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Sample records for anti-malarial drug quality

  1. Quality of anti-malarial drugs provided by public and private healthcare providers in south-east Nigeria

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    Uzochukwu Benjamin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little existing knowledge about actual quality of drugs provided by different providers in Nigeria and in many sub-Saharan African countries. Such information is important for improving malaria treatment that will help in the development and implementation of actions designed to improve the quality of treatment. The objective of the study was to determine the quality of drugs used for the treatment of malaria in a broad spectrum of public and private healthcare providers. Methods The study was undertaken in six towns (three urban and three rural in Anambra state, south-east Nigeria. Anti-malarials (225 samples, which included artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP, quinine, and chloroquine, were either purchased or collected from randomly selected providers. The quality of these drugs was assessed by laboratory analysis of the dissolution profile using published pharmacopoeial monograms and measuring the amount of active ingredient using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Findings It was found that 60 (37% of the anti-malarials tested did not meet the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP specifications for the amount of active ingredients, with the suspect drugs either lacking the active ingredients or containing suboptimal quantities of the active ingredients. Quinine (46% and SP formulations (39% were among drugs that did not satisfy the tolerance limits published in USP monograms. A total of 78% of the suspect drugs were from private facilities, mostly low-level providers, such as patent medicine dealers (vendors. Conclusion This study found that there was a high prevalence of poor quality drugs. The findings provide areas for public intervention to improve the quality of malaria treatment services. There should be enforced checks and regulation of drug supply management as well as stiffer penalties for people stocking substandard and counterfeit drugs.

  2. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

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    Sie Ali

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers and illicit (market and street vendors, shops sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50% chloroquine, 10/77 (13% pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12% quinine, 6/77 (8% amodiaquine, 9/77 (12% artesunate, and 4/77 (5% artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42% drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6% and 27/30 (90.0% samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the

  3. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

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    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  4. Quality assessment of some selected brands of anti malarial drugs used in Ghana: A case study of Agona West Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asare, Aquisman Ebenezer

    2016-07-01

    The availability of numerous brands of artesunate in our drug market today places clinicians and pharmacists in a difficult situation of choice of a suitable brand or the possibility of alternative use. Fake artesunate could compromise the hope that ACT (artemisinin combination therapy) offers for malaria control in Africa. In this study, quality of some selected brands of anti - malarial drugs used in the communities of Agona west Municipality, Ghana was determined. Blister or packs of anti – malarial tablets were randomly sampled. The Protocols of the International Pharmacopeia and Global Pharma Health Fund Minilab were used to assess the quality of anti – malarial tablets per blister pack manufactured by Bliss Gvs Pharma Ltd. India, Letap Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. Ghana and Guilin Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. China and sold in chemical sales outlets at the farming communities of Agona West Municipality, Ghana. The identification test was used to confirm the presence of active ingredients in the tablets. A confirmatory test for the active ingredient was achieved with artesunate (ICRS 1302) reference standards and Gsunate reference standard (ICRS4061). The friability test was used to confirm the hardness of the tablets to determine the drug ability to withstand abrasion in packaging, handling and shipping. The disintegration test was used to confirm the time required for the tablets to disintegrate into particles. Titrimetric analysis confirmed the amount of artesunate found in tablets.The results of the study are as follows for Artesunate by GPCL, LPL and Gsunate by BGPL; the identification test confirmed the presence of the active ingredient in all the brands. Based on the International Pharmacopoeia acceptable range of 1 to 15 min for genuine artesunate per tablet, 93.75 % of field selected artesunate blister pack tablets manufactured by GPCL passed the disintegration test and 6.25% failed. Also 85.57% of the sampled artesunate blister pack manufactured by

  5. Artemisinin anti-malarial drugs in China

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    Zongru Guo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Discovered by Youyou Tu, one of the 2015 Nobel Prize winners in Physiology or Medicine, together with many other Chinese scientists, artemisinin, artemether and artesunate, as well as other artemisinins, have brought the global anti-malarial treatment to a new era, saving millions of lives all around the world for the past 40 years. The discoveries of artemisinins were carried out beginning from the 1970s, a special period in China, by hundreds of scientists all together under the “whole nation” system. This article focusing on medicinal chemistry research, briefly introduced the discovery and invention course of the scientists according to the published papers, and highlighted their academic contribution and achievements.

  6. malaria and anti-malarial drugs utilisation among adults in a rural

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vihar

    Magreth Komanya (Bsc Nursing). AMREF. ABSTRACT. Objective: To study malaria and examine determinants of anti-malarial drugs utilization among ..... anti-malarials for prophylaxis and chemotherapy or may be provided with prescription forms to buy drugs. Moreover the general understanding that pregnant women are ...

  7. Modulating effects of plasma containing anti-malarial antibodies on in vitro anti-malarial drug susceptibility in Plasmodium falciparum

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    Udomsangpetch Rachanee

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of anti-malarial drugs is determined by the level of parasite susceptibility, anti-malarial drug bioavailability and pharmacokinetics, and host factors including immunity. Host immunity improves the in vivo therapeutic efficacy of anti-malarial drugs, but the mechanism and magnitude of this effect has not been characterized. This study characterized the effects of 'immune' plasma to Plasmodium falciparumon the in vitro susceptibility of P. falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. Methods Titres of antibodies against blood stage antigens (mainly the ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen [RESA] were measured in plasma samples obtained from Thai patients with acute falciparum malaria. 'Immune' plasma was selected and its effects on in vitro parasite growth and multiplication of the Thai P. falciparum laboratory strain TM267 were assessed by light microscopy. The in vitro susceptibility to quinine and artesunate was then determined in the presence and absence of 'immune' plasma using the 3H-hypoxanthine uptake inhibition method. Drug susceptibility was expressed as the concentrations causing 50% and 90% inhibition (IC50 and IC90, of 3H-hypoxanthine uptake. Results Incubation with 'immune' plasma reduced parasite maturation and decreased parasite multiplication in a dose dependent manner. 3H-hypoxanthine incorporation after incubation with 'immune' plasma was decreased significantly compared to controls (median [range]; 181.5 [0 to 3,269] cpm versus 1,222.5 [388 to 5,932] cpm (p= 0.001. As a result 'immune' plasma reduced apparent susceptibility to quinine substantially; median (range IC50 6.4 (0.5 to 23.8 ng/ml versus 221.5 (174.4 to 250.4 ng/ml (p = 0.02, and also had a borderline effect on artesunate susceptibility; IC50 0.2 (0.02 to 0.3 ng/ml versus 0.8 (0.2 to 2.3 ng/ml (p = 0.08. Effects were greatest at low concentrations, changing the shape of the concentration-effect relationship. IC90 values were not

  8. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Frank M; Massawe, Isolide S; Lemnge, Martha M

    2011-01-01

    prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results...... women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp) during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform...... a baseline study of the private market for anti-malarials in Muheza town, an area with widespread anti-malarial drug resistance, prior to the implementation of a provider training and accreditation programme that will allow accredited drug shops to sell subsidized ALu. Methods: All drug shops selling...

  9. A qualitative assessment of the challenges of WHO prequalification for anti-malarial drugs in China.

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    Huang, Yangmu; Pan, Ke; Peng, Danlu; Stergachis, Andy

    2018-04-03

    While China is a major manufacturer of artemisinin and its derivatives, it lags as a global leader in terms of the total export value of anti-malarial drugs as finished pharmaceutical products ready for marketing and use by patients. This may be due to the limited number of World Health Organization (WHO) prequalified anti-malarial drugs from China. Understanding the reasons for the slow progress of WHO prequalification (PQ) in China can help improve the current situation and may lead to greater efforts in malaria eradication by Chinese manufacturers. In-depth interviews were conducted in China between November 2014 and December 2016. A total of 26 key informants from central government agencies, pharmaceutical companies, universities, and research institutes were interviewed, all of which had current or previous experience overseeing or implementing anti-malarial research and development in China. Chinese anti-malarial drugs that lack WHO PQ are mainly exported for use in the African private market. High upfront costs with unpredictable benefits, as well as limited information and limited technical support on WHO PQ, were reported as the main barriers to obtain WHO PQ for anti-malarial drugs by respondents from Chinese pharmaceutical companies. Potential incentives identified by respondents included tax relief, human resource training and consultation, as well as other incentives related to drug approval, such as China's Fast Track Channel. Government support, as well as innovative incentives and collaboration mechanisms are needed for further adoption of WHO PQ for anti-malarial drugs in China.

  10. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

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    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  11. Molecular characterization of Plasmodium falciparum uracil-DNA glycosylase and its potential as a new anti-malarial drug target

    OpenAIRE

    Suksangpleng, Thidarat; Leartsakulpanich, Ubolsree; Moonsom, Saengduen; Siribal, Saranya; Boonyuen, Usa; Wright, George E; Chavalitshewinkoon-Petmitr, Porntip

    2014-01-01

    Background Based on resistance of currently used anti-malarials, a new anti-malarial drug target against Plasmodium falciparum is urgently needed. Damaged DNA cannot be transcribed without prior DNA repair; therefore, uracil-DNA glycosylase, playing an important role in base excision repair, may act as a candidate for a new anti-malarial drug target. Methods Initially, the native PfUDG from parasite crude extract was partially purified using two columns, and the glycosylase activity was monit...

  12. Assessing anti-malarial drug effects ex vivo using the haemozoin detection assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebelo, Maria; Tempera, Carolina; Fernandes, José F.; Grobusch, Martin P.; Hänscheid, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In vitro sensitivity assays are crucial to detect and monitor drug resistance. Plasmodium falciparum has developed resistance to almost all anti-malarial drugs. Although different in vitro drug assays are available, some of their inherent characteristics limit their application, especially in the

  13. interventional studies of anti-malarial drugs utilization in public

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    ABSTRACT. The best way to analyze drug utilization and evaluate impact of an intervention in health care institutions is to study the universal indicators, which are not dependent either on investigator or time of measurement. The aim of this study was to characterize the prescription pattern of public health institutions in ...

  14. Interventional studies of anti-malarial drugs utilization in public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The best way to analyze drug utilization and evaluate impact of an intervention in health care institutions is to study the universal indicators, which are not dependent either on investigator or time of measurement. The aim of this study was to characterize the prescription pattern of public health institutions in Kano, Nigeria ...

  15. Molecular Farming in Artemisia annua, a sustainable approach to improve anti-malarial drug production

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    Giuseppe ePulice

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a parasite infection affecting millions of people worldwide. Even though progresses in prevention and treatment have been developed, 198 million cases of malaria occurred in 2013, resulting in 584000 estimated deaths. 90% of all malaria deaths occurred in Africa, mostly among children under the age of five. This article aims to review malaria’s history, epidemiology and current treatments, with a particular focus on the potential of molecular farming that use metabolic engineering in plants as effective anti-malarial solution. Malaria indeed represents an example of how a health problem on one hand, may eventually influence the proper development of a country due to the burden of the disease, and on the other hand, constitutes an opportunity for lucrative business of diverse stakeholders. In contrast, plant biofarming is here proposed as a sustainable alternative for the production not only of natural herbal repellents used for malaria prevention but also for the production of sustainable anti-malarial drugs like artemisinin used for primary parasite infection treatments.Artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone, is a natural anti-malarial compound that can be found in Artemisia annua plant. However, the low concentration of artemisinin in plant makes this molecule relatively expensive and difficult to meet the worldwide demand of Artemisinin Combination Therapies, especially for economically disadvantaged people in developing countries. The biosynthetic pathway of artemisinin, a process that only takes place in glandular secretory trichomes of A. annua, is relatively well elucidated, and significant efforts using plant genetic engineering have been made to increase the production of this compound. These include studies on diverse transcription factors, which all have been shown to regulate artemisinin genetic pathway and other biological processes. Therefore, genetic manipulation of these genes may be used as a cost-effective potential

  16. Spread of anti-malarial drug resistance: Mathematical model with implications for ACT drug policies

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    Dondorp Arjen M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most malaria-endemic countries are implementing a change in anti-malarial drug policy to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT. The impact of different drug choices and implementation strategies is uncertain. Data from many epidemiological studies in different levels of malaria endemicity and in areas with the highest prevalence of drug resistance like borders of Thailand are certainly valuable. Formulating an appropriate dynamic data-driven model is a powerful predictive tool for exploring the impact of these strategies quantitatively. Methods A comprehensive model was constructed incorporating important epidemiological and biological factors of human, mosquito, parasite and treatment. The iterative process of developing the model, identifying data needed, and parameterization has been taken to strongly link the model to the empirical evidence. The model provides quantitative measures of outcomes, such as malaria prevalence/incidence and treatment failure, and illustrates the spread of resistance in low and high transmission settings. The model was used to evaluate different anti-malarial policy options focusing on ACT deployment. Results The model predicts robustly that in low transmission settings drug resistance spreads faster than in high transmission settings, and treatment failure is the main force driving the spread of drug resistance. In low transmission settings, ACT slows the spread of drug resistance to a partner drug, especially at high coverage rates. This effect decreases exponentially with increasing delay in deploying the ACT and decreasing rates of coverage. In the high transmission settings, however, drug resistance is driven by the proportion of the human population with a residual drug level, which gives resistant parasites some survival advantage. The spread of drug resistance could be slowed down by controlling presumptive drug use and avoiding the use of combination therapies containing drugs with

  17. Factors determining anti-malarial drug use in a peri-urban population from malaria holoendemic region of western kenya

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    Abong'o Benard

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions to reverse trends in malaria-related morbidity and mortality in Kenya focus on preventive strategies and drug efficacy. However, the pattern of use of anti-malarials in malaria-endemic populations, such as in western Kenya, is still poorly understood. It is critical to understand the patterns of anti-malarial drug use to ascertain that the currently applied new combination therapy to malaria treatment, will achieve sustained cure rates and protection against parasite resistance. Therefore, this cross-sectional study was designed to determine the patterns of use of anti-malarial drugs in households (n = 397 in peri-urban location of Manyatta-B sub-location in Kisumu in western Kenya. Methods Household factors, associated with the pattern of anti-malarials use, were evaluated. Using clusters, questionnaire was administered to a particular household member who had the most recent malaria episode (within Results Stratification of the type of anti-malarial drugs taken revealed that 37.0% used sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP, 32.0% artemisinin-based combined therapy (ACT, 11.1% anti-pyretics, 7.3% chloroquine (CQ, 7.1% quinine, 2.5% amodiaquine (AQ, while 3.0% used others which were perceived as anti-malarials (cough syrups and antibiotics. In a regression model, it was demonstrated that age (P = 0.050, household size (P = 0.047, household head (P = 0.049, household source of income (P = 0.015, monthly income (P = 0.020, duration of use (P = 0.029, dosage of drugs taken (P = 0.036, and source of drugs (P = 0.005 significantly influenced anti-malarial drug use. Overall, 38.8% of respondents used drugs as recommended by the Ministry of Health. Conclusion This study demonstrates that consumers require access to correct and comprehensible information associated with use of drugs, including self-prescription. There is potential need by the Kenyan government to improve malaria care and decrease malaria-related morbidity and

  18. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Lawrence; Coignez, Veerle; Barojas, Adrian; Bempong, Daniel; Bradby, Sanford; Dijiba, Yanga; James, Makeida; Bretas, Gustavo; Adhin, Malti; Ceron, Nicolas; Hinds-Semple, Alison; Chibwe, Kennedy; Lukulay, Patrick; Pribluda, Victor

    2012-06-15

    Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector) and unlicensed facilities (informal sector) is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58%) anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30) and 11% (5/47) respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32) failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45) in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86%) were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. The findings of the studies in both countries point to significant problems with the quality of anti-malarial medicines

  19. Quality of anti-malarials collected in the private and informal sectors in Guyana and Suriname

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    Evans Lawrence

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a significant reduction in the number of malaria cases in Guyana and Suriname, this disease remains a major problem in the interior of both countries, especially in areas with gold mining and logging operations, where malaria is endemic. National malaria control programmes in these countries provide treatment to patients with medicines that are procured and distributed through regulated processes in the public sector. However, availability to medicines in licensed facilities (private sector and unlicensed facilities (informal sector is common, posing the risk of access to and use of non-recommended treatments and/or poor quality products. Methods To assess the quality of circulating anti-malarial medicines, samples were purchased in the private and informal sectors of Guyana and Suriname in 2009. The sampling sites were selected based on epidemiological data and/or distance from health facilities. Samples were analysed for identity, content, dissolution or disintegration, impurities, and uniformity of dosage units or weight variation according to manufacturer, pharmacopeial, or other validated method. Results Quality issues were observed in 45 of 77 (58% anti-malarial medicines sampled in Guyana of which 30 failed visual & physical inspection and 18 failed quality control tests. The proportion of monotherapy and ACT medicines failing quality control tests was 43% (13/30 and 11% (5/47 respectively. A higher proportion of medicines sampled from the private sector 34% (11/32 failed quality control tests versus 16% (7/45 in the informal sector. In Suriname, 58 medicines were sampled, of which 50 (86% were Artecom®, the fixed-dose combination of piperaquine-dihydroartemisinin-trimethoprim co-blistered with a primaquine phosphate tablet. All Artecom samples were found to lack a label claim for primaquine, thus failing visual and physical inspection. Conclusions The findings of the studies in both countries point to

  20. Effects of anti-malarial drugs on the electrocardiographic QT interval modelled in the isolated perfused guinea pig heart system

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    Kotaki Hajime

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concern over the potential cardiotoxicity of anti-malarial drugs inducing a prolonged electrocardiographic QT interval has resulted in the almost complete withdrawal from the market of one anti-malarial drug - halofantrine. The effects on the QT interval of four anti-malarial drugs were examined, using the guinea pig heart. Methods The guinea pig heart was isolated, mounted on a Langendorff apparatus, and was then perfused with pyruvate-added Klebs-Henseleit solutions containing graded concentrations of the four agents such as quinidine (0.15 - 1.2 μM, quinine (0.3 - 2.4 μM, halofantrine (0.1 - 2.0 μM and mefloquine (0.1 - 2.0 μM. The heart rate-corrected QaTc intervals were measured to evaluate drug-induced QT prolongation effects. Results Quinidine, quinine, and halofantrine prolonged the QaTc interval in a dose-dependent manner, whereas no such effect was found with mefloquine. The EC50 values for the QaTc prolongation effects, the concentration that gives a half-maximum effect, were quinidine Conclusions In this study, an isolated, perfused guinea pig heart system was constructed to assess the cardiotoxic potential of anti-malarial drugs. This isolated perfused guinea pig heart system could be used to test newly developed anti-malarial drugs for their inherent QT lengthening potential. More information is required on the potential variation in unbound drug concentrations in humans, and their role in cardiotoxicity.

  1. Co-treatment with the anti-malarial drugs mefloquine and primaquine highly sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells by increasing P-gp inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Hwa; Choi, Ae-Ran; Kim, Yong Kee; Yoon, Sungpil

    2013-11-22

    The purpose of this study was to identify conditions that will increase the sensitivity of resistant cancer cells to anti-mitotic drugs. Currently, atovaquine (ATO), chloroquine (CHL), primaquine (PRI), mefloquine (MEF), artesunate (ART), and doxycycline (DOY) are the most commonly used anti-malarial drugs. Herein, we tested whether anti-malarial drugs can sensitize drug-resistant KBV20C cancer cells. None of the six tested anti-malarial drugs was found to better sensitize the drug-resistant cells compared to the sensitive KB cells. With an exception of DOY, all other anti-malarial drugs tested could sensitize both KB and KBV20C cells to a similar extent, suggesting that anti-malarial drugs could be used for sensitive as well as resistant cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the effects of anti-malarial drugs in combination with an antimitotic drug, vinblastine (VIN) on the sensitisation of resistant KBV20C cells. Using viability assay, microscopic observation, assessment of cleaved PARP, and Hoechst staining, we identified that two anti-malarial drugs, PRI and MEF, highly sensitized KBV20C-resistant cells to VIN treatment. Moreover, PRI- or MEF-induced sensitisation was not observed in VIN-treated sensitive KB parent cells, suggesting that the observed effect is specific to resistant cancer cells. We demonstrated that the PRI and MEF sensitisation mechanism mainly depends on the inhibition of p-glycoprotein (P-gp). Our findings may contribute to the development of anti-malarial drug-based combination therapies for patients resistant to anti-mitotic drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A simple and inexpensive haemozoin-based colorimetric method to evaluate anti-malarial drug activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Tran Thanh; Huy, Nguyen Tien; Trang, Dai Thi Xuan; Shuaibu, Mohammed Nasir; Hirayama, Kenji; Kamei, Kaeko

    2012-08-09

    The spread of drug resistance in malaria parasites and the limited number of effective drugs for treatment indicates the need for new anti-malarial compounds. Current assays evaluating drugs against Plasmodium falciparum require expensive materials and equipment, thus limiting the search for new drugs, particularly in developing countries. This study describes an inexpensive procedure that is based on the advantage of a positive correlation between the haemozoin level of infected erythrocytes and parasite load. The relationship between parasitaemia and the haemozoin level of infected erythrocytes was investigated after converting haemozoin into monomeric haem. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of chloroquine, quinine, artemisinin, quinidine and clotrimazole against P. falciparum K1 and 9A strains were determined using the novel assay method. The haemozoin of parasites was extracted and converted into monomeric haem, allowing the use of a colorimeter to efficiently and rapidly measure the growth of the parasites. There was a strong and direct linear relationship between the absorbance of haem converted from haemozoin and the percentage of the parasite (R2 = 0.9929). Furthermore, the IC50 values of drugs were within the range of the values previously reported. The haemozoin-based colorimetric assay can be considered as an alternative, simple, robust, inexpensive and convenient method, making it applicable in developing countries.

  3. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chance Michael L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP. Methods Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Results Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9. The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. Conclusion This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum

  4. Molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Lahj Governorate, Yemen: baseline data and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubjer, Reem A; Adeel, Ahmed A; Chance, Michael L; Hassan, Amir A

    2011-08-21

    This is an investigation of anti-malarial molecular markers coupled with a therapeutic efficacy test of chloroquine (CQ) against falciparum malaria in an area of unstable malaria in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. The study was aimed at assessment of therapeutic response to CQ and elucidation of baseline information on molecular markers for Plasmodium falciparum resistance against CQ and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP). Between 2002 and 2003 the field test was conducted according to the standard WHO protocol to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of CQ in 124 patients with falciparum malaria in an endemic area in Lahj Governorate in Yemen. Blood samples collected during this study were analysed for P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt)-76 polymorphisms, mutation pfcrt-S163R and the antifolate resistance-associated mutations dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr)-C59R and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps)-K540E. Direct DNA sequencing of the pfcrt gene from three representative field samples was carried out after DNA amplification of the 13 exons of the pfcrt gene. Treatment failure was detected in 61% of the 122 cases that completed the 14-day follow-up. The prevalence of mutant pfcrt T76 was 98% in 112 amplified pre-treatment samples. The presence of pfcrt T76 was poorly predictive of in vivo CQ resistance (PPV = 61.8%, 95% CI = 52.7-70.9). The prevalence of dhfr Arg-59 mutation in 99 amplified samples was 5%, while the dhps Glu-540 was not detected in any of 119 amplified samples. Sequencing the pfcrt gene confirmed that Yemeni CQ resistant P. falciparum carry the old world (Asian and African) CQ resistant haplotype CVIETSESI at positions 72,73,74,75,76,220,271, 326 and 371. This is the first study to report baseline information on the characteristics and implications of anti-malarial drug resistance markers in Yemen. It is also the first report of the haplotype associated with CQR P. falciparum parasites from Yemen. Mutant pfcrtT76 is highly prevalent but it

  5. Making the most of clinical data: reviewing the role of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models of anti-malarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Julie A; Zaloumis, Sophie; DeLivera, Alysha M; Price, Ric N; McCaw, James M

    2014-09-01

    Mechanistic within-host models integrating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile provide a valuable decision tool for determining dosing regimens for anti-malarial treatments, as well as a formative component of population-level drug resistance models. We reviewed published anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic models to identify the challenges for these complex models where parameter estimation from clinical field data is limited. The inclusion of key pharmacodynamic processes in the mechanistic structure adopted varies considerably. These include the life cycle of the parasite within the red blood cell, the action of the anti-malarial on a specific stage of the life cycle, and the reduction in parasite growth associated with immunity. With regard to estimation of the pharmacodynamic parameters, the majority of studies simply compared descriptive summaries of the simulated outputs to published observations of host and parasite responses from clinical studies. Few studies formally estimated the pharmacodynamic parameters within a rigorous statistical framework using observed individual patient data. We recommend three steps in the development and evaluation of these models. Firstly, exploration through simulation to assess how the different parameters influence the parasite dynamics. Secondly, application of a simulation-estimation approach to determine whether the model parameters can be estimated with reasonable precision based on sampling designs that mimic clinical efficacy studies. Thirdly, fitting the mechanistic model to the clinical data within a Bayesian framework. We propose that authors present the model both schematically and in equation form and give a detailed description of each parameter, including a biological interpretation of the parameter estimates.

  6. SMS for Life: a pilot project to improve anti-malarial drug supply management in rural Tanzania using standard technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    restricted availability of anti-malarial drugs or other medicines in rural or under-resourced areas. PMID:20979633

  7. CPP-ZFN: A potential DNA-targeting anti-malarial drug

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    Nain Vikrant

    2010-09-01

    . Implications of the hypothesis Targeting of the Plasmodium genome using ZFN has great potential for the development of anti-malarial drugs. It allows the development of a single drug against all malarial infections, including multidrug-resistant strains. Availability of multiple ZFN target sites in a single gene will provide alternative drug target sites to combat the development of resistance in the future.

  8. Assessing the utility of an anti-malarial pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic model for aiding drug clinical development

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    Zaloumis Sophie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanistic within-host models relating blood anti-malarial drug concentrations with the parasite-time profile help in assessing dosing schedules and partner drugs for new anti-malarial treatments. A comprehensive simulation study to assess the utility of a stage-specific pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD model for predicting within-host parasite response was performed. Methods Three anti-malarial combination therapies were selected: artesunate-mefloquine, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine, and artemether-lumefantrine. The PK-PD model included parameters to represent the concentration-time profiles of both drugs, the initial parasite burden and distribution across the parasite life cycle, and the parasite multiplication factor due to asexual reproduction. The model also included the maximal killing rate of each drug, and the blood drug concentration associated with half of that killing effect (in vivo EC50, derived from the in vitro IC50, the extent of binding to 0.5% Albumax present in the in vitro testing media, and the drugs plasma protein binding and whole blood to plasma partitioning ratio. All stochastic simulations were performed using a Latin-Hypercube-Sampling approach. Results The simulations demonstrated that the proportion of patients cured was highly sensitive to the in vivo EC50 and the maximal killing rate of the partner drug co-administered with the artemisinin derivative. The in vivo EC50 values that corresponded to on average 95% of patients cured were much higher than the adjusted values derived from the in vitro IC50. The proportion clinically cured was not strongly influenced by changes in the parameters defining the age distribution of the initial parasite burden (mean age of 4 to 16 hours and the parasite multiplication factor every life cycle (ranging from 8 to 12 fold/cycle. The median parasite clearance times, however, lengthened as the standard deviation of the initial parasite burden increased (i

  9. Clinical manifestations of new versus recrudescent malaria infections following anti-malarial drug treatment

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    Shaukat Ayesha M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distinguishing new from recrudescent infections in post-treatment episodes of malaria is standard in anti-malarial drug efficacy trials. New infections are not considered malaria treatment failures and as a result, the prevention of subsequent episodes of malaria infection is not reported as a study outcome. However, in moderate and high transmission settings, new infections are common and the ability of a short-acting medication to cure an initial infection may be outweighed by its inability to prevent the next imminent infection. The clinical benefit of preventing new infections has never been compared to that of curing the initial infection. Methods Children enrolled in a sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine efficacy study in Blantyre, Malawi from 1998–2004 were prospectively evaluated. Six neutral microsatellites were used to classify new and recrudescent infections in children aged less than 10 years with recurrent malaria infections. Children from the study who did not experience recurrent parasitaemia comprised the baseline group. The odds of fever and anaemia, the rate of haemoglobin recovery and time to recurrence were compared among the groups. Results Fever and anemia were more common among children with parasitaemia compared to those who remained infection-free throughout the study period. When comparing recrudescent vs. new infections, the incidence of fever was not statistically different. However, children with recrudescent infections had a less robust haematological recovery and also experienced recurrence sooner than those whose infection was classified as new. Conclusions The results of this study confirm the paramount importance of providing curative treatment for all malaria infections. Although new and recrudescent infections caused febrile illnesses at a similar rate, recurrence due to recrudescent infection did have a worsened haemological outcome than recurrence due to new infections. Local decision

  10. Quinine, an old anti-malarial drug in a modern world: role in the treatment of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achan, Jane; Talisuna, Ambrose O; Erhart, Annette; Yeka, Adoke; Tibenderana, James K; Baliraine, Frederick N; Rosenthal, Philip J; D'Alessandro, Umberto

    2011-05-24

    Quinine remains an important anti-malarial drug almost 400 years after its effectiveness was first documented. However, its continued use is challenged by its poor tolerability, poor compliance with complex dosing regimens, and the availability of more efficacious anti-malarial drugs. This article reviews the historical role of quinine, considers its current usage and provides insight into its appropriate future use in the treatment of malaria. In light of recent research findings intravenous artesunate should be the first-line drug for severe malaria, with quinine as an alternative. The role of rectal quinine as pre-referral treatment for severe malaria has not been fully explored, but it remains a promising intervention. In pregnancy, quinine continues to play a critical role in the management of malaria, especially in the first trimester, and it will remain a mainstay of treatment until safer alternatives become available. For uncomplicated malaria, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) offers a better option than quinine though the difficulty of maintaining a steady supply of ACT in resource-limited settings renders the rapid withdrawal of quinine for uncomplicated malaria cases risky. The best approach would be to identify solutions to ACT stock-outs, maintain quinine in case of ACT stock-outs, and evaluate strategies for improving quinine treatment outcomes by combining it with antibiotics. In HIV and TB infected populations, concerns about potential interactions between quinine and antiretroviral and anti-tuberculosis drugs exist, and these will need further research and pharmacovigilance.

  11. The effect of intermittent preventive treatment on anti-malarial drug resistance spread in areas with population movement.

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    Teboh-Ewungkem, Miranda I; Mohammed-Awel, Jemal; Baliraine, Frederick N; Duke-Sylvester, Scott M

    2014-11-15

    The use of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnant women (IPTp), children (IPTc) and infant (IPTi) is an increasingly popular preventive strategy aimed at reducing malaria risk in these vulnerable groups. Studies to understand how this preventive intervention can affect the spread of anti-malarial drug resistance are important especially when there is human movement between neighbouring low and high transmission areas. Because the same drug is sometimes utilized for IPTi and for symptomatic malaria treatment, distinguishing their individual roles on accelerating the spread of drug resistant malaria, with or without human movement, may be difficult to isolate experimentally or by analysing data. A theoretical framework, as presented here, is thus relevant as the role of IPTi on accelerating the spread of drug resistance can be isolated in individual populations and when the populations are interconnected and interact. A previously published model is expanded to include human movement between neighbouring high and low transmission areas, with focus placed on the malaria parasites. Parasite fitness functions, determined by how many humans the parasites can infect, are used to investigate how fast resistance can spread within the neighbouring communities linked by movement, when the populations are at endemic equilibrium. Model simulations indicate that population movement results in resistance spreading fastest in high transmission areas, and the more complete the anti-malarial resistance the faster the resistant parasite will tend to spread through a population. Moreover, the demography of infection in low transmission areas tends to change to reflect the demography of high transmission areas. Additionally, when regions are strongly connected the rate of spread of partially resistant parasites (R1) relative to drug sensitive parasites (RS), and fully resistant parasites (R2) relative to partially resistant parasites (R1) tend to behave the same in both

  12. Ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Dakar, Senegal, to seven standard anti-malarial drugs

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    Pradines Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of widespread chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT (which includes artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Since then, there have been very few reports on the ex vivo susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To examine whether parasite susceptibility has been affected by the widespread use of ACT, the ex vivo susceptibility of local isolates was assessed at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The ex vivo susceptibility of 93 P. falciparum isolates from Dakar was successfully determined using the Plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH ELISA for the following drugs: chloroquine (CQ, quinine (QN, mefloquine (MQ, monodesethylamodiaquine (MDAQ, lumefantrine (LMF, dihydroartemisinin (DHA and doxycycline (DOX. Results After transformation of the isolate IC50 in ratio of IC50 according to the susceptibility of the 3D7 reference strain (isolate IC50/3D7 IC50, the prevalence of the in vitro resistant isolates with reduced susceptibility was 50% for MQ, 22% for CQ, 12% for DOX, 6% for both QN and MDAQ and 1% for the drugs LMF and DHA. The highest significant positive correlations were shown between responses to CQ and MDAQ (r = 0.569; P r = 0.511; P r = 0.428; P = 0.0001, LMF and MQ (r = 0.413; P = 0.0002, QN and DHA (r = 0.402; P = 0.0003 and QN and MQ (r = 0.421; P = 0.0001. Conclusions The introduction of ACT in 2002 has not induced a decrease in P. falciparum susceptibility to the drugs DHA, MDAQ and LMF, which are common ACT components. However, the prevalence of P. falciparum isolates with reduced susceptibility has increased for both MQ and DOX. Taken together, these data suggest that intensive surveillance of the P. falciparum in vitro susceptibility to anti-malarial drugs in Senegal is required.

  13. Malavefes: A computational voice-enabled malaria fuzzy informatics software for correct dosage prescription of anti-malarial drugs

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    Olugbenga O. Oluwagbemi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is one of the infectious diseases consistently inherent in many Sub-Sahara African countries. Among the issues of concern are the consequences of wrong diagnosis and dosage administration of anti-malarial drugs on sick patients; these have resulted into various degrees of complications ranging from severe headaches, stomach and body discomfort, blurred vision, dizziness, hallucinations, and in extreme cases, death. Many expert systems have been developed to support different infectious disease diagnoses, but not sure of any yet, that have been specifically designed as a voice-based application to diagnose and translate malaria patients’ symptomatic data for pre-laboratory screening and correct prescription of proper dosage of the appropriate medication. We developed Malavefes, (a malaria voice-enabled computational fuzzy expert system for correct dosage prescription of anti-malarial drugs using Visual Basic.NET., and Java programming languages. Data collation for this research was conducted by survey from existing literature and interview from public health experts. The database for this malaria drug informatics system was implemented using Microsoft Access. The Root Sum Square (RSS was implemented as the inference engine of Malavefes to make inferences from rules, while Centre of Gravity (CoG was implemented as the defuzzification engine. The drug recommendation module was voice-enabled. Additional anti-malaria drug expiration validation software was developed using Java programming language. We conducted a user-evaluation of the performance and user-experience of the Malavefes software. Keywords: Informatics, Bioinformatics, Fuzzy, Anti-malaria, Voice computing, Dosage prescription

  14. Major reduction in anti-malarial drug consumption in Senegal after nation-wide introduction of malaria rapid diagnostic tests.

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    Sylla Thiam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While WHO recently recommended universal parasitological confirmation of suspected malaria prior to treatment, debate has continued as to whether wide-scale use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs can achieve this goal. Adherence of health service personnel to RDT results has been poor in some settings, with little impact on anti-malarial drug consumption. The Senegal national malaria control programme introduced universal parasite-based diagnosis using malaria RDTs from late 2007 in all public health facilities. This paper assesses the impact of this programme on anti-malarial drug consumption and disease reporting. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Nationally-collated programme data from 2007 to 2009 including malaria diagnostic outcomes, prescription of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and consumption of RDTs in public health facilities, were reviewed and compared. Against a marked seasonal variation in all-cause out-patient visits, non-malarial fever and confirmed malaria, parasite-based diagnosis increased nationally from 3.9% of reported malaria-like febrile illness to 86.0% over a 3 year period. The prescription of ACT dropped throughout this period from 72.9% of malaria-like febrile illness to 31.5%, reaching close equivalence to confirmed malaria (29.9% of 584,873 suspect fever cases. An estimated 516,576 courses of inappropriate ACT prescription were averted. CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate high adherence of anti-malarial prescribing practice to RDT results after an initial run-in period. The large reduction in ACT consumption enabled by the move from symptom-based to parasite-based diagnosis demonstrates that effective roll-out and use of malaria RDTs is achievable on a national scale through well planned and structured implementation. While more detailed information on management of parasite-negative cases is required at point of care level to assess overall cost-benefits to the health sector, considerable cost-savings were

  15. Major Reduction in Anti-Malarial Drug Consumption in Senegal after Nation-Wide Introduction of Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Sylla; Thior, Moussa; Faye, Babacar; Ndiop, Médoune; Diouf, Mamadou Lamine; Diouf, Mame Birame; Diallo, Ibrahima; Fall, Fatou Ba; Ndiaye, Jean Louis; Albertini, Audrey; Lee, Evan; Jorgensen, Pernille; Gaye, Oumar; Bell, David

    2011-01-01

    Background While WHO recently recommended universal parasitological confirmation of suspected malaria prior to treatment, debate has continued as to whether wide-scale use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can achieve this goal. Adherence of health service personnel to RDT results has been poor in some settings, with little impact on anti-malarial drug consumption. The Senegal national malaria control programme introduced universal parasite-based diagnosis using malaria RDTs from late 2007 in all public health facilities. This paper assesses the impact of this programme on anti-malarial drug consumption and disease reporting. Methods and Findings Nationally-collated programme data from 2007 to 2009 including malaria diagnostic outcomes, prescription of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and consumption of RDTs in public health facilities, were reviewed and compared. Against a marked seasonal variation in all-cause out-patient visits, non-malarial fever and confirmed malaria, parasite-based diagnosis increased nationally from 3.9% of reported malaria-like febrile illness to 86.0% over a 3 year period. The prescription of ACT dropped throughout this period from 72.9% of malaria-like febrile illness to 31.5%, reaching close equivalence to confirmed malaria (29.9% of 584873 suspect fever cases). An estimated 516576 courses of inappropriate ACT prescription were averted. Conclusions The data indicate high adherence of anti-malarial prescribing practice to RDT results after an initial run-in period. The large reduction in ACT consumption enabled by the move from symptom-based to parasite-based diagnosis demonstrates that effective roll-out and use of malaria RDTs is achievable on a national scale through well planned and structured implementation. While more detailed information on management of parasite-negative cases is required at point of care level to assess overall cost-benefits to the health sector, considerable cost-savings were achieved in ACT

  16. Major reduction in anti-malarial drug consumption in Senegal after nation-wide introduction of malaria rapid diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Sylla; Thior, Moussa; Faye, Babacar; Ndiop, Médoune; Diouf, Mamadou Lamine; Diouf, Mame Birame; Diallo, Ibrahima; Fall, Fatou Ba; Ndiaye, Jean Louis; Albertini, Audrey; Lee, Evan; Jorgensen, Pernille; Gaye, Oumar; Bell, David

    2011-04-06

    While WHO recently recommended universal parasitological confirmation of suspected malaria prior to treatment, debate has continued as to whether wide-scale use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can achieve this goal. Adherence of health service personnel to RDT results has been poor in some settings, with little impact on anti-malarial drug consumption. The Senegal national malaria control programme introduced universal parasite-based diagnosis using malaria RDTs from late 2007 in all public health facilities. This paper assesses the impact of this programme on anti-malarial drug consumption and disease reporting. Nationally-collated programme data from 2007 to 2009 including malaria diagnostic outcomes, prescription of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and consumption of RDTs in public health facilities, were reviewed and compared. Against a marked seasonal variation in all-cause out-patient visits, non-malarial fever and confirmed malaria, parasite-based diagnosis increased nationally from 3.9% of reported malaria-like febrile illness to 86.0% over a 3 year period. The prescription of ACT dropped throughout this period from 72.9% of malaria-like febrile illness to 31.5%, reaching close equivalence to confirmed malaria (29.9% of 584,873 suspect fever cases). An estimated 516,576 courses of inappropriate ACT prescription were averted. The data indicate high adherence of anti-malarial prescribing practice to RDT results after an initial run-in period. The large reduction in ACT consumption enabled by the move from symptom-based to parasite-based diagnosis demonstrates that effective roll-out and use of malaria RDTs is achievable on a national scale through well planned and structured implementation. While more detailed information on management of parasite-negative cases is required at point of care level to assess overall cost-benefits to the health sector, considerable cost-savings were achieved in ACT procurement. Programmes need to be allowed

  17. Saleability of anti-malarials in private drug shops in Muheza, Tanzania: a baseline study in an era of assumed artemisinin combination therapy (ACT

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    Ringsted Frank M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemether-lumefantrine (ALu replaced sulphadoxine-pymimethamine (SP as the official first-line anti-malarial in Tanzania in November 2006. So far, artemisinin combination therapy (ACT is contra-indicated during pregnancy by the national malaria treatment guidelines, and pregnant women depend on SP for Intermittent Preventive Treatment (IPTp during pregnancy. SP is still being dispensed by private drug stores, but it is unknown to which extent. If significant, it may undermine its official use for IPTp through induction of resistance. The main study objective was to perform a baseline study of the private market for anti-malarials in Muheza town, an area with widespread anti-malarial drug resistance, prior to the implementation of a provider training and accreditation programme that will allow accredited drug shops to sell subsidized ALu. Methods All drug shops selling prescription-only anti-malarials, in Muheza town, Tanga Region voluntarily participated from July to December 2009. Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with owners or shopkeepers on saleability of anti-malarials, and structured questionnaires provided quantitative data on drugs sales volume. Results All surveyed drug shops illicitly sold SP and quinine (QN, and legally amodiaquine (AQ. Calculated monthly sale was 4,041 doses, in a town with a population of 15,000 people. Local brands of SP accounted for 74% of sales volume, compared to AQ (13%, QN (11% and ACT (2%. Conclusions In community practice, the saleability of ACT was negligible. SP was best-selling, and use was not reserved for IPTp, as stipulated in the national anti-malarial policy. It is a major reason for concern that such drug-pressure in the community equals de facto intermittent presumptive treatment. In an area where SP drug resistance remains high, unregulated SP dispensing to people other than pregnant women runs the risk of eventually jeopardizing the effectiveness of the IPTp

  18. Availability and quality of anti-malarials among private sector outlets in Myanmar in 2012: results from a large, community-based, cross-sectional survey before a large-scale intervention.

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    Khin, Hnin Su Su; Chen, Ingrid; White, Chris; Sudhinaraset, May; McFarland, Willi; Littrell, Megan; Montagu, Dominic; Aung, Tin

    2015-07-14

    Global malaria control efforts are threatened by the spread and emergence of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites. In 2012, the widespread sale of partial courses of artemisinin-based monotherapy was suspected to take place in the highly accessed, weakly regulated private sector in Myanmar, posing potentially major threats to drug resistance. This study investigated the presence of artemisinin-based monotherapies in the Myanmar private sector, particularly as partial courses of therapy, to inform the targeting of future interventions to stop artemisinin resistance. A large cross-sectional survey comprised of a screening questionnaire was conducted across 26 townships in Myanmar between March and May, 2012. For outlets that stocked anti-malarials at the time of survey, a stock audit was conducted, and for outlets that stocked anti-malarials within 3 months of the survey, a provider survey was conducted. A total of 3,658 outlets were screened, 83% were retailers (pharmacies, itinerant drug vendors and general retailers) and 17% were healthcare providers (private facilities and health workers). Of the 3,658 outlets screened, 1,359 outlets (32%) stocked at least one anti-malarial at the time of study. Oral artemisinin-based monotherapy comprised of 33% of self-reported anti-malarials dispensing volumes found. The vast majority of artemisinin-based monotherapy was sold by retailers, where 63% confirmed that they sold partial courses of therapy by cutting blister packets. Very few retailers (5%) had malaria rapid diagnostic tests available, and quality-assured artemisinin-based combination therapy was virtually nonexistent among retailers. Informal private pharmacies, itinerant drug vendors and general retailers should be targeted for interventions to improve malaria treatment practices in Myanmar, particularly those that threaten the emergence and spread of artemisinin resistance.

  19. Community perceptions of targeted anti-malarial mass drug administrations in two provinces in Vietnam: a quantitative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy-Nhien; Thu, Pham N Huong; Hung, Ngo Trong; Son, Do Hung; Tien, Nguyen Thanh; Van Dung, Nguyen; Quang, Huynh Hong; Seidlein, Lorenz von; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Dondorp, Arjen M; Day, Nicholas P J; White, Nicholas J; Hien, Tran Tinh

    2017-01-06

    As part of a targeted malaria elimination project, mass drug administrations (MDAs) were conducted in Vietnam. The impact of MDAs on malaria transmission depends largely on the efficacy of the anti-malarial drug regimen, the malaria epidemiology in the site and the population coverage. To explore why some people participate in MDAs and others do not, a quantitative survey of the villagers' perceptions was undertaken in Vietnam. In 2013/2014 MDAs were conducted in a village in Binh Phuoc province and a village in Ninh Thuan province. Within three months of the drug administration, 59 respondents in a village in Binh Phuoc and 79 respondents in a village in Ninh Thuan were randomly selected and interviewed. Comprehension of the purpose of the intervention was of paramount importance for participation in the intervention. Respondents aware that the intervention aims to protect against malaria were significantly more likely to participate than respondents who were unaware of the MDA's purpose. Secondly, how and by whom villagers were informed was critical for participation. There was a strong association between sensitization by an informant such as a member of the local health team with participation in the intervention. The study suggests several approaches to increase participation in mass drug administration campaigns. Training trustworthy informants to sensitize the study population is critical to maximize village participation in this setting. To achieve high coverage the entire community must understand and agree with the intervention.

  20. A new double-antibody sandwich ELISA targeting Plasmodium falciparum aldolase to evaluate anti-malarial drug sensitivity

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    Brun Reto

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The standard in vitro test to assess anti-malarial activity of chemical compounds is the [3H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay. It is a radioactivity-based method to measure DNA replication of Plasmodium in red blood cells. The method is highly reproducible, however, the handling of radioactive material is costly, hazardous and requires the availability of appropriate technology and trained staff. Several other ways to evaluate in vitro anti-malarial activity do exist, all with their own assets and limitations. Methods The newly developed double-antibody sandwich ELISA described here is based on the properties of a non-overlapping pair of monoclonal antibodies directed against Plasmodium falciparum aldolase. This glycolytic enzyme possesses some unique nucleotide sequences compared to the human isoenzymes and has been highly conserved through evolution. Out of twenty possibilities, the most sensitive antibody pair was selected and used to quantitatively detect parasite aldolase in infected blood lysates. Results A total of 34 compounds with anti-malarial activity were tested side-by-side by ELISA and the [3H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay. The novel ELISA provided IC50s closely paralleling those from the radioactivity-based assay (R = 0.99, p Conclusion The newly developed ELISA presents several advantages over the comparative method, the [3H]hypoxanthine incorporation assay. The assay is highly reproducible, less hazardous (involves no radioactivity and requires little and cheap technical equipment. Relatively unskilled personnel can conduct this user-friendly assay. All this makes it attractive to be employed in resource-poor laboratories.

  1. Anti-malarial drug safety information obtained through routine monitoring in a rural district of South-Western Senegal

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    Brasseur Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowing the safety profile of anti-malarial treatments in routine use is essential; millions of patients receive now artemisinin combination therapy (ACT annually, but the return on information through current systems is as yet inadequate. Cohort event monitoring (CEM is a WHO (World Health Organization-recommended practice; testing its performance and feasibility in routine practice in malaria-endemic is important. Methods A nine-year CEM-based study of the safety of artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ at five peripheral health facilities in a rural district of South-western Senegal. Staff (nurses, health workers were trained to collect actively and systematically information on the patient, treatment and events on a purposely designed questionnaire. The occurrence and severity of events was collected before, during and after treatment up to 28 days in order to generate information on all adverse events (AEs as well as treatment-emerging signs/symptoms (TESS. Laboratory tests (haematology, liver and renal was planned for at least 10% of cases. Results During 2001–2009, 3,708 parasitologically-confirmed malaria cases (mean age = 16.0 ± 12.7 years were enrolled (26% and 52% of all and parasitologically-confirmed ASAQ treatments, respectively. Treatment was supervised in 96% of cases. Products changed over time: 49% were a loose combination of individually-packaged products (available 2001–03, 42% co-blistered products (2004–09 and 9% a fixed-dose co-formulation (2006–09; dosing was age-based for 42%, weight-based for 58%. AS and AQ were correctly dosed in 97% and 82% of cases with the loose and 93% and 86% with the fixed combination, but only 50% and 42% with the co-blistered product. Thirty-three per cent (33% of patients had at least one sign/symptom pre-treatment, 12% had at least one AE and 9% a TESS (total events 3,914, 1,144 and 693, respectively. AEs overestimated TESS by 1.2-2 fold (average 1.7. Changes in

  2. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewchuk, Tanya; O'Connell, Kathryn A; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Chapman, Steven; Chavasse, Desmond

    2011-10-31

    Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012.ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the project aims to disseminate findings widely for decision

  3. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman Steven

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the

  4. The ACTwatch project: methods to describe anti-malarial markets in seven countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Policy makers, governments and donors are faced with an information gap when considering ways to improve access to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and malaria diagnostics including rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). To help address some of these gaps, a five-year multi-country research project called ACTwatch was launched. The project is designed to provide a comprehensive picture of the anti-malarial market to inform national and international anti-malarial drug policy decision-making. Methods The project is being conducted in seven malaria-endemic countries: Benin, Cambodia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia from 2008 to 2012. ACTwatch measures which anti-malarials are available, where they are available and at what price and who they are used by. These indicators are measured over time and across countries through three study components: outlet surveys, supply chain studies and household surveys. Nationally representative outlet surveys examine the market share of different anti-malarials passing through public facilities and private retail outlets. Supply chain research provides a picture of the supply chain serving drug outlets, and measures mark-ups at each supply chain level. On the demand side, nationally representative household surveys capture treatment seeking patterns and use of anti-malarial drugs, as well as respondent knowledge of anti-malarials. Discussion The research project provides findings on both the demand and supply side determinants of anti-malarial access. There are four key features of ACTwatch. First is the overlap of the three study components where nationally representative data are collected over similar periods, using a common sampling approach. A second feature is the number and diversity of countries that are studied which allows for cross-country comparisons. Another distinguishing feature is its ability to measure trends over time. Finally, the project aims to disseminate

  5. Factors related to compliance to anti-malarial drug combination: example of amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine among children in rural Senegal

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    Sow Diarietou

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The introduction of new anti-malarial treatment that is effective, but more expensive, raises questions about whether the high level of effectiveness observed in clinical trials can be found in a context of family use. The objective of this study was to determine the factors related to adherence, when using the amodiaquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (AQ/SP association, a transitory strategy before ACT implementation in Senegal. Methods The study was conducted in five rural dispensaries. Children, between two and 10 years of age, who presented mild malaria were recruited at the time of the consultation and were prescribed AQ/SP. The child's primary caretaker was questioned at home on D3 about treatment compliance and factors that could have influenced his or her adherence to treatment. A logistic regression model was used for the analyses. Results The study sample included 289 children. The adherence rate was 64.7%. Two risks factors for non-adherence were identified: the children's age (8–10 years (ORa = 3.07 [1.49–6.29]; p = 0.004; and the profession of the head of household (retailer/employee versus farmer (ORa = 2.71 [1.34–5.48]; p = 0.006. Previously seeking care (ORa = 0.28 [0.105–0.736], p=0.001] satisfaction with received information (ORa = 0.45 [0.24–0.84]; p = 0.013, and the quality of history taking (ORa = 0.38 [0.21–0.69]; p = 0.001 were significantly associated with good compliance. Conclusion The results of the study show the importance of information and communication between caregivers and health center staff. The experience gained from this therapeutic transition emphasizes the importance of information given to the patients at the time of the consultation and drug delivery in order to improve drug use and thus prevent the emergence of rapid drug resistance.

  6. Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Harparkash; Clarke, Siȃn; Lalani, Mirza; Phanouvong, Souly; Guérin, Philippe; McLoughlin, Andrew; Wilson, Benjamin K; Deats, Michael; Plançon, Aline; Hopkins, Heidi; Miranda, Debora; Schellenberg, David

    2016-02-13

    This meeting report presents the key findings and discussion points of a 1-day meeting entitled 'Fake anti-malarials: start with the facts' held on 28th May 2015, in Geneva, Switzerland, to disseminate the findings of the artemisinin combination therapy consortium's drug quality programme. The teams purchased over 10,000 samples, using representative sampling approaches, from six malaria endemic countries: Equatorial Guinea (Bioko Island), Cambodia, Ghana, Nigeria, Rwanda and Tanzania. Laboratory analyses of these samples showed that falsified anti-malarials (substandard artemisinin-based combinations were present in all six countries and, artemisinin-based monotherapy tablets are still available in some places despite the fact that the WHO has urged regulatory authorities in malaria-endemic countries to take measures to halt the production and marketing of these oral monotherapies since 2007. This report summarizes the presentations that reviewed the public health impact of falsified and substandard drugs, sampling strategies, techniques for drug quality analysis, approaches to strengthen health systems capacity for the surveillance of drug quality, and the ensuing discussion points from the dissemination meeting.

  7. Finding parasites and finding challenges: improved diagnostic access and trends in reported malaria and anti-malarial drug use in Livingstone district, Zambia

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    Masaninga Freddie

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the impact of malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT use on management of acute febrile disease at a community level, and on the consumption of anti-malarial medicines, is critical to the planning and success of scale-up to universal parasite-based diagnosis by health systems in malaria-endemic countries. Methods A retrospective study of district-wide community-level RDT introduction was conducted in Livingstone District, Zambia, to assess the impact of this programmed on malaria reporting, incidence of mortality and on district anti-malarial consumption. Results Reported malaria declined from 12,186 cases in the quarter prior to RDT introduction in 2007 to an average of 12.25 confirmed and 294 unconfirmed malaria cases per quarter over the year to September 2009. Reported malaria-like fever also declined, with only 4,381 RDTs being consumed per quarter over the same year. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero in the year to September 2009, and all-cause mortality declined. Consumption of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT dropped dramatically, but remained above reported malaria, declining from 12,550 courses dispensed by the district office in the quarter prior to RDT implementation to an average of 822 per quarter over the last year. Quinine consumption in health centres also declined, with the district office ceasing to supply due to low usage, but requests for sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP rose to well above previous levels, suggesting substitution of ACT with this drug in RDT-negative cases. Conclusions RDT introduction led to a large decline in reported malaria cases and in ACT consumption in Livingstone district. Reported malaria mortality declined to zero, indicating safety of the new diagnostic regime, although adherence and/or use of RDTs was still incomplete. However, a deficiency is apparent in management of non-malarial fever, with inappropriate use of a low-cost single dose drug, SP

  8. Exposure to anti-malarial drugs and monitoring of adverse drug reactions using toll-free mobile phone calls in private retail sector in Sagamu, Nigeria: implications for pharmacovigilance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogunwande Isiaka A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adverse drug reactions (ADRs contribute to ill-health or life-threatening outcomes of therapy during management of infectious diseases. The exposure to anti-malarial and use of mobile phone technology to report ADRs following drug exposures were investigated in Sagamu - a peri-urban community in Southwest Nigeria. Methods Purchase of medicines was actively monitored for 28 days in three Community Pharmacies (CP and four Patent and Proprietary Medicine Stores (PPMS in the community. Information on experience of ADRs was obtained by telephone from 100 volunteers who purchased anti-malarials during the 28-day period. Results and Discussion A total of 12,093 purchases were recorded during the period. Antibiotics, analgesics, vitamins and anti-malarials were the most frequently purchased medicines. A total of 1,500 complete courses of anti-malarials were purchased (12.4% of total purchases; of this number, purchases of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and chloroquine (CQ were highest (39.3 and 25.2% respectiuvely. Other anti-malarials purchased were artesunate monotherapy (AS - 16.1%, artemether-lumefantrine (AL 10.0%, amodiaquine (AQ - 6.6%, quinine (QNN - 1.9%, halofantrine (HF - 0.2% and proguanil (PR - 0.2%. CQ was the cheapest (USD 0.3 and halofantrine the most expensive (USD 7.7. AL was 15.6 times ($4.68 more expensive than CQ. The response to mobile phone monitoring of ADRs was 57% in the first 24 hours (day 1 after purchase and decreased to 33% by day 4. Participants in this monitoring exercise were mostly with low level of education (54%. Conclusion The findings from this study indicate that ineffective anti-malaria medicines including monotherapies remain widely available and are frequently purchased in the study area. Cost may be a factor in the continued use of ineffective monotherapies. Availability of a toll-free telephone line may facilitate pharmacovigilance and follow up of response to medicines in a resource

  9. The anti-malarial drug Mefloquine disrupts central autonomic and respiratory control in the working heart brainstem preparation of the rat

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    Lall Varinder K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mefloquine is an anti-malarial drug that can have neurological side effects. This study examines how mefloquine (MF influences central nervous control of autonomic and respiratory systems using the arterially perfused working heart brainstem preparation (WHBP of the rat. Recordings of nerve activity were made from the thoracic sympathetic chain and phrenic nerve, while heart rate (HR and perfusion pressure were also monitored in the arterially perfused, decerebrate, rat WHBP. MF was added to the perfusate at 1 μM to examine its effects on baseline parameters as well as baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes. Results MF caused a significant, atropine resistant, bradycardia and increased phrenic nerve discharge frequency. Chemoreceptor mediated sympathoexcitation (elicited by addition of 0.1 ml of 0.03% sodium cyanide to the aortic cannula was significantly attenuated by the application of MF to the perfusate. Furthermore MF significantly decreased rate of return to resting HR following chemoreceptor induced bradycardia. An increase in respiratory frequency and attenuated respiratory-related sympathetic nerve discharge during chemoreceptor stimulation was also elicited with MF compared to control. However, MF did not significantly alter baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. Conclusions These studies indicate that in the WHBP, MF causes profound alterations in autonomic and respiratory control. The possibility that these effects may be mediated through actions on connexin 36 containing gap junctions in central neurones controlling sympathetic nervous outflow is discussed.

  10. Plasmodium falciparum neutral aminopeptidases: new targets for anti-malarials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner-Adams, Tina S; Stack, Colin M; Trenholme, Katharine R; Brown, Chris L; Grembecka, Jolanta; Lowther, Jonathan; Mucha, Artur; Drag, Marcin; Kafarski, Pawel; McGowan, Sheena; Whisstock, James C; Gardiner, Donald L; Dalton, John P

    2010-01-01

    The neutral aminopeptidases M1 alanyl aminopeptidase (PfM1AAP) and M17 leucine aminopeptidase (PfM17LAP) of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum are targets for the development of novel anti-malarial drugs. Although the functions of these enzymes remain unknown, they are believed to act in the terminal stages of haemoglobin degradation, generating amino acids essential for parasite growth and development. Inhibitors of both enzymes are lethal to P. falciparum in culture and kill the murine malaria P. chabaudi in vivo. Recent biochemical, structural and functional studies provide the substrate specificity and mechanistic binding data needed to guide the development of more potent anti-malarial drugs. Together with biological studies, these data form the rationale for choosing PfM1AAP and PfM17LAP as targets for anti-malarial development. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanochemical Synthesis, In vivo Anti-malarial and Safety Evaluation of Amodiaquine-zinc Complex

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    Arise Rotimi Olusanya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available So far, some prospective metal-based anti-malarial drugs have been developed. The mechanochemical synthesis and characterization of Zn (II complex with amodiaquine and its anti-malarial efficacy on Plasmodium berghei-infected mice and safety evaluation were described in this study.

  12. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

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    Ronn Anita

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1 therapeutic agent. There is a dire need to continue monitoring quality of CQ as there is a major influx of substandard and fake formulations into malaria-endemic countries. The use of fake/substandard drugs will result in sub-therapeutic levels endangering the patient and possibly select for parasite resistance. The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple antibody-based ELISA to measure CQ concentrations in tablets and in plasma. Methods A monoclonal antibody (MAb that reacts with the N-side chain of the CQ molecule was prepared by use of a CQ analogue. A specific and reliable ELISA for detection of CQ was developed. The developed assay was validated by measuring CQ in tablets sold in Denmark, India and Sudan. Furthermore, kinetics of CQ concentrations in plasma of four volunteers, who ingested two tablets of Malarex® containing, 250 mg CQ base, were measured before drug intake, three hours later and thereafter at days 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. The same plasma samples were simultaneously measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Results The ELISA proved an easy-to-handle and very sensitive tool for the detection of CQ with a lower limit of detection at 3.9 ng/ml. ELISA levels of CQ in plasma showed high agreement with the levels obtained by HPLC (r = 0.98. The specificity in the negative control group was 100%. Conclusion The developed ELISA can be used for quality screening of CQ in pharmaceutical formulations and for drug monitoring in malaria and in other infectious diseases, such as HIV, where CQ proved to be an effective therapeutic agent. The methodology has been exploited to develop monoclonal

  13. Anti-malarial prescribing practices in Sudan eight years after introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapies and implications for development of drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmannan, Abeer Abuzeid Atta; Elmardi, Khalid Abdelmutalab; Idris, Yassir Ali; Spector, Jonathan M; Ali, Nahid Abdelgadir; Malik, Elfatih Mohamed

    2015-03-26

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. Sudan revised its malaria treatment policy accordingly in 2004. However, eight years after ACTs were introduced in Sudan the patterns of ACT prescribing practices among health care providers remain unclear. We systematically analyzed use of ACTs in a large number of primary health facilities and we discuss the public health implications of our findings. This cross-sectional study was based on WHO's guidance for investigating drug use in health facilities. Data were collected from 40 randomly selected primary health centers in five localities in Gezira State, Sudan. The primary outcome of the study was the proportion of patients who were adequately managed according to Sudan's recommended malaria treatment guidelines. Twelve drug-use indicators were used to assess key ACT prescribing practices. One thousand and two hundred patients diagnosed with uncomplicated malaria were recruited into the study. ACT was prescribed for 88.6%patients and artemether injections were (incorrectly) prescribed in 9.5% of cases. Only 40.9% of patients in the study were correctly diagnosed and 26.9% were adequately managed according to the nationally recommended treatment guidelines. Incorrect prescribing activities included failure to use generic medicine names (88.2%), incorrect dosage (27.7%), and unexplained antibiotic co-prescription (24.2%). Dispensing practices were also poor, with labeling practices inadequate (97.1%) and insufficient information given to patients about their prescribed treatment (50.5%). Irrational malaria treatment practices are common in Sudan. This has important public health implications since failure to adhere to nationally recommended guidelines could play a role in the future development of drug resistance. As such, identifying ways to improve the anti-malarial prescribing practices of heath workers in Sudan may

  14. A “reverse pharmacology” approach for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine

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    Diakite Chiaka

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A “reverse pharmacology” approach to developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine was designed and implemented in Mali, resulting in a new standardized herbal anti-malarial after six years of research. The first step was to select a remedy for development, through a retrospective treatment-outcome study. The second step was a dose-escalating clinical trial that showed a dose-response phenomenon and helped select the safest and most efficacious dose. The third step was a randomized controlled trial to compare the phytomedicine to the standard first-line treatment. The last step was to identify active compounds which can be used as markers for standardization and quality control. This example of “reverse pharmacology” shows that a standardized phytomedicine can be developed faster and more cheaply than conventional drugs. Even if both approaches are not fully comparable, their efficiency in terms of public health and their complementarity should be thoroughly considered.

  15. Target-similarity search using Plasmodium falciparum proteome identifies approved drugs with anti-malarial activity and their possible targets.

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    Reagan M Mogire

    Full Text Available Malaria causes about half a million deaths annually, with Plasmodium falciparum being responsible for 90% of all the cases. Recent reports on artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia warrant urgent discovery of novel drugs for the treatment of malaria. However, most bioactive compounds fail to progress to treatments due to safety concerns. Drug repositioning offers an alternative strategy where drugs that have already been approved as safe for other diseases could be used to treat malaria. This study screened approved drugs for antimalarial activity using an in silico chemogenomics approach prior to in vitro verification. All the P. falciparum proteins sequences available in NCBI RefSeq were mined and used to perform a similarity search against DrugBank, TTD and STITCH databases to identify similar putative drug targets. Druggability indices of the potential P. falciparum drug targets were obtained from TDR targets database. Functional amino acid residues of the drug targets were determined using ConSurf server which was used to fine tune the similarity search. This study predicted 133 approved drugs that could target 34 P. falciparum proteins. A literature search done at PubMed and Google Scholar showed 105 out of the 133 drugs to have been previously tested against malaria, with most showing activity. For further validation, drug susceptibility assays using SYBR Green I method were done on a representative group of 10 predicted drugs, eight of which did show activity against P. falciparum 3D7 clone. Seven had IC50 values ranging from 1 μM to 50 μM. This study also suggests drug-target association and hence possible mechanisms of action of drugs that did show antiplasmodial activity. The study results validate the use of proteome-wide target similarity approach in identifying approved drugs with activity against P. falciparum and could be adapted for other pathogens.

  16. Genotyping of Plasmodium falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh

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    Akter Jasmin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past many regions of Bangladesh were hyperendemic for malaria. Malaria control in the 1960s to 1970s eliminated malaria from the plains but in the Chittagong Hill Tracts remained a difficult to control reservoir. The Chittagong Hill Tracts have areas with between 1 and 10% annual malaria rates, predominately 90-95% Plasmodium falciparum. In Southeast Asia, multiplicity of infection for hypo-endemic regions has been approximately 1.5. Few studies on the genetic diversity of P. falciparum have been performed in Bangladesh. Anderson et al. performed a study in Khagrachari, northern Chittagong Hill Tracts in 2002 on 203 patients and found that parasites had a multiplicity of infection of 1.3 by MSP-1, MSP-2 and GLURP genotyping. A total of 94% of the isolates had the K76T Pfcrt chloroquine resistant genotype, and 70% showed the N86Y Pfmdr1 genotype. Antifolate drug resistant genotypes were high with 99% and 73% of parasites having two or more mutations at the dhfr or dhps loci. Methods Nested and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR methods were used to genotype P. falciparum using antigenic polymorphic markers and to study anti-malarial drug resistance markers in malaria endemic areas of Bangladesh. Results The analysis of polymorphic and drug resistant genotype on 33 paired recrudescent infections after drug treatment in the period 2004 to 2008 in the Chittagong Hill Tracts, which is just prior to countrywide provision of artemisinin combination therapy. Overall the multiplicity of infection for MSP-1 was 2.7 with a slightly smaller parasite diversity post-treatment. The 13 monoclonal infections by both GLURP and MSP-1 were evenly divided between pre- and post-treatment. The MSP-1 MAD block was most frequent in 66 of the samples. The prevalence of the K76T PfCRT chloroquine resistant allele was approximately 82% of the samples, while the resistant Pfmdr1 N86Y was present in 33% of the samples. Interestingly, the post

  17. Plasmodium falciparum parasite population structure and gene flow associated to anti-malarial drugs resistance in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Ankit; Khim, Nimol; Reynes, Christelle; Ravel, Patrice; Ma, Laurence; Tichit, Magali; Bourchier, Christiane; Kim, Saorin; Dourng, Dany; Khean, Chanra; Chim, Pheaktra; Siv, Sovannaroth; Frutos, Roger; Lek, Dysoley; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile; Ariey, Frédéric; Menard, Didier; Cornillot, Emmanuel

    2016-06-14

    Western Cambodia is recognized as the epicentre of emergence of Plasmodium falciparum multi-drug resistance. The emergence of artemisinin resistance has been observed in this area since 2008-2009 and molecular signatures associated to artemisinin resistance have been characterized in k13 gene. At present, one of the major threats faced, is the possible spread of Asian artemisinin resistant parasites over the world threatening millions of people and jeopardizing malaria elimination programme efforts. To anticipate the diffusion of artemisinin resistance, the identification of the P. falciparum population structure and the gene flow among the parasite population in Cambodia are essential. To this end, a mid-throughput PCR-LDR-FMA approach based on LUMINEX technology was developed to screen for genetic barcode in 533 blood samples collected in 2010-2011 from 16 health centres in malaria endemics areas in Cambodia. Based on successful typing of 282 samples, subpopulations were characterized along the borders of the country. Each 11-loci barcode provides evidence supporting allele distribution gradient related to subpopulations and gene flow. The 11-loci barcode successfully identifies recently emerging parasite subpopulations in western Cambodia that are associated with the C580Y dominant allele for artemisinin resistance in k13 gene. A subpopulation was identified in northern Cambodia that was associated to artemisinin (R539T resistant allele of k13 gene) and mefloquine resistance. The gene flow between these subpopulations might have driven the spread of artemisinin resistance over Cambodia.

  18. Effect of selected anti-malarial drugs on the blood chemistry and brain serotonin levels in male rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eigbibhalu, Ukpo Grace; Albert Taiwo, Ebuehi Osaretin; Douglass, Idiakheua Akhabue; Abimbola, Efunogbon Aderonke

    2013-01-01

    The effects of oral administration of sulfadoxine - pyrimethamine (SP), artesunate (A) and sulfadoxine - pyrimethamine - artesunate (SPA) on blood chemistry and brain serotonin in rabbits were investigated. Forty rabbits were divided into four groups of ten animals each. The group that served as the control received 2ml of distilled water while the other groups were received 1.25/25mg base/kg body weight of SP, 3.3mg/kg body weight of A and 1.25/25mg base/kg body weight of SP plus 3.3mg/kg body weight of A respectively by oral route daily for 3 days in a week for four weeks. At the end of each week of drug administration, three rabbits from each group were anaesthetized, blood was taken from the jugular veins using sterile needle and serum was extracted. The rabbits were sacrificed by decapitation; the liver and brain tissues were excised and homogenized. Total blood protein, cholesterol, triglyceride, albumin, creatinine and urea concentrations, creatine kinase, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase, ALP activities were assayed using CX5 synchron autoanalyzer. The brain and liver serotonin levels were determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). There were no significant differences (P levels of rabbits administered SP, A and SPA were significantly higher as compared to the control throughout the duration of the study Data of the study indicate that oral administration of SP, A or SPA in rabbits do not affect blood chemistry, but affected brain serotonin levels and could alter some neural functions.

  19. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijpma, S.R.; Heuvel, J.J.; Velden, M. van der; Sauerwein, R.W.; Russel, F.G.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly

  20. "Every drug goes to treat its own disease…" - a qualitative study of perceptions and experiences of taking anti-retrovirals concomitantly with anti-malarials among those affected by HIV and malaria in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangesho, Peter E; Reynolds, Joanna; Lemnge, Martha

    2014-01-01

    and supporting the clinical management and treatment for co-infected individuals. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted in Tanzania alongside a clinical trial of concomitant treatment for HIV and malaria co-infection. Focus group discussions were held with people receiving treatment for HIV and/or malaria...... to their compromised immune status but saw the disease as unavoidable. For those enrolled in the clinical controlled study, taking anti-malarials together with ARVs was largely seen as unproblematic, with health workers' advice and endorsement of concomitant drug taking influential in reported adherence. However......, perceptions of drug strength appeared to compel some people not enrolled in the clinical study to take the drugs at separate times to avoid anticipated harm to the body. CONCLUSIONS: Management of HIV and malaria concurrently often requires individuals to cross the domains of different disease programmes...

  1. Post-marketing surveillance of anti-malarial medicines used in Malawi

    OpenAIRE

    Chikowe, Ibrahim; Osei-Safo, Dorcas; Harrison, Jerry JEK; Konadu, Daniel Y; Addae-Mensah, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background The growing concern over the extent of anti-malarial medicine resistance in sub-Saharan Africa, driven largely by administration of sub-therapeutic doses derived from falsified and substandard medicines necessitates regular monitoring of the quality of these medicines to avert any potential public health disaster. This study aimed at determining the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) content of anti-malarial medicines available in Malawi with respect to the manufacturers? label...

  2. Mapping the genome of Plasmodium falciparum on the drug-like chemical space reveals novel anti-malarial targets and potential drug leads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kasper; Plichta, Damian Rafal; Panagiotou, Gianni

    2012-01-01

    essential proteins and the effect of their perturbations on the metabolic network of P. falciparum, as well as indication of drug resistance emergence. Finally, we predict potential off-target effects on the human host with associations to cancer, neurological and dermatological disorders, based......The parasite Plasmodium falciparum is the main agent responsible for malaria. In this study, we exploited a recently published chemical library from GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) that had previously been confirmed to inhibit parasite growth of the wild type (3D7) and the multi-drug resistance (D2d) strains...... on integration of available chemical-protein and protein-protein interaction data. Our work suggests that a large number of the P. falciparum proteome is potentially druggable and could therefore serve as novel drug targets in the fight against malaria. At the same time, prioritized compounds from the GSK...

  3. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littrell, Megan; Gatakaa, Hellen; Phok, Sochea; Allen, Henrietta; Yeung, Shunmay; Chuor, Char Meng; Dysoley, Lek; Socheat, Duong; Spiers, Angus; White, Chris; Shewchuk, Tanya; Chavasse, Desmond; O'Connell, Kathryn A

    2011-10-31

    Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT). The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Most public outlets (85%) and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%), drug stores (14%), mobile providers (4%) and grocery stores (2%). Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61%) and private (42%) sectors. While data on the anti-malarial market shows favourable progress towards replacing

  4. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littrell Megan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT. The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Methods Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Results Most public outlets (85% and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%, drug stores (14%, mobile providers (4% and grocery stores (2%. Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61% and private (42% sectors. Conclusions While data on the anti-malarial

  5. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the anti-malarial activity of Caesalpinia pluviosa

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    Eberlin Marcos N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To overcome the problem of increasing drug resistance, traditional medicines are an important source for potential new anti-malarials. Caesalpinia pluviosa, commonly named "sibipiruna", originates from Brazil and possess multiple therapeutic properties, including anti-malarial activity. Methods Crude extract (CE was obtained from stem bark by purification using different solvents, resulting in seven fractions. An MTT assay was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity in MCF-7 cells. The CE and its fractions were tested in vitro against chloroquine-sensitive (3D7 and -resistant (S20 strains of Plasmodium falciparum and in vivo in Plasmodium chabaudi-infected mice. In vitro interaction with artesunate and the active C. pluviosa fractions was assessed, and mass spectrometry analyses were conducted. Results At non-toxic concentrations, the 100% ethanolic (F4 and 50% methanolic (F5 fractions possessed significant anti-malarial activity against both 3D7 and S20 strains. Drug interaction assays with artesunate showed a synergistic interaction with the F4. Four days of treatment with this fraction significantly inhibited parasitaemia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed the presence of an ion corresponding to m/z 303.0450, suggesting the presence of quercetin. However, a second set of analyses, with a quercetin standard, showed distinct ions of m/z 137 and 153. Conclusions The findings show that the F4 fraction of C. pluviosa exhibits anti-malarial activity in vitro at non-toxic concentrations, which was potentiated in the presence of artesunate. Moreover, this anti-malarial activity was also sustained in vivo after treatment of infected mice. Finally, mass spectrometry analyses suggest that a new compound, most likely an isomer of quercetin, is responsible for the anti-malarial activity of the F4.

  6. Do anti-malarials in Africa meet quality standards? The market penetration of non quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy in eight African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul N; Hanson, Kara; Goodman, Catherine

    2017-05-25

    Quality of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is important for ensuring malaria parasite clearance and protecting the efficacy of artemisinin-based therapies. The extent to which non quality-assured ACT (non-QAACT), or those not granted global regulatory approval, are available and used to treat malaria in endemic countries is poorly documented. This paper uses national and sub-national medicine outlet surveys conducted in eight study countries (Benin, Kinshasa and Kantanga [Democratic Republic of the Congo, DRC], Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia) between 2009 and 2015 to describe the non-QAACT market and to document trends in availability and distribution of non-QAACT in the public and private sector. In 2014/15, non-QAACT were most commonly available in Kinshasa (83%), followed by Katanga (53%), Nigeria (48%), Kenya (42%), and Uganda (33%). Non-QAACT accounted for 20% of the market share in the private sector in Kenya, followed by Benin and Uganda (19%), Nigeria (12%) and Zambia (8%); this figure was 27% in Katanga and 40% in Kinshasa. Public sector non-QAACT availability and distribution was much lower, with the exception of Zambia (availability, 85%; market share, 32%). Diverse generics and formulations were available, but non-QAACT were most commonly artemether-lumefantrine (AL) or dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA PPQ), in tablet formulation, imported, and distributed in urban areas at either pharmacies or drug stores. The number of unique manufacturers supplying non-QAACT to each country ranged from 9 in Uganda to 92 in Nigeria. Addressing the availability and distribution of non-QAACT will require effective private sector engagement and evidence-based strategies to address provider and consumer demand for these products. Given the variation in non-QAACT markets observed across the eight study countries, active efforts to limit registration, importation and distribution of non-QAACT must be tailored to the country context

  7. Access to artesunate-amodiaquine, quinine and other anti-malarials: policy and markets in Burundi

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    Dismas Baza

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in post-conflict Burundi. To counter the increasing challenge of anti-malarial drug resistance and improve highly effective treatment Burundi adopted artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and oral quinine as second-line treatment in its national treatment policy in 2003. Uptake of this policy in the public, private and non-governmental (NGO retail market sectors of Burundi is relatively unknown. This study was conducted to evaluate access to national policy recommended anti-malarials. Methods Adapting a standardized methodology developed by Health Action International/World Health Organization (HAI/WHO, a cross-sectional survey of 70 (24 public, 36 private, and 10 NGO medicine outlets was conducted in three regions of Burundi, representing different levels of transmission of malaria. The availability on day of the survey, the median prices, and affordability (in terms of number of days' wages to purchase treatment of AS-AQ, quinine and other anti-malarials were calculated. Results Anti-malarials were stocked in all outlets surveyed. AS-AQ was available in 87.5%, 33.3%, and 90% of public, private, and NGO retail outlets, respectively. Quinine was the most common anti-malarial found in all outlet types. Non-policy recommended anti-malarials were mainly found in the private outlets (38.9% compared to public (4.2% and NGO (0% outlets. The median price of a course of AS-AQ was US$0.16 (200 Burundi Francs, FBu for the public and NGO markets, and 3.5-fold higher in the private sector (US$0.56 or 700 FBu. Quinine tablets were similarly priced in the public (US$1.53 or 1,892.50 FBu, private and NGO sectors (both US$1.61 or 2,000 FBu. Non-policy anti-malarials were priced 50-fold higher than the price of AS-AQ in the public sector. A course of AS-AQ was affordable at 0.4 of a day's wage in the public and NGO sectors

  8. Epidemiological models for the spread of anti-malarial resistance

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    Antia R

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of drug resistance is making malaria control increasingly difficult. Mathematical models for the transmission dynamics of drug sensitive and resistant strains can be a useful tool to help to understand the factors that influence the spread of drug resistance, and they can therefore help in the design of rational strategies for the control of drug resistance. Methods We present an epidemiological framework to investigate the spread of anti-malarial resistance. Several mathematical models, based on the familiar Macdonald-Ross model of malaria transmission, enable us to examine the processes and parameters that are critical in determining the spread of resistance. Results In our simplest model, resistance does not spread if the fraction of infected individuals treated is less than a threshold value; if drug treatment exceeds this threshold, resistance will eventually become fixed in the population. The threshold value is determined only by the rates of infection and the infectious periods of resistant and sensitive parasites in untreated and treated hosts, whereas the intensity of transmission has no influence on the threshold value. In more complex models, where hosts can be infected by multiple parasite strains or where treatment varies spatially, resistance is generally not fixed, but rather some level of sensitivity is often maintained in the population. Conclusions The models developed in this paper are a first step in understanding the epidemiology of anti-malarial resistance and evaluating strategies to reduce the spread of resistance. However, specific recommendations for the management of resistance need to wait until we have more data on the critical parameters underlying the spread of resistance: drug use, spatial variability of treatment and parasite migration among areas, and perhaps most importantly, cost of resistance.

  9. Increased pfmdr1 gene copy number and the decline in pfcrt and pfmdr1 resistance alleles in Ghanaian Plasmodium falciparum isolates after the change of anti-malarial drug treatment policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duah, Nancy O; Matrevi, Sena A; de Souza, Dziedzom K; Binnah, Daniel D; Tamakloe, Mary M; Opoku, Vera S; Onwona, Christiana O; Narh, Charles A; Quashie, Neils B; Abuaku, Benjamin; Duplessis, Christopher; Kronmann, Karl C; Koram, Kwadwo A

    2013-10-30

    With the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) in 2005, monitoring of anti-malarial drug efficacy, which includes the use of molecular tools to detect known genetic markers of parasite resistance, is important for first-hand information on the changes in parasite susceptibility to drugs in Ghana. This study investigated the Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance gene (pfmdr1) copy number, mutations and the chloroquine resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) mutations in Ghanaian isolates collected in seven years to detect the trends in prevalence of mutations. Archived filter paper blood blots collected from children aged below five years with uncomplicated malaria in 2003-2010 at sentinel sites were used. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), 756 samples were assessed for pfmdr1 gene copy number. PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to detect alleles of pfmdr1 86 in 1,102 samples, pfmdr1 184, 1034, 1042 and 1246 in 832 samples and pfcrt 76 in 1,063 samples. Merozoite surface protein 2 (msp2) genotyping was done to select monoclonal infections for copy number analysis. The percentage of isolates with increased pfmdr1 copy number were 4, 27, 9, and 18% for 2003-04, 2005-06, 2007-08 and 2010, respectively. Significant increasing trends for prevalence of pfmdr1 N86 (×(2) = 96.31, p resistance has been reported. The decreasing trend in the prevalence of chloroquine resistance markers after change of treatment policy presents the possibility for future introduction of chloroquine as prophylaxis for malaria risk groups such as children and pregnant women in Ghana.

  10. Therapeutic indications and other use-case-driven updates in the drug ontology: anti-malarials, anti-hypertensives, opioid analgesics, and a large term request

    OpenAIRE

    Hogan, William R.; Hanna, Josh; Hicks, Amanda; Amirova, Samira; Bramblett, Baxter; Diller, Matthew; Enderez, Rodel; Modzelewski, Timothy; Vasconcelos, Mirela; Delcher, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Background The Drug Ontology (DrOn) is an OWL2-based representation of drug products and their ingredients, mechanisms of action, strengths, and dose forms. We originally created DrOn for use cases in comparative effectiveness research, primarily to identify historically complete sets of United States National Drug Codes (NDCs) that represent packaged drug products, by the ingredient(s), mechanism(s) of action, and so on contained in those products. Although we had designed DrOn from the outs...

  11. Therapeutic indications and other use-case-driven updates in the drug ontology: anti-malarials, anti-hypertensives, opioid analgesics, and a large term request.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, William R; Hanna, Josh; Hicks, Amanda; Amirova, Samira; Bramblett, Baxter; Diller, Matthew; Enderez, Rodel; Modzelewski, Timothy; Vasconcelos, Mirela; Delcher, Chris

    2017-03-03

    The Drug Ontology (DrOn) is an OWL2-based representation of drug products and their ingredients, mechanisms of action, strengths, and dose forms. We originally created DrOn for use cases in comparative effectiveness research, primarily to identify historically complete sets of United States National Drug Codes (NDCs) that represent packaged drug products, by the ingredient(s), mechanism(s) of action, and so on contained in those products. Although we had designed DrOn from the outset to carefully distinguish those entities that have a therapeutic indication from those entities that have a molecular mechanism of action, we had not previously represented in DrOn any particular therapeutic indication. In this work, we add therapeutic indications for three research use cases: resistant hypertension, malaria, and opioid abuse research. We also added mechanisms of action for opioid analgesics and added 108 classes representing drug products in response to a large term request from the Program for Resistance, Immunology, Surveillance and Modeling of Malaria in Uganda (PRISM) project. The net result is a new version of DrOn, current to May 2016, that represents three major therapeutic classes of drugs and six new mechanisms of action. A therapeutic indication of a drug product is represented as a therapeutic function in DrOn. Adverse effects of drug products, as well as other therapeutic uses for which the drug product was not designed are dispositions. Our work provides a framework for representing additional therapeutic indications, adverse effects, and uses of drug products beyond their design. Our work also validated our past modeling decisions for specific types of mechanisms of action, namely effects mediated via receptor and/or enzyme binding. DrOn is available at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dron.owl . A smaller version without NDCs is available at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/dron/dron-lite.owl.

  12. Anti-malarial treatment outcomes in Ethiopia: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebreyohannes, Eyob Alemayehu; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Seid, Mohammed Assen; Tegegn, Henok Getachew

    2017-07-03

    Ethiopia is among countries with a high malaria burden. There are several studies that assessed the efficacy of anti-malarial agents in the country and this systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to obtain stronger evidence on treatment outcomes of malaria from the existing literature in Ethiopia. A systematic literature search using the preferred reporting items for systematic review and meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement was conducted on studies from Pubmed, Google Scholar, and ScienceDirect databases to identify published and unpublished literature. Comprehensive meta-analysis software was used to perform all meta-analyses. The Cochrane Q and the I 2 were used to evaluate heterogeneity of studies. Random effects model was used to combine studies showing heterogeneity of Cochrane Q p  50. Twenty-one studies were included in the final analysis with a total number of 3123 study participants. Treatment outcomes were assessed clinically and parasitologically using World Health Organization guidelines. Adequate clinical and parasitological response was used to assess treatment success at the 28th day. Overall, a significant high treatment success of 92.9% (95% CI 89.1-96.6), p Ethiopia, but associated with high rates of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). However, these ADRs were not serious enough to discontinue anti-malarial treatment. The results of this study suggest that the current anti-malarial medications are effective and safe; however, greater priority should be placed on the discovery of new anti-malarial drugs to achieve successful outcomes as resistance seems inevitable since cases of anti-malarial drug resistance have been reported from other areas of the world.

  13. Efficacy comparison between anti-malarial drugs in Africans presenting with mild malaria in the Central Republic of Africa: a preliminary study

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    Nambei W.S.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance to Plasmodium falciparum contributes to major health problems in central Africa and, as a consequence, poverty. We have analyzed the efficacy of three currently available antimalarial drugs to treat symptomatic, uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in semiimmune adults living in Bangui, Central Republic of Africa. 210 consecutive individuals were enrolled in the survey, of which 45 were excluded. Those having received dihydroartemisin proved significantly less parasitemic than those having received quinine per os or sulfadoxin-pyrimethamin (χ2 = 16.93 ; p < 0.05, and 75 % recovered in two days compared to 57 and 44 %, respectively. The 25 % who did not recover benefited from a second cure with dihydroartemisin, which proved 100 % efficient. The most accurate protocol remains to be established by analyzing clinical and parasitological data and taking into account the economics of the country.

  14. Evaluation of chloroquine as a potent anti-malarial drug: issues of public health policy and healthcare delivery in post-war Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaquoi, Moses B F; Kennedy, Stephen B

    2003-02-01

    Chloroquine-resistant plasmodium falciparum malaria is a serious public health threat that is spreading rapidly across Sub-Saharan Africa. It affects over three quarters (80%) of malarial endemic countries. Of the estimated 300-500 million cases of malaria reported annually, the vast majority of malarial-related morbidities occur among young children in Africa, especially those concentrated in the remote rural areas with inadequate access to appropriate health care services. In Liberia, in vivo studies conducted between 1993 and 2000 observed varying degrees of plasmodium falciparum malaria infections that were resistant to chloroquine, including sulfadiazine-pyrimethamine. As the country emerges from a prolonged civil war, the health care delivery system may not be adequately prepared to implement an effective nation-wide malarial control strategy. As a result, the management of uncomplicated malaria in Liberia poses a significant public health challenge for the government-financed health care delivery system. Therefore, based on extensive literature review, we report the failure of chloroquine as an effective first-line drug for the treatment of uncomplicated plasmodium falciparum malaria in Liberia and recommend that national health efforts be directed at identifying alternative drug(s) to replace it.

  15. The acceptability of mass administrations of anti-malarial drugs as part of targeted malaria elimination in villages along the Thai–Myanmar border

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    Ladda Kajeechiwa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A targeted malaria elimination project, including mass drug administrations (MDA of dihydroartemisinin/piperaquine plus a single low dose primaquine is underway in villages along the Thailand Myanmar border. The intervention has multiple components but the success of the project will depend on the participation of the entire communities. Quantitative surveys were conducted to study reasons for participation or non-participation in the campaign with the aim to identify factors associated with the acceptance and participation in the mass drug administrations. Methods The household heads in four study villages in which MDAs had taken place previously were interviewed between January 2014 and July 2015. Results 174/378 respondents (46 % completed three rounds of three drug doses each, 313/378 (83 % took at least three consecutive doses and 56/378 (15 % did not participate at all in the MDA. The respondents from the two villages (KNH and TPN were much more likely to participate in the MDA than respondents from the other two villages (HKT and TOT. The more compliant villages KNH and TPN had both an appearance of cohesive communities with similar demographic and ethnic backgrounds. By contrast the villages with low participation were unique. One village was fragmented following years of armed conflict and many respondents gave little inclination to cooperate with outsiders. The other village with low MDA coverage was characterised by a high percentage of short-term residents with little interest in community interventions. A universal reason for non-participation in the MDA applicable to all villages was an inadequate understanding of the intervention. Conclusions It is unlikely that community engagement can unite fragmented communities in participating in an intervention, which benefits the community. Understanding the purpose and the reasons underlying the intervention is an important pre-condition for participation. In the

  16. Analysis of genetic mutations associated with anti-malarial drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum from the Democratic Republic of East Timor

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Afonso; Arez, Ana Paula; Cravo, Pedro VL; do Rosário, Virgílio E

    2009-01-01

    Background In response to chloroquine (CQ) resistance, the policy for the first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria in the Democratic Republic of East Timor (DRET) was changed in early 2000. The combination of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) was then introduced for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Methods Blood samples were collected in two different periods (2003–2004 and 2004–2005) from individuals attending hospitals or clinics in six districts of the DRET and checked for Plasmodium falciparum infection. 112 PCR-positive samples were inspected for genetic polymorphisms in the pfcrt, pfmdr1, pfdhfr and pfdhps genes. Different alleles were interrogated for potential associations that could be indicative of non-random linkage. Results Overall prevalence of mutations associated with resistance to CQ and SP was extremely high. The mutant form of Pfcrt (76T) was found to be fixed even after five years of alleged CQ removal. There was a significant increase in the prevalence of the pfdhps 437G mutation (X2 = 31.1; p = 0.001) from the first to second survey periods. A non-random association was observed between pfdhfr51/pfdhps437 (p = 0.001) and pfdhfr 59/pfdhps 437 (p = 0.013) alleles. Conclusion Persistence of CQ-resistant mutants even after supposed drug withdrawal suggests one or all of the following: local P. falciparum may still be inadvertently exposed to the drug, that mutant parasites are being "imported" into the country, and/or reduced genetic diversity and low parasite transmission help maintain mutant haplotypes. The association between pfdhfr51/pfdhps437 and pfdhfr 59/pfdhps 437 alleles indicates that these are undergoing concomitant positive selection in the DRET. PMID:19358729

  17. Analysis of an ordinal outcome in a multicentric randomized controlled trial: application to a 3- arm anti- malarial drug trial in Cameroon

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    Gwét Henri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a burden in Sub-Saharan Countries. The strategy proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO is to systematically compare the therapeutic efficacy of antimalarial drugs using as primary outcome for efficacy, a four-category ordered criterion. The objective of the present work was to analyze the treatment effects on this primary outcome taking into account both a center-effect and individual covariates. A three-arm, three-centre trial of Amodiaquine (AQ, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP and their combination (AQ + SP, conducted by OCEAC-IRD in 2003, in 538 children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, is used as an illustration. Methods Analyses were based on ordinal regression methods, assuming an underlying continuous latent variable, using either the proportional odds (PO or the proportional hazards (PH models. Different algorithms, corresponding to both frequentist- and bayesian-approaches, were implemented using the freely available softwares R and Winbugs, respectively. The performances of the different methods were evaluated on a simulated data set, and then they were applied on the trial data set. Results Good coverage probability and type-1 error for the treatment effect were achieved. When the methods were applied on the trial data set, results highlighted a significance decrease of SP efficacy when compared to AQ (PO, odds ratio [OR] 0.14, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.04-0.57; hazard ratio [HR] 0.605, 95% CI 0.42-0.82, and an equal effectiveness between AQ + SP and AQ (PO, odds ratio [OR] 1.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.25-11.44; hazard ratio [HR] 1.40, 95% CI 0.88-2.18. The body temperature was significantly related to the responses. The patient weights were marginally associated to the clinical response. Conclusion The proposed analyses, based on usual statistical packages, appeared adapted to take into account the full information contained in the four categorical outcome in

  18. Poisoning by anti-malarial drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and tinnitus, a david@tibbutt.co.uk. 1 Chloroquine is a 4-aminoquinolone and comes as a number of salts mainly the phosphate and sulphate. Vasodilatation. •. (flushing sensation more obvious in a pale skin). This may be exacerbated by the vasodilatation caused by the malaria itself and so cause postural (orthostatic) ...

  19. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. Methods A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Results Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Conclusion Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change

  20. The counterfeit anti-malarial is a crime against humanity: a systematic review of the scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunamoorthi, Kaliyaperumal

    2014-06-02

    The counterfeiting of anti-malarials represents a form of attack on global public health in which fake and substandard anti-malarials serve as de facto weapons of mass destruction, particularly in resource-constrained endemic settings, where malaria causes nearly 660,000 preventable deaths and threatens millions of lives annually. It has been estimated that fake anti-malarials contribute to nearly 450,000 preventable deaths every year. This crime against humanity is often underestimated or ignored. This study attempts to describe and characterize the direct and indirect effects of counterfeit anti-malarials on public health, clinical care and socio-economic conditions. A search was performed using key databases, WHO documents, and English language search engines. Of 262 potential articles that were identified using a fixed set of criteria, a convenience sample of 105 appropriate articles was selected for this review. Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is an important tool in the fight against malaria, but a sizable number of patients are unable to afford to this first-line treatment. Consequently, patients tend to procure cheaper anti-malarials, which may be fake or substandard. Forensic palynology reveals that counterfeits originate in Asia. Fragile drug regulations, ineffective law-enforcement agencies and corruption further burden ailing healthcare facilities. Substandard/fake anti-malarials can cause (a) economic sabotage; (b) therapeutic failure; (c) increased risk of the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax; (d) an undermining of trust/confidence in healthcare stakeholders/systems; and, (e) serious side effects or death. Combating counterfeit anti-malarials is a complex task due to limited resources and poor techniques for the detection and identification of fake anti-malarials. This situation calls for sustainable, global, scientific research and policy change. Further, responsible stakeholders in

  1. Atovaquone and quinine anti-malarials inhibit ATP binding cassette transporter activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijpma, Sanna R; van den Heuvel, Jeroen J M W; van der Velden, Maarten; Sauerwein, Robert W; Russel, Frans G M; Koenderink, Jan B

    2014-09-13

    Therapeutic blood plasma concentrations of anti-malarial drugs are essential for successful treatment. Pharmacokinetics of pharmaceutical compounds are dependent of adsorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. ATP binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins are particularly involved in drug deposition, as they are located at membranes of many uptake and excretory organs and at protective barriers, where they export endogenous and xenobiotic compounds, including pharmaceuticals. In this study, a panel of well-established anti-malarial drugs which may affect drug plasma concentrations was tested for interactions with human ABC transport proteins. The interaction of chloroquine, quinine, artemisinin, mefloquine, lumefantrine, atovaquone, dihydroartemisinin and proguanil, with transport activity of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), bile salt export pump (BSEP) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRP) 1-4 were analysed. The effect of the anti-malarials on the ATP-dependent uptake of radio-labelled substrates was measured in membrane vesicles isolated from HEK293 cells overexpressing the ABC transport proteins. A strong and previously undescribed inhibition of BCRP-mediated transport by atovaquone with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.23 μM (95% CI 0.17-0.29 μM) and inhibition of P-gp-mediated transport by quinine with an IC50 of 6.8 μM (95% CI 5.9-7.8 μM) was observed. Furthermore, chloroquine and mefloquine were found to significantly inhibit P-gp-mediated transport. BCRP transport activity was significantly inhibited by all anti-malarials tested, whereas BSEP-mediated transport was not inhibited by any of the compounds. Both MRP1- and MRP3-mediated transport were significantly inhibited by mefloquine. Atovaquone and quinine significantly inhibit BCRP- and P-gp- mediated transport at concentrations within the clinically relevant prophylactic and therapeutic range. Co-administration of these established anti-malarials

  2. Post-marketing surveillance of anti-malarial medicines used in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikowe, Ibrahim; Osei-Safo, Dorcas; Harrison, Jerry J E K; Konadu, Daniel Y; Addae-Mensah, Ivan

    2015-03-25

    The growing concern over the extent of anti-malarial medicine resistance in sub-Saharan Africa, driven largely by administration of sub-therapeutic doses derived from falsified and substandard medicines necessitates regular monitoring of the quality of these medicines to avert any potential public health disaster. This study aimed at determining the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) content of anti-malarial medicines available in Malawi with respect to the manufacturers' label claim and pharmacopoeia specifications. Samples of anti-malarial medicines (112) collected from both licensed and unlicensed markets throughout Malawi were subjected to visual inspection of dosage form and packaging, and registration verification with the regulatory body. Basic (colourimetric) tests were employed to establish the presence and identity of the requisite APIs. Semi-quantitative thin layer chromatography (SQ-TLC) was employed as a quick assay for the verification of identity and estimation of the API content while HPLC assays were used to quantify the APIs. The results were compared with pharmacopoeia specifications and manufacturers' label claims. For combination therapies, a sample was considered to have failed if one or more of its component APIs did not meet pharmacopoeia specifications. There was 86.6% registration status and 100% compliance with visual inspection and basic tests confirming the presence of requisite APIs. The identification test was confirmed by the SQ-TLC assay. API quantification by HPLC assay however, showed that 88.4% (99/112) of the samples failed the quality tests due to the presence of either insufficient or excessive API. The results suggest the existence of substandard anti-malarial medicines in Malawi. The presence of both excessive and insufficient artemisinin-based and non-artemisinin-based API, clearly points to poor adherence to GMP and improper handling during storage or distribution. The country relies heavily on imported anti-malarial

  3. In vitro and in vivo anti-malarial activity of Boerhavia elegans and Solanum surattense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khodakarim Nastaran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an urgent need to identify new anti-malarial drug targets for both prophylaxis and chemotherapy, due to the increasing problem of drug resistance to malaria parasites. In the present study, the aim was to discover novel, effective plant-based extracts for the activity against malaria. Methods Ten plants found in Iran were selected by ethnobotanical survey of medicinal plants. The crude ethanolic extracts were tested for in vitro anti-plasmodial activity against two strains of Plasmodium falciparum: K1 (chloroquine-resistant strain and CY27 (chloroquine-sensitive strain, using the parasite lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH assay. The anti-plasmodial activity of the extracts was also assessed in the 4-day suppressive anti-malarial assay in mice inoculated with Plasmodium berghei (ANKA strain. Crude ethanolic extracts showed good anti-plasmodial activity were further fractionated by partitioning in water and dichloromethane. Results Of 10 plant species assayed, three species: Boerhavia elegans (Choisy, Solanum surattense (Burm.f. and Prosopis juliflora (Sw. showed promising anti-plasmodial activity in vitro (IC50 ≤ 50 μg/ml and in vivo with no toxicity. The dichloromethane fraction of three extracts revealed stronger anti-plasmodial activity than the total extracts. Conclusion Anti-plasmodial activities of extracts of B. elegans and S. surattense are reported for the first time.

  4. Evidence on anti-malarial and diagnostic markets in Cambodia to guide malaria elimination strategies and policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phok, Sochea; Lek, Dysoley

    2017-04-25

    Understanding Cambodia's anti-malarial and diagnostic landscape in 2015 is critical for informing and monitoring strategies and policies as Cambodia moves forward with national efforts to eliminate malaria. The aim of this paper is to present timely and key findings on the public and private sector anti-malarial and diagnostic landscape in Cambodia. This evidence can serve as a baseline benchmark for guiding implementation of national strategies as well as other regional initiatives to address malaria elimination activities. From August 17th to October 1st, 2015, a cross sectional, nationally-representative malaria outlet survey was conducted in Cambodia. A census of all public and private outlets with potential to distribute malaria testing and/or treatment was conducted among 180 communes. An audit was completed for all anti-malarials, malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) and microscopy. A total of 26,664 outlets were screened, and 1303 outlets were eligible and interviewed. Among all screened outlets in the public sector, 75.9% of public health facilities and 67.7% of community health workers stocked both malaria diagnostic testing and a first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Among anti-malarial-stocking private sector outlets, 64.7% had malaria blood testing available, and 70.9% were stocking a first-line ACT. Market share data illustrate that most of the anti-malarials were sold or distributed through the private sector (58.4%), including itinerant drug vendors (23.4%). First-line ACT accounted for the majority of the market share across the public and private sectors (90.3%). Among private sector outlets stocking any anti-malarial, the proportion of outlets with a first-line ACT or RDT was higher among outlets that had reportedly received one or more forms of 'support' (e.g. reportedly received training in the previous year on malaria diagnosis [RDT and/or microscopy] and/or the national treatment guidelines for malaria) compared to outlets

  5. Therapeutic efficacy of artesunate in the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and anti-malarial, drug-resistance marker polymorphisms in populations near the China-Myanmar border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Fang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome after seven-day artesunate monotherapy for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Yingjiang County along the China-Myanmar border and investigate genetic polymorphisms in the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter (pfcrt, multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1, dihydrofolate reductase (pfdhfr, dihydropteroate synthase (pfdhps and ATPase (pfatp6 genes. Methods Patients ≥ one year of age with fever (axillary temperature ≥37.5°C or history of fever and P. falciparum mono-infection were included. Patients received anti-malarial treatment with artesunate (total dose of 16 mg/kg over seven days by directly observed therapy. After a 28-day follow-up, treatment efficacy and effectiveness were assessed based on clinical and parasitological outcomes. Treatment failure was defined as recrudescence of the original parasite and distinguished with new infection confirmed by PCR. Analysis of gene mutation and amplification were performed by nested polymerase chain reaction. Results Sixty-five patients were enrolled; 10 withdrew from the study, and six were lost to follow-up. All but two patients demonstrated adequate clinical and parasitological response; 12 had detectable parasitaemia on day 3. These two patients were confirmed to be new infection by PCR. The efficacy of artesunate was 95.9%. The pfcrt mutation in codon 76 was found in all isolates (100%, and mutations in codons 71 and 72 were found in 4.8% of parasite isolates. No mutation of pfmdr1 (codons 86 or 1246 was found. Among all samples, 5.1% were wild type for pfdhfr, whereas the other samples had mutations in four codons (51, 59, 108 and 164, and mutations in pfdhps (codons 436, 437, 540 and 581 were found in all isolates. No samples had mutations in pfatp6 codons 623 or 769, but two new mutations (N683K and R756K were found in 4.6% and 9.2% of parasite isolates, respectively. Conclusion Plasmodium

  6. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal medicinal products already

  7. Natural products as starting points for future anti-malarial therapies: going back to our roots?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells Timothy NC

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of new anti-malarials are at a crossroads. Fixed dose artemisinin combination therapy is now being used to treat a hundred million children each year, with a cost as low as 30 cents per child, with cure rates of over 95%. However, as with all anti-infective strategies, this triumph brings with it the seeds of its own downfall, the emergence of resistance. It takes ten years to develop a new medicine. New classes of medicines to combat malaria, as a result of infection by Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are urgently needed. Results Natural product scaffolds have been the basis of the majority of current anti-malarial medicines. Molecules such as quinine, lapachol and artemisinin were originally isolated from herbal medicinal products. After improvement with medicinal chemistry and formulation technologies, and combination with other active ingredients, they now make up the current armamentarium of medicines. In recent years advances in screening technologies have allowed testing of millions of compounds from pharmaceutical diversity for anti-malarial activity in cellular assays. These initiatives have resulted in thousands of new sub-micromolar active compounds – starting points for new drug discovery programmes. Against this backdrop, the paucity of potent natural products identified has been disappointing. Now is a good time to reflect on the current approach to screening herbal medicinal products and suggest revisions. Nearly sixty years ago, the Chinese doctor Chen Guofu, suggested natural products should be approached by dao-xing-ni-shi or ‘acting in the reversed order’, starting with observational clinical studies. Natural products based on herbal remedies are in use in the community, and have the potential unique advantage that clinical observational data exist, or can be generated. The first step should be the confirmation and definition of the clinical activity of herbal

  8. Novel in vivo active anti-malarials based on a hydroxy-ethyl-amine scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciana, Claire-Lise; Siegrist, Romain; Aissaoui, Hamed; Marx, Léo; Racine, Sophie; Meyer, Solange; Binkert, Christoph; de Kanter, Ruben; Fischli, Christoph; Wittlin, Sergio; Boss, Christoph

    2013-02-01

    A novel series of anti-malarials, based on a hydroxy-ethyl-amine scaffold, initially identified as peptidomimetic protease inhibitors is described. Combination of the hydroxy-ethyl-amine anti-malarial phramacophore with the known Mannich base pharmacophore of amodiaquine (57) resulted in promising in vivo active novel derivatives. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Kathryn A; Gatakaa, Hellen; Poyer, Stephen; Njogu, Julius; Evance, Illah; Munroe, Erik; Solomon, Tsione; Goodman, Catherine; Hanson, Kara; Zinsou, Cyprien; Akulayi, Louis; Raharinjatovo, Jacky; Arogundade, Ekundayo; Buyungo, Peter; Mpasela, Felton; Adjibabi, Chérifatou Bello; Agbango, Jean Angbalu; Ramarosandratana, Benjamin Fanomezana; Coker, Babajide; Rubahika, Denis; Hamainza, Busiku; Chapman, Steven; Shewchuk, Tanya; Chavasse, Desmond

    2011-10-31

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets) as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT (price of first-line quality-assured ACT ($0.14 [IQR: $0.10, $0.57]) was significantly lower than the most popular treatment (chloroquine, $0.36 [IQR: $0.36, $0.36]). Quality-assured ACT accounted for less than 25% of total anti-malarial volumes; private-sector quality-assured ACT volumes represented less than 6% of the total market share. Most anti-malarials were distributed through the private sector, but often comprised non-artemisinin therapies, and in the DRC and Nigeria, oral artemisinin monotherapies. Provider knowledge of the first-line treatment was significantly lower in the private sector than in the public/not-for-profit sector. These standardized, nationally representative results demonstrate the typically low availability, low market share and high prices of ACT, in the private sector where most anti-malarials

  10. Methods for implementing a medicine outlet survey: lessons from the anti-malarial market

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years an increasing number of public investments and policy changes have been made to improve the availability, affordability and quality of medicines available to consumers in developing countries, including anti-malarials. It is important to monitor the extent to which these interventions are successful in achieving their aims using quantitative data on the supply side of the market. There are a number of challenges related to studying supply, including outlet sampling, gaining provider cooperation and collecting accurate data on medicines. This paper provides guidance on key steps to address these issues when conducting a medicine outlet survey in a developing country context. While the basic principles of good survey design and implementation are important for all surveys, there are a set of specific issues that should be considered when conducting a medicine outlet survey. Methods This paper draws on the authors’ experience of designing and implementing outlet surveys, including the lessons learnt from ACTwatch outlet surveys on anti-malarial retail supply, and other key studies in the field. Key lessons and points of debate are distilled around the following areas: selecting a sample of outlets; techniques for collecting and analysing data on medicine availability, price and sales volumes; and methods for ensuring high quality data in general. Results and conclusions The authors first consider the inclusion criteria for outlets, contrasting comprehensive versus more focused approaches. Methods for developing a reliable sampling frame of outlets are then presented, including use of existing lists, key informants and an outlet census. Specific issues in the collection of data on medicine prices and sales volumes are discussed; and approaches for generating comparable price and sales volume data across products using the adult equivalent treatment dose (AETD) are explored. The paper concludes with advice on practical considerations

  11. Got ACTs? Availability, price, market share and provider knowledge of anti-malarial medicines in public and private sector outlets in six malaria-endemic countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connell Kathryn A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is the first-line malaria treatment throughout most of the malaria-endemic world. Data on ACT availability, price and market share are needed to provide a firm evidence base from which to assess the current situation concerning quality-assured ACT supply. This paper presents supply side data from ACTwatch outlet surveys in Benin, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC, Madagascar, Nigeria, Uganda and Zambia. Methods Between March 2009 and June 2010, nationally representative surveys of outlets providing anti-malarials to consumers were conducted. A census of all outlets with the potential to provide anti-malarials was conducted in clusters sampled randomly. Results 28,263 outlets were censused, 51,158 anti-malarials were audited, and 9,118 providers interviewed. The proportion of public health facilities with at least one first-line quality-assured ACT in stock ranged between 43% and 85%. Among private sector outlets stocking at least one anti-malarial, non-artemisinin therapies, such as chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, were widely available (> 95% of outlets as compared to first-line quality-assured ACT ( Conclusions These standardized, nationally representative results demonstrate the typically low availability, low market share and high prices of ACT, in the private sector where most anti-malarials are accessed, with some exceptions. The results confirm that there is substantial room to improve availability and affordability of ACT treatment in the surveyed countries. The data will also be useful for monitoring the impact of interventions such as the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria.

  12. Development and optimization of a novel 384-well anti-malarial imaging assay validated for high-throughput screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Sandra; Avery, Vicky M

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing occurrence of drug resistance in the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, there is a great need for new and novel anti-malarial drugs. We have developed a 384-well, high-throughput imaging assay for the detection of new anti-malarial compounds, which was initially validated by screening a marine natural product library, and subsequently used to screen more than 3 million data points from a variety of compound sources. Founded on another fluorescence-based P. falciparum growth inhibition assay, the DNA-intercalating dye 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, was used to monitor changes in parasite number. Fluorescent images were acquired on the PerkinElmer Opera High Throughput confocal imaging system and analyzed with a spot detection algorithm using the Acapella data processing software. Further optimization of this assay sought to increase throughput, assay stability, and compatibility with our high-throughput screening equipment platforms. The assay typically yielded Z'-factor values of 0.5-0.6, with signal-to-noise ratios of 12.

  13. The potential of anti-malarial compounds derived from African medicinal plants, part I: a pharmacological evaluation of alkaloids and terpenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoa Onguéné, Pascal; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Lifongo, Lydia Likowo; Ndom, Jean Claude; Sippl, Wolfgang; Mbaze, Luc Meva'a

    2013-12-13

    Traditional medicine caters for about 80% of the health care needs of many rural populations around the world, especially in developing countries. In addition, plant-derived compounds have played key roles in drug discovery. Malaria is currently a public health concern in many countries in the world due to factors such as chemotherapy faced by resistance, poor hygienic conditions, poorly managed vector control programmes and no approved vaccines. In this review, an attempt has been made to assess the value of African medicinal plants for drug discovery by discussing the anti-malarial virtue of the derived phytochemicals that have been tested by in vitro and in vivo assays. This survey was focused on pure compounds derived from African flora which have exhibited anti-malarial properties with activities ranging from "very active" to "weakly active". However, only the compounds which showed anti-malarial activities from "very active" to "moderately active" are discussed in this review. The activity of 278 compounds, mainly alkaloids, terpenoids, flavonoids, coumarines, phenolics, polyacetylenes, xanthones, quinones, steroids, and lignans have been discussed. The first part of this review series covers the activity of 171 compounds belonging to the alkaloid and terpenoid classes. Data available in the literature indicated that African flora hold an enormous potential for the development of phytomedicines for malaria.

  14. An ethnobotanical study of anti-malarial plants among indigenous people on the upper Negro River in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frausin, Gina; Hidalgo, Ari de Freitas; Lima, Renata Braga Souza; Kinupp, Valdely Ferreira; Ming, Lin Chau; Pohlit, Adrian Martin; Milliken, William

    2015-11-04

    material available, the patient's age (children and adults) and the local expert. The treatment time varies from a single dose to up to several weeks. Most anti-malarial plants are domesticated or grow spontaneously. They are grown in home gardens, open areas near the communities, clearings and secondary forests, and wild species grow in areas of seasonally flooded wetlands and terra firme ('solid ground') forest, in some cases in locations that are hard to access. Traditional knowledge of plants was found to be falling into disuse presumably as a consequence of the local official health services that treat malaria in the communities using commercial drugs. Despite this, some species are used in the prevention of this disease and also in the recovery after using conventional anti-malarial drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Anti-malarial effect of 1-(N-acetyl-6-aminohexyl-3-hydroxy-2-methylpyridin-4-one and green tea extract on erythrocyte-stage Plasmodium berghei in mice

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    Phitsinee Thipubon

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: CM1 would be effective per se and synergize with PYR in inhibiting growth of murine malaria parasites, possibly by limiting iron supply from plasma transferrin and host PRBC cytoplasm, and chelating catalytic iron cstitutive in parasites’ mitochondrial cytochromes and cytoplasmic ribonucleotide reductase. CM1 would be a promising adjuvant to enhance PYR anti-malarial activity and minimize the drug resistance.

  16. Accessibility, availability and affordability of anti-malarials in a rural district in Kenya after implementation of a national subsidy scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simiyu Chrispinus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor access to prompt and effective treatment for malaria contributes to high mortality and severe morbidity. In Kenya, it is estimated that only 12% of children receive anti-malarials for their fever within 24 hours. The first point of care for many fevers is a local medicine retailer, such as a pharmacy or chemist. The role of the medicine retailer as an important distribution point for malaria medicines has been recognized and several different strategies have been used to improve the services that these retailers provide. Despite these efforts, many mothers still purchase ineffective drugs because they are less expensive than effective artemisinin combination therapy (ACT. One strategy that is being piloted in several countries is an international subsidy targeted at anti-malarials supplied through the retail sector. The goal of this strategy is to make ACT as affordable as ineffective alternatives. The programme, called the Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria was rolled out in Kenya in August 2010. Methods In December 2010, the affordability and accessibility of malaria medicines in a rural district in Kenya were evaluated using a complete census of all public and private facilities, chemists, pharmacists, and other malaria medicine retailers within the Webuye Demographic Surveillance Area. Availability, types, and prices of anti-malarials were assessed. There are 13 public or mission facilities and 97 medicine retailers (registered and unregistered. Results The average distance from a home to the nearest public health facility is 2 km, but the average distance to the nearest medicine retailer is half that. Quinine is the most frequently stocked anti-malarial (61% of retailers. More medicine retailers stocked sulphadoxine-pyramethamine (SP; 57% than ACT (44%. Eleven percent of retailers stocked AMFm subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (AL. No retailers had chloroquine in stock and only five were selling artemisinin

  17. Mass anti-malarial administration in western Cambodia: a qualitative study of factors affecting coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pell, Christopher; Tripura, Rupam; Nguon, Chea; Cheah, Phaikyeong; Davoeung, Chan; Heng, Chhouen; Dara, Lim; Sareth, Ma; Dondorp, Arjen; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Peto, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    Mass anti-malarial administration has been proposed as a key component of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategy in the Greater Mekong sub-Region. Its effectiveness depends on high levels of coverage in the target population. This article explores the factors that influenced mass

  18. Mass anti-malarial administration in western Cambodia: a qualitative study of factors affecting coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Christopher; Tripura, Rupam; Nguon, Chea; Cheah, Phaikyeong; Davoeung, Chan; Heng, Chhouen; Dara, Lim; Sareth, Ma; Dondorp, Arjen; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Peto, Thomas J

    2017-05-19

    Mass anti-malarial administration has been proposed as a key component of the Plasmodium falciparum malaria elimination strategy in the Greater Mekong sub-Region. Its effectiveness depends on high levels of coverage in the target population. This article explores the factors that influenced mass anti-malarial administration coverage within a clinical trial in Battambang Province, western Cambodia. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews and focus group discussions with villagers, in-depth interviews with study staff, trial drop-outs and refusers, and observations in the communities. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and translated from Khmer to English for qualitative content analysis using QSR NVivo. Malaria was an important health concern and villagers reported a demand for malaria treatment. This was in spite of a fall in incidence over the previous decade and a lack of familiarity with asymptomatic malaria. Participants generally understood the overall study aim and were familiar with study activities. Comprehension of the study rationale was however limited. After the first mass anti-malarial administration, seasonal health complaints that participants attributed to the anti-malarial as "side effects" contributed to a decrease of coverage in round two. Staff therefore adapted the community engagement approach, bringing to prominence local leaders in village meetings. This contributed to a subsequent increase in coverage. Future mass anti-malarial administration must consider seasonal disease patterns and the importance of local leaders taking prominent roles in community engagement. Further research is needed to investigate coverage in scenarios that more closely resemble implementation i.e. without participation incentives, blood sampling and free healthcare.

  19. Anticancer Effect of AntiMalarial Artemisinin Compounds | Das ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artemisinins seem to regulate key factors such as nuclear factor‑kappa B, survivin, NOXA, hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α, and BMI‑1, involving multiple pathways that may affect drug response, drug interactions, drug resistance, and associated parameters upon normal cells. Newer synthetic artemisinins have been developed ...

  20. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard Alan E; Dorsey Grant; Gupta Vinay; Rosenthal Philip J; Greenhouse Bryan

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary elec...

  1. In Vivo anti-malarial activities of Clerodendrum myricoides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Malaria caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum is an acute disease which kills an estimated 863,000 people per year according to the WHO report of 2009. The fight against malaria is faced with the occurrence of widespread resistance of P. falciparum. The search for plant-derived antimalarial drugs ...

  2. Synthesis, and anti-malarial screening, of 1-diethylamino-4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Artemisinin and its derivatives have become antimalarial drugs of choice because they are effective against most stages in the life cycle of plasmodium and are safe for all, including pregnant women. World Health Organisation ... The target compound also had an LD50 of 330 mg/kg in mice by the oral route. A single dose ...

  3. Several Human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, Structurally Related to Roscovitine, As New Anti-Malarial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Houzé

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Africa, malaria kills one child each minute. It is also responsible for about one million deaths worldwide each year. Plasmodium falciparum, is the protozoan responsible for the most lethal form of the disease, with resistance developing against the available anti-malarial drugs. Among newly proposed anti-malaria targets, are the P. falciparum cyclin-dependent kinases (PfCDKs. There are involved in different stages of the protozoan growth and development but share high sequence homology with human cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. We previously reported the synthesis of CDKs inhibitors that are structurally-related to (R-roscovitine, a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine, and they showed activity against neuronal diseases and cancers. In this report, we describe the synthesis and the characterization of new CDK inhibitors, active in reducing the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (3D7 and 7G8 strains. Six compounds are more potent inhibitors than roscovitine, and three exhibited IC50 values close to 1 µM for both 3D7 and 7G8 strains. Although, such molecules do inhibit P. falciparum growth, they require further studies to improve their selectivity for PfCDKs.

  4. Longitudinal in vitro surveillance of Plasmodium falciparum sensitivity to common anti-malarials in Thailand between 1994 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug and multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria has existed in Thailand for several decades. Furthermore, Thailand serves as a sentinel for drug-resistant malaria within the Greater Mekong sub-region. However, the drug resistance situation is highly dynamic, changing quickly over time. Here parasite in vitro drug sensitivity is reported for artemisinin derivatives, mefloquine, chloroquine and quinine, across Thailand. Methods Blood was drawn from patients infected with P. falciparum in seven sentinel provinces along Thai international borders with Cambodia, Myanmar, Laos, and Malaysia. In vitro parasite sensitivity was tested using the World Health Organization’s microtest (mark III (between 1994 and 2002 and the histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP2-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (in 2010. Following World Health Organization protocol, at least 30 isolates were collected for each province and year represented in this study. Where possible, t-tests were used to test for significant differences. Results There appears to be little variation across study sites with regard to parasite sensitivity to chloroquine. Quinine resistance appears to have been rising prior to 1997, but has subsequently decreased. Mefloquine sensitivity appears high across the provinces, especially along the north-western border with Myanmar and the eastern border with Cambodia. Finally, the data suggest that parasite sensitivity to artemisinin and its derivatives is significantly higher in provinces along the north-western border with Myanmar. Conclusions Parasite sensitivity to anti-malarials in Thailand is highly variable over time and largely mirrors official drug use policy. The findings with regard to reduced sensitivity to artemisinin derivatives are supported by recent reports of reduced parasite clearance associated with artemisinin. This trend is alarming since artemisinin is considered the last defence against malaria. Continued

  5. In vivo validation of anti-malarial activity of crude extracts of Terminalia macroptera, a Malian medicinal plant

    OpenAIRE

    Haidara, Mahamane; Haddad, Mohamed; Denou, Adama; Marti, Guillaume; Bourgeade-Delmas, Sandra; Sanogo, Rokia; Bourdy, Geneviève; Aubouy, Agnès

    2018-01-01

    Background Plasmodium falciparum malaria is still one of the most deadly pathology worldwide. Efficient treatment is jeopardized by parasite resistance to artemisinin and its derivatives, and by poor access to treatment in endemic regions. Anti-malarial traditional remedies still offer new tracks for identifying promising antiplasmodial molecules, and a way to ensure that all people have access to care. The present study aims to validate the traditional use of Terminalia macroptera, a Malian ...

  6. In vivo validation of anti-malarial activity of crude extracts of Terminalia macroptera, a Malian medicinal plant

    OpenAIRE

    Haidara, M.; Haddad, Mohamed; Denou, A.; Marti, G.; Bourgeade-Delmas, Sandra; Sanogo, R.; Bourdy, Geneviève; Aubouy, Agnès

    2018-01-01

    Background: Plasmodium falciparum malaria is still one of the most deadly pathology worldwide. Efficient treatment is jeopardized by parasite resistance to artemisinin and its derivatives, and by poor access to treatment in endemic regions. Anti-malarial traditional remedies still offer new tracks for identifying promising antiplasmodial molecules, and a way to ensure that all people have access to care. The present study aims to validate the traditional use of Terminalia macroptera, a Malian...

  7. Communicating the AMFm message: exploring the effect of communication and training interventions on private for-profit provider awareness and knowledge related to a multi-country anti-malarial subsidy intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria (AMFm), implemented at national scale in eight African countries or territories, subsidized quality-assured artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) and included communication campaigns to support implementation and promote appropriate anti-malarial use. This paper reports private for-profit provider awareness of key features of the AMFm programme, and changes in provider knowledge of appropriate malaria treatment. Methods This study had a non-experimental design based on nationally representative surveys of outlets stocking anti-malarials before (2009/10) and after (2011) the AMFm roll-out. Results Based on data from over 19,500 outlets, results show that in four of eight settings, where communication campaigns were implemented for 5–9 months, 76%-94% awareness of the AMFm ‘green leaf’ logo, 57%-74% awareness of the ACT subsidy programme, and 52%-80% awareness of the correct recommended retail price (RRP) of subsidized ACT were recorded. However, in the remaining four settings where communication campaigns were implemented for three months or less, levels were substantially lower. In six of eight settings, increases of at least 10 percentage points in private for-profit providers’ knowledge of the correct first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria were seen; and in three of these the levels of knowledge achieved at endline were over 80%. Conclusions The results support the interpretation that, in addition to the availability of subsidized ACT, the intensity of communication campaigns may have contributed to the reported levels of AMFm-related awareness and knowledge among private for-profit providers. Future subsidy programmes for anti-malarials or other treatments should similarly include communication activities. PMID:24495691

  8. Multiple treatment comparisons in a series of anti-malarial trials with an ordinal primary outcome and repeated treatment evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youdom Solange

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT are widely used in African countries, including Cameroon. Between 2005 and 2007, five randomized studies comparing different treatment arms among artesunate-amodiaquine and other ACT were conducted in Cameroonian children aged two to 60 months who had uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria. In these studies, the categorical criterion proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO to assess the relative effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs was repeatedly evaluated on Days 14, 21 and 28 after treatment initiation. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of different treatments on this repeated ordinal outcome, hence using the fully available information. Methods The quantitative synthesis was based on individual patient data. Due to the incomplete block design concerning treatment arms between different trials, a mixed treatment comparison (MTC meta-analysis approach was adopted. The repeated ordinal outcome was modelled through a latent variable, as a proportional odds mixed model with trial, period and treatment arms as covariates. The model was further complexified to account for the variance heterogeneity, and the individual log-residual variance was modelled as a linear mixed model, as well. The effects of individual covariates at inclusion, such as parasitaemia, fever, gender and weight, were also tested. Model parameters were estimated using a Bayesian approach via the WinBUGS software. After selecting the best model using Deviance Information Criterion (DIC, mixed treatment comparisons were based on the estimated treatment effects. Results Modeling the residual variance improved the model ability to adjust the data. The results showed that, compared to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ, dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHPP was significantly more efficacious. Artesunate-chlorproguanil-dapsone (ASCD was less efficacious than artesunate

  9. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary electrophoresis from randomized trials of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) vs. dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) performed in two areas of Uganda: Kanungu, where transmission is moderate, and Apac, where transmission is very high. Both gel and capillary methods evaluated polymorphic regions of the merozoite surface protein 1 and 2 and glutamine rich protein genes. Results Capillary electrophoresis detected more alleles and provided higher discriminatory power than agarose gel electrophoresis at both study sites. There was only moderate agreement between classification of outcomes with the two methods in Kanungu (kappa = 0.66) and poor agreement in Apac (kappa = 0.24). Overall efficacy results were similar when using gel vs. capillary methods in Kanungu (42-day risk of treatment failure for AL: 6.9% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.4; DP 2.4% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.5). However, the measured risk of recrudescence was significantly higher when using gel vs. capillary electrophoresis in Apac (risk of treatment failure for AL: 17.0% vs. 10.7%, p = 0.02; DP: 8.5% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.03). Risk differences between AL and DP were not significantly different whether gel or capillary methods were used. Conclusions Genotyping with gel electrophoresis overestimates the risk of recrudescence in anti-malarial trials performed in areas of high transmission intensity. Capillary electrophoresis provides more accurate outcomes for such trials and should be performed when possible. In areas of moderate transmission, gel electrophoresis

  10. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay; Dorsey, Grant; Hubbard, Alan E; Rosenthal, Philip J; Greenhouse, Bryan

    2010-01-15

    Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure) or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary electrophoresis from randomized trials of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) vs. dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP) performed in two areas of Uganda: Kanungu, where transmission is moderate, and Apac, where transmission is very high. Both gel and capillary methods evaluated polymorphic regions of the merozoite surface protein 1 and 2 and glutamine rich protein genes. Capillary electrophoresis detected more alleles and provided higher discriminatory power than agarose gel electrophoresis at both study sites. There was only moderate agreement between classification of outcomes with the two methods in Kanungu (kappa = 0.66) and poor agreement in Apac (kappa = 0.24). Overall efficacy results were similar when using gel vs. capillary methods in Kanungu (42-day risk of treatment failure for AL: 6.9% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.4; DP 2.4% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.5). However, the measured risk of recrudescence was significantly higher when using gel vs. capillary electrophoresis in Apac (risk of treatment failure for AL: 17.0% vs. 10.7%, p = 0.02; DP: 8.5% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.03). Risk differences between AL and DP were not significantly different whether gel or capillary methods were used. Genotyping with gel electrophoresis overestimates the risk of recrudescence in anti-malarial trials performed in areas of high transmission intensity. Capillary electrophoresis provides more accurate outcomes for such trials and should be performed when possible. In areas of moderate transmission, gel electrophoresis appears adequate to estimate comparative

  11. Gel versus capillary electrophoresis genotyping for categorizing treatment outcomes in two anti-malarial trials in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbard Alan E

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular genotyping is performed in anti-malarial trials to determine whether recurrent parasitaemia after therapy represents a recrudescence (treatment failure or new infection. The use of capillary instead of agarose gel electrophoresis for genotyping offers technical advantages, but it is unclear whether capillary electrophoresis will result in improved classification of anti-malarial treatment outcomes. Methods Samples were genotyped using both gel and capillary electrophoresis from randomized trials of artemether-lumefantrine (AL vs. dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DP performed in two areas of Uganda: Kanungu, where transmission is moderate, and Apac, where transmission is very high. Both gel and capillary methods evaluated polymorphic regions of the merozoite surface protein 1 and 2 and glutamine rich protein genes. Results Capillary electrophoresis detected more alleles and provided higher discriminatory power than agarose gel electrophoresis at both study sites. There was only moderate agreement between classification of outcomes with the two methods in Kanungu (kappa = 0.66 and poor agreement in Apac (kappa = 0.24. Overall efficacy results were similar when using gel vs. capillary methods in Kanungu (42-day risk of treatment failure for AL: 6.9% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.4; DP 2.4% vs. 2.9%, p = 0.5. However, the measured risk of recrudescence was significantly higher when using gel vs. capillary electrophoresis in Apac (risk of treatment failure for AL: 17.0% vs. 10.7%, p = 0.02; DP: 8.5% vs. 3.4%, p = 0.03. Risk differences between AL and DP were not significantly different whether gel or capillary methods were used. Conclusions Genotyping with gel electrophoresis overestimates the risk of recrudescence in anti-malarial trials performed in areas of high transmission intensity. Capillary electrophoresis provides more accurate outcomes for such trials and should be performed when possible. In areas of moderate transmission

  12. Site-specific integration and expression of an anti-malarial gene in transgenic Anopheles gambiae significantly reduces Plasmodium infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M Meredith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have a devastating impact on global health and this is worsening due to difficulties with existing control measures and climate change. Genetically modified mosquitoes that are refractory to disease transmission are seen as having great potential in the delivery of novel control strategies. Historically the genetic modification of insects has relied upon transposable elements which have many limitations despite their successful use. To circumvent these limitations the Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase system has been successfully adapted for site-specific transgene integration in insects. Here, we present the first site-specific transformation of Anopheles gambiae, the principal vector of human malaria. Mosquitoes were initially engineered to incorporate the phiC31 targeting site at a defined genomic location. A second phase of genetic modification then achieved site-specific integration of Vida3, a synthetic anti-malarial gene. Expression of Vida3, specifically in the midgut of bloodfed females, offered consistent and significant protection against Plasmodium yoelii nigeriensis, reducing average parasite intensity by 85%. Similar protection was observed against Plasmodium falciparum in some experiments, although protection was inconsistent. In the fight against malaria, it is imperative to establish a broad repertoire of both anti-malarial effector genes and tissue-specific promoters for their expression, enabling those offering maximum effect with minimum fitness cost to be identified. In the future, this technology will allow effective comparisons and informed choices to be made, potentially leading to complete transmission blockade.

  13. Docking Based 3D-QSAR Study of Tricyclic Guanidine Analogues of Batzelladine K as anti-malarial agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nafees; Anwar, Sirajudheen; Thet Htar, Thet

    2017-06-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum Lactate Dehydrogenase enzyme (PfLDH) catalyzes inter-conversion of pyruvate to lactate during glycolysis producing the energy required for parasitic growth. The PfLDH has been studied as a potential molecular target for development of anti-malarial agents. In an attempt to find the potent inhibitor of PfLDH, we have used Discovery studio to perform molecular docking in the active binding pocket of PfLDH by CDOCKER, followed by three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies of tricyclic guanidine batzelladine compounds, which were previously synthesized in our laboratory. Docking studies showed that there is a very strong correlation between in silico and in vitro results. Based on docking results, a highly predictive 3D-QSAR model was developed with q2 of 0.516. The model has predicted r2 of 0.91 showing that predicted IC50 values are in good agreement with experimental IC50 values. The results obtained from this study revealed the developed model can be used to design new anti-malarial compounds based on tricyclic guanidine derivatives and to predict activities of new inhibitors.

  14. Reduction of anti-malarial consumption after rapid diagnostic tests implementation in Dar es Salaam: a before-after and cluster randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swai Ndeniria

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Presumptive treatment of all febrile patients with anti-malarials leads to massive over-treatment. The aim was to assess the effect of implementing malaria rapid diagnostic tests (mRDTs on prescription of anti-malarials in urban Tanzania. Methods The design was a prospective collection of routine statistics from ledger books and cross-sectional surveys before and after intervention in randomly selected health facilities (HF in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The participants were all clinicians and their patients in the above health facilities. The intervention consisted of training and introduction of mRDTs in all three hospitals and in six HF. Three HF without mRDTs were selected as matched controls. The use of routine mRDT and treatment upon result was advised for all patients complaining of fever, including children under five years of age. The main outcome measures were: (1 anti-malarial consumption recorded from routine statistics in ledger books of all HF before and after intervention; (2 anti-malarial prescription recorded during observed consultations in cross-sectional surveys conducted in all HF before and 18 months after mRDT implementation. Results Based on routine statistics, the amount of artemether-lumefantrine blisters used post-intervention was reduced by 68% (95%CI 57-80 in intervention and 32% (9-54 in control HF. For quinine vials, the reduction was 63% (54-72 in intervention and an increase of 2.49 times (1.62-3.35 in control HF. Before-and-after cross-sectional surveys showed a similar decrease from 75% to 20% in the proportion of patients receiving anti-malarial treatment (Risk ratio 0.23, 95%CI 0.20-0.26. The cluster randomized analysis showed a considerable difference of anti-malarial prescription between intervention HF (22% and control HF (60% (Risk ratio 0.30, 95%CI 0.14-0.70. Adherence to test result was excellent since only 7% of negative patients received an anti-malarial. However, antibiotic

  15. In vivo validation of anti-malarial activity of crude extracts of Terminalia macroptera, a Malian medicinal plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidara, Mahamane; Haddad, Mohamed; Denou, Adama; Marti, Guillaume; Bourgeade-Delmas, Sandra; Sanogo, Rokia; Bourdy, Geneviève; Aubouy, Agnès

    2018-02-05

    Plasmodium falciparum malaria is still one of the most deadly pathology worldwide. Efficient treatment is jeopardized by parasite resistance to artemisinin and its derivatives, and by poor access to treatment in endemic regions. Anti-malarial traditional remedies still offer new tracks for identifying promising antiplasmodial molecules, and a way to ensure that all people have access to care. The present study aims to validate the traditional use of Terminalia macroptera, a Malian plant used in traditional medicine. Terminalia macroptera was collected in Mali. Leaves (TML) and roots ethanolic extracts (TMR) were prepared and tested at 2000 mg/kg for in vivo acute toxicity in Albino Swiss mice. Antiplasmodial activity of the extracts was assessed against a chloroquine resistant strain P. falciparum (FcB1) in vitro. In vivo, anti-malarial efficacy was assessed by a 4-day suppressive test at 100 mg/kg in two malaria murine models of uncomplicated malaria (Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi infection) and cerebral malaria (Plasmodium berghei strain ANKA infection). Constituents of TMR were characterized by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry. Top ranked compounds were putatively identified using plant databases and in silico fragmentation pattern. Lethal dose of TML and TMR were greater than 2000 mg/kg in Albino Swiss mice. According to the OECD's Globally Harmonized System of Classification, both extracts are non-toxic orally. Antiplasmodial activity of T. macroptera extracts was confirmed in vitro against P. falciparum FcB1 strain with IC50 values of 1.2 and 1.6 µg/mL for TML and TMR, respectively. In vivo, oral administration of TML and TMR induced significant reduction of parasitaemia (37.2 and 46.4% respectively) in P. chabaudi chabaudi infected mice at the 7th day of infection compared to untreated mice. In the cerebral malaria experimental model, mice treated with TMR and TML presented respectively 50 and 66

  16. Combination treatment of glioblastoma multiforme cell lines with the anti-malarial artesunate and the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor OSI-774.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efferth, Thomas; Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Gebhart, Erich; Halatsch, Marc-Eric

    2004-05-01

    New drugs and combination modalities for otherwise non-responsive brain tumors are urgently required. The anti-malarial artesunate (ART) and the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor OSI-774 reveal profound cytotoxic activity. The effectiveness of a combination treatment and the underlying molecular determinants of cellular response are unknown. In the present investigation, we studied ART and OSI-774 in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines. Supra-additive inhibition of cell growth was observed in U-87MG.DeltaEGFR cells transduced with a deletion-mutant constitutively active EGFR gene, while additive effects were present in cells transduced with wild-type EGFR (U-87MG.WT-2N), kinase-deficient EGFR (U-87MG.DK-2N), mock vector controls (U-87MG.LUX), or non-transduced parental U-87MG cells. Among nine other non-transduced GBM cell lines, supra-additive effects were found in two cell lines (G-210GM, G-599GM), while ART and OSI-774 acted in an additive manner in the other seven cell lines (G-211GM, G-750GM, G-1163GM, G-1187GM, G-1265GM, G-1301GM, and G-1408GM). Sub-additive or antagonistic effects were not observed. Genomic gains and losses of genetic material in the non-transduced cell lines as assessed by comparative genomic hybridization were correlated with the IC(50) values for ART and OSI-774 and subsequently subjected to hierarchical cluster analysis and cluster image mapping. A genomic profile of imbalances was detected that predicted cellular response to ART and OSI-774. The genes located at the genomic imbalances of interest may serve as candidate resistance genes of GBM cells towards ART and OSI-774. In conclusion, the combination treatment of ART and OSI-774 resulted in an increased growth inhibition of GBM cell lines as compared to each drug alone.

  17. Effects of anti-malarial alkaloids on the sperm properties and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... saponins and quinine hydrochloride. Contraception, 50: 185-190. Heller CG, Clemont Y (1963). Spermatogenesis in man: An estimation of its duration. Science 140: 184-186. Isah AO, Ohaju-Obodo J, Isah EC, Ozemoya O (1997). Drug use in a. Nigerian City Hospital. Pharmacoepidemiol. Drug Safety, 6: ...

  18. Community participation during two mass anti-malarial administrations in Cambodia: lessons from a joint workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peto, Thomas J.; Debackere, Mark; Etienne, William; Vernaeve, Lieven; Tripura, Rupam; Falq, Gregoire; Davoeung, Chan; Nguon, Chea; Rekol, Huy; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Dondorp, Arjen M.; Sanann, Nou; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; de Smet, Martin; Pell, Christopher; Kindermans, Jean-Marie

    2018-01-01

    Two mass drug administrations (MDA) against falciparum malaria were conducted in 2015-16, one as operational research in northern Cambodia, and the other as a clinical trial in western Cambodia. During an April 2017 workshop in Phnom Penh the field teams from Medecins Sans Frontieres and the

  19. Anti-malarial activity of a non-piperidine library of next-generation quinoline methanols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The clinical utility for mefloquine has been eroded due to its association with adverse neurological effects. Better-tolerated alternatives are required. The objective of the present study was the identification of lead compounds that are as effective as mefloquine, but exhibit physiochemical properties likely to render them less susceptible to passage across the blood-brain barrier. Methods A library of drug-like non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. These compounds are diverse in structure and physiochemical properties. They were screened in appropriate in vitro assays and evaluated in terms of their potential as lead compounds. The correlation of specific structural attributes and physiochemical properties with activity was assessed. Results The most potent analogs were low molecular weight unconjugated secondary amines with no heteroatoms in their side-chains. However, these compounds were more metabolically labile and permeable than mefloquine. In terms of physiochemical properties, lower polar surface area, lower molecular weight, more freely rotatable bonds and fewer H-bond acceptors were associated with greater potency. There was no such relationship between activity and LogP, LogD or the number of hydrogen bond donors (HBDs). The addition of an H-bond donor to the side-chain yielded a series of active diamines, which were as metabolically stable as mefloquine but showed reduced permeability. Conclusions A drug-like library of non-piperidine analogs of mefloquine was synthesized. From amongst this library an active lead series of less permeable, but metabolically stable, diamines was identified. PMID:20149249

  20. Reverse pharmacology for developing an anti-malarial phytomedicine. The example of Argemone mexicana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Simoes-Pires

    2014-12-01

    Reverse pharmacology, also called bedside-to-bench, is a research approach based on the traditional knowledge and relates to reversing the classical laboratory to clinic pathway to a clinic to laboratory practice. It is a trans-disciplinary approach focused on traditional knowledge, experimental observations and clinical experiences. This paper is an overview of the reverse pharmacology approach applied to the decoction of Argemone mexicana, used as an antimalarial traditional medicine in Mali. A. mexicana appeared as the most effective traditional medicine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Mali, and the clinical efficacy of the decoction was comparable to artesunate–amodiaquine as previously published. Four stages of the reverse pharmacology process will be described here with a special emphasis on the results for stage 4. Briefly, allocryptopine, protopine and berberine were isolated through bioguided fractionation, and had their identity confirmed by spectroscopic analysis. The three alkaloids showed antiparasitic activity in vitro, of which allocryptopine and protopine were selective towards Plasmodium falciparum. Furthermore, the amount of the three active alkaloids in the decoction was determined by quantitative NMR, and preliminary in vivo assays were conducted. On the basis of these results, the reverse pharmacology approach is discussed and further pharmacokinetic studies appear to be necessary in order to determine whether these alkaloids can be considered as phytochemical markers for quality control and standardization of an improved traditional medicine made with this plant.

  1. A pilot study on quality of artesunate and amodiaquine tablets used in the fishing community of Tema, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affum, Andrews O; Lowor, Samuel; Osae, Shiloh D; Dickson, Adomako; Gyan, Benjamin A; Tulasi, Delali

    2013-06-28

    The ineffectiveness of artesunate and amodiaquine tablets in malaria treatment remains a health burden to WHO and governments of malaria-endemic countries, including Ghana. The proliferation of illegitimate anti-malarial drugs and its use by patients is of primary concern to international and local drug regulatory agencies because such drugs are known to contribute to the development of the malaria-resistant parasites in humans. No data exist on quality of these drugs in the fishing village communities in Ghana although the villagers are likely users of such drugs. A pilot study on the quality of anti-malarial tablets in circulation during the major fishing season at a malarious fishing village located along the coast of Tema in southern Ghana was determined. Blisterpacks of anti-malarial tablets were randomly sampled. The International Pharmacopoeia and Global Pharma Health Fund Minilab protocols were used to assess the quality of anti-malarial tablets per blisterpacks allegedly manufactured by Guilin Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, China (GPCL) and Letap Pharmaceuticals Ltd, Ghana (LPL) and sold in chemical sales outlets at Kpone-on-Sea. Ferric chloride and cobaltous thiocyanate tests confirmed the presence of active ingredients in the tablets. A confirmatory test for the active ingredient was achieved with artesunate (ICRS1409) and amodiaquine (ICRS0209) reference standards. A high performance liquid chromatography analysis confirmed the amount of artesunate found in tablets. Based on the International Pharmacopoeia acceptable range of 96/98 to 102% for genuine artesunate per tablet, 10% [relative standard deviation (RSD): 3.2%] of field-selected artesunate blisterpack per tablets manufactured by GPCL, and 50% (RSD: 5.1%) of a similar package per tablet by LPL, passed the titrimetric test. However, 100% (RSD: 2.2%) of amodiaquine blisterpack per tablet by GPCL were found to be within the International Pharmacopeia acceptable range of 90 to 110% for genuine amodiaquine in

  2. Combined effect of rifampicin-induced P-glycoprotein expression and lipopolysaccharide-induced intestinal sepsis on the effective permeability and pharmacokinetics of an anti-malarial candidate CDRI 97/78 in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yeshwant; Hidau, Mahendra Kumar; Krishna, Jampala; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2015-01-01

    1. The study aimed to investigate the influences on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of an anti-malarial drug 97/78 in rats pretreated with orally administered rifampicin and bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 2. In-situ intestinal absorption studies were conducted on rats pretreated with rifampicin and LPS or both to estimate effective permeability (Peff) of 97/78. In-vivo studies were then conducted to explore 97/78 PK profile under these conditions. In-situ studies revealed that Peff value decreased to 64% (2.7 ± 0.6) × 10(-4 )cm/s in rats pretreated with rifampicin. This decrease was further enhanced very significantly to 4.5% (0.19 ± 0.03) × 10(-4 )cm/s in rats pretreated both with rifampicin and LPS (p97/78 in rifampicin-pretreated rats. This decrease was further augmented to 12-fold upon rifampicin and LPS pretreatment. 3. Orally administered rifampicin decreased the concentration of 97/78 in circulation. This decrease was further enhanced significantly to a very low level by LPS-induced intestinal sepsis.

  3. What happened to anti-malarial markets after the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria pilot? Trends in ACT availability, price and market share from five African countries under continuation of the private sector co-payment mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougher, Sarah; Hanson, Kara; Goodman, Catherine

    2017-04-25

    The private sector supplies anti-malarial treatment for large proportions of patients in sub-Saharan Africa. Following the large-scale piloting of the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria (AMFm) from 2010 to 2011, a private sector co-payment mechanism (CPM) provided continuation of private sector subsidies for quality-assured artemisinin combination therapies (QAACT). This article analyses for the first time the extent to which improvements in private sector QAACT supply and distribution observed during the AMFm were maintained or intensified during continuation of the CPM through 2015 in Kenya, Madagascar, Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda using repeat cross-sectional outlet survey data. QAACT market share in all five countries increased during the AMFm period (p co-payment mechanism for QAACT implemented at national scale for 5 years was associated with positive and sustained improvements in QAACT availability, price and market share in Nigeria, Tanzania and Uganda, with more mixed results in Kenya, and few improvements in Madagascar. The subsidy mechanism as implemented over time across countries was not sufficient on its own to achieve optimal QAACT uptake. Supporting interventions to address continued availability and distribution of non-artemisinin therapies, and to create demand for QAACT among providers and consumers need to be effectively implemented to realize the full potential of this subsidy mechanism. Furthermore, there is need for comprehensive market assessments to identify contemporary market barriers to high coverage with both confirmatory testing and appropriate treatment.

  4. Effect of anti-malarial interventions on trends of malaria cases, hospital admissions and deaths, 2005-2015, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aregawi, Maru; Malm, Keziah L; Wahjib, Mohammed; Kofi, Osae; Allotey, Naa-Korkor; Yaw, Peprah Nana; Abba-Baffoe, Wilmot; Segbaya, Sylvester; Owusu-Antwi, Felicia; Kharchi, Abderahmane T; Williams, Ryan O; Saalfeld, Mark; Workneh, Nibretie; Shargie, Estifanos Biru; Noor, Abdisalan M; Bart-Plange, Constance

    2017-04-26

    indicators were observed in the three epidemiological strata (coastal, forest, savannah). All-cause admissions increased significantly in patients covered by the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) compared to the non-insured. The non-malaria cases and non-malaria deaths increased or remained unchanged during the same period. All-cause mortality for children under 5 years old in household surveys, similar to those observed in the hospitals, declined by 43% between 2008 and 2014. The data provide compelling evidence of impact following LLIN mass campaigns targeting all ages since 2011, while maintaining other anti-malarial interventions. Malaria cases and deaths decreased by over 50 and 65%, respectively. The declines were stronger in children under five. Test positivity rate in all ages decreased by >40%. The decrease in malaria deaths was against a backdrop of increased admissions owing to free access to hospitalization through the NHIS. The study demonstrated that retrospective health facility-based data minimize reporting biases to assess effect of interventions. Malaria control in Ghana is dependent on sustained coverage of effective interventions and strengthened surveillance is vital to monitor progress of these investments.

  5. Development of ELISA-based methods to measure the anti-malarial drug chloroquine in plasma and in pharmaceutical formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, Insaf F; Alifrangis, Michael; Recke, Camilla

    2011-01-01

    In Central and South America and Eastern and Southern Africa, Plasmodium vivax infections accounts for 71-81% and 5% of malaria cases, respectively. In these areas, chloroquine (CQ) remains the treatment of choice for P. vivax malaria. In addition, CQ has recently proven to be an effective HIV-1 ...... resistance. The aim of this study was to develop an inexpensive, simple antibody-based ELISA to measure CQ concentrations in tablets and in plasma....

  6. Accuracy of a Plasmodium falciparum specific histidine-rich protein 2 rapid diagnostic test in the context of the presence of non-malaria fevers, prior anti-malarial use and seasonal malaria transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiemde, Francois; Bonko, Massa Dit Achille; Tahita, Marc Christian; Lompo, Palpouguini; Rouamba, Toussaint; Tinto, Halidou; Boele van Hensbroek, Michael; Mens, Petra F.; Schallig, Henk D. F. H.

    2017-01-01

    It remains challenging to distinguish malaria from other fever causing infections, as a positive rapid diagnostic test does not always signify a true active malaria infection. This study was designed to determine the influence of other causes of fever, prior anti-malarial treatment, and a possible

  7. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study

  8. Compliance with a three-day course of artesunate-mefloquine combination and baseline anti-malarial treatment in an area of Thailand with highly multidrug resistant falciparum malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na-Bangchang Kesara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT is presently recommended by the World Health Organization as first-line treatment for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in several countries, as a mean of prolonging the effectiveness of first-line malaria treatment regimens. A three-day course of artesunate-mefloquine (4 mg/kg body weight once daily for three consecutive days, plus 15 and 10 mg/kg body weight mefloquine on the first and second days has been adopted by Malaria Control Programme of Thailand as first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria all over the country since 2008. The gametocytocydal anti-malarial drug primaquine is administered at the dose of 30 mg (0.6 mg/kg on the last day. The aim of the present study was to assess patient compliance of this combination regimen when applied to field condition. Methods A total of 240 patients (196 males and 44 females who were attending the malaria clinics in Mae-Sot, Tak Province and presenting with symptomatic acute uncomplicated falciparum malaria, with no reappearance of Plasmodium vivax parasitaemia during follow-up were included into the study. The first dose of the treatment was given to the patients under direct supervision. All patients were given the medication for self-treatment at home and were requested to come back for follow-up on day 3 of the initial treatment. Baseline (day 0 and day 3 whole blood mefloquine and plasma primaquine concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results Two patients had recrudescence on days 28 and 35. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the 42-day efficacy rate of this combination regimen was 99.2% (238/240. Based on whole blood mefloquine and plasma primaquine concentrations on day 3 of the initial treatment, compliance with mefloquine and primaquine in this three-day artesunate-mefloquine combination regimen were 96.3% (207/215, and 98.5% (197/200, respectively. Baseline mefloquine

  9. Frequency of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in malaria patients from six African countries enrolled in two randomized anti-malarial clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duparc Stephan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is common in populations living in malaria endemic areas. G6PD genotype and phenotype were determined for malaria patients enrolled in the chlorproguanil-dapsone-artesunate (CDA phase III clinical trial programme. Methods Study participants, aged > 1 year, with microscopically confirmed uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and haemoglobin ≥ 70 g/L or haematocrit ≥ 25%, were recruited into two clinical trials conducted in six African countries (Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania, Mali. G6PD genotype of the three most common African forms, G6PD*B, G6PD*A (A376G, and G6PD*A- (G202A, A542T, G680T and T968C, were determined and used for frequency estimation. G6PD phenotype was assessed qualitatively using the NADPH fluorescence test. Exploratory analyses investigated the effect of G6PD status on baseline haemoglobin concentration, temperature, asexual parasitaemia and anti-malarial efficacy after treatment with CDA 2/2.5/4 mg/kg or chlorproguanil-dapsone 2/2.5 mg/kg (both given once daily for three days or six-dose artemether-lumefantrine. Results Of 2264 malaria patients enrolled, 2045 had G6PD genotype available and comprised the primary analysis population (1018 males, 1027 females. G6PD deficiency prevalence was 9.0% (184/2045; 7.2% [N = 147] male hemizygous plus 1.8% [N = 37] female homozygous, 13.3% (273/2045 of patients were heterozygous females, 77.7% (1588/2045 were G6PD normal. All deficient G6PD*A- genotypes were A376G/G202A. G6PD phenotype was available for 64.5% (1319/2045 of patients: 10.2% (134/1319 were G6PD deficient, 9.6% (127/1319 intermediate, and 80.2% (1058/1319 normal. Phenotype test specificity in detecting hemizygous males was 70.7% (70/99 and 48.0% (12/25 for homozygous females. Logistic regression found no significant effect of G6PD genotype on adjusted mean baseline haemoglobin (p = 0.154, adjusted mean baseline temperature (p = 0

  10. SENYAWA AKTIF ANTIKANKER PAYUDARA DAN ANTIMALARIA DARI TUMBUHAN DADAP AYAM (ERHYTHRINA VALERIEGATA SECARA IN VITRO (Anti Breast-cancer and anti-malarial Active Compounds of Erithrina Variegata by in Vitro Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tati Herlina

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Tumbuhan Erythrina variegata (Leguminosae secara tradisional dikenal oleh masyarakat Indonesia sebagai obat antikanker dan antimalaria. Bagian tumbuhan ini yang biasa digunakan sebagai bahan pengobatan adalah daun dan kulit batang, tapi kandungan senyawa kimia aktif biologisnya belum banyak dilaporkan. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengungkapkan senyawa aktif antikanker dan antimalaria secara in vitro yang terdapat di dalam daun dan kulit batang E. variegata. Penelitian dilakukan dengan cara ekstraksi metanol dan fraksionasi dari daun dan kulit batang E. variegata yang dipandu dengan uji antikanker secara in vitro terhadap sel kanker payudara T47D menggunakan metode Sulforodamin B (SRB dan uji antimalaria secara in vitro terhadap Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 (sensitif klorokuin dan K1 (resisten klorokuin menggunakan metode laktatdehidrogenase (LDH. Selanjutnya dilakukan pemisahan fraksi etil asetat daun dan kulit batang E. variegata yang dipantau dengan uji antikanker dan antimalaria secara in vitro menggunakan kombinasi kolom kromatografi diperoleh tiga senyawa aktif (1, 2, dan 3. Struktur kimia senyawa aktif (1, 2, dan 3 ditetapkan berdasarkan data-data spektroskopi dan diidentifikasikan sebagai turunan triterpenoid pentasiklik glikosida(1; flavonoid, eristagallin A (2; dan steroid, (22E-5α,8α-epidioksiergosta-6,22-dien-3β-ol (3. Senyawa (1 menunjukkan aktivitas antimalaria secara in vitro terhadap P. falciparum strain 3D7 (sensitif klorokuin dengan IC50 1,8 µg/mL dan terhadap strain K1 (resisten klorokuin dengan IC50 3,3 µg/mL. Senyawa (2 dan (3 menunjukkan aktivitas antikanker secara in vitro terhadap sel kanker payurada T47D dengan IC50 masing-masing 3,0 dan 3,2 µg/mL. Tumbuhan E. variegata mempunyai potensi sebagai bahan dasar obat herbal antikanker payudara dan antimalaria. ABSTRACT Erythrina variegata (Leguminosae plant used traditionaly as plant of  anti-cancer and anti-malarial in Indonesia. The leaves and stem bark of

  11. A study of the pharmaceutical quality of chloroquine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kemrilib

    SUMMARY. Malaria is a major public health problem in endemic countries, and the quality of anti- malarial products is a concern in the therapeutic management of individual patient. In this study, we have evaluated the pharmaceutical quality of chloroquine and paracetamol oral products obtained from a major Nigerian ...

  12. Trends in malaria cases, hospital admissions and deaths following scale-up of anti-malarial interventions, 2000-2010, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karema, Corine; Aregawi, Maru W; Rukundo, Alphonse; Kabayiza, Alain; Mulindahabi, Monique; Fall, Ibrahima S; Gausi, Khoti; Williams, Ryan O; Lynch, Michael; Cibulskis, Richard; Fidele, Ngabo; Nyemazi, Jean-Pierre; Ngamije, Daniel; Umulisa, Irenee; Newman, Robert; Binagwaho, Agnes

    2012-07-23

    unchanged. Rainfall and temperature remained favourable for malaria transmission. The annual all-cause mortality in children under-five in household surveys declined from 152 per 1,000 live births during 2001-2005, to 76 per 1,000 live births in 2006-2010 (55% decline). The five-year cumulative number of all-cause deaths in hospital declined 28% (8,051 to 5,801) during the same period. A greater than 50% decline in confirmed malaria cases, admissions and deaths at district hospitals in Rwanda since 2005 followed a marked increase in ITN coverage and use of ACT. The decline occurred among both children under-five and in those five years and above, while hospital utilization increased and suitable conditions for malaria transmission persisted. Declines in malaria indicators in children under 5 years were more striking than in the older age groups. The resurgence in cases associated with decreased ITN coverage in 2009 highlights the need for sustained high levels of anti-malarial interventions in Rwanda and other malaria endemic countries.

  13. Prevalence of molecular markers of anti-malarial drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum in two districts of Nepal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjitkar, Samir; Schousboe, Mette L; Thomsen, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    endemic areas. However, SP is still used against P. falciparum infections in low endemic areas while CQ is used in suspected cases in areas with lack of diagnostic facilities. This study examines the prevalence of molecular markers of P. falciparum and Plasmodium vivax CQ and SP resistance to determine...... if high levels of in vivo resistance are reflected at molecular level as well. METHODS: Finger prick blood samples (n=189) were collected from malaria positive patients from two high endemic districts and analysed for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the resistance related genes of P. falciparum...... on a few P. falciparum samples, the molecular level of CQ resistance in P. falciparum was high since nearly all parasites had the Pfcrt mutant haplotypes CVIET (55%) or SVMNT (42%), though frequency of Pfmdr1 wild type haplotype was relatively low (35%). Molecular levels of SP resistance in P. falciparum...

  14. Identification of Selective Inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum Hexose Transporter PfHT by Screening Focused Libraries of Anti-Malarial Compounds.

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    Diana Ortiz

    Full Text Available Development of resistance against current antimalarial drugs necessitates the search for novel drugs that interact with different targets and have distinct mechanisms of action. Malaria parasites depend upon high levels of glucose uptake followed by inefficient metabolic utilization via the glycolytic pathway, and the Plasmodium falciparum hexose transporter PfHT, which mediates uptake of glucose, has thus been recognized as a promising drug target. This transporter is highly divergent from mammalian hexose transporters, and it appears to be a permease that is essential for parasite viability in intra-erythrocytic, mosquito, and liver stages of the parasite life cycle. An assay was developed that is appropriate for high throughput screening against PfHT based upon heterologous expression of PfHT in Leishmania mexicana parasites that are null mutants for their endogenous hexose transporters. Screening of two focused libraries of antimalarial compounds identified two such compounds that are high potency selective inhibitors of PfHT compared to human GLUT1. Additionally, 7 other compounds were identified that are lower potency and lower specificity PfHT inhibitors but might nonetheless serve as starting points for identification of analogs with more selective properties. These results further support the potential of PfHT as a novel drug target.

  15. Flow cytometry for the evaluation of anti-plasmodial activity of drugs on Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes

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    Pipy Bernard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activity of promising anti-malarial drugs against Plasmodium gametocytes is hard to evaluate even in vitro. This is because visual examination of stained smears, which is commonly used, is not totally convenient. In the current study, flow cytometry has been used to study the effect of established anti-malarial drugs against sexual stages obtained from W2 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. Gametocytes were treated for 48 h with different drug concentrations and the gametocytaemia was then determined by flow cytometry and compared with visual estimation by microscopy. Results and conclusions Initially gametocytaemia was evaluated either using light microscopy or flow cytometry. A direct correlation (r2 = 0.9986 was obtained. Two distinct peaks were observed on cytometry histograms and were attributed to gametocyte populations. The activities of established anti-malarial compounds were then measured by flow cytometry and the results were equivalent to those obtained using light microscopy. Primaquine and artemisinin had IC50 of 17.6 μM and 1.0 μM, respectively. Gametocyte sex was apparently distinguishable by flow cytometry as evaluated after induction of exflagellation by xanthurenic acid. These data form the basis of further studies for developing new methods in drug discovery to decrease malaria transmission.

  16. Population Genetics and Drug Resistance Markers: An Essential for Malaria Surveillance in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, A.; Beg, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium (P.) vivax is the prevalent malarial species accounting for 70% of malaria cases in Pakistan. However, baseline epidemiological data on P. vivax population structure and drug resistance are lacking from Pakistan. For population structure studies, molecular genetic markers, circumsporozoite protein (csp) and merozoite surface protein-1 (msp-1) are considered useful as these play an important role in P. vivax survival under immune and environmental pressure. Furthermore, these genes have also been identified as suitable candidates for vaccine development. While efforts for effective vaccine are underway, anti-malarial agents remain the mainstay for control. Evidence of resistance against commonly used anti-malarial agents, particularly Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is threatening to make this form of control defunct. Therefore, studies on drug resistance are necessary so that anti-malarial treatment strategies can be structured and implemented accordingly by the Malaria Control Program, Pakistan. This review aims to provide information on genetic markers of P. vivax population structure and drug resistance and comment on their usefulness in molecular surveillance and control. (author)

  17. Quality of Antimalarial Drugs Analysed in the National Quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the period 2002–2005, the National Quality Control Laboratory analysed 229 samples of antimalarial drugs. In 2002, 42% of these products failed to comply with compendial specifications, with the sulfadoxine/ sulfamethoxypyrazine and pyrimethamine combination products forming 39% of the total failures.

  18. Psychoactive Drugs and Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soren Ventegodt

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed on a representative sample of the Danish population in order to investigate the connection to the use of psychoactive drugs and quality of life (QOL by way of a questionnaire-based survey. The questionnaire was mailed in February 1993 to 2,460 persons aged between 18 and 88, randomly selected from the CPR (Danish Central Register, and 7,222 persons from the Copenhagen Perinatal Birth Cohort 1959–61.A total of 1,501 persons between the ages 18 and 88 years and 4,626 persons between the ages 31 and 33 years returned the questionnaire (response rates of 61.0% and 64.1%, respectively. Variables investigated in this study were ten different psychotropic drugs and quality of life.Our study showed that over half the Danish population had used illegal psychotropic drugs. The most commonly used was cannabis (marijuana though experience of this drug appeared not to co-vary with QOL to any significant extent. Cocaine, amphetamine, and psilocybin had been used by 1.2 to 3.3% of the population and this varied with QOL to a clear albeit small extent. LSD has been used by 1.2% of the population and the users had a QOL score 10% lower than those who had never used psychotropic drugs. The group with the lowest quality of life was found to be persons who had used heroin, morphine, methadone, and a mixture of alcohol and tranquilizers (10–20% below the group with the highest quality of life.

  19. Improvements in access to malaria treatment in Tanzania after switch to artemisinin combination therapy and the introduction of accredited drug dispensing outlets - a provider perspective

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    Dillip Angel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To improve access to treatment in the private retail sector a new class of outlets known as accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDO was created in Tanzania. Tanzania changed its first-line treatment for malaria from sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP to artemether-lumefantrine (ALu in 2007. Subsidized ALu was made available in both health facilities and ADDOs. The effect of these interventions on access to malaria treatment was studied in rural Tanzania. Methods The study was carried out in the villages of Kilombero and Ulanga Demographic Surveillance System (DSS and in Ifakara town. Data collection consisted of: 1 yearly censuses of shops selling drugs; 2 collection of monthly data on availability of anti-malarials in public health facilities; and 3 retail audits to measure anti-malarial sales volumes in all public, mission and private outlets. The data were complemented with DSS population data. Results Between 2004 and 2008 access to malaria treatment greatly improved and the number of anti-malarial treatment doses dispensed increased by 78%. Particular improvements were observed in the availability (from 0.24 shops per 1,000 people in 2004 to 0.39 in 2008 and accessibility (from 71% of households within 5 km of a shop in 2004 to 87% in 2008 of drug shops. Despite no improvements in affordability this resulted in an increase of the market share from 49% of anti-malarial sales 2005 to 59% in 2008. The change of treatment policy from SP to ALu led to severe stock-outs of SP in health facilities in the months leading up to the introduction of ALu (only 40% months in stock, but these were compensated by the wide availability of SP in shops. After the introduction of ALu stock levels of the drug were relatively high in public health facilities (over 80% months in stock, but the drug could only be found in 30% of drug shops and in no general shops. This resulted in a low overall utilization of the drug (19% of all anti-malarial

  20. Quality of drug prescription in primary health care facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Marwa

    Abstract. Background: Drug therapy can improve a patient's quality of life and health outcomes if only used properly. However, data on prescription quality at primary health care facilities in Tanzania is scanty. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of drug prescriptions in selected health care facilities in.

  1. Quality of drug prescription in primary health care facilities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Drug therapy can improve a patient's quality of life and health outcomes if only used properly. However, data on prescription quality at primary health care facilities in Tanzania is scanty. The objective of this study was to assess the quality of drug prescriptions in selected health care facilities in two districts of ...

  2. Virtual screen for repurposing approved and experimental drugs for candidate inhibitors of EBOLA virus infection [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/51s

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko Veljkovic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing Ebola virus epidemic has presented numerous challenges with respect to control and treatment because there are no approved drugs or vaccines for the Ebola virus disease (EVD. Herein is proposed simple theoretical criterion for fast virtual screening of molecular libraries for candidate inhibitors of Ebola virus infection. We performed a repurposing screen of 6438 drugs from DrugBank using this criterion and selected 267 approved and 382 experimental drugs as candidates for treatment of EVD including 15 anti-malarial drugs and 32 antibiotics. An open source Web server allowing screening of molecular libraries for candidate drugs for treatment of EVD was also established.

  3. 76 FR 50741 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality and...: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in cosponsorship with Parenteral...

  4. 76 FR 25358 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food...

  5. Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Brito, Miguel; Gil, Jose Pedro

    2016-02-09

    Facing chloroquine drug resistance, Angola promptly adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as the first-line to treat malaria. Currently, the country aims to consolidate malaria control, while preparing for the elimination of the disease, along with others African countries in the region. However, the remarkable capacity of Plasmodium to develop drug resistance represents an alarming threat for those achievements. Herein, the available, but relatively scarce and dispersed, information on malaria drug resistance in Angola, is reviewed and discussed. The review aims to inform but also to encourage future research studies that monitor and update the information on anti-malarial drug efficacy and prevalence of molecular markers of drug resistance, key fields in the context and objectives of elimination.

  6. Implementation of a reference standard and proficiency testing programme by the World Wide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnes Karen I

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN is a global collaboration to support the objective that anyone affected by malaria receives effective and safe drug treatment. The Pharmacology module aims to inform optimal anti-malarial drug selection. There is an urgent need to define the drug exposure - effect relationship for most anti-malarial drugs. Few anti-malarials have had their therapeutic blood concentration levels defined. One of the main challenges in assessing safety and efficacy data in relation to drug concentrations is the comparability of data generated from different laboratories. To explain differences in anti-malarial pharmacokinetics in studies with different measurement laboratories it is necessary to confirm the accuracy of the assay methods. This requires the establishment of an external quality assurance process to assure results that can be compared. This paper describes this process. Methods The pharmacology module of WWARN has established a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC programme consisting of two separate components: 1. A proficiency testing programme where blank human plasma spiked with certified reference material (CRM in different concentrations is sent out to participating bioanalytical laboratories. 2. A certified reference standard programme where accurately weighed amounts of certified anti-malarial reference standards, metabolites, and internal standards are sent to participating bioanalytical and in vitro laboratories. Conclusion The proficiency testing programme is designed as a cooperative effort to help participating laboratories assess their ability to carry out drug analysis, resolve any potential problem areas and to improve their results - and, in so doing, to improve the quality of anti-malarial pharmacokinetic data published and shared with WWARN. By utilizing the same source of standards for all laboratories, it is possible to minimize bias arising from poor

  7. Quality Performance of Drugs Analyzed in the Drug Analysis and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ICT TEAM

    During the period 2006-2010, the Drug Analysis and Research Unit analyzed 583 samples. The samples comprised 50.6% local and 49.4% imported products. Samples were subjected to compendial or in-house specifications. The failure rate was 12.2% for local products and 14.2% for imports. Antibacterial products ...

  8. Nonlinear mixed-effects modelling of in vitro drug susceptibility and molecular correlates of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Simpson

    Full Text Available The analysis of in vitro anti-malarial drug susceptibility testing is vulnerable to the effects of different statistical approaches and selection biases. These confounding factors were assessed with respect to pfmdr1 gene mutation and amplification in 490 clinical isolates. Two statistical approaches for estimating the drug concentration associated with 50% effect (EC50 were compared: the commonly used standard two-stage (STS method, and nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. The in vitro concentration-effect relationships for, chloroquine, mefloquine, lumefantrine and artesunate, were derived from clinical isolates obtained from patients on the western border of Thailand. All isolates were genotyped for polymorphisms in the pfmdr1 gene. The EC50 estimates were similar for the two statistical approaches but 15-28% of isolates in the STS method had a high coefficient of variation (>15% for individual estimates of EC50 and these isolates had EC50 values that were 32 to 66% higher than isolates derived with more precision. In total 41% (202/490 of isolates had amplification of pfmdr1 and single nucleotide polymorphisms were found in 50 (10%. Pfmdr1 amplification was associated with an increase in EC50 for mefloquine (139% relative increase in EC50 for 2 copies, 188% for 3+ copies, lumefantrine (82% and 75% for 2 and 3+ copies respectively and artesunate (63% and 127% for 2 and 3+ copies respectively. In contrast pfmdr1 mutation at codons 86 or 1042 were associated with an increase in chloroquine EC50 (44-48%. Sample size calculations showed that to demonstrate an EC50 shift of 50% or more with 80% power if the prevalence was 10% would require 430 isolates and 245 isolates if the prevalence was 20%. In conclusion, although nonlinear mixed-effects modelling did not demonstrate any major advantage for determining estimates of anti-malarial drug susceptibility, the method includes all isolates, thereby, potentially improving confirmation of candidate

  9. Quality assurance of herbal drug valerian by chemotaxonomic markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality assurance of valerian (Balchur), a traditional herbal drug of global importance mainly used for nervous disorders, was studied. At global, regional, national and local levels the end users of this drug face the problems of adulteration. Two different botanical sources are commercially marketed in the Indo-Pak ...

  10. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    have an effective means of monitoring the quality of generic drug products in the market. This results in widespread ... countries. Marketing of such drugs has been widely reported in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. © CNCS .... three-fourth of the plate. The plate was dried in air for 15 minutes and examined under UV-light,.

  11. Assessing website pharmacy drug quality: safer than you think?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Bate

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internet-sourced drugs are often considered suspect. The World Health Organization reports that drugs from websites that conceal their physical address are counterfeit in over 50 percent of cases; the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA works with the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP to regularly update a list of websites likely to sell drugs that are illegal or of questionable quality. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This study examines drug purchasing over the Internet, by comparing the sales of five popular drugs from a selection of websites stratified by NABP or other ratings. The drugs were assessed for price, conditions of purchase, and basic quality. Prices and conditions of purchase varied widely. Some websites advertised single pills while others only permitted the purchase of large quantities. Not all websites delivered the exact drugs ordered, some delivered no drugs at all; many websites shipped from multiple international locations, and from locations that were different from those advertised on the websites. All drug samples were tested against approved U.S. brand formulations using Raman spectrometry. Many (17 websites substituted drugs, often in different formulations from the brands requested. These drugs, some of which were probably generics or perhaps non-bioequivalent copy versions, could not be assessed accurately. Of those drugs that could be assessed, none failed from "approved", "legally compliant" or "not recommended" websites (0 out of 86, whereas 8.6% (3 out of 35 failed from "highly not recommended" and unidentifiable websites. CONCLUSIONS: Of those drugs that could be assessed, all except Viagra(R passed spectrometry testing. Of those that failed, few could be identified either by a country of manufacture listed on the packaging, or by the physical location of the website pharmacy. If confirmed by future studies on other drug samples, then U.S. consumers should be able to reduce their risk by

  12. Deficient supplies of drugs for life threatening diseases in an African community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Marit

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Malawi essential drugs are provided free of charge to patients at all public health facilities in order to ensure equitable access to health care. The country thereby spends about 30% of the national health budget on drugs. In order to investigate the level of drug shortages and eventually find the reasons for the drugs shortages in Malawi, we studied the management of the drug supplies for common and life threatening diseases such as pneumonia and malaria in a random selection of health centres. Methods In July and August 2005 we visited eight out of a total of 37 health centres chosen at random in the Lilongwe District, Malawi. We recorded the logistics of eight essential and widely used drugs which according to the treatment guidelines should be available at all health centres. Five drugs are used regularly to treat pneumonia and three others to treat acute malaria. Out-of-stock situations in the course of one year were recorded retrospectively. We compared the quantity of each drug recorded on the Stock Cards with the actual stock of the drug on the shelves at the time of audit. We reviewed 8,968 Patient Records containing information on type and amount of drugs prescribed during one month. Results On average, drugs for treating pneumonia were out of stock for six months during one year of observation (median value 167 days; anti-malarial drugs were lacking for periods ranging from 42 to138 days. The cross-sectional audit was even more negative, but here too the situation was more positive for anti-malarial drugs. The main reason for the shortage of drugs was insufficient deliveries from the Regional Medical Store. Benzyl penicillin was in shortest supply (4% received. The median value for non-availability was 240 days in the course of a year. The supply was better for anti-malarial drugs, except for quinine injections (9 %. Only 66 % of Stock Card records of quantities received were reflected in Patient Records

  13. 21 CFR 212.20 - What activities must I perform to ensure drug quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... quality? 212.20 Section 212.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... DRUGS (Eff. 12-12-2011) Quality Assurance § 212.20 What activities must I perform to ensure drug quality... actions. (e) Quality assurance. You must establish and follow written quality assurance procedures. ...

  14. How sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP was perceived in some rural communities after phasing out chloroquine (CQ as a first-line drug for uncomplicated malaria in Tanzania: lessons to learn towards moving from monotherapy to fixed combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nsimba Stephen ED

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malaria is a leading cause of death in Sub-Saharan Africa. Tanzania changed its malaria treatment policy from chloroquine (CQ to Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP as first line drug in August 2001. We wanted to assess the perception and behaviour about SP after phasing out chloroquine which was very popular, cheap, available, and was preferred by many people for self-medication in homes as it was considered to have minimal side effects. Focus Group Discussions (FGDs were carried out after one year of the anti-malarial drug treatment policy change in the country. The FGD themes were on malaria for under-five children and other age groups, anti-malarial drug use through self-medications, specific experiences people had about SP drug for both mothers/guardians, men in the communities and health workers. A total of twelve FGDs were performed with mothers/guardians, men and health workers in the selected public health care facilities in the district. In the FGDs people feared adverse reactions from SP; its slow ability of reducing fever and self-treatment in this case was less reported from the mothers/guardians groups. However, SP was reported by health workers to be administered using the direct observation approach under supervision in their health care facilities. This was done in order to increase compliance as there were worries that some mothers were throwing away the drug if they were instructed by health workers to go and administer SP to their sick children at home. Based on this information, it is obvious that fear and negative perceptions about SP drug was common in the study setting. As evidence of this, there was less reported home-stocking and self-medication in the discussions for this particular recommended new first-line anti-malarial. The public has demonstrated a lack of confidence in SP. Furthermore, some health workers expressed obvious fear and negative perceptions towards the drug despite the fact that some FGDs with

  15. Quality of selected aromatic herbal drugs available on Belgrade's marketplaces

    OpenAIRE

    Drobac, Milica; Arsenijević, Jelena; Stojanović, Danilo; Jančić, Radiša; Kovačević, Nada

    2017-01-01

    Herbal drugs are often administered in the form of monocomponent teas or herbal tea mixtures (tea blends). In order to assess the quality of herbal drugs that are components of the monocomponent teas commercially available on marketplaces in Belgrade, we analyzed 4 samples of Melissa leaf (Melissae folium), 6 samples of Wild thyme, (Serpylli herba), 6 samples of Yarrow (Millefolii herba), 4 samples of Wormwood (Absinthii herba) and 6 samples of Juniper (Juniperi pseudo-fructus), according to ...

  16. Refractometry for quality control of anesthetic drug mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabenow, Jennifer M; Maske, Mindy L; Vogler, George A

    2006-07-01

    Injectable anesthetic drugs used in rodents are often mixed and further diluted to increase the convenience and accuracy of dosing. We evaluated clinical refractometry as a simple and rapid method of quality control and mixing error detection of rodent anesthetic or analgesic mixtures. Dilutions of ketamine, xylazine, acepromazine, and buprenorphine were prepared with reagent-grade water to produce at least 4 concentration levels. The refraction of each concentration then was measured with a clinical refractometer and plotted against the percentage of stock concentration. The resulting graphs were linear and could be used to determine the concentration of single-drug dilutions or to predict the refraction of drug mixtures. We conclude that refractometry can be used to assess the concentration of dilutions of single drugs and can verify the mixing accuracy of drug combinations when the components of the mixture are known and fall within the detection range of the instrument.

  17. Ex vivo drug sensitivity profiles of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Cambodia and Thailand, 2005 to 2010, determined by a histidine-rich protein-2 assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyner Stuart D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro drug susceptibility assay of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates processed “immediate ex vivo” (IEV, without culture adaption, and tested using histidine-rich protein-2 (HRP-2 detection as an assay, is an expedient way to track drug resistance. Methods From 2005 to 2010, a HRP-2 in vitro assay assessed 451 P. falciparum field isolates obtained from subjects with malaria in western and northern Cambodia, and eastern Thailand, processed IEV, for 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 against seven anti-malarial drugs, including artesunate (AS, dihydroartemisinin (DHA, and piperaquine. Results In western Cambodia, from 2006 to 2010, geometric mean (GM IC50 values for chloroquine, mefloquine, quinine, AS, DHA, and lumefantrine increased. In northern Cambodia, from 2009–2010, GM IC50 values for most drugs approximated the highest western Cambodia GM IC50 values in 2009 or 2010. Conclusions Western Cambodia is associated with sustained reductions in anti-malarial drug susceptibility, including the artemisinins, with possible emergence, or spread, to northern Cambodia. This potential public health crisis supports continued in vitro drug IC50 monitoring of P. falciparum isolates at key locations in the region.

  18. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sitwala

    Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs. Medical Journal of Zambia, Volume 37 Number 1 (2010). *P. Mweemba, M.K. Makukula, P.K. Mukwato, M.M. Makoleka. Department of Nursing Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia. ABSTRACT. Introduction: Antiretroviral therapy has led to ...

  19. Quality of antiretroviral drugs, stavudine and indinavir capsules ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The number of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) available to HIV/AIDS patients in Tanzania is increasing due to a number of intervention programs such as PEPFAR and the Clinton Foundation. These ARVs are imported from a number of countries. However, currently there are no reports on the quality of these ...

  20. X-ray Spectroscopy for Quality Control of Chemotherapy Drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greaves, E. D.; Barros, H.; Bermudez, J.; Sajo-Bohus, L.; Angeli-Greaves, M.

    2007-01-01

    We develop a method, employing Compton peak standardization and the use of matrix-matched spiked samples with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence (TXRF), for the determination of platinum plasma concentrations of patients undergoing chemotherapy with Pt-bearing drugs. Direct blood plasma analysis attains Pt detection limits of 70 ng/ml. Measurement results of prescribed drug doses are compared to achieved blood Pt concentrations indicating a lack of expected correlations. Direct analysis of Pt-containing infused drugs from a variety of suppliers indicates cases of abnormal concentrations which raises quality control issues. We demonstrate the potential usefulness of the method for pharmacokinetic studies or for routine optimization and quality control of Pt chemotherapy treatments

  1. The influence of nevirapine and efavirenz-based anti-retroviral therapy on the pharmacokinetics of lumefantrine and anti-malarial dose recommendation in HIV-malaria co-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganda, Betty A; Ngaimisi, Eliford; Kamuhabwa, Appolinary A R; Aklillu, Eleni; Minzi, Omary M S

    2015-04-25

    HIV-malaria co-infected patients in most parts of sub-Saharan Africa are treated with both artemether-lumefantrine (AL) and efavirenz (EFV) or nevirapine (NVP)-based antiretroviral therapy (ART). EFV, NVP, artemether and lumefantrine are substrates, inhibitors or inducers of CYP3A4 and CYP2B6, creating a potential for drug-drug interactions. The effect of EFV and/or NVP on lumefantrine pharmacokinetic profile among HIV-malaria co-infected patients on ART and treated with AL was investigated. Optimal lumefantrine dosage regimen for patients on EFV-based ART was determined by population pharmacokinetics and simulation. This was a non-randomized, open label, parallel, prospective cohort study in which 128, 66 and 75 HIV-malaria co-infected patients on NVP-based ART (NVP-arm), EFV-based ART (EFV-arm) and ART naïve (control-am) were enrolled, respectively. Patients were treated with AL and contributed sparse venous plasma samples. Pharmacokinetic analysis of lumefantrine was done using non-linear mixed effect modelling. Of the evaluated models, a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model with first order absorption and lag-time described well lumefantrine plasma concentrations time profile. Patients in the EFV-arm but not in the NVP-arm had significantly lower lumefantrine bioavailability compared to that in the control-arm. Equally, 32% of patients in the EFV-arm had day-7 lumefantrine plasma concentrations below 280 ng/ml compared to only 4% in the control-arm and 3% in the NVP-arm. Upon post hoc simulation of lumefantrine exposure, patients in the EFV-arm had lower exposure (median (IQR)) compared to that in the control-arm; AUC0-inf; was 303,130 (211,080-431,962) versus 784,830 (547,405-1,116,250); day-7 lumefantrine plasma concentrations was: 335.5 (215.8-519.5) versus 858.7 (562.3-1,333.8), respectively. The predictive model through simulation of lumefantrine exposure at different dosage regimen scenarios for patients on EFV-based ART, suggest that AL taken twice

  2. Structural mapping of the ClpB ATPases of Plasmodium falciparum: Targeting protein folding and secretion for antimalarial drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AhYoung, Andrew P; Koehl, Antoine; Cascio, Duilio; Egea, Pascal F

    2015-09-01

    Caseinolytic chaperones and proteases (Clp) belong to the AAA+ protein superfamily and are part of the protein quality control machinery in cells. The eukaryotic parasite Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of malaria, has evolved an elaborate network of Clp proteins including two distinct ClpB ATPases. ClpB1 and ClpB2 are involved in different aspects of parasitic proteostasis. ClpB1 is present in the apicoplast, a parasite-specific and plastid-like organelle hosting various metabolic pathways necessary for parasite growth. ClpB2 localizes to the parasitophorous vacuole membrane where it drives protein export as core subunit of a parasite-derived protein secretion complex, the Plasmodium Translocon of Exported proteins (PTEX); this process is central to parasite virulence and survival in the human host. The functional associations of these two chaperones with parasite-specific metabolism and protein secretion make them prime drug targets. ClpB proteins function as unfoldases and disaggregases and share a common architecture consisting of four domains-a variable N-terminal domain that binds different protein substrates, followed by two highly conserved catalytic ATPase domains, and a C-terminal domain. Here, we report and compare the first crystal structures of the N terminal domains of ClpB1 and ClpB2 from Plasmodium and analyze their molecular surfaces. Solution scattering analysis of the N domain of ClpB2 shows that the average solution conformation is similar to the crystalline structure. These structures represent the first step towards the characterization of these two malarial chaperones and the reconstitution of the entire PTEX to aid structure-based design of novel anti-malarial drugs. © 2015 The Protein Society.

  3. Prevalence of molecular markers of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Dakar, Senegal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wurtz Nathalie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a result of the widespread resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT (including artemether-lumefantrine and artesunate-amodiaquine has been recommended as a first-line anti-malarial regimen in Senegal since 2006. Intermittent preventive treatments with anti-malarial drugs based on sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine are also given to children or pregnant women once per month during the transmission season. Since 2006, there have been very few reports on the susceptibility of Plasmodium falciparum to anti-malarial drugs. To estimate the prevalence of resistance to several anti-malarial drugs since the introduction of the widespread use of ACT, the presence of molecular markers associated with resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine was assessed in local isolates at the military hospital of Dakar. Methods The prevalence of genetic polymorphisms in genes associated with anti-malarial drug resistance, i.e., Pfcrt, Pfdhfr, Pfdhps and Pfmdr1, and the copy number of Pfmdr1 were evaluated for a panel of 174 isolates collected from patients recruited at the military hospital of Dakar from 14 October 2009 to 19 January 2010. Results The Pfcrt 76T mutation was identified in 37.2% of the samples. The Pfmdr1 86Y and 184F mutations were found in 16.6% and 67.6% of the tested samples, respectively. Twenty-eight of the 29 isolates with the 86Y mutation were also mutated at codon 184. Only one isolate (0.6% had two copies of Pfmdr1. The Pfdhfr 108N/T, 51I and 59R mutations were identified in 82.4%, 83.5% and 74.1% of the samples, respectively. The double mutant (108N and 51I was detected in 83.5% of the isolates, and the triple mutant (108N, 51I and 59R was detected in 75.3%. The Pfdhps 437G, 436F/A and 613S mutations were found in 40.2%, 35.1% and 1.8% of the samples, respectively. There was no double mutant (437G and 540E or no quintuple mutant (Pfdhfr 108N, 51I and 59R

  4. Repurposing of antiparasitic drugs: the hydroxy-naphthoquinone buparvaquone inhibits vertical transmission in the pregnant neosporosis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Wong, Ho Ning; Haynes, Richard K; Hemphill, Andrew

    2016-02-17

    The three anti-malarial drugs artemiside, artemisone, and mefloquine, and the naphthoquinone buparvaquone known to be active against theileriosis in cattle and Leishmania infections in rodents, were assessed for activity against Neospora caninum infection. All four compounds inhibited the proliferation of N. caninum tachyzoites in vitro with IC50 in the sub-micromolar range, but artemisone and buparvaquone were most effective (IC50 = 3 and 4.9 nM, respectively). However, in a neosporosis mouse model for cerebral infection comprising Balb/c mice experimentally infected with the virulent isolate Nc-Spain7, the three anti-malarial compounds failed to exhibit any activity, since treatment did not reduce the parasite burden in brains and lungs compared to untreated controls. Thus, these compounds were not further evaluated in pregnant mice. On the other hand, buparvaquone, shown earlier to be effective in reducing the parasite load in the lungs in an acute neosporosis disease model, was further assessed in the pregnant mouse model. Buparvaquone efficiently inhibited vertical transmission in Balb/c mice experimentally infected at day 7 of pregnancy, reduced clinical signs in the pups, but had no effect on cerebral infection in the dams. This demonstrates proof-of-concept that drug repurposing may lead to the discovery of an effective compound against neosporosis that can protect offspring from vertical transmission and disease.

  5. Structure of Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase-Halofuginone Complex Provides Basis for Development of Drugs against Malaria and Toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vitul; Yogavel, Manickam; Oshima, Yoshiteru; Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Touquet, Bastien; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Sharma, Amit

    2015-05-05

    The Chinese herb Dichroa febrifuga has traditionally treated malaria-associated fever. Its active component febrifugine (FF) and derivatives such as halofuginone (HF) are potent anti-malarials. Here, we show that FF-based derivatives arrest parasite growth by direct interaction with and inhibition of the protein translation enzyme prolyl-tRNA synthetase (PRS). Dual administration of inhibitors that target different tRNA synthetases suggests high utility of these drug targets. We reveal the ternary complex structure of PRS-HF and adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate where the latter facilitates HF integration into the PRS active site. Structural analyses also highlight spaces within the PRS architecture for HF derivatization of its quinazolinone, but not piperidine, moiety. We also show a remarkable ability of HF to kill the related human parasite Toxoplasma gondii, suggesting wider HF efficacy against parasitic PRSs. Hence, our cell-, enzyme-, and structure-based data on FF-based inhibitors strengthen the case for their inclusion in anti-malarial and anti-toxoplasmosis drug development efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality Testing of Artemisinin-Based Antimalarial Drugs in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Suqin; Kyaw, Myat Phone; He, Lishan; Min, Myo; Ning, Xiangxue; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Baomin; Cui, Liwang

    2017-10-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies are the frontline treatment of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. The circulation of falsified and substandard artemisinin-based antimalarials in Southeast Asia has been a major predicament for the malaria elimination campaign. To provide an update of this situation, we purchased 153 artemisinin-containing antimalarials, as convenience samples, in private drug stores from different regions of Myanmar. The quality of these drugs in terms of their artemisinin derivative content was tested using specific dipsticks for these artemisinin derivatives, as point-of-care devices. A subset of these samples was further tested by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This survey identified that > 35% of the collected drugs were oral artesunate and artemether monotherapies. When tested with the dipsticks, all but one sample passed the assays, indicating that the detected artemisinin derivative content corresponded approximately to the labeled contents. However, one artesunate injection sample was found to contain no active ingredient at all by the dipstick assay and subsequent HPLC analysis. The continued circulation of oral monotherapies and the description, for the first time, of falsified parenteral artesunate provides a worrisome picture of the antimalarial drug quality in Myanmar during the malaria elimination phase, a situation that deserves more oversight from regulatory authorities.

  7. Perception of quality of life of people with drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Célia Santos

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Drug addiction affects many people’s lives and statistical data demonstrate the extent of the problem, which usually begins at an early age and is maintained throughout life, with implications for health and quality of life (QOL. Objectives: To evaluate the perception of QOL of people with addictive problems; to compare the perception of QOL between the dependents of illicit drugs and alcohol; to evaluate the differences between the perception of QOL in terms of sociodemographic, health and treatment variables. Methods: A quantitative, descriptive and cross-sectional study was carried out with a sample of 108 people, mostly males, with a mean age of 45 years and low schooling, with a long history of substance use, especially in poly-consumption, beginning on early ages and undergoing treatment in the District of Porto. To evaluate the perception of QOL, the Quality of Life Index (QLI, Portuguese version, by Ferrans & Powers was used. Results: Participants perceived their QOL as positive, with no differences according the type of chemical dependence (illicit drugs/alcohol; Female participants (p=0.01, non-active (p=0.006, who lived alone (p=0.002, had previous treatments (p=0.01, and who continued to consume (p=0.001 presented lower values in the global QLI scores. Conclusions: The aim of this study was to evaluate the perception of QOL of people with drug dependence, and to identify groups with greater vulnerability, in order to plan more effective intervention programmes.

  8. Quality of drug interaction alerts in prescribing and dispensing software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweidan, Michelle; Reeve, James F; Brien, Jo-anne E; Jayasuriya, Pradeep; Martin, Jennifer H; Vernon, Graeme M

    2009-03-02

    To investigate the quality of drug interaction decision support in selected prescribing and dispensing software systems, and to compare this information with that found in a range of reference sources. A comparative study, conducted between June 2006 and February 2007, of the support provided for making decisions about 20 major and 20 minor drug interactions in six prescribing and three dispensing software systems used in primary care in Australia. Five electronic reference sources were evaluated for comparison. Sensitivity, specificity and quality of information; for major interactions: whether information on clinical effects, timeframe and pharmacological mechanism was included, whether management advice was helpful, and succinctness. Six of the nine software systems had a sensitivity rate > or = 90%, detecting most of the major interactions. Only 3/9 systems had a specificity rate of > or = 80%, with other systems providing inappropriate or unhelpful alerts for many minor interactions. Only 2/9 systems provided adequate information about clinical effects for more than half the major drug interactions, and 1/9 provided useful management advice for more than half of these. The reference sources had high sensitivity and in general provided more comprehensive clinical information than the software systems. Drug interaction decision support in commonly used prescribing and dispensing software has significant shortcomings.

  9. In vivo anti-malarial activity of hydroalcoholic extracts from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    of medicine is the emergence of the Peruvian (Cinchona) bark (Rubiaceae) coupled with its pharmacologically active substance, - the quinine. Quinine is a classic ... at optimum humidity for at least three days before being subjected to the experiments (2). All the experiments were carried out in a calm laboratory setting that ...

  10. Prevalence of cutaneous drug eruptions in adult Nigerians with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salami, T A T; Asalu, A F; Samuel, S O

    2010-06-01

    Adverse cutaneous drug eruptions are dreaded complication of drug use and this is more so when it occurs in the setting of human immune virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aims to look at the prevalence of cutaneous drug eruptions in adult Nigerians with HIV/AIDS and find out the etiological agents, outcome, and prognosis of such occurrence in Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irrua Edo State Nigeria. A retrospective study of cutaneous drug eruptions in patients with HIV/AIDS managed in this centre over the past five years (between January 2001 and December 2005 prior to initiation of antiretroviral therapy) was carried out. A total of 900 patients with HIV/AIDS were managed during this period (antiretroviral treatment was not available during this period). Twenty five of these patients (2.8%) not had cutaneous drug eruptions (2.8%). Erythema multiforme major or Steven Johnson Syndrome (SJS)-40% and Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN)-20% were the most frequent types of adverse cutaneous drug events found while combination antituberculosis agent of Isoniazid/Thiacethazone (64%) and anti malarial Sulphadoxine/Pyrimethamine (20%) were the notable culprit drugs found to be responsible for these. There was a 20% fatality rate. Treatment of tuberculosis which is the most common AIDS presenting illness with anti tuberculosis regimen that includes thiacethazone and the ready availability of anti malarials over the counter without prescription are responsible for the findings of this study. Avoiding drugs such as those found to be culprit agents in this study in patients with HIV/AIDS; right prescription practice by health practitioners as well as more intense health education of the public on the hazards of self prescription will all go a long way in minimising the occurrence of these events.

  11. 1624-IJBCS -Article-Serigne Omar sarr+

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Evans et al., 2012; Pribluda et al., 2012). In this context, national drug regulators need to strengthen their roles in the monitoring of anti-malarial drug quality using simple, economical and precise analytical methods like this newly developed method. Conclusion. The proposed method is simple and precise and do not suffer ...

  12. Quality control of drugs. Certification scheme on the quality of pharmaceutical products moving in international commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    In an effort to ensure a desirable level of quality control of drugs in international commerce, the 28th World Health Assembly recommended, in its resolution WHA28.65, that Member States apply the requirements for "Good Practices in the Manufacture and Quality Control of Drugs" and participate in the Certification Scheme on the Quality of Pharmaceutical Products moving in International Commerce. Since the publication of the 1st list 13 countries (Austria, Congo, Denmark, El Salvador, India, Iran, Israel, Liberia, Swaziland, Thailand, Tunisia, United Republic of Tanzania, and Zaire) have informed the World Health Organization of their agreement to participate in the Certification Scheme, and the texts of their replies are included here.

  13. Liposomal Drug Product Development and Quality: Current US Experience and Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Mamta; Lee, Sau L; Tyner, Katherine M

    2017-05-01

    Research in the area of liposomes has grown substantially in the past few decades. Liposomes are lipid bilayer structures that can incorporate drug substances to modify the drug's pharmacokinetic profile thereby improving drug delivery. The agency has received over 400 liposomal drug product submissions (excluding combination therapies), and there are currently eight approved liposomal drug products on the US market. In order to identify the pain points in development and manufacturing of liposomal drug products, a retrospective analysis was performed from a quality perspective on submissions for new and generic liposomal drug products. General analysis on liposomal drug product submissions was also performed. Results indicated that 96% of the submissions were Investigational New Drug (IND) applications, 3% were New Drug Applications (NDAs), and the remaining 1% was Abbreviated New Drug Applications (ANDAs). Doxorubicin hydrochloride was the most commonly used drug substance incorporated into the liposomes (31%). The majority of the liposomal products were administered via intravenous route (84%) with cancer (various types) being the most common indication (63%). From a quality perspective, major challenges during the development of liposomal drug products included identification and (appropriate) characterization of critical quality attributes of liposomal drug products and suitable control strategies during product development. By focusing on these areas, a faster and more efficient development of liposomal drug products may be achieved. Additionally, in this way, the drug review process for such products can be streamlined.

  14. Analysis of ex vivo drug response data of Plasmodium clinical isolates: the pros and cons of different computer programs and online platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirjanata, Grennady; Handayuni, Irene; Zaloumis, Sophie G; Chalfein, Ferryanto; Prayoga, Pak; Kenangalem, Enny; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne Rini; Noviyanti, Rintis; Simpson, Julie A; Price, Ric N; Marfurt, Jutta

    2016-03-02

    In vitro drug susceptibility testing of malaria parasites remains an important component of surveillance for anti-malarial drug resistance. The half-maximal inhibition of growth (IC50) is the most commonly reported parameter expressing drug susceptibility, derived by a variety of statistical approaches, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. In this study, licensed computer programs WinNonlin and GraphPad Prism 6.0, and the open access programs HN-NonLin, Antimalarial ICEstimator (ICE), and In Vitro Analysis and Reporting Tool (IVART) were tested for their ease of use and ability to estimate reliable IC50 values from raw drug response data from 31 Plasmodium falciparum and 29 P. vivax clinical isolates tested with five anti-malarial agents: chloroquine, amodiaquine, piperaquine, mefloquine, and artesunate. The IC50 and slope estimates were similar across all statistical packages for all drugs tested in both species. There was good correlation of results derived from alternative statistical programs and non-linear mixed-effects modelling (NONMEM) which models all isolate data simultaneously. The user-friendliness varied between packages. While HN-NonLin and IVART allow users to enter the data in 96-well format, IVART and GraphPad Prism 6.0 are capable to analyse multiple isolates and drugs in parallel. WinNonlin, GraphPad Prism 6.0, IVART, and ICE provide alerts for non-fitting data and incorrect data entry, facilitating data interpretation. Data analysis using WinNonlin or ICE took the longest computationally, whilst the offline ability of GraphPad Prism 6.0 to analyse multiple isolates and drugs simultaneously made it the fastest among the programs tested. IC50 estimates obtained from the programs tested were comparable. In view of processing time and ease of analysis, GraphPad Prism 6.0 or IVART are best suited for routine and large-scale drug susceptibility testing.

  15. Identification of active Plasmodium falciparum calpain to establish screening system for Pf-calpain-based drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soh Byoung

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the increasing resistance of malaria parasites to available drugs, there is an urgent demand to develop new anti-malarial drugs. Calpain inhibitor, ALLN, is proposed to inhibit parasite proliferation by suppressing haemoglobin degradation. This provides Plasmodium calpain as a potential target for drug development. Pf-calpain, a cysteine protease of Plasmodium falciparum, belongs to calpain-7 family, which is an atypical calpain not harboring Ca2+-binding regulatory motifs. In this present study, in order to establish the screening system for Pf-calpain specific inhibitors, the active form of Pf-calpain was first identified. Methods Recombinant Pf-calpain including catalytic subdomain IIa (rPfcal-IIa was heterologously expressed and purified. Enzymatic activity was determined by both fluorogenic substrate assay and gelatin zymography. Molecular homology modeling was carried out to address the activation mode of Pf-calpain in the aspect of structural moiety. Results Based on the measurement of enzymatic activity and protease inhibitor assay, it was found that the active form of Pf-calpain only contains the catalytic subdomain IIa, suggesting that Pf-calpain may function as a monomeric form. The sequence prediction indicates that the catalytic subdomain IIa contains all amino acid residues necessary for catalytic triad (Cys-His-Asn formation. Molecular modeling suggests that the Pf-calpain subdomain IIa makes an active site, holding the catalytic triad residues in their appropriate orientation for catalysis. The mutation analysis further supports that those amino acid residues are functional and have enzymatic activity. Conclusion The identified active form of Pf-calpain could be utilized to establish high-throughput screening system for Pf-calpain inhibitors. Due to its unique monomeric structural property, Pf-calpain could be served as a novel anti-malarial drug target, which has a high specificity for malaria parasite

  16. Health, perceived quality of life and health services use among homeless illicit drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, K K; Schuttke, A; Alhakeem, A; Donnelly-Swift, E; Keogh, C; O'Carroll, A; O'Sullivan, K; Galvin, R; Fahey, T

    2015-09-01

    Drug misuse has been identified as a significant problem in homeless populations. This study examines aspects of physical and mental health, perceived quality of life and health service use among homeless illicit drug users and compares these to non-drug users. Participants were recruited through health clinics across Dublin. A questionnaire assessed participants' drug use, health and well-being, health behaviours and use of health services. Descriptive statistics are presented for the entire cohort and drug users separately. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between drug use and (i) multimorbidity, (ii) anxiety and/or depression, (iii) perceived quality of life and (iv) use of health services. Of 105 participants recruited, 35 (33%) were current drug users. Current and previous drug users were significantly more likely to have multimorbidity than those who had never taken drugs (OR 4.86, 95% CI 1.00-23.66). There was no significant difference between drug users and non-drug users in the prevalence of anxiety and/or depression. Drug users were five times more likely than non-drug users to have a low perceived quality of life (OR 5.2, 95% CI 1.7-16.0). Health service utilization was high, although some services were used less by drug users (e.g., dentist and psychiatric outpatient services) while others were used more often (e.g., phoneline services and day care centres). This study highlights the high levels of drug use in this population and the negative impact of drug use on health and perceived quality of life of a homeless population in Dublin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. How the media do drugs: quality control and the reporting of drug issues in the UK print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomber; Morris; Dunn

    2000-05-01

    Exaggeration, distortion, inaccuracy, sensationalism; each of these labels has been consistently applied to the reporting of drug related issues in the print and other media over the last 40 years and beyond. This research sought to understand what quality control mechanisms are employed by the UK print media in relation to issues related to illicit drugs to ensure accurate, informed and appropriate reporting. It was found that the print media in the UK employ almost no quality control mechanisms to ensure that such reporting takes place and that they predominately rely on the demonstrably insufficient qualities of the 'good reporting' skills that journalists bring to their research and writing. What concerns did exist regarding accuracy related predominately to protecting the publication from being sued for libel and no specific journalistic expertise of drug issues was considered necessary. A discussion of these issues is undertaken followed by the recommendation for the production of a negotiated media guide.

  18. Quality assurance of herbal drug valerian by chemotaxonomic markers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... under 366 nm UV light. This is a very reliable and reproducible method of authentication of a particular herbal drug and differen- tiation of problematic medicinal plants on the basis of TLC fingerprints. Digital photography. A digital camera (Sony, DSC-W50) was used in the photography of the herbal drugs ...

  19. 42 CFR 423.153 - Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug utilization management, quality assurance, and... management, quality assurance, and medication therapy management programs (MTMPs). (a) General rule. Each... utilization management program, quality assurance measures and systems, and an MTMP as described in paragraphs...

  20. The relationship between guilt and quality of drug experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R G; Schill, T R; Monroe, S

    1978-10-01

    Consistent with predictions from Mosher's (1966) guilt construct, the present study found that high guilt males, compared with low guilt Ss, reported significantly less use of marijuana, depressant, stimulant and hallucinogenic drugs. Among all Ss who reported at least one use within each drug category, high guilt Ss rated their experiences as less pleasant and reported a higher frequency of "bad trips" than did low guilt individuals. Overall, these results support Mosher's contention that high vs. low guilt Ss are less likely to engage in culturally prohibited activities such as drug use and are more likely to have unpleasant experiences resulting from guilt when such activities are pursued.

  1. Adverse drug reactions in Nigerian children: a retrospective review of reports submitted to the Nigerian Pharmacovigilance Centre from 2005 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obebi Cliff-Eribo, Kennedy; Sammons, Helen; Star, Kristina; Ralph Edwards, I; Osakwe, Adeline; Choonara, Imti

    2016-11-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in children recorded in national pharmacovigilance databases in high-income countries have been analysed. Nigeria has a population of 31 million children and became a member of the WHO Programme for International Drug Monitoring in 2004 since when it has been submitting reports of suspected ADRs to the WHO Global Individual Case Safety Report database, VigiBase. To gain information on reported ADRs in Nigerian children aged 0-17 years in VigiBase from 2005 to 2012. The data were analysed for annual reports, age and sex of patients, type of reporters, suspected drugs and adverse reactions. The most commonly reported ADRs and suspected drugs were ranked, and drugs associated with the fatalities were evaluated. A total of 297 reports of 473 ADRs in 297 children were received from doctors, pharmacists, other health-care professionals and consumers during the period. ADRs were most frequently reported for anti-retrovirals (74, 24%), antibiotics (71, 23%) and anti-malarials (60, 20%). The most frequently reported ADRs were rash (15.2%), fever (10.3%) and pruritus (6.8%). Anti-infective agents were responsible for more than half of the reports. Twenty-one children (7%) died, eight from acute renal failure. Seven of the cases of acute renal failure were associated with contaminated paracetamol/diphenhydramine hydrochloride and herbal medicines used for teething problems. In the majority of cases, the products were contaminated with diethylene glycol. There were 14 cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, three of which were fatal. Anti-infective agents (antibiotics, anti-malarials and anti-retrovirals) were associated with a majority of the ADRs. Stevens-Johnson syndrome was the most frequent severe ADR. Some of the fatalities were associated with sub-standard and herbal medications.

  2. Is the quality of brief motivational interventions for drug use in primary care associated with subsequent drug use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palfai, Tibor P; Cheng, Debbie M; Bernstein, Judith A; Palmisano, Joseph; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine A; Goodness, Tracie; Saitz, Richard

    2016-05-01

    Although a number of brief intervention approaches for drug use are based on motivational interviewing (MI), relatively little is known about whether the quality of motivational interviewing skills is associated with intervention outcomes. The current study examined whether indices of motivational interviewing skill were associated with subsequent drug use outcomes following two different MI-based brief interventions delivered in primary care; a 15 min Brief Negotiated Interview (BNI) and a 45 min adaptation of motivational interviewing (MOTIV). Audio recordings from 351 participants in a randomized controlled trial for drug use in primary care were coded using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Scale, (MITI Version 3.1.1). Separate negative binomial regression analyses, stratified by intervention condition, were used to examine the associations between six MITI skill variables and the number of days that the participant used his/her main drug 6 weeks after study entry. Only one of the MITI variables (% reflections to questions) was significantly associated with the frequency of drug use in the MOTIV condition and this was opposite to the hypothesized direction (global p=0.01, adjusted IRR 1.50, 95%CI: 1.03-2.20 for middle vs. lowest tertile [higher skill, more drug use]. None were significantly associated with drug use in the BNI condition. Secondary analyses similarly failed to find consistent predictors of better drug outcomes. Overall, this study provides little evidence to suggest that the level of MI intervention skills are linked with better drug use outcomes among people who use drugs and receive brief interventions in primary care. Findings should be considered in light of the fact that data from the study are from negative trial of SBI and was limited to primary care patients. Future work should consider alternative ways of examining these process variables (i.e., comparing thresholds of proficient versus non-proficient skills) or

  3. Equilibrium solubility measurement of ionizable drugs – consensus recommendations for improving data quality

    OpenAIRE

    Avdeef, Alex; Fuguet, Elisabet; Llinàs, Antonio; Ràfols, Clara; Bosch, Elisabeth; Völgyi, Gergely; Verbić, Tatjana; Boldyreva, Elena; Takács-Novák, Krisztina

    2016-01-01

    This commentary addresses data quality in equilibrium solubility measurement in aqueous solution. Broadly discussed is the “gold standard” shake-flask (SF) method used to measure equilibrium solubility of ionizable drug-like molecules as a function of pH. Many factors affecting the quality of the measurement are recognized. Case studies illustrating the analysis of both solution and solid state aspects of solubility measurement are presented. Coverage includes drug aggregation in solution (su...

  4. Drug treatment in the elderly: an intervention in primary care to enhance prescription quality and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Inger Nordin; Runnamo, Rebecka; Engfeldt, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effect on prescription quality and quality of life after intervention with prescription reviews and promotion of patient participation in primary care. A randomized controlled study with three groups: (A) controls, (B) prescription review sent to physician, and (C) as in B and with a current comprehensive medication record sent to the patient. The municipality of Örebro, Sweden (130 000 inhabitants). The study focused on the easiest possible intervention to increase prescription quality and thereby increase quality of life. The intervention should be cost-efficient, focus on colleague-to-colleague advice, and be possible to perform in the primary health care centre without additional resources such as a pharmacist. 150 patients recently discharged from hospital. Inclusion criteria were: ≥ 75 years, ≥ five drugs and living in ordinary homes. Quality of life (EQ-5D index, EQ VAS) and quality of prescriptions. Extreme polypharmacy was common and persistent in all three groups and this was accompanied by an unchanged frequency of drug-risk indicators. There was a low EQ-5D index and EQ VAS in all three groups throughout the study. No statistically significant differences were found anywhere between the groups. The intervention seems to have had no effect on quality of prescriptions or quality of life. This underlines the major challenge of finding new strategies for improving prescription quality to improve patient outcome measures such as quality of life and reduce the known risks of polypharmacy for the elderly.

  5. Formulation, quality control and shelf life of the experimental cytostatic drug cyclopentenyl cytosine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schimmel, Kirsten; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; van Kan, Erik

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the formulation and quality control of an aqueous sterilized formulation of the experimental cytostatic drug cyclopentenyl cytosine (CPEC) to be used in Phase I/II clinical trials. The raw drug substance was extensively tested. A High Pressure Liquid Chromotography (HPLC) method

  6. Microbiological Quality of some Expired Drugs in Sokoto Metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    5Department of Biological Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria. 6Department of Science ... ABSTRACT: Twenty eight samples of expired drugs were obtained from different medical stores including. Sokoto State Medical Store in .... prevented completely through testing of the final product (Orji, 2003).

  7. Microbiological Quality of some Expired Drugs in Sokoto Metropolis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nutrient agar plates were incubated at 37oC for 24 hours and the Malt Extract plates were incubated at 26oC for 3-7 days After incubation, the organisms were identified using a combination of microscopy and biochemical tests. For each drug, the procedure was repeated four times. The frequency of occurrence of each ...

  8. Quality of drug label information on QT interval prolongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam J; Holtkamp, Frank A; Rutten, Frans H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information regarding QT-prolongation in the drug label may vary between products. This could lead to suboptimal risk minimization strategies. OBJECTIVE: To systematically assess the variation in the extent and content of information on QT prolongation in the summary of product...

  9. Quality of life in children with adverse drug reactions: a narrative and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozzo-Magaña, Blanca R; Rieder, Michael J; Lazo-Langner, Alejandro

    2015-10-01

    Adverse drug reactions are a common problem affecting adults and children. The economic impact of the adverse drug reactions has been widely evaluated; however, studies of the impact on the quality of life of children with adverse drug reactions are scarce. The aim was to evaluate studies assessing the health-related quality of life of children with adverse drug reactions. We conducted a systematic review that included the following electronic databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library (including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and the Health Technology Assessment Databases). Nine studies were included. Four of the studies were conducted in children with epilepsy; the rest of them involved children with chronic viral hepatitis, Crohn's disease, paediatric cancer and multiple adverse drug reactions compared with healthy children. Based on their findings, authors of all studies concluded that adverse drug reactions had a negative impact on the quality of life of children. No meta-analysis was conducted given the heterogeneous nature of the studies. To date, there is no specific instrument that measures quality of life of children with adverse drug reactions, and the information available is poor and variable. In general, adverse drug reactions have a negative impact on the quality of life of affected children. For those interested in this area, more work needs to be done to improve tools that help to evaluate efficiently the health-related quality of life of children with adverse drug reactions and chronic diseases. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Review of Drug Quality and Security Act of 2013: The Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elona Gjini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA signed into law in November 27, 2013 by president Obama creates a uniform national standard for tracing drug products through the supply chain. The goal of DQSA is to enhance FDA’s ability to help protect consumers by detecting and removing potential dangerous products from the pharmaceutics distribution supply chain. A new electronic, interoperable system will identify and trace only prescription drugs in the finished form for human use while distributed in the United States. The purpose of this review was to shed light on a complex and complicated process that it will require cooperation between FDA and drug manufactures, wholesale drug distributors, repackagers and dispensers. The implementation of the DSCSA is based on several law requirements and FDA has developed a schedule with time frames for each of them to be executed over a 10-year period. From this review, FDA recommendations are provided through the FDA Guidance on Identifying Suspect Product document to help trading partners and provide information about the risk of suspect drugs entering the supply chain. Moreover, FDA organized on April 5-6, 2016 in Silver Spring, MD a public workshop to gather valuable feedback from stakeholders who shared their input about the implementation of the new electronic system and its requirements. By the end of 2023, a unified system will provide easier data exchange and less errors, and will increase the safety and security of the pharmaceutical distribution supply chain.   Type: Student Project

  11. Use of a colorimetric (DELI) test for the evaluation of chemoresistance of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt-Riccio, Lilian R; Chehuan, Yonne F; Siqueira, Maria José; das Graças Alecrim, Maria; Bianco-Junior, Cesare; Druilhe, Pierre; Brasseur, Philippe; de Fátima Ferreira-da-Cruz, Maria; Carvalho, Leonardo J M; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio T

    2013-08-12

    The emergence and spread of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax resistance to available anti-malarial drugs represents a major drawback in the control of malaria and its associated morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemoresistance profile of P. falciparum and P. vivax to commonly used anti-plasmodial drugs in a malaria-endemic area in the Brazilian Amazon. The study was carried out in Manaus (Amazonas state), in the Brazilian Amazon. A total of 88 P. falciparum and 178 P. vivax isolates was collected from 2004 to 2007. The sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates was determined to chloroquine, quinine, mefloquine and artesunate and the sensitivity of P. vivax isolates was determined to chloroquine and mefloquine, by using the colorimetric DELI test. As expected, a high prevalence of P. falciparum isolates resistant to chloroquine (78.1%) was observed. The prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance or decreased sensitivity for quinine, mefloquine and artesunate was 12.7, 21.2 and 11.7%, respectively. In the case of P. vivax, the prevalence of isolates with profile of resistance for chloroquine and mefloquine was 9.8 and 28%, respectively. No differences in the frequencies of isolates with profile of resistance or geometric mean IC50s were seen when comparing the data obtained in 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007, for all tested anti-malarials. The great majority of P. falciparum isolates in the Brazilian malaria-endemic area remain resistant to chloroquine, and the decreased sensitivity to quinine, mefloquine and artesunate observed in 10-20% of the isolates must be taken with concern, especially for artesunate. Plasmodium vivax isolates also showed a significant proportion of isolates with decreased sensitivity to chloroquine (first-line drug) and mainly to mefloquine. The data presented here also confirm the usefulness of the DELI test to generate results able to impact on public health policies.

  12. A multiple biomarker assay for quality assessment of botanical drugs using a versatile microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Hao; Ai, Ni; Yu, Lawrence X; Qian, Zhong-Zhi; Cheng, Yi-Yu

    2017-09-25

    Quality control is critical for ensuring the safety and effectiveness of drugs. Current quality control method for botanical drugs is mainly based on chemical testing. However, chemical testing alone may not be sufficient as it may not capture all constituents of botanical drugs. Therefore, it is necessary to establish a bioassay correlating with the drug's known mechanism of action to ensure its potency and activity. Herein we developed a multiple biomarker assay to assess the quality of botanicals using microfluidics, where enzyme inhibition was employed to indicate the drug's activity and thereby evaluate biological consistency. This approach was exemplified on QiShenYiQi Pills using thrombin and angiotensin converting enzyme as "quality biomarkers". Our results demonstrated that there existed variations in potency across different batches of the intermediates and preparations. Compared with chromatographic fingerprinting, the bioassay provided better discrimination ability for some abnormal samples. Moreover, the chip could function as "affinity chromatography" to identify bioactive phytochemicals bound to the enzymes. This work proposed a multiple-biomarker strategy for quality assessment of botanical drugs, while demonstrating for the first time the feasibility of microfluidics in this field.

  13. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    population receiving oral antihyperglycaemic treatment (9,791 persons) was set up, and indicator positives identified (Articles no. 2 and 3). The third step in the model consisted of a risk assessment of preventable adverse drug events, including an assessment of clinical areas that need quality improvement...... events are common in primary care, with many resulting in hospitalisation. Projected to a Danish setting, 216,000 patients will experience a preventable adverse drug event each year, and 162,000 of these patients will need hospital admission. Quality improvement interventions should target errors......Summary Background: Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use process, and are of particular interest when designing interventions to improve the quality of medication therapy. Type 2...

  14. Drug policy and administration affecting quality of life of the poor in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prutipinyo, Chardsumon; Sirichotiratana, Nithat

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to analyze drug policy and administration affecting quality of life of the poor in Thailand. Review of official reports and related documents, for the past 10 years (from 2000-2010). By imposing compulsory licensing, the Thai government maintains negotiating power over the price of pharmaceutical products with the patent holders of the original drugs. This gives an opportunity for relevant government agencies to produce or import patented drugs. At present, there are many problems and obstacles. The findings show that developing countries need to strengthen their negotiating power so that the pharmaceutical manufacturers cannot take advantage through mechanisms provided for such as compulsory licensing and provisions for flexibility in Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement. Furthermore, these countries must support and empower the local pharmaceutical manufacturers to produce generic drugs. Developing countries should ensure that their populations have confidence in universal coverage service and medical systems regarding the quality of generic drugs.

  15. Quality indicators of preventable adverse drug events in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Linda Aagaard

    interventions against medication errors. Methods: A systematic literature review of the available literature on preventable adverse A systematic literature review of the available literature on preventable adverse drug events was conducted to describe the incidence and characteristics of preventable adverse......Summary Background: Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use Preventable adverse drug events are caused by errors in the medication use process, and are of particular interest when designing interventions to improve the quality of medication therapy. Type 2...... diabetes became the case because a large proportion of patients are undertreated and not monitored as recommended; yet, the epidemiology of preventable adverse drug events in type 2 diabetes is largely unknown. The aims of the studies were to develop quality indicators for preventable adverse drug events...

  16. Prescription drugs in nursing homes: managing costs and quality in a complex environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Dan; Ramchand, Rajeev; Abramson, Richard; Tumlinson, Anne

    2002-11-12

    This brief provides a description of prescription drug use in nursing homes and a summary of current policy issues in this area. The brief first profiles the nursing home pharmaceutical market, outlining the major trends in demographics and drug utilization, the supply chain by which drugs go from manufacturers to pharmacies to nursing home residents, and the alternative arrangements by which prescription drugs in nursing homes are financed. The brief then provides a synopsis of current policy issues, focusing in turn on cost containment and quality improvement initiatives.

  17. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    requirements for the registration, assessment, marketing, authorization, and quality control of .... The mobile phase was consisted of a mixture of methanol, dichloromethane, ammonia and acetonitrile. (40:40:20:10) as stated in BP 2004. A test solution of 0.05% w/v was prepared by mixing 750 ml of water with powdered ...

  18. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. An attempt was made to assess the quality and compare the physicochemical equivalence of six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets marketed in Tigray, Ethiopia. Six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets were used in the study. Identity, weight uniformity test, disintegration test, dissolution test and assay for the content of ...

  19. Quality of Life and Adherence to Antiretroviral Drugs | Mweemba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quality of life is a complex broad ranging multidimensional concept defined in terms of individual's subjective experiences. The definition by the ... Antiretroviral regimens are demanding and difficult, with numerous possible side effects and patients need to take the pills for indefinite periods of time. Efficacy of antiretroviral ...

  20. Quality Assessment of the Commonly Prescribed Antimicrobial Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An attempt was made to assess the quality and compare the physicochemical equivalence of six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets marketed in Tigray, Ethiopia. Six brands of ciprofloxacin tablets were used in the study. Identity, weight uniformity test, disintegration test, dissolution test and assay for the content of active ...

  1. Eye disorders reported with the use of mefloquine (Lariam(®)) chemoprophylaxis--A drug safety database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamcova, Miriam; Schaerer, Martin T; Bercaru, Isabella; Cockburn, Iain; Rhein, Hans-Georg; Schlagenhauf, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Between 80 and 90 million travellers visit malaria endemic areas annually and many require malaria chemoprophylaxis. The characterization of the risk and nature of eye disorders occurring during the use of malaria chemoprophylaxis is relevant for travel medicine advisors. We did a database analysis on eye disorder adverse events reported for mefloquine (as Lariam®) using the F. Hoffmann-La Roche global drug safety database for the time frame February 1984 to January 18th, 2011. These adverse event reports were reviewed by a trained ophthalmologist. The analysis focused on 3 categories of eye disorders--Category 1: visual acuity; Category 2: anatomical parts of the eye and Category 3: neuro-ophthalmic events. To put our analysis in context, an extensive literature search on "mefloquine" and "eye disorders" was conducted. A total of 591 cases with 695 events assigned to the "Eye disorder" SOC in individuals exposed to mefloquine chemoprophylaxis were reported. The highest proportion of events (n = 493, 70.9%) was in Category 1: visual acuity (mainly visual impairment and blurred vision), followed by Category 3: neuro-ophthalmic events (n = 124, 17.8%). The majority of visual adverse events were non-serious but 37.7% (n = 223) of cases were classified as serious. Nine events of maculopathy were reported and 48 cases with 53 events described symptoms of optic neuropathy. Mefloquine, like other anti-malarials, may be associated with eye disorders. Prescribers of anti-malarials should inform travellers regarding the risk of potential ocular side effects. Users of chemoprophylaxis who experience visual disorders should be referred to an ophthalmologist. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Use of refractometry and colorimetry as field methods to rapidly assess antimalarial drug quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael D; Nettey, Henry; Villalva Rojas, Ofelia; Pamanivong, Chansapha; Khounsaknalath, Lamphet; Grande Ortiz, Miguel; Newton, Paul N; Fernández, Facundo M; Vongsack, Latsamy; Manolin, Ot

    2007-01-04

    The proliferation of counterfeit and poor-quality drugs is a major public health problem; especially in developing countries lacking adequate resources to effectively monitor their prevalence. Simple and affordable field methods provide a practical means of rapidly monitoring drug quality in circumstances where more advanced techniques are not available. Therefore, we have evaluated refractometry, colorimetry and a technique combining both processes as simple and accurate field assays to rapidly test the quality of the commonly available antimalarial drugs; artesunate, chloroquine, quinine, and sulfadoxine. Method bias, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy relative to high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis of drugs collected in the Lao PDR were assessed for each technique. The HPLC method for each drug was evaluated in terms of assay variability and accuracy. The accuracy of the combined method ranged from 0.96 to 1.00 for artesunate tablets, chloroquine injectables, quinine capsules, and sulfadoxine tablets while the accuracy was 0.78 for enterically coated chloroquine tablets. These techniques provide a generally accurate, yet simple and affordable means to assess drug quality in resource-poor settings.

  3. Strengthening of national capacity in implementation of antimalarial drug quality assurance in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijaykadga, Saowanit; Cholpol, Sawat; Sitthimongkol, Saipin; Pawaphutanan, Anusorn; Pinyoratanachot, Arunya; Rojanawatsirivet, Chaiporn; Kovithvattanapong, Rojana; Thimasarn, Krongthong

    2006-01-01

    Substandard and counterfeit pharmaceutical products, including antimalarial drugs, appear to be widespread internationally and affect both the developing and developed countries. The aim of the study was to investigate the quality of antimalarial drugs, ie, artesunate (ART), chloroquine (CHL), mefloquine (MEF), quinine (QUI), sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (S/P) and tetracycline (TT) obtained from the government sector and private pharmacies in 4 Thai provinces: Mae Hong Son, Kanchanaburi, Ranong, and Chanthaburi. Three hundred sixty-nine samples of 6 antimalarial drugs from 27 government hospitals, 27 malaria clinics, and 53 drugstores, were collected. Drug quality was assessed by simple disintegration test and semi-quantitative thin-layer chromatography in each province; 10% passed, 100% failed and doubtful samples were sent to be verified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) at the Thai National Drug Analysis Laboratory, (NL). Fifteen point four percent of ART, 11.1% of CHL and 29.4% of QUI were substandard. Based on the finding, drug regulatory authorities in the country took appropriate action against violators to ensure that antimalarial drugs consumed by malaria patients are of good quality.

  4. The method of quality marker research and quality evaluation of traditional Chinese medicine based on drug properties and effect characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tiejun; Bai, Gang; Han, Yanqi; Xu, Jun; Gong, Suxiao; Li, Yazhuo; Zhang, Hongbing; Liu, Changxiao

    2018-03-01

    Quality of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) plays a critical role in industry of TCM. Rapid development of TCM pharmaceutical areas is, however, greatly limited, since there are many issues not been resolved, concerning the quality study of TCM. Core concept of TCM quality as well as the characteristics of TCM was discussed, in order to guide the quality research and evaluation of TCM, further improve the level of TCM quality control. In this review, on the basis of systematic analysis of fundamental property and features of TCM in clinical application, the approaches and methods of quality marker (Q-marker) study were proposed through combination of transitivity and traceability of essentials of quality, correlation between chemical ingredients and drug property/efficacy, as well as analysis of endemicity of ingredients sharing similar pharmacophylogenetic and biosynthetic approaches. The approaches and methods of Q-marker study were proposed and the novel integrated pattern for quality assessment and control of TCM was established. The core concept of Q-marker has helped to break through the bottleneck of the current fragmented quality research of TCM and improved the scientificity, integrity and systematicness of quality control. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Dihydrofolate reductase: A potential drug target in trypanosomes and leishmania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccotto, Fabio; Martin, Andrew C. R.; Laskowski, Roman A.; Thornton, Janet M.; Gilbert, Ian H.

    1998-05-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase has successfully been used as a drug target in the area of anti-cancer, anti-bacterial and anti-malarial chemotherapy. Little has been done to evaluate it as a drug target for treatment of the trypanosomiases and leishmaniasis. A crystal structure of Leishmania major dihydrofolate reductase has been published. In this paper, we describe the modelling of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei dihydrofolate reductases based on this crystal structure. These structures and models have been used in the comparison of protozoan, bacterial and human enzymes in order to highlight the different features that can be used in the design of selective anti-protozoan agents. Comparison has been made between residues present in the active site, the accessibility of these residues, charge distribution in the active site, and the shape and size of the active sites. Whilst there is a high degree of similarity between protozoan, human and bacterial dihydrofolate reductase active sites, there are differences that provide potential for selective drug design. In particular, we have identified a set of residues which may be important for selective drug design and identified a larger binding pocket in the protozoan than the human and bacterial enzymes.

  6. Report of the WHO Collaborating Centre for Quality Assurance of Essential Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drs. R. Pandjaitan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available National Quality Control Laboratory of Drugs and Food (NQCL DF is a central quality control laboratory for pharmaceuticals and food commodities under the supervision of the Director General of Drug and Food Control, Ministry of Health.Based on the Ministry of Health Act.No. 145/Menkes/SK/IV/1978, in 1978, NQCL DF was established. In the same year 27 Provincial Quality Control Laboratory of Drug and Food (PQCL DF, in each province in Indonesia were also established based on the Ministry of Health Act.No. 146/Menkes/ SK/IV/1978. The objective of NQCL DF are: To protect the consumers from adulterated or misbranded pharmaceutical and food commodities.To evaluated and to accrediate the quality control laboratories of pharmaceuticals and food commoditities.To control and give guidance to all quality control laboratories of drug and food.To stimulate the quality of domestic pro­ducts of pharmaceuticals and food com­modities to promote the volume of exports.

  7. Poor-quality antimalarial drugs in southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Gaurvika M L; Breman, Joel G; Newton, Paul N; Herrington, James

    2012-06-01

    Poor-quality antimalarial drugs lead to drug resistance and inadequate treatment, which pose an urgent threat to vulnerable populations and jeopardise progress and investments in combating malaria. Emergence of artemisinin resistance or tolerance in Plasmodium falciparum on the Thailand-Cambodia border makes protection of the effectiveness of the drug supply imperative. We reviewed published and unpublished studies reporting chemical analyses and assessments of packaging of antimalarial drugs. Of 1437 samples of drugs in five classes from seven countries in southeast Asia, 497 (35%) failed chemical analysis, 423 (46%) of 919 failed packaging analysis, and 450 (36%) of 1260 were classified as falsified. In 21 surveys of drugs from six classes from 21 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, 796 (35%) of 2297 failed chemical analysis, 28 (36%) of 77 failed packaging analysis, and 79 (20%) of 389 were classified as falsified. Data were insufficient to identify the frequency of substandard (products resulting from poor manufacturing) antimalarial drugs, and packaging analysis data were scarce. Concurrent interventions and a multifaceted approach are needed to define and eliminate criminal production, distribution, and poor manufacturing of antimalarial drugs. Empowering of national medicine regulatory authorities to protect the global drug supply is more important than ever. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Drug management in acute kidney disease - Report of the Acute Disease Quality Initiative XVI meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, Marlies; Chawla, Lakhmir S; Forni, Lui G; Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Kellum, John A; Koyner, Jay; Murray, Patrick T; Ronco, Claudio; Goldstein, Stuart L

    2018-02-01

    To summarize and extend the main conclusions and recommendations relevant to drug management during acute kidney disease (AKD) as agreed at the 16 th Acute Disease Quality Initiative (ADQI) consensus conference. Using a modified Delphi method to achieve consensus, experts attending the 16 th ADQI consensus conference reviewed and appraised the existing literature on drug management during AKD and identified recommendations for clinical practice and future research. The group focussed on drugs with one of the following characteristics: (i) predominant renal excretion; (ii) nephrotoxicity; (iii) potential to alter glomerular function; and (iv) presence of metabolites that are modified in AKD and may affect other organs. We recommend that medication reconciliation should occur at admission and discharge, at AKD diagnosis and change in AKD phase, and when the patient's condition changes. Strategies to avoid adverse drug reactions in AKD should seek to minimize adverse events from overdosing and nephrotoxicity and therapeutic failure from under-dosing or incorrect drug selection. Medication regimen assessment or introduction of medications during the AKD period should consider the nephrotoxic potential, altered renal and nonrenal elimination, the effects of toxic metabolites and drug interactions and altered pharmacodynamics in AKD. A dynamic monitoring plan including repeated serial assessment of clinical features, utilization of renal diagnostic tests and therapeutic drug monitoring should be used to guide medication regimen assessment. Drug management during different phases of AKD requires an individualized approach and frequent re-assessment. More research is needed to avoid drug associated harm and therapeutic failure. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  9. Quality assurance of chemical ingredient classification for the National Drug File - Reference Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling; Yumak, Hasan; Chen, Ling; Ochs, Christopher; Geller, James; Kapusnik-Uner, Joan; Perl, Yehoshua

    2017-09-01

    The National Drug File - Reference Terminology (NDF-RT) is a large and complex drug terminology consisting of several classification hierarchies on top of an extensive collection of drug concepts. These hierarchies provide important information about clinical drugs, e.g., their chemical ingredients, mechanisms of action, dosage form and physiological effects. Within NDF-RT such information is represented using tens of thousands of roles connecting drugs to classifications. In previous studies, we have introduced various kinds of Abstraction Networks to summarize the content and structure of terminologies in order to facilitate their visual comprehension, and support quality assurance of terminologies. However, these previous kinds of Abstraction Networks are not appropriate for summarizing the NDF-RT classification hierarchies, due to its unique structure. In this paper, we present the novel Ingredient Abstraction Network (IAbN) to summarize, visualize and support the audit of NDF-RT's Chemical Ingredients hierarchy and its associated drugs. A common theme in our quality assurance framework is to use characterizations of sets of concepts, revealed by the Abstraction Network structure, to capture concepts, the modeling of which is more complex than for other concepts. For the IAbN, we characterize drug ingredient concepts as more complex if they belong to IAbN groups with multiple parent groups. We show that such concepts have a statistically significantly higher rate of errors than a control sample and identify two especially common patterns of errors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ANTIMICROBIAL, PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL QUALITIES OF MEDICINAL ANTISEPTIC DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paliy D. V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our research results of the study of antimicrobial, physical and chemical qualities of antiseptic medicines of decamethoxin (DCM. Antimicrobial activity of DCM, palisan, decasan, deseptol against srains of S.aureus (n 56, S.epidermidis (n 26, E.coli (n 24, P.mirabilis (n 11, P.vulgaris (n 8 was studied by means of method of serial dilutions. Obtained data of mass spectrometry study of antimicrobial compositions with constant concentrations of DCM have shown that medicinal forms of DCM are complex physical and chemical systems, because of different origin and number of adjuvant ingredients used during their fabrication. Among synthetic quaternary ammonium agents there have been found the substance (commercial name of medicine is decamethoxin to have high antimicrobial activity against strains of grampositive and gram-negative microorganisms, an also C.albicans. There was found that antimicrobial activity of antiseptic palisan had been higher comparably to DCM in equivalent concentration. The composition and concentrations of acting agents and the methodology of preparation of palisan have been substantiated on the basis of microbiological, mass spectrometry characteristics of antiseptics DCM, palisan.

  11. Risky drug use and effects on sleep quality and daytime sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogeil, Rowan P; Phillips, James G; Rajaratnam, Shantha M W; Broadbear, Jillian H

    2015-09-01

    Sleep problems are commonly reported following alcohol and cannabis abuse, but our understanding of sleep in non-clinical drug using populations is limited. The present study examined the sleep characteristics of alcohol and cannabis users recruited from the wider community. Two hundred forty-eight self-identified alcohol and/or cannabis users (131 women and 117 men) with a mean age of 26.41 years completed an online study that was advertised via online forums, print media and flyers. As part of the study, participants completed validated sleep scales assessing sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale) in addition to validated drug scales assessing alcohol (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) and cannabis (Marijuana Screening Inventory) use. Problems with sleep quality were more commonly reported than were complaints of excessive daytime sleepiness. Clinically significant poor sleep quality was associated with comorbid problem alcohol and cannabis use. Women reporting problem alcohol and cannabis use had poorer sleep outcomes than men. Social drug users who report risky alcohol and cannabis use also report poor sleep. Poor sleep quality likely exacerbates any drug-associated problems in non-clinical populations. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Effect of quality chronic disease management for alcohol and drug dependence on addiction outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Theresa W; Saitz, Richard; Cheng, Debbie M; Winter, Michael R; Witas, Julie; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2012-12-01

    We examined the effect of the quality of primary care-based chronic disease management (CDM) for alcohol and/or other drug (AOD) dependence on addiction outcomes. We assessed quality using (1) a visit frequency based measure and (2) a self-reported assessment measuring alignment with the chronic care model. The visit frequency based measure had no significant association with addiction outcomes. The self-reported measure of care-when care was at a CDM clinic-was associated with lower drug addiction severity. The self-reported assessment of care from any healthcare source (CDM clinic or elsewhere) was associated with lower alcohol addiction severity and abstinence. These findings suggest that high quality CDM for AOD dependence may improve addiction outcomes. Quality measures based upon alignment with the chronic care model may better capture features of effective CDM care than a visit frequency measure. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Brett D; Mansfield, Peter R; Spurling, Geoffrey K; Ward, Alison M

    2008-05-20

    Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements), but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few advertisements (2.7%) promoted the assessment of cardiovascular risk

  14. Do advertisements for antihypertensive drugs in Australia promote quality prescribing? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spurling Geoffrey K

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antihypertensive medications are widely prescribed by doctors and heavily promoted by the pharmaceutical industry. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of thiazide diuretics, trends in both promotion and prescription of antihypertensive drugs favour newer, less cost-effective agents. Observational evidence shows correlations between exposure to pharmaceutical promotion and less ideal prescribing. Our study therefore aimed to determine whether print advertisements for antihypertensive medications promote quality prescribing in hypertension. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 113 advertisements for antihypertensive drugs from 4 general practice-oriented Australian medical publications in 2004. Advertisements were evaluated using a quality checklist based on a review of hypertension management guidelines. Main outcome measures included: frequency with which antihypertensive classes were advertised, promotion of thiazide class drugs as first line agents, use of statistical claims in advertisements, mention of harms and prices in the advertisements, promotion of assessment and treatment of cardiovascular risk, promotion of lifestyle modification, and targeting of particular patient subgroups. Results Thiazides were the most frequently advertised drug class (48.7% of advertisements, but were largely promoted in combination preparations. The only thiazide advertised as a single agent was the most expensive, indapamide. No advertisement specifically promoted any thiazide as a better first-line drug. Statistics in the advertisements tended to be expressed in relative rather than absolute terms. Drug costs were often reported, but without cost comparisons between drugs. Adverse effects were usually reported but largely confined to the advertisements' small print. Other than mentioning drug interactions with alcohol and salt, no advertisements promoted lifestyle modification. Few

  15. A new roadmap for biopharmaceutical drug product development: Integrating development, validation, and quality by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Moe, Sheryl; Lim, Fredric J; Wong, Rita L; Sreedhara, Alavattam; Sundaram, Jagannathan; Sane, Samir U

    2011-08-01

    Quality by design (QbD) is a science- and risk-based approach to drug product development. Although pharmaceutical companies have historically used many of the same principles during development, this knowledge was not always formally captured or proactively submitted to regulators. In recent years, the US Food and Drug Administration has also recognized the need for more controls in the drug manufacturing processes, especially for biological therapeutics, and it has recently launched an initiative for Pharmaceutical Quality for the 21st Century to modernize pharmaceutical manufacturing and improve product quality. In the biopharmaceutical world, the QbD efforts have been mainly focused on active pharmaceutical ingredient processes with little emphasis on drug product development. We present a systematic approach to biopharmaceutical drug product development using a monoclonal antibody as an example. The approach presented herein leverages scientific understanding of products and processes, risk assessments, and rational experimental design to deliver processes that are consistent with QbD philosophy without excessive incremental effort. Data generated using these approaches will not only strengthen data packages to support specifications and manufacturing ranges but hopefully simplify implementation of postapproval changes. We anticipate that this approach will positively impact cost for companies, regulatory agencies, and patients, alike. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Low quality of reporting adverse drug reactions in paediatric randomised controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Tjalling W; van Roon, Eric N

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Randomised controlled trials (RCT) offer an opportunity to learn about frequency and character of adverse drug reactions. To improve the quality of reporting adverse effects, the Consort group published recommendations. The authors studied the application of these recommendations in RCTs

  17. Assessment of drug treatment quality in two Danish health-care centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Ejdrup; Edfors, Kajsa

    2011-01-01

    Bridging the primary and secondary sector, health-care centres aim to reduce morbidity and prevent further hospitalization in patients with chronic heart diseases. The aim of this study was to describe the quality of drug treatment in patients with chronic heart diseases in two Copenhagen health-care...

  18. Comparison of indicators assessing the quality of drug prescribing for asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veninga, C.C.M.; Denig, P.; Pont, L.G.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.

    Objective. To compare different indicators for assessing the quality of drug prescribing and establish their agreement in identifying doctors who may not adhere to treatment guidelines. Data Sources/Study Setting. Data from 181 general practitioners (GPs) from The Netherlands. The case of asthma is

  19. Evaluation of the quality of anti Tuberculosis drugs in Lusaka, Zambia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: This was a cross sectional study whose objective was to determine the quality of 3 types of fixed dose combination (FDC) anti TB drugs namely 4FDC, 3FDC and 2FDC tablets available in Lusaka District by assessing the presence of active ingredients and the percentage content of these active ingredients ...

  20. Concepts of illicit drug quality among darknet market users: Purity, embodied experience, craft and chemical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancroft, Angus; Scott Reid, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Users of darknet markets refer to product quality as one of the motivations for buying drugs there, and vendors present quality as a selling point. However, what users understand by quality and how they evaluate it is not clear. This article investigates how users established and compared drug quality. We used a two-stage method for investigating users' assessments. The user forum of a darknet market that we called 'Merkat' was analysed to develop emergent themes. Qualitative interviews with darknet users were conducted, then forum data was analysed again. To enhance the applicability of the findings, the forum was sampled for users who presented as dependent as well as recreational. Quality could mean reliability, purity, potency, and predictability of effect. We focused on the different kinds of knowledge users drew on to assess quality. These were: embodied; craft; and chemical. Users' evaluations of quality depended on their experience, the purpose of use, and its context. Market forums are a case of indigenous harm reduction where users share advise and experiences and can be usefully engaged with on these terms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A review on the status of quality control and standardization of herbal drugs in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Dhiman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Most of the herbal medicines in the world originate from the developing countries. There are ample opportunities for these countries to expand their global export. The world market for botanical medicines including drug products and raw materials has been estimated to have an annual growth rate between 5% and 15%. Total global botanical drug market is estimated at US$62 billion and is expected to grow to the tune of US$5 trillion by the year 2050. In the USA alone, the usage of botanicals has been increased by 380% between the years 1990 and 1997. Materials and Methods: Ayurveda, the Indian system of medicine, is one of the ancient, yet living traditions that face a typical Western bias. Widespread and growing use of botanicals has created public health challenges globally in terms of quality, safety, and efficacy. Results and Discussion: The development of parameters for standardization and quality control of botanicals is a challenging task. Various regulatory authorities, research organizations, and botanical drug manufacturers have contributed in developing guiding principles and addressing issues related to the quality, safety, and efficacy. Conclusions: The present review describes the regulatory aspects of herbal drugs in India and various other countries.

  2. Comparison quality of life patients treated with insulin and oral hypoglycemic drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, A. W.; Nasution, M. S.

    2018-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of chronic metabolic diseases with characteristic hyperglycemia that occurs due to abnormalities in insulin secretion, insulin action or both. Improved quality of life is one of the goals of DM management. This study aims to compare thequality of life in40 patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin therapy and 40 patients using oral hypoglycemic drugs in H. Adam Malik Hospital year 2015. This study is an observational study with cross-sectionalstudy designand consecutive sampling method. Evaluation of the patient’s quality of life taken through interviews and questionnaires using the Short Form-36 questionnaire consistingof8 domains of quality of life. Statistical analysis using unpaired t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Results of the quality of life-based on patient characteristics showed significant differences in education factor (p=0.005) and employment factor (p=0.001). Quality of life-based on therapy showed significant differences in domain role of physical (p=0.005) and domain role of emotional (p=0.038).The quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes using insulin better than using hypoglycemic drug significantly in domain role of physical and domain role of emotions.

  3. [Drug users' quality of life, self-esteem and self-image].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Camila da; Meyer, Carolina; Souza, Gabriel Renaldo de; Ramos, Manoella de Oliveira; Souza, Melissa de Carvalho; Monte, Fernanda Guidarini; Guimarães, Adriana Coutinho de Azevedo; Parcias, Sílvia Rosane

    2013-07-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the quality of life, self-esteem and self-image among drug users of São José Institute in São José in the State of Santa Catarina. The accessibility sample was comprised of 100 male patients with a mean age of 43.0 ± 10.7, who had studied for a mean period of 8.4 ± 3.7 years. 48% of them were married and had been hospitalized or treated for a minimum period of seven days. When the participants were not hospitalized they lived with wives and children (23%), were married (48%), employed (72%), were part of income level B (58%), had done something they regret in their lives (57%) and perceived their health as good (57%). Regarding quality of life, the highest scores were found in the environmental domain (65%) and the lowest scores were in the psychological domain (58%). All patients were taking medication and had low self-esteem and self-image (77% and 96% respectively). The absence of interference of the quality of life on self-esteem and self-image of the drug users was observed by means of logistic regression. Positive quality of life did not interfere in changes in low self-esteem and self-image of drug users.

  4. Benefits of Exercise for the Quality of Life of Drug-Dependent Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez-Meseguer, Jorge; Tortosa-Martínez, Juan; de los Remedios Fernández-Valenciano, María

    2015-01-01

    This study combined quantitative and qualitative research methods to evaluate quality-of-life changes in drug-dependent patients after participation in a group-based exercise program. Quality of life (SF-36) and physical fitness (six-minute Walk Test, Timed Get Up and Go Test, and Chair Stand Test) were quantitatively determined in a group (n=37) of drug-dependent patients before and after a 12-week group exercise program (n=18) or routine care (n=19). Additionally, in-depth interviews were conducted at the end of the program with a subsample of 11 participants from the exercise group. Quantitative results showed improvements in fitness and different aspects of quality of life, such as physical function, mental health, vitality, social function, and general health perception. Qualitative results showed specific physical benefits (decreased injuries and muscle pain, decreased weight, and increased vitality with improvement in activities of daily living), psychological benefits (forgetting about everyday problems, improved mood, decreased stress and anxiety), social benefits, and a reduction in craving. The results of this study provide insight into the importance of exercise for the quality of life and recovery process of drug-dependent patients.

  5. Implications of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act on the quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals used in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, R.; Sheinin, E.B.

    1990-01-01

    The drug sections of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (Title 21 U.S.C.) are intended to assure the consumer that drugs are safe and effective for their intended use. The Act requires that new drugs be approved by the FDA before they go on the market. The regulations for the new drug review process, are contained in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Title 21, sections 312 for Investigational New Drugs (INDs), 314 for New Drug Applications (NDAs). Section 361 deals with radioactive drugs for certain research (RDR) uses. The regulations require that sufficient information be provided on the acceptable limits and the analytical methods used for the assurance of the identity, strength, quality, purity and the stability of the new drug as well as the raw materials used in the preparation of the new drug. The impact of the Act on the control of radiopharmaceutical products will be discussed

  6. The application of the drug user quality of life scale (DUQOL in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaran Carlos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The concept of quality of life relates to the perceptions of individuals about their mental and physical health as well as non-health related areas. The evaluation of quality of life in the context of substance abuse has been conducted using generic instruments. The Drug Users Quality of Life Scale (DUQOL is a specific assessment tool in which the most pertinent and salient areas to drug abusers are taken into consideration. In this study, the authors report the results of a validation study in which the DUQOL was used for the first time in Australia. Methods A sample of 120 participants from inpatient and outpatient treatment facilities completed a series of questionnaires, including the DUQOL and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF. Parameters investigated in this study included the demographic characteristics of the sample, internal structure, and convergent validity. Correlations between the DUQOL scale scores and the scores of the WHOQOL-Bref test were investigated via Pearson product-moment correlation analyses. Results The English version of the DUQOL attained a significant overall Cronbach's alpha of 0.868. The factorial analysis of the DUQOL identified one principal factor that accounted for 28.499% of the variance. Convergent validity analyses demonstrate significant correlations (p Conclusions This study demonstrates that the DUQOL constitutes a reliable research instrument for evaluating quality of life of substance users in Australia.

  7. Batch-to-Batch Quality Consistency Evaluation of Botanical Drug Products Using Multivariate Statistical Analysis of the Chromatographic Fingerprint

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Haoshu; Yu, Lawrence X.; Qu, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    Botanical drug products have batch-to-batch quality variability due to botanical raw materials and the current manufacturing process. The rational evaluation and control of product quality consistency are essential to ensure the efficacy and safety. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an important and widely used tool to characterize the chemical composition of botanical drug products. Multivariate statistical analysis has showed its efficacy and applicability in the quality evaluation of many ...

  8. Poor quality drugs: grand challenges in high throughput detection, countrywide sampling, and forensics in developing countries†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Facundo M.; Hostetler, Dana; Powell, Kristen; Kaur, Harparkash; Green, Michael D.; Mildenhall, Dallas C.; Newton, Paul N.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout history, poor quality medicines have been a persistent problem, with periodical crises in the supply of antimicrobials, such as fake cinchona bark in the 1600s and fake quinine in the 1800s. Regrettably, this problem seems to have grown in the last decade, especially afflicting unsuspecting patients and those seeking medicines via on-line pharmacies. Here we discuss some of the challenges related to the fight against poor quality drugs, and counterfeits in particular, with an emphasis on the analytical tools available, their relative performance, and the necessary workflows needed for distinguishing between genuine, substandard, degraded and counterfeit medicines. PMID:21107455

  9. Milk quality parameters associated with the occurrence of veterinary drug residues in bulk tank milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Cristina Almeida Picinin

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Veterinary drug residues in bulk tank milk are important to all sectors of the dairy chain because they are one of the major factors which determine the safety of the final product. This study attempted to identify milk quality parameters that are associated with the occurrence of veterinary drug residues using multivariate principal component analysis (PCA. A total of 132 raw milk samples were collected from 45 dairy farms in the state of Minas Gerais - Brazil and analyzed for 42 analytes, including pyrethroids, macrocyclic lactones and antibacterials, using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry in tandem mode and gas chromatography with electron capture detection. Out of the 132 milk samples, 40 samples tested positive for at least one analyte (above the detection limit. The milk parameters associated with the antimicrobial residues by confirmatory tests were lactose and nonfat concentrations, as revealed by PCA. This analysis showed that fat and total solid concentrations, as well as the somatic cell and total bacteria counts were associated with macrocyclic lactone residues in bulk tank milk. A PCA assessing pyrethroid residues in bulk tank milk revealed that the lactose and nonfat solid concentrations and titratable acidity were inversely associated with these residues. Thus, the data analysis indicated that the veterinary drug residues were associated with certain milk quality parameters that can be used to target farms at higher risk of veterinary drug residue contamination for testing programs in combination with incentives, education and training programs to improve mammary health, milk hygiene and safety.

  10. Analyses of marketplace tacrolimus drug product quality: bioactivity, NMR and LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Cynthia D; Pang, Eric S; Ghasriani, Houman; Berendt, Robert T; Vilker, Vincent L; Keire, David A; Boyne, Michael T

    2013-11-01

    Tacrolimus (FK506) is a potent, narrow therapeutic index, immunosuppressive drug used to avoid organ rejection in patients that have undergone organ transplantation. Recent clinical reports suggested a significant reduction in the tacrolimus concentration/dose ratio in the plasma of liver and kidney recipients when the reference listed drug was substituted with a generic drug. In response to these concerns about switching between tacrolimus from different approved manufacturers during treatment, the FDA initiated purity, potency and quality studies of the innovator and generic tacrolimus products available in the US marketplace. A combination of analytical methods, including mass spectrometry (LC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and bioactivity assay were developed and validated to assess the quality of tacrolimus. These tests measured the identity, impurities and activity of tacrolimus from active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) sources and with formulated drug product from five different approved manufactures. In addition, some testing was performed on tacrolimus capsules obtained from a non US approved Indian source. The data obtained showed no discernible difference in the impurity profiles and potency between the generic and innovator tacrolimus products. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Equilibrium solubility measurement of ionizable drugs – consensus recommendations for improving data quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avdeef

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This commentary addresses data quality in equilibrium solubility measurement in aqueous solution. Broadly discussed is the “gold standard” shake-flask (SF method used to measure equilibrium solubility of ionizable drug-like molecules as a function of pH. Many factors affecting the quality of the measurement are recognized. Case studies illustrating the analysis of both solution and solid state aspects of solubility measurement are presented. Coverage includes drug aggregation in solution (sub-micellar, micellar, complexation, use of mass spectrometry to assess aggregation in saturated solutions, solid state characterization (salts, polymorphs, cocrystals, polymorph creation by potentiometric method, solubility type (water, buffer, intrinsic, temperature, ionic strength, pH measurement, buffer issues, critical knowledge of the pKa, equilibration time (stirring and sedimentation, separating solid from saturated solution, solution handling and adsorption to untreated surfaces, solubility units, and tabulation/graphic presentation of reported data. The goal is to present cohesive recommendations that could lead to better assay design, to result in improved quality of measurements, and to impart a deeper understanding of the underlying solution chemistry in suspensions of drug solids.

  12. Assessment of the effects of antihistamine drugs on mood, sleep quality, sleepiness, and dream anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Pinar Guzel; Karadag, Ayşe Serap; Selvi, Yavuz; Boysan, Murat; Bilgili, Serap Gunes; Aydin, Adem; Onder, Sevda

    2014-08-01

    There are limited comparative studies on classic and new-generation antihistamines that affect sleep quality and mood. The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the effects of classic and new-generation antihistamines on sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, dream anxiety, and mood. Ninety-two patients with chronic pruritus completed study in the dermatology outpatient clinic. Treatments with regular recommended therapeutic doses were administered. The effects of antihistaminic drugs on mood, daytime sleepiness, dream anxiety, and sleep quality were assessed on the first day and 1 month after. Outpatients who received cetirizine and hydroxyzine treatments reported higher scores on the depression, anxiety, and fatigue sub-scales than those who received desloratadine, levocetirizine, and rupatadine. Pheniramine and rupatadine were found to be associated with daytime sleepiness and better sleep quality. UKU side effects scale scores were significantly elevated among outpatients receiving pheniramine. Classic antihistamines increased daytime sleepiness and decreased the sleep quality scores. New-generation antihistamines reduced sleep latency and dream anxiety, and increased daytime sleepiness and sleep quality. Both antihistamines, significantly increased daytime sleepiness and nocturnal sleep quality. Daytime sleepiness was significantly predicted by rupadatine and pheniramine treatment. Cetirizine and hydroxyzine, seem to have negative influences on mood states. Given the extensive use of antihistamines in clinical settings, these results should be more elaborately examined in further studies.

  13. Cytostatic versus cytocidal profiling of quinoline drug combinations via modified fixed-ratio isobologram analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug combination therapy is the frontline of malaria treatment. There is an ever-accelerating need for new, efficacious combination therapies active against drug resistant malaria. Proven drugs already in the treatment pipeline, such as the quinolines, are important components of current combination therapy and also present an attractive test bank for rapid development of new concepts. Methods The efficacy of several drug combinations versus chloroquine-sensitive and chloroquine-resistant strains was measured using both cytostatic and cytocidal potency assays. Conclusions These screens identify quinoline and non-quinoline pairs that exhibit synergy, additivity, or antagonism using the fixed-ratio isobologram method and find tafenoquine – methylene blue combination to be the most synergistic. Also, interestingly, for selected pairs, additivity, synergy, or antagonism defined by quantifying IC50 (cytostatic potency) does not necessarily predict similar behaviour when potency is defined by LD50 (cytocidal potency). These data further support an evolving new model for quinoline anti-malarials, wherein haem and haemozoin are the principle target for cytostatic activity, but may not be the only target relevant for cytocidal activity. PMID:24044530

  14. Combined Transcriptomics and Metabolomics in a Rhesus Macaque Drug Administration Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multi-omic approach to understanding the effects that the anti-malarial drug pyrimethamine has on immune physiology in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Whole blood and bone marrow RNA-Seq and plasma metabolome profiles (each with over 15,000 features have been generated for five naïve individuals at up to seven time-points before, during and after three rounds of drug administration. Linear modelling and Bayesian network analyses are both considered, alongside investigations of the impact of statistical modeling strategies on biological inference. Individual macaques were found to be a major source of variance for both omic data types, and factoring individuals into subsequent modelling increases power to detect temporal effects. A major component of the whole blood transcriptome follows the bone marrow with a time-delay, while other components of variation are unique to each compartment. We demonstrate that pyrimethamine administration does impact both compartments throughout the experiment, but very limited perturbation of transcript or metabolite abundance following each round of drug exposure is observed. New insights into the mode of action of the drug are presented in the context of pyrimethamine’s predicted effect on suppression of cell division and metabolism in the immune system.

  15. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezmir, Julia; Cohen, Ted; Zignol, Matteo; Nyakan, Edwin; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Gardner, Adrian; Kamle, Lydia; Injera, Wilfred; Carter, E Jane

    2016-01-01

    To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance. This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains. Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints.

  16. Use of Lot Quality Assurance Sampling to Ascertain Levels of Drug Resistant Tuberculosis in Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Jezmir

    Full Text Available To classify the prevalence of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB in two different geographic settings in western Kenya using the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS methodology.The prevalence of drug resistance was classified among treatment-naïve smear positive TB patients in two settings, one rural and one urban. These regions were classified as having high or low prevalence of MDR-TB according to a static, two-way LQAS sampling plan selected to classify high resistance regions at greater than 5% resistance and low resistance regions at less than 1% resistance.This study classified both the urban and rural settings as having low levels of TB drug resistance. Out of the 105 patients screened in each setting, two patients were diagnosed with MDR-TB in the urban setting and one patient was diagnosed with MDR-TB in the rural setting. An additional 27 patients were diagnosed with a variety of mono- and poly- resistant strains.Further drug resistance surveillance using LQAS may help identify the levels and geographical distribution of drug resistance in Kenya and may have applications in other countries in the African Region facing similar resource constraints.

  17. Nurses' perception of the quality of care they provide to hospitalized drug addicts: testing the theory of reasoned action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natan, Merav Ben; Beyil, Valery; Neta, Okev

    2009-12-01

    A correlational design was used to examine nursing staff attitudes and subjective norms manifested in intended and actual care of drug users based on the Theory of Reasoned Action. One hundred and thirty-five nursing staff from three central Israeli hospitals completed a questionnaire examining theory-based variables as well as sociodemographic and professional characteristics. Most respondents reported a high to very high level of actual or intended care of drug users. Nurses' stronger intentions to provide quality care to drug users were associated with more positive attitudes. Nursing staff members had moderately negative attitudes towards drug users. Nurses were found to hold negative stereotypes of drug addict patients and most considered the management of this group difficult. Positive attitudes towards drug users, perceived expectations of others and perceived correctness of the behaviour are important in their effect on the intention of nurses to provide high-quality care to hospitalized patients addicted to drugs.

  18. Drug-related problems and quality of life in arthritis and low back pain sufferers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael E; Iyer, Shrividya S; Doucette, William R

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between drug-related problems (DRPs) and health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) in ambulatory, community-dwelling patients with musculoskeletal disorders. A 12-month, prospective, observational study was conducted in 12 independent community pharmacies in eastern Iowa. Ambulatory patients with self-reported diagnoses of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or low back pain were invited to participate. During quarterly visits to the pharmacy, patients used touch-screen computers to fill out the Short Form-36 (SF-36) general health survey. Using the results of these point-of-service health status assessments, community pharmacists interviewed patients to assess for DRPs. To examine the influences of different DRP characteristics on HRQoL and controlling for potential confounders, both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using the change in physical component summary (PCS) score and mental component summary (MCS) score of the SF-36 from baseline to 12 months as the dependent variables. In each regression, the independent variables were those significant variables from the univariate analyses, as well as the types of DRPs and their outcomes. A total of 461 patients were enrolled in the study. Through 12 months, 926 cumulative DRPs were identified. Overall regression models were significant for the PCS and MCS scores, respectively. Two types of DRPs showed significant negative associations with change in PCS: wrong drug and needs additional drug therapy. One type of DRP showed significant negative association with change in MCS: needs additional drug therapy. Resolution or improvement in DRPs showed a significant positive correlation with change in MCS but not PCS. Two DRPs, needs additional drug therapy and wrong drug, are associated with reduced self-reported physical health in arthritis and low back pain, while the DRP needs additional drug therapy is also associated with reduced self

  19. Injection Drug Use Quality of Life scale (IDUQOL: A validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palepu Anita

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing measures of injection drug users' quality of life have focused primarily on health and health-related factors. Clearly, however, quality of life among injection drug users is impacted by a range of unique cultural, socioeconomic, medical, and geographic factors that must also be considered in any measure. The Injection Drug User Quality of Life (IDUQOL scale was designed to capture the unique and individual circumstances that determine quality of life among injection drug users. The overall purpose of the present study was to examine the validity of inferences made from the IDUQOL by examining the (a dimensionality, (b reliability of scores, (c criterion-related validity evidence, and (d both convergent and discriminant validity evidence. Methods An exploratory factor analysis using principal axis factoring in SPSS 12.0 was conducted to determine whether the use of a total score on the IDUQOL was advisable. Reliability of scores from the IDUQOL was obtained using internal consistency and one-week test-retest reliability estimates. Criterion-related validity evidence was gathered using variables such as stability of housing, sex trade involvement, high-risk injection behaviours, involvement in treatment programs, emergency treatment or overdose over the previous six months, hospitalization and emergency treatment over the subsequent six month period post data collection. Convergent and discriminant validity evidence was gathered using measures of life satisfaction, self-esteem, and social desirability. Results The sample consisted of 241 injection drug users ranging in age from 19 to 61 years. Factor analysis supports the use of a total score. Both internal consistency (alpha = .88 and one-week test-retest reliability (r = .78 for IDUQOL total scores were good. Criterion-related, convergent, and discriminant validity evidence supports the interpretation of IDUQOL total scores as measuring a construct consistent with

  20. Data quality in drug discovery: the role of analytical performance in ligand binding assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätzig, Hermann; Oltmann-Norden, Imke; Steinicke, Franziska; Alhazmi, Hassan A; Nachbar, Markus; El-Hady, Deia Abd; Albishri, Hassan M; Baumann, Knut; Exner, Thomas; Böckler, Frank M; El Deeb, Sami

    2015-09-01

    Despite its importance and all the considerable efforts made, the progress in drug discovery is limited. One main reason for this is the partly questionable data quality. Models relating biological activity and structures and in silico predictions rely on precisely and accurately measured binding data. However, these data vary so strongly, such that only variations by orders of magnitude are considered as unreliable. This can certainly be improved considering the high analytical performance in pharmaceutical quality control. Thus the principles, properties and performances of biochemical and cell-based assays are revisited and evaluated. In the part of biochemical assays immunoassays, fluorescence assays, surface plasmon resonance, isothermal calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance and affinity capillary electrophoresis are discussed in details, in addition radiation-based ligand binding assays, mass spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and microscale thermophoresis are briefly evaluated. In addition, general sources of error, such as solvent, dilution, sample pretreatment and the quality of reagents and reference materials are discussed. Biochemical assays can be optimized to provide good accuracy and precision (e.g. percental relative standard deviation data quality are still advancing and will further advance the progress in drug development.

  1. Cytotoxic Drugs Departments as a precondition for high-quality product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Głuszek

    2014-06-01

    a pharmacy becomes the producer and distributor of oncologic drugs. This is related with high requirements concerning the production of drugs (high quality, safety of the engaged staff, as well as participation in a rational management of medicines. According to the FIP, a pharmacy is a public health care facility where work is performed by authorised persons: Masters of Pharmacy and pharmacy technicians. At present the task of a clinical pharmacist also includes the supervision of activities in the area of clinical pharmacy. This is a new task for pharmacists, who are obliged to constantly expand their knowledge and actively participate in the activities of the medical team.

  2. Assessment of the quality and quantity of drug-drug interaction studies in recent NDA submissions: study design and data analysis issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S M; Lesko, L J; Williams, R L

    1999-10-01

    This report investigates the quality and quantity of drug-drug interaction studies in recent new drug applications (NDAs). Eighty-nine studies contained in 14 NDAs submitted between December 1995 and November 1996 to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were reviewed. The results indicated that the median number of clinical drug-drug interaction studies per NDA was 6, almost double that of a 1994-1995 survey. In vitro metabolism data were present in 70% of the submissions. More than 50% of the submissions contained interaction studies using a battery of drugs (cimetidine, digoxin, or warfarin) without optimal use of the in vitro metabolism or in vivo mass balance data. Various study designs using a median number of 12 subjects were employed in the evaluation of drug-drug interactions. Some of the important study design factors such as dose size, dosing regimen, dosing duration, and timing of coadministration were considered, although not consistently, by the sponsors in their study design. Seventy-five percent of the studies used normal, healthy male subjects, and 25% used patients for whom the new molecular entities were intended. In 33% of the studies, female subjects were also recruited. Although the majority (80%) of the submissions still used p-values to determine the significance of drug interactions, 30% used a more relevant equivalence approach with 90% confidence intervals for key pharmacokinetic and/or pharmacodynamic parameter ratios to assess the extent of drug interactions. Overall, 82% of the studies concluded no interaction. Although population pharmacokinetic analysis can be a useful tool in studying drug-drug interactions, only 21% of the submissions used this approach. In summary, this assessment reveals that the quantity and quality of drug-drug interaction studies in NDAs have improved over the years. These improvements, as well as others that can be implemented, should result in more informative labeling and better patient care. FDA

  3. Quality of online pharmacies and websites selling prescription drugs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orizio, Grazia; Merla, Anna; Schulz, Peter J; Gelatti, Umberto

    2011-09-30

    Online pharmacies are companies that sell pharmaceutical preparations, including prescription-only drugs, on the Internet. Very little is known about this phenomenon because many online pharmacies operate from remote countries, where legal bases and business practices are largely inaccessible to international research. The aim of the study was to perform an up-to-date and comprehensive review of the scientific literature focusing on the broader picture of online pharmacies by scanning several scientific and institutional databases, with no publication time limits. We searched 4 electronic databases up to January 2011 and the gray literature on the Internet using the Google search engine and its tool Google Scholar. We also investigated the official websites of institutional agencies (World Health Organization, and US and European centers for disease control and drug regulation authorities). We focused specifically on online pharmacies offering prescription-only drugs. We decided to analyze and report only articles with original data, in order to review all the available data regarding online pharmacies and their usage. We selected 193 relevant articles: 76 articles with original data, and 117 articles without original data (editorials, regulation articles, or the like) including 5 reviews. The articles with original data cover samples of online pharmacies in 47 cases, online drug purchases in 13, consumer characteristics in 15, and case reports on adverse effects of online drugs in 12. The studies show that random samples with no specific limits to prescription requirements found that at least some websites sold drugs without a prescription and that an online questionnaire was a frequent tool to replace prescription. Data about geographical characteristics show that this information can be concealed in many websites. The analysis of drug offer showed that online a consumer can get virtually everything. Regarding quality of drugs, researchers very often found

  4. Quality assurance of rifampicin-containing fixed-drug combinations in South Africa: dosing implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Court, R; Chirehwa, M T; Wiesner, L; Wright, B; Smythe, W; Kramer, N; McIlleron, H

    2018-05-01

    Rifampicin (RMP) drives treatment response in drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Low RMP concentrations increase the risk of poor outcomes, and drug quality needs to be excluded as a contributor to low RMP exposure. We performed an open-label, three-way cross-over study of three licensed RMP-containing formulations widely used in South Africa to evaluate the bioavailability of RMP in a two-drug fixed-dose combination tablet (2FDC) and a four-drug FDC (4FDC) against a single-drug reference. RMP dosed at 600 mg was administered 2 weeks apart in random sequence. Plasma RMP concentrations were measured pre-dose and 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8 and 12 h post-dose. The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC0-12) of the FDCs was compared to the single drug reference. Simulations were used to predict the impact of our findings. Twenty healthy volunteers (median age 22.8 years, body mass index 24.2 kg/m2) completed the study. The AUC0-12 of the 4FDC/reference (geometric mean ratio [GMR] 78%, 90%CI 69-89) indicated an average 20% reduction in RMP bioavailability in the 4FDC. The 2FDC/reference (GMR 104%, 90%CI 97-111) was bioequivalent. Simulations suggested dose adjustments to compensate for the poor bioavailability of RMP with the 4FDC, and revised weight-band doses to prevent systematic underdosing of low-weight patients. Post-marketing surveillance of in vivo bioavailability of RMP and improved weight band-based dosing are recommended.

  5. The lay user perspective on the quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services--results of focus group discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Marie; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2002-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland.......This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland....

  6. The quality of drugs in private pharmacies in Lao PDR: a repeat study in 1997 and 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syhakhang, Lamphone; Lundborg, Cecilia Stålsby; Lindgren, Björn; Tomson, Göran

    2004-12-01

    To present a repeated test of the quality of ampicillin, tetracycline, chloroquine and ASA from private pharmacies in Laos in 1997 and 1999, and to discuss the quality in relation to the National Drug Policy Programme. A total of 115 of 214 licensed private pharmacies were selected in Savannakhet province, a pilot province in the Lao National Drug Policy Programme. The four drugs, if available, were collected at each pharmacy. Thirty tablets of each drug were taken from a selected container. In 1997, 366 samples were analysed and three hundred in 1999. Identity, assay (content of active component) and measurement of weight variation tests were performed. Drug quality was compared mainly according to the standards of the British and United States' pharmacopoeias. The percentage of substandard drugs decreased significantly from 46% to 22% between 1997 and 1999 (PSubstandard ampicillin and tetracycline were reduced significantly from 67% to 9% and from 38% to 12%, respectively (P active ingredient, 12% vs 4% had too little or too much active ingredient, and 35% vs 14% had weight variation outside pharmacopoeial limits. Drug quality was improved. However, the prevalence of substandard drugs was still unacceptably high, which may result in adverse clinical effect or treatment failure for individual patients.

  7. Injection Drug User Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL: Findings from a content validation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palepu Anita

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of life studies among injection drug users have primarily focused on health-related measures. The chaotic life-style of many injection drug users (IDUs, however, extends far beyond their health, and impacts upon social relationships, employment opportunities, housing, and day to day survival. Most current quality of life instruments do not capture the realities of people living with addictions. The Injection Drug Users' Quality of Life Scale (IDUQOL was developed to reflect the life areas of relevance to IDUs. The present study examined the content validity of the IDUQOL using judgmental methods based on subject matter experts' (SMEs ratings of various elements of this measure (e.g., appropriateness of life areas or items, names and descriptions of life areas, instructions for administration and scoring. Methods Six SMEs were provided with a copy of the IDUQOL and its administration and scoring manual and a detailed content validation questionnaire. Two commonly used judgmental measures of inter-rater agreement, the Content Validity Index (CVI and the Average Deviation Mean Index (ADM, were used to evaluate SMEs' agreement on ratings of IDUQOL elements. Results A total of 75 elements of the IDUQOL were examined. The CVI results showed that all elements were endorsed by the required number of SMEs or more. The ADM results showed that acceptable agreement (i.e., practical significance was obtained for all elements but statistically significant agreement was missed for nine elements. For these elements, SMEs' feedback was examined for ways to improve the elements. Open-ended feedback also provided suggestions for other revisions to the IDUQOL. Conclusion The results of the study provided strong evidence in support of the content validity of the IDUQOL and direction for the revision of some IDUQOL elements.

  8. Relationship Between Time Consumption and Quality of Responses to Drug-related Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amundstuen Reppe, Linda; Lydersen, Stian; Schjøtt, Jan

    2016-01-01

    DICs in Scandinavia, and the time consumption required for processing them was estimated. Clinical pharmacologists (internal experts) and general practitioners (external experts) reviewed responses individually. We used mixed model linear regression analyses to study the associations between time...... in score, –0.05 per hour of work; 95% CI, –0.08 to –0.01; P = 0.005). No such associations were found for the internal experts’ assessment. Implications To our knowledge, this is the first study of the association between time consumption and quality of responses to drug-related queries in DICs...

  9. Green tea in transdermal formulation: HPLC method for quality control and in vitro drug release assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Campos Alves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RP-HPLC based analytical method for use in both quality control of green tea in a semisolid formulation and for in vitro drug release assays was developed and validated. The method was precise (CV 0.99, robust, and specific for the determination of epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG, caffeine (CAF, and gallic acid (GA. In a diffusion cell chamber, the release rate of EGCG was 8896.01 µg cm-2. This data showed that EGCG will be able to exert its systemic activity when delivered though the transdermal formulation, due to its good flux rates with the synthetic membrane.

  10. Monitoring quality and coverage of harm reduction services for people who use drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiessing, Lucas; Ferri, Marica; Běláčková, Vendula

    2017-01-01

    indicators and to present a framework for extending them with additional indicators of coverage and quality of harm reduction services, for monitoring and evaluation at international, national or subnational levels. The ultimate aim is to improve these services in order to reduce health and social problems...... are proposed for opioid agonist therapy (OAT), needle and syringe programmes (NSP) and generic cross-cutting aspects of harm reduction (and potentially other drug) services. Under the specific OAT indicators, priority indicators included 'coverage', 'waiting list time', 'dosage' and 'availability in prisons...

  11. A retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at twelve health facilities in four districts in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascalina Chanda-Kapata

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: Malaria case management was characterised by poor adherence to treatment guidelines. The non-adherence was mainly in terms of: inconsistent use of confirmatory tests (rapid diagnostic test or microscopy for malaria; prescribing anti-malarials which are not recommended (e.g. sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and prescribing anti-malarials to cases testing negative. Innovative approaches are required to improve health worker adherence to diagnosis and treatment guidelines.

  12. The effectiveness of group selection theory on the quality of drug addicted life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sodani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds and aim: Increase in addiction in the community and the plight of its people demand for improving the problems of addicts, indicate a need for individuals to interventions and training expertise. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of group selection theory on the quality of drug addicted life.  .  Methods: This study is an quasi-experimental design with pretest-posttest and follow up with the control group. The study population included: all addicted people who referred to ahvaz addiction treatment center in 2015. 50 addicts were selected by using of  available sampling and randomly divided into  two experimental group (number=25 and control group (number=25. The participants were completed the quality of life inventory in three stages (pre-test, post-test and follow-up after 60 days. The experimental group was received group training of the concepts of selection theory of 10 sessions of 90 minutes per week.Statistical data were analyzed  using of covariance(ANCOVA analysis. Results: Group training theory led to a significant difference among pretest, posttest, and follow-up of quality of addicted people life (p <0.001. In this case, the post-test and follow-up, after controlling of pre-test score, the experimental group compared to the control group higher quality of life was reported. Conclusion: Group training of selected theory about the role of choosing a behavior, five senses  the importance of self control, the role of effective behavior, the way of need fulfilment, responsibility, self worth, Quality world, seven destructive behavior, seven caring behavior, faiure identification and success identification can result in increasing the quality of life for addicted people.

  13. Interlaboratory variability in the quantification of new generation antiepileptic drugs based on external quality assessment data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, John; Bialer, Meir; Johannessen, Svein I; Krämer, Günther; Levy, René; Mattson, Richard H; Perucca, Emilio; Patsalos, Philip N; Wilson, John F

    2003-01-01

    To assess interlaboratory variability in the determination of serum levels of new antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Lyophilised serum samples containing clinically relevant concentrations of felbamate (FBM), gabapentin (GBP), lamotrigine (LTG), the monohydroxy derivative of oxcarbazepine (OCBZ; MHD), tiagabine (TGB), topiramate (TPM), and vigabatrin (VGB) were distributed monthly among 70 laboratories participating in the international Heathcontrol External Quality Assessment Scheme (EQAS). Assay results returned over a 15-month period were evaluated for precision and accuracy. The most frequently measured compound was LTG (65), followed by MHD (39), GBP (19), TPM (18), VGB (15), FBM (16), and TGB (8). High-performance liquid chromatography was the most commonly used assay technique for all drugs except for TPM, for which two thirds of laboratories used a commercial immunoassay. For all assay methods combined, precision was MHD, FBM, TPM, and LTG, close to 15% for GBP and VGB, and as high as 54% for TGB (p methods, except for TPM, for which gas chromatography showed poorer accuracy compared with immunoassay and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. With the notable exception of TGB, interlaboratory variability in the determination of new AEDs was comparable to that reported with older-generation agents. Poor assay performance is related more to individual operators than to the intrinsic characteristics of the method applied. Participation in an EQAS scheme is recommended to ensure adequate control of assay variability in therapeutic drug monitoring.

  14. Eliciting the Intension of Drug Value Sets – Principles and Quality Assurance Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Nathan J.; Nelson, Scott D.; Winnenburg, Rainer; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Value sets (VSs) used in electronic clinical quality measures are lists of codes from standard terminologies (“extensional” VSs), whose purpose (“intension”) is not always explicitly stated. We elicited the intension for the 09/01/2014 release of extensional medication value sets by comparison to drug classes from the October 2014 release of RxClass. Value sets matched drug classes if they shared common ingredients, as evidenced by Jaccard similarity score. We elicited the intension of 80 extensional value sets. The average Jaccard similarity was 0.65 for single classes and 0.80 for combination classes, with 34% (27/80) of the value sets having high similarity scores. Manual review by a pharmacist indicated 51% (41/80) of the drug classes selected as the best mapping for a value set matched the intension reflected in that value set name. This approach has the potential for facilitating the development and maintenance of medication value sets. PMID:29295218

  15. Application of Absorption Modeling in Rational Design of Drug Product Under Quality-by-Design Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Mitra, Amitava

    2015-09-01

    Physiologically based absorption models can be an important tool in understanding product performance and hence implementation of Quality by Design (QbD) in drug product development. In this report, we show several case studies to demonstrate the potential application of absorption modeling in rational design of drug product under the QbD paradigm. The examples include application of absorption modeling—(1) prior to first-in-human studies to guide development of a formulation with minimal sensitivity to higher gastric pH and hence reduced interaction when co-administered with PPIs and/or H2RAs, (2) design of a controlled release formulation with optimal release rate to meet trough plasma concentrations and enable QD dosing, (3) understanding the impact of API particle size distribution on tablet bioavailability and guide formulation design in late-stage development, (4) assess impact of API phase change on product performance to guide specification setting, and (5) investigate the effect of dissolution rate changes on formulation bioperformance and enable appropriate specification setting. These case studies are meant to highlight the utility of physiologically based absorption modeling in gaining a thorough understanding of the product performance and the critical factors impacting performance to drive design of a robust drug product that would deliver the optimal benefit to the patients.

  16. Batch-to-batch quality consistency evaluation of botanical drug products using multivariate statistical analysis of the chromatographic fingerprint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Haoshu; Yu, Lawrence X; Qu, Haibin

    2013-06-01

    Botanical drug products have batch-to-batch quality variability due to botanical raw materials and the current manufacturing process. The rational evaluation and control of product quality consistency are essential to ensure the efficacy and safety. Chromatographic fingerprinting is an important and widely used tool to characterize the chemical composition of botanical drug products. Multivariate statistical analysis has showed its efficacy and applicability in the quality evaluation of many kinds of industrial products. In this paper, the combined use of multivariate statistical analysis and chromatographic fingerprinting is presented here to evaluate batch-to-batch quality consistency of botanical drug products. A typical botanical drug product in China, Shenmai injection, was selected as the example to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach. The high-performance liquid chromatographic fingerprint data of historical batches were collected from a traditional Chinese medicine manufacturing factory. Characteristic peaks were weighted by their variability among production batches. A principal component analysis model was established after outliers were modified or removed. Multivariate (Hotelling T(2) and DModX) control charts were finally successfully applied to evaluate the quality consistency. The results suggest useful applications for a combination of multivariate statistical analysis with chromatographic fingerprinting in batch-to-batch quality consistency evaluation for the manufacture of botanical drug products.

  17. A Synthetic Biology Project - Developing a single-molecule device for screening drug-target interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Keith; Evans, Luke; Youell, James

    2012-07-16

    This review describes a European-funded project in the area of Synthetic Biology. The project seeks to demonstrate the application of engineering techniques and methodologies to the design and construction of a biosensor for detecting drug-target interactions at the single-molecule level. Production of the proteins required for the system followed the principle of previously described "bioparts" concepts (a system where a database of biological parts - promoters, genes, terminators, linking tags and cleavage sequences - is used to construct novel gene assemblies) and cassette-type assembly of gene expression systems (the concept of linking different "bioparts" to produce functional "cassettes"), but problems were quickly identified with these approaches. DNA substrates for the device were also constructed using a cassette-system. Finally, micro-engineering was used to build a magnetoresistive Magnetic Tweezer device for detection of single molecule DNA modifying enzymes (motors), while the possibility of constructing a Hall Effect version of this device was explored. The device is currently being used to study helicases from Plasmodium as potential targets for anti-malarial drugs, but we also suggest other potential uses for the device. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E; O'Donnell, Aidan J; Cunningham, Emma J A

    2012-06-22

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way through infection prior to pregnancy can alter their immune response, with major consequences for offspring health and survival. In untreated maternal infections, maternally transferred protection suppressed parasitaemia and reduced pup mortality by 75 per cent compared with pups from naïve dams. However, when dams were treated with anti-malarial drugs, pups received fewer maternal antibodies, parasitaemia was only marginally suppressed, and mortality risk was 25 per cent higher than for pups from dams with full infections. We observed the same qualitative patterns across three different host strains and two parasite genotypes. This study reveals the role that within-host infection dynamics play in the fitness consequences of maternally transferred immunity. Furthermore, it highlights a potential trade-off between the health of mothers and offspring suggesting that anti-parasite treatment may significantly affect the outcome of infection in newborns.

  19. Drug treatment of malaria infections can reduce levels of protection transferred to offspring via maternal immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszewski, Vincent; Reece, Sarah E.; O'Donnell, Aidan J.; Cunningham, Emma J. A.

    2012-01-01

    Maternally transferred immunity can have a fundamental effect on the ability of offspring to deal with infection. However, levels of antibodies in adults can vary both quantitatively and qualitatively between individuals and during the course of infection. How infection dynamics and their modification by drug treatment might affect the protection transferred to offspring remains poorly understood. Using the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium chabaudi, we demonstrate that curing dams part way through infection prior to pregnancy can alter their immune response, with major consequences for offspring health and survival. In untreated maternal infections, maternally transferred protection suppressed parasitaemia and reduced pup mortality by 75 per cent compared with pups from naïve dams. However, when dams were treated with anti-malarial drugs, pups received fewer maternal antibodies, parasitaemia was only marginally suppressed, and mortality risk was 25 per cent higher than for pups from dams with full infections. We observed the same qualitative patterns across three different host strains and two parasite genotypes. This study reveals the role that within-host infection dynamics play in the fitness consequences of maternally transferred immunity. Furthermore, it highlights a potential trade-off between the health of mothers and offspring suggesting that anti-parasite treatment may significantly affect the outcome of infection in newborns. PMID:22357264

  20. Analysis of the importance of drug packaging quality for end users and pharmaceutical industry as a part of the quality management system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lončar Irma M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we collected and analyzed information on the importance of drug packaging quality to end users and pharmaceutical industry, as an indicator of the process of traceability and originality of drugs. Two surveys were conducted: one among the end users of drugs (252 patients and the other among professionals working in seven pharmaceutical companies in Serbia. For most end users (82.5% quality on the packaging of drugs was important, but only 41.8% of them thought that the appearance of the packaging could be an indicator of genuinity of drugs. The existence of the control marks (KM on drug packaging was not of great importance, since most of them (86.9% know, its function, but majority (60.2% would nevertheless decide to buy the drug without KM. Regarding the experts from the pharmaceutical industry, more then two-thirds of them (68.4% believed that the existence of KM did not contribute to efficient operations. Although a great number of pharmaceutical industry professionals (84.2% answered that the introduction of GS1 DataMatrix system would allow for complete traceability of the drug from the manufacturer to the end user, only 22.2% of them introduced this system to their products. This study also showed that domestic producers did not have a great interest for additional protection (special inks, holograms, special graphics, smart multicolor design, watermark, chemically labeled paper and cardboard etc.. on their products, given that only 15.8 % of them had some kind of additional protection against counterfeiting. Monitoring drug traceability from a manufacturer to end user is achieved by many complex activities regulated by law. A high percentage of responders said they were satisfied with the functionality of traceability systems used in their companies. As a way to increase the quality of drug packaging and business performance most responders saw in the continuous improvement of the system of traceability within the company

  1. In vivo anti-malarial potentials of some plants extracts on ICR-mice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five medicinal plants, Acacia nilotica (Fabaceae), Citrus aurantifolia (Rutaceae), Mangifera indica (Anacardiaceae) Carica papaya (Caricaceae), and Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae) used for the treatment of malaria/ fever by the Hausa people of Kano-Nigeria were selected based on their traditional claims. These were ...

  2. The molecular evolution of four anti-malarial immune genes in the Anopheles gambiae species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simard Frederic

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If the insect innate immune system is to be used as a potential blocking step in transmission of malaria, then it will require targeting one or a few genes with highest relevance and ease of manipulation. The problem is to identify and manipulate those of most importance to malaria infection without the risk of decreasing the mosquito's ability to stave off infections by microbes in general. Molecular evolution methodologies and concepts can help identify such genes. Within the setting of a comparative molecular population genetic and phylogenetic framework, involving six species of the Anopheles gambiae complex, we investigated whether a set of four pre-selected immunity genes (gambicin, NOS, Rel2 and FBN9 might have evolved under selection pressure imposed by the malaria parasite. Results We document varying levels of polymorphism within and divergence between the species, in all four genes. Introgression and the sharing of ancestral polymorphisms, two processes that have been documented in the past, were verified in this study in all four studied genes. These processes appear to affect each gene in different ways and to different degrees. However, there is no evidence of positive selection acting on these genes. Conclusion Considering the results presented here in concert with previous studies, genes that interact directly with the Plasmodium parasite, and play little or no role in defense against other microbes, are probably the most likely candidates for a specific adaptive response against P. falciparum. Furthermore, since it is hard to establish direct evidence linking the adaptation of any candidate gene to P. falciparum infection, a comparative framework allowing at least an indirect link should be provided. Such a framework could be achieved, if a similar approach like the one involved here, was applied to all other anopheline complexes that transmit P. falciparum malaria.

  3. Access to artemisinin-based anti-malarial treatment and its related factors in rural Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatib, Rashid A; Selemani, Majige; Mrisho, Gumi A; Masanja, Irene M; Amuri, Mbaraka; Njozi, Mustafa H; Kajungu, Dan; Kuepfer, Irene; Abdulla, Salim M; de Savigny, Don

    2013-05-07

    Artemisinin-based combination treatment (ACT) has been widely adopted as one of the main malaria control strategies. However, its promise to save thousands of lives in sub-Saharan Africa depends on how effective the use of ACT is within the routine health system. The INESS platform evaluated effective coverage of ACT in several African countries. Timely access within 24 hours to an authorized ACT outlet is one of the determinants of effective coverage and was assessed for artemether-lumefantrine (Alu), in two district health systems in rural Tanzania. From October 2009 to June 2011 we conducted continuous rolling household surveys in the Kilombero-Ulanga and the Rufiji Health and Demographic Surveillance Sites (HDSS). Surveys were linked to the routine HDSS update rounds. Members of randomly pre-selected households that had experienced a fever episode in the previous two weeks were eligible for a structured interview. Data on individual treatment seeking, access to treatment, timing, source of treatment and household costs per episode were collected. Data are presented on timely access from a total of 2,112 interviews in relation to demographics, seasonality, and socio economic status. In Kilombero-Ulanga, 41.8% (CI: 36.6-45.1) and in Rufiji 36.8% (33.7-40.1) of fever cases had access to an authorized ACT provider within 24 hours of fever onset. In neither of the HDSS site was age, sex, socio-economic status or seasonality of malaria found to be significantly correlated with timely access. Timely access to authorized ACT providers is below 50% despite interventions intended to improve access such as social marketing and accreditation of private dispensing outlets. To improve prompt diagnosis and treatment, access remains a major bottle neck and new more innovative interventions are needed to raise effective coverage of malaria treatment in Tanzania.

  4. Effects of anti-malarial alkaloids on the sperm properties and blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venous blood and masturbation specimens of semen were obtained from the subjects before treatment, immediately post-treatment and by the 65th day from commencement of treatment. Blood levels of follicle stimulating hormones, leutinizing hormone and testosterone were determined by Enzyme Linked Imuno Assay.

  5. Anti-malarial activity of ethanolic leaf extract of Piliostigma thonningii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... control option for malaria, current research on vaccine development is still at preclinical stage and ... NIPRD/H/6268 has been deposited for future reference at the department's (MPR and TM) herbarium. .... more recently artemisinin derivatives have been identified using rodent malaria model (David et al., ...

  6. Quality of Life in Arthritis Patients Using Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingela Wiklund

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Arthritis is a painful and disabling condition. To suppress the pain and the inflammatory process, patients are often chronic nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID users. Chronic use of NSAIDs may induce peptic ulcer, dyspeptic problems and heartburn. Therefore, these patients are often provided with treatment to relieve and/or protect against gastrointestinal problems. Rheumatic disorders also affect a range of health-related quality of life domains. In one study, patients with NSAID-associated gastroduodenal lesions complained about lack of energy, sleep disturbances, emotional distress and social isolation in addition to pain and mobility limitations. The degree of distress and dysfunction differed markedly from scores in an unselected population. Clinical trial data suggest that acid-suppressing therapy with omeprazole is superior to therapy with misoprostol and ranitidine in healing gastroduodenal lesions and preventing abdominal pain, heartburn and indigestion symptoms during continued NSAID treatment. Because arthritic patients are severely incapacitated by their condition regarding most aspects of health-related quality of life, it is important to offer a treatment that is effective in healing and preventing NSAID-induced ulcers and gastrointestinal symptoms during continued NSAID treatment without further compromising the patients’ quality of life. Treatment with omeprazole once daily has been shown to be superior to that with ranitidine and misoprostol in this respect.

  7. Injections, cocktails and diviners: therapeutic flexibility in the context of malaria elimination and drug resistance in Northeast Cambodia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Gryseels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adherence to effective malaria medication is extremely important in the context of Cambodia's elimination targets and drug resistance containment. Although the public sector health facilities are accessible to the local ethnic minorities of Ratanakiri province (Northeast Cambodia, their illness itineraries often lead them to private pharmacies selling "cocktails" and artemether injections, or to local diviners prescribing animal sacrifices to appease the spirits. METHODS: The research design consisted of a mixed methods study, combining qualitative (in-depth interviews and participant observation and quantitative methods (household and cross-sectional survey. RESULTS: Three broad options for malaria treatment were identified: i the public sector; ii the private sector; iii traditional treatment based on divination and ceremonial sacrifice. Treatment choice was influenced by the availability of treatment and provider, perceived side effects and efficacy of treatments, perceived etiology of symptoms, and patient-health provider encounters. Moreover, treatment paths proved to be highly flexible, changing mostly in relation to the perceived efficacy of a chosen treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Despite good availability of anti-malarial treatment in the public health sector, attendance remained low due to both structural and human behavioral factors. The common use and under-dosage of anti-malaria monotherapy in the private sector (single-dose injections, single-day drug cocktails represents a threat not only for individual case management, but also for the regional plan of drug resistance containment and malaria elimination.

  8. [Quality of life change and its influencing factors in patients with acute coronary syndrome after drug-eluting stent implantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Chao; Hu, Da-yi; Sun, Yi-hong; Ding, Rong-jing; Wang, Wei-min; Liu, Wen-ling; Li, Cui-lan; Li, Lei; Chen, Yu

    2012-04-01

    To prospectively evaluate the change of quality of life in patients with acute coronary syndrome following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents and explore the influencing factors of quality of life. There hundred and thirty four consecutive patients with acute coronary syndrome receiving drug-eluting stents implantation between September 2008 and December 2009 were enrolled. Of them, two hundred and ninety three patients completed 36-item short form health survey at baseline and 6 months after PCI procedure. Change of quality of life and influencing factors on quality of life were analyzed. Compared with baseline, quality of life improved significantly after PCI in terms of both physical component summary and mental component summary [ (51.07 ± 20.39) scores vs. (61.69 ± 19.73) scores and (63.27 ± 20.00) scores vs. (68.81 ± 18.71) scores, respectively; all P Quality of life of acute coronary syndrome patients is significantly improved at 6 months after drug-eluting stents implantation. The predictors of physical quality of life improvement are female, diabetes, and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Predictors of mental quality of life improvement are previous PCI and diabetes.

  9. "Product on Stopper" in a Lyophilized Drug Product: Cosmetic Defect or a Product Quality Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Shyam B; Roy, Shouvik; Yang, Han-Chang Cathy

    2018-02-09

    During manufacturing of a lyophilized drug product, operator errors in product handling during loading of product filled vials onto the lyophilizer can lead to a seemingly cosmetic defect which can impact certain critical quality attributes of finished product. In this study, filling of a formulated monoclonal antibody in vials was performed using a peristaltic pump filling unit, and subsequently, the product was lyophilized. After lyophilization, upon visual inspection, around 40% of vials had cosmetic defect with residual product around stopper of the vial and were categorized as "product on stopper" vials, whereas remaining 60% vials with no cosmetic defect were called "acceptable vials." Both groups of vials from 1 single batch were tested for critical quality attributes including protein concentration (ultraviolet absorbance at 280), residual moisture (Karl Fischer), sterility (membrane filtration), and container closure integrity (CCI) (blue dye ingress). Analysis of protein quality attributes such as aggregation, protein concentration, residual moisture showed no significant difference between vials with "product on stopper" and "acceptable vials." However, CCI of the "product on stopper" vials was compromised due to the presence of product around stopper of the vial. The results from this case study demonstrate the following 2 important findings: (1) that a seemingly cosmetic defect may impact product quality, compromising the integrity of the product and (2) that CCI test method can be used as an orthogonal method to sterility testing to evaluate sterility assurance of the product. The corrective action proposed to mitigate this defect is use of a larger sized vial that can potentially minimize this defect that arises because of product handling errors. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The lay user perspective on the quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services--results of focus group discussions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article presents the results of a study on quality of pharmacy services and perceived risk of pharmaceuticals. The results presented here are part of a multi-study evaluation of major changes in drug distribution in Iceland. OBJECTIVES: This sub-study addressed the question: what...... is the lay user perspective on pharmaceuticals and pharmacy services, including their perception of risk? METHODS: To answer this question, seven focus group discussions were conducted with pharmacy customers in different locations in Iceland following new drug distribution legislation in 1996. RESULTS......: The lay perspective emphasizes a definite split between lay and expert views on the value and quality of pharmaceuticals, drug therapy and pharmacy services, as well as in their assessment of risk. Participants voiced spontaneous criticism of the roles of both physicians and pharmacists in drug therapy...

  11. Quality by design case study: an integrated multivariate approach to drug product and process development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Kaul, Goldi; Cai, Chunsheng; Chatlapalli, Ramarao; Hernandez-Abad, Pedro; Ghosh, Krishnendu; Nagi, Arwinder

    2009-12-01

    To facilitate an in-depth process understanding, and offer opportunities for developing control strategies to ensure product quality, a combination of experimental design, optimization and multivariate techniques was integrated into the process development of a drug product. A process DOE was used to evaluate effects of the design factors on manufacturability and final product CQAs, and establish design space to ensure desired CQAs. Two types of analyses were performed to extract maximal information, DOE effect & response surface analysis and multivariate analysis (PCA and PLS). The DOE effect analysis was used to evaluate the interactions and effects of three design factors (water amount, wet massing time and lubrication time), on response variables (blend flow, compressibility and tablet dissolution). The design space was established by the combined use of DOE, optimization and multivariate analysis to ensure desired CQAs. Multivariate analysis of all variables from the DOE batches was conducted to study relationships between the variables and to evaluate the impact of material attributes/process parameters on manufacturability and final product CQAs. The integrated multivariate approach exemplifies application of QbD principles and tools to drug product and process development.

  12. Analysis of the physico-chemical quality Enalapril and Simvastatin drugs manipulated in magistral pharmacies from Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Tatiana Cristina Bomfim

    2013-01-01

    The increasing expansion of compounding pharmacy associated with several reports on variances in the quality of compounded drugs demonstrates the need for verification of quality, safety and efficacy of these products. In this work, physical and chemical analyzes were performed to evaluate the quality of some capsules manipulated enalapril and simvastatin, acquired in five pharmacies in Belo Horizonte /Brazil. Among the analyzes are pharmacopoeial tests for appearance, identification, determination of weight, content, related compounds and uniformity of dosage units, and was also performed neutron activation analysis for the determination of inorganic impurities in drugs sampled. The results showed that 60% of the samples were unsatisfactory for pharmacopoeial tests. The contents of the capsules sampled for individual testing unit dose uniformity between 0% and 136.2%. This test is important in evaluating the quality, which influences the safety and efficacy of drug treatment, since it allows you to check if the product contains the proper dosage and necessary for successful pharmacotherapy. On the other hand, underdosing can lead to reduced or absent desired therapeutic response, and overdoses can provide an undesirable effects and even toxic. The concentration of inorganic impurities was considered to be relatively small. However, no specific limits for some chemical elements in medicine hamper a better thread. In addition, further studies must be performed to assess chronic exposure to low concentrations of inorganic impurities, since drugs can be continuously used, and other sources of exposure must also be considered in order to evaluate the risk. The problems related to the quality and safety of compounded drugs are still reality in the country and reveal a serious public health problem, especially regarding the lack of uniformity between the unit doses of medications. It is suggested that the competent authorities to sanitary products, propose changes in

  13. Assessment of Quality of Sleep and Use of Drugs with Sedating Properties in Adult Patients Hospitalized in Hamadan Ekbatan Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Zeraati

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Hospitalization can significantly disrupt sleeping patterns. considering the prevalence of insomnia and widespread use of benzodiazepines and other hypnotics in hospitalized patients, we conducted this study to assess the quality of sleep and hypnotic drug use in hospitalized adult patients in 2007.Materials & Methods: This descriptive analytical cross-sectional study involved an assessment of sleep quality for patients whose consent had been obtained when admitted to the internal ward of Hamadan Ekbatan hospital. The Pittsburg sleep quality index (PSQI was used to measure the quality of sleep in patients and completed at the time of admission and discharge. Also the relation of factors such as age, sex. Marital status, education and sedating drug use prior to and during hospitalization with sleep quality were assessed. 300 patients entered this study and completed PSQI sleep questionnaires two twice, at the time of admission & discharge. Results: At the time of admission only 36% of patients had good sleep quality (PSQI score <5 while this percent decreased to 18.3% at the time of discharge. Mean global PSQI score was 7.6 at the time of admission versus 9.4 at the time of discharge indicating the patients’ worse sleep quality at the time of discharge (Pv<0.05. 23% of patients received hypnotic drugs while in the hospital with no evidence of preadmission hypnotic use. Benzodiazepines were prescribed for all of them.Conclusion: Quality of sleep at the time of discharge was significantly worse than it at the time of admission and it seems that despite widespread use of sedative drug in the hospital , there are still patients with poor sleep quality in the hospital.

  14. Association Between Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs and Sleep Quality in a Large College Student Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamir, Yahya A; Zullig, Keith J; Wen, Sijin; Montgomery-Downs, Hawley; Kristjansson, Alfgeir L; Misra, Ranjita; Zhang, Jianjun

    2017-11-13

    Poor sleep and nonmedical use (NMU) of prescription drugs (NMUPD) are both common among college students. Since lack of sleep adversely influences academic performance, this study examined the association between NMUPD and subjective sleep quality among college students. Students who completed the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment data (Fall 2010, Spring 2011; N = 135,874). Associations were examined between NMUPD in four classes over the past 12 months (antidepressant, painkillers, sedatives, and stimulants), and five aspects of sleep quality (Enough Sleep, Early Awakening, Daytime Sleepiness, Difficulty Falling Asleep, and Problem With Daytime Sleepiness) in the past seven days. Any NMUPD (at least one class), NMU of stimulants specifically, and NMU of painkillers specifically were associated with getting fewer days of Enough Sleep (OR: 0.86, 0.93, and 0.84 respectively), more days of Early Awakening (OR: 1.28, 1.10, and 1.28 respectively), Daytime Sleepiness (OR: 1.23, 1.13, and 1.16 respectively), and Difficulty Falling Asleep (OR:1.32, 1.10, and 1.27 respectively; p sleep among college students. Therefore, behavioral medicine screening and treatment of this vulnerable population should consider sleep health, NMUPD, and the potential that these problems may be comorbid.

  15. When Quality Beats Quantity: Decision Theory, Drug Discovery, and the Reproducibility Crisis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack W Scannell

    Full Text Available A striking contrast runs through the last 60 years of biopharmaceutical discovery, research, and development. Huge scientific and technological gains should have increased the quality of academic science and raised industrial R&D efficiency. However, academia faces a "reproducibility crisis"; inflation-adjusted industrial R&D costs per novel drug increased nearly 100 fold between 1950 and 2010; and drugs are more likely to fail in clinical development today than in the 1970s. The contrast is explicable only if powerful headwinds reversed the gains and/or if many "gains" have proved illusory. However, discussions of reproducibility and R&D productivity rarely address this point explicitly. The main objectives of the primary research in this paper are: (a to provide quantitatively and historically plausible explanations of the contrast; and (b identify factors to which R&D efficiency is sensitive. We present a quantitative decision-theoretic model of the R&D process. The model represents therapeutic candidates (e.g., putative drug targets, molecules in a screening library, etc. within a "measurement space", with candidates' positions determined by their performance on a variety of assays (e.g., binding affinity, toxicity, in vivo efficacy, etc. whose results correlate to a greater or lesser degree. We apply decision rules to segment the space, and assess the probability of correct R&D decisions. We find that when searching for rare positives (e.g., candidates that will successfully complete clinical development, changes in the predictive validity of screening and disease models that many people working in drug discovery would regard as small and/or unknowable (i.e., an 0.1 absolute change in correlation coefficient between model output and clinical outcomes in man can offset large (e.g., 10 fold, even 100 fold changes in models' brute-force efficiency. We also show how validity and reproducibility correlate across a population of simulated

  16. Private sector role, readiness and performance for malaria case management in Uganda, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaula, Henry; Buyungo, Peter; Opigo, Jimmy

    2017-05-25

    survey illustrate that the majority of anti-malarials were distributed through the private sector (54.3%), with 31.4% of all anti-malarials distributed through drug stores and 14.4% through private for-profit health facilities. Availability of different anti-malarials and diagnostic testing in the private sector was: ACT (80.7%), quality-assured (QA) ACT (72.0%), sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) (47.1%), quinine (73.2%) and any malaria blood testing (32.9%). Adult QAACT ($1.62) was three times more expensive than SP ($0.48). The results from the fever case management study found 44.4% of respondents received a malaria test, and among those who tested positive for malaria, 60.0% received an ACT, 48.5% received QAACT; 14.4% a non-artemisinin therapy; 14.9% artemether injection, and 42.5% received an antibiotic. The private sector plays an important role in malaria case management in Uganda. While several private sector initiatives have improved availability of QAACT, there are gaps in malaria diagnosis and distribution of non-artemisinin monotherapies persists. Further private sector strategies, including those focusing on drug stores, are needed to increase coverage of parasitological testing and removal of non-artemisinin therapies from the marketplace.

  17. Quality of antidepressant drugs research articles published in Indian medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charan, Jaykaran; Saxena, Deepak; Yadav, Preeti; Kantharia, N D

    2011-07-01

    Quality of methodological and statistical parameters published in various Indian Medical Journals are usually debated in terms of appropriateness. Aim of this manuscript is to analyze and validate efficacy studies on antidepressant drugs published in Indian Medical Journals regarding quality of various methodological and statistical parameters used. An in-depth review of Efficacy studies on Antidepressant published in Indian Medical Journals was conducted. Articles were retrieved from all possible sources like Published Journals, downloaded through Pubmed, MedInd, Opengate, Medknow, and Cochrane. These studies were analyzed and validated for various methodological and statistical parameters. Descriptive statistics for various parameters with confidence interval (CI) is also reported herewith. Of 32 articles reviewed, primary and secondary endpoints and sample size calculation was reported in only one article (3.1%; 95% CI, 0.5 to 15.7%). Power and CI was not reported in any of the reviewed articles. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were reported in 9 (28.3%; 95% CI, 15.5 to 45.3%) articles. Information regarding randomization was mentioned in 12 (37.5%; 95% CI, 22.9 to 54.7%) articles, whereas reporting of blinding or open label status of the study was mentioned in 21 (65.6%; 95% CI, 48.3 to 79.5%) articles. Assumptions of statistical tests were not reported in any of the reviewed articles. Statistical tests were used in only 14 (43.7%; 95% CI, 28.1 to 60.6%) articles of which 70% of were inappropriate. All studies were underpowered for small and medium effect size. Quality of reporting of methodological and statistical aspects of antidepressant efficacy studies published in Indian medical journals are poor and hence makes difficult to conclude on issues related to validity of these studies.

  18. Single-item measure for assessing quality of life in children with drug-resistant epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Lauryn; Widjaja, Elysa; Smith, Mary Lou

    2018-03-01

    The current study investigated the psychometric properties of a single-item quality of life (QOL) measure, the Global Quality of Life in Childhood Epilepsy question (G-QOLCE), in children with drug-resistant epilepsy. Data came from the Impact of Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery on Health-Related Quality of Life Study (PESQOL), a multicenter prospective cohort study (n = 118) with observations collected at baseline and at 6 months of follow-up on children aged 4-18 years. QOL was measured with the QOLCE-76 and KIDSCREEN-27. The G-QOLCE was an overall QOL question derived from the QOLCE-76. Construct validity and reliability were assessed with Spearman's correlation and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Responsiveness was examined through distribution-based and anchor-based methods. The G-QOLCE showed moderate (r ≥ 0.30) to strong (r ≥ 0.50) correlations with composite scores, and most subscales of the QOLCE-76 and KIDSCREEN-27 at baseline and 6-month follow-up. The G-QOLCE had moderate test-retest reliability (ICC range: 0.49-0.72) and was able to detect clinically important change in patients' QOL (standardized response mean: 0.38; probability of change: 0.65; Guyatt's responsiveness statistics: 0.62 and 0.78). Caregiver anxiety and family functioning contributed most strongly to G-QOLCE scores over time. Results offer promising preliminary evidence regarding the validity, reliability, and responsiveness of the proposed single-item QOL measure. The G-QOLCE is a potentially useful tool that can be feasibly administered in a busy clinical setting to evaluate clinical status and impact of treatment outcomes in pediatric epilepsy.

  19. Functional interrogation of Plasmodium genus metabolism identifies species- and stage-specific differences in nutrient essentiality and drug targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa M Abdel-Haleem

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several antimalarial drugs exist, but differences between life cycle stages among malaria species pose challenges for developing more effective therapies. To understand the diversity among stages and species, we reconstructed genome-scale metabolic models (GeMMs of metabolism for five life cycle stages and five species of Plasmodium spanning the blood, transmission, and mosquito stages. The stage-specific models of Plasmodium falciparum uncovered stage-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism and predicted potential targets that could affect several life cycle stages. The species-specific models further highlight differences between experimental animal models and the human-infecting species. Comparisons between human- and rodent-infecting species revealed differences in thiamine (vitamin B1, choline, and pantothenate (vitamin B5 metabolism. Thus, we show that genome-scale analysis of multiple stages and species of Plasmodium can prioritize potential drug targets that could be both anti-malarials and transmission blocking agents, in addition to guiding translation from non-human experimental disease models.

  20. Functional interrogation of Plasmodium genus metabolism identifies species- and stage-specific differences in nutrient essentiality and drug targeting

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel-Haleem, Alyaa M.

    2018-01-04

    Several antimalarial drugs exist, but differences between life cycle stages among malaria species pose challenges for developing more effective therapies. To understand the diversity among stages and species, we reconstructed genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism for five life cycle stages and five species of Plasmodium spanning the blood, transmission, and mosquito stages. The stage-specific models of Plasmodium falciparum uncovered stage-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism and predicted potential targets that could affect several life cycle stages. The species-specific models further highlight differences between experimental animal models and the human-infecting species. Comparisons between human- and rodent-infecting species revealed differences in thiamine (vitamin B1), choline, and pantothenate (vitamin B5) metabolism. Thus, we show that genome-scale analysis of multiple stages and species of Plasmodium can prioritize potential drug targets that could be both anti-malarials and transmission blocking agents, in addition to guiding translation from non-human experimental disease models.

  1. Information on the quality of substance for the preparation of pharmaceutical drugs in terms of hospital pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovović Marija Đ.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Explanation the topic The pharmaceutical activity is the activity of public or social and special interest, because it is a direct function of health care. Topic positioning and discussion The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of ensuring the quality of pharmaceutical substances that supplies hospitals, which are used for production of galenic and magistral drugs. Conclusion Compliance with national legislation, as well as establishing compliance prescribed by the European legislation in the field of drug development is binding. Therefore, all manufacturers of drugs and/or active pharmaceutical ingredients must apply quality standards prescribed by the European Pharmacopoeia in order to develop, manufacture and sales of medicines. When it comes to the quality of pharmaceutical ingredients for the production of drugs in the pharmacy, pharmacies especially in residential institutions in our country is permanently done by harmonizing national legislation in order to improve conditions for the preparation and production of galenic drugs in terms of inpatient health institutions performed in a manner that is prescribed by international regulations. This requires the adaptation of institutions, including fundamental changes in competence as national professional and administrative and regulatory rules that apply to state- and private sectors.

  2. Quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among men who inject drugs in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mental disorders such as depression, anxiety and suicide represent an important public health problem in India. Elsewhere in the world a high prevalence of symptoms of common mental disorders have been found among people who inject drugs (PWID). Research in India has largely overlooked symptoms of common mental disorders among this high risk group. This paper reports on the results of a survey examining quality of life, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation among adult males who inject drugs living in Delhi. Methods Participants (n = 420) were recruited from needle and syringe programs using time location sampling and were interviewed using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Self-report symptom scales were used to measure the severity of symptoms of depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-2) within the preceding 2 weeks. We assessed the presence of suicidal thoughts and attempts within the past 12 months. Results The mean length of injecting career was 20.9 years indicating a sample of chronic injecting drug users, of whom only one-third (38%) were born in Delhi. The level of illiteracy was very high (62%), and just 2% had completed class 12. Scavenging / rag picking was the main form of income for 48%, and many were homeless (69%). One-third (33%) had been beaten up at least twice during the preceding 6 months, and many either never (45%) or rarely (27%) attended family events. We found a high prevalence of depressive (84%, cut-off ≥10) and anxiety (71%, cut-off score of ≥3) symptoms. Fifty-three percent thought about killing themselves in the past 12 months, and 36% had attempted to kill themselves. Conclusions Our findings revealed a socially excluded population of PWID in Delhi who have minimal education and are often homeless, leaving them vulnerable to physical violence, poverty, poor health, imprisonment and disconnection from family. The high prevalence of psychological distress found in this study has implications for

  3. An Exploration of Quality of Life and Its Predictors in Patients with Addictive Disorders: Gambling, Alcohol and Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Victoria; Gomez, Brenda; Guo, Song; Low, Yee Deng; Koh, Puay Kee; Wong, Kim Eng

    2012-01-01

    The study set out to examine Quality of Life (QoL), specifically subjective well being in three different addiction populations (260 alcohol-dependent, 282 drug-dependent, and 132 pathological gambling outpatients) at their first visit to treatment, using the Personal Well being Index (PWI). The mean PWI score for all patients was significantly…

  4. The prevalence and degree of resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to first-line antimalarial drugs: an in vitro study from a malaria endemic region in Yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shamahy, H.; Al-Harazy, Abdulilah Hussein; Harmal, Nabil S.; Al-Kabsi, Abdulgudos N.

    2007-01-01

    Unpublished studies on antimalarial drug efficacy have found low levels of chloroquine resistance in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the current prevalence of drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum in Yemen to the main anti-malarial drugs and to determine the effective concentration (EC) values. The WHO standard protocol was used for the selection of subjects, collection of blood samples, culture techniques, examination of post-culture blood slides and interpretation of results. The in vitro micro-test Mark III was used for assessing susceptibility of P. falciparum isolates. The criteria for blood parasite density was met by 219 P. falciparum malaria patients. Chloroquine resistance was found in 47% of isolated P. falciparum schizonts. Mefloquine resistance was found in 5.2%. In addition, the EC50 and EC95 values in blood that inhibited schizont maturation in resistant isolates were higher than the normal therapeutic level for mefloquine. No resistance occurred against quinine or artemisinin, with no growth at the cut off level for quinine and inhibition at low concentrations of artemisinin. Our study confirmed the occurrence of chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum and a slow increase in the rate of this resistance will increase further and spread over all the foci of malaria in Yemen. The low rate of chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum was lower than that reported in Africa or Southeast Asia, but is the first report of the mefloquine resistance in Yemen. Finally, the isolates were sensitive to low concentrations of quinine and artemisinin. (author)

  5. The Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) Leachables and Extractables Working Group Initiatives for Parenteral and Ophthalmic Drug Product (PODP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskiet, Diane; Jenke, Dennis; Ball, Douglas; Houston, Christopher; Norwood, Daniel L; Markovic, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    The Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) is a non-profit consortium of organizations working together to generate and share timely, relevant, and impactful information that advances drug product quality and development. The collaborative activities of PQRI participants have, in the case of orally inhaled and nasal drug products (OINDPs), resulted in comprehensive and widely-accepted recommendations for leachables assessments to help ensure patient safety with respect to this class of packaged drug products. These recommendations, which include scientifically justified safety thresholds for leachables, represent a significant milestone towards establishing standardized approaches for safety qualification of leachables in OINDP. To build on the success of the OINDP effort, PQRI's Parenteral and Ophthalmic Drug Products (PODP) Leachables and Extractables Working Group was formed to extrapolate the OINDP threshold concepts and best practice recommendations to other dosage forms with high concern for interaction with packaging/delivery systems. This article considers the general aspects of leachables and their safety assessment, introduces the PODP Work Plan and initial study Protocol, discusses the laboratory studies being conducted by the PODP Chemistry Team, outlines the strategy being developed by the PODP Toxicology Team for the safety qualification of PODP leachables, and considers the issues associated with application of the safety thresholds, particularly with respect to large-volume parenterals. Lastly, the unique leachables issues associated with biologics are described. The Product Quality Research Institute (PQRI) is a non-profit consortium involving industry organizations, academia, and regulatory agencies that together provide recommendations in support of regulatory guidance to advance drug product quality. The collaborative activities of the PQRI Orally Inhaled and Nasal Drug Products Leachables and Extractables Working Group resulted in a

  6. The malaria testing and treatment landscape in mainland Tanzania, 2016.

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    Michael, Daniel; Mkunde, Sigsbert Patila

    2017-04-24

    Understanding the key characteristics of malaria testing and treatment is essential to the control of a disease that continues to pose a major risk of morbidity and mortality in mainland Tanzania, with evidence of a resurgence of the disease in recent years. The introduction of artemisinin combination therapy (ACT) as the first-line treatment for malaria, alongside policies to promote rational case management following testing, highlights the need for evidence of anti-malarial and testing markets in the country. The results of the most recent mainland Tanzania ACTwatch outlet survey are presented here, including data on the availability, market share and price of anti-malarials and malaria diagnosis in 2016. A nationally-representative malaria outlet survey was conducted between 18th May and 2nd July, 2016. A census of public and private outlets with potential to distribute malaria testing and/or treatment was conducted among a representative sample of administrative units. An audit was completed for all anti-malarials, malaria rapid (RDT) diagnostic tests and microscopy. A total of 5867 outlets were included in the nationally representative survey, across both public and private sectors. In the public sector, availability of malaria testing was 92.3% and quality-assured (QA) ACT was 89.1% among all screened outlets. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) was stocked by 51.8% of the public sector and injectable artesunate was found in 71.4% of all screened public health facilities. Among anti-malarial private-sector stockists, availability of testing was 15.7, and 65.1% had QA ACT available. The public sector accounted for 83.4% of the total market share for malaria diagnostics. The private sector accounted for 63.9% of the total anti-malarial market, and anti-malarials were most commonly distributed through accredited drug dispensing outlets (ADDOs) (39.0%), duka la dawa baridi (DLDBs) (13.3%) and pharmacies (6.7%). QA ACT comprised 33.1% of the national market share (12

  7. Quality Evaluation of Ayurvedic Crude Drug Daruharidra, Its Allied Species, and Commercial Samples from Herbal Drug Markets of India

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    Sharad Srivastava

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Berberis aristata known as “Daruharidra” in Ayurveda is a versatile medicinal plant used singly or in combination with other medicinal plants for treating a variety of ailments like jaundice, enlargement of spleen, leprosy, rheumatism, fever, morning/evening sickness, snakebite, and so forth. A major bioactive marker of this genus is an alkaloid berberine, which is known for its activity against cholera, acute diarrhea, amoebiasis, and latent malaria and for the treatment of oriental sore caused by Leishmania tropica. Although the roots of B. aristata are considered as the official drug (Ayurvedic Pharmacopoeia of India, the study revealed that different species of Berberis, namely. B. asiatica, B. chitria, and B. lycium are also used under the name of Daruharidra in different parts of the country. Detailed physicochemical and phytochemical studies of subjects like total ash, acid insoluble ash, tannins, and total alkaloids were calculated from the shade dried powdered material according to the recommended procedures. Further, heavy metal studies and quantitative estimation of berberine through HPTLC have also been performed as per ICH guidelines. A detailed study of four Berberis species, namely B. aristata, B. asiatica, B. chitria, and B. lycium, which are implicated as Daruharidra and collected from wild and ten commercial samples procured from various important drug markets in India has been carried out, which may be useful to pharmaceutical industries for the authentication of the commercial samples and exploring the possibilities of using other species as a substitute of B. aristata.

  8. Analysis of Gap in Service Quality in Drug Addiction Treatment Centers of Kerman, Iran, Using SERVQUAL Model.

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    Naqavi, Mohammad Reza; Refaiee, Raheleh; Baneshi, Mohammad Reza; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of drug addicts is one of the main strategies of drug control in Iran. Client satisfaction strongly influences the success of any treatment program. This study aimed to explore the difference between customer expectations and perceptions in drug addiction treatment centers of Kerman, Iran, using SERVQUAL model. Using a cross-sectional design 260 clients referring to drug addiction treatment centers of Kerman, were enrolled in 2012. From among 84 clinics, 20 centers were selected randomly. Based on the number of clients registered in each center, a random sample proportional to the size was selected and 290 subjects were invited for interviews. A well validated 22-item questionnaire, which measured the 5 dimensions of service quality (reliability, assurance, tangibility, empathy, and responsiveness), was completed by participants. Each item measured 2 aspects of service quality; expectations and perceptions. Mean ± SD (Standard deviation) age of the subjects was 37.7 ± 9.4. Most of them were male (87.7%). Less than half of them had an educational level lower than diploma. The total score of clients` expectations was higher than their perceptions (P SERVQUAL model, only 1 dimension (i.e., assurance) showed no difference between perceptions and expectations of the participants (P = 0.134). There was a gap between the clients' expectations and what they actually perceived in the clinics. Thus, more attention should be devoted to the clients' views regarding service quality in addiction treatment clinics.

  9. Quality of antimalarial drugs and antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: a survey of the health facility supply chain.

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    Manuel W Hetzel

    Full Text Available Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT. In Papua New Guinea (PNG, Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG.Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3 contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4% primaquine, 3/70 (4.3% amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions.This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory mechanisms. Measures to stop the

  10. Quality of Antimalarial Drugs and Antibiotics in Papua New Guinea: A Survey of the Health Facility Supply Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzel, Manuel W.; Page-Sharp, Madhu; Bala, Nancy; Pulford, Justin; Betuela, Inoni; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Lavu, Evelyn K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor-quality life-saving medicines are a major public health threat, particularly in settings with a weak regulatory environment. Insufficient amounts of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) endanger patient safety and may contribute to the development of drug resistance. In the case of malaria, concerns relate to implications for the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT). In Papua New Guinea (PNG), Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax are both endemic and health facilities are the main source of treatment. ACT has been introduced as first-line treatment but other drugs, such as primaquine for the treatment of P. vivax hypnozoites, are widely available. This study investigated the quality of antimalarial drugs and selected antibiotics at all levels of the health facility supply chain in PNG. Methods and Findings Medicines were obtained from randomly sampled health facilities and selected warehouses and hospitals across PNG and analysed for API content using validated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Of 360 tablet/capsule samples from 60 providers, 9.7% (95% CI 6.9, 13.3) contained less, and 0.6% more, API than pharmacopoeial reference ranges, including 29/37 (78.4%) primaquine, 3/70 (4.3%) amodiaquine, and one sample each of quinine, artemether, sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and amoxicillin. According to the package label, 86.5% of poor-quality samples originated from India. Poor-quality medicines were found in 48.3% of providers at all levels of the supply chain. Drug quality was unrelated to storage conditions. Conclusions This study documents the presence of poor-quality medicines, particularly primaquine, throughout PNG. Primaquine is the only available transmission-blocking antimalarial, likely to become important to prevent the spread of artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum and eliminating P. vivax hypnozoites. The availability of poor-quality medicines reflects the lack of adequate quality control and regulatory

  11. Towards an in vitro model of Plasmodium hypnozoites suitable for drug discovery.

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    Dembele, Laurent; Gego, Audrey; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Franetich, Jean-François; Silvie, Olivier; Rametti, Armelle; Le Grand, Roger; Dereuddre-Bosquet, Nathalie; Sauerwein, Robert; van Gemert, Geert-Jan; Vaillant, Jean-Christophe; Thomas, Alan W; Snounou, Georges; Kocken, Clemens H M; Mazier, Dominique

    2011-03-31

    Amongst the Plasmodium species in humans, only P. vivax and P. ovale produce latent hepatic stages called hypnozoites, which are responsible for malaria episodes long after a mosquito bite. Relapses contribute to increased morbidity, and complicate malaria elimination programs. A single drug effective against hypnozoites, primaquine, is available, but its deployment is curtailed by its haemolytic potential in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient persons. Novel compounds are thus urgently needed to replace primaquine. Discovery of compounds active against hypnozoites is restricted to the in vivo P. cynomolgi-rhesus monkey model. Slow growing hepatic parasites reminiscent of hypnozoites had been noted in cultured P. vivax-infected hepatoma cells, but similar forms are also observed in vitro by other species including P. falciparum that do not produce hypnozoites. P. falciparum or P. cynomolgi sporozoites were used to infect human or Macaca fascicularis primary hepatocytes, respectively. The susceptibility of the slow and normally growing hepatic forms obtained in vitro to three antimalarial drugs, one active against hepatic forms including hypnozoites and two only against the growing forms, was measured. The non-dividing slow growing P. cynomolgi hepatic forms, observed in vitro in primary hepatocytes from the natural host Macaca fascicularis, can be distinguished from similar forms seen in P. falciparum-infected human primary hepatocytes by the differential action of selected anti-malarial drugs. Whereas atovaquone and pyrimethamine are active on all the dividing hepatic forms observed, the P. cynomolgi slow growing forms are highly resistant to treatment by these drugs, but remain susceptible to primaquine. Resistance of the non-dividing P. cynomolgi forms to atovaquone and pyrimethamine, which do not prevent relapses, strongly suggests that these slow growing forms are hypnozoites. This represents a first step towards the development of a practical medium

  12. Towards an in vitro model of Plasmodium hypnozoites suitable for drug discovery.

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    Laurent Dembele

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Amongst the Plasmodium species in humans, only P. vivax and P. ovale produce latent hepatic stages called hypnozoites, which are responsible for malaria episodes long after a mosquito bite. Relapses contribute to increased morbidity, and complicate malaria elimination programs. A single drug effective against hypnozoites, primaquine, is available, but its deployment is curtailed by its haemolytic potential in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficient persons. Novel compounds are thus urgently needed to replace primaquine. Discovery of compounds active against hypnozoites is restricted to the in vivo P. cynomolgi-rhesus monkey model. Slow growing hepatic parasites reminiscent of hypnozoites had been noted in cultured P. vivax-infected hepatoma cells, but similar forms are also observed in vitro by other species including P. falciparum that do not produce hypnozoites.P. falciparum or P. cynomolgi sporozoites were used to infect human or Macaca fascicularis primary hepatocytes, respectively. The susceptibility of the slow and normally growing hepatic forms obtained in vitro to three antimalarial drugs, one active against hepatic forms including hypnozoites and two only against the growing forms, was measured.The non-dividing slow growing P. cynomolgi hepatic forms, observed in vitro in primary hepatocytes from the natural host Macaca fascicularis, can be distinguished from similar forms seen in P. falciparum-infected human primary hepatocytes by the differential action of selected anti-malarial drugs. Whereas atovaquone and pyrimethamine are active on all the dividing hepatic forms observed, the P. cynomolgi slow growing forms are highly resistant to treatment by these drugs, but remain susceptible to primaquine.Resistance of the non-dividing P. cynomolgi forms to atovaquone and pyrimethamine, which do not prevent relapses, strongly suggests that these slow growing forms are hypnozoites. This represents a first step towards the development of a

  13. Forming a national multicentre collaboration to conduct clinical trials: increasing high-quality research in the drug and alcohol field.

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    Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Brand, Matthew; Shakeshaft, Anthony; Haber, Paul; Day, Carolyn; Conigrave, Katherine; Mattick, Richard; Lintzeris, Nicholas; Teesson, Maree

    2010-09-01

    There is a shortage of high-quality intervention-based evidence in the drug and alcohol misuse field. That is, evidence based on replicated effects using rigorous methodology, to establish a causal knowledge base around ethical, cost-effective methods relevant to clinical practice. The knowledge base in this field is limited participant recruitment challenges; difficulty generalizing results from single-centre studies; lack of research culture; issues in managing research teams; incentives for descriptive research; and limited expertise in research design and working in multidisciplinary teams. An Australian national multicentre collaboration is proposed to overcome these barriers, and reduce the burden of drug and alcohol misuse by increasing the number of high-quality clinical trials in this field. It would involve: selecting a representative sample of centres nation-wide with expertise in specific drug and alcohol issues; creating an expert multidisciplinary team to facilitate clinical trials; simultaneous recruitment and implementation of clinical trials across centres; establishing a virtual infrastructure; forming an independent data-integrity and methodology review panel; and attracting and allocating funding for clinical trials. The ability to allocate funding, the involvement of multidisciplinary experts in drug and alcohol research, and the establishment of infrastructure and procedures are likely to result in the national multicentre group's capacity to prescribe the type of research conducted under its auspices. The proposed initiative is likely to increase the volume of high-quality clinical trials in the Australian drug and alcohol field, a key step towards reducing the burden of drug and alcohol misuse.

  14. Assessment of copy number variation in genes related to drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum isolates from the Brazilian Amazon and a systematic review of the literature.

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    Costa, Gabriel Luíz; Amaral, Lara Cotta; Fontes, Cor Jesus Fernandes; Carvalho, Luzia Helena; de Brito, Cristiana Ferreira Alves; de Sousa, Taís Nóbrega

    2017-04-19

    Parasite resistance to anti-malarials represents a great obstacle for malaria elimination. The majority of studies have investigated the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and drug resistance; however, it is becoming clear that the copy number variation (CNV) is also associated with this parasite phenotype. To provide a baseline for molecular surveillance of anti-malarial drug resistance in the Brazilian Amazon, the present study characterized the genetic profile of both markers in the most common genes associated with drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax isolates. Additionally, these data were compared to data published elsewhere applying a systematic review of the literature published over a 20-year time period. The genomic DNA of 67 patients infected by P. falciparum and P. vivax from three Brazilian States was obtained between 2002 and 2012. CNV in P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene-1 (pfmdr1), GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (pfgch1) and P. vivax multidrug resistance gene-1 (pvmdr1) were assessed by real-time PCR assays. SNPs in the pfmdr1 and pfcrt genes were assessed by PCR-RFLP. A literature search for studies that analysed CNP in the same genes of P. falciparum and P. vivax was conducted between May 2014 and March 2017 across four databases. All analysed samples of P. falciparum carried only one copy of pfmdr1 or pfgch1. Although the pfcrt K76T polymorphism, a determinant of CQ resistance, was present in all samples genotyped, the pfmdr1 N86Y was absent. For P. vivax isolates, an amplification rate of 20% was found for the pvmdr1 gene. The results of the study are in agreement with the low amplification rates for pfmdr1 gene evidenced in the Americas and Africa, while higher rates have been described in Southeast Asia. For P. vivax, very low rates of amplification for pvmdr1 have been described worldwide, with exceptions in French Guiana, Cambodia, Thailand and Brazil. The present study was the first to evaluate

  15. Effect of a primary care based brief intervention trial among risky drug users on health-related quality of life.

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    Baumeister, Sebastian E; Gelberg, Lillian; Leake, Barbara D; Yacenda-Murphy, Julia; Vahidi, Mani; Andersen, Ronald M

    2014-09-01

    Improvement in quality of life (QOL) is a long term goal of drug treatment. Although some brief interventions have been found to reduce illicit drug use, no trial among adult risky (moderate non-dependent) drug users has tested effects on health-related quality of life. A single-blind randomized controlled trial of patients enrolled from February 2011 to November 2012 was conducted in waiting rooms of five federally qualified health centers. 413 adult primary care patients were identified as risky drug users using the WHO-ASSIST and 334 (81% response; 171 intervention, 163 control) consented to participate in the trial. Three-month follow-ups were completed by 261 patients (78%). Intervention patients received the QUIT intervention of brief clinician advice and up to two drug-use health telephone sessions. The control group received usual care and information on cancer screening. Outcomes were three-month changes in the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) mental health component summary score (MCS) and physical health component summary score (PCS). The average treatment effect (ATE) was non-significant for MCS (0.2 points, p-value=0.87) and marginally significant for PCS (1.7 points, p-value=0.08). The average treatment effect on the treated (ATT) was 0.1 (p-value=0.93) for MCS and 1.9 (p-value=0.056) for PCS. The effect on PCS was stronger at higher (above median) baseline number of drug use days: ATE=2.7, p-value=0.04; ATT=3.21, p-value=0.02. The trial found a marginally significant effect on improvement in PCS, and significant and stronger effect on the SF-12 physical component among patients with greater frequency of initial drug use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular monitoring of plasmodium falciparum drug susceptibility at the time of the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy in Yaoundé, Cameroon: Implications for the future

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    Menard Sandie

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regular monitoring of the levels of anti-malarial resistance of Plasmodium falciparum is an essential policy to adapt therapy and improve malaria control. This monitoring can be facilitated by using molecular tools, which are easier to implement than the classical determination of the resistance phenotype. In Cameroon, chloroquine (CQ, previously the first-line therapy for uncomplicated malaria was officially withdrawn in 2002 and replaced initially by amodiaquine (AQ monotherapy. Then, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, notably artesunate-amodiaquine (AS-AQ or artemether-lumefantrine (AL, was gradually introduced in 2004. This situation raised the question of the evolution of P. falciparum resistance molecular markers in Yaoundé, a highly urbanized Cameroonian city. Methods The genotype of pfcrt 72 and 76 and pfmdr1 86 alleles and pfmdr1 copy number were determined using real-time PCR in 447 P. falciparum samples collected between 2005 and 2009. Results This study showed a high prevalence of parasites with mutant pfcrt 76 (83% and pfmdr1 86 (93% codons. On the contrary, no mutations in the pfcrt 72 codon and no samples with duplication of the pfmdr1 gene were observed. Conclusion The high prevalence of mutant pfcrt 76T and pfmdr1 86Y alleles might be due to the choice of alternative drugs (AQ and AS-AQ known to select such genotypes. Mutant pfcrt 72 codon was not detected despite the prolonged use of AQ either as monotherapy or combined with artesunate. The absence of pfmdr1 multicopies suggests that AL would still remain efficient. The limited use of mefloquine or the predominance of mutant pfmdr1 86Y codon could explain the lack of pfmdr1 amplification. Indeed, this mutant codon is rarely associated with duplication of pfmdr1 gene. In Cameroon, the changes of therapeutic strategies and the simultaneous use of several formulations of ACT or other anti-malarials that are not officially recommended result in a

  17. The spectrum of unhealthy drug use and quality of care for hypertension and diabetes: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Theresa W; Samet, Jeffrey H; Cheng, Debbie M; Bernstein, Judith; Wang, Na; German, Jacqueline; Saitz, Richard

    2015-12-21

    Although it is well known that addiction is associated with adverse medical consequences, the effects of the spectrum of unhealthy drug use (illicit drug or prescription misuse) on chronic conditions such as hypertension and diabetes are understudied. This study evaluated the associations between measures of drug use (ie, frequency, severity and type) and standard quality metrics for inadequate blood pressure (BP) and blood glucose (BG) control. Longitudinal cohort study. Adult primary care patients with unhealthy drug use and hypertension or diabetes. Urban hospital-based primary care practice. Outcomes were (1) inadequate BP (systolic BP ≥ 140 or diastolic BP ≥ 90) and (2) inadequate BG (glycated haemoglobin ≥ 8%) control (Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set criteria). Drug use was characterised by a primary independent variable, drug use frequency, and two secondary variables, severity of use and drug type. We fit separate regression models for each drug use measure and outcome. Overall, 40% (65/164) of the sample with hypertension had inadequate BP control and 44% (24/54) of those with diabetes had inadequate BG control. More frequent drug use was not significantly associated with inadequate BP control (adjusted OR (AOR) 0.67; 95% CI 0.31 to 1.46, highest vs lowest tertile; AOR 0.72; 95% CI 0.36 to 1.41, middle vs lowest tertile) or BG control (AOR 0.27; 95% CI 0.07 to 1.10, highest vs lowest tertile; AOR 1.01; 95% CI 0.38 to 2.69, middle vs lowest tertile). Drug use severity was also not associated with BP or BG control. Cocaine use was associated with inadequate BG control compared to marijuana use (AOR 8.82; 95% CI1.86 to 41.90). Among primary care patients with recent drug use and hypertension or diabetes, drug type was significantly associated with inadequate BG, but not BP control. Frequency and severity of use were not significant predictors of either outcome. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where

  18. Quality of Antimalarials at the Epicenter of Antimalarial Drug Resistance: Results from an Overt and Mystery Client Survey in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L. S.; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M.; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D.; Fernandez, Facundo M.; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-01-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. PMID:25897063

  19. Real-Time Analysis on Drug-Antibody Ratio of Antibody-Drug Conjugates for Synthesis, Process Optimization, and Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yubo; Tang, Feng; Yang, Yang; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Hu; Dong, Jinhua; Huang, Wei

    2017-08-10

    Drug-antibody ratio (DAR) of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) is important for their therapeutic efficacy and pharmacokinetics, therefore control on DAR in synthesis process is a key for ADC quality control. Although various analytical methods were reported, the real-time monitoring on DAR is still a challenge because time-consuming sample preparation is usually needed during the analysis. Antibody deglycosylation of ADC simplifies DAR measurement, however long-time PNGaseF digestion for deglycosylation hampers the real-time detection. Here, we report a rapid DAR analysis within 15 min by robust deglycosylation treatment and LC-MS detection that enables real-time DAR monitoring for optimization on ADC synthetic process. With this approach, we were able to screen suitable conjugation conditions efficiently and afford the ADCs with expected DARs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on real-time DAR analysis of ADCs for conjugation optimization and quality control, compatible with random lysine-linked ADCs, glycosite-specific ADCs, and the complicated dual-payload ADCs.

  20. Purely in silico BCS classification: science based quality standards for the world's drugs.

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    Dahan, Arik; Wolk, Omri; Kim, Young Hoon; Ramachandran, Chandrasekharan; Crippen, Gordon M; Takagi, Toshihide; Bermejo, Marival; Amidon, Gordon L

    2013-11-04

    BCS classification is a vital tool in the development of both generic and innovative drug products. The purpose of this work was to provisionally classify the world's top selling oral drugs according to the BCS, using in silico methods. Three different in silico methods were examined: the well-established group contribution (CLogP) and atom contribution (ALogP) methods, and a new method based solely on the molecular formula and element contribution (KLogP). Metoprolol was used as the benchmark for the low/high permeability class boundary. Solubility was estimated in silico using a thermodynamic equation that relies on the partition coefficient and melting point. The validity of each method was affirmed by comparison to reference data and literature. We then used each method to provisionally classify the orally administered, IR drug products found in the WHO Model list of Essential Medicines, and the top-selling oral drug products in the United States (US), Great Britain (GB), Spain (ES), Israel (IL), Japan (JP), and South Korea (KR). A combined list of 363 drugs was compiled from the various lists, and 257 drugs were classified using the different in silico permeability methods and literature solubility data, as well as BDDCS classification. Lastly, we calculated the solubility values for 185 drugs from the combined set using in silico approach. Permeability classification with the different in silico methods was correct for 69-72.4% of the 29 reference drugs with known human jejunal permeability, and for 84.6-92.9% of the 14 FDA reference drugs in the set. The correlations (r(2)) between experimental log P values of 154 drugs and their CLogP, ALogP and KLogP were 0.97, 0.82 and 0.71, respectively. The different in silico permeability methods produced comparable results: 30-34% of the US, GB, ES and IL top selling drugs were class 1, 27-36.4% were class 2, 22-25.5% were class 3, and 5.46-14% were class 4 drugs, while ∼8% could not be classified. The WHO list

  1. Evaluation Management of Drugs and Relations with Quality of Outpatient Pharmacy Services in One of Hospital Pontianak City

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    Enggy Erwansani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays government policy which embodies the National Social Security System (SJSN where the presence of this system that every Indonesian people entitled to social security to be able to meet the basic needs of living. This study aims to describe the pharmaceutical drug outpatient management Hospital X Pontianak City and analyze the relationship management with the quality of pharmaceutical care medicine outpatient Hospital X Pontianak. This medication management including planning, organizing, directing, and monitoring. This study uses a quantitative approach which is an observational analytic research using cross sectional study with a sample of outpatient pharmacy customer research in Hospital X Pontianak. Collecting data using questionnaires from 100 customers outpatient with consecutive sampling method. The results using Pearson Correlation analysis showed the drug management relationship with the quality of outpatient pharmacy services which means the value of aspects planning (r=0.626; p<0,001, organizing (r=0.409; p<0,001, directing (r=0.359; p<0,001, and controlling (r=0.426; p<0,001 with R2 multiple 66.80%. The description of pharmaceutical drug management in outpatient Hospital X produce an average value 96.90% so as to be in very good category, there by proving the existence of a strong relationship between the four functions of management of the quality of pharmaceutical care medicine outpatient Hospital X.

  2. When it just won't go away: oral artemisinin monotherapy in Nigeria, threatening lives, threatening progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujuju, Chinazo; Anyanti, Jennifer; Newton, Paul N; Ntadom, Godwin

    2017-12-15

    Oral artemisinin monotherapy (AMT), an important contributor to multi-drug resistant malaria, has been banned in Nigeria. While oral AMT has scarcely been found for several years now in other malaria-endemic countries, availability has persisted in Nigeria's private sector. In 2015, the ACTwatch project conducted a nationally representative outlet survey. Results from the outlet survey show the extent to which oral AMT prevails in Nigeria's anti-malarial market, and provide key product information to guide strategies for removal. Between August 10th and October 3rd, 2015 a total of 13,480 outlets were screened for availability of anti-malarials and/or malaria blood testing services. Among the 3624 anti-malarial outlets, 33,539 anti-malarial products were audited, of which 1740 were oral AMT products, primarily artesunate (n = 1731). Oral AMT was imported from three different countries (Vietnam, China and India), representing six different manufacturers and 11 different brands. Availability of oral AMT was highest among pharmacies (84.0%) and Patent Propriety Medicine Vendors (drug stores, PPMVs) (38.7%), and rarely found in the public sector (2.0%). Oral AMT consisted of 2.5% of the national anti-malarial market share. Of all oral AMT sold or distributed, 52.3% of the market share comprised of a Vietnamese product, Artesunat ® , manufactured by Mekophar Chemical Pharmaceutical Joint Stock Company. A further 35.1% of the market share were products from China, produced by three different manufacturers and 12.5% were from India by one manufacturer, Medrel Pharmaceuticals. Most of the oral AMT was distributed by PPMVs accounting for 82.2% of the oral AMT market share. The median price for a package of artesunate ($1.78) was slightly more expensive than the price of quality-assured (QA) artemether lumefantrine (AL) for an adult ($1.52). The median price for a package of artesunate suspension ($2.54) was three times more expensive than the price of a package of QA AL

  3. Influence Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction towards Drug Purchase Intention in Anggrek Outpatient Pharmacy Depo at Hasan Sadikin Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratiwi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The quality of service is an evaluation which focused on customer’s awareness about a structural construction of a service or product that involves 5 main aspects which are tangibility, empathy, responsiveness, reliability and assurance. Based on monthly reports of pharmacy installation only about 30% of patients buy drugs in the Anggrek out patient depo out off patients visiting Anggrek out patient specialist clinic in Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of service quality and customer satisfaction to purchase intention in the Anggrek out patient depo Hasan Sadikin hospital at Bandung. The method used in this study is analytical survey with cross sectional design. The samples used were 200 patients, consist of 104 customers who have visited more than one times and 96 first visit costumer to this clinic. Data was collected using a questionnaire and analyzed using Smart PLS V 2.0 software. The results of this study showed that the service quality with tangible dimensions, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and empathy are affecting the customer satisfaction with a score of 12.755 t-count (greater than t-table 1.983 and a positive value of the original sample of 0.800. Customer satisfaction affecting the customer purchase intentions with t-count is greater than t-table values of 5.012 and 0.726 of the original positive sample. While the service quality does not directly influence customer purchase intention with the t-test is smaller than t-table is 1.455 and the negative of the original sample -0.287. Some of service quality influence customers that causes not purchasing drugs from the out patient depo there are effect of unavailability of counseling, long waiting time of service, the need for special counseling room, a spacious waiting room, and the completeness of drug availability.

  4. A Methodology for Assessing the Military Benefits of Science and Technology Investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Infectious Disease Research Combat Casualty Care Research Operational Medicine Research Malaria prophylaxis Mefloquine Adenovirus vaccine...Production 2nd Generation Infrared “Smart” Reactive Armor Mefloquine (anti-malarial drug) Hepatitis A Virus (HAV) Vaccine TOW Weapon System

  5. Effect of drug utilization reviews on the quality of in-hospital prescribing: a quasi-experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabot Isabelle

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug utilization review (DUR programs are being conducted in Canadian hospitals with the aim of improving the appropriateness of prescriptions. However, there is little evidence of their effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of both a retrospective and a concurrent DUR programs on the quality of in-hospital prescribing. Methods We conducted an interrupted time series quasi-experimental study. Using explicit criteria for quality of prescribing, the natural history of cisapride prescription was established retrospectively in three university-affiliated hospitals. A retrospective DUR was implemented in one of the hospitals, a concurrent DUR in another, whereas the third hospital served as a control. An archivist abstracted records of all patients who were prescribed cisapride during the observation period. The effect of DURs relative to the control hospital was determined by comparing estimated regression coefficients from the time series models and by testing the statistical significance using a 2-tailed Student's t test. Results The concurrent DUR program significantly improved the appropriateness of prescriptions for the indication for use whereas the retrospective DUR brought about no significant effect on the quality of prescribing. Conclusion Results suggest a retrospective DUR approach may not be sufficient to improve the quality of prescribing. However, a concurrent DUR strategy, with direct feedback to prescribers seems effective and should be tested in other settings with other drugs.

  6. Substandard antimalarials available in Afghanistan: a case for assessing the quality of drugs in resource poor settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalani, Mirza; Kaur, Harparkash; Mohammed, Nader; Mailk, Naiela; Wyk, Albert van; Jan, Sakhi; Kakar, Rishtya Meena; Mojadidi, Mohammed Khalid; Leslie, Toby

    2015-06-01

    Good-quality antimalarials are crucial for the effective treatment and control of malaria. A total of 7,740 individual and packaged tablets, ampoules, and syrups were obtained from 60 randomly selected public (N = 35) and private outlets (N = 25) in Afghanistan. Of these, 134 samples were screened using the Global Pharma Health Fund (GPHF) MiniLab® in Kabul with 33/126 (26%) samples failing the MiniLab® disintegration test. The quality of a subsample (N = 37) of cholorquine, quinine, and sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine tablets was assessed by in vitro dissolution testing following U.S. Pharmacopeia (USP) monographs at a bioanalytical laboratory in London, United Kingdom. Overall, 12/32 (32%) samples of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine and quinine were found not to comply with the USP tolerance limits. Substandard antimalarials were available in Afghanistan demonstrating that continuous monitoring of drug quality is warranted. However, in Afghanistan as in many low-income countries, capacity to determine and monitor drug quality using methods such as dissolution testing needs to be established to empower national authorities to take appropriate action in setting up legislation and regulation. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. Prescription drug samples--does this marketing strategy counteract policies for quality use of medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, K E M; Sketris, I; Tett, S E

    2003-08-01

    Prescription drug samples, as used by the pharmaceutical industry to market their products, are of current interest because of their influence on prescribing, and their potential impact on consumer safety. Very little research has been conducted into the use and misuse of prescription drug samples, and the influence of samples on health policies designed to improve the rational use of medicines. This is a topical issue in the prescription drug debate, with increasing costs and increasing concerns about optimizing use of medicines. This manuscript critically evaluates the research that has been conducted to date about prescription drug samples, discusses the issues raised in the context of traditional marketing theory, and suggests possible alternatives for the future.

  8. Extent, quality and impact of patient and public involvement in antimicrobial drug development research: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David; Bird, Emma; Gibson, Andy; Grier, Sally; Chin, Teh Li; Stoddart, Margaret; MacGowan, Alasdair

    2018-02-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is increasingly recognized as bringing a range of benefits to clinical and health services research. Recent systematic reviews have identified and synthesized many benefits (eg higher recruitment rates) and some costs (eg extra time need). Much of the literature focuses on PPI in long-term conditions rather than more acute health care in which the majority of microbiological research is undertaken. The aim was to identify the extent, quality and impact of PPI in antimicrobial drug development research. Objectives were to identify any relevant reporting of PPI in antimicrobial research; appraise the quality of reporting on PPI using recognized PPI reporting and critical appraisal tools; and extract and synthesize data on the impact of PPI. A systematic review was undertaken with a search strategy based on four word groups (PPI, patients, antimicrobial drug development and outcomes). Eight online databases were searched. English language publication, publication between 1996 and 2016 and studies describing PPI in antimicrobial drug development research. No studies were found through online searching that met the search strategy and inclusion criteria. One relevant protocol paper with a brief mention of PPI was identified through expert recommendation. Commentary papers recommending PPI were identified through website searching and expert opinion. Despite strong policy guidance encouraging PPI at the international and national levels, and anecdotal accounts of PPI taking place, evidence for the extent, quality and impact of PPI in antimicrobial drug development research has not yet appeared in the peer-reviewed literature. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Extent and quality of drug use in community-dwelling people aged ≥75 years: A Swedish nationwide register-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerin, Annica; Törnkvist, Lena; Nilsson, Gunnar; Johnell, Kristina; Fastbom, Johan

    2017-12-01

    It is important for district nurses and other health professionals in primary care to gain more insight into the patterns and quality of drug use in community-dwelling older people, particularly in 75-year-olds, who have been the target of preventive home visits. This study aimed to examine the extent and quality of drug use in community-dwelling older people and to compare drug use in 75-year-olds with that of older age groups. Data from 2013 on people aged ≥75 years were obtained from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Those living in the community (671,940/739,734 people aged ≥75 years) were included in the study. Quality of drug use was assessed by using a selection of indicators issued by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. The prevalence of polypharmacy and of many drug groups increased with age, as did several indicators of inappropriate drug use. However some drug groups, as well as inappropriate drugs, were prevalent in 75-year-olds and declined with age, for example diabetes drugs, drugs with major anticholinergic effects and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The substantial use of some drugs as early as 75 years of age confirms the value of including drug use as a topic in preventive home visits to 75-year-olds. The finding that polypharmacy and many measures of inappropriate drug use increased with age in community-dwelling older people also underscores the importance of district nurses' role in continuing to promote safe medication management at higher ages.

  10. The Suitability of P. falciparum Merozoite Surface Proteins 1 and 2 as Genetic Markers for In Vivo Drug Trials in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-abd, Nazeh M.; Mahdy, Mohammed A. K.; Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M. Q.; Snounou, Georges; Abdul-Majid, Nazia B.; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M.; Fong, Mun Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background The accuracy of the conclusions from in vivo efficacy anti-malarial drug trials depends on distinguishing between recrudescences and re-infections which is accomplished by genotyping genes coding P. falciparum merozoite surface 1 (MSP1) and MSP2. However, the reliability of the PCR analysis depends on the genetic markers’ allelic diversity and variant frequency. In this study the genetic diversity of the genes coding for MSP1 and MSP2 was obtained for P. falciparum parasites circulating in Yemen. Methods Blood samples were collected from 511 patients with fever and screened for malaria parasites using Giemsa-stained blood films. A total 74 samples were infected with P. falciparum, and the genetic diversity was assessed by nested PCR targeting Pfmsp1 (Block2) and Pfmsp2 (block 3). Results Overall, 58%, 28% and 54% of the isolates harboured parasites of the Pfmsp1 K1, MAD20 and RO33 allelic families, and 55% and 89% harboured those of the Pfmsp2 FC27 and 3D7 allelic families, respectively. For both genetic makers, the multiplicity of the infection (MOI) was significantly higher in the isolates from the foothills/coastland areas as compared to those from the highland (PYemen Pfmsp1 should not be used for PCR correction of in vivo clinical trials outcomes, and that caution should be exercised when employing Pfmsp2. PMID:23861823

  11. [HERA-QUEST: HTA evaluation of generic pharmaceutical products to improve quality, economic efficiency, patient safety and transparency in drug product changes in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyalrong-Steur, Miriam; Kellermann, Anita; Bernard, Rudolf; Berndt, Georg; Bindemann, Meike; Nusser-Rothermundt, Elfriede; Amann, Steffen; Brakebusch, Myga; Brüggmann, Jörg; Tydecks, Eva; Müller, Markus; Dörje, Frank; Kochs, Eberhard; Riedel, Rainer

    2017-04-01

    In view of the rising cost pressure and an increasing number of drug shortages, switches between generic drug preparations have become a daily routine in hospitals. To ensure consistently high treatment quality and best possible patient safety, the equivalence of the new and the previous drug preparation must be ensured before any change in the purchase of pharmaceutical products takes place. So far, no easily usable, transparent and standardized instrument for this kind of comparison between generic drug products has been available. A group of pharmaceutical experts has developed the drug HTA (health technology assessment) model "HERA" (HTA Evaluation of geneRic phArmaceutical products) through a multi-step process. The instrument is designed to perform both a qualitative and economic comparison of equivalent drug preparations ("aut idem" substitution) before switching products. The economic evaluation does not only consider unit prices and consumption quantity, but also the processing costs associated with a product change process. The qualitative comparison is based on the evaluation of 34 quality criteria belonging to six evaluation fields (e.g., approval status, practical handling, packaging design). The objective evaluation of the quality criteria is complemented by an assessment of special features of the individual hospital for complex drug switches, including the feedback of the physicians utilizing the drug preparation. Thus potentially problematic switches of pharmaceutical products can be avoided at the best possible rate, contributing to the improvement of patient safety. The novel drug HTA model HERA is a tool used in clinical practice that can add to an increase in quality, therapeutic safety and transparency of drug use while simultaneously contributing to the economic optimization of drug procurement in hospitals. Combining these two is essential for hospitals facing the tension between rising cost pressure and at the same time increasing demands

  12. Appropriate experimental approaches for predicting abuse potential and addictive qualities in preclinical drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Andy N

    2014-11-01

    Drug abuse is an increasing social and public health issue, putting the onus on drug developers and regulatory agencies to ensure that the abuse potential of novel drugs is adequately assessed prior to product launch. This review summarizes the core preclinical data that frequently contribute to building an understanding of abuse potential for a new molecular entity, in addition to highlighting models that can provide increased resolution regarding the level of risk. Second, an important distinction between abuse potential and addiction potential is drawn, with comments on how preclinical models can inform on each. While the currently adopted preclinical models possess strong predictive validity, there are areas for future refinement and research. These areas include a more refined use of self-administration models to assess relative reinforcement; and the need for open innovation in pursuing improvements. There is also the need for careful scientifically driven application of models rather than a standardization of methodologies, and the need to explore the opportunities that may exist for enhancing the value of physical dependence and withdrawal studies by focusing on withdrawal-induced drug seeking, rather than broad symptomology.

  13. The quality of economic evaluations of ultra-orphan drugs in Europe - a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuller, Y.; Hollak, C. E. M.; Biegstraaten, M.

    2015-01-01

    An orphan disease is defined in the EU as a disorder affecting less than 1 in 2 000 individuals. The concept of ultra-orphan has been proposed for diseases with a prevalence of less than 1:50 000. Drugs for ultra-orphan diseases are amongst the most expensive medicines on a cost-per-patient basis.

  14. Have VET Reforms Resulted in Improvements in Quality? Illustrations from the Alcohol and Other Drugs Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Ann; Kostadinov, Victoria; White, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Australian vocational education and training (VET) has undergone major reforms since the 1990s, including the introduction of competency based training (CBT) and the "streamlining" of qualifications. This paper examines the impact of these reforms, using the alcohol and other drugs sector as a case illustration. A survey of alcohol and…

  15. [European Union regulatory and quality requirements for botanical drugs and their implications for Chinese herbal medicinal products development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, You-Ping

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces regulatory pathways and characteristic quality requirements for marketing authorization of herbal medicinal products in the European Union(EU), and the legal status and applications of "European Union list of herbal substances, preparations and combinations" and "European Union herbal monographs". Also introduced are Chinese herbs that have been granted the EU list entry, those with EU herbal monographs, and registered EU traditional herbal medicinal products with Chinese herbs as active ingredients. Special attention is paid to the technical details of three authorized EU herbal medicinal products (Veregen, Sativex and Episalvan) in comparison with Andrographis paniculata extract HMPL-004 that failed the phase Ⅲ clinical trial for ulcerative colitis. The paper further emphasizes the importance of enriching active fractions of herbal extracts and taking regulatory and quality considerations into account in early stage of botanical drug development. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  16. Quality not Quantity: The Role of Marine Natural Products in Drug Discovery and Reverse Chemical Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Piggott

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Reverse chemical proteomics combines affinity chromatography with phage display and promises to be a powerful new platform technology for the isolation of natural product receptors, facilitating the drug discovery process by rapidly linking biologically active small molecules to their cellular receptors and the receptors’ genes. In this paper we review chemical proteomics and reverse chemical proteomics and show how these techniques can add value to natural products research. We also report on techniques for the derivatisation of polystyrene microtitre plates with cleavable linkers and marine natural products that can be used in chemical proteomics or reverse chemical proteomics. Specifically, we have derivatised polystyrene with palau’amine and used reverse chemical proteomics to try and isolate the human receptors for this potent anticancer marine drug.

  17. Quality of antimalarials at the epicenter of antimalarial drug resistance: results from an overt and mystery client survey in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Shunmay; Lawford, Harriet L S; Tabernero, Patricia; Nguon, Chea; van Wyk, Albert; Malik, Naiela; DeSousa, Mikhael; Rada, Ouk; Boravann, Mam; Dwivedi, Prabha; Hostetler, Dana M; Swamidoss, Isabel; Green, Michael D; Fernandez, Facundo M; Kaur, Harparkash

    2015-06-01

    Widespread availability of monotherapies and falsified antimalarials is thought to have contributed to the historical development of multidrug-resistant malaria in Cambodia. This study aimed to document the quality of artemisinin-containing antimalarials (ACAs) and to compare two methods of collecting antimalarials from drug outlets: through open surveyors and mystery clients (MCs). Few oral artemisinin-based monotherapies and no suspected falsified medicines were found. All 291 samples contained the stated active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of which 69% were considered good quality by chemical analysis. Overall, medicine quality did not differ by collection method, although open surveyors were less likely to obtain oral artemisinin-based monotherapies than MCs. The results are an encouraging indication of the positive impact of the country's efforts to tackle falsified antimalarials and artemisinin-based monotherapies. However, poor-quality medicines remain an ongoing challenge that demands sustained political will and investment of human and financial resources. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  18. Analytical Quality by Design Approach to Test Method Development and Validation in Drug Substance Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. V. S. S. Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical industry has been emerging rapidly for the last decade by focusing on product Quality, Safety, and Efficacy. Pharmaceutical firms increased the number of product development by using scientific tools such as QbD (Quality by Design and PAT (Process Analytical Technology. ICH guidelines Q8 to Q11 have discussed QbD implementation in API synthetic process and formulation development. ICH Q11 guidelines clearly discussed QbD approach for API synthesis with examples. Generic companies are implementing QbD approach in formulation development and even it is mandatory for USFDA perspective. As of now there is no specific requirements for AQbD (Analytical Quality by Design and PAT in analytical development from all regulatory agencies. In this review, authors have discussed the implementation of QbD and AQbD simultaneously for API synthetic process and analytical methods development. AQbD key tools are identification of ATP (Analytical Target Profile, CQA (Critical Quality Attributes with risk assessment, Method Optimization and Development with DoE, MODR (method operable design region, Control Strategy, AQbD Method Validation, and Continuous Method Monitoring (CMM. Simultaneous implementation of QbD activities in synthetic and analytical development will provide the highest quality product by minimizing the risks and even it is very good input for PAT approach.

  19. Mixing monoclonal antibody formulations using bottom-mounted mixers: impact of mechanism and design on drug product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gikanga, Benson; Chen, Yufei; Stauch, Oliver B; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2015-01-01

    Using bottom-mounted mixers, particularly those that are magnetically driven, is becoming increasingly common during the mixing process in pharmaceutical and biotechnology manufacturing because of their associated low risk of contamination, ease of use, and ability to accommodate low minimum mixing volumes. Despite these benefits, the impact of bottom-mounted mixers on biologic drug product is not yet fully understood and is scarcely reported. This study evaluated four bottom-mounted mixers to assess their impact on monoclonal antibody formulations. Changes in product quality (size variants, particles, and turbidity) and impact on process performance (sterile filtration) were evaluated after mixing. The results suggested that mixers that are designed to function with no contact between the impeller and the drive unit are the most favorable and gentle to monoclonal antibody molecules. Designs with contact or a narrow clearance tended to shear and grind the protein and resulted in high particle count in the liquid, which would subsequently foul a filter membrane during sterile filtration using a 0.22 μm pore size filter. Despite particle formation, increases in turbidity of the protein solution and protein aggregation/fragmentation were not detected. Further particle analysis indicated particles in the range of 0.2-2 μm are responsible for filter fouling. A small-scale screening model was developed using two types of magnetic stir bars mimicking the presence or absence of contact between the impeller and drive unit in the bottom-mounted mixers. The model is capable of differentiating the sensitivity of monoclonal antibody formulations to bottom-mounted mixers with a small sample size. This study fills an important gap in understanding a critical bioprocess unit operation. Mixing is an important unit operation in drug product manufacturing for compounding (dilution, pooling, homogenization, etc.). The current trend in adopting disposable bottom-mounted mixers has

  20. 75 FR 70011 - Guidance for Industry, Mammography Quality Standards Act Inspectors, and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-16

    ... of computer controlled compression devices; 12. Mammography equipment evaluations of laser printers; 13. Quality control testing of monitors and laser printers; 14. Mammography equipment evaluations of new FFDM units; and 15. Mammography equipment evaluations of off-site laser printers and monitors. The...

  1. Association between drug prescribing and quality of life in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Samanta E; Zaccolo, Anamaria V; da Silva, Sabrina L C; Mengue, Sotero S

    2010-12-01

    To evaluate quality of life among patients of Family Health Strategy Units and how it relates to the prescribing complexity and to the number of psychotropic medications prescribed, including adjustments for sociodemographic characteristics. Family Health Strategy Units in a municipality in the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul. Cross-sectional study using face-to-face interviews and prescribing analysis among users of Family Health Strategy Units. Patients were recruited by consecutive sampling. Multiple linear regression models were fitted to the different domains of quality of life in the WHOQOL-Bref questionnaire. The response rate for the patients who completed the interview was 97%. The prescribed medication data and sociodemographic characteristics of the sample were included as covariates. Prescribing complexity was analyzed by means of the Medication Regimen Complexity Index. The assumptions in the estimated models were tested and the models were validated. Quality of life among patients of Family Health Strategy Units. At total, 336 patients answered the questionnaire. Through multiple linear regression, it was observed that higher prescribing complexity was associated with significantly low scores in the physical (-2.01, 95% CI = -2.89 to -1.35) and overall (-1.93, 95% CI = -2.81 to -0.99) quality of life domains. Greater amounts of psychotropic medications prescribed were associated with significantly low scores in the physical (-1.02, 95% CI = -1.29 to -0.56), psychological (-2.52, 95% CI = -3.15 to -1.65) and overall (-0.97, 95% CI = -2.06 to -0.33) domains of the interviewees' quality of life. The estimated models were adjusted for the sociodemographic characteristics of the sample and presented good predictive capacity. The evaluated aspects of the prescribed medication (complexity and presence of psychotropic medications) were associated with low scores in the physical, psychological and overall quality of life domains. This may be an intrinsic

  2. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus

    2016-01-01

    in the private health sector in Uganda. METHODS: A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono District, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables: drug shop characteristics, training of staff in management of pneumonia, availability of guidelines and basic equipment.......5% were prescribing antibiotics, especially amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (septrin). The professional qualification of a provider was significantly associated with this practice, p=0.04; where lower cadre staff (nursing assistants and enrolled nurses) overprescribed antibiotics. A third...

  3. External Quality Assessment for Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Drug Resistance in the European Union: A Five Year Multicentre Implementation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolayevskyy, Vladyslav; Hillemann, Doris; Richter, Elvira; Ahmed, Nada; van der Werf, Marieke J; Kodmon, Csaba; Drobniewski, Francis; Ruesch-Gerdes, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    External quality assurance (EQA) systems are essential to ensure accurate diagnosis of TB and drug-resistant TB. The implementation of EQA through organising regular EQA rounds and identification of training needs is one of the key activities of the European TB reference laboratory network (ERLTB-Net). The aim of this study was to analyse the results of the EQA rounds in a systematic manner and to identify potential benefits as well as common problems encountered by the participants. The ERLTB-Net developed seven EQA modules to test laboratories' proficiency for TB detection and drug susceptibility testing using both conventional and rapid molecular tools. All National TB Reference laboratories in the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) Member States were invited to participate in the EQA scheme. A total of 32 National TB Reference laboratories participated in six EQA rounds conducted in 2010-2014. The participation rate ranged from 52.9% - 94.1% over different modules and rounds. Overall, laboratories demonstrated very good proficiency proving their ability to diagnose TB and drug-resistant TB with high accuracy in a timely manner. A small number of laboratories encountered problems with identification of specific Non-tuberculous Mycobacteria (NTMs) (N = 5) and drug susceptibility testing to Pyrazinamide, Amikacin, Capreomycin, and Ethambutol (N = 4). The European TB Reference laboratories showed a steady and high level of performance in the six EQA rounds. A network such as ERLTB-Net can be instrumental in developing and implementing EQA and in establishing collaboration between laboratories to improve the diagnosis of TB in the EU/EEA.

  4. Brazilian Drug Information Centre: descriptive study on the quality of information 2010-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Alejandra Escalante-Saavedra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To define the activities of the Drug Information Centre of the Federal Council of Pharmacy (Cebrim/FCP, to describe the passive information and the satisfaction of its users.Method: The centre has a computerized system for recording and storing the received questions and their answers: the Sistema de Informação Farmacoterapêutica SIFAR (Pharmacotherapeutical Information System that generates management reports; out of these, the reports from the period 2010 to 2015 were analyzed.Results: The main activity carried out by the centre was the passive information provided to pharmacists and undergraduate Pharmacy students. The most frequent subjects were: administration and way of use of medicines and indication and drug interactions, which were answered in less than 24 hours in most cases. Approximately 80% of those users who completed the satisfaction survey rated the service provided as good and optimal.Conclusion: Cebrim/FCP provides objective, updated and timely information (passive information on medicines for pharmacists, with administration and way of use as the most recurrent subjects, and the majority of applicants were satisfied with the service.

  5. Investigation of specificity ensuring of quality of biological medicinal products on example of drugs Cortexin and Retinalamin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. O. Vetiutneva

    2013-06-01

    consists of the following stages: preparing of the solution for bottling, sterilizing filtration, washing and sterilizing of the bottles, aseptic filling, freeze drying and plugging, seaming, continuous monitoring in bulk. After getting the quality certificate and declaration of conformity products are transferred to the storage place for finished products. The specificity of differences between biological medical products and synthetic medicines was investigated. Stages of ensuring of the quality of biological medicinal products with considering of particular qualities of the critical points were considered - the special conditions in the manufacturing process, temperature monitoring, systems and procedures of ensuring in quality during transportation, storage. The main stages of ensuring of quality were studied on the example of original drugs Cortexin and Retinalamin in the chain from production to sale.

  6. An assessment of quality of sleep and the use of drugs with sedating properties in hospitalized adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumann Terryn

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospitalization can significantly disrupt sleeping patterns. In consideration of the previous reports of insomnia and apparent widespread use of benzodiazepines and other hypnotics in hospitalized patients, we conducted a study to assess quality of sleep and hypnotic drug use in our acute care adult patient population. The primary objectives of this study were to assess sleep disturbance and its determinants including the use of drugs with sedating properties. Methods This single-centre prospective study involved an assessment of sleep quality for consenting patients admitted to the general medicine and family practice units of an acute care Canadian hospital. A validated Verran and Snyder-Halpern (VSH Sleep Scale measuring sleep disturbance, sleep effectiveness, and sleep supplementation was completed daily by patients and scores were compared to population statistics. Patients were also asked to identify factors influencing sleep while in hospital, and sedating drug use prior to and during hospitalization was also assessed. Results During the 70-day study period, 100 patients completed at least one sleep questionnaire. There was a relatively even distribution of males versus females, most patients were in their 8th decade of life, retired, and suffered from multiple chronic diseases. The median self-reported pre-admission sleep duration for participants was 8 hours and our review of PharmaNetR profiles revealed that 35 (35% patients had received a dispensed prescription for a hypnotic or antidepressant drug in the 3-month period prior to admission. Benzodiazepines were the most common sedating drugs prescribed. Over 300 sleep disturbance, effective and supplementation scores were completed. Sleep disturbance scores across all study days ranged 16–681, sleep effectiveness scores ranged 54–402, while sleep supplementation scores ranged between 0–358. Patients tended to have worse sleep scores as compared to healthy non

  7. Psychosocial functioning, quality of life and clinical correlates of comorbid alcohol and drug dependence syndromes in people with schizophrenia across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrà, Giuseppe; Johnson, Sonia; Crocamo, Cristina; Angermeyer, Matthias C; Brugha, Traolach; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Toumi, Mondher; Bebbington, Paul E

    2016-05-30

    Little is known about the correlates of comorbid drug and alcohol dependence in people with schizophrenia outside the USA. We tested hypotheses that dependence on alcohol/drugs would be associated with more severe symptoms, and poorer psychosocial functioning and quality of life. The EuroSC Cohort study (N=1204), based in France, Germany and the UK, used semi-structured clinical interviews for diagnoses, and standardized tools to assess correlates. We used mixed models to compare outcomes between past-year comorbid dependence on alcohol/drugs, controlling for covariates and modelling both subject and country-level effects. Participants dependent on alcohol or drugs had fewer negative symptoms on PANSS than their non-dependent counterparts. However, those dependent on alcohol scored higher on PANSS general psychopathology than those who were not, or dependent only on drugs. People with schizophrenia dependent on drugs had poorer quality of life, more extrapyramidal side effects, and scored worse on Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) than those without dependence. People with alcohol dependence reported more reasons for non-compliance with medication, and poorer functioning on GAF, though not on Global Assessment of Relational Functioning. In people with schizophrenia, comorbid dependence on alcohol or drugs is associated with impaired clinical and psychosocial adjustment, and poorer quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Implementation and evaluation of a multisite drug usage evaluation program across Australian hospitals - a quality improvement initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background With the use of medicines being a broad and extensive part of health management, mechanisms to ensure quality use of medicines are essential. Drug usage evaluation (DUE) is an evidence-based quality improvement methodology, designed to improve the quality, safety and cost-effectiveness of drug use. The purpose of this paper is to describe a national DUE methodology used to improve health care delivery across the continuum through multi-faceted intervention involving audit and feedback, academic detailing and system change, and a qualitative assessment of the methodology, as illustrated by the Acute Postoperative Pain Management (APOP) project. Methods An established methodology, consisting of a baseline audit of inpatient medical records, structured patient interviews and general practitioner surveys, followed by an educational intervention and follow-up audit, is used. Australian hospitals, including private, public, metropolitan and regional, are invited to participate on a voluntary basis. De-identified data collected by hospitals are collated and evaluated nationally to provide descriptive comparative analyses. Hospitals benchmark their practices against state and national results to facilitate change. The educational intervention consists of academic detailing, group education, audit and feedback, point-of-prescribing prompts and system changes. A repeat data collection is undertaken to assess changes in practice. An online qualitative survey was undertaken to evaluate the APOP program. Qualitative assessment of hospitals' perceptions of the effectiveness of the overall DUE methodology and changes in procedure/prescribing/policy/clinical practice which resulted from participation were elicited. Results 62 hospitals participated in the APOP project. Among 23 respondents to the evaluation survey, 18 (78%) reported improvements in the documentation of pain scores at their hospital. 15 (65%) strongly agreed or agreed that participation in APOP directly

  9. Implementation and evaluation of a multisite drug usage evaluation program across Australian hospitals - a quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Marion B

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the use of medicines being a broad and extensive part of health management, mechanisms to ensure quality use of medicines are essential. Drug usage evaluation (DUE is an evidence-based quality improvement methodology, designed to improve the quality, safety and cost-effectiveness of drug use. The purpose of this paper is to describe a national DUE methodology used to improve health care delivery across the continuum through multi-faceted intervention involving audit and feedback, academic detailing and system change, and a qualitative assessment of the methodology, as illustrated by the Acute Postoperative Pain Management (APOP project. Methods An established methodology, consisting of a baseline audit of inpatient medical records, structured patient interviews and general practitioner surveys, followed by an educational intervention and follow-up audit, is used. Australian hospitals, including private, public, metropolitan and regional, are invited to participate on a voluntary basis. De-identified data collected by hospitals are collated and evaluated nationally to provide descriptive comparative analyses. Hospitals benchmark their practices against state and national results to facilitate change. The educational intervention consists of academic detailing, group education, audit and feedback, point-of-prescribing prompts and system changes. A repeat data collection is undertaken to assess changes in practice. An online qualitative survey was undertaken to evaluate the APOP program. Qualitative assessment of hospitals' perceptions of the effectiveness of the overall DUE methodology and changes in procedure/prescribing/policy/clinical practice which resulted from participation were elicited. Results 62 hospitals participated in the APOP project. Among 23 respondents to the evaluation survey, 18 (78% reported improvements in the documentation of pain scores at their hospital. 15 (65% strongly agreed or agreed that

  10. Genotyping External Quality Assurance in the World Health Organization HIV Drug Resistance Laboratory Network During 2007–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, James; Bertagnolio, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a global laboratory network to support human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance genotyping for public health surveillance in resource-limited countries. Blinded proficiency panels are an essential part of a genotyping quality-assurance program and are used to monitor the reliability of genotyping data in the WHO laboratory network. Laboratories in Europe, North America, Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean have tested panels annually since 2007; 103 of 131 submissions (79%) had >99% nucleotide sequence identity and resistance mutation concordance, compared with consensus. Most errors were associated with mixtures in the test specimen, leading to subjectivity in base-calling or amplification bias. Overall, genotyping assays used by the WHO laboratory network are reliable. PMID:22544186

  11. Who continues to stock oral artemisinin monotherapy? Results of a provider survey in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Si Thu; Sudhinaraset, May; Khin, Hnin Su Su; McFarland, Willi; Aung, Tin

    2016-06-22

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is a key strategy for global malaria elimination efforts. However, the development of artemisinin-resistant malaria parasites threatens progress and continued usage of oral artemisinin monotherapies (AMT) predisposes the selection of drug resistant strains. This is particularly a problem along the Myanmar/Thailand border. The artemisinin monotherapy replacement programme (AMTR) was established in 2012 to remove oral AMT from stocks in Myanmar, specifically by replacing oral AMT with quality-assured ACT and conducting behavioural change communication activities to the outlets dispensing anti-malarial medications. This study attempts to quantify the characteristics of outlet providers who continue to stock oral AMT despite these concerted efforts. A cross-sectional survey of all types of private sector outlets that were stocking anti-malarial drugs in 13 townships of Eastern Myanmar was implemented from July to August 2014. A total of 573 outlets were included. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regressions were conducted to assess outlet and provider-level characteristics associated with stocking oral AMT. In total, 2939 outlets in Eastern Myanmar were screened for presence of any anti-malarial drugs in August 2014. The study found that 573 (19.5 %) had some kind of oral anti-malarial drug in stock at the time of survey and among them, 96 (16.8 %) stocked oral AMT. In bivariate analyses, compared to health care facilities, itinerant drug vendors, retailers and health workers were less likely to stock oral AMT (33.3 vs 12.9, 10.0, 8.1 %, OR = 0.30, 0.22, 0.18, respectively). Providers who cut blister pack or sell partial courses (40.6 vs 11.7 %, OR 5.18, CI 3.18-8.44) and those who based their stock decision on consumer demand (32.8 vs 12.1 %, OR 3.54, CI 2.21-5.63) were more likely to stock oAMT. Multivariate logistic regressions produced similar significant associations. Private healthcare facilities and drug

  12. Sexual services, drugs and human trafficking, smuggling – in GDP figures: Quality of life indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilks A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years different kind of antisocial and criminal activities, according to the EU regulations, are being included in GDP indicators. The activities, included in GDP indicators are as follows: those of criminal nature (drugs, arms and human trafficking, corruptive activities, etc.; illegal activities, which are not of criminal nature (businesses without licenses and special permits, poaching, etc.; legal activities, though the income from them is not taxed and not recorded (prostitution, alcohol production, etc.; illegal use of intellectual property objects (illegal use of unlicensed programmes. Estimates on the inclusion of illegal, among them criminal activities in GDP indicators are important not only to learn the actual size of GDP, but also to give a chance to the law enforcement authorities to pay attention to separate areas of unregulated economic activities. The author of the article outlines the approximate extent of illegal and informal economic activities and their share in GDP, describes the methods of determination of the economic sector, as well as analyzes some separate informal economic sectors, which should be included into GDP.

  13. Nuclear attitudes and reactions: associations with depression, drug use, and quality of life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newcomb, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    For 40 years the world has lived with the threat of nuclear war and, recently, with the possibility of nuclear power plant accidents. Although virtually every generation must confront various national or international crises, the threat of nuclear war is unprecedented in its destructive potential. This study is an attempt to assess attitudes and amount of distress associated with the ever-present threat of nuclear war and the possibility of accidents at nuclear power plants. The Nuclear Attitudes Questionnaire (NAQ) consists of 15 items and was administered to 722 young adults who have grown up in the nuclear age. The items were found to reflect four latent factors of nuclear concern, nuclear support, fear of the future, and nuclear denial, all of which in turn represent a second-order construct of nuclear anxiety. Women reported significantly more nuclear concern, less nuclear support, more fear of the future, and less nuclear denial than did men. In latent-variable models, nuclear anxiety was found to be significantly associated with less purpose in life, less life satisfaction, more powerlessness, more depression, and more drug use. It is concluded that the threat of nuclear war and accidents is significantly related to psychological distress and may disturb normal maturational development

  14. The strategic relevance of manufacturing technology: An overall quality concept to promote innovation preventing drug shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzitta, Michele; Ponti, Mauro; Bruno, Giorgio; Cois, Giancarlo; D'Arpino, Alessandro; Minghetti, Paola; Mendicino, Francesca Romana; Perioli, Luana; Ricci, Maurizio

    2017-01-10

    Manufacturing is the bridge between research and patient: without product, there is no clinical outcome. Shortage has a variety of causes, in this paper we analyse only causes related to manufacturing technology and we use shortage as a paradigm highliting the relevance of Pharmaceutical Technology. Product and process complexity and capacity issues are the main challenge for the Pharmaceutical Industry Supply chain. Manufacturing Technology should be acknowledged as a R&D step and as a very important matter during University degree in Pharmacy and related disciplines, promoting collaboration between Academia and Industry, measured during HTA step and rewarded in terms of price and reimbursement. The above elements are not yet properly recognised, and manufacturing technology is taken in to consideration only when a shortage is in place. In a previous work, Panzitta et al. proposed to perform a full technology assessment at the Health Technological Assessment stage, evaluating three main technical aspects of a medicine: manufacturing process, physicochemical properties, and formulation characteristics. In this paper, we develop the concept of manufacturing appraisal, providing a technical overview of upcoming challenges, a risk based approach and an economic picture of shortage costs. We develop also an overall quality concept, not limited to GMP factors but broaden to all elements leading to a robust supply and promoting technical innovation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Estimating the Impact of Means-tested Subsidies under Treatment Externalities with Application to Anti-Malarial Bednets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Debopam; Dupas, Pascaline; Kanaya, Shin

    purchase price, causing free-riding and sub-optimal private procurement, such products may be subsidized in developing countries through means-testing. Owing to associated spillover effects, cost-benefit analysis of such subsidies requires modelling behavioral responses of both the subsidized household...... resulting from a specific targeting rule, depending on the resulting aggregate incidence of subsidy. Applying our method to the Kenyan data, we find that (i) individual ITN use rises with neighborhood subsidy-rates, (ii) under means-testing, predicted ITN use is a convex increasing function of the subsidy...

  16. How do initial signals of quality influence the diffusion of new medical products? The case of new cancer drug treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Rena M; Bernstein, Arielle; Meltzer, David O

    2012-01-01

    Objective measures of a new treatment's expected ability to improve patients' health are presumed to be significant factors influencing physicians' treatment decisions. Physicians' behavior may also be influenced by their patients' disease severity and insurance reimbursement policies, firm promotional activities and public media reports. This chapter examines how objective evidence of the incremental effectiveness of novel drugs to treat cancer ("chemotherapies") impacts the rate at which physicians' adopt these treatments into practice, holding constant other factors. The novelty of the analysis resides in the dataset and estimation strategy employed. Data is derived from a United States population-based chemotherapy order entry system, IntrinsiQ Intellidose. Quality/price endogeneity is overcome by employing sample selection methods and an estimation strategy that exploits quality variation at the molecule-indication level. Pooled diffusion rates across molecule-indication pairs are estimated using nonparametric hazard models. Results suggest incremental effectiveness is negatively and nonsignificantly associated with the diffusion of new chemotherapies; faster rates of diffusion are positively and significantly related to low five-year survival probabilities and measures of perceived clinical significance. Results are robust to numerous specification checks, including a measure of alternative therapeutic availability. We discuss the magnitude and potential direction of bias introduced by several threats to internal validity. Evidence of incremental effectiveness does not appear to motivate the rate of specialty physician diffusion of new medical treatment; in all models high risk of disease mortality and perceptions of therapeutic quality are significant drivers of physician use of novel chemotherapies. Understanding the rate of technological advance across different clinical settings, as well as the product-, provider-, and patient-level determinants of this

  17. [Actuality investigation on general crude drugs and its quality standard of Tibetan medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guoyue; Zhou, Fucheng; Shi, Shangmei; Zhou, Huarong; Yu, Jiangyong; Ping, A; Liu, Haiqing; Dawa, Zhuoma

    2012-08-01

    To provide a reference for the standardization of Tibetan medicine. Investigating the hospital preparations , Tibetan formulated products, and the literature recorded preparations in the Tibetan, Qinghai, Gansu, Sichuan and Yunnan Provinces. Moreover, the varieties, original bases and standard conditions of these preparations were analyzed. According to Chinese Pharmacopoeia, Tibetan medicine part of ministerial standard, Tibetan medicine standards and related monographs and literatures of Tibetan medicine. About 502 various of herbs were used in 711 hospital preparations from 40 medical institutions, Tibetan formulated products from Tibetan pharmaceutical factories, and 439 literature recorded preparations. About 154 herbs were used in more than 10 preparations, while most of them were Tibetan endemic species. About 416 medicinal varieties have the original documented basis, including 287 botanicals, 78 animal medicines, 51 mineral medicines, involving a total of 94 families, 261 genus and 643 species of botanical origin (including species of the next grade), 35 families, 52 genera and 61 species of the animal origin (including species of the next grade). About 122 varieties of herbs were cross-used in the traditional Chinese medicine and Tibetan medicine, about 80% of Tibetan medicinal varieties are produced in the Tibetan Areas of Tibet Plateau. About 293 medicinal varieties were contained in the above standards. Most of the herb's standards only contains character, indentification, and examination, except for 8 varieties which were recorded in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia (2010) as Tibetan medicine. This study of quality standard of Tibetan medicine should have an emphasis on the general varieties, especially the study on the arrangement research and the efficacious material basis of the varieties and the original, as well as term standardization of the National Medicine.

  18. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum and distribution of drug resistance haplotypes in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Hashami, Zainab; Al-Farsi, Hissa; Al-mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Idris, Mohamed A; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Babiker, Hamza A

    2013-07-15

    Despite evident success of malaria control in many sites in the Arabian Peninsula, malaria remains endemic in a few spots, in Yemen and south-west of Saudi Arabia. In addition to local transmission, imported malaria sustains an extra source of parasites that can challenge the strengths of local control strategies. This study examined the genetic diversity of Plasmodium falciparum in Yemen and mutations of drug resistant genes, to elucidate parasite structure and distribution of drug resistance genotypes in the region. Five polymorphic loci (MSP-2, Pfg377 and three microsatellites on chromosome 8) not involved in anti-malarial drug resistance, and four drug resistant genes (pfcrt, pfmdr1, dhfr and dhps) were genotyped in 108 P. falciparum isolates collected in three sites in Yemen: Dhamar, Hodeidah and Taiz. High diversity was seen in non-drug genes, pfg377 (He = 0.66), msp-2 (He = 0.80) and three microsatellites on chr 8, 7.7 kb (He = 0.88), 4.3 kb (He = 0.77) and 0.8 kb (He = 0.71). There was a high level of mixed-genotype infections (57%), with an average 1.8 genotypes per patient. No linkage disequilibrium was seen between drug resistant genes and the non-drug markers (p Yemen is indicative of a large parasite reservoir, which represents a challenge to control efforts. The presence of two distinct pfcrt genotype, CVIET and SVMNT, suggests that chloroquine resistance can possibly be related to a migratory path from Africa and Asia. The absence of the triple mutant dhfr genotype (IRN) and dhps mutations supports the use of artesunate + sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine as first-line therapy. However, the prevalent pfmdr1 genotype NFSND [21%] has previously been associated with tolerance/resistance response to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT). Regular surveys are, therefore, important to monitor spread of pfmdr1 and dhfr mutations and response to ACT.

  19. Association between severity of illicit drug dependence and quality of life in a psychosocial care center in BRAZIL: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campêlo, Selva Rios; Barbosa, Maria Alves; Dias, Danilo Rocha; Caixeta, Camila Cardoso; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Porto, Celmo Celeno

    2017-11-17

    Quality of life must be one of the main purposes for the treatment of drug users, requiring a better understanding of the association between the quality of life and the severity of dependency. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between severity of substance use in various areas of human functioning and quality of life of illicit drug users in a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs. This cross-sectional study included 60 participants - illicit drug users - treated at a psychosocial care center for alcohol and drugs. Participants were evaluated with the short version of World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-Bref) instrument to measure the quality of life, the 6th version of Addiction Severity Index (ASI-6) to assess the severity of dependence in several areas and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) to identify the presence of psychiatric disorders. Pearson and Spearman correlation tests and linear regression were applied to verify the association between the severity of dependence and the quality of life, and Student's t-test to compare the mean quality of life between individuals with and without psychiatric comorbidities. Negative correlation was found between the severity of dependence on the drugs dimensions: alcohol, psychiatric, medical, legal, family/social support and family/social problems of ASI-6, and the quality of life domains measured by the WHOQOL-Bref. The evidence was strongest in the psychiatric and medical dimensions. There was a significant difference in the quality of life mean among participants presenting or not presenting psychiatric comorbidities, for the psychological domain in anxiety disorders, and for the physical and psychological domains in mood disorders. The quality of life decreased as the severity of dependence increased, with different results in the various areas of the participant's life. This result emphasizes the need for training the professional team which works in the

  20. Optimizing the HRP-2 in vitro malaria drug susceptibility assay using a reference clone to improve comparisons of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutvisuttinunt Wiriya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apparent emerging artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Southeast Asia requires development of practical tools to monitor for resistant parasites. Although in vitro anti-malarial susceptibility tests are widely used, uncertainties remain regarding interpretation of P. falciparum field isolate values. Methods Performance parameters of the W2 P. falciparum clone (considered artemisinin “sensitive” were evaluated as a reference for the HRP-2 immediate ex vivo assay. Variability in W2 IC50s was assessed, including intra- and inter-assay variability among and between technicians in multiple experiments, over five freeze-thaw cycles, over five months of continuous culture, and before and after transport of drug-coated plates to remote field sites. Nominal drug plate concentrations of artesunate (AS and dihydroartemisinin (DHA were verified by LC-MS analysis. Plasmodium falciparum field isolate IC50s for DHA from subjects in an artemisinin-resistant area in Cambodia were compared with W2 susceptibility. Results Plate drug concentrations and day-to-day technical assay performance among technicians were important sources of variability for W2 IC50s within and between assays. Freeze-thaw cycles, long-term continuous culture, and transport to and from remote sites had less influence. Despite variability in W2 susceptibility, the median IC50s for DHA for Cambodian field isolates were higher (p Conclusion The W2 reference clone improved the interpretability of field isolate susceptibility from the immediate ex vivo HRP-2 assay from areas of artemisinin resistance. Methods to increase the reproducibility of plate coating may improve overall assay interpretability and utility.

  1. Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, N.; Jeffries, J.; Mach, J.; Robson, M.; Pajot, D.; Harrigan, J.; Lebsack, T.; Mullen, D.; Rat, F.; Theys, P.

    1993-01-01

    What is quality? How do you achieve it? How do you keep it once you have got it. The answer for industry at large is the three-step hierarchy of quality control, quality assurance and Total quality Management. An overview is given of the history of quality movement, illustrated with examples from Schlumberger operations, as well as the oil industry's approach to quality. An introduction of the Schlumberger's quality-associated ClientLink program is presented. 15 figs., 4 ills., 16 refs

  2. Using supply side evidence to inform oral artemisinin monotherapy replacement in Myanmar: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khin, Hnin Su Su; Aung, Tin; Aung, Moe; Thi, Aung; Boxshall, Matt; White, Chris

    2016-08-18

    In 2012, alarmingly high rates of oral artemisinin monotherapy availability and use were detected along Eastern Myanmar, threatening efforts to halt the spread of artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS), and globally. The aim of this paper is to exemplify how the use of supply side evidence generated through the ACTwatch project shaped the artemisinin monotherapy replacement malaria (AMTR) project's design and interventions to rapidly displace oral artemisinin monotherapy with subsidized, quality-assured ACT in the private sector. The AMTR project was implemented as part of the Myanmar artemisinin resistance containment (MARC) framework along Eastern Myanmar. Guided by outlet survey and supply chain evidence, the project implemented a high-level subsidy, including negotiations with a main anti-malarial distributor, with the aim of squeezing oral artemisinin monotherapy out of the market through price competition and increased availability of quality-assured artemisinin-based combinations. This was complemented with a plethora of demand-creation activities targeting anti-malarial providers and consumers. Priority outlet types responsible for the distribution of oral artemisinin monotherapy were identified by the outlet survey, and this evidence was used to target the AMTR project's supporting interventions. The widespread availability and use of oral artemisinin monotherapy in Myanmar has been a serious threat to malaria control and elimination in the country and across the region. Practical anti-malarial market evidence was rapidly generated and used to inform private sector approaches to address these threats. The program design approach outlined in this paper is illustrative of the type of evidence generation and use that will be required to ensure effective containment of artemisinin drug resistance and progress toward regional and global malaria elimination goals.

  3. Factors associated with health-related quality of life among injection drug users at methadone clinics in Taipei, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yung-Feng; Chou, Pesus; Lin, Yu-Shiuan; Deng, Chung-Yeh

    2015-05-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is widely used as an indicator of health status. However, few studies have examined predictors of HRQOL among injection drug users (IDUs). We investigated factors associated with HRQOL among IDUs in Taiwan. In this cross-sectional study, recruited IDUs completed an HRQOL-related interview at methadone clinics in Taipei during 2012-2013. Multiple linear regression was used to identify factors associated with HRQOL. Of 802 eligible participants, 85.4% were male; mean (SD) age was 44.7 (8.7) years. Mean scores for physical, psychological, social, and environmental HRQOL were 13.2, 11.8, 12.5, and 12.5, respectively. In multivariate analysis, social support was significantly associated with better HRQOL in all domains (β = 0.56, 0.87, 0.83, and 0.64, respectively), while obtaining most income from temporary jobs or other noncriminal sources was significantly associated with worse HRQOL in all domains (β = -1.00, -1.03, -1.15, and -1.22, respectively). Receiving methadone treatment was associated with good physical and psychological HRQOL (β = 1.47 and 0.79, respectively), while history of drug overdose (β = -0.40 and -0.53, respectively), history of cutaneous abscess (β = -0.45 and -0.53, respectively), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positivity (β = -0.41 and -0.58, respectively) were associated with lower physical and psychological HRQOL. Male sex (β = -0.64 and -0.70, respectively) and a greater number of incarcerations (β = -0.11 and -0.12, respectively) were associated with poor social and environmental HRQOL. Poor HRQOL was associated with a number of factors among IDUs at methadone clinics in Taipei, Taiwan. To improve HRQOL in this population, future programs should focus on IDUs with a history of drug overdose. In addition, methadone programs and social support should be integrated to improve HRQOL among this socially marginalized population. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  4. A simultaneous determination of related substances by high performance liquid chromatography in a drug product using quality by design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Trupti; Kadam, Nilesh; Raotole, Nilesh; Desai, Anita; Samanta, Gautam

    2016-02-05

    The combination of Abacavir, Lamivudine and Dolutegravir is an anti-retroviral formulation that displays high efficacy and superiority in comparison to other anti-retroviral combinations. Analysis of related substances in this combination drug product was very challenging due to the presence of nearly thirty peaks including the three active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), eleven known impurities and other pharmaceutical excipients. Objective of this study was to develop a single, selective, and robust high performance liquid chromatography method for the efficient separation of all peaks. Initially, one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) approach was adopted to develop the method. But, it could not resolve all the critical peaks in such complex matrix. This led to the advent of two different HPLC methods for the determination of related substances, one for Abacavir and Lamivudine and the other for Dolutegravir. But, since analysis of a single sample using two methods instead of one is time and resource consuming and thus expensive, an attempt was made to develop a single and robust method by adopting quality by design (QbD) principles. Design of Experiments (DoE) was applied as a tool to achieve the optimum conditions through Response surface methodology with three method variables, pH, temperature, and mobile phase composition. As the study progressed, it was discovered that establishment of the design space was not viable due to the completely distant pH requirements of the two responses, i.e. (i) retention time for Lamivudine carboxylic acid and (ii) resolution between Abacavir impurity B and unknown impurity. Eventually, neglecting one of these two responses each time, two distinguished design spaces have been established and verified. Edge of failures at both design spaces indicate high probability of failure. It therefore, becomes very important to identify the most robust zone or normal operating range (NOR) within the design space with low risk of failure and high

  5. The adverse drug reaction reporting assignment for specialist oncology nurses : a preliminary evaluation of quality, relevance and educational value in a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, Tim; van Eekeren, Rike; Richir, Milan; van Staveren, Jojanneke; van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel

    In a new prescribing qualification course for specialist oncology nurses, we thought that it is important to emphasize pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting. We aimed to develop and evaluate an ADR reporting assignment for specialist oncology nurses. The quality of report

  6. The challenges of changing national malaria drug policy to artemisinin-based combinations in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otieno Dorothy N

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgound Sulphadoxine/sulphalene-pyrimethamine (SP was adopted in Kenya as first line therapeutic for uncomplicated malaria in 1998. By the second half of 2003, there was convincing evidence that SP was failing and had to be replaced. Despite several descriptive investigations of policy change and implementation when countries moved from chloroquine to SP, the different constraints of moving to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT in Africa are less well documented. Methods A narrative description of the process of anti-malarial drug policy change, financing and implementation in Kenya is assembled from discussions with stakeholders, reports, newspaper articles, minutes of meetings and email correspondence between actors in the policy change process. The narrative has been structured to capture the timing of events, the difficulties and hurdles faced and the resolutions reached to the final implementation of a new treatment policy. Results Following a recognition that SP was failing there was a rapid technical appraisal of available data and replacement options resulting in a decision to adopt artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the recommended first-line therapy in Kenya, announced in April 2004. Funding requirements were approved by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM and over 60 million US$ were agreed in principle in July 2004 to procure AL and implement the policy change. AL arrived in Kenya in May 2006, distribution to health facilities began in July 2006 coincidental with cascade in-service training in the revised national guidelines. Both training and drug distribution were almost complete by the end of 2006. The article examines why it took over 32 months from announcing a drug policy change to completing early implementation. Reasons included: lack of clarity on sustainable financing of an expensive therapeutic for a common disease, a delay in release of funding, a lack of comparative efficacy data

  7. Safety in the preparation of cytotoxic drugs: How to integrate gravimetric control in the quality assurance policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecordier, J; Heluin, Y; Plivard, C; Bureau, A; Mouawad, C; Chaillot, B; Lahet, J-J

    2011-02-01

    We present the way to integrate gravimetric control (GC) in a centralized preparation of cytotoxic drugs unit. Two different modalities are described. In the first strategy, the balance is located inside the isolator, whereas in the second, it is located outside in order to remove many technical and ergonomic constraints. These two modalities are compared in terms of benefits and limits. GC consists in comparing the observed weight variation with the expected weight variation using a precision balance. According to the B-in strategy, this variation is directly attributable to the weight of the cytotoxic solution injected, whereas with the B-out strategy, the weight of various additional components must be taken into account. Five hundred and seventy-seven preparations have been weighed. For "B-in" strategy, the 95% confidence interval is [1.02-1.14%] and every preparation is below the threshold of 5%. For "B-out" strategy, the 95% confidence interval is [2.34-2.63%] and 94% of preparations are below the threshold of 5%. B-in strategy is distinctly more precise than B-out strategy and can be applied to all preparations. However, B-out strategy is a feasible option in practice and enables the detection of an important mistake. All in all, results obtained from B-out strategy can be considered as a quality indicator in the production line. Results of GC are helpful in the final step of release, which the pharmacist is responsible for. Many contributions in the quality assurance policy could justify using of GC in every unit. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The use of paediatric artemisinin combinations in sub-Saharan Africa: a snapshot questionnaire survey of health care personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnandji Selidji T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paediatric drug formulations for artemisinin combination therapy (P-ACT have been developed over the past few years and have been shown to improve the therapeutic management of young children with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. This process was however not equally paralleled by a timely adoption of P-ACT in national and international treatment recommendations. National malaria programmes in sub-Saharan Africa have not yet widely embraced this new therapeutic tool. To which extent P-ACT is used in the field in sub-Saharan Africa is not known to date. Methods This snapshot questionnaire survey aimed to provide an overview on the current routine practices for the availability and use of P-ACT as anti-malarial treatment for young children in sub-Saharan Africa. Health care personnel in seven countries in West-, Central, and East-Africa were invited to answer a structured questionnaire assessing use and availability of P-ACT. Results A total of 71 respondents including doctors, nurses and pharmacy personnel responsible for the anti-malarial treatment of young children were interviewed. P-ACT was used by 83% (95% confidence interval: 73-90%; n = 59 as first-line treatment for young children. Use of 15 different P-ACT products was reported among which only two have received WHO prequalification status and approval by a stringent registration authority. Use of a specific P-ACT product was not linked to consumer prices or availability of supporting clinical trial data, but may depend more on the marketing capacity of the manufacturer. Major differences in frequency and dosing of anti-malarial regimens with identical anti-malarial compounds and the marketing of loose combinations were recorded. Conclusion Paediatric ACT is widely used for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in young children. However, the majority of P-ACT formulations in use do not meet highest international quality standards evoking concerns for patients

  9. General Pharmacology of Artesunate, a Commonly used Antimalarial Drug:Effects on Central Nervous, Cardiovascular, and Respiratory System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyang-Ae; Kim, Ki-Suk; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2010-09-01

    Artesunate, a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, is used primarily as a treatment for malaria. Its effects on the central nervous system, general behavior, and cardiovascular, respiratory, and other organ systems were studied using mice, rats, guinea pigs, and dogs. Artesunate was administered orally to mice at doses of 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg and to rats and guinea pigs at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg. In dogs, test drugs were administered orally in gelatin capsules at doses of 50, 100, and 150 mg/kg. Artesunate induced insignificant changes in general pharmacological studies, including general behavior, motor coordination, body temperature, analgesia, convulsion modulation, blood pressure, heart rate (HR) , and electrocardiogram (ECG) in dogs in vivo; respiration in guinea pigs; and gut motility or direct effects on isolated guinea pig ileum, contractile responses, and renal function. On the other hand, artesunate decreased the HR and coronary flow rate (CFR) in the rat in vitro; however, the extent of the changes was small and they were not confirmed in in vivo studies in the dog. Artesunate increased hexobarbital-induced sleeping time in a dose-related manner. Artesunate induced dose-related decreases in the volume of gastric secretions and the total acidity of gastric contents, and induced increases in pH at a dose of 400 mg/kg. However, all of these changes were observed at doses much greater than clinical therapeutic doses (2.4 mg/kg in humans, when used as an anti-malarial) . Thus, it can be concluded that artesunate is safe at clinical therapeutic doses.

  10. The application of the Accelerated Stability Assessment Program (ASAP) to quality by design (QbD) for drug product stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Kenneth Craig

    2011-09-01

    An isoconversion paradigm, where times in different temperature and humidity-controlled stability chambers are set to provide a fixed degradant level, is shown to compensate for the complex, non-single order kinetics of solid drug products. A humidity-corrected Arrhenius equation provides reliable estimates for temperature and relative humidity effects on degradation rates. A statistical protocol is employed to determine best fits for chemical stability data, which in turn allows for accurate estimations of shelf life (with appropriate confidence intervals) at any storage condition including inside packaging (based on the moisture vapor transmission rate of the packaging and moisture sorption isotherms of the internal components). These methodologies provide both faster results and far better predictions of chemical stability limited shelf life (expiry) than previously possible. Precise shelf-life estimations are generally determined using a 2-week, product-specific protocol. Once the model for a product is developed, it can play a critical role in providing the product understanding necessary for a quality by design (QbD) filing for product approval and enable rational control strategies to assure product stability. Moreover, this Accelerated Stability Assessment Program (ASAP) enables the coupling of product attributes (e.g., moisture content, packaging options) to allow for flexibility in how control strategies are implemented to provide a balance of cost, speed, and other factors while maintaining adequate stability.

  11. The impact of drug related problems on health-related quality of life among hypertensive patients in Jordan

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    Abu Farha R

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertension is a major cause of cardiovascular diseases with a high prevalence in Jordan. No previous studies have been carried out to determine the effect of the presence of drug-related problems (DRPs on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL among hypertensive patients. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of different types of DRPs on the HRQOL of hypertensive patients. Methods: A total of 200 hypertensive patients were recruited in this cross-sectional correlation study that was conducted across the cardiac outpatient clinic at Jordan University Hospital. Ethical approval was obtained and patients were recruited using convenience sampling technique. During the study period, patients’ data was used to evaluate their quality of life using RAND-12 scale and to identify DRPs utilizing a systematic evidence based approach. Results: 200 hypertensive patients (mean age 59.7 years (SD=10.2 were recruited in this study. Patients showed a poor quality of life on both the physical and mental domains of the RAND-12 scale. The average number of DRPs was 5.1 (SD=2.3. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that among DRPs categories, non-adherence to medications, non-adherence to non-pharmacological therapies and inadequate knowledge about medications were among the main predictors of the poor physical domain of the RAND-12 (Beta= -0.149, -0.226 and -0.230 respectively, p-value < 0.05 for all. On the other hand, only non-adherence to medication and non-adherence to non-pharmacological therapies were significantly associated with poor mental domain of the RAND-12 (Beta= -0.208 and -0.191 respectively, p-value < 0.05 for both. Conclusion: Prevalence of DRPs among hypertensive patients is a concern that needs attention. These DRPs were associated with poor HRQOL on both the physical and mental domain of the RAND-12 scale. The pharmaceutical care service delivered by pharmacists is needed to identify

  12. Japanese external quality assessment program to standardize HIV-1 drug-resistance testing (JEQS2010 program) using in vitro transcribed RNA as reference material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shigeru; Hattori, Junko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Okada, Kiyomi; Kazuyama, Yukumasa; Hashimoto, Osamu; Ibe, Shiro; Fujisawa, Shin-ichi; Chiba, Hitoshi; Tatsumi, Masashi; Kato, Shingo; Sugiura, Wataru

    2015-03-01

    To design appropriate antiretroviral therapy regimens and avoid the emergence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 variants with reduced susceptibility to antiretroviral drugs, genotypic drug-resistance testing (HIV genotyping) is strongly recommended. To monitor the quality of HIV genotyping in Japan, we performed an external quality assessment (EQA), named the Japanese external quality assessment program, to standardize HIV genotyping (JEQS). To accurately evaluate the quality of HIV genotyping, we employed as reference material (RM) a well-characterized sample, in vitro transcribed RNA (trRNA) that includes the HIV gag-pol sequence, and created a JEQS2010 panel consisting of three single variant and three mixed trRNA samples. All 11 participating laboratories showed high concordance rates (>96%) for the single variant samples. Eight laboratories also showed good rates of detecting minor variants, but three laboratories failed to detect the variants comprising one-half of the sample. These three laboratories used a common primer that had four internal mismatches to the minor trRNA clone. This program showed the usefulness of trRNA as RM, the high quality of HIV genotyping, and extensive interlaboratory variation in the ability to detect minor variants. These results suggest that improving the quality of HIV genotyping in Japan requires regularly implementing the EQA program and improving the HIV genotyping protocol in each laboratory.

  13. Over-diagnosis of malaria by microscopy in the Kilombero Valley, Southern Tanzania: an evaluation of the utility and cost-effectiveness of rapid diagnostic tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harchut, Kelly; Standley, Claire; Dobson, Andrew; Klaassen, Belia; Rambaud-Althaus, Clotilde; Althaus, Fabrice; Nowak, Katarzyna

    2013-05-10

    Early and accurate diagnosis of febrile patients is essential to treat uncomplicated malaria cases properly, prevent severe malaria, and avert unnecessary anti-malarial treatments. Improper use of anti-malarials increases the risk of adverse drug reaction and the evolution of drug/parasite resistance. While microscopy is the most common form of malaria diagnosis, concerns over its accuracy have prompted the incorporation of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) into many national malaria control programmes. Over a three-month period, a direct comparison between microscopy and RDTs was made in a rural, private dispensary in the Kilombero Valley, Morogoro District, southern Tanzania, with the aim of estimating the extent of malaria over-diagnosis and over-treatment with anti-malarials. The study cohort was made up of patients referred by the dispensary's clinician for malaria testing. One hundred percent of patients approached agreed to participate in this study and were then tested using both microscopy and RDTs. Using the results from the comparison of the two tests at this dispensary, the potential cost effectiveness of introducing RDTs to a neighbouring public health centre was estimated on the basis of this centre's past malaria records spanning December 2007 to August 2011. At the private dispensary, the apparent prevalence of malaria was 78% based on microscopy whereas the true prevalence, calculated using RDTs as the gold standard, was estimated at 14%. This discrepancy indicates that when using microscopy as the sole diagnostic test, malaria is being over-diagnosed by approximately a factor of five in this setting. At the public clinic, apparent malaria prevalence based on microscopy was 74%. If similar rates of over-diagnosis are assumed, 5,285 patients of the 6,769 patients positively diagnosed with malaria using microscopy were likely given unnecessary anti-malarials, and their true cause of illness was not addressed. The introduction of RDTs to the

  14. Quality Control and Complication Screening Programme of Chinese Medicinal Drugs at the First German Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine - A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchart, Dieter; Hager, Stefan; Dai, Jingzhang; Weidenhammer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The use of drugs derived from plants is a cornerstone of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Yet, too little is known about risk and safety of Chinese medicinal drugs (CMD). Therefore, the TCM hospital Bad Kötzting has developed a quality control and complication screening programme in order to ensure a safe administration of TCM drugs to their patients. All Chinese medicinal drugs delivered to the hospital between September 1, 2012 and December 31, 2013 entered the quality control program and were screened for microbial contamination, aflatoxin, pesticides and heavy metals. A routinely applied complication screening programme monitored liver enzymes in all patients. Case causality assessment by CIOMS scale and identification of admitted herbs were conducted. Additionally, side effects of patients were identified by a routinely performed web-based documentation system. In 5 of 23 investigated samples (21.7%) the initial testing showed microbial contamination (2), pesticide (2) and heavy metals (1). The drugs were tested for authenticity and adulterations, respectively. All 994 patients (mean age 52.6 years; 72.6% female) admitted were available for analysis. 448 (45.1%) of all patients reported having perceived at least one side effect of treatment. They experienced mainly gastrointestinal symptoms (13.6%), neurovegetative symptoms (10.8 %), temporary deteriorations of pain (8.8%), diarrhoea (5.9%), nausea (1.6%) and vomiting (0.5%). Further, 6 patients with a more than 2-fold elevation (compared to maximum normal value or elevated admission values) of ALT were found in the systematic laboratory control with a non-conclusive causality assessment for TCM-drugs. Approximate incidence rates and analysed drugs associated with liver damage revealed a low rate of liver injury. Patients should be informed of the gastrointestinal symptoms caused by and potential hepatotoxicity of TCM herbs. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  15. Quality by design: characterization of self-nano-emulsified drug delivery systems (SNEDDs) using ultrasonic resonator technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, R B; Zidan, A S; Funck, T; Tawakkul, M A; Nguyenpho, A; Khan, M A

    2007-08-16

    In the present work, a novel application of ultrasonic measurements is detailed to characterize nano-emulsion formulations as a part of the overall Quality by Design (QbD) goal. Ultrasonic resonator technology (URT) was utilized to measure sound velocity and absorption of self-nanoemulsified drug delivery systems (SNEDDs) consisting of various ratios of oil:surfactant:co-surfactant. A QbD concept was used to create different SNEDDs formulations utilizing sweet orange oil (oil), Emulphor-620 (surfactant), and Capmul (co-surfactant) by dissolving Cyclosporine A in oil. The mixture was emulsified in water and ultrasonic measurements were carried out in an ultrasonic resonator system isothermally for a period of about 15-20min. Compressibility of the individual components in the droplets, hydration of the droplets and the influence of the composition on droplet stability were studied by systematic ultrasonic measurements at a single resonator frequency. The adiabetic compressibilities for the oil, aqueous and interfacial components were 68, 44.6, and 53 [10(-11)Pa(-1)], respectively as calculated using Urick's equation. Also the ultrasonic absorption correlated droplet size of nano-emulsions linearly with R(2) of 0.84 indicating this can be used as an additional technique to measure the droplet size of nano-emulsions. Correlation of ultrasonic data with formulation components indicated that the ultrasonic velocity correlated negatively with increasing oil amount in the formulation as well as surfactant-to-cosurfactant ratios where as droplet diameter correlated positively with these formulation factors. It can be envisioned from the results that the compressibility of the media increases with the addition of the oily component and thus reducing the sound velocity. Thus URT enabled direct and convenient analysis of the physical properties as well as influence of formulation factors of nano-emulsions which is an important indication of stability of these nano-emulsions.

  16. Assessing the quality of service of village malaria workers to strengthen community-based malaria control in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ly Po

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria continues to be a major public health problem in remote forested areas in Cambodia. As a national strategy to strengthen community-based malaria control, the Cambodian government has been running the Village Malaria Worker (VMW project since 2001. This study sought to examine the nature and quality of the VMWs' services. Methods Data collection was carried out in February and March 2008 through interviews with one of the two VMWs who takes the lead in malaria control activities in each of the 315 VMW villages (n = 251. The questionnaire addressed 1 the sociodemographic characteristics of VMWs, 2 service quality, 3 actions for malaria prevention and vector control, and 4 knowledge of malaria epidemiology and vector ecology. Results VMWs were effective in conducting diagnosis with Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDTs and prescribing anti-malarials to those who had positive RDT results, skills that they had acquired through their training programmes. However, most other services, such as active detection, explanations about compliance, and follow-up of patients, were carried out by only a small proportion of VMWs. The variety of actions that VMWs took for malaria prevention and vector control was small (average action index score 12.8/23, and their knowledge was very limited with less than 20% of the VMWs giving correct answers to six out of seven questions on malaria epidemiology and vector ecology. Knowledge of vector breeding places and malaria transmission were significant determinants of both the quality of VMWs' services and the variety of their actions for malaria prevention and vector control. Conclusions VMWs' services focused primarily on diagnosis and treatment. Their focus needs to be broadened to cover other aspects of malaria control in order to further strengthen community-based malaria control. VMWs' actions and knowledge also need substantial improvement. Strengthening training programmes can help achieve better

  17. Drug allergy

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    Warrington Richard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Drug allergy encompasses a spectrum of immunologically-mediated hypersensitivity reactions with varying mechanisms and clinical presentations. This type of adverse drug reaction (ADR not only affects patient quality of life, but may also lead to delayed treatment, unnecessary investigations, and even mortality. Given the myriad of symptoms associated with the condition, diagnosis is often challenging. Therefore, referral to an allergist experienced in the identification, diagnosis and management of drug allergy is recommended if a drug-induced allergic reaction is suspected. Diagnosis relies on a careful history and physical examination. In some instances, skin testing, graded challenges and induction of drug tolerance procedures may be required. The most effective strategy for the management of drug allergy is avoidance or discontinuation of the offending drug. When available, alternative medications with unrelated chemical structures should be substituted. Cross-reactivity among drugs should be taken into consideration when choosing alternative agents. Additional therapy for drug hypersensitivity reactions is largely supportive and may include topical corticosteroids, oral antihistamines and, in severe cases, systemic corticosteroids. In the event of anaphylaxis, the treatment of choice is injectable epinephrine. If a particular drug to which the patient is allergic is indicated and there is no suitable alternative, induction of drug tolerance procedures may be considered to induce temporary tolerance to the drug. This article provides a backgrounder on drug allergy and strategies for the diagnosis and management of some of the most common drug-induced allergic reactions, such allergies to penicillin, sulfonamides, cephalosporins, radiocontrast media, local anesthetics, general anesthetics, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  18. Integrated Application of Quality-by-Design Principles to Drug Product Development: A Case Study of Brivanib Alaninate Film-Coated Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif I F; Narang, Ajit S; LaMarche, Keirnan R; Subramanian, Ganeshkumar A; Varia, Sailesh A; Lin, Judy; Stevens, Tim; Shah, Pankaj A

    2016-01-01

    Modern drug product development is expected to follow quality-by-design (QbD) paradigm. At the same time, although there are several issue-specific examples in the literature that demonstrate the application of QbD principles, a holistic demonstration of the application of QbD principles to drug product development and control strategy, is lacking. This article provides an integrated case study on the systematic application of QbD to product development and demonstrates the implementation of QbD concepts in the different aspects of product and process design for brivanib alaninate film-coated tablets. Using a risk-based approach, the strategy for development entailed identification of product critical quality attributes (CQAs), assessment of risks to the CQAs, and performing experiments to understand and mitigate identified risks. Quality risk assessments and design of experiments were performed to understand the quality of the input raw materials required for a robust formulation and the impact of manufacturing process parameters on CQAs. In addition to the material property and process parameter controls, the proposed control strategy includes use of process analytical technology and conventional analytical tests to control in-process material attributes and ensure quality of the final product. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. First evaluation after implementation of a quality control system for the second line drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis joint efforts in low and high incidence countries.

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    Doris Hillemann

    Full Text Available Three networks/projects involving 27 European countries were established to investigate the quality of second-line drug (SLD susceptibility testing with conventional and molecular methods. 1. The "Baltic-Nordic TB-Laboratory Network" comprised 11 reference laboratories in the Baltic-Nordic States. They performed SLD testing in the first phase with a panel of 20 Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. After several laboratories made technical changes a second panel of 10 strains with a higher proportion of resistant strains were tested. Although the concordance for Ofloxacin, Kanamycin, and Capreomycin was consistently high, the largest improvements in performance were achieved for the analysis of Ofloxacin resistant (from 88.9 to 95.0%, and Capreomycin resistant (from 71.0 to 88.9% strains. 2. Within the FP7 TB PAN-NET project (EU Grant agreement 223681 a quality control panel to standardize the EQA (External Quality Assurance for first-line drugs (FLD and SLD testing for phenotypic and molecular methods was established. The strains were characterized by their robustness, unambiguous results when tested, and low proportion of secondary drug resistances. 3. The (European Reference Laboratory Network-TB ERLN-TB network analyzed four different panels for drug resistance testing using phenotypic and molecular methods; in two rounds in 2010 the 31 participating laboratories began with 5 strains, followed by 10 strains and 6 additional crude DNA extracts in 2011 and 2012 were examined by conventional DST and molecular methods. Overall, we demonstrated the importance of developing inter-laboratory networks to establish quality assurance and improvement of SLD testing of M. tuberculosis.

  20. The Quality of Clinical Information in Adverse Drug Reaction Reports by Patients and Healthcare Professionals : A Retrospective Comparative Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolfes, Leàn; van Hunsel, Florence; van der Linden, Laura; Taxis, Katja; van Puijenbroek, Eugène

    Introduction Clinical information is needed to assess the causal relationship between a drug and an adverse drug reaction (ADR) in a reliable way. Little is known about the level of relevant clinical information about the ADRs reported by patients. Objectives The aim was to determine to what extent

  1. Drug coverage in treatment of malaria and the consequences for resistance evolution - evidence from the use of sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine

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    Malisa Allen L

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is argued that, the efficacy of anti-malarials could be prolonged through policy-mediated reductions in drug pressure, but gathering evidence of the relationship between policy, treatment practice, drug pressure and the evolution of resistance in the field is challenging. Mathematical models indicate that drug coverage is the primary determinant of drug pressure and the driving force behind the evolution of drug resistance. These models show that where the basis of resistance is multigenic, the effects of selection can be moderated by high recombination rates, which disrupt the associations between co-selected resistance genes. Methods To test these predictions, dhfr and dhps frequency changes were measured during 2000-2001 while SP was the second-line treatment and contrasted these with changes during 2001-2002 when SP was used for first-line therapy. Annual cross sectional community surveys carried out before, during and after the policy switch in 2001 were used to collect samples. Genetic analysis of SP resistance genes was carried out on 4,950 Plasmodium falciparum infections and the selection pressure under the two policies compared. Results The influence of policy on the parasite reservoir was profound. The frequency of dhfr and dhps resistance alleles did not change significantly while SP was the recommended second-line treatment, but highly significant changes occurred during the subsequent year after the switch to first line SP. The frequency of the triple mutant dhfr (N51I,C59R,S108N allele (conferring pyrimethamine resistance increased by 37% - 63% and the frequency of the double A437G, K540E mutant dhps allele (conferring sulphadoxine resistance increased 200%-300%. A strong association between these unlinked alleles also emerged, confirming that they are co-selected by SP. Conclusion The national policy change brought about a shift in treatment practice and the resulting increase in coverage had a substantial

  2. The impact of quality-of-life data in relative effectiveness assessments of new anti-cancer drugs in European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, Sarah; Leonardo Alves, Teresa; Meijboom, Kim; Lipska, Iga; De Boer, Anthonius; Leufkens, Hubertus G; Goettsch, Wim G

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of health-related quality-of-life (QoL) data in relative effectiveness assessments (REAs) of new anti-cancer drugs across European jurisdictions, during health technology assessment procedures. Comparative analysis of guidelines and publicly available REAs in six European jurisdictions of anti-cancer drugs approved by EMA between 2011 and 2013. Fourteen anti-cancer drugs were included, adding up to 79 REAs. Whilst all guidelines state that QoL is a relevant endpoint to determine the relative effectiveness of new cancer drugs, QoL data were included in only 54% of the 79 reports and their impact on the recommendations was limited. Whilst national guidelines recognize the relevance of QoL to determine the relative effectiveness of new anti-cancer drugs, this is not well-reflected in current assessments. Developing and implementing into REAs specific evidence requirements for QoL data would improve the use of this patient-centred outcome in future reimbursement and pricing decisions.

  3. PARENTING QUALITY IN DRUG-ADDICTED MOTHERS IN A THERAPEUTIC MOTHER-CHILD COMMUNITY: THE CONTRIBUTION OF ATTACHMENT AND PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT

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    Francesca eDe Palo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence shows that attachment is a key risk factor for the diagnosis and treatment of clinical diseases in Axis I, such as drug addiction. Recent literature regarding attachment, psychiatric pathology and drug addiction demonstrates that there is a clear prevalence of insecure attachment patterns in clinical and drug addicted subjects. Specifically, some authors emphasize that the anxious-insecure attachment pattern is prevalent among drug-addicted women with double diagnosis (Fonagy et al., 1996. The construct of attachment as a risk factor in clinical samples of drug-addicted mothers needs to be studied more in depth though. The present explorative study focused on the evaluation of parenting quality in a therapeutic mother-child community using attachment and personality assessment tools able to outline drug-addicted mothers’ profiles. This study involved 30 drug addicted mothers, inpatients of a therapeutic community. Attachment representations were assessed via the Adult Attachment Interview; personality diagnosis and symptomatic profiles were performed using the Structured Clinical Interview of the DSM-IV (SCID-II and the Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R respectively. Both instruments were administered during the first six months of residence in a therapeutic community. Results confirmed the prevalence of insecure attachment representations (90%, with a high presence of U patterns, prevalently scored for dangerous and/or not protective experiences in infanthood. Very high values (>5 were found for some experience scales (i.e. neglect and rejection scales. Data also showed very low values (1-3 in metacognitive monitoring, coherence of transcript and coherence of mind scales. Patients’ different profiles (U vs. E vs. Ds were linked to SCID-II diagnosis, providing insightful indications both for treatment planning and intervention on parenting functions and for deciding if to start foster care or adoption proceedings for

  4. Parenting quality in drug-addicted mothers in a therapeutic mother-child community: the contribution of attachment and personality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palo, Francesca; Capra, Nicoletta; Simonelli, Alessandra; Salcuni, Silvia; Di Riso, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence shows that attachment is a key risk factor for the diagnosis and treatment of clinical diseases in Axis I, such as drug addiction. Recent literature regarding attachment, psychiatric pathology, and drug addiction demonstrates that there is a clear prevalence of insecure attachment patterns in clinical and drug addicted subjects. Specifically, some authors emphasize that the anxious-insecure attachment pattern is prevalent among drug-addicted women with double diagnosis (Fonagy et al., 1996). The construct of attachment as a risk factor in clinical samples of drug-addicted mothers needs to be studied more in depth though. The present explorative study focused on the evaluation of parenting quality in a therapeutic mother-child community using attachment and personality assessment tools able to outline drug-addicted mothers' profiles. This study involved 30 drug addicted mothers, inpatients of a therapeutic community (TC). Attachment representations were assessed via the Adult Attachment Interview; personality diagnosis and symptomatic profiles were performed using the Structured Clinical Interview of the DSM-IV (SCID-II) and the Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R), respectively. Both instruments were administered during the first six months of residence in a TC. Results confirmed the prevalence of insecure attachment representations (90%), with a high presence of U patterns, prevalently scored for dangerous and/or not protective experiences in infanthood. Very high values (>5) were found for some experience scales (i.e., neglect and rejection scales). Data also showed very low values (1-3) in metacognitive monitoring, coherence of transcript and coherence of mind scales. Patients' different profiles (U vs. E vs. Ds) were linked to SCID-II diagnosis, providing insightful indications both for treatment planning and intervention on parenting functions and for deciding if to start foster care or adoption proceedings for children.

  5. The mediating effects of depressive symptoms and sleep quality on the relationship between the non-medical use of prescription drugs and suicidal behaviors among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Yan; Guo, Lan; Deng, Jian-Xiong; Huang, Jing-Hui; Huang, Guo-Liang; Gao, Xue; Wu, Hong; Pan, Si-Yuan; Lu, Ci-Yong

    2017-09-01

    The nature of the relationship between the non-medical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) and suicide has not been clearly elucidated. Some studies have suggested that the relationship between substance use and suicidal ideation may be spurious and could be explained by other variables. A school-based cross-sectional study was performed in Guangzhou. A total of 5853 students completed questionnaires and were included in the study. NMUPD, alcohol use, illicit drug use, depressive symptoms, sleep quality, and suicidal behaviors were assessed. The mediating effects of depressive symptoms and sleep quality on the relationship between NMUPD and suicidal behaviors were examined using a structural equation model. In the simple model without mediation, a positive relationship between NMUPD and suicidal behaviors in adolescents was found, which was independent of effects from the use of other substances. Both depressive symptoms and sleep quality were significant mediators of this relationship. Public health and educational professionals should survey depressive symptoms and sleep quality and provide interventions when managing suicidal behaviors among adolescents engaging in NMUPD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of the quality and pharmacoeconomics of some generic drugs versus their reputed counterpart brands in the Saudi market

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    Farouk M Sakr

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Pharmacopeial examinations showed that generic tablets are quantitatively and qualitatively equivalent to their internationally reputed brands within the tested tablet groups with the advantage for the generic drugs being significantly the cheapest.

  7. 'You've got m@il: fluoxetine coming soon!': accessibility and quality of a prescription drug sold on the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelatti, U; Pedrazzani, R; Marcantoni, C; Mascaretti, S; Repice, C; Filippucci, L; Zerbini, I; Dal Grande, M; Orizio, G; Feretti, D

    2013-09-01

    The increasing phenomenon of online pharmacies has potential for serious public health problems. This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of accessing a prescription drug in the absence of a prescription for an Italian purchaser. Fluoxetine pills were ordered from several online pharmacies. The study included website analysis, and the quality of the received product including packaging, chemical and microbiological analyses. Orders could be placed correctly on 61 of the 98 selected websites, and a sales transaction was concluded successfully on 17 websites. Thirteen drug samples were eventually received. In one case it was necessary to fill in a questionnaire before ordering the drugs. All websites displayed aggressive marketing strategies. There was wide variation in terms of domain registration, company base (when declared) and manufacturer's location (mostly India). All pills were delivered in sealed blister packs showing the lot number and manufacturer's details. A leaflet was enclosed in one case only. In three cases we received more pills than ordered, and in one case Viagra pills as a free gift. Pharmacopoeia microbiological requirements were satisfied. Chemical analysis revealed that the active principle was always present, although many samples did not meet the Pharmacopoeia "other impurities" or "total impurities" criteria. Heavy metals and solvents regulated by the Pharmacopoeia did not exceed the set limits; some of the non-regulated ones were also assessed, in some cases with a positive result (e.g. styrene). About 20% of purchase attempts resulted in delivery of the drugs, even in the absence of a medical prescription. Traceability was poor and drug quality was generally worse compared to conventional pharmacy-purchased products. Based on all these broad-spectrum results, user safety appears not to be globally guaranteed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Correcting India's Chronic Shortage of Drug Inspectors to Ensure the Production and Distribution of Safe, High-Quality Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadam, Abhay B; Maigetter, Karen; Jeffery, Roger; Mistry, Nerges F; Weiss, Mitchell G; Pollock, Allyson M

    2016-04-27

    Good drug regulation requires an effective system for monitoring and inspection of manufacturing and sales units. In India, despite widespread agreement on this principle, ongoing shortages of drug inspectors have been identified by national committees since 1975. The growth of India's pharmaceutical industry and its large export market makes the problem more acute. The focus of this study is a case study of Maharashtra, which has 29% of India's manufacturing units and 38% of its medicines exports. India's regulations were reviewed, comparing international, national and state inspection norms with the actual number of inspectors and inspections. Twenty-six key informant interviews were conducted to ascertain the causes of the shortfall. In 2009-2010, 55% of the sanctioned posts of drug inspectors in Maharashtra were vacant. This resulted in a shortfall of 83%, based on the Mashelkar Committee's recommendations. Less than a quarter of the required inspections of manufacturing and sales units were undertaken. The Indian Drugs and Cosmetics Act and its Rules and Regulations make no provisions for drug inspectors and workforce planning norms, despite the growth and increasing complexity of India's pharmaceutical industry. The Maharashtra Food and Drug Administration (FDA) falls short of the Mashelkar Committee's recommended workforce planning norms. Legislation and political and operational support are required to produce needed changes. © 2016 by Kerman University of Medical Sciences

  9. RELATIONSHIP OF ASSESS SELF-ESTEEM AND LOCUS OF CONTROL WITH QUALITY OF LIFE DURING TREATMENT STAGES IN PATIENTS REFERRING TO DRUG ADDICTION REHABILITATION CENTERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Mohammad; Ghodusi, Mansureh

    2016-07-24

    Thus, the present research was carried out aimed at determining the relationship between self-esteem and locus of control and quality of life during treatment stages in the patients referring to drug addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city, Iran. The current study was a sectional research of descriptive correlation type. The research sample was 150 individuals of patients referring to addiction rehabilitation centers of Borujen city. For data gathering, Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, Rotter's Locus of Control Scale, and SF36 Quality of Life Questionnaire were used. Following collection of questionnaires, the data were analyzed using SPSS/16 software. According to the results, in the 12 th day of treatment, 96 patients exhibited moderate self-esteem, 102 patients had internal locus of control, and the score of their overall quality of life was 40.43±12.71. Furthermore, Pearson's correlation coefficient indicated that a significant and positive relationship was observed between locus of control and quality of life during different treatment stages. It seems that quality of life improves during addiction treatment stages due to improvement of personality traits including locus of control and self-esteem. Therefore, consultation methods as a very crucial priority in addiction rehabilitation centers shall be taken into account by the health sector authorities and managers and can play an essential role in enhancing quality of life.

  10. [Orphan drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golocorbin Kon, Svetlana; Vojinović, Aleksandra; Lalić-Popović, Mladena; Pavlović, Nebojsa; Mikov, Momir

    2013-01-01

    Drugs used for treatment of rare diseases are known worldwide under the term of orphan drugs because pharmaceutical companies have not been interested in "adopting" them, that is in investing in research, developing and producing these drugs. This kind of policy has been justified by the fact that these drugs are targeted for small markets, that only a small number of patients is available for clinical trials, and that large investments are required for the development of drugs meant to treat diseases whose pathogenesis has not yet been clarified in majority of cases. The aim of this paper is to present previous and present status of orphan drugs in Serbia and other countries. THE BEGINNING OF ORPHAN DRUGS DEVELOPMENT: This problem was first recognized by Congress of the United States of America in January 1983, and when the "Orphan Drug Act" was passed, it was a turning point in the development of orphan drugs. This law provides pharmaceutical companies with a series of reliefs, both financial ones that allow them to regain funds invested into the research and development and regulatory ones. Seven years of marketing exclusivity, as a type of patent monopoly, is the most important relief that enables companies to make large profits. There are no sufficient funds and institutions to give financial support to the patients. It is therefore necessary to make health professionals much more aware of rare diseases in order to avoid time loss in making the right diagnosis and thus to gain more time to treat rare diseases. The importance of discovery, development and production of orphan drugs lies in the number of patients whose life quality can be improved significantly by administration of these drugs as well as in the number of potential survivals resulting from the treatment with these drugs.

  11. Microbiological quality of water from the rivers of Curitiba, Paraná State, Brazil, and the susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs and pathogenicity of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giowanella, Melissa; Bozza, Angela; do Rocio Dalzoto, Patricia; Dionísio, Jair Alves; Andraus, Sumaia; Guimarães, Edson Luiz Gomes; Pimentel, Ida Chapaval

    2015-11-01

    Water safety is determined by several markers, and Escherichia coli is one of the most important indicators of water quality. The objective of this study was to evaluate the microbiological parameters in environmental samples of fresh water from rivers of Curitiba and its metropolitan area in Paraná State, Brazil. In addition, we evaluated the pathogenicity and susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs in E. coli. These evaluations were performed by quantitative and qualitative methods employing selective media for isolating thermotolerant coliforms and biochemical tests for identifying E. coli. Pathogenic strains of E. coli were detected by PCR multiplex using specific primers. From the water samples, 494 thermotolerant coliforms were obtained, of which 96 (19.43%) isolates were characterized as E. coli. Three isolates were identified as enteroaggregative E. coli, one as enterotoxigenic E. coli, one as enteropathogenic E. coli, and two carried the Eae virulence gene. E. coli susceptibility to commonly employed antimicrobial drugs was analyzed by the disc diffusion method. The results showed 49 (51.04%) isolates resistant to all the drugs assayed, 16 (16.67%) with an intermediate resistance to all drugs, and 31 (32.29%) intermediately or fully resistant to one or more drugs tested. The highest rate of resistance was observed for tetracycline 30 μg, streptomycin 10 μg, and ceftazidime 30 μg. Detection of E. coli is associated with water contamination by fecal material from humans and warm-blooded animals. The occurrence of resistant strains can be the result of the indiscriminate use of antimicrobial drugs and poor sanitation in the areas assayed.

  12. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety: a cross-sectional survey in the private sector in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Clarke, Siân E; Lal, Sham; Hansen, Kristian S; Magnussen, Pascal; LaRussa, Philip

    2016-03-15

    The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the private health sector in Uganda. A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono District, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables: drug shop characteristics, training of staff in management of pneumonia, availability of guidelines and basic equipment, available antibiotics, knowledge on treatment of pneumonia in children aged guideline is to give oral rehydration salts and zinc tablets. Only few providers, 8.2%, had training on antibiotics, with 10.6% on pneumonia case management. Further to this, 7.1% drug shops had WHO-Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines, and a negligible proportion (guidelines. There is urgent need to regulate drug shop practices of prescribing and selling antibiotics, for the safety of patients seeking care at these outlets. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Quality Assessment of Serially Ultradiluted and Agitated Drug Digitalis purpurea by Emission Spectroscopy and Clinical Analysis of Its Effect on the Heart Rate of Indian Bufo melanostictus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of ultradiluted (homeopathic drugs is extremely interesting and challenging, and from that point of view this study shows novelty. A study of in vivo changes in heart rate of the Indian Bufo melanostictus caused by commercially available serially ultra-diluted and agitated extract of Digitalis purpurea has been tried in order to understand their pharmacological role. RR interval (of ECG was compared after intraperitoneal administration of serially diluted and agitated Digitalis purpurea extract, diluent rectified spirit, and Digoxin in anesthetized animals. The study revealed statistically significant changes in the heart rate after application of these drugs except in case of Digoxin and the 200th serial dilution of Digitalis purpurea. The duration of RR intervals after application of the drugs was corroborative of the effect of Digoxin and Digitalis purpurea extract up to 30th dilution. Emission spectra were obtained for the experimental ultra-diluted Digitalis purpurea extract and Digoxin to identify and characterize them. The observed RR pattern and emission spectra show an association. The quality assessment of the commercial ultra-diluted organic drugs obtained from natural products may be initiated by monitoring in vivo studies on animal models.

  14. Comparing subjective well-being and health-related quality of life of Australian drug users in treatment in regional and rural Victoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Peter G; Hyder, Shannon; Zinkiewicz, Lucy; Droste, Nicolas; Harris, Jane B

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the self-reported subjective well-being and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of alcohol and other drug users and to examine whether subjective well-being in this sample would be predicted by either HRQOL and/or severity of dependence. A cross-sectional survey was conducted of 201 Victorian substance users in individual targeted outpatient treatment for a variety of types of substance use. Participants were administered an interview, including the personal well-being index, the SF-8 health survey and the severity of dependence scale, in order to assess subjective well-being, the mental health component of HRQOL and severity of drug dependence respectively. Subjective well-being was predicted by mental health aspects of HRQOL (sr(2)  = 0.03) and by employment (sr(2)  = 0.05), rather than by severity of dependence [F(5, 146) = 5.60, P well-being than do the general population. Subjective well-being was predicted by mental aspects of HRQOL and not by severity of drug dependence or by physical aspects of HRQOL. Treatment which aims to improve substance users' well-being should include mental health interventions and pathways to employment. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  15. International drug price comparisons: quality assessment Comparación internacional de precios de medicamentos: evaluación de la calidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Machado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To quantitatively summarize results (i.e., prices and affordability reported from international drug price comparison studies and assess their methodological quality. METHODS: A systematic search of the most relevant databases-Medline, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (IPA, and Scopus, from their inception to May 2009-was conducted to identify original research comparing international drug prices. International drug price information was extracted and recorded from accepted papers. Affordability was reported as drug prices adjusted for income. Study quality was assessed using six criteria: use of similar countries, use of a representative sample of drugs, selection of specific types of prices, identification of drug packaging, different weights on price indices, and the type of currency conversion used. RESULTS: Of the 1 828 studies identified, 21 were included. Only one study adequately addressed all quality issues. A large variation in study quality was observed due to the many methods used to conduct the drug price comparisons, such as different indices, economic parameters, price types, basket of drugs, and more. Thus, the quality of published studies was considered poor. Results varied across studies, but generally, higher income countries had higher drug prices. However, after adjusting drug prices for affordability, higher income countries had more affordable prices than lower income countries. CONCLUSIONS: Differences between drug prices and affordability in different countries were found. Low income countries reported less affordability of drugs, leaving room for potential problems with drug access, and consequently, a negative impact on health. The quality of the literature on this topic needs improvement.OBJETIVO: Resumir cuantitativamente los resultados (p. ej., precios y asequibilidad presentados en estudios de comparación internacional de precios de medicamentos y evaluar su calidad metodológica. M

  16. Filling quality of the reports of adverse drug reactions received at the Pharmacovigilance Centre of São Paulo (Brazil): missing information hinders the analysis of suspected associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Adalton; Lima, Silvana; Zampieri, Maria-Elisa; Peinado, Mirtes; Figueras, Albert

    2017-12-01

    The completeness and accuracy of the reports of suspected adverse drug reactions is important in pharmacovigilance. The aim of the present study was to analyze the quality of the information included in the reports sent to the Pharmacovigilance Centre of São Paulo (Brazil). A sample of 999 reports received from January 2013 to December 2014 was selected. The quality of the filled information was evaluated according to a 'sufficiency' criterion to apply the Karch-Lasagna causality algorithm. There were 820 reports from manufacturers and 179 from health centres. Only 4.4% (44) were fully filled, thus allowing the adequate analysis of the causal relationship between the suspected medication and the adverse event. In 30% of the reports from manufacturers, the information about the critical variables was lacking or incomplete, preventing the adequate evaluation of the report. It was also noted that the reports' poor filling quality was not related with less severity or with old and well-known medicines. The poor quality of the information included in the reports received by this centre, especially those sent by pharmaceutical manufacturers, hampers the identification of potential safety signals. Measures to improve the quality of the reports must be urgently adopted.

  17. Factors associated with health-related quality of life among injection drug users at methadone clinics in Taipei, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Feng Yen

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion: Poor HRQOL was associated with a number of factors among IDUs at methadone clinics in Taipei, Taiwan. To improve HRQOL in this population, future programs should focus on IDUs with a history of drug overdose. In addition, methadone programs and social support should be integrated to improve HRQOL among this socially marginalized population.

  18. Application of a colorimetric technique in quality control for printed pediatric orodispersible drug delivery systems containing propranolol hydrochloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vakili, Hossein; Nyman, Johan O; Genina, Natalja

    2016-01-01

    analyses were conducted to study the effect of printing on the surface morphology and topography of the substrates. Differential scanning calorimetry and attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy were used to study the solid state properties and possible interactions between the drug...

  19. Effective non-drug interventions for improving outcomes and quality of maternal health care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wekesah, Frederick M; Mbada, Chidozie E; Muula, Adamson S; Kabiru, Caroline W; Muthuri, Stella K; Izugbara, Chimaraoke O

    2016-08-15

    Many interventions have been implemented to improve maternal health outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Currently, however, systematic information on the effectiveness of these interventions remains scarce. We conducted a systematic review of published evidence on non-drug interventions that reported effectiveness in improving outcomes and quality of care in maternal health in SSA. African Journals Online, Bioline, MEDLINE, Ovid, Science Direct, and Scopus databases were searched for studies published in English between 2000 and 2015 and reporting on the effectiveness of interventions to improve quality and outcomes of maternal health care in SSA. Articles focusing on interventions that involved drug treatments, medications, or therapies were excluded. We present a narrative synthesis of the reported impact of these interventions on maternal morbidity and mortality outcomes as well as on other dimensions of the quality of maternal health care (as defined by the Institute of Medicine 2001 to comprise safety, effectiveness, efficiency, timeliness, patient centeredness, and equitability). Seventy-three studies were included in this review. Non-drug interventions that directly or indirectly improved quality of maternal health and morbidity and mortality outcomes in SSA assumed a variety of forms including mobile and electronic health, financial incentives on the demand and supply side, facility-based clinical audits and maternal death reviews, health systems strengthening interventions, community mobilization and/or peer-based programs, home-based visits, counseling and health educational and promotional programs conducted by health care providers, transportation and/or communication and referrals for emergency obstetric care, prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, and task shifting interventions. There was a preponderance of single facility and community-based studies whose effectiveness was difficult to assess. Many non-drug interventions have been

  20. A unique drug distribution process for radium Ra 223 dichloride injection and its implication for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansereau, Raymond N

    2014-11-01

    On May 15, 2013, Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals announced that it had received marketing approval for the therapeutic radioactive medication radium Ra 223 dichloride injection (Xofigo; Ra 223). The product acquisition and distribution process for hospital-based nuclear pharmacies and nuclear medicine services is unlike any other. The product is distributed as a low-risk compounded sterile preparation through a single compounding nuclear pharmacy located in Denver, Colorado, pursuant to a prescription. This model for drug distribution and delivery to the user institution has implications for product quality, patient privacy, and delineation of professional responsibilities. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. A Multilaboratory, Multicountry Study To Determine MIC Quality Control Ranges for Phenotypic Drug Susceptibility Testing of Selected First-Line Antituberculosis Drugs, Second-Line Injectables, Fluoroquinolones, Clofazimine, and Linezolid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Daniela M.; Hoffner, Sven; Ismail, Nazir A.; Kaur, Devinder; Lounis, Nacer; Metchock, Beverly; Pfyffer, Gaby E.; Venter, Amour

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to establish reference MIC quality control (QC) ranges for drug susceptibility testing of antimycobacterials, including first-line agents, second-line injectables, fluoroquinolones, and World Health Organization category 5 drugs for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis using a 7H9 broth microdilution MIC method. A tier-2 reproducibility study was conducted in eight participating laboratories using Clinical Laboratory and Standards Institute (CLSI) guidelines. Three lots of custom-made frozen 96-well polystyrene microtiter plates were used and prepared with 2× prediluted drugs in 7H9 broth-oleic acid albumin dextrose catalase. The QC reference strain was Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. MIC frequency, mode, and geometric mean were calculated for each drug. QC ranges were derived based on predefined, strict CLSI criteria. Any data lying outside CLSI criteria resulted in exclusion of the entire laboratory data set. Data from one laboratory were excluded due to higher MIC values than other laboratories. QC ranges were established for 11 drugs: isoniazid (0.03 to 0.12 μg/ml), rifampin (0.03 to 0.25 μg/ml), ethambutol (0.25 to 2 μg/ml), levofloxacin (0.12 to 1 μg/ml), moxifloxacin (0.06 to 0.5 μg/ml), ofloxacin (0.25 to 2 μg/ml), amikacin (0.25 to 2 μg/ml), kanamycin (0.25 to 2 μg/ml), capreomycin (0.5 to 4 μg/ml), linezolid (0.25 to 2 μg/ml), and clofazimine (0.03 to 0.25 μg/ml). QC ranges could not be established for nicotinamide (pyrazinamide surrogate), prothionamide, or ethionamide, which were assay nonperformers. Using strict CLSI criteria, QC ranges against the M. tuberculosis H37Rv reference strain were established for the majority of commonly used antituberculosis drugs, with a convenient 7H9 broth microdilution MIC method suitable for use in resource-limited settings. PMID:27654338

  2. Drug coverage in treatment of malaria and the consequences for resistance evolution--evidence from the use of sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malisa, Allen L; Pearce, Richard J; Abdulla, Salim; Mshinda, Hassan; Kachur, Patrick S; Bloland, Peter; Roper, Cally

    2010-07-05

    It is argued that, the efficacy of anti-malarials could be prolonged through policy-mediated reductions in drug pressure, but gathering evidence of the relationship between policy, treatment practice, drug pressure and the evolution of resistance in the field is challenging. Mathematical models indicate that drug coverage is the primary determinant of drug pressure and the driving force behind the evolution of drug resistance. These models show that where the basis of resistance is multigenic, the effects of selection can be moderated by high recombination rates, which disrupt the associations between co-selected resistance genes. To test these predictions, dhfr and dhps frequency changes were measured during 2000-2001 while SP was the second-line treatment and contrasted these with changes during 2001-2002 when SP was used for first-line therapy. Annual cross sectional community surveys carried out before, during and after the policy switch in 2001 were used to collect samples. Genetic analysis of SP resistance genes was carried out on 4,950 Plasmodium falciparum infections and the selection pressure under the two policies compared. The influence of policy on the parasite reservoir was profound. The frequency of dhfr and dhps resistance alleles did not change significantly while SP was the recommended second-line treatment, but highly significant changes occurred during the subsequent year after the switch to first line SP. The frequency of the triple mutant dhfr (N51I,C59R,S108N) allele (conferring pyrimethamine resistance) increased by 37% - 63% and the frequency of the double A437G, K540E mutant dhps allele (conferring sulphadoxine resistance) increased 200%-300%. A strong association between these unlinked alleles also emerged, confirming that they are co-selected by SP. The national policy change brought about a shift in treatment practice and the resulting increase in coverage had a substantial impact on drug pressure. The selection applied by first-line use

  3. Impact of Potentially Inappropriate Prescribing on Adverse Drug Events, Health Related Quality of Life and Emergency Hospital Attendance in Older People Attending General Practice: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Emma; McDowell, Ronald; Bennett, Kathleen; Fahey, Tom; Smith, Susan M

    2017-02-01

    Potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) describes medications where risk generally outweighs benefit for older people. Cross-sectional studies suggest an association between PIP and poorer health outcomes but there is a paucity of prospective cohort studies. This study investigates the longitudinal association of PIP with adverse drug events (ADEs), health related quality of life, and accident & emergency visits. Study design: Two-year (2010-2012) prospective cohort study (n = 904, ≥70 years, community-dwelling) with linked pharmacy dispensing data. Baseline PIP: Screening Tool for Older Persons potentially Inappropriate Prescriptions (STOPP) and Beers 2012 applied 12 months prior. ADEs (patient interview), health related quality of life (EQ-5D-3L: patient questionnaire), and accident & emergency visits (general practice medical record review). Descriptive statistics: Poisson (incidence rate ratio [95% confidence interval [CI

  4. Avaliação da qualidade do uso de medicamentos em idosos Quality assessment of drug use in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela B G Mosegui

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade do uso de medicamentos através da análise do padrão do uso, do grau de concordância com listas de medicamentos essenciais, do valor terapêutico e das interações medicamentosas encontradas entre mulheres com mais de 60 anos. MÉTODOS: Foram pesquisadas 634 mulheres que freqüentam a Universidade Aberta da Terceira Idade da Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Os dados foram coletados através de questionário padronizado e testado. As variáveis utilizadas foram relativas aos medicamentos e a seu modo de utilização. As unidades de análise foram o medicamento e o indivíduo. RESULTADOS: Das 634 mulheres estudadas, 9,1% não tomam qualquer tipo de medicamento. A média de medicamentos consumidos foi de 4,0 por mulher. Das 2.510 especialidades farmacêuticas citadas, há 538 princípios ativos diferentes. Cerca de 26% dos medicamentos são concordantes com as recomendações da Organização Mundial da Saúde, e 17%, com as da Relação Nacional de Medicamentos Essenciais. Cerca de 17% dos medicamentos são inadequados para o uso. No que diz respeito a redundâncias, 14,1% das mulheres podem sofrer conseqüências decorrentes desse evento. Quanto às interações medicamentosas, 15,5% das entrevistadas estão expostas às principais interações. CONCLUSÕES: Os dados sugerem que o padrão do uso dos medicamentos entre as idosas é bastante influenciado pela prescrição médica e que sua qualidade é prejudicada pela baixa seletividade do mercado farmacêutico.INTRODUCTION: The objective is to evaluate the quality of medication utilization through the analysis of the pattern of usage, the degree of compliance to essential drug lists, therapeutic value and by drug interactions found among women over 60 years of age. METHODS: Six hundred thirty-four women enrolled at the Open University of the Third Age were studied. Data was collected through pattern-oriented, tested questionnaires. The variables examined

  5. The Application of the Accelerated Stability Assessment Program (ASAP) to Quality by Design (QbD) for Drug Product Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Waterman, Kenneth Craig

    2011-01-01

    An isoconversion paradigm, where times in different temperature and humidity-controlled stability chambers are set to provide a fixed degradant level, is shown to compensate for the complex, non-single order kinetics of solid drug products. A humidity-corrected Arrhenius equation provides reliable estimates for temperature and relative humidity effects on degradation rates. A statistical protocol is employed to determine best fits for chemical stability data, which in turn allows for accurate...

  6. Quality assessment of structure and language elements of written responses given by seven Scandinavian drug information centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reppe, Linda Amundstuen; Spigset, Olav; Kampmann, Jens Peter

    2017-01-01

    experts preferred the use of primary sources to the use of secondary and tertiary sources. Both internal and external experts criticised the use of abbreviations, professional terminology and study findings that was left unexplained. The plain language expert emphasised the importance of defining...... on drug-related queries with respect to language and text structure. Giving specific advice and precise conclusions and avoiding too compressed language and non-standard abbreviations may aid to reach this goal....

  7. Diffusion of subsidized ACTs in accredited drug shops in Tanzania: determinants of stocking and characteristics of early and late adopters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Peter S; Yadav, Prashant; Alphs, Sarah; Arkedis, Jean; Massaga, Julius; Sabot, Oliver; Cohen, Jessica L

    2013-12-18

    Many households in sub-Saharan Africa utilize the private sector as a primary source of treatment for malaria episodes. Expanding access to effective treatment in private drug shops may help reduce incidence of severe disease and mortality. This research leveraged a longitudinal survey of stocking of subsidized artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs), an effective anti-malarial, in Accredited Drug Dispensing Outlets (ADDOs) in two regions of Tanzania. This provided a unique opportunity to explore shop and market level determinants of product diffusion in a developing country retail market. 356 ADDOs in the Rukwa and Mtwara regions of Tanzania were surveyed at seven points between Feb 2011 and May 2012. Shop level audits were used to measure the availability of subsidized ACTs at each shop. Data on market and shop level factors were collected during the survey and also extracted from GIS layers. Regression and network based methodologies were used. Shops classified as early and late adopters, following Rogers' model of product diffusion, were compared. The Bass model of product diffusion was applied to determine whether shops stocked ACTs out of a need to imitate market competitors or a desire to satisfy customer needs. Following the introduction of a subsidy for ACTs, stocking increased from 12% to nearly 80% over the seven survey rounds. Stocking was influenced by higher numbers of proximal shops and clinics, larger customer traffic and the presence of a licensed pharmacist. Early adopters were characterized by a larger percentage of customers seeking care for malaria, a larger catchment and sourcing from specific wholesalers/suppliers. The Bass model of product diffusion indicated that shops were adopting products in response to competitor behavior, rather than customer demand. Decisions to stock new pharmaceutical products in Tanzanian ADDOs are influenced by a combination of factors related to both market competition and customer demand, but are particularly

  8. Influence of Different Container Closure Systems and Capping Process Parameters on Product Quality and Container Closure Integrity (CCI) in GMP Drug Product Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathaes, Roman; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Roggo, Yves; Huwyler, Joerg; Eder, Juergen; Fritsch, Kamila; Posset, Tobias; Mohl, Silke; Streubel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Capping equipment used in good manufacturing practice manufacturing features different designs and a variety of adjustable process parameters. The overall capping result is a complex interplay of the different capping process parameters and is insufficiently described in literature. It remains poorly studied how the different capping equipment designs and capping equipment process parameters (e.g., pre-compression force, capping plate height, turntable rotating speed) contribute to the final residual seal force of a sealed container closure system and its relation to container closure integrity and other drug product quality parameters. Stopper compression measured by computer tomography correlated to residual seal force measurements.In our studies, we used different container closure system configurations from different good manufacturing practice drug product fill & finish facilities to investigate the influence of differences in primary packaging, that is, vial size and rubber stopper design on the capping process and the capped drug product. In addition, we compared two large-scale good manufacturing practice manufacturing capping equipment and different capping equipment settings and their impact on product quality and integrity, as determined by residual seal force.The capping plate to plunger distance had a major influence on the obtained residual seal force values of a sealed vial, whereas the capping pre-compression force and the turntable rotation speed showed only a minor influence on the residual seal force of a sealed vial. Capping process parameters could not easily be transferred from capping equipment of different manufacturers. However, the residual seal force tester did provide a valuable tool to compare capping performance of different capping equipment. No vial showed any leakage greater than 10(-8)mbar L/s as measured by a helium mass spectrometry system, suggesting that container closure integrity was warranted in the residual seal force range

  9. A European multi-centre External Quality Assessment (EQA) study on phenotypic and genotypic methods used for Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) drug resistance testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Baharak; Bibby, David F; Piorkowska, Renata; Ohemeng-Kumi, Natasha; Snoeck, Robert; Andrei, Graciela; Gillemot, Sarah; Morfin, Florence; Frobert, Emilie; Burrel, Sonia; Boutolleau, David; Crowley, Brendan; Mbisa, Jean L

    2017-11-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) drug resistance is a significant public health concern among immunocompromised individuals. Phenotypic assays are considered the gold standard method for detecting HSV drug resistance. However, plaque reduction assays (PRAs) are technically demanding, often with long turnaround times of up to four weeks. In contrast, genotypic tests can be performed within a few days. The development and coordination of the first European External Quality Assessment (EQA) study to evaluate phenotypic and genotypic methods used for HSV drug resistance testing in specialised reference laboratories. Four HSV-1 or HSV-2 strains with different antiviral susceptibility profiles were isolated from clinical samples. Isolates were quantified by qPCR, and aliquoted in culture medium. One isolate was distributed at two dilutions to help assess assay sensitivity. The panel was distributed to five European centres with a six-week deadline for the return of phenotypic and genotypic results, together with clinical reports. Four out of five participating labs returned results by the deadline. Limited results were later available from the fifth lab. Phenotypic and genotypic data were largely, but not completely, concordant. An unusual resistance profile shown by one of the samples was explained by the detection of a mixed virus population after extensive further investigation by one of the centres. Discordant clinical outputs reflecting the diversity of phenotypic methodologies demonstrated the utility of this exercise. With emerging genotypic technologies looking to supplant phenotyping, there is a need for curated public databases, accessible interpretation tools and standardised control materials for quality management. By establishing a network of testing laboratories, we hope that this EQA scheme will facilitate ongoing progress in this area. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Four years of early benefit assessment of new drugs in Germany: a qualitative study on methodological requirements for quality of life data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blome, Christine; Augustin, Matthias; Metin, Hidayet; Lohrberg, David

    2017-03-01

    Since 2011, an early benefit assessment (EBA) of new drugs constricts free price setting in Germany. According to the Pharmaceutical Market Restructuring Act (AMNOG), pharmaceutical companies are obliged to demonstrate added benefit of new drugs over comparative treatment. Benefit is usually evaluated by the Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG). The final appraisal is made by the Federal Joint Committee, Germany's highest-ranking decision body in the health sector, triggering drug prize negotiations between companies and statutory health insurance funds. One of four evaluation criteria is quality of life (QoL). QoL outcomes have, however, only rarely been pivotal in EBAs. This study determined methodological requirements for QoL measurement and data presentation in the EBA. In a qualitative content analysis, documents of all EBAs completed by 2014 were searched for the term QoL. Relevant passages of all EBAs of 2011-2013 were independently extracted and reduced to key content by two researchers. Recurring patterns were identified and verified through comparison with EBAs of 2014. We identified a range of requirements regarding QoL assessment, analysis, presentation, and interpretation, which go beyond official regulations. Disease-specific questionnaires are preferred and have to be validated according to certain standards and in the respective patient group. Effects must exceed the minimal important difference, which in turn must be validated in compliance with specific requirements. Often, instruments were not accepted as QoL measures, sometimes inconsistently across EBAs. Another frequent reason for non-acceptance of QoL data was that more than 30 % of randomized patients could not be analyzed due to missing data. Non-compliance with methodological requirements for QoL evidence impairs chances for positive benefit evaluation.

  11. Proguanil and cycloguanil are organic cation transporter and multidrug and toxin extrusion substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velden, M van der; Bilos, A.; Heuvel, J.M. van den; Rijpma, S.R.; Hurkmans, E.G.E.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Russel, F.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malaria, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis endemic areas show considerable geographical overlap, leading to incidence of co-infections. This requires treatment with multiple drugs, potentially causing adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs). As anti-malarials are generally positively charged at

  12. Localization of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transport proteins PfMRP1, PfMRP2, and PfMDR5 at the Plasmodium falciparum plasma membrane.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavishe, R.A.; Heuvel, J.M.W. van den; Vegte-Bolmer, M.G. van de; Luty, A.J.F.; Russel, F.G.M.; Koenderink, J.B.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spread of drug resistance has been a major obstacle to the control of malaria. The mechanisms underlying drug resistance in malaria seem to be complex and multigenic. The current literature on multiple drug resistance against anti-malarials has documented PfMDR1, an ATP-binding

  13. Short peptide based nanotubes capable of effective curcumin delivery for treating drug resistant malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Panda, Jiban Jyoti; Mukherjee, Tapan Kumar; Chauhan, Virander Singh

    2016-04-05

    Curcumin (Ccm) has shown immense potential as an antimalarial agent; however its low solubility and less bioavailability attenuate the in vivo efficacy of this potent compound. In order to increase Ccm's bioavailability, a number of organic/inorganic polymer based nanoparticles have been investigated. However, most of the present day nano based delivery systems pose a conundrum with respect to their complex synthesis procedures, poor in vivo stability and toxicity issues. Peptides due to their high biocompatibility could act as excellent materials for the synthesis of nanoparticulate drug delivery systems. Here, we have investigated dehydrophenylalanine (ΔPhe) di-peptide based self-assembled nanoparticles for the efficient delivery of Ccm as an antimalarial agent. The self-assembly and curcumin loading capacity of different ΔPhe dipeptides, phenylalanine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine (FΔF), arginine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine (RΔF), valine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine (VΔF) and methonine-α,β-dehydrophenylalanine (MΔF) were investigated for achieving enhanced and effective delivery of the compound for potential anti-malarial therapy. FΔF, RΔF, VΔF and MΔF peptides formed different types of nanoparticles like nanotubes and nanovesicles under similar assembling conditions. Out of these, F∆F nanotubes showed maximum curcumin loading capacity of almost 68 % W/W. Ccm loaded F∆F nanotubes (Ccm-F∆F) showed comparatively higher (IC50, 3.0 µM) inhibition of Plasmodium falciparum (Indo strain) as compared to free Ccm (IC50, 13 µM). Ccm-F∆F nano formulation further demonstrated higher inhibition of parasite growth in malaria infected mice as compared to free Ccm. The dipeptide nanoparticles were highly biocompatible and didn't show any toxic effect on mammalian cell lines and normal blood cells. This work provides a proof of principle of using highly biocompatible short peptide based nanoparticles for entrapment and in vivo delivery of Ccm leading to an

  14. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug ... Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug ...

  15. Antibodies to malaria vaccine candidates are associated with chloroquine or sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine treatment efficacy in children in an endemic area of Burkina Faso

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diarra, Amidou; Nebie, Issa; Tiono, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patient immune status is thought to affect the efficacy of anti-malarial chemotherapy. This is a subject of some importance, since evidence of immunity-related interactions may influence our use of chemotherapy in populations with drug resistance, as well as assessment...... of the value of suboptimal vaccines. The study aim was to investigate relationship between antibodies and anti-malarial drug treatment outcomes. METHODS: Some 248 children aged 0.5 and 15 years were recruited prior to the high malaria transmission season. Venous blood (5 ml) was obtained from each child...

  16. Water quality in coastal wetlands: illicit drugs in surface waters of L'Albufera Natural Park (Valencia, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Roig, P.; Blasco, C.; Andreu, V.; Pascual, J. A.; Rubio, J. L.; Picó, Y.

    2010-05-01

    A wide range of emerging pollutants have been identified in environment: antibiotics, hormones, personal care products, etc. But quite recently a new class of ecological threat has been reported: the presence in waters of abuse drugs coming from human consumption [1,2]. Treatment of wastewaters may remove a portion of these compounds, but sometimes, these treatments are insufficient or nonexistent, residues can reach into the aquatic environment. ĹAlbufera Natural Park (Valencia, Spain) is a marsh area of a great interest because it is the habitat of a large quantity of unique species of flora and fauna, and a zone of refuge, feeding and breeding for a large number of migratory birds. However, this area is threatened by urban, industrial and agricultural pressures. The aim of this work has been to develop a fast and sensitive multi-residue analytical method for to establish the occurrence and distribution of commonly consumed illicit drugs in surface waters of ĹAlbufera lake. A representative set of abuse drugs with different mode of action was chosen for this purpose, including: amphetaminics, opiates, cocainics and cannabinoids (THC and nor-9-carboxy-THC). In April 2008 and October 2008 a total of 16 samples of water were collected, corresponding to different sampling points previously designed, and covering the most important channels that flow in to the lake. Samples of 250 mL of water were concentrated by Solid Phase Extraction through an Oasis HLB cartridge and extracted subsequently with methanol as solvent. Quantification was carried out by LC-MS/MS with an ESI interface. Performance characteristics of the PLE-SPE followed by LC-MS/MS were established by validation procedure. Selectivity, linearity, precision, recoveries and limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) were studied. Our search shows that current sewage treatment systems do not completely remove illicit drug residues from urban wastewater. Benzoylecgonine, the main metabolite from

  17. Effects of drug and exercise intervention on functional capacity and quality of life in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Goto, Toshihiko; Wakami, Kazuaki; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are often elderly and their primary chronic symptom is severe exercise intolerance that results in a reduced quality of life (QOL).Thus, improvement of exercise capacity and QOL presents an important clinical outcome in HFpEF patients. Although the effects of interventions such as cardiovascular drugs and exercise training on exercise capacity and QOL in HFpEF patients have been examined in a number of clinical trials, the results are inconsistent due in part to limited power with small sample sizes. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trial (RCT)s on the effect of drug or exercise intervention on exercise capacity and QOL in HFpEF patients. The search of electronic databases identified five RCTs on exercise (245 patients) and eight RCTs on cardiovascular drugs (1080 patients). The pooled analysis showed that exercise training improved peak exercise oxygen uptake (VO2) (weighted mean difference (WMD) 2.283, 95% confidence interval (CI)) (1.318-3.248) ml/min/kg), six-minute walk distance (6MWD) (30.275 m (4.315-56.234)), and Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) total score (8.974 points (3.321-14.627)) compared with usual care. In contrast, drug intervention did not improve peak VO2 (WMD (95% CI), -0.393 (-1.005-0.220) ml/min/kg), 6MWD (-9.463 (-21.455-2.530) m), or MLHFQ total score (1.042 (-0.982-3.066) point) compared with placebo or no treatment. Our meta-analysis indicates that exercise training may be a therapeutic option to improve functional capacity and QOL in HFpEF patients. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  18. Quality by Design–Applied Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry Determination of Enzalutamide Anti-Prostate Cancer Therapy Drug in Spiked Plasma Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ASK Sankar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research article presents the Quality by Design (QbD–finalised conditions for a method that uses liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of concentration of enzalutamide (ENZ, an atypical anticancer drug, in a drug formulation and in spiked plasma samples. Critical process attributes (CPA considered to be the influential parameters in separation, identification, and quantification processes by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS were organic content, buffer strength, pH modifier, flow rate, spray voltage, sheath gas, and auxiliary gas that alter critical analytical attributes, such as retention time (R1 and area (R2. These factors were evaluated first in a factorial design (Taguchi orthogonal array design and then extensively in a central composite design (CCD to zero-in on the mobile phase for the quantification of ENZ standard drug and along with its internal standard (ENZIS in spiked plasma samples and in formulation. Pareto chart from initial factorial design (Taguchi orthogonal array design model suggested which of the CPA factors should be given the weightage, that is, to be exhaustively analysed in the CCD and response surface analysis. The elaborated parameters proposed by World Health Organization were studied by method validation, ie, selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision repeatability system-suitability tests, method robustness/ruggedness, sensitivity, and stability. The strategy followed gives an insight on the development of a robust QbD-compliant quantitative UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for ENZ drug containing plasma samples (spiked.

  19. Intravenous solid tip ECG lead placement in telemetry implanted dogs: Part 2: High quality telemetry signals yield high sensitivity to drug-induced changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrea Z; Bills, Andrew J; Wittwer, Gary T; Foley, C Michael; Kremer, John J; Chen, Hepei; Osinski, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Dogs are commonly used in cardiovascular drug safety assessment, and implanted telemetry models include subcutaneous or epicardial electrocardiogram (ECG) electrode placements. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity of a canine telemetry model with intravenous ECG lead placement: the negative ECG lead (solid tip) inserted into the jugular vein and the positive lead sutured to the diaphragm. Reference drugs were administered to test the sensitivity to drug-induced changes. Twenty-four dogs were implanted with PCT or PCTP transmitters [Data Sciences International (DSI)]. Three reference drugs were administered: sotalol to eight PCT and milrinone to eight PCTP transmitter-implanted dogs. Twenty-four dogs received moxifloxacin (12 dogs/transmitter type). Telemetry data were collected for 25h and analyzed using double Latin squares for sotalol and milrinone data or a 4×4 or 3×6 parallel design for moxifloxacin data. Evaluated parameters were PR, QT, corrected QT (QTc), QRS, heart rate, left ventricular function, and hemodynamic data. Various correction factors for QTc interval were tested. Retrospective power analysis was performed to detect minimal absolute changes comparing a single to a double Latin square or the two parallel designs. Expected changes on ECG and hemodynamic parameters were observed after administration of all reference drugs. The individual animal corrected QT (QTci) interval provided the optimal correction factor. Retrospective power analysis confirmed detection of smaller differences in double versus single Latin squares. Minimal detectable differences were smaller in both Latin squares compared to parallel designs, with smaller detectable differences in a 3×6 compared to a 4×4 parallel design. The solid tip intravenous ECG lead configuration in dogs is a viable radiotelemetry model to detect drug-induced changes with high sensitivity. This model yields comparable signal quality and represents a refinement over epicardial

  20. Improving titer while maintaining quality of final formulated drug substance via optimization of CHO cell culture conditions in low-iron chemically defined media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianlin; Rehmann, Matthew S; Xu, Xuankuo; Huang, Chao; Tian, Jun; Qian, Nan-Xin; Li, Zheng Jian

    2018-04-01

    During biopharmaceutical process development, it is important to improve titer to reduce drug manufacturing costs and to deliver comparable quality attributes of therapeutic proteins, which helps to ensure patient safety and efficacy. We previously reported that relative high-iron concentrations in media increased titer, but caused unacceptable coloration of a fusion protein during early-phase process development. Ultimately, the fusion protein with acceptable color was manufactured using low-iron media, but the titer decreased significantly in the low-iron process. Here, long-term passaging in low-iron media is shown to significantly improve titer while maintaining acceptable coloration during late-phase process development. However, the long-term passaging also caused a change in the protein charge variant profile by significantly increasing basic variants. Thus, we systematically studied the effect of media components, seed culture conditions, and downstream processing on productivity and quality attributes. We found that removing β-glycerol phosphate (BGP) from basal media reduced basic variants without affecting titer. Our goals for late-phase process development, improving titer and matching quality attributes to the early-phase process, were thus achieved by prolonging seed culture age and removing BGP. This process was also successfully scaled up in 500-L bioreactors. In addition, we demonstrated that higher concentrations of reactive oxygen species were present in the high-iron Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures compared to that in the low-iron cultures, suggesting a possible mechanism for the drug substance coloration caused by high-iron media. Finally, hypotheses for the mechanisms of titer improvement by both high-iron and long-term culture are discussed.

  1. Quality risk management of top spray fluidized bed process for antihypertensive drug formulation with control strategy engendered by Box-behnken experimental design space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukharya, Amit; Patel, Paresh U; Shenoy, Dinesh; Chaudhary, Shivang

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Lacidipine (LCDP) is a very low soluble and highly biovariable calcium channel blocker used in the treatment of hypertension. To increase its apparent solubility and to reduce its biovariability, solid dispersion fluid bed processing technology was explored, as it produces highly dispersible granules with a characteristic porous structure that enhances dispersibility, wettability, blend uniformity (by dissolving and spraying a solution of actives), flow ability and compressibility of granules for tableting and reducing variability by uniform drug-binder solution distribution on carrier molecules. Materials and Methods: Main object of this quality risk management (QRM) study is to provide a sophisticated “robust and rugged” Fluidized Bed Process (FBP) for the preparation of LCDP tablets with desired quality (stability) and performance (dissolution) by quality by design (QbD) concept. Results and Conclusion: This study is principally focusing on thorough mechanistic understanding of the FBP by which it is developed and scaled up with a knowledge of the critical risks involved in manufacturing process analyzed by risk assessment tools like: Qualitative Initial Risk-based Matrix Analysis (IRMA) and Quantitative Failure Mode Effective Analysis (FMEA) to identify and rank parameters with potential to have an impact on In Process/Finished Product Critical Quality Attributes (IP/FP CQAs). These Critical Process Parameters (CPPs) were further refined by DoE and MVDA to develop design space with Real Time Release Testing (RTRT) that leads to implementation of a control strategy to achieve consistent finished product quality at lab scale itself to prevent possible product failure at larger manufacturing scale. PMID:23799202

  2. THE IMPACT OF OPIATE PAIN MEDICATIONS AND PSYCHOACTIVE DRUGS ON THE QUALITY OF COLON PREPARATION IN OUTPATIENT COLONOSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnir, Vladimir M.; Bhat, Pavan; Chokshi, Reena V.; Lee, Alexander; Borg, Brian B.; Gyawali, C. Prakash; Sayuk, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Suboptimal colon preparation is a significant barrier to quality colonoscopy. The impact of pharmacologic agents associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility on quality of colon preparation has not been well characterized. Aims Evaluate impact of opiate pain medication and psychoactive medications on colon preparation quality in outpatient undergoing colonoscopy. Methods Outpatients undergoing colonoscopy at a single medical center during a 6-month period were retrospectively identified. Demographics, clinical characteristics and pharmacy records were extracted from electronic medical records. Colon preparation adequacy was evaluated using a validated composite colon preparation score. Results 2600 patients (57.3±12.9 years, 57% female) met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. 223 (8.6%) patients were regularly using opioids, 92 antipsychotics, 83 tricyclic antidepressants and 421 non-tricyclic antidepressants. Opioid use was associated with inadequate colon preparation both with low dose (OR=1.4, 95%CI 1.0-2.1, p=0.05) and high dose opioid users (OR=1.7, 95%CI 1.1-2.9, p=0.039) in a dose dependent manner. Other significant predictors of inadequate colon preparation included use of tricyclics (OR=1.9, 95%CI 1.1-3.0, p=0.012), non-tricyclic antidepressants (OR=1.5, 95%CI 1.1-2.0, p=0.013), and antipsychotic medications (OR=2.2, 95%CI 1.4-3.4, p=0.001). Conclusions Opiate pain medication use independently predict inadequate quality colon preparation in a dose dependent fashion; furthermore psychoactive medications have even more prominent effects and further potentate the negative impact of opiates with concurrent use. PMID:24012559

  3. A pilot external quality assurance programme for line-probe assay detection of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, K L; Yip, C W; Tang, H S; Lai, Y W; Lam, T K; Kam, K M

    2013-02-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB; resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin) is difficult to detect and control. Line-probe assays (LiPA) are widely used for the rapid detection of MDR-TB. To ensure the quality of the test, a pilot external quality assurance (EQA) programme was initiated to assess the feasibility of running such a programme and the possibility of improving the proficiency of TB laboratories in performing the test. Prepared filter-paper-based Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA samples were shipped to participant laboratories for LiPA EQA. The tests were performed blind, and the results were returned to the organising laboratory for comparison and analysis. A total of four rounds of EQA samples were dispatched to five laboratories in four countries. Overall inter- and intra-laboratory reproducibility was respectively 97% and 96%. The strengths and weaknesses of the participant laboratories in performing the test were discussed. A LiPA EQA programme can ensure quality and improve the performance of TB laboratories. This is a critical step during the initial stages at the time of setting up this method of testing.

  4. Methadone dosage and its relationship to quality of life, satisfaction, psychopathology, cognitive performance and additional consumption of non-prescribed drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero-Pérez, Eduardo J; MethaQoL, Grupo

    2016-06-14

    The effectiveness of methadone maintenance treatment is beyond any doubt, but there remains some incertitude about the appropriate and effective dosage and the objectives that should be achieved by this therapy. Some authors maintain that only doses higher than 50-60 mg/day ought to be considered effective, since only these block all the opioid receptors. But others propose the use of doses adjusted to the needs of the patient, based on their recovery process. Quality of life, satisfaction with treatment, psychopathological symptoms, cognitive performance and additional intake of illegal and unprescribed drugs were evaluated in a representative sample of all patients treated with opioid agonists in the Addiction Institute of Madrid (N = 1898, n = 450) and the Junta de Extremadura (N = 100, n = 65). The results revealed a negative relationship between dose and quality of life, psychopathological symptoms and cognitive performance. Satisfaction with treatment, based on doses negotiated together by doctor and patient, was very high, regardless of the dose. To establish hypothetical causal dependencies among the studied variables structural equation modelling was performed. The results reject the need for high dosage if not required by the patient, and highlight the benefits of other psychosocial interventions that lead to recovery, despite the chronification that could imply the use of high doses. Whereas high dosage programmes provide better indicators of social control, the patient's quality of life must be one of the main indicators of a successful treatment, as in any other health problem.

  5. Mekong malaria. Malaria, multi-drug resistance and economic development in the greater Mekong subregion of Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhasivanon, P

    1999-01-01

    This monograph brings together national malaria databases for 1996, 1997 and 1998 from the 6 countries comprising the Greater Mekong Subregion of Southeast Asia: Cambodia, China (southern provinces), Lao People's Democratic Republic, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam. The objective is to create a regional perspective in what is a global epicenter of drug resistant falciparum malaria, so to enhance the information flow required to improve malaria control on a regional basis in the context of economic and social change. Geographical Information Systems technology has been applied to the regional mapping of total reported malaria cases, malaria incidence, confirmed cases, parasite species distribution. There is great diversity in disease patterns in the 6 countries and at subnational administrative unit area level in each country, so that in the region as a whole there is marked asymmetry in disease distribution, with many areas of high endemicity. Focal expansion of maps in the vicinity of international border areas delineates the differential trans-border malaria distribution that presents a challenge for disease control. The malaria pattern is also depicted in environmental context against regional elevation and forest cover profiles, which affect mosquito breeding site distribution and agricultural activity. Data on resistance of falciparum malaria to a range of anti-malarial drugs summarise the historical and recent context of resistance development and spread in terms of geography and time frame. Data on population movement across international borders identify the magnitude of a major factor in the dispersal of malaria, including resistant parasite strains. Malaria control involves consideration of microeconomic capacity and operates in the broader context of macroeconomic policy: economic and social profiles of the region are included to provide this perspective. So too are maps depicting major economic development projects in the region, projects that have and will

  6. Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide Sanitization of an Isolator for Aseptic Filling of Monoclonal Antibody Drug Product - Hydrogen Peroxide Uptake and Impact on Protein Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Aaron; Reodl, Thomas; Hui, Ada; Knueppel, Stephanie; Eppler, Kirk; Lehnert, Siegfried; Maa, Yuh-Fun

    2018-03-15

    A monoclonal antibody drug product (DP) manufacturing process was transferred to a different production site, where aseptic filling took place within an isolator that was sanitized using vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VPHP). A quality-by-design approach was applied for study design to understand the impact of VPHP uptake in the isolator on DP quality. A combination of small-scale and manufacturing-scale studies was performed to evaluate the sensitivity of the monoclonal antibody to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as well as VPHP uptake mechanisms during the filling process. The acceptable H2O2 level was determined to be 100 ng/mL for the antibody in the H2O2 spiking study; protein oxidation was observed above this threshold. The most prominent sources of VPHP uptake were identified to be via the silicone tubing assembly (associated with the peristaltic pumps) and open, filled vials. Silicone tubing, an effective depot to H2O2, could absorb VPHP during different stages of the filling process and discharge H2O2 into the DP solution during filling interruptions. A small-scale isolator model, established to simulate manufacturing-scale conditions, was a useful tool in understanding H2O2 uptake in relation to tubing dimensions and VPHP concentration in the isolator air (or atmosphere). Although the tubing assembly had absorbed a substantial amount of VPHP during the decontamination phase, the majority of H2O2 could be removed during tubing cleaning and sterilization in the subsequent isolator aeration phase, demonstrating that H2O2 in the DP solution is taken up primarily via atmospheric VPHP residues in the isolator during filling. Picarro sensor monitoring suggested that the validated VPHP aeration process generates reproducible residual VPHP profiles in isolator air, thus allowing small-scale studies to provide more relevant recommendations on tubing size and interruption time limits for commercial manufacturing. The recommended process parameters were demonstrated to be

  7. Data-Driven Model-Free Adaptive Control of Particle Quality in Drug Development Phase of Spray Fluidized-Bed Granulation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengsong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel data-driven model-free adaptive control (DDMFAC approach is first proposed by combining the advantages of model-free adaptive control (MFAC and data-driven optimal iterative learning control (DDOILC, and then its stability and convergence analysis is given to prove algorithm stability and asymptotical convergence of tracking error. Besides, the parameters of presented approach are adaptively adjusted with fuzzy logic to determine the occupied proportions of MFAC and DDOILC according to their different control performances in different control stages. Lastly, the proposed fuzzy DDMFAC (FDDMFAC approach is applied to the control of particle quality in drug development phase of spray fluidized-bed granulation process (SFBGP, and its control effect is compared with MFAC and DDOILC and their fuzzy forms, in which the parameters of MFAC and DDOILC are adaptively adjusted with fuzzy logic. The effectiveness of the presented FDDMFAC approach is verified by a series of simulations.

  8. Attitudes of homeless and drug-using youth regarding barriers and facilitators in delivery of quality and culturally sensitive health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiani, Ashley; Hudson, Angela L; Nyamathi, Adeline; Mutere, Malaika; Sweat, Jeffrey

    2008-08-01

    Major barriers to care included a lack of culturally competent, accessible care despite the proximity of numerous health service agencies serving homeless youth. A qualitative approach using semistructured focus groups was used to assess the perspectives of 54 homeless and drug-using youth, aged 18-24 years, recruited from street- and shelter-based settings. Substance use was perceived as an adaptive response to psychological pain and survival on the streets as well as a health risk and barrier to care. Facilitators to care and suggestions for improved health delivery and quality of care included utilization of health "mentors" to assist in navigating the medical system, cultural competency enhancements, improved amenities in clinic wait areas, and expanded pharmaceutical services.

  9. The adverse drug reaction reporting assignment for specialist oncology nurses: a preliminary evaluation of quality, relevance and educational value in a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutte, Tim; van Eekeren, Rike; Richir, Milan; van Staveren, Jojanneke; van Puijenbroek, Eugène; Tichelaar, Jelle; van Agtmael, Michiel

    2018-01-01

    In a new prescribing qualification course for specialist oncology nurses, we thought that it is important to emphasize pharmacovigilance and adverse drug reaction (ADR) reporting. We aimed to develop and evaluate an ADR reporting assignment for specialist oncology nurses. The quality of report documentation was assessed with the "Clinical Documentation tool to assess Individual Case Safety Reports" (ClinDoc). The relevance of the reports was evaluated in terms of ADR seriousness, the listing for additional monitoring of the drug by European Medicines Agency (EMA), and lack of labelling information about the ADR. Nurses' opinions of the assignment were evaluated using an E-survey. Thirty-three ADRs were reported, 32 (97%) of which were well documented according to ClinDoc. Thirteen ADRs (39%) were "serious" according to CIOMS criteria. In five cases (15%), the suspect drugs were listed for additional monitoring by EMA and in seven cases (21%), the ADR was not mentioned in the Summary of Product Characteristics. Twenty-five (78.1%) of the 32 enrolled nurses completed the E-survey. Most were > 45 years of age (68%), female (92%) and had extensive clinical experience (6-33 years). All agreed or completely agreed that the reporting assignment was useful, that it fitted in daily practice and that it increased their attention for medication/patient safety. A large majority (84.0%) agreed the assignment changed how they dealt with ADRs. Specialist oncology nurses are capable of reporting ADRs, and they considered the assignment useful. The assignment yielded valuable, relevant, and well-documented ADR reports for pharmacovigilance practice.

  10. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Facts Search form Search Menu Home Drugs That People Abuse Alcohol Facts Bath Salts Facts Cocaine (Coke, ... Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids ...

  11. Drug Facts

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    Full Text Available ... Get Addicted to Drugs? Does Addiction Run in Families? Why Is It So Hard to Quit Drugs? ... Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn ...

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    Full Text Available ... People Drug Use and Families Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and ... Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids About Drugs: What to Say if You Used ...

  13. Analytical quality assurance in veterinary drug residue analysis methods: matrix effects determination and monitoring for sulfonamides analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Rodrigo Barcellos; Rübensam, Gabriel; Jank, Louise; Barreto, Fabiano; Peralba, Maria do Carmo Ruaro; Pizzolato, Tânia Mara; Silvia Díaz-Cruz, M; Barceló, Damià

    2015-01-01

    In residue analysis of veterinary drugs in foodstuff, matrix effects are one of the most critical points. This work present a discuss considering approaches used to estimate, minimize and monitoring matrix effects in bioanalytical methods. Qualitative and quantitative methods for estimation of matrix effects such as post-column infusion, slopes ratios analysis, calibration curves (mathematical and statistical analysis) and control chart monitoring are discussed using real data. Matrix effects varying in a wide range depending of the analyte and the sample preparation method: pressurized liquid extraction for liver samples show matrix effects from 15.5 to 59.2% while a ultrasound-assisted extraction provide values from 21.7 to 64.3%. The matrix influence was also evaluated: for sulfamethazine analysis, losses of signal were varying from -37 to -96% for fish and eggs, respectively. Advantages and drawbacks are also discussed considering a workflow for matrix effects assessment proposed and applied to real data from sulfonamides residues analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Investigation of drug polymorphism: Case of artemisinin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horosanskaia, E.; Seidel-Morgenstern, A.; Lorenz, H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The Artemisinin dimorphic system was found to be enantiotropic. • The Orthorhombic modification is the form stable at low-temperatures and the triclinic modification the form stable at high-temperatures. • The polymorphic phase transition occurs at ∼130 °C. - Abstract: The polymorphism of the anti-malarial compound artemisinin was examined. The phase behavior of solid artemisinin has experimentally been investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and temperature-resolved X-Ray powder diffraction. In addition, complementary solution studies and suspension experiments were performed. The results clearly confirm the existence of two modifications of artemisinin, which are related enantiotropically. The orthorhombic modification is the thermodynamically stable form at low temperatures, while the triclinic form is the stable one at higher temperatures with a transition temperature of ∼130 °C. Problems associated with analysis of the polymorphic phase behavior are comprehensively addressed

  15. Biphasic dissolution method for quality control and assurance of drugs containing active substances in the form of weak acid salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc Aleš

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Substances in the form of weak acid salts have been found to be problematic for dissolution testing. Their absorption can start only after they are turned into the form of an acid following the gastric passage although they were administered in the form of a salt. Due to poor solubility, they cannot be tested in acidic gastric environment for a biased dissolution profile. The biphasic dissolution method is promising for overcoming this obstacle. Tablets with warfarin clathrate sodium salt in two concentrations and two different particle size distributions were tested as a suitable model for finding the medium and process conditions of dissolution. The dissolution method based on the use of the upper organic layer (1-octanol and the lower aqueous layer 0.1 mol L−1 HCl was found suitable and discriminatory for tablets containing active substances in the form of salts of weak acids. The method also reflects physical differences in the quality of used substances.

  16. Analysis of the physico-chemical quality Enalapril and Simvastatin drugs manipulated in magistral pharmacies from Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Analise da qualidade fisico-quimica dos medicamentos Enalapril e Sinvastatina manipulados em farmacias magistrais de Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Tatiana Cristina Bomfim

    2013-07-01

    The increasing expansion of compounding pharmacy associated with several reports on variances in the quality of compounded drugs demonstrates the need for verification of quality, safety and efficacy of these products. In this work, physical and chemical analyzes were performed to evaluate the quality of some capsules manipulated enalapril and simvastatin, acquired in five pharmacies in Belo Horizonte /Brazil. Among the analyzes are pharmacopoeial tests for appearance, identification, determination of weight, content, related compounds and uniformity of dosage units, and was also performed neutron activation analysis for the determination of inorganic impurities in drugs sampled. The results showed that 60% of the samples were unsatisfactory for pharmacopoeial tests. The contents of the capsules sampled for individual testing unit dose uniformity between 0% and 136.2%. This test is important in evaluating the quality, which influences the safety and efficacy of drug treatment, since it allows you to check if the product contains the proper dosage and necessary for successful pharmacotherapy. On the other hand, underdosing can lead to reduced or absent desired therapeutic response, and overdoses can provide an undesirable effects and even toxic. The concentration of inorganic impurities was considered to be relatively small. However, no specific limits for some chemical elements in medicine hamper a better thread. In addition, further studies must be performed to assess chronic exposure to low concentrations of inorganic impurities, since drugs can be continuously used, and other sources of exposure must also be considered in order to evaluate the risk. The problems related to the quality and safety of compounded drugs are still reality in the country and reveal a serious public health problem, especially regarding the lack of uniformity between the unit doses of medications. It is suggested that the competent authorities to sanitary products, propose changes in

  17. The successful binomium of multivariate strategies and electrophoresis for the Quality by Design separation of a class of drugs: the case of triptans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Benedetta; Orlandini, Serena; Del Bubba, Massimo; Bertol, Elisabetta; Furlanetto, Sandra

    2015-11-01

    Quality by Design (QbD) approach was followed having as analytical target profile the determination of different antimigraine drugs (seven triptans, TRP) available on the market. Multivariate strategies were used for defining the design space and solvent-modified MEKC was the selected analytical method. The versatility of electrophoretic technique, allowing a fine modulation of experimental parameters, made it possible to define the design space (DS). The DS limited a suitable range of experimental parameters in which all possible combinations of variables led to an electrokinetic method able to determine all the considered analytes with a predefined quality. Design of experiments and risk analysis fully assisted the method development from the initial investigation of MEKC knowledge space to the DS definition and finally to the control strategy. Applying the working operative conditions, the baseline separation of TRP was obtained in less than 9 min. The method was finally used for the quantification of three TRP in different pharmaceutical products. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Boosting Quality Registries with Clinical Decision Support Functionality*. User Acceptance of a Prototype Applied to HIV/TB Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannheden, Carolina; Hvitfeldt-Forsberg, Helena; Eftimovska, Elena; Westling, Katarina; Ellenius, Johan

    2017-08-11

    The care of HIV-related tuberculosis (HIV/TB) is complex and challenging. Clinical decision support (CDS) systems can contribute to improve quality of care, but more knowledge is needed on factors determining user acceptance of CDS. To analyze physicians' and nurses' acceptance of a CDS prototype for evidence-based drug therapy recommendations for HIV/TB treatment. Physicians and nurses were involved in designing a CDS prototype intended for future integration with the Swedish national HIV quality registry. Focus group evaluation was performed with ten nurses and four physicians, respectively. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) was used to analyze acceptance. We identified several potential benefits with the CDS prototype as well as some concerns that could be addressed by redesign. There was also concern about dependence on physician attitudes, as well as technical, organizational, and legal issues. Acceptance evaluation at a prototype stage provided rich data to improve the future design of a CDS prototype. Apart from design and development efforts, substantial organizational efforts are needed to enable the implementation and maintenance of a future CDS system.

  19. Comparison of Image Quality and Diagnostic Performance of Cone-Beam CT during Drug-Eluting Embolic Transarterial Chemoembolization and Multidetector CT in the Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucatelli, Pierleone; Argirò, Renato; Ginanni Corradini, Stefano; Saba, Luca; Cirelli, Carlo; Fanelli, Fabrizio; Ricci, Carmelo; Levi Sandri, Giovanni Battista; Catalano, Carlo; Bezzi, Mario

    2017-07-01

    To compare image quality and diagnostic performance of cone-beam computed tomography (CT) and multidetector CT in the detection of hypervascular hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with cirrhosis undergoing transarterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting embolic agents. Fifty-five consecutive patients referred for chemoembolization of hypervascular HCC were prospectively enrolled. Imaging included preprocedural multidetector CT within 1 month before planned treatment, intraprocedural cone-beam CT, and 1-month follow-up multidetector CT. Analysis of image quality was performed with calculations of lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (LLCNR) and lesion-to-liver signal-to-noise-ratio (LLSNR). One-month follow-up multidetector CT was considered the reference standard for the detection of HCC nodules. Median LLCNR values were 3.94 (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.06-5.05) for preprocedural multidetector CT and 6.90 (95% CI, 5.17-7.77) for intraprocedural cone-beam CT (P cone-beam CT (P cone-beam CT detected 15 additional hypervascular nodules that were also visible on 1-month follow-up multidetector CT. Cone-beam CT has a significantly higher diagnostic performance compared with preprocedural multidetector CT in the detection of HCCs and can influence management of patients with cirrhosis by identifying particularly aggressive tumors. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Ernesto Nicolás Gulin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%. Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction.

  1. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-11-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction.

  2. Quality of Reporting and Adherence to ARRIVE Guidelines in Animal Studies for Chagas Disease Preclinical Drug Research: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Julián Ernesto Nicolás; Rocco, Daniela Marisa; García-Bournissen, Facundo

    2015-01-01

    Publication of accurate and detailed descriptions of methods in research articles involving animals is essential for health scientists to accurately interpret published data, evaluate results and replicate findings. Inadequate reporting of key aspects of experimental design may reduce the impact of studies and could act as a barrier to translation of research findings. Reporting of animal use must be as comprehensive as possible in order to take advantage of every study and every animal used. Animal models are essential to understanding and assessing new chemotherapy candidates for Chagas disease pathology, a widespread parasitic disease with few treatment options currently available. A systematic review was carried out to compare ARRIVE guidelines recommendations with information provided in publications of preclinical studies for new anti-Trypanosoma cruzi compounds. A total of 83 publications were reviewed. Before ARRIVE guidelines, 69% of publications failed to report any macroenvironment information, compared to 57% after ARRIVE publication. Similar proportions were observed when evaluating reporting of microenvironmental information (56% vs. 61%). Also, before ARRIVE guidelines publication, only 13% of papers described animal gender, only 18% specified microbiological status and 13% reported randomized treatment assignment, among other essential information missing or incomplete. Unfortunately, publication of ARRIVE guidelines did not seem to enhance reporting quality, compared to papers appeared before ARRIVE publication. Our results suggest that there is a strong need for the scientific community to improve animal use description, animal models employed, transparent reporting and experiment design to facilitate its transfer and application to the affected human population. Full compliance with ARRIVE guidelines, or similar animal research reporting guidelines, would be an excellent start in this direction. PMID:26587586

  3. Food-drug interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    Interactions between food and drugs may inadvertently reduce or increase the drug effect. The majority of clinically relevant food-drug interactions are caused by food-induced changes in the bioavailability of the drug. Since the bioavailability and clinical effect of most drugs are correlated......, the bioavailability is an important pharmacokinetic effect parameter. However, in order to evaluate the clinical relevance of a food-drug interaction, the impact of food intake on the clinical effect of the drug has to be quantified as well. As a result of quality review in healthcare systems, healthcare providers...... are increasingly required to develop methods for identifying and preventing adverse food-drug interactions. In this review of original literature, we have tried to provide both pharmacokinetic and clinical effect parameters of clinically relevant food-drug interactions. The most important interactions are those...

  4. Use of RDTs to improve malaria diagnosis and fever case management at primary health care facilities in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabakooza Jane

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early and accurate diagnosis of malaria followed by prompt treatment reduces the risk of severe disease in malaria endemic regions. Presumptive treatment of malaria is widely practised where microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs are not readily available. With the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for treatment of malaria in many low-resource settings, there is need to target treatment to patients with parasitologically confirmed malaria in order to improve quality of care, reduce over consumption of anti-malarials, reduce drug pressure and in turn delay development and spread of drug resistance. This study evaluated the effect of malaria RDTs on health workers' anti-malarial drug (AMD prescriptions among outpatients at low level health care facilities (LLHCF within different malaria epidemiological settings in Uganda. Methods All health workers (HWs in 21 selected intervention (where RDTs were deployed LLHF were invited for training on the use RDTs. All HWs were trained to use RDTs for parasitological diagnosis of all suspected malaria cases irrespective of age. Five LLHCFs with clinical diagnosis (CD only were included for comparison. Subsequently AMD prescriptions were compared using both a 'pre - post' and 'intervention - control' analysis designs. In-depth interviews of the HWs were conducted to explore any factors that influence AMD prescription practices. Results A total of 166,131 out-patient attendances (OPD were evaluated at 21 intervention LLHCFs. Overall use of RDTs resulted in a 38% point reduction in AMD prescriptions. There was a two-fold reduction (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.55-0.70 in AMD prescription with the greatest reduction in the hypo-endemic setting (RR 0.46 95% CI 0.51-0.53 but no significant change in the urban setting (RR1.01, p-value = 0.820. Over 90% of all eligible OPD patients were offered a test. An average of 30% (range 25%-35% of the RDT-negative fever patients received

  5. Decreased prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance markers to amodiaquine despite its wide scale use as ACT partner drug in Zanzibar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröberg, Gabrielle; Jörnhagen, Louise; Morris, Ulrika; Shakely, Delér; Msellem, Mwinyi I; Gil, José P; Björkman, Anders; Mårtensson, Andreas

    2012-09-11

    Zanzibar has recently undergone a rapid decline in Plasmodium falciparum transmission following combined malaria control interventions with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and integrated vector control. Artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) was implemented as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Zanzibar in 2003. Resistance to amodiaquine has been associated with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles pfcrt 76T, pfmdr1 86Y, 184Y and 1246Y. An accumulation of these SNP alleles in the parasite population over time might threaten ASAQ efficacy.The aim of this study was to assess whether prolonged use of ASAQ as first-line anti-malarial treatment selects for P. falciparum SNPs associated with resistance to the ACT partner drug amodiaquine. The individual as well as the combined SNP allele prevalence were compared in pre-treatment blood samples from patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria enrolled in clinical trials conducted just prior to the introduction of ASAQ in 2002-2003 (n = 208) and seven years after wide scale use of ASAQ in 2010 (n = 122). There was a statistically significant decrease of pfcrt 76T (96-63%), pfmdr1 86Y (75-52%), 184Y (83-72%), 1246Y (28-16%) and the most common haplotypes pfcrt/pfmdr1 TYYD (46-26%) and TYYY (17-8%), while an increase of pfcrt/pfmdr1 KNFD (0.4-14%) and KNYD (1-12%). This is the first observation of a decreased prevalence of pfcrt 76T, pfmdr1 86Y, 184Y and 1246Y in an African setting after several years of extensive ASAQ use as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. This may support sustained efficacy of ASAQ on Zanzibar, although it was unexpected considering that all these SNPs have previously been associated with amodiaquine resistance. The underlying factors of these results are unclear. Genetic dilution by imported P. falciparum parasites from mainland Tanzania, a de-selection by artesunate per se and/or an associated fitness cost might represent contributing

  6. Decreased prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum resistance markers to amodiaquine despite its wide scale use as ACT partner drug in Zanzibar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröberg Gabrielle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zanzibar has recently undergone a rapid decline in Plasmodium falciparum transmission following combined malaria control interventions with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and integrated vector control. Artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ was implemented as first-line treatment for uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria in Zanzibar in 2003. Resistance to amodiaquine has been associated with the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP alleles pfcrt 76T, pfmdr1 86Y, 184Y and 1246Y. An accumulation of these SNP alleles in the parasite population over time might threaten ASAQ efficacy. The aim of this study was to assess whether prolonged use of ASAQ as first-line anti-malarial treatment selects for P. falciparum SNPs associated with resistance to the ACT partner drug amodiaquine. Methods The individual as well as the combined SNP allele prevalence were compared in pre-treatment blood samples from patients with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria enrolled in clinical trials conducted just prior to the introduction of ASAQ in 2002–2003 (n = 208 and seven years after wide scale use of ASAQ in 2010 (n = 122. Results There was a statistically significant decrease of pfcrt 76T (96–63%, pfmdr1 86Y (75–52%, 184Y (83–72%, 1246Y (28–16% and the most common haplotypes pfcrt/pfmdr1 TYYD (46–26% and TYYY (17–8%, while an increase of pfcrt/pfmdr1 KNFD (0.4–14% and KNYD (1–12%. Conclusions This is the first observation of a decreased prevalence of pfcrt 76T, pfmdr1 86Y, 184Y and 1246Y in an African setting after several years of extensive ASAQ use as first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria. This may support sustained efficacy of ASAQ on Zanzibar, although it was unexpected considering that all these SNPs have previously been associated with amodiaquine resistance. The underlying factors of these results are unclear. Genetic dilution by imported P. falciparum parasites from mainland Tanzania, a de-selection by

  7. [Designer drugs in Jutland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, K W; Kaa, E

    2001-04-16

    The aim of this investigation was to examine illegal tablets and capsules seized in Jutland, the western part of Denmark, during the period 1995-1999. The drugs are described according to technical appearance (colour, logo, score, diameter) and content of synthetic drugs. All illegal tablets and capsules received during the period 1995-1999 (109 cases containing 192 different samples) were examined. MDMA was the most common drug and was seen during the entire period. Amphetamine was the second most common drug and has been frequently detected during the the last two years. Drugs like MDE, MBDB, BDB, and 2-CB were rarely seen and they disappeared quickly from the illegal market. MDA appeared on the market at the end of 1999. Only 53% of the tablets contained MDMA as the sole drug. Eighty-one percent of the tablets/capsules contained only one synthetic drug, whereas 13% contained a mixture of two or more synthetic drugs. Six per cent of the samples did not contain a euphoric drug/designer drug. The content of MDMA, MDE, and amphetamine in the tablets varied greatly. MDMA is apparently the drug preferred by the users, but still only half of the tablets contained MDMA as the only drug. The rest of the tablets contained either another synthetic drug or a mixture of drugs. In conclusion, the increasing supply of various drugs with different and unpredictable effects and of miscellaneous quality brings about the risk of serious and complicated intoxications.

  8. Drug Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attempt to stop taking the drug Recognizing unhealthy drug use in family members Sometimes it's difficult to ... sold to support drug use Recognizing signs of drug use or intoxication Signs and symptoms of drug ...

  9. Drug Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seizure Loss of consciousness Other conditions resulting from drug allergy Less common drug allergy reactions occur days ... reaction the first time you take the drug. Drugs commonly linked to allergies Although any drug can ...

  10. Patient-reported adverse drug reactions and their influence on adherence and quality of life of chronic myeloid leukemia patients on per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kekäle M

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Meri Kekäle,1 Marikki Peltoniemi,2 Marja Airaksinen1 1Clinical Pharmacy Group, Division of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, 2Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Purpose: To evaluate adverse drug reactions (ADRs experienced by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients during per oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment and correlation of ADR symptoms with medication adherence and perceived quality of life (QoL.Patients and methods: Eighty-six adult, chronic-phase CML patients who had been on TKI treatment (79% on imatinib, 10.5% dasatinib, and 10.5% nilotinib for at least 6 months participated in the study (mean age: 57.8 years, 52% males. The mean time from diagnosis was 5.1 years. All patients were interviewed, and patient-reported ADRs were obtained using a structured list. Adherence was assessed using Morisky’s 8-item Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS. The symptoms’ interference with patient’s daily QoL was measured by asking patients about the influence of symptom(s on their mood, general condition, enjoyment of life, walking, relationships, and work.Results: Ninety-seven percent of the patients were suffering from at least one ADR. The mean number of different symptoms was seven (range: 0–15, median 6. The most commonly perceived ADRs were muscle soreness or cramp (69/86, 80%; swelling of hands, legs, feet, or around the eyes (59/86, 69%; and fatigue (43/86, 50%. No correlation was found between adherence and ADRs, because symptoms were equally common in each MMAS adherence class. Half of the patients felt that the ADRs had a negative influence on their daily QoL. A quarter of the patients reported that ADRs affected either their mood, general condition, or enjoyment of life. The incidence of almost all ADRs was much higher among patients reporting negative influence of ADRs on their daily life compared to total study population (P=0.016.Conclusion

  11. Dried whole plant Artemisia annua as an antimalarial therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A Elfawal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Drugs are primary weapons for reducing malaria in human populations. However emergence of resistant parasites has repeatedly curtailed the lifespan of each drug that is developed and deployed. Currently the most effective anti-malarial is artemisinin, which is extracted from the leaves of Artemisia annua. Due to poor pharmacokinetic properties and prudent efforts to curtail resistance to monotherapies, artemisinin is prescribed only in combination with other anti-malarials composing an Artemisinin Combination Therapy (ACT. Low yield in the plant, and the added cost of secondary anti-malarials in the ACT, make artemisinin costly for the developing world. As an alternative, we compared the efficacy of oral delivery of the dried leaves of whole plant (WP A. annua to a comparable dose of pure artemisinin in a rodent malaria model (Plasmodium chabaudi. We found that a single dose of WP (containing 24 mg/kg artemisinin reduces parasitemia more effectively than a comparable dose of purified drug. This increased efficacy may result from a documented 40-fold increase in the bioavailability of artemisinin in the blood of mice fed the whole plant, in comparison to those administered synthetic drug. Synergistic benefits may derive from the presence of other anti-malarial compounds in A. annua. If shown to be clinically efficacious, well-tolerated, and compatible with the public health imperative of forestalling evolution of drug resistance, inexpensive, locally grown and processed A. annua might prove to be an effective addition to the global effort to reduce malaria morbidity and mortality.

  12. Molecular Evidence of Increased Resistance to Anti-Folate Drugs in Plasmodium falciparum in North-East India: A Signal for Potential Failure of Artemisinin Plus Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Pradyumna Kishore; Sarma, Devojit Kumar; Prakash, Anil; Bora, Khukumoni; Ahmed, Md. Atique; Sarma, Bibhas; Goswami, Basanta Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Dibya Ranjan; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2014-01-01

    North-east India, being a corridor to South-east Asia, is believed to play an important role in transmitting drug resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria to India and South Asia. North-east India was the first place in India to record the emergence of drug resistance to chloroquine as well as sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine. Presently chloroquine resistance is widespread all over the North-east India and resistance to other anti-malarials is increasing. In this study both in vivo therapeutic efficacy and molecular assays were used to screen the spectrum of drug resistance to chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in the circulating P. falciparum strains. A total of 220 P. falciparum positives subjects were enrolled in the study for therapeutic assessment of chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and assessment of point mutations conferring resistances to these drugs were carried out by genotyping the isolates following standard methods. Overall clinical failures in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and chloroquine were found 12.6 and 69.5% respectively, while overall treatment failures recorded were 13.7 and 81.5% in the two arms. Nearly all (99.0%) the isolates had mutant pfcrt genotype (76T), while 68% had mutant pfmdr-1 genotype (86Y). Mutation in dhps 437 codon was the most prevalent one while dhfr codon 108 showed 100% mutation. A total of 23 unique haplotypes at the dhps locus and 7 at dhfr locus were found while dhps-dhfr combined loci revealed 49 unique haplotypes. Prevalence of double, triple and quadruple mutations were common while 1 haplotype was found with all five mutated codons (F/AGEGS/T) at dhps locus. Detection of quadruple mutants (51I/59R/108N/164L) in the present study, earlier recorded from Car Nicobar Island, India only, indicates the presence of high levels of resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in north-east India. Associations between resistant haplotypes and the clinical outcomes and emerging resistance in sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine in

  13. Quality-by-design based development of a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system to reduce the effect of food on Nelfinavir mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Sunil; Rana, Vikas

    2016-03-30

    Poor aqueous solubility and moderate permeability of Nelfinavir mesylate (NFM) leads to high variability in absorption after oral administration. To improve the solubility and bioavailability of NFM, the self microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) was developed. For this purpose, Quality by design (QbD) approach employing D-optimal mixture design was used to prepare SMEDDS of NFM. Further, the software generated numerically optimized SMEDDS were developed by utilizing desirability function. Maisine 35-1, Tween 80, and Transcutol HP were identified as oil, surfactant, and co-surfactant that had best solubility for NFM. Ternary phase diagrams were plotted to identify the self-emulsification region. Dissolution of putative NFM in simulated fasted or fed small intestinal conditions, respectively, predicted that there is a positive food effect. However, NFM loaded SMEDDS showed absence of food effect with no significant difference in dissolution performance either in Fasted or fed state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF or FeSSIF) biorelevent dissolution media. The prepared SMEDDS were thermodynamically stable with droplet size (121 nm), poly dispersity index (PDI) (0.198) and emulsification time (food effect on pure NFM suspension. However, absence of food effect and 3.5-3.6 fold enhancement in the oral bioavailability was observed when NFM was formulated into SMEDDS. Thus, it could be envisaged that development of SMEDDS formulation of NFM could be one of the best alternative to enhance oral bioavailability of NFM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some signs and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What Makes Someone More Likely ... So Hard to Quit Drugs? Effects of Drugs Drug Use and Other People Drug Use and Families Drug ...

  15. The Impact of School Based Anti-Malarial Treatment on Adolescents' Cognition: Evidence from a Cluster-Randomized Intervention in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Kevin A.

    2010-01-01

    Children's health is an important factor that influences their success in education--poor health, especially when induced by disease, has been linked to poorer cognitive performance, particularly among children across the developing world (Behrman, 1996; UNESCO, 2008; Jukes et al., 2008). One health concern, particularly for sub-Saharan Africa,…

  16. Impact of introducing subsidized combination treatment with artemether-lumefantrine on sales of anti-malarial monotherapies: a survey of private sector pharmacies in Huambo, Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussiana, Cristina; Floridia, Marco; Martinho do Rosário, Joana; Fortes, Filomeno; Allan, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) against malaria are subsidized in many African countries, but the impact of subsidy programs in reducing the sales of concomitantly available antimalarial monotherapies is poorly defined. Data from The MENTOR initiative, that introduced subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (sAL) in the private sector of Huambo province, Angola, were used. The main response variable was represented by sales of sAL and of monotherapies, measured as number of treatment courses. Sales in private pharmacies of sAL and four antimalarial monotherapies between 2009 and 2013 were organized in four time-periods, and analyzed using generalized linear models for repeated measures. A secondary analysis evaluated changes in relative market share. We analyzed data from 34 pharmacies at four time points, taken from a larger survey that involved 165 pharmacies between June 2009 and March 2013. The sAL, following its introduction, became the dominant antimalarial treatment in the private sector, usually exceeding the total sales of all antimalarial monotherapies combined (1480/2800 total treatment courses, 52.8% of all sales in March 2013). Sales of monotherapies decreased significantly, but did not stop, representing 36.7% (1028/2800) of sales at the end of the survey. Subsidized ACTs can attain rapidly a high relative market share. Their introduction reduced, but did not eliminate the demand for less effective monotherapies, that might favor parasite resistance. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Exploring the relationship between online buyers and sellers of image and performance enhancing drugs (IPEDs): Quality issues, trust and self-regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Ven, K.; Koenraadt, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Online drug markets are expanding the boundaries of drug supply including the sale and purchase of image and performance enhancing drugs (IPEDs). However, the role of the internet in IPED markets, and in particular the ways in which these substances are supplied via the surface web, has

  18. Drug allergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allergic reaction - drug (medication); Drug hypersensitivity; Medication hypersensitivity ... A drug allergy involves an immune response in the body that produces an allergic reaction to a medicine. The ...

  19. Tanzania | Page 41 | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Alexander Soucy is correct to identify insecticide-treated bednets and inexpensive anti-malarial drugs as crucial to the global fight against malaria ('An easy way to save three million lives,' April 26). Read more about Tanzania ... Legislation on competition brings productivity and business investment to Tanzania. Increasing ...

  20. Antiplasmodial activity of some phenolic compounds from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Plasmodium falciparum, one of the causative agents of malaria, has high adaptability through mutation and is resistant to many types of anti-malarial drugs. This study presents an in vitro assessment of the antiplasmodial activity of some phenolic compounds isolated from plants of the genus Allanblackia.

  1. Treatment Failure for Malaria in Vietnam

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-06-05

    WHO malaria expert, Dr. Charlotte Rasmussen, discusses anti-malarial drug resistance in Vietnam.  Created: 6/5/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 6/5/2017.

  2. Tanzanie | Page 32 | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    insecticides et les médicaments antipaludiques abordables sont des leviers ... Alexander Soucy is correct to identify insecticide-treated bednets and inexpensive anti-malarial drugs as crucial to the global fight against malaria ('An easy way to ...

  3. Reviews Evaluating the Anti-Plasmodium, Anti-Pyretic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discovery and Innovation ... With the introduction of cheap anti-malaria drugs, there was marked reduction in the use of local herbal medicine. ... Key Words: medicinal plants, local traditional medicine, malaria, anti-malarial properties, antipyretic and analgesic properties, concoctions, efficacy, resistance, generic ...

  4. Risk factors for placental malaria and associated adverse pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Use of at least 2 doses of SP for IPTp during pregnancy was insignificantly associated with reducing the risk PM (P=0.08), low birth weight. (P=0.73) and maternal anemia (P=0.71) but associated ... they have developed immunity to sequestered parasites. 10,11. ..... anti-malarial drugs for IPTp, e.g. ACTs, is challenged by.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment based on quantitative PCR after controlled human malaria infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walk, J.; Schats, R.; Langenberg, M.C.; Reuling, I.J.; Teelen, K.; Roestenberg, M.; Hermsen, C.C.; Visser, L.G.; Sauerwein, R.W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) has become well-established in the evaluation of drugs and vaccines. Anti-malarial treatment is usually initiated when thick blood smears are positive by microscopy. This study explores the effects of using the more sensitive qPCR as the primary

  6. Chloroquine induced pruritus - questionnaire based epidemiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chloroquine (CQ) is a very useful drug with a broad spectrum of uses (as anti malarial, anti amoebiasis and for connective tissue diseases). A major side effect preventing or limiting its utilization in blacks is chloroquine induced pruritus (CP). A descriptive cross sectional questionnaire based epidemiological study of ...

  7. Characterizing the impact of sustained sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine use upon the Plasmodium falciparum population in Malawi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravenhall, Matt; Benavente, Ernest Diez; Mipando, Mwapatsa

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Malawi experienced prolonged use of sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) as the front-line anti-malarial drug, with early replacement of chloroquine and delayed introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy. Extended use of SP, and its continued application in pregnancy is impacting...

  8. Placental malaria and immunity to infant measles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owens, S.; Harper, G.; Amuasi, J.; Offei-Larbi, G.; Ordi, J.; Brabin, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    The efficiency of transplacental transfer of measles specific antibody was assessed in relation to placental malaria. Infection at delivery was associated with a 30% decrease in expected cord measles antibody titres. Uninfected women who received anti-malarial drugs during pregnancy transmitted 30%

  9. Antibodies to malaria vaccine candidates are associated with chloroquine or sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine treatment efficacy in children in an endemic area of Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diarra Amidou

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient immune status is thought to affect the efficacy of anti-malarial chemotherapy. This is a subject of some importance, since evidence of immunity-related interactions may influence our use of chemotherapy in populations with drug resistance, as well as assessment of the value of suboptimal vaccines. The study aim was to investigate relationship between antibodies and anti-malarial drug treatment outcomes. Methods Some 248 children aged 0.5 and 15 years were recruited prior to the high malaria transmission season. Venous blood (5 ml was obtained from each child to measure antibody levels to selected malaria antigens, using ELISA. Blood smears were also performed to assess drug efficacy and malaria infection prevalence. Children were actively followed up to record clinical malaria cases. Results IgG levels to MSP3 were always higher in the successfully treated group than in the group with treatment failure. The same observation was made for GLURP but the reverse observation was noticed for MSP1-19. Cytophilic and non-cytophilic antibodies were significantly associated with protection against all three antigens, except for IgG4 to MSP1-19 and GLURP. Conclusion Acquired anti-malarial antibodies may play an important role in the efficacy of anti-malarial drugs in younger children more susceptible to the disease.

  10. Radiopharmaceutical drug review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    To ensure proper radioactive drug use (such as quality, diagnostic improvement, and minimal radioactive exposure), the Food and Drug Administration evaluates new drugs with respect to safety, effectiveness, and accuracy and adequacy of the labeling. The IND or NDA process is used for this purpose. A brief description of the process, including the Chemical Classification System and the therapeutic potential classification, is presented as it applies to radiopharmaceuticals. Also, the status of the IND or NDA review of radiopharmaceuticals is given

  11. Auricular acupuncture for drug dependence: an open-label randomized investigation on clinical outcomes, health-related quality of life, and patient acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lua, Pei Lin; Talib, Nor Samira

    2013-01-01

    Substance abuse has been prevalent in Malaysia for many years and currently represents one of the main concerns to its society. The limitations of conventional therapies have resulted in efforts to explore the potentia of complementary therapies in the management of drug addiction. The evidence for auricular acupuncture (AA) as a potential complementary therapy for drug addiction is still limited and inconclusive. The study intended (1) to compare the clinical outcomes of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) alone and MMT plus AA (MMT+AA) with regard to the daily methadone dose, number of cigarettes smoked/wk, relapse rates, and withdrawal symptoms; (2) to evaluate health-related quality of life (HR QoL) pre- and postintervention; and (3) to determine participants' acceptance of AA therapy. The research team designed this study to be prospective, longitudinal, open-labeled, and randomized, with one intervention group (AA group) and one control group. The settings were three MMT centers in Terengganu, Malaysia: (1) the Methadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) Center, Hospital Sultanah Nur Zahirah; (2) the MMT Center, Marang Health Clinic; and (3) the MMT Center, Seberang Takir Health Clinic. Participants were individuals who were enrolled in the three MMT programs. After randomization, the intervention group received MMT+AA while the control group received MMT only. Participants in the AA group underwent concurrent AA sessions for 8 wk. All outcomes were evaluated using questionnaires that the research team developed and WHOQOL-BREF. Data were analysed employing descriptive and nonparametric statistics (SPSS v16). A total of 97, eligible, male patients consented to participation (MMT = 42; MMT+AA = 55; median age = 36.0 y; Malay ethnicity = 97.9%). After screening for dropouts, the data from only 69 participants were considered for postintervention analysis (MMT = 40; MMT+AA = 29). At preintervention, participants differed significantly by HR QoL profile and the

  12. Application of Quality by Design (QbD) Principles to Extractables/Leachables Assessment. Establishing a Design Space for Terminally Sterilized Aqueous Drug Products Stored in a Plastic Packaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The concept of quality by design (QbD) reflects the current global regulatory thinking related to pharmaceutical products. A cornerstone of the QbD paradigm is the concept of a design space, where the design space is a multidimensional combination of input variables and process parameters that have been demonstrated to provide the assurance of product quality. If a design space can be established for a pharmaceutical process or product, then operation within the design space confirms that the product or process output possesses the required quality attributes. This concept of design space can be applied to the safety (leachables) assessment of drug products manufactured and stored in packaging systems. Critical variables in such a design space would include those variables that affect the interaction of the drug product and its packaging, including (a) composition of the drug product, (b) composition of the packaging system, (c) configuration of the packaging system, and (d) the conditions of contact. This paper proposes and justifies such a leachables design space for aqueous drug products packaged in a specific plastic packaging system. Such a design space has the following boundaries:Aqueous drug products with a pH in the range of 2 to 8 and that contain no polarity-impacting agents such as organic solubilizers and stabilizers (addressing variable a). Packaging systems manufactured from materials that meet the system's existing material specifications (addressing variable b). Nominal fill volumes from 50 to 1000 mL (addressing variable c). Products subjected to terminal sterilization and then stored at room temperature for a period of up to 24 months (addressing variable d). The ramification of such a design space is that any drug product that falls within these boundaries is deemed to be compatible with the packaging system, from the perspective of safety, without the requirement of supporting drug product testing. When drug products are packaged in plastic

  13. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use and Kids Drug Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on ... Someone Find Treatment and Recovery Resources? Prevention Help Children and Teens Stay Drug-Free Talking to Kids ...

  14. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use and HIV/AIDS Treatment & ...

  15. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Use and Unborn Children Drug Use and Your Health Other Effects on the Body Drug Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug ...

  16. Drug Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... over-the-counter drug. The FDA evaluates the safety of a drug by looking at Side effects ... clinical trials The FDA also monitors a drug's safety after approval. For you, drug safety means buying ...

  17. Drug Facts

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and symptoms of someone with a drug use problem? How Does Drug Use Become an Addiction? What ... Use Hurts Brains Drug Use and Mental Health Problems Often Happen Together The Link Between Drug Use ...

  18. Identification of resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to artesunate-mefloquine combination in an area along the Thai-Myanmar border: integration of clinico-parasitological response, systemic drug exposure, and in vitro parasite sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na-Bangchang, Kesara; Muhamad, Phunuch; Ruaengweerayut, Ronnatrai; Chaijaroenkul, Wanna; Karbwang, Juntra

    2013-07-30

    sensitivity of P. falciparum isolates to artemisinins in areas along the Thai-Myanmar border, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) would be expected to remain the key anti-malarial drug for treatment of multidrug resistance P. falciparum. Continued monitoring and active surveillance of clinical efficacy of ACT, including identification of true artemisinin resistant parasites, is required for appropriate implementation of malaria control policy in this area.

  19. Direct comparison of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests in Plasmodium falciparum reference clones and fresh ex vivo field isolates from Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaorattanakawee, Suwanna; Tyner, Stuart D; Lon, Chanthap; Yingyuen, Kritsanai; Ruttvisutinunt, Wiriya; Sundrakes, Siratchana; Sai-gnam, Piyaporn; Johnson, Jacob D; Walsh, Douglas S; Saunders, David L; Lanteri, Charlotte A

    2013-07-12

    Performance of the histidine-rich protein-2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and malaria SYBR Green I fluorescence (MSF) drug sensitivity tests were directly compared using Plasmodium falciparum reference strains and fresh ex vivo isolates from Cambodia against a panel of standard anti-malarials. The objective was to determine which of these two common assays is more appropriate for studying drug susceptibility of "immediate ex vivo" (IEV) isolates, analysed without culture adaption, in a region of relatively low malaria transmission. Using the HRP-2 and MSF methods, the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values against a panel of malaria drugs were determined for P. falciparum reference clones (W2, D6, 3D7 and K1) and 41 IEV clinical isolates from an area of multidrug resistance in Cambodia. Comparison of the IC50 values from the two methods was made using Wilcoxon matched pair tests and Pearson's correlation. The lower limit of parasitaemia detection for both methods was determined for reference clones and IEV isolates. Since human white blood cell (WBC) DNA in clinical samples is known to reduce MSF assay sensitivity, SYBR Green I fluorescence linearity of P. falciparum samples spiked with WBCs was evaluated to assess the relative degree to which MSF sensitivity is reduced in clinical samples. IC50 values correlated well between the HRP-2 and MSF methods when testing either P. falciparum reference clones or IEV isolates against 4-aminoquinolines (chloroquine, piperaquine and quinine) and the quinoline methanol mefloquine (Pearson r =