LOPD) have not yet been clearly elucidated. We investigated characteristic features and symptoms related to quality of life (QoL) in LOPD patients. We recruited drug-naïve, early PD patients. The patient cohort was divided into 3 subgroups based on patient age at onset (AAO): the YOPD group (AAO patients, 26 were in the YOPD group, 74 in the MOPD group, and 32 in the LOPD group. Among parkinsonian symptoms, patients in the LOPD group had a lower score on the Korean version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment than the other groups. Logistic regression analysis showed genitourinary symptoms were related to the LOPD group. Linear regression analysis showed both MS and NMS were correlated with QoL in the MOPD group, but only NMS were correlated with QoL in the LOPD group. Particularly, anxiety and fatigue affected QoL in the LOPD group. LOPD patients showed different characteristic clinical features, and different symptoms were related with QoL for LOPD than YOPD and MOPD patients. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Exploring the relationship between online buyers and sellers of image and performance enhancing drugs (IPEDs): Quality issues, trust and self-regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, K.; Koenraadt, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Online drug markets are expanding the boundaries of drug supply including the sale and purchase of image and performance enhancing drugs (IPEDs). However, the role of the internet in IPED markets, and in particular the ways in which these substances are supplied via the surface web, has

  19. Download this PDF file

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    INTRODUCTION. Chloroquine resistant malaria remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in sub Saharan African children . Although the World Health Organisation. (WHO) has recommended Artemisin-based. Combination therapies (ACTs) as the best anti- malarial drugs currently available , the use of ACTs.

  20. Tanzania | Page 41 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Alexander Soucy is correct to identify insecticide-treated bednets and inexpensive anti-malarial drugs as crucial to the global fight against malaria ('An easy way to save three million lives,' April 26). Read more about Tanzania ... Legislation on competition brings productivity and business investment to Tanzania. Increasing ...

  1. Treatment Failure for Malaria in Vietnam

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-06-05

    WHO malaria expert, Dr. Charlotte Rasmussen, discusses anti-malarial drug resistance in Vietnam.  Created: 6/5/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/5/2017.

  2. A potent series targeting the malarial cGMP-dependent protein kinase clears infection and blocks transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, D.A.; Stewart, L.B.; Large, J.M.; Bowyer, P.W.; Ansell, K.H.; Jimenez-Diaz, M.B.; Bakkouri, M. El; Birchall, K.; Dechering, K.J.; Bouloc, N.S.; Coombs, P.J.; Whalley, D.; Harding, D.J.; Smiljanic-Hurley, E.; Wheldon, M.C.; Walker, E.M.; Dessens, J.T.; Lafuente, M.J.; Sanz, L.M.; Gamo, F.J.; Ferrer, S.B.; Hui, R.; Bousema, T.; Angulo-Barturen, I.; Merritt, A.T.; Croft, S.L.; Gutteridge, W.E.; Kettleborough, C.A.; Osborne, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    To combat drug resistance, new chemical entities are urgently required for use in next generation anti-malarial combinations. We report here the results of a medicinal chemistry programme focused on an imidazopyridine series targeting the Plasmodium falciparum cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase

  3. Tanzanie | Page 32 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    insecticides et les médicaments antipaludiques abordables sont des leviers ... Alexander Soucy is correct to identify insecticide-treated bednets and inexpensive anti-malarial drugs as crucial to the global fight against malaria ('An easy way to ...

  4. Antiplasmodial activity of some phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Plasmodium falciparum, one of the causative agents of malaria, has high adaptability through mutation and is resistant to many types of anti-malarial drugs. This study presents an in vitro assessment of the antiplasmodial activity of some phenolic compounds isolated from plants of the genus Allanblackia.

  5. Placental malaria and immunity to infant measles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, S.; Harper, G.; Amuasi, J.; Offei-Larbi, G.; Ordi, J.; Brabin, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    The efficiency of transplacental transfer of measles specific antibody was assessed in relation to placental malaria. Infection at delivery was associated with a 30% decrease in expected cord measles antibody titres. Uninfected women who received anti-malarial drugs during pregnancy transmitted 30%

  6. Antibodies to malaria vaccine candidates are associated with chloroquine or sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine treatment efficacy in children in an endemic area of Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diarra Amidou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient immune status is thought to affect the efficacy of anti-malarial chemotherapy. This is a subject of some importance, since evidence of immunity-related interactions may influence our use of chemotherapy in populations with drug resistance, as well as assessment of the value of suboptimal vaccines. The study aim was to investigate relationship between antibodies and anti-malarial drug treatment outcomes. Methods Some 248 children aged 0.5 and 15 years were recruited prior to the high malaria transmission season. Venous blood (5 ml was obtained from each child to measure antibody levels to selected malaria antigens, using ELISA. Blood smears were also performed to assess drug efficacy and malaria infection prevalence. Children were actively followed up to record clinical malaria cases. Results IgG levels to MSP3 were always higher in the successfully treated group than in the group with treatment failure. The same observation was made for GLURP but the reverse observation was noticed for MSP1-19. Cytophilic and non-cytophilic antibodies were significantly associated with protection against all three antigens, except for IgG4 to MSP1-19 and GLURP. Conclusion Acquired anti-malarial antibodies may play an important role in the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in younger children more susceptible to the disease.

  7. Observational Study of Human Electrical Muscle Incapacitation and Cardiac Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    clarithromycin, and ketoconazole), anti-malarial drugs (quinine and chloroquine ), methadone, and cocaine.7,8,9 The Bazett method has been used ...distribution unlimited. Distribution A. Distribution authorized for public release NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings...corporation; or convey any rights or permission to manufacture, use , or sell any patented invention that may relate to them. Qualified requestors may

  8. CHAPTER 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Changes in Plasmodium Falciparum Population Dynamics in ... vaccine. The most polymorphic genetic loci is msp-2 gene and it has been suggested that ... Thick blood smears stained with Giemsa were prepared ... specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). ..... anti-malarial drug treatment in Tanzanian children with acute.

  9. 78 FR 3440 - Government-Owned Inventions; Availability for Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... no vaccine for malaria, and there is growing resistance to existing anti-malarial drugs. Sexual stage... Applications: Malaria vaccine, diagnostic and therapeutic. Competitive Advantages: Single protein malaria... candidate oral anthrax vaccine exists and would result in an easy-to-administer oral delivery system to...

  10. Chloroquine induced pruritus - questionnaire based epidemiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a very useful drug with a broad spectrum of uses (as anti malarial, anti amoebiasis and for connective tissue diseases). A major side effect preventing or limiting its utilization in blacks is chloroquine induced pruritus (CP). A descriptive cross sectional questionnaire based epidemiological study of ...

  11. Radiopharmaceutical drug review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    To ensure proper radioactive drug use (such as quality, diagnostic improvement, and minimal radioactive exposure), the Food and Drug Administration evaluates new drugs with respect to safety, effectiveness, and accuracy and adequacy of the labeling. The IND or NDA process is used for this purpose. A brief description of the process, including the Chemical Classification System and the therapeutic potential classification, is presented as it applies to radiopharmaceuticals. Also, the status of the IND or NDA review of radiopharmaceuticals is given

  12. Two New Plant-Like Pathways Link Hemoglobin Degradation to Lipid Biogenesis in Falciparum Malaria: Novel Targets for Anti-Malarial Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    when the compound was added at 50/uM (Appendix VI, B). Furthermore, clofibric acid , an inhibitor of PtdEtn methylransferases (19), had no effect on Pfpmt...reduced when the compound was added at 50 AM (Fig. 5B). Furthermore, clofibric acid , an inhibitor of PtdEtn B 35 methyltransferases (34), had no...Fig. 5B). Furthermore, clofibric acid , an takDs .Shnmn .Jnsn .Coday n .U~a o inhibitor of PtdEtn methyltransferases, had no effect on Pfpmt helpful

  13. The Impact of School Based Anti-Malarial Treatment on Adolescents' Cognition: Evidence from a Cluster-Randomized Intervention in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Children's health is an important factor that influences their success in education--poor health, especially when induced by disease, has been linked to poorer cognitive performance, particularly among children across the developing world (Behrman, 1996; UNESCO, 2008; Jukes et al., 2008). One health concern, particularly for sub-Saharan Africa,…

  14. Impact of introducing subsidized combination treatment with artemether-lumefantrine on sales of anti-malarial monotherapies: a survey of private sector pharmacies in Huambo, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussiana, Cristina; Floridia, Marco; Martinho do Rosário, Joana; Fortes, Filomeno; Allan, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) against malaria are subsidized in many African countries, but the impact of subsidy programs in reducing the sales of concomitantly available antimalarial monotherapies is poorly defined. Data from The MENTOR initiative, that introduced subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (sAL) in the private sector of Huambo province, Angola, were used. The main response variable was represented by sales of sAL and of monotherapies, measured as number of treatment courses. Sales in private pharmacies of sAL and four antimalarial monotherapies between 2009 and 2013 were organized in four time-periods, and analyzed using generalized linear models for repeated measures. A secondary analysis evaluated changes in relative market share. We analyzed data from 34 pharmacies at four time points, taken from a larger survey that involved 165 pharmacies between June 2009 and March 2013. The sAL, following its introduction, became the dominant antimalarial treatment in the private sector, usually exceeding the total sales of all antimalarial monotherapies combined (1480/2800 total treatment courses, 52.8% of all sales in March 2013). Sales of monotherapies decreased significantly, but did not stop, representing 36.7% (1028/2800) of sales at the end of the survey. Subsidized ACTs can attain rapidly a high relative market share. Their introduction reduced, but did not eliminate the demand for less effective monotherapies, that might favor parasite resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Drug Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  16. Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cocaine Heroin Inhalants Marijuana Prescription drugs, including opioids Drug abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug ...

  18. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on ... Someone Find Treatment and Recovery Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids ...

  19. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uses. Other uses of these drugs are abuse. Club drugs are also sometimes used as "date rape" drugs, to make someone unable to say no to or fight back against sexual assault. Abusing these drugs can ...

  20. Application of Quality by Design (QbD) Principles to Extractables/Leachables Assessment. Establishing a Design Space for Terminally Sterilized Aqueous Drug Products Stored in a Plastic Packaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The concept of quality by design (QbD) reflects the current global regulatory thinking related to pharmaceutical products. A cornerstone of the QbD paradigm is the concept of a design space, where the design space is a multidimensional combination of input variables and process parameters that have been demonstrated to provide the assurance of product quality. If a design space can be established for a pharmaceutical process or product, then operation within the design space confirms that the product or process output possesses the required quality attributes. This concept of design space can be applied to the safety (leachables) assessment of drug products manufactured and stored in packaging systems. Critical variables in such a design space would include those variables that affect the interaction of the drug product and its packaging, including (a) composition of the drug product, (b) composition of the packaging system, (c) configuration of the packaging system, and (d) the conditions of contact. This paper proposes and justifies such a leachables design space for aqueous drug products packaged in a specific plastic packaging system. Such a design space has the following boundaries:Aqueous drug products with a pH in the range of 2 to 8 and that contain no polarity-impacting agents such as organic solubilizers and stabilizers (addressing variable a). Packaging systems manufactured from materials that meet the system's existing material specifications (addressing variable b). Nominal fill volumes from 50 to 1000 mL (addressing variable c). Products subjected to terminal sterilization and then stored at room temperature for a period of up to 24 months (addressing variable d). The ramification of such a design space is that any drug product that falls within these boundaries is deemed to be compatible with the packaging system, from the perspective of safety, without the requirement of supporting drug product testing. When drug products are packaged in plastic

  1. BDA-410: a novel synthetic calpain inhibitor active against blood stage malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuerong; Chen, Huiqing; Jeong, Jong-Jin; Chishti, Athar H

    2007-09-01

    Falcipains, the papain-family cysteine proteases of the Plasmodium falciparum, are potential drug targets for malaria parasite. Pharmacological inhibition of falcipains can block the hydrolysis of hemoglobin, parasite development, and egress, suggesting that falcipains play a key role at the blood stage of parasite life cycle. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-malarial effects of BDA-410, a novel cysteine protease inhibitor as a potential anti-malarial drug. Recombinant falcipain (MBP-FP-2B) and P. falciparum trophozoite extract containing native falcipains were used for enzyme inhibition studies in vitro. The effect of BDA-410 on the malaria parasite development in vitro as well as its anti-malarial activity in vivo was evaluated using the Plasmodium chabaudi infection rodent model. The 50% inhibitory concentrations of BDA-410 were determined to be 628 and 534nM for recombinant falcipain-2B and parasite extract, respectively. BDA-410 inhibited the malaria parasite growth in vitro with an IC(50) value of 173nM causing irreversible damage to the intracellular parasite. In vivo, the BDA-410 delayed the progression of malaria infection significantly using a mouse model of malaria pathogenesis. The characterization of BDA-410 as a potent inhibitor of P. falciparum cysteine proteases, and the demonstration of its efficacy in blocking parasite growth both in vitro and in vivo assays identifies BDA-410 is an important lead compound for the development of novel anti-malarial drugs.

  2. Assessing the potential impact of non-proprietary drug copies on quality of medicine and treatment in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis: the experience with fingolimod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correale J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jorge Correale,1 Erwin Chiquete,2 Snezana Milojevic,3 Nadina Frider,3 Imre Bajusz31Raúl Carrea Institute for Neurological Research, Foundation for the Fight against Infant Neurological Illnesses, Buenos Aires, Argentina; 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Salvador Zubirán National Institute of Medical Science and Nutrition, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, SwitzerlandBackground: Fingolimod is a once-daily oral treatment for relapsing multiple sclerosis, the proprietary production processes of which are tightly controlled, owing to its susceptibility to contamination by impurities, including genotoxic impurities. Many markets produce nonproprietary medicines; assessing their efficacy and safety is difficult as regulators may approve nonproprietary drugs without bioequivalence data, genotoxic evaluation, or risk management plans (RMPs. This assessment is especially important for fingolimod given its solubility/bioavailability profile, genotoxicity risk, and low-dose final product (0.5 mg. This paper presents an evaluation of the quality of proprietary and nonproprietary fingolimod variants.Methods: Proprietary fingolimod was used as a reference substance against which eleven nonproprietary fingolimod copies were assessed. The microparticle size distribution of each compound was assessed by laser light diffraction, and inorganic impurity content by sulfated ash testing. Heavy metals content was quantified using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry, and levels of unspecified impurities by high-performance liquid chromatography. Solubility was assessed in a range of solvents at different pH values. Key information from the fingolimod RMP is also presented.Results: Nonproprietary fingolimod variants exhibited properties out of proprietary or internationally accepted specifications, including differences in particle size distribution and levels of impurities such as heavy metals. For microparticle size and

  3. [Raman spectroscopy applied to analytical quality control of injectable drugs: analytical evaluation and comparative economic versus HPLC and UV / visible-FTIR].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourget, P; Amin, A; Vidal, F; Merlette, C; Troude, P; Corriol, O

    2013-09-01

    In France, central IV admixture of chemotherapy (CT) treatments at the hospital is now required by law. We have previously shown that the shaping of Therapeutic Objects (TOs) could profit from an Analytical Quality Assurance (AQA), closely linked to the batch release, for the three key parameters: identity, purity, and initial concentration of the compound of interest. In the course of recent and diversified works, we showed the technical superiority of non-intrusive Raman Spectroscopy (RS) vs. any other analytical option and, especially for both HPLC and vibrational method using a UV/visible-FTIR coupling. An interconnected qualitative and economic assessment strongly helps to enrich these relevant works. The study compares in operational situation, the performance of three analytical methods used for the AQC of TOs. We used: a) a set of evaluation criteria, b) the depreciation tables of the machinery, c) the cost of disposables, d) the weight of equipment and technical installations, e) the basic accounting unit (unit of work) and its composite costs (Euros), which vary according to the technical options, the weight of both human resources and disposables; finally, different combinations are described. So, the unit of work can take 12 different values between 1 and 5.5 Euros, and we provide various recommendations. A qualitative evaluation grid constantly places the SR technology as superior or equal to the 2 other techniques currently available. Our results demonstrated: a) the major interest of the non-intrusive AQC performed by RS, especially when it is not possible to analyze a TO with existing methods e.g. elastomeric portable pumps, and b) the high potential for this technique to be a strong contributor to the security of the medication circuit, and to fight the iatrogenic effects of drugs especially in the hospital. It also contributes to the protection of all actors in healthcare and of their working environment.

  4. Validated spectroscopic methods for determination of anti-histaminic drug azelastine in pure form: Analytical application for quality control of its pharmaceutical preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Masry, Amal A.; Hammouda, Mohammed E. A.; El-Wasseef, Dalia R.; El-Ashry, Saadia M.

    2018-02-01

    Two simple, sensitive, rapid, validated and cost effective spectroscopic methods were established for quantification of antihistaminic drug azelastine (AZL) in bulk powder as well as in pharmaceutical dosage forms. In the first method (A) the absorbance difference between acidic and basic solutions was measured at 228 nm, whereas in the second investigated method (B) the binary complex formed between AZL and Eosin Y in acetate buffer solution (pH 3) was measured at 550 nm. Different criteria that have critical influence on the intensity of absorption were deeply studied and optimized so as to achieve the highest absorption. The proposed methods obeyed Beer's low in the concentration range of (2.0-20.0 μg·mL- 1) and (0.5-15.0 μg·mL- 1) with % recovery ± S.D. of (99.84 ± 0.87), (100.02 ± 0.78) for methods (A) and (B), respectively. Furthermore, the proposed methods were easily applied for quality control of pharmaceutical preparations without any conflict with its co-formulated additives, and the analytical results were compatible with those obtained by the comparison one with no significant difference as insured by student's t-test and the variance ratio F-test. Validation of the proposed methods was performed according the ICH guidelines in terms of linearity, limit of quantification, limit of detection, accuracy, precision and specificity, where the analytical results were persuasive. The absorption spectrum of AZL (16 μg·mL- 1) in 0.1 M HCl. The absorption spectrum of AZL (16 μg·mL- 1) in 0.1 M NaOH. The difference absorption spectrum of AZL (16 μg·mL- 1) in 0.1 M NaOH vs 0.1 M HCl. The absorption spectrum of eosin binary complex with AZL (10 μg·mL- 1).

  5. Testing times: trends in availability, price, and market share of malaria diagnostics in the public and private healthcare sector across eight sub-Saharan African countries from 2009 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Kara; Goodman, Catherine

    2017-05-19

    The World Health Organization guidelines have recommended that all cases of suspected malaria should receive a confirmatory test with microscopy or a malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT), however evidence from sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) illustrates that only one-third of children under five with a recent fever received a test. The aim of this study was to evaluate availability, price and market share of microscopy and RDT from 2009/11 to 2014/15 in 8 SSA countries, to better understand barriers to improving access to malaria confirmatory testing in the public and private health sectors. Repeated national cross-sectional quantitative surveys were conducted among a sample of outlets stocking anti-malarial medicines and/or diagnostics. In total, 169,655 outlets were screened. Availability of malaria blood testing among all screened public health facilities increased significantly between the first survey wave in 2009/11 and the most recent in 2014/15 in Benin (36.2, 85.4%, p sector in Zambia (90.9%), Benin (90.3%), Madagascar (84.5%), Katanga (74.3%), mainland Tanzania (73.5%), Uganda (71.8%), Nigeria (68.4%), Kenya (53.2%) and Kinshasa (51.9%). In the anti-malarial stocking private sector, significant increases in availability of diagnostic tests among private for-profit facilities were observed between the first and final survey rounds in Kinshasa (82.1, 94.0%, p sector price of RDT for a child was equal to the price of pre-packaged quality-assured artemisinin-based combination therapy (QAACT) treatment for a two-year old child in some countries, and 1.5-2.5 times higher in others. Median private sector QAACT price for an adult varied from having parity with an RDT for an adult to being up to 2 times more expensive. The exception was in both Kinshasa and Katanga, where the median price of QAACT was less expensive than RDTs. Significant strides have been made in the availability of testing, mainly through the widespread distribution of RDT, and especially in public

  6. Drug allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The first time ...

  7. Study Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to quit, they may have withdrawal symptoms like depression, thoughts of suicide, intense drug cravings, sleep problems, and fatigue. The health risks aren't the only downside to study drugs. Students caught with illegal prescription drugs may get suspended ...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen ... to prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To ...

  10. Drug Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem is interactions, which may occur between Two drugs, such as aspirin and blood thinners Drugs and food, such as statins and grapefruit Drugs and supplements, such as ginkgo and blood thinners ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol ...

  12. Correcting India’s Chronic Shortage of Drug Inspectors to Ensure the Production and Distribution of Safe, High-Quality Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Abhay B.; Maigetter, Karen; Jeffery, Roger; Mistry, Nerges F.; Weiss, Mitchell G.; Pollock, Allyson M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Good drug regulation requires an effective system for monitoring and inspection of manufacturing and sales units. In India, despite widespread agreement on this principle, ongoing shortages of drug inspectors have been identified by national committees since 1975. The growth of India’s pharmaceutical industry and its large export market makes the problem more acute. Methods: The focus of this study is a case study of Maharashtra, which has 29% of India’s manufacturing units and 38% of its medicines exports. India’s regulations were reviewed, comparing international, national and state inspection norms with the actual number of inspectors and inspections. Twenty-six key informant interviews were conducted to ascertain the causes of the shortfall. Results: In 2009-2010, 55% of the sanctioned posts of drug inspectors in Maharashtra were vacant. This resulted in a shortfall of 83%, based on the Mashelkar Committee’s recommendations. Less than a quarter of the required inspections of manufacturing and sales units were undertaken. The Indian Drugs and Cosmetics Act and its Rules and Regulations make no provisions for drug inspectors and workforce planning norms, despite the growth and increasing complexity of India’s pharmaceutical industry. Conclusion: The Maharashtra Food and Drug Administration (FDA) falls short of the Mashelkar Committee’s recommended workforce planning norms. Legislation and political and operational support are required to produce needed changes PMID:27694680

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? Does Drug Treatment Work? What Are the Treatment Options? What Is Recovery? ...

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from drugs. But she's afraid ...

  15. Drug Pricing Reforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Mendez, Susan J.; Rønde, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Reference price systems for prescription drugs have found widespread use as cost containment tools. Under such regulatory regimes, patients co-pay a fraction of the difference between pharmacy retail price of the drug and a reference price. Reference prices are either externally (based on drug...... prices in other countries) or internally (based on domestic drug prices) determined. In a recent study, we analysed the effects of a change from external to internal reference pricing in Denmark in 2005, finding that the reform led to substantial reductions in prices, producer revenues, and expenditures...... for patients and the health insurance system. We also estimated an increase in consumer welfare but the size effect depends on whether or not perceived quality differences between branded and other drugs are taken into account....

  16. Use of FMEA analysis to reduce risk of errors in prescribing and administering drugs in paediatric wards: a quality improvement report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Paola; Bizzarri, Giancarlo; Scalzotto, Francesca; Parpaiola, Antonella; Amigoni, Angela; Putoto, Giovanni; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Administering medication to hospitalised infants and children is a complex process at high risk of error. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) is a proactive tool used to analyse risks, identify failures before they happen and prioritise remedial measures. To examine the hazards associated with the process of drug delivery to children, we performed a proactive risk-assessment analysis. Five multidisciplinary teams, representing different divisions of the paediatric department at Padua University Hospital, were trained to analyse the drug-delivery process, to identify possible causes of failures and their potential effects, to calculate a risk priority number (RPN) for each failure and plan changes in practices. To identify higher-priority potential failure modes as defined by RPNs and planning changes in clinical practice to reduce the risk of patients harm and improve safety in the process of medication use in children. In all, 37 higher-priority potential failure modes and 71 associated causes and effects were identified. The highest RPNs related (>48) mainly to errors in calculating drug doses and concentrations. Many of these failure modes were found in all the five units, suggesting the presence of common targets for improvement, particularly in enhancing the safety of prescription and preparation of endovenous drugs. The introductions of new activities in the revised process of administering drugs allowed reducing the high-risk failure modes of 60%. FMEA is an effective proactive risk-assessment tool useful to aid multidisciplinary groups in understanding a process care and identifying errors that may occur, prioritising remedial interventions and possibly enhancing the safety of drug delivery in children.

  17. Exploring the relationship between online buyers and sellers of image and performance enhancing drugs (IPEDs): Quality issues, trust and self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Katinka; Koenraadt, Rosa

    2017-12-01

    Online drug markets are expanding the boundaries of drug supply including the sale and purchase of image and performance enhancing drugs (IPEDs). However, the role of the internet in IPED markets, and in particular the ways in which these substances are supplied via the surface web, has rarely been considered. This article examines the online IPED market in order to inform drug policy and to provide a nuanced understanding of retailers involved, particularly exploring the relationship between buyers and sellers. This paper is based on two extensive research projects conducted in the Netherlands and Belgium. The first project focuses on muscle drugs and is based on 64 IPED dealing cases, semi-structured interviews with authorities (N=32), and dealers (N=15), along with an analysis of 10 steroid-selling websites. The second research project primarily focuses on weight loss drugs and sexual enhancers in the Netherlands, and relies on interviews with authorities (N=38), suppliers (N=30), and consumers (N=10), analysis of 69 criminal case files, and an online analysis. In the literature, the illicit online sale of IPEDs is generally associated with illegal online pharmacies that try to mislead buyers. While confirmed in our research, we also illustrate that there are online suppliers who invest in customer relationships and services, and that users are aware of the illegal nature of their business. These e-vendors incorporate a 'social supply business model' by providing the best possible service to their customers and attempting to minimise risks in order to attract, satisfy and maintain customers. As it is likely that users will continue to make use of the internet to order IPEDs, regardless of closing down selling websites, it is first of all important to counteract these online sources by educating all types of consumers and providing harm reduction services. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Poorer functionality is related to better quality of life response following the use of biological drugs: 6-month outcomes in a prospective cohort from the Public Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde), Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Junior, Haliton Alves; dos Santos, Jéssica Barreto; Acurcio, Francisco Assis; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Alvares, Juliana; de Carvalho, Luis Fernando Duarte; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2015-06-01

    We aim to analyze factors associated with the quality of life (QOL) response of individuals with rheumatic diseases treated by the Public Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde) with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs). Data from 428 patients using bDMARDs were collected using a standardized form at baseline and 6 months after the onset of treatment. The average reduction of the scores on EuroQol-five dimension was 0.11 ± 0.18 6 months after the onset of treatment with bDMARDs, denoting significant improvement of the participants' QOL. All the investigated types of disease exhibited significant improvement at the 6-month assessment, without any difference among them (p = 0.965). The participants with baseline poorest functionality and best QOL exhibited the best QOL outcomes after 6 months of treatment. Our study showed that the use of biological drugs induced considerable improvement in the participants' QOL.

  19. Substance use - prescription drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Substance use disorder - prescription drugs; Substance abuse - prescription drugs; Drug abuse - prescription drugs; Drug use - prescription drugs; Narcotics - substance use; Opioid - substance use; Sedative - substance ...

  20. The procedure of new drug application and the philosophy of critical rationalism or the limits of quality assurance with good clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Högel, J; Gaus, W

    1999-12-01

    K.R. Popper's philosophy of critical rationalism is concerned with the detection and removal of error. Fundamental contradictions exist between Popper's theory of knowledge and the present-day practice of the clinical investigation of new drugs. Currently, the public authorities concerned with the licensing of drugs pass judgment on trials, which are closely linked by the one-sponsor problem: the assertions made by the sponsor are not independently confirmed. This lack leads to excessive documentation and to costly monitoring and auditing, which are intended to ensure the credibility of results. In Popper's view, confirmatory trials, independent of the sponsor and supervised by the regulatory bodies, would be a better way to achieve reliable knowledge. The consequence would, among other things, be a reorganization of phase III of the clinical investigation of new drugs by dividing it into independent parts, one under the control of the sponsor and one under the control of the public authority. The implementation of this suggestion would lead to a more scientific manner of dealing with new drugs and to savings in terms of unproductive measures during the application process.

  1. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can ...

  2. Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different competition is going on: the National Football League (NFL) vs. drug use. Read More » 92 Comments ... Future survey highlights drug use trends among the Nation’s youth for marijuana, alcohol, cigarettes, e-cigarettes (e- ...

  3. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth ... 662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter ...

  4. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts ... addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain ...

  5. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of ... Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1- ...

  6. Drug Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviton, Harvey S.

    1975-01-01

    This article attempts to assemble pertinent information about the drug problem, particularily marihuana. It also focuses on the need for an educational program for drug control with the public schools as the main arena. (Author/HMV)

  7. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs ... Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call ...

  8. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? What are some signs and symptoms of someone ... use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted ...

  9. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page Click on the button that ... about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana ...

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) ... treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice ( ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I ... The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) is part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) , the ...

  12. Orphan drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Goločorbin-Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojša; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in ”adopting” them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of ...

  13. Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testing, substance abuse testing, toxicology screen, tox screen, sports doping tests What is it used for? Drug screening is used to find out whether or not a person has taken a certain drug or drugs. It ... Sports organizations. Professional and collegiate athletes usually need to ...

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to main content Easy-to-Read Drug Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts ... Past Drug Use Prevention Phone Numbers and Websites Search Share Listen English Español Information about this page ...

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can call 1-800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the computer will read the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos ... I want my daughter to avoid drugs. "Debbie" has been drug-free for years. She wants her daughter to stay away from ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs ... adicción. English Español About the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) | About This Website Tools and Resources | Contact ...

  18. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? Does Drug Treatment Work? What Are the Treatment Options? What Is Recovery? ...

  19. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Makes Someone More Likely to Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard ... the text to you. This website talks about drug abuse, addiction, and treatment. Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol ...

  20. Discontinued drugs in 2012: cardiovascular drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Ping; Jiang, Hong-Min; Xiang, Bing-Ren

    2013-11-01

    The continued high rate of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has attracted wide concern and great attention of pharmaceutical industry. In order to reduce the attrition of cardiovascular drug R&D, it might be helpful recapitulating previous failures and identifying the potential factors to success. This perspective mainly analyses the 30 cardiovascular drugs dropped from clinical development in 2012. Reasons causing the termination of the cardiovascular drugs in the past 5 years are also tabulated and analysed. The analysis shows that the attrition is highest in Phase II trials and financial and strategic factors and lack of clinical efficacy are the principal reasons for these disappointments. To solve the four problems (The 'better than the Beatles' problem, the 'cautious regulator' problem, the 'throw money at it' tendency and the 'basic researchbrute force' bias) is recommended as the main measure to increase the number and quality of approvable products.

  1. WAr on DrugS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-04-12

    Apr 12, 2009 ... ABStrAct. Since drugs became both a public and social issue in Nigeria, fear about both the real and .... drugs as being morally reprehensible, and ..... tice system (see for instance, Shaw, 1995; ..... A cut throat business:.

  2. Implementation of quality by design principles in the development of microsponges as drug delivery carriers: Identification and optimization of critical factors using multivariate statistical analyses and design of experiments studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonoska Crcarevska, Maja; Dimitrovska, Aneta; Sibinovska, Nadica; Mladenovska, Kristina; Slavevska Raicki, Renata; Glavas Dodov, Marija

    2015-07-15

    Microsponges drug delivery system (MDDC) was prepared by double emulsion-solvent-diffusion technique using rotor-stator homogenization. Quality by design (QbD) concept was implemented for the development of MDDC with potential to be incorporated into semisolid dosage form (gel). Quality target product profile (QTPP) and critical quality attributes (CQA) were defined and identified, accordingly. Critical material attributes (CMA) and Critical process parameters (CPP) were identified using quality risk management (QRM) tool, failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA). CMA and CPP were identified based on results obtained from principal component analysis (PCA-X&Y) and partial least squares (PLS) statistical analysis along with literature data, product and process knowledge and understanding. FMECA identified amount of ethylcellulose, chitosan, acetone, dichloromethane, span 80, tween 80 and water ratio in primary/multiple emulsions as CMA and rotation speed and stirrer type used for organic solvent removal as CPP. The relationship between identified CPP and particle size as CQA was described in the design space using design of experiments - one-factor response surface method. Obtained results from statistically designed experiments enabled establishment of mathematical models and equations that were used for detailed characterization of influence of identified CPP upon MDDC particle size and particle size distribution and their subsequent optimization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adoption of new HIV treatment guidelines and drug substitutions within first-line as a measure of quality of care in rural Lesotho: health centers and hospitals compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhardt, Niklaus D; Sello, Motlalepula; Lejone, Thabo; Ehmer, Jochen; Mokhantso, Mohlaba; Lynen, Lutgarde; Pfeiffer, Karolin

    2012-10-01

    In 2007, Lesotho launched new national antiretroviral treatment (ART) guidelines, prioritising tenofovir and zidovudine over stavudine as a backbone together with lamivudine. We compared the rate of adoption of these new guidelines and substitution of first-line drugs by health centers (HC) and hospitals in two catchment areas in rural Lesotho. Retrospective cohort analysis. Patients aged ≥16 years were stratified into a HC- and a hospital-group. Type of backbone at ART-initiation (i), substitutions within first line (ii) and type of backbone among patients retained by December 2010 (iii). A multiple logistic regression model including HC vs. hospital, patient characteristics (sex, age, WHO-stage, baseline CD4-count, concurrent pregnancy, concurrent tuberculosis treatment) and year of ART-start, was used. Of 3936 adult patients initiated on ART between 2007 and 2010, 1971 started at hospitals and 1965 at HCs. Hospitals were more likely to follow the new guidelines as measured by prescription of backbones without stavudine (Odds-ratio 1.55; 95%CI: 1.32-1.81) and had a higher rate of drug substitutions while on first-line ART (2.39; 1.83-3.13). By December 2010, patients followed at health centres were more likely to still receive stavudine (2.28; 1.83-2.84). Health centers took longer to adopt the new guidelines and substituted drugs less frequently. Decentralised ART-programmes need close support, supervision and mentoring to absorb new guidelines and to adhere to them. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Investigation of the Study Characteristics Affecting Clinical Trial Quality Using the Protocol Deviations Leading to Exclusion of Subjects From the Per Protocol Set Data in Studies for New Drug Application: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Norihito; Kaneko, Masayuki; Narukawa, Mamoru

    2018-01-01

    The concept of the risk-based approach has been introduced as an effort to secure the quality of clinical trials. In the risk-based approach, identification and evaluation of risk in advance are considered important. For recently completed clinical trials, we investigated the relationship between study characteristics and protocol deviations leading to the exclusion of subjects from Per Protocol Set (PPS) efficacy analysis. New drugs approved in Japan in the fiscal year 2014-2015 were targeted in the research. The reasons for excluding subjects from the PPS efficacy analysis were described in 102 trials out of 492 in the summary of new drug application documents, which was publicly disclosed after the drug's regulatory approval. The author extracted these reasons along with the numbers of the cases and the study characteristics of each clinical trial. Then, the direct comparison, univariate regression analysis, and multivariate regression analysis was carried out based on the exclusion rate. The study characteristics for which exclusion of subjects from the PPS efficacy analysis were frequently observed was multiregional clinical trials in study region; inhalant and external use in administration route; Anti-infective for systemic use; Respiratory system, Dermatologicals, and Nervous system in therapeutic drug under the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification. In the multivariate regression analysis, the clinical trial variables of inhalant, Respiratory system, or Dermatologicals were selected as study characteristics leading to a higher exclusion rate. The characteristics of the clinical trial that is likely to cause protocol deviations that will affect efficacy analysis were suggested. These studies should be considered for specific attention and priority observation in the trial protocol or its monitoring plan and execution, such as a clear description of inclusion/exclusion criteria in the protocol, development of training materials to site staff, and

  5. COPD - control drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - control drugs; Bronchodilators - COPD - control drugs; Beta agonist inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Anticholinergic inhaler - COPD - control drugs; Long-acting inhaler - COPD - control drugs; ...

  6. AIDSinfo Drug Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content Drugs Home Drugs Find information on FDA-approved HIV/ ... infection drugs and investigational HIV/AIDS drugs. Search Drugs Search drug Search Icon What's this? Close Popup ...

  7. Cruce de datos de calidad y seguridad de medicamentos nacionales a partir de bases de datos automatizadas: Primer semestre 2006 Cross of quality and safety data of national drugs starting from the automated databases: First semester 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giset Jiménez López

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Dentro del sistema de vigilancia poscomercialización, la cooperación entre centros es crucial, la Dirección de Calidad de QUIMEFA, la cual rige la vigilancia de la calidad de productos de la industria nacional, y la Unidad Coordinadora Nacional de Farmacovigilancia del Centro para el Desarrollo de la Farmacoepidemiología, que coordina a su vez el Sistema Nacional de Monitoreo de Sospechas de Reacciones Adversas producidas por medicamentos, establecieron un sistema de consultas de sus bases de datos. El Sistema de Vigilancia de Calidad de Productos se lleva en una base de datos en Access, y las sospechas de reacciones adversas en una hoja de Excel con funciones de bases de datos. Mensualmente se realiza un cruce de estos datos entre ambos sistemas, que se basa en el nombre del producto, lote, fabricante, lugar de reporte, etc. y se retroalimentan ambos subsistemas. También mensualmente se realiza una reunión para chequear los resultados de los sistemas. En el primer semestre del 2006 el subsistema de calidad ha procesado más de 800 quejas de calidad provenientes de las droguerías, por lo que se establecieron 11 planes de aviso de retención y 28 planes de aviso de retiro de productos. Por su parte el sistema de reporte de reacciones adversas ha recibido 4 254 notificaciones y se han establecido 9 expedientes donde los productos tienen reportes de reacciones adversas a medicamentos. Toda la información es enviada al sistema de poscomercialización del Centro Estatal de Control de Calidad de los MedicamentosWithin the system of postmarketing surveillance, the cooperation between centres is crucial. That's why, the Quality Division of Quimefa, which rules the vigilance of the quality of the national industry products, and the National Coordinating Pharmacovigilance Unit of the Center for Pharmacoepidemiology Development that coordinates the National Monitoring System of Adverse Reactions Suspicions produced by drugs, established a database

  8. The effect of tofacitinib on function and quality of life indicators in patients with rheumatoid arthritis resistant to synthetic and biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs in real clinical practice: Results of a multicenter observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Karateev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tofacitinib (TOFA, a representative of a new class of targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (s-DMARD, is a promising drug for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA and other immune inflammatory diseases.Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of therapy with TOFA in combination with methotrexate (MTX and other s-DMARDs in real clinical practice in patients with active RA and previous ineffective therapy.Patients and methods. A 6-month Russian multicenter study of function and quality of life enrolled 101 patients with resistant RA: 18 men and 83 women; mean age, 51.03±11.28 years; mean disease duration, 105.4±81.43 months; rheumatoid factor-positive individuals (89.1%; and anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibody-positive ones (74.7%. 93 (92,1% of these patients completed a 24-week study. TOFA was used as both second-line drug (after failure of therapy with s-DMARD (n=74 and as a third-line drug (after failure of therapy with s-DMARDs and biological agents (BAs (n=74. The tools RAPID3, HAQ, and EQ-5D were used to determine disease outcomes from a patient's assessment.Results. All the three tools demonstrated significant positive changes at 3–6 months following therapy initiation. RAPID3 scores for the status of a patient achieving a low disease activity or remission coincided with the mean DAS28-ESR and SDAI scores in 60% and 68% of cases, respectively. The achievement rates of the minimally clinically significant improvement (ΔHAQ≥0.22 and functional remission (HAQ≤0.5 at 6 months of TOFA therapy were 79.6 and 30.1%, respectively. The mean change value in EQ-5D scores over 6 months was -0.162±0.21. There were no significant between the groups of patients who used TOFA as a second- or third-line agent in the majority of indicators, except EQ-5D scores at 6 months.Conclusions. The results of our multicenter study using considerable Russian material confirmed the pronounced positive effect of TOFA used

  9. Prevalence of the use of antihypertensive medications in Greenland: a study of quality of care amongst patients treated with antihypertensive drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, M.; Jarbol, D. E.; Paulsen, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    in January 2011. Only patients aged 20 or above were included. The age-and gender-specific prevalence of patients in antihypertensive treatment was calculated using the population as it was 1 January 2010 in Greenland as background population. A subsample consisting of patients in antihypertensive treatment...... and blood pressure level, respectively. Results. The total number of patients in treatment with antihypertensive drugs was 4,462 (1,998 males and 2,464 females) corresponding to a prevalence of 11.4% (4,462/39,231). The prevalence was higher among females than among males. The prevalence increased with age...... and differed among the 5 health regions. The percentage of patients in antihypertensive treatment with minimum 1 follow-up visit within 1 year (blood pressure measured and registered in a health clinic) was only 77.7%. Some 45% of patients in antihypertensive treatment achieved blood pressure below 140/90 mm...

  10. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What ... Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800- ...

  11. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and Nicotine Facts Other Drugs of Abuse What is Addiction? ... Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can call 1-800-662- ...

  12. Antineoplastic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadée, Wolfgang; El Sayed, Yousry Mahmoud

    The limited scope of therapeutic drug-level monitoring in cancer chemotherapy results from the often complex biochemical mechanisms that contribute to antineoplastic activity and obscure the relationships among drug serum levels and therapeutic benefits. Moreover, new agents for cancer chemotherapy are being introduced at a more rapid rate than for the treatment of other diseases, although the successful application of therapeutic drug-level monitoring may require several years of intensive study of the significance of serum drug levels. However, drug level monitoring can be of considerable value during phase I clinical trials of new antineoplastic agents in order to assess drug metabolism, bioavailability, and intersubject variability; these are important parameters in the interpretation of clinical studies, but have no immediate benefit to the patient. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) probably represents the most versatile and easily adaptable analytical technique for drug metabolite screening (1). HPLC may therefore now be the method of choice during phase I clinical trials of antineoplastic drugs. For example, within a single week we developed an HPLC assay—using a C18 reverse-phase column, UV detection, and direct serum injection after protein precipitation—for the new radiosensitizer, misonidazole (2).

  13. Drugged Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Survey Results Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Unpredictable Danger Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2016 Monitoring the Future 2016 Survey Results Drug and Alcohol Use in College-Age Adults in 2015 View All NIDA Home ...

  14. Impacto de las actitudes de las enfermeras en la calidad de los cuidados en drogodependientes The impact of nurses´ attitudes in the quality of care for drug-dependents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Molina Mula

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Las enfermeras ocupan un lugar privilegiado en la atención a los drogodependientes, por su conocimiento, naturaleza de su profesión y cercanía con la familia. Esta revisión de la literatura analiza cómo las actitudes, percepciones y conocimientos de las enfermeras influyen en la calidad de la atención a estos pacientes. Los resultados de la revisión ponen de manifiesto que las creencias individuales, la edad, género, etnia y la religión influyen en las actitudes ante los drogodependientes; que las actitudes de los profesionales difieren en base a los distintos roles, la socialización, el tipo y naturaleza del contacto con estos pacientes; que la institución donde se trabaja también influye en la atención; que es patente una falta de formación en drogodependencias y una escasa presencia en los planes de estudio de pre y postgrado, y que los profesionales de enfermería han estado históricamente presentes en la atención a drogodependientes más que otros grupos de profesionales sanitarios y son pieza clave. Por todo ello, consideramos necesario profundizar en esta materia por la escasez de evidencia que aporte soluciones al respecto.Thanks to their knowledge, the nature of their profession and close ties with family, nurses are well-placed to care for drug addicts. The aim of this study is to analyze how nurses´ attitudes, perceptions and knowledge influence the quality of care of drug addicts. The outcomes of the review highlight several aspects such as individual beliefs, age, gender, ethnicity and religion influence professional attitudes towards drug addicts, professional attitudes depend on the different roles, socialization and type and nature of contact with these patients, the institution where professionals work affects care, health professionals´ lack of training in substance abuse and the need for the strong presence of this kind of training in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula and nurses´ historically greater

  15. Microfabrication for Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Brendan; Rubino, Ilaria; Quan, Fu-Shi; Yoo, Bongyoung; Choi, Hyo-Jick

    2016-01-01

    This review is devoted to discussing the application of microfabrication technologies to target challenges encountered in life processes by the development of drug delivery systems. Recently, microfabrication has been largely applied to solve health and pharmaceutical science issues. In particular, fabrication methods along with compatible materials have been successfully designed to produce multifunctional, highly effective drug delivery systems. Microfabrication offers unique tools that can tackle problems in this field, such as ease of mass production with high quality control and low cost, complexity of architecture design and a broad range of materials. Presented is an overview of silicon- and polymer-based fabrication methods that are key in the production of microfabricated drug delivery systems. Moreover, the efforts focused on studying the biocompatibility of materials used in microfabrication are analyzed. Finally, this review discusses representative ways microfabrication has been employed to develop systems delivering drugs through the transdermal and oral route, and to improve drug eluting implants. Additionally, microfabricated vaccine delivery systems are presented due to the great impact they can have in obtaining a cold chain-free vaccine, with long-term stability. Microfabrication will continue to offer new, alternative solutions for the development of smart, advanced drug delivery systems. PMID:28773770

  16. Antibodies to malaria vaccine candidates are associated with chloroquine or sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine treatment efficacy in children in an endemic area of Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diarra, Amidou; Nebie, Issa; Tiono, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patient immune status is thought to affect the efficacy of anti-malarial chemotherapy. This is a subject of some importance, since evidence of immunity-related interactions may influence our use of chemotherapy in populations with drug resistance, as well as assessment...... of the value of suboptimal vaccines. The study aim was to investigate relationship between antibodies and anti-malarial drug treatment outcomes. METHODS: Some 248 children aged 0.5 and 15 years were recruited prior to the high malaria transmission season. Venous blood (5 ml) was obtained from each child...... to measure antibody levels to selected malaria antigens, using ELISA. Blood smears were also performed to assess drug efficacy and malaria infection prevalence. Children were actively followed up to record clinical malaria cases. RESULTS: IgG levels to MSP3 were always higher in the successfully treated...

  17. Establishment of an unrelated umbilical cord blood bank qualification program: ensuring quality while meeting Food and Drug Administration vendor qualification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabe, Fran; Kadidlo, Diane; Van Orsow, Lisa; McKenna, David

    2013-10-01

    Qualification of a cord blood bank (CBB) is a complex process that includes evaluation of multiple aspects of donor screening and testing, processing, accreditation and approval by professional cell therapy groups, and results of received cord blood units. The University of Minnesota Medical Center Cell Therapy Laboratory has established a CBB vendor qualification process to ensure the CBB meets established regulatory and quality requirements. The deployed qualification of CBBs is based on retrospective and prospective review of the CBB. Forty-one CBBs were evaluated retrospectively: seven CBBs were disqualified based on failed quality control (QC) results. Eight CBBs did not meet the criteria for retrospective qualification because fewer than 3 cord blood units were received and the CBB was not accredited. As of March 2012, three US and one non-US CBBs have been qualified prospectively. One CBB withdrew from the qualification process after successful completion of the comprehensive survey and subsequent failure of the provided QC unit to pass the minimum criteria. One CBB failed the prospective qualification process based on processing methods that were revealed during the paper portion of the evaluation. A CBB qualification process is necessary for a transplant center to manage the qualification of the large number of CBBs needed to support a umbilical cord blood transplantation program. A transplant center that has utilized cord blood for a number of years before implementation of a qualification process should use a retrospective qualification process along with a prospective process. © 2013 American Association of Blood Banks.

  18. Impact of the Mass Drug Administration for malaria in response to the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aregawi, Maru; Smith, Samuel J; Sillah-Kanu, Musa; Seppeh, John; Kamara, Anitta R Y; Williams, Ryan O; Aponte, John J; Bosman, Andrea; Alonso, Pedro

    2016-09-20

    As emergency response to the Ebola epidemic, the Government of Sierra Leone and its partners implemented a large-scale Mass Drug Administration (MDA) with artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) covering >2.7 million people in the districts hardest hit by Ebola during December 2014-January 2015. The World Health Organization (WHO) and the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) evaluated the impact of the MDA on malaria morbidity at health facilities and the number of Ebola alerts received at District Ebola Command Centres. The coverage of the two rounds of MDA with ASAQ was estimated by relating the number anti-malarial medicines distributed to the estimated resident population. Segmented time-series analysis was applied to weekly data collected from 49 primary health units (PHUs) and 11 hospitals performing malaria parasitological testing during the study period, to evaluate trends of malaria cases and Ebola alerts during the post-MDA weeks compared to the pre-MDA weeks in MDA- and non-MDA-cheifdoms. After two rounds of the MDA, the number of suspected cases tested with rapid diagnostic test (RDT) decreased significantly by 43 % (95 % CI 38-48 %) at week 1 and remained low at week 2 and 3 post-first MDA and at week 1 and 3 post-second MDA; RDT positive cases decreased significantly by 47 % (41-52 %) at week 1 post-first and remained lower throughout all post-MDA weeks; and the RDT test positivity rate (TPR) declined by 35 % (32-38 %) at week 2 and stayed low throughout all post-MDA weeks. The total malaria (clinical + confirmed) cases decreased significantly by 45 % (39-52 %) at week 1 and were lower at week 2 and 3 post-first MDA; and week 1 post-second MDA. The proportion of confirmed malaria cases (out of all-outpatients) fell by 33 % (29-38 %) at week 1 post-first MDA and were lower during all post-MDA weeks. On the contrary, the non-malaria outpatient cases (cases due to other health conditions) either remained unchanged or fluctuated insignificantly

  19. Drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Rong; Wu, Ping; Kong, De-Xin

    2015-02-01

    Given the high risk and lengthy procedure of traditional drug development, drug repurposing is gaining more and more attention. Although many types of drug information have been used to repurpose drugs, drug-drug interaction data, which imply possible physiological effects or targets of drugs, remain unexploited. In this work, similarity of drug interaction was employed to infer similarity of the physiological effects or targets for the drugs. We collected 10,835 drug-drug interactions concerning 1074 drugs, and for 700 of them, drug similarity scores based on drug interaction profiles were computed and rendered using a drug association network with 589 nodes (drugs) and 2375 edges (drug similarity scores). The 589 drugs were clustered into 98 groups with Markov Clustering Algorithm, most of which were significantly correlated with certain drug functions. This indicates that the network can be used to infer the physiological effects of drugs. Furthermore, we evaluated the ability of this drug association network to predict drug targets. The results show that the method is effective for 317 of 561 drugs that have known targets. Comparison of this method with the structure-based approach shows that they are complementary. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of drug repurposing based on drug-drug interaction data. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. [Club drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro, Diogo Frasquilho; Carmo, Ana Lisa; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Navarro, Rita; Góis, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Club drugs are the following substances: Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA); Methamphetamine; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide (LSD); Ketamine; Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and Flunitrazepam. These substances are mainly used by adolescents and young adults, mostly in recreational settings like dance clubs and rave parties. These drugs have diverse psychotropic effects, are associated with several degrees of toxicity, dependence and long term adverse effects. Some have been used for several decades, while others are relatively recent substances of abuse. They have distinct pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties, are not easy to detect and, many times, the use of club drugs is under diagnosed. Although the use of these drugs is increasingly common, few health professionals feel comfortable with the diagnosis and treatment. The authors performed a systematic literature review, with the goal of synthesising the existing knowledge about club drugs, namely epidemiology, mechanism of action, detection, adverse reactions and treatment. The purpose of this article is creating in Portuguese language a knowledge data base on club drugs, that health professionals of various specialties can use as a reference when dealing with individual with this kind of drug abuse.

  1. Critical analysis of India's National Mission on Medicinal Plants (NMMP in providing access to quality botanical drugs to improve public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahi Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs play an important role in improving health of the population. Medicinal plants help in addressing the health issues of a large section of the population – especially the low and middle-income people. However, there are some concerns about the supply, efficacy and safety in using them. This study reviews India's major initiative toward medicinal plants namely, the National Mission on Medicinal Plants to meet medicinal plants challenges. The study analyzed the mission's probable shortcomings due to its design and operational details. This study used “content analysis” approach for analysis of mission's publicly available documents, viz. “Operational guidelines” and its two amendments. The study identified prevalent 28 shortcomings in the original document related to clarity of the document; accountability, transparency and stakeholders' representation. These challenges were partially addressed in two amendments, which indicate persistence of shortcomings in design and operational details. The mission can help in improving and strengthening the Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy program by addressing those shortcomings.

  2. Health implications of water quality: drugs residues in water Repercusiones sanitarias de la calidad del agua: los residuos de medicamentos en el agua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damià Barceló Culleres

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript summarizes the main results obtained in various monitoring studies conducted in the Llobregat and the Ebro River basins to evaluate the occurrence of pharmaceuticals and drugs of abuse in their aquatic environments and the potentially derived risks for environmental and human health. The occurrence of these compounds in surface waters, located downstream the point of discharge of sewage treatment plants (STP, points out STPs effluents as the main source of these substances in the aquatic environment. Both river basins had similar pharmaceutical contamination patterns. However, hazard quotients (HQ calculated for three different trophic levels (algae, daphnia and fish pointed out sulfamethoxazol (sulfamide antibiotic for algae, gemfibrozil (lipid regulator for algae and fish, clofibric acid (lipid regulator and erythromycine (macrolide antibiotic for daphnia, and ibuprofen (analgesic anti-inflammatory for all investigated tropic levels, as the compounds with the highest ecotoxicological risk in the Llobregat. In the Ebro River, the most problematic pharmaceuticals were sulfamethoxazol for algae, and erythromycine, clofibric acid and fluoxetine (anti-depressive for daphnids. Levels of drugs of abuse measured in surface waters of the Ebro River were one and two orders of magnitude lower than those observed in effluent and influent sewage waters, respectively. Lack of data about their ecotoxicity does not allow calculation of HQ for these compounds. The presence of pharmaceuticals and drugs of abuse in surface and drinking waters is not subjected to regulation; hence, they are not considered priority pollutants to be included in monitoring programs. However, due to their possible harmful outcomes in wildlife, research on their potential effects in human health is indispensable.Este trabajo resume varios estudios de monitorización de fármacos y drogas de abuso llevados a cabo en el medio ambiente acuático de las cuencas de los r

  3. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco ... Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You ...

  4. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA ( ... Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/ ...

  5. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth ( ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  6. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain ... About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other ...

  7. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 3. Drug Metabolism: A Fascinating Link Between Chemistry and Biology. Nikhil Taxak Prasad V Bharatam. General Article Volume 19 Issue 3 March 2014 pp 259-282 ...

  8. Drugged Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  9. Club Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  10. Drug Metabolism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    behind metabolic reactions, importance, and consequences with several ... required for drug action. ... lism, which is catalyzed by enzymes present in the above-men- ... catalyze the transfer of one atom of oxygen to a substrate produc-.

  11. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Pain Medicine (Oxy, Vike) Facts Spice (K2) Facts Tobacco and ... Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs You can ...

  12. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 800-662-HELP (4357) at any time to find drug treatment centers near you. I want my ... is making positive changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who don't ...

  13. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, ... Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) ...

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & Recovery Why Does a Person Need Treatment? ... of Health (NIH) , the principal biomedical and behavioral research agency of the United States Government. NIH is ...

  15. Drug Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids and Teens Pregnancy and Childbirth Women Men Seniors Your Health Resources Healthcare Management End-of-Life Issues Insurance & Bills Self Care Working With Your Doctor Drugs, Procedures & Devices Over-the- ...

  16. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescription drugs. The addiction slowly took over his life. I need different people around me. To stop ... marijuana, "Cristina" is making positive changes in her life. She finds support from family and friends who ...

  17. Drug Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drug-resistance testing is also recommended for all pregnant women with HIV before starting HIV medicines and also in some pregnant women already taking HIV medicines. Pregnant women will work with their health ...

  18. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana (Weed, Pot) Facts MDMA (Ecstasy, Molly) Facts Meth (Crank, ... Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) Tobacco/Nicotine ...

  19. Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as hearing colors Impulsive behavior Rapid shifts in emotions Permanent mental changes in perception Rapid heart rate ... Drug use can negatively affect academic performance and motivation to excel in school. Legal issues. Legal problems ...

  20. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Heroin (Smack, Junk) Facts Marijuana ( ... Watch Videos Information About Drugs Alcohol Bath Salts Cocaine Heroin Marijuana MDMA Meth Pain Medicines Spice (K2) ...

  1. Drugs for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisapel, Nava

    2012-09-01

    Sleep is a vital neurochemical process involving sleep-promoting and arousal centers in the brain. Insomnia is a pervasive disorder characterized by difficulties in initiating or maintaining or non-refreshing (poor quality) sleep and clinically significant daytime distress. Insomnia is more prevalent in women and old age and puts sufferers at significant physical and mental health risks. This review summarizes published data on the current and emerging insomnia drug classes, rationale for development and associated risks/benefits. (Summary of Product Characteristics and Medline search on "hypnotic" or specific drug names and "Insomnia"). GABA(A) receptor modulators facilitate sleep onset and some improve maintenance but increase risk of dependence, memory, cognitive and psychomotor impairments, falls, accidents and mortality. Melatonin receptor agonists improve quality of sleep and/or sleep onset but response may develop over several days. They have more benign safety profiles and are indicated for milder insomnia, longer usage and (prolonged release melatonin) older patients. Histamine H-1 receptor antagonists improve sleep maintenance but their effects on cognition, memory and falls remain to be demonstrated. Late-stage pipeline orexin OX1/OX2 and serotonin 5HT2A receptor antagonists may hold the potential to address several unmet needs in insomnia pharmacotherapy but safety issues cast some doubts over their future. Current and new insomnia drugs in the pipeline target different sleep regulating mechanisms and symptoms and have different tolerability profiles. Drug selection would ideally be based on improvement in the quality of patients' sleep, overall quality of life and functional status weighed against risk to the individual and public health.

  2. The Role of Social Supports, Spirituality, Religiousness, Life Meaning and Affiliation with 12-Step Fellowships in Quality of Life Satisfaction Among Individuals in Recovery from Alcohol and Drug Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre B.; Morgen, Keith; White, William L.

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Many recovering substance users report quitting drugs because they wanted a better life. The road of recovery is the path to a better life but a challenging and stressful path for most. There has been little research among recovering persons in spite of the numbers involved, and most research has focused on substance use outcomes. This study examines stress and quality of life as a function of time in recovery, and uses structural equation modeling to test the hypothesis that social supports, spirituality, religiousness, life meaning, and 12-step affiliation buffer stress toward enhanced life satisfaction. Recovering persons (N = 353) recruited in New York City were mostly inner-city ethnic minority members whose primary substance had been crack or heroin. Longer recovery time was significantly associated with lower stress and with higher quality of life. Findings supported the study hypothesis; the ‘buffer’ constructs accounted for 22% of the variance in life satisfaction. Implications for research and clinical practice are discussed. PMID:16892161

  3. 有关《药品生产质量管理规范(2010年修订)》的若干问题%Issues in revising the Code for quality management of drug manufacture (2010)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂光备; 涂有; 张鑫

    2012-01-01

    The revised Code for quality management of drug manufacture (2010) is further closer to the international standards. It is helpful to improve the medicine quality of China and to enter the international market. Provides some ideas and suggestions on the issues possibly occurred in implementation of the code such as cleanness classes, occupied conditions, testing point minimum sample amount, static pressure difference between different cleanliness classes, standby operating conditions, etc.%修订的2010版《药品生产质量管理规范》与国际标准更加