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Sample records for anti-inflammatory heat shock

  1. Post heat shock tolerance: a neuroimmunological anti-inflammatory phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazani Nima

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We previously showed that the progression of burn-induced injury was inhibited by exposing the peripheral area of injured skin to sublethal hyperthermia following the burn. We called this phenomenon post-heat shock tolerance. Here we suggest a mechanism for this phenomenon. Exposure of the peripheral primary hyperalgesic/allodynic area of burned skin to local hyperthermia (45°C, 30 seconds, which is a non-painful stimulus for normal skin, results in a painful sensation transmitted by nociceptors. This hyperthermia is too mild to induce any tissue injury, but it does result in pain due to burn-induced hyperalgesia/allodynia. This mild painful stimulus can result in the induction of descending anti-nociceptive mechanisms, especially in the adjacent burned area. Some of these inhibitory mechanisms, such as alterations of sympathetic outflow and the production of endogenous opioids, can modify peripheral tissue inflammation. This decrease in burn-induced inflammation can diminish the progression of burn injury.

  2. Investigation of heat treating conditions for enhancing the anti-inflammatory activity of citrus fruit (Citrus reticulata) peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Su-Chen; Lin, Chih-Cheng

    2008-09-10

    In traditional Chinese medicine, dried citrus fruit peels are widely used as remedies to alleviate coughs and reduce phlegm in the respiratory tract. Induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in inflammatory cells and increased airway production of nitric oxide (NO) are well recognized as key events in inflammation-related respiratory tract diseases. Despite the fact that the enhancing effect of heat treatment on the antioxidant activity of citrus fruit peels has been well documented, the impact of heat treatment on citrus peel beneficial activities regarding anti-inflammation is unclear. To address this issue, we determined the anti-inflammatory activities of heat-treated citrus peel extracts by measuring their inhibitory effect upon NO production by lipopolysaccharide-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Results showed that the anti-inflammatory activity of citrus peel was significantly elevated after 100 degrees C heat treatment in a time-dependent fashion during a period from 0 to 120 min. Inhibition of iNOS gene expression was the major NO-suppressing mechanism of the citrus peel extract. Additionally, the anti-inflammatory activity of citrus peel extract highly correlated with the content of nobiletin and tangeretin. Conclusively, proper and reasonable heat treatment helped to release nobiletin and tangeretin, which were responsible for the increased anti-inflammatory activity of heat-treated citrus peels. PMID:18683945

  3. The Protective Effect of Electroacupuncturing Zusanli Points on Hemorrhagic Shock Rats through Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Hui DU; Jian-Guo LI; Yan-Lin WANG; Zhou-Quan PENG; Xiao-Feng YE

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction In conditions of circulatory shock, systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) plays a funda mental pathogenetic role, with activation of transcription nuclear factors(mainly NF- kB) and markedly increased production of cytokines (mainly TNF-a), which trigger the inflammatory cascade active ation. Recent research have identified a basic neural pathway that reflexively monitors and adjusts such response. It is through the rapid activation (in "real-time") of efferent vagus nerve fibres(the recentlyrecognized "brain cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway" ) [1].There are show that the rapid activation cholinergic antiinflammatory pathway can protect against the hemorrhagic shock[2,3].

  4. Endogenous stress proteins as targets for anti-inflammatory T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieten, L.

    2009-01-01

    Stress proteins such as heat shock proteins (Hsp) are important controllers of both cellular and immune homeostasis. Enhanced Hsp expression can be observed in virtually every inflammatory condition and has been proposed by us and others to lead to local activation of Hsp-specific anti-inflammatory

  5. The Protective Effect of Electroacupuncturing Zusanli Points on Hemorrhagic Shock Rats through Cholinergic Anti-inflammatory Pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    1 IntroductionIn conditions of circulatory shock, systemic inflammatory response (SIRS) plays a funda mental pathogenetic role, with activation of transcription nuclear factors (mainly NF- kB) and markedly increased production of cytokines (mainly TNF-a), which trigger the inflammatory cascade active ation. Recent research have identified a basic neural pathway that reflexively monitors and adjusts such response. It is through the rapid activation (in “real-time”) of efferent vagus nerve fibres(the recently...

  6. Prescription Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    MENU Return to Web version Prescription Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Medicines Prescription Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Medicines How do prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs work? Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (also called NSAIDs) stop cyclooxygenase ...

  7. Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is the body's first response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered as part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. The search for natural compounds and phytoconstituents that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing a prolonged inflammation could be useful for human health. Here, the anti-inflammatory properties of plant-based drugs are put together with both in vitro and acute (carrageenan, egg albumin and croton oil) and chronic (cotton pellet) in vivo models. PMID:26939273

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Heat Shock Protein 70 Genes are Positively Associated with Human Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Ripudaman; Kølvraa, Steen; Bross, Peter Gerd;

    2010-01-01

    A positive relationship between stress tolerance and longevity has been observed in several model systems. That the same correlation is applicable in humans and that it may be open to experimental manipulation for extending human lifespan requires studies on association of stress genes with longe...

  9. Influence of heat on biological activity and concentration of oleocanthal--a natural anti-inflammatory agent in virgin olive oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicerale, Sara; Conlan, Xavier A; Barnett, Neil W; Sinclair, Andrew J; Keast, Russell S J

    2009-02-25

    The olive oil phenolic oleocanthal is a natural nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compound that irritates the oral pharynx in a dose-dependent manner. It has been proposed that the biological activity of oleocanthal is partially responsible for the beneficial health effects of the Mediterranean diet. Virgin olive oil containing oleocanthal is often added as an ingredient in a number of cooked dishes, and therefore it is of great importance to understand how best to preserve the putative health-promoting benefits of this compound, as olive oil phenolics are subject to degradation upon heating in general. One extra virgin olive oil containing 53.9 mg/kg oleocanthal was heated at various temperatures (100, 170, and 240 degrees C) for set time periods (0, 1, 5, 20, 60, and 90 min). Oleocanthal concentrations were quantified using HPLC, and its biological activity was determined with a taste bioassay measuring the intensity of throat irritation. Results demonstrated that oleocanthal was heat stable compared with other olive oil phenolics, with a maximum loss of 16% as determined by HPLC analysis. However, there was a significant decrease of up to 31% (p oleocanthal as determined by the taste bioassay. Although there was minimal degradation of oleocanthal concentration, there was a significant decrease in the biological activity of oleocanthal upon extended heating time, indicating a possible loss of the putative health -benefiting properties of oleocanthal. Alternatively, the difference in the concentration and biological activity of oleocanthal after heat treatment could be a result of an oleocanthal antagonist forming, decreasing or masking the biological activity of oleocanthal. PMID:19166297

  10. Compound A, a selective glucocorticoid receptor modulator, enhances heat shock protein Hsp70 gene promoter activation.

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    Ilse M Beck

    Full Text Available Compound A possesses glucocorticoid receptor (GR-dependent anti-inflammatory properties. Just like classical GR ligands, Compound A can repress NF-κB-mediated gene expression. However, the monomeric Compound A-activated GR is unable to trigger glucocorticoid response element-regulated gene expression. The heat shock response potently activates heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, upregulates Hsp70, a known GR chaperone, and also modulates various aspects of inflammation. We found that the selective GR modulator Compound A and heat shock trigger similar cellular effects in A549 lung epithelial cells. With regard to their anti-inflammatory mechanism, heat shock and Compound A are both able to reduce TNF-stimulated IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. We established an interaction between Compound A-activated GR and Hsp70, but remarkably, although the presence of the Hsp70 chaperone as such appears pivotal for the Compound A-mediated inflammatory gene repression, subsequent novel Hsp70 protein synthesis is uncoupled from an observed CpdA-induced Hsp70 mRNA upregulation and hence obsolete in mediating CpdA's anti-inflammatory effect. The lack of a Compound A-induced increase in Hsp70 protein levels in A549 cells is not mediated by a rapid proteasomal degradation of Hsp70 or by a Compound A-induced general block on translation. Similar to heat shock, Compound A can upregulate transcription of Hsp70 genes in various cell lines and BALB/c mice. Interestingly, whereas Compound A-dependent Hsp70 promoter activation is GR-dependent but HSF1-independent, heat shock-induced Hsp70 expression alternatively occurs in a GR-independent and HSF1-dependent manner in A549 lung epithelial cells.

  11. Stimulation of the Fibrillar Collagen and Heat Shock Proteins by Nicotinamide or Its Derivatives in Non-Irradiated or UVA Radiated Fibroblasts, and Direct Anti-Oxidant Activity of Nicotinamide Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Neena Philips; Jovinna Chalensouk-Khaosaat; Salvador Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    In skin aging, from intrinsic factors or exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, there is loss of structural fibrillar collagen and regulatory heat shock proteins. Phenolic compounds, with hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic ring, have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Nicotinamide is an amide derivative of niacin or vitamin B3, with an amide linked to an aromatic ring, with UV absorptive, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cell death/apoptosis properties. The goal of...

  12. Exercise Training-Induced Changes in Inflammatory Mediators and Heat Shock Proteins in Young Tennis Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemann, Ewa; Zembroñ-Lacny, Agnieszka; Kasperska, Anna; Antosiewicz, Jȩdrzej; Grzywacz, Tomasz; Garsztka, Tomasz; Laskowski, Radoslaw

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsp) represent proteins’ groups, whose protective function, may be induced by heat, reactive oxygen species, cytokines etc. We evaluated blood levels of Hsp27 and Hsp70, and their relation to skeletal muscle damage and inflammation in young tennis players before and after the conditioning camp. Blood samples were collected directly after tournament season, 3-day rest and 14-day conditioning camp that followed. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) demonstrated the highest concentration directly after tournament season, which significantly decreased at camp’s end. The pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα decreased, whereas anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 increased after 3d rest and 14d camp. Hsp27 increased after 3d rest and remained so after 14d camp, while Hsp70 decreased from baseline to camp’s completion. Hsp27 and Hsp70 correlated significantly with H2O2, IL-1β and TNFα. Muscle damage, observed as creatine kinase (CK) activity changes, increased after 14d camp similarly to Hsp27 and anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-10. Obtained data allows to conclude that decrease of Hsp27 and increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines could be a good indicator of overreaching. Reverse tendencies in these proteins may verify accuracy of conditioning camp. Finally, this training program caused an increase in the anti-inflammatory cytokines concentrations, improving individual status of recovery. Key Points The study demonstrating low grade inflammation-induced by the tournament season in young tennis player. Three days of active rest stimulated the anti-inflammatory response via rise of Hsp27 and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Observed decrease of blood Hsp70 may support mental recovery. Thirteen-day appropriate training program led to maintaining an immunological response balance. PMID:24149807

  13. The Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of Hsp70

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago J Borges

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Immune responses to heat shock proteins (Hsp develop in virtually all inflammatory diseases; however, the significance of such responses is only now becoming clear. In experimental disease models, Hsp administration can prevent or arrest inflammatory damage, and in initial clinical trials in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, Hsp peptides have been shown to promote the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, indicating immunoregulatory potential of Hsp. Therefore, the presence of immune responses to Hsp in inflammatory diseases can be seen as an attempt of the immune system to correct the inflammatory condition. Hsp70 can modulate inflammatory responses in models of arthritis, colitis and graft rejection, and the mechanisms underlying this effect are now being elucidated. Incubation with microbial Hsp70 was seen to induce tolerogenic DCs and to promote a suppressive phenotype in myeloid-derived suppressor cells and monocytes. These DC could induce regulatory T cells (Tregs, independently of the antigens they presented. Some Hsp70 family members are associated with autophagy, leading to a preferential uploading of Hsp70 peptides in MHC class II molecules of stressed cells. Henceforth, conserved Hsp70 peptides may be presented in these situations and constitute targets of Tregs, contributing to downregulation of inflammation. Finally, an interfering effect in multiple intracellular inflammatory signaling pathways is also known for Hsp70. Altogether it seems attractive to use Hsp70, or its derivative peptides, for modulation of inflammation. This is a physiological immunotherapy approach, without the immediate necessity of defining disease specific auto-antigens. In this article, we present the evidence on anti-inflammatory effects of Hsp70 and discuss the need for experiments that will be crucial for the further exploration of the immuno-suppressive potential of this protein.

  14. Activation of an immune-regulatory macrophage response and inhibition of lung inflammation in a mouse model of COPD using heat-shock protein alpha B-crystallin-loaded PLGA microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, Johannes M.; Bsibsi, Malika; Nacken, Peter J.; Gerritsen, Wouter H.; Amor, Sandra; Holtman, Inge R.; Boddeke, Erik; van Ark, Ingrid; Leusink-Muis, Thea; Folkerts, Gert; Hennink, Wim E.; Amidi, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    As an extracellular protein, the small heat-shock protein alpha B-crystallin (HSPB5) has anti-inflammatory effects in several mouse models of inflammation. Here, we show that these effects are associated with the ability of HSPB5 to activate an immune-regulatory response in macrophages via endosomal

  15. Anti-inflammatory defense mechanisms of Entamoeba histolytica.

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    Silva-García, Raúl; Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe

    2011-02-01

    The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor (MLIF), a heat-stable oligopeptide found in the supernatant fluid of Entamoeba histolytica axenic cultures, may contribute to the delayed inflammation observed in amoebic hepatic abscess. This factor was isolated by ultra-filtration and high powered liquid chromatography, obtaining a primary Met-Gln-Cys-Asn-Ser structure, identified afterwards as the carboxyl-terminal (…Cys-Asn-Ser) active site. The selective anti-inflammatory effects of the pentapeptide have been observed in both in vitro and in vivo models, using a synthetic pentapeptide to maintain the same anti-inflammatory conditions during the experimental assays. Anti-inflammatory effects observed include inhibition of human monocyte locomotion and the respiratory burst in monocytes and neutrophils, increasing expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines and inhibiting expression of the adhesion molecules VLA-4 and VCAM, among others. In this review, we will describe the effects of MLIF detected so far and how it might be used as a therapeutical agent against inflammatory diseases.

  16. The gastroprotective effect of menthol: involvement of anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Leite Rozza

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the anti-apoptotic, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of menthol against ethanol-induced gastric ulcers in rats. Wistar rats were orally treated with vehicle, carbenoxolone (100 mg/kg or menthol (50 mg/kg and then treated with ethanol to induce gastric ulcers. After euthanasia, stomach samples were prepared for histological slides and biochemical analyses. Immunohistochemical analyses of the cytoprotective and anti-apoptotic heat-shock protein-70 (HSP-70 and the apoptotic Bax protein were performed. The neutrophils were manually counted. The activity of the myeloperoxidase (MPO was measured. To determine the level of antioxidant functions, the levels of glutathione (GSH, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, glutathione reductase (GR and superoxide dismutase (SOD were measured using ELISA. The levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and interleukin-6 (IL-6 and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10 were assessed using ELISA kits. The menthol treated group presented 92% gastroprotection compared to the vehicle-treated group. An increased immunolabeled area was observed for HSP-70, and a decreased immunolabeled area was observed for the Bax protein in the menthol treated group. Menthol treatment induced a decrease in the activity of MPO and SOD, and the protein levels of GSH, GSH-Px and GR were increased. There was also a decrease in the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and an increase in the level of IL-10. In conclusion, oral treatment with menthol displayed a gastroprotective activity through anti-apoptotic, antixidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms.

  17. Heat shock proteins and immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XinZHAO; XueMeiXU; GuoxingSONG

    2005-01-01

    Being one of the most abundant intracellular proteins,heat shock proteins(HSPs) have many housekeeping functions which are crucial for the survival of organisms.In addition,some HSPs are new immunoactive molecules which play important roles in both adaptive and innate immunity.They could activate CD8+ and CD4+ lymphocytes,induce innate immune response including natural killer(NK) cell activation and cytokine secretion,and induce maturation of dendritic cells(DCs).These characteristics have been used for immunotherapy of various types of cancers and infectious disenses.This review focuses on the main HSP families——HSP70 and 90 families.The mechanism of HSPs’ function in eliciting immune response are elucidated and various forms of HSPs used in immunotherapy are discussed in details.At the end of this review,authors summarize clinical trials related to HSPs and evaluate their clinical efficacy.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of five commercially available mushroom species determined in lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ activated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, Dhanushka; Bennett, Louise; Shanmugam, Kirubakaran; King, Kerryn; Williams, Roderick; Zabaras, Dimitrios; Head, Richard; Ooi, Lezanne; Gyengesi, Erika; Münch, Gerald

    2014-04-01

    Inflammation is a well-known contributing factor to many age-related chronic diseases. One of the possible strategies to suppress inflammation is the employment of functional foods with anti-inflammatory properties. Edible mushrooms are attracting more and more attention as functional foods since they are rich in bioactive compounds, but their anti-inflammatory properties and the effect of food processing steps on this activity has not been systematically investigated. In the present study, White Button and Honey Brown (both Agaricus bisporus), Shiitake (Lentinus edodes), Enoki (Flammulina velutipes) and Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) preparations were tested for their anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) activated murine RAW 264.7 macrophages. Potent anti-inflammatory activity (IC₅₀portion of the anti-inflammatory activity was lost suggesting that the anti-inflammatory compounds might be susceptible to heating or prone to evaporation. PMID:24262531

  19. The heat shock protein response following eccentric exercise in human skeletal muscle is unaffected by local NSAID infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Paulsen, G; Schjerling, P;

    2013-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed in relation to pain and injuries in skeletal muscle, but may adversely affect muscle adaptation probably via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. Induction of heat shock proteins (HSP) represents an important adaptive response...... in muscle subjected to stress, and in several cell types including cardiac myocytes prostaglandins are important in induction of the HSP response. This study aimed to determine the influence of NSAIDs on the HSP response to eccentric exercise in human skeletal muscle. Healthy males performed 200 maximal...

  20. miR-155 acts as an anti-inflammatory factor in atherosclerosis-associated foam cell formation by repressing calcium-regulated heat stable protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Kong, Deyong; Chen, Heming; Liu, Shuiyi; Hu, Hui; Wu, Tangwei; Wang, Jing; Chen, Weiqun; Ning, Yong; Li, Yong; Lu, Zhongxin

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is chronic inflammation in response to lipid accumulation. MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) is being increasingly studied to evaluate its potential as diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in many diseases. However, delineating the role of miR-155 in AS remains difficult. Here, we detected constitutive expression of several microRNAs (miRNAs) possibly associated with cardiovascular disease in foam cells and clinical specimens from patients with AS. Among them, we found that the level of miR-155 in foam cells was the most significantly elevated in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of miR-155 was elevated in the plasma and plaque of patients with AS. We also reported for the first time that miR-155 targets calcium-regulated heat stable protein 1 (CARHSP1), which regulates the stability of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanism by which the miR-155 level is elevated. miR-155 upregulation is due to transcriptional regulation by nuclear factor (NF)-κB, which is activated by the inflammatory factor TNF-α. In summary, increased miR-155 relieves chronic inflammation by a negative feedback loop and plays a protective role during atherosclerosis-associated foam cell formation by signaling through the miR-155-CARHSP1-TNF-α pathway. PMID:26899994

  1. Anti-inflammatory and gastroprotective properties of Hypericum richeri oil extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdunić, Gordana; Godevac, Dejan; Milenković, Marina; Savikin, Katarina; Menković, Nebojsa; Petrović, Silvana

    2010-08-01

    Oil extracts of flowering tops of Hypericum richeri Vill. prepared in three different ways were evaluated for chemical composition, and anti-inflammatory and gastroprotective activities. An HPLC method was developed for determination of two dominant flavonoids, quercetin and I3,II8-biapigenin. The carrageenan-induced rat paw edema test was used for screening the anti-inflammatory activity, while indomethacin-induced rat gastric mucosa damage test was used for evaluation of gastroprotective activity. The oil extract prepared by maceration with 96% ethanol, followed by extraction with sunflower oil by heating on a water bath, exhibited the highest anti-inflammatory (38.4%) and gastroprotective activities (gastric damage score of 0.9). The same oil extract had the highest content of quercetin (49 microg/mL) and I3,II8-biapigenin (60 microg/mL). These results approve the usage of oil extracts of H. richeri as an anti-inflammatory and gastroprotective agent.

  2. Heat shock proteins in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Jacqueline H L Fok; Davies, Faith E.

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins are molecular chaperones with a central role in protein folding and cellular protein homeostasis. They also play major roles in the development of cancer and in recent years have emerged as promising therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the known molecular mechanisms of various heat shock protein families and their involvement in cancer and in particular, multiple myeloma. In addition, we address the current progress and challenges in pharmacologically targeting...

  3. Novel anti-inflammatory agents in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loukides, Stelios; Bartziokas, Konstantinos; Vestbo, Jørgen;

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation plays a central role in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD related inflammation is less responsive to inhaled steroids compared to asthma. There are three major novel anti-inflammatory approaches to the management of COPD. The first approach is phosphodiesterase...

  4. Anti-inflammatory Agents: Present and Future.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinarello, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation involving the innate and adaptive immune systems is a normal response to infection. However, when allowed to continue unchecked, inflammation may result in autoimmune or autoinflammatory disorders, neurodegenerative disease, or cancer. A variety of safe and effective anti-inflammatory a

  5. Heat shock factor 1 prevents the reduction in thrashing due to heat shock in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhashi, Tsubasa; Sakamoto, Kazuichi

    2015-07-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) is activated by heat stress and induces the expression of heat shock proteins. However, the role of HSF-1 in thermotolerance remains unclear. We previously reported that heat stress reversibly reduces thrashing movement in Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we analyzed the function of HSF-1 on thermotolerance by monitoring thrashing movement. hsf-1 RNAi suppressed the restoration of thrashing reduced by heat stress. In contrast, hsf-1 knockdown cancelled prevention of movement reduction in insulin/IGF-1-like growth factor 1 receptor (daf-2) mutant, but didn't suppress thrashing restoration in daf-2 mutant. In addition, hsf-1 RNAi accelerated the reduction of thrashing in heat-shocked wild-type C. elegans. And, daf-16 KO didn't accelerate the reduction of thrashing by heat stress. Taken together, these results suggest that HSF-1 prevents the reduction of thrashing caused by heat shock.

  6. Citocinas anti-inflamatorias y sus acciones y efectos en la sepsis y el choque séptico (Anti-inflammatory cytokines and their actions and effects in the sepsis and septic shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Álvarez, Ricardo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLas citocinas anti- inflamatorias reconocidas son las interleucinas (IL IL-4, IL-10, IL-6, IL-13, el factor estimulante de colonia granulocito –macrófago (FEC-GM y el interferón alfa (IFN-alfa, los cuales tienen la capacidad de inhibir la liberación de las citocinas pro-inflamatorias y de inducir la producción del antagonista del receptor de la IL-1 y la liberación del receptor soluble del FNT, los cuales limitan algunas de las actividades de las citocinas pro-inflamatorias IL-1 y FNT-α. Sin embargo, los eventos que ocurren durante la inflamación y la sepsis no son tan simples como parajustificar siempre acciones antagonistas entre las citocinas proinflamatorias y las anti-inflamatorias, las cuales, pueden tener acorde con las circunstancias un comportamiento dual y/o antagónico en el choque séptico. Así por ejemplo la IL-10 tiene propiedades anti-inflamatorias, lo cual ocurre en la diabetes auto-inmune cuyo comienzo y desarrollo son acelerados en ratones transgénicos que sobre-expresan la IL-10 en los islotes pancreáticos. Esto también ocurre con la IL-10 en un modelo de uveítis en el que se incrementó la inflamación ocular. Ejemplos como los anteriores son extensivos a otras citocinas anti-inflamatorias como la IL-4, IL-13, el factor estimulante de colonia granulocito –macrófago y el factor beta transformante del crecimiento (FβTC, y que serán mencionadas y descritas en el presente artículo de revisión, así como los factores que determinan ese comportamiento dual de las citocinas.Summaryinterleucinas. The anti-inflammatory cytokines which are recognized are the interleukins (IL IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, interferon-alpha (IFN-α and because they are able to inhibit the release of pro inflammatory cytokines, to induce the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-ra and the release of soluble TNF receptor and to limit some of the pro-inflammatory activities of IL-1 and TNF. However the events which occur during

  7. Medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maione, Francesco; Russo, Rosa; Khan, Haroon; Mascolo, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Medicinal plants have been the main remedy to treat various ailments for a long time and nowadays, many drugs have been developed from traditional medicine. This paper reviews some medicinal plants and their main constituents which possess anti-inflammatory activities useful for curing joint inflammation, inflammatory skin disorders, cardiovascular inflammation and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we provide a brief overview of quick and easy reading on the role of medicinal plants and their main constituents in these inflammatory diseases. We hope that this overview will shed some light on the function of these natural anti-inflammatory compounds and attract the interest of investigators aiming at the design of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions.

  8. Anti-inflammatory actions of acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freek J. Zijlstra

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture has a beneficial effect when treating many diseases and painful conditions, and therefore is thought to be useful as a complementary therapy or to replace generally accepted pharmacological intervention. The attributive effect of acupuncture has been investigated in inflammatory diseases, including asthma, rhinitis, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, epicondylitis, complex regional pain syndrome type 1 and vasculitis. Large randomised trials demonstrating the immediate and sustained effect of acupuncture are missing. Mechanisms underlying the ascribed immunosuppressive actions of acupuncture are reviewed in this communication. The acupuncture-controlled release of neuropeptides from nerve endings and subsequent vasodilative and anti-inflammatory effects through calcitonine gene-related peptide is hypothesised. The complex interactions with substance P, the analgesic contribution of β-endorphin and the balance between cell-specific pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin-10 are discussed.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Allium ursinum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Elena PÂRVU

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate Allium ursinum leaves and flowers extract anti-inflammatory effect. Plant extract 1:1 (w:v was prepared from A. ursinum leaves by a modified Squibb repercolation method. The in vivo anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated on a rat turpentine oil-induced inflammation (i.m. 6 mL/kg BW. The animals were randomly assigned to nine groups (n=8: negative control, inflammation, A. ursinum flower extract (AUF, A. ursinum leaves extract (AUL, indomethacin (INDO (20 mg/kg BW, aminoguanidine (AG (50 mg/kg b.w./d i.p. as a selective NOS2 inhibitor, NG-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (NAME (5 mg/kg b.w./d i.p. as a nonselective NOS inhibitor, L-arginine (ARG (100 mg/kg b.w./d i.p., NO synthesis substrate, and Trolox (20 mg/kg b.w./d i.p as an antioxidant. At 24h from inflammation induction total oxidative status (TOS, oxidative stress index (OSI, nitric oxide (NOx and in vitro phagocytosis test were reduced and the total antioxidative reactivity (TAR was increased by the testes plant extracts. AUF had a better inhibitory effect than AUL. In conclusion, we provided evidence for the hypothesis that A. ursinum leaves and flowers extract exerts anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the phagocytosis through the reduction of the nitro-oxidative stress.

  10. Biophoton emission induced by heat shock.

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    Katsuhiro Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observed to increase in response to elevated temperatures, pretreatment at lower high temperatures inhibited photon emission at higher temperatures. Biophoton measurements are useful for observing and evaluating heat shock.

  11. Citocinas anti-inflamatorias y sus acciones y efectos en la sepsis y el choque séptico - Anti-inflammatory cytokines and their actions and effects in the sepsis and septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González Álvarez, Ricardo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLas citocinas anti- inflamatorias reconocidas son las interleucinas (ILIL-4, IL-10, IL-6, IL-13, el factor estimulante de colonia granulocito – macrófago (FEC-GM y el interferón alfa (IFN-alfa, los cuales tienen la capacidad de inhibir la liberación de las citocinas pro-inflamatorias y de inducir la producción del antagonista del receptor de la IL-1 y la liberación del receptor soluble del FNT, los cuales limitan algunas de las actividades de las citocinas pro-inflamatorias IL-1 y FNT-α. Sin embargo, los eventos que ocurren durante la inflamación y la sepsis no son tan simples como para justificar siempre acciones antagonistas entre las citocinas pro-inflamatorias y las antiinflamatorias, las cuales, pueden tener acorde con las circunstancias un comportamiento dual y/o antagónico en el choque séptico. Así por ejemplo la IL-10 tiene propiedades anti-inflamatorias, lo cual ocurre en la diabetes auto-inmune cuyo comienzo y desarrollo son acelerados en ratones transgénicos que sobre-expresan la IL-10 en los islotes pancreáticos. Esto también ocurre con la IL-10 en un modelo de uveítis en el que se incrementó la inflamación ocular. Ejemplos como los anteriores son extensivos a otras citocinas antiinflamatorias como la IL-4, IL-13, el factor estimulante de colonia granulocito –macrófago y el factor beta transformante del crecimiento (FβTC, y que serán mencionadas y descritas en el presente artículo de revisión, así como los factores que determinan ese comportamiento dual de las citocinas.SummaryThe anti-inflammatory cytokines which are recognized are theinterleukins (IL IL-4, IL-10, IL-13, interferon-alpha (IFN-α andbecause they are able to inhibit the release of pro inflammatorycytokines, to induce the production of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-raand the release of soluble TNF receptor and to limit some of the proinflammatory activities of IL-1 and TNF. However the events whichoccur during inflammation and sepsis are

  12. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  13. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  14. Association of heat shock proteins, heat shock factors and male infertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Liang Ji; Yong-Gang Duan; Li-Sha Mou; Jean-Pierre Allam; Gerhard Haidl; Zhi-Ming Cai

    2012-01-01

    It has been well established that heat shock proteins(HSP) and heat shock factors(HSF) are involved in wide varieties of physiological regulation process and signal pathway.Numerous members of heat shock family exhibit a cell-type-specific expression pattern during spermatogenesis and play crucial roles in germ cell development.This led to the emerging studies to reveal the association between heat shock family and male infertility.Aberrant expressions ofHSP/HSFs observed in sterile men and animal models indicate the two opposite effects, both protective and harmful, of heat shock family on male fertility.Moreover,HSP/HSFs are also involved in the two major causes of male infertility.It seems that different behaviors of HSP/HSFs patients with varicocele andChlamydia trachomatis infection lead to distinct outcomes of male fertility.In addition, emerging evidence has demonstrated that the altered expression ofHSP/HSFs may be responsible for the abnormal germ cell apoptosis and subsequently results in impaired spermatogenesis.Therefore, heat shock family may play an important role in the quality-control of germ cells during spermatogenesis, raising the prospect of their utility for novel treatment targets in male infertility.

  15. Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities of virgin coconut oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intahphuak, S; Khonsung, P; Panthong, A

    2010-02-01

    This study investigated some pharmacological properties of virgin coconut oil (VCO), the natural pure oil from coconut [Cocos nucifera Linn (Palmae)] milk, which was prepared without using chemical or high-heat treatment. The anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects of VCO were assessed. In acute inflammatory models, VCO showed moderate anti-inflammatory effects on ethyl phenylpropiolate-induced ear edema in rats, and carrageenin- and arachidonic acid-induced paw edema. VCO exhibited an inhibitory effect on chronic inflammation by reducing the transudative weight, granuloma formation, and serum alkaline phosphatase activity. VCO also showed a moderate analgesic effect on the acetic acid-induced writhing response as well as an antipyretic effect in yeast-induced hyperthermia. The results obtained suggest anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic properties of VCO.

  16. Nonsteroid Anti-inflammatory Drugs and Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Yıldırım1

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are often used in the treatment of chronic and acute pain and inflammation as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory agent. They inhibit the synthesis of prostaglandins which have influence on glomerular capillaries, vasa recta and tubular functions. They lead to significant complications such as hyperkalemia, hyponatremia, edema and hypertension. Usage of NSAIDs is a risk factor for acute kidney injury in some conditions such as advanced age, dehydration, vomiting, diuretics, ACE/ARB therapy, heart failure, nephrotic syndrome, cirrhosis and chronic kidney disease. Acute interstitial nephritis is not dependent on the drug dose and it is characterized by immunological inflammatory reaction and a decrease in creatinine clearance. Besides the classical findings, glomerules can be involved and minimal change disease or membranous glomerulonephritis can develop. Analgesic nephropathy is characterized by interstitial nephritis and papillary necrosis. Metabolites of NSAIDs are accumulated in renal medulla which has lowest oxygen pressure in kidney and they disrupt the renal parencymal perfusion by vasoconstriction. Respectively, papillar necrosis, glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis and cortical atrophy can develop insidiously.

  17. Heat shock protection against cold stress of Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, V; Mitchell, H K; Young, P.; Petersen, N S

    1988-01-01

    Heat shock protein synthesis can be induced during recovery from cold treatment of Drosophila melanogaster larvae. Survival of larvae after a cold treatment is dramatically improved by a mild heat shock just before the cold shock. The conditions which induce tolerance to cold are similar to those which confer tolerance to heat.

  18. Heat shock protein 70-dependent protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ying; Naito, Yuji; Handa, Osamu; Hayashi, Natsuko; Kuki, Aiko; Mizushima, Katsura; Omatsu, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yuko; Morita, Mayuko; Adachi, Satoko; Fukui, Akifumi; Hirata, Ikuhiro; Kishimoto, Etsuko; Nishikawa, Taichiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Yagi, Nobuaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2011-11-01

    Protection of the small intestine from mucosal injury induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including acetylsalicylic acid is a critical issue in the field of gastroenterology. Polaprezinc an anti-ulcer drug, consisting of zinc and L-carnosine, provides gastric mucosal protection against various irritants. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of polaprezinc on acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of the RIE1 rat intestinal epithelial cell line. Confluent rat intestinal epithelial cells were incubated with 70 µM polaprezinc for 24 h, and then stimulated with or without 15 mM acetylsalicylic acid for a further 15 h. Subsequent cellular viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining. Acetylsalicylic acid-induced cell death was also qualified by fluorescent microscopy of Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide. Heat shock proteins 70 protein expression after adding polaprezinc or acetylsalicylic acid was assessed by western blotting. To investigate the role of Heat shock protein 70, Heat shock protein 70-specific small interfering RNA was applied. Cell viability was quantified by fluorometric assay based on cell lysis and staining and apoptosis was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that acetylsalicylic acid significantly induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Polaprezinc significantly suppressed acetylsalicylic acid-induced apoptosis of rat intestinal epithelial cells at its late phase. At the same time, polaprezinc increased Heat shock protein 70 expressions of rat intestinal epithelial cells in a time-dependent manner. However, in Heat shock protein 70-silenced rat intestinal epithelial cells, polaprezinc could not suppress acetylsalicylic acid -induced apoptosis at its late phase. We conclude that polaprezinc-increased Heat shock protein 70 expression might be an important mechanism by which polaprezinc suppresses acetylsalicylic

  19. Heat Shock Proteins and their clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Pathan

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the physiological role of heat shock proteins is currently limited; however better understanding of their function and thereby the acquisition of the capacity to harness their power might lead to their use as therapeutic agents and revolutionize clinical practice in a number of areas. Future work is needed to translate the experimental data on the capacity of heat shock proteins to induce tumor protection and immunity to infectious agents into the clinical environment. Approach to cancer vaccine is based on the role of HSP in the presentation of antigens. In several infections and especially autoimmune diseases, the implications of immune responses against HSP are still not properly or fully understood. HSP have clinical significance in conditions such as cardiac hypertrophy, vascular wall injury, cardiac surgery, ischemic preconditioning and ageing. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(12.000: 558-560

  20. Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Tkáčová

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs are a large class of proteins that have been conserved throughout evolution and exist by prokaryote and eukaryote organisms. Heat shock proteins play an important role in protein homeostasis. They can found in all major cellular compartments. The HSP90 family are important in the formation of the steroid receptor complex. The HSP70 family is necessary for protein synthesis, translocation, and folding. HSP60 family is important in protein stability. Many factors, e. g. heavy metals and organic toxic substances, elevated temperature in all cells responsive to the formation of proteins called stress proteins. This is happening with a simple bacterium and with complex of neurons too. The concentration of HSPs in muscle in young and adults birds is increasing rapidly in the cellular stress. Increasing HSPs leads to significant changes in gene expression, which lead to reconstruction of skeletal muscle.

  1. Heat Shock Protein 90 in Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang-Rong Ou; Meng-Shan Tan; An-Mu Xie; Jin-Tai Yu; Lan Tan

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the first most common neurodegenerative disease. Despite a large amount of research, the pathogenetic mechanism of AD has not yet been clarified. The two hallmarks of the pathology of AD are the extracellular senile plaques (SPs) of aggregated amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and the accumulation of the intracellular microtubule-associated protein tau into fibrillar aggregates. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) play a key role in preventing protein misfolding and aggregation, an...

  2. Heat Shock Proteins in the Human Eye

    OpenAIRE

    Lærke Urbak; Henrik Vorum

    2010-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are believed to primarily protect and maintain cell viability under stressful conditions such as those occurring during thermal and oxidative challenges chiefly by refolding and stabilizing proteins. Hsps are found throughout the various tissues of the eye where they are thought to confer protection from disease states such as cataract, glaucoma, and cancer. This minireview summarizes the placement, properties, and roles of Hsps in the eye and aims to provide a bett...

  3. Biophoton Emission Induced by Heat Shock

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kawano, Shinya; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Hara, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Ultraweak biophoton emission originates from the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are produced in mitochondria as by-products of cellular respiration. In healthy cells, the concentration of ROS is minimized by a system of biological antioxidants. However, heat shock changes the equilibrium between oxidative stress and antioxidant activity, that is, a rapid rise in temperature induces biophoton emission from ROS. Although the rate and intensity of biophoton emission was observe...

  4. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  5. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Ghasemian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil’s claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle.

  6. Study of anti-inflammatory effect of simvastatin in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranga Satya Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Results: At a dose of 40 mg Simvastatin showed anti-inflammatory effect which is statically highly significant. Conclusions: However, the above preclinical experiments only give us an idea about the anti-inflammatory activity, but large scale clinical trials are necessary for final assessment. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(4.000: 1520-1523

  7. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Carica papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Saurabh; Cabot, Peter J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked with the generation and progression of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis, and anti-inflammatory drugs therefore have the potential to assist in the treatment of these conditions. Carica papaya is a tropical plant that is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments including inflammatory conditions. A literature search was conducted by using the keywords "papaya", "anti-inflammatory and inflammation" and "immunomodulation and immune" along with cross-referencing. Both in vitro and in vivo investigation studies were included. This is a review of all studies published since 2000 on the anti-inflammatory activity of papaya extracts and their effects on various immune-inflammatory mediators. Studies on the anti-inflammatory activities of recognized phytochemicals present in papaya are also included. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that papaya extracts and papaya-associated phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, clinical studies are lacking.

  8. Heat Shock Proteins in the Human Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lærke Urbak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (Hsps are believed to primarily protect and maintain cell viability under stressful conditions such as those occurring during thermal and oxidative challenges chiefly by refolding and stabilizing proteins. Hsps are found throughout the various tissues of the eye where they are thought to confer protection from disease states such as cataract, glaucoma, and cancer. This minireview summarizes the placement, properties, and roles of Hsps in the eye and aims to provide a better comprehension of their function and involvement in ocular disease pathogenesis.

  9. Impact of heat shock on heat shock proteins expression,biological and commercial traits of Bombyx mori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VASUDHA B. CHAVADI; APARNA H. S OSALEGOWDA; MANJUNATHA H.B OREGOWDA

    2006-01-01

    We report the thermotolerance of new bivoltine silkworm, Bombyx mori strains NB4D2, KSO1, NP2, CSR2 and CSR4 and differential expression of heat shock proteins at different instars. Different instars of silkworm larva were subjected to heat shock at 35℃,40℃ and 45℃ for 2 hours followed by 2 hours recovery. Heat shock proteins were analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The impact of heat shock on commercial traits of cocoons was analyzed by following different strategies in terms of acquired thermotolerance over control. Comparatively NP2 exhibited better survivability than other strains. Resistance to heat shock was increased as larval development proceeds in the order of first instar > second instar > third instar > fourth instar > fifth instar in all silkworm strains. Expression of heat shock proteins varies in different instars. 90 kDa in the first, second and third instars, 84 kDa in the fourth instar and 84, 62, 60, 47 and 33 kDa heat shock proteins in fifth instar was observed in response to heat shock. Relative influence of heat shock on commercial traits that correspond to different stages was significant in all strains. In NB4D2, cocoon and shell weight significantly increased to 17.52% and 19.44% over control respectively. Heat shock proteins as molecular markers for evaluation and evolution of thermotolerant silkworm strains for tropics was discussed.

  10. Barcoding heat shock proteins to human diseases : looking beyond the heat shock response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kakkar, Vaishali; Meister-Broekema, Melanie; Minoia, Melania; Carra, Serena; Kampinga, Harm H.

    2014-01-01

    There are numerous human diseases that are associated with protein misfolding and the formation of toxic protein aggregates. Activating the heat shock response (HSR) - and thus generally restoring the disturbed protein homeostasis associated with such diseases - has often been suggested as a therape

  11. Heat shock proteins in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Rajasree; Van Why, Scott K

    2016-10-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are essential to cell survival through their function as protein chaperones. The role they play in kidney health and disease is varied. Hsp induction may be either beneficial or detrimental to the kidney, depending on the specific Hsp, type of cell, and context. This review addresses the role of Hsps in the kidney, including during development, as osmoprotectants, and in various kidney disease models. Heat shock transcription factor, activated by a stress on renal cells, induces Hsp elaboration and separately regulates immune responses that can contribute to renal injury. Induced Hsps in the intracellular compartment are mostly beneficial in the kidney by stabilizing and restoring cell architecture and function through acting as protein chaperones. Intracellular Hsps also inhibit apoptosis and facilitate cell proliferation, preserving renal tubule viability after acute injury, but enhancing progression of cystic kidney disease and malignancy. Induced Hsps in the extracellular compartment, either circulating or located on outer cell membranes, are mainly detrimental through enhancing inflammation pathways to injury. Correctly harnessing these stress proteins promises the opportunity to alter the course of acute and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26913726

  12. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs: Adverse Effects and Their Prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonkeman, Harald E.; Laar, van de Mart A.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To discuss nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), their history, development, mode of action, toxicities, strategies for the prevention of toxicity, and future developments. - Methods: Medline search for articles published up to 2007, using the keywords acetylsalicylic acid, asp

  13. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of Melanthera scandens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jude E Okokon; Anwanga E Udoh; Samuel G Frank; Louis U Amazu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of leaf extract of Melanthera scandens (M. scandens). Methods: The crude leaf extract (39-111 mg/kg) of M. scandens was investigated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities using various experimental models. The anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carragenin, egg-albumin induced oedema models, while acetic acid, formalin-induced paw licking and thermal-induced pain models were used to evaluate the antinociceptive property. Results: The extract caused a significant (P<0.05 - 0.001) dose-dependent reduction of inflammation and pains induced by different agents used. Conclusions: The leaf extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects which may be mediated through the phytochemical constituents of the plant.

  14. Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. displays anti-inflammatory responses during chemically induced rat mammary tumorigenesis through simultaneous and differential regulation of NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Animesh; Bishayee, Anupam

    2015-01-01

    Trianthema portulacastrum, a medicinal and dietary plant, has gained substantial importance due to its various pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and anticarcinogenic activities. We have recently reported that a characterized T. portulacastrum extract (TPE) affords a considerable chemoprevention of 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced rat mammary tumorigenesis though the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate anti-inflammatory mechanisms of TPE during DMBA mammary carcinogenesis in rats by monitoring cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Mammary tumors were harvested from our previous study in which TPE (50-200 mg/kg) was found to inhibit mammary tumorigenesis in a dose-response manner. The expressions of intratumor COX-2, HSP90, NF-κB, inhibitory kappaB-alpha (IκBα) and Nrf2 were determined by immunohistochemistry. TPE downregulated the expression of COX-2 and HSP90, blocked the degradation of IκBα, hampered the translocation of NF-κB from cytosol to nucleus and upregulated the expression and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 during DMBA mammary carcinogenesis. These results in conjunction with our previous findings suggest that TPE prevents DMBA-induced breast neoplasia by anti-inflammatory mechanisms mediated through simultaneous and differential modulation of two interconnected molecular circuits, namely NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling pathways. PMID:25622256

  15. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of yacon leaf extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Rejane B. Oliveira; Daniela A. Chagas-Paula; Adriana Secatto; Thaís H. Gasparoto; Faccioli, Lúcia H.; Campanelli, Ana P.; Fernando B. Da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp.) H. Rob. , Asteraceae, known as yacon, is an herb that is traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in folk medicine. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this plant has other interesting properties such as anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory actions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the topical anti-inflammatory property of different extracts prepared from yacon leaves and analyze the role of different chemical classes in this...

  16. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of chalcone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herencia, F; Ferrándiz, M L; Ubeda, A; Domínguez, J N; Charris, J E; Lobo, G M; Alcaraz, M J

    1998-05-19

    Chalcones and their derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity. In vitro, chalcones 2, 4, 8, 10 and 13 inhibited degranulation and 5-lipoxygenase in human neutrophils, whereas 11 behaved as scavenger of superoxide. Only four compounds (4-7) inhibited cyclo-oxygenase-2 activity. The majority of these samples showed anti-inflammatory effects in the mouse air pouch model.

  17. Heat Shock Protein and Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-FuTsan; BaochongGao

    2004-01-01

    In addition to serving as molecular chaperones, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been implicated in autoimmune diseases, antigen presentation and tumor immunity. Extensive work in the last 10 years has also suggested that HSPs such as Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90 and gp96, may be potent activators of the innate immune system capable of inducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by the monocyte-macrophage system, and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells via the Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signal transduction pathways. However, recent evidence suggests that the reported cytokine effects of HSPs may be a result of the contaminating bacterial cell-wall products. This concise review summarizes the current controversy over the role of HSPs in innate immunity. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  18. Heat Shock Protein and Innate Immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min-Fu Tsan; Baochong Gao

    2004-01-01

    In addition to serving as molecular chaperones, heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been implicated in autoimmune diseases, antigen presentation and tumor immunity. Extensive work in the last 10 years has also suggested that HSPs such as Hsp60, Hsp70, Hsp90 and gp96, may be potent activators of the innate immune system capable of inducing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by the monocyte-macrophage system, and the activation and maturation of dendritic cells via the Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 signal transduction pathways. However, recent evidence suggests that the reported cytokine effects of HSPs may be a result of the contaminating bacterial cell-wall products. This concise review summarizes the current controversy over the role of HSPs in innate immunity.

  19. Heat shock proteins: Molecules with assorted functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Surajit SARKAR; M. Dhruba SINGH; Renu YADAV; K. P. ARUNKUMAR; Geoffrey W. PITTMAN

    2011-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) or molecular chaperones,are highly conserved protein families present in all studied organisms.Following cellular stress,the intracellular concentration of Hsps generally increases several folds.Hsps undergo ATP-driven conformational changes to stabilize unfolded proteins or unfold them for transiocation across membranes or mark them for degradation.They are broadly classified in several families according to their molecular weights and functional properties.Extensive studies during the past few decades suggest that Hsps play a vital role in both normal cellular homeostasis and stress response.Hsps have been reported to interact with numerous substrates and are involved in many biological functions such as cellular communication,immune response,protein transport,apoptosis,cell cycle regulation,gametogenesis and aging.The present review attempts to provide a brief overview of various Hsps and summarizes their involvement in diverse biological activities.

  20. Anti-inflammatory Effects and M echmdsms of Usnic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhijun; ZHENG Guohua; TAO Junyan; RUAN Jinlan

    2011-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory effect and mechanism of Usnic acid (UA) were explored on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cell line.The effects of UA on pro-inflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-alfa (TNF-a),interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-I beta (IL-lβ),pro-inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO),inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)were studied by sandwich ELISA,real-time PCR and western blot analyses.Similarly,the effect of UA on anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin- 10 (IL- 10) and anti-inflammatory mediator heme oxygenase- l (HO- 1)were also studied following the same methods.Furthermore,nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) was assayed by immunocytochemistry.The results showed that UA has anti-inflammatory effect by down-regulatinng iNOS,COX-2,IL-lβ,IL-6 and TNF-a,COX-2 gene expression through the suppression of NF-kB activation and increasing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and anti-inflammatory mediator HO-1 production.

  1. Anti-Inflammatory and Organ-Protective Effects of Resveratrol in Trauma-Hemorrhagic Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Chao Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic compound of grape and red wine, owns potential anti-inflammatory effects, which results in the reduction of cytokines overproduction, the inhibition of neutrophil activity, and the alteration of adhesion molecules expression. Resveratrol also possesses antioxidant, anti-coagulation and anti-aging properties, and it may control of cell cycle and apoptosis. Resveratrol has been shown to reduce organ damage following traumatic and shock-like states. Such protective phenomenon is reported to be implicated in a variety of intracellular signaling pathways including the activation of estrogen receptor, the regulation of the sirtuin 1/nuclear factor-kappa B and mitogen-activated protein kinases/hemeoxygenase-1 pathway, and the mediation of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species formation and reaction. In the recent studies, resveratrol attenuates hepatocyte injury and improves cardiac contractility due to reduction of proinflammatory mediator expression and ameliorates hypoxia-induced liver and kidney mitochondrial dysfunction following trauma and hemorrhagic injuries. Moreover, through anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant properties, the resveratrol is believed to protect organ function in trauma-hemorrhagic injury. In this review, the organ-protective and anti-inflammatory effects of resveratrol in trauma-hemorrhagic injury will be discussed.

  2. Riboflavin protects mice against liposaccharide-induced shock through expression of heat shock protein 25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riboflavin (vitamin B2) is a water-soluble vitamin essential for normal cellular functions, growth and development. The study was aimed at investigating the effects of vitamin B2 on the survival rate, and expressions of tissue heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in mice und...

  3. Protective role of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway in a mouse model of viral myocarditis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Cheng

    Full Text Available Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, which relies on the α7nAchR (alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, has been shown to decrease proinflammatory cytokines. This relieves inflammatory responses and improves the prognosis of patients with experimental sepsis, endotoxemia, ischemia/reperfusion injury, hemorrhagic shock, pancreatitis, arthritis and other inflammatory syndromes. However, whether the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has an effect on acute viral myocarditis has not been investigated. Here, we studied the effects of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway on acute viral myocarditis.In a coxsackievirus B3 murine myocarditis model (Balb/c, nicotine and methyllycaconitine were used to stimulate and block the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, respectively. Relevant signal pathways were studied to compare their effects on myocarditis, survival rate, histopathological changes, ultrastructural changes, and cytokine levels. Nicotine treatments significantly improved survival rate, attenuated myocardial lesions, and downregulated the expression of TNF-α and IL-6. Methyllycaconitine decreased survival rate, aggravated myocardial lesions, and upregulated the expression of TNF-α and IL-6. In addition, levels of the signaling protein phosphorylated STAT3 were higher in the nicotine group and lower in the methyllycaconitine group compared with the untreated myocarditis group.These results show that nicotine protects mice from CVB3-induced viral myocarditis and that methyllycaconitine aggravates viral myocarditis in mice. Because nicotine is a α7nAchR agonist and methyllycaconitine is a α7nAchR antagonist, we conclude that α7nAchR activation increases the phosphorylation of STAT3, reduces the expression of TNF-α and IL-6, and, ultimately, alleviates viral myocarditis. We also conclude that blocking α7nAchR reduces the phosphorylation of STAT3, increases the expression of TNF-α and IL-6, aggravating viral

  4. A novel anti-inflammatory oligopeptide produced by Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, R R; Rico, G; Giménez, J A

    2001-02-01

    The monocyte locomotion inhibitory factor (MLIF), a heat-stable oligopeptide found in the supernatant fluid of Entamoeba histolytica axenic cultures was isolated by ultra-filtration, gel-sieve chromatography and high powered liquid chromatography (HPLC), and its primary structure (Met-Gln-Cys-Asn-Ser) established by Edman sequencing and mass-spectrometry (MS). A synthetic peptide had the same selective anti-inflammatory features as the native material in comparable concentrations: in vitro inhibition of the locomotion in human peripheral blood monocytes, and of the respiratory burst in the same cells and in human neutrophil polymorphonuclear leucocytes; and in vivo depression of delayed hypersensitivity skin reactions to dinitrochlorobenzene in guinea pigs. This oligopeptide is apparently synthesized by the ameba as suggested by [(35)S]-Cys and Met incorporation, probably as part of a larger molecule, from which it is cleaved by proteolysis. The full sequence was not found in the 431 available E. histolytica protein sequences. The factor may contribute to the unexpected paucity of the late inflammatory reaction found in advanced invasive amebiasis and, perhaps in consequence, to the regeneration without scarring (restitutio ad integrum) of the affected organs that is observed following successful treatment of this disease

  5. Diminished heat shock response in the aged myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    Locke, Marius; Tanguay, Robert M.

    1996-01-01

    Induction of heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp72 in particular, has been associated with myocardial protection. Since a decreased Hsp response has been reported to occur with aging, it was of interest to determine if hearts from aged animals also demonstrate an altered heat shock response and subsequent myocardial protection. Adult (6 months old) and aged (22 months old) Fischer 344 rats were heat stressed by raising their rectal temperatures to 41 °C for 10 min. At selected times following hea...

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of Bromelia hieronymi: comparison with bromelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errasti, María E; Caffini, Néstor O; Pelzer, Lilian E; Rotelli, Alejandra E

    2013-03-01

    Some plant proteases (e. g., papain, bromelain, ficin) have been used as anti-inflammatory agents for some years, and especially bromelain is still being used as alternative and/or complementary therapy to glucocorticoids, nonsteroidal antirheumatics, and immunomodulators. Bromelain is an extract rich in cysteine endopeptidases obtained from Ananas comosus. In this study the anti-inflammatory action of a partially purified extract of Bromelia hieronymi fruits, whose main components are cysteine endopeptidases, is presented. Different doses of a partially purified extract of B. hieronymi were assayed on carrageenan-induced and serotonine-induced rat paw edema, as well as in cotton pellet granuloma model. Doses with equal proteolytic activity of the partially purified extract and bromelain showed significantly similar anti-inflammatory responses. Treatment of the partially purified extract and bromelain with E-64 provoked loss of anti-inflammatory activity on carrageenan-induced paw edema, a fact which is consistent with the hypothesis that the proteolytic activity would be responsible for the anti-inflammatory action.

  7. Anti-inflammatory management for tendon injuries - friends or foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Kai-Ming

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute and chronic tendon injuries are very common among athletes and in sedentary population. Most physicians prescribe anti-inflammatory managements to relieve the worst symptoms of swelling and pain, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and physical therapies. However, experimental research shows that pro-inflammatory mediators such as prostaglandins may play important regulatory roles in tendon healing. Noticeably nearly all cases of chronic tendon injuries we treat as specialists have received non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs by their physician, suggesting that there might be a potential interaction in some of these cases turning a mild inflammatory tendon injury into chronic tendinopathy in predisposed individuals. We are aware of the fact that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids may well have a positive effect on the pain control in the clinical situation whilst negatively affect the structural healing. It follows that a comprehensive evaluation of anti-inflammatory management for tendon injuries is needed and any such data would have profound clinical and health economic importance.

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of root of Alpinia galanga willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Kumar Ghosh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of the study is to evaluate the acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activities of root extract of Alpinia galanga in rodents. Materials and Methods: The study was carried out using albino rats of either sex (150-200 g. An extract of the root of A. galanga was prepared using absolute alcohol and distillation in a Soxhlet apparatus. The acute anti-inflammatory effects of this extract were evaluated using carrageenan-, bradykinin-, and 5-HT-induced rat paw edema. The chronic anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated using formaldehyde-induced rat paw edema. Results and Analysis: Inhibition of inflammation was seen to be 32.22% in carrageenan-induced, 37.70% in 5-HT-induced, and 35.21% in bradykinin-induced anti-inflammatory models. In chronic inflammatory model, a progressive inhibition of 34.73% (3 rd day, 37.50% (5 th day, 38.83% (7 th day, 44.66% (9 th day, 49.59% (11 th day, and 55.75% (13 th day was observed with study compound. The efficacy was comparable with the standard drugs. Conclusion: It can be thus concluded that A. galanga has anti-inflammatory properties and probably acts by blocking histaminic and serotonin pathways. It may be an effective alternative to NASAIDs and corticosteroid in inflammatory disorders.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects, nuclear magnetic resonance identification, and high-performance liquid chromatography isolation of the total flavonoids from Artemisia frigida

    OpenAIRE

    Qinghu Wang; Jinmei Jin; Nayintai Dai; Narenchaoketu Han; Jingjing Han; Baiyinmuqier Bao

    2016-01-01

    The aerial parts of Artemisia frigida Willd. are used to treat joint swelling, renal heat, abnormal menstruation, and sore carbuncle. The anti-inflammatory effects of A. frigida have been well-known in folk medicine, suggesting that components extracted from A. frigida could potentially treat inflammatory disease. With the aim of discovering bioactive compounds, in this study, we extracted total flavonoids from the aerial parts of A. frigida and investigated their anti-inflammatory effects ag...

  10. Heat shock response of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, RCC; Fan, L.

    1996-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were documented for the first time in both somatic extracts and excretory/secretory (ES) products of the infective-stage larvae of Trichinella spiralis and T. pseudospiralis. Larvae recovered from muscles of infected mice were heat shocked at 37, 40, 43 and 45 degrees C in RPMI 1640 medium containing L(-)[35S]methionine. Somatic extracts and ES products of heat-shocked worms were then analysed by SDS-PAGE, autoradiography and laser densitometry. Prominent bands of H...

  11. Chromosome Behavior of Heat Shock Induced Triploid in Fenneropenaeus Chinensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓军; 李富花; 相建海

    2003-01-01

    Triploidy was induced in Chinese shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis by 30 + 0.5 ℃ heat shock treatment (initiated at 20 min after fertilization) for 10 min to inhibit the release of PB2 at 18.0℃ . The highest triploid rate obtained was 84.5% in nauplius stage. The effect of heat shock treatment on meiosis and cleavage of eggs was investigated in this work aimed to establish ef ficient procedures for triploid induction and to gain understanding of the mechanism of triploid production. Three pronuclei that could be observed in the treated eggs under fluorescence microscope developed into triploid embryos. Some abnormal chromosome behavior was observed in heat shocked eggs.

  12. Heat shock protein 90: the cancer chaperone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Len Neckers

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone required for the stability and function of a number of conditionally activated and/or expressed signalling proteins, as well as multiple mutated, chimeric, and/or over-expressed signalling proteins, that promote cancer cell growth and/or survival. Hsp90 inhibitors are unique in that, although they are directed towards a specific molecular target, they simultaneously inhibit multiple cellular signalling pathways. By inhibiting nodal points in multiple overlapping survival pathways utilized by cancer cells, combination of an Hsp90 inhibitor with standard chemotherapeutic agents may dramatically increase the in vivo efficacy of the standard agent. Hsp90 inhibitors may circumvent the characteristic genetic plasticity that has allowed cancer cells to eventually evade the toxic effects of most molecularly targeted agents. The mechanism-based use of Hsp90 inhibitors, both alone and in combination with other drugs, should be effective toward multiple forms of cancer. Further, because Hsp90 inhibitors also induce Hsf-1-dependent expression of Hsp70, and because certain mutated Hsp90 client proteins are neurotoxic, these drugs display ameliorative properties in several neurodegenerative disease models, suggesting a novel role for Hsp90 inhibitors in treating multiple pathologies involving neurodegeneration.

  13. Heat-shock protein 70: molecular supertool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufricht, Christoph

    2005-06-01

    The cellular stress response decreases cellular injury, either via primary induction of cytoresistance or by secondary enhancement of cellular repair mechanisms. The most frequently studied and best understood effectors of the cellular stress response are the heat shock proteins (HSP). HSP are among the oldest tools in the cellular protein machinery, demonstrating extremely high conservation of the genetic code since bacteria. Molecular chaperons, with the HSP-70 being the prototype, cooperate in transport and folding of proteins, preventing aggregation, and even resolubilizing injured proteins. Increasing evidence supports a role for HSP during the recovery from renal ischemia, in particular in cellular salvage from apoptotic cell death and cytoskeletal restoration. Recent studies also report the potential for biomolecular profiling of newborns for the risk of acute renal failure. In peritoneal dialysis novel data suggest the use of HSP expression for biocompatibility testing. More importantly, HSP are prime therapeutic candidates for clinical situations associated with predictable insults, such as organ procurement in transplant medicine and repetitive exposure to hyperosmolar and acidotic peritoneal dialysis fluids. The next challenge will be to define the regulatory pathways of the cellular stress response in these models to introduce novel therapeutic interventions, such as new pharmaceutics enhancing the HSP expression.

  14. Heat Shock Proteins, Autoimmunity, and Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K. Calderwood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs have been linked to the therapy of both cancer and inflammatory diseases, approaches that utilize contrasting immune properties of these proteins. It would appear that HSP family members Hsp60 and Hsp70, whether from external sources or induced locally during inflammation, can be processed by antigen-presenting cells and that HSP-derived epitopes then activate regulatory T cells and suppress inflammatory diseases. These effects also extend to the HSP-rich environments of cancer cells where elevated HSP concentrations may participate in the immunosuppressive tumor milieu. However, HSPs can also be important mediators of tumor immunity. Due to their molecular chaperone properties, some HSPs can bind tumor-specific peptides and deliver them deep into the antigen-processing pathways of antigen-presenting cells (APCs. In this context, HSP-based vaccines can activate tumor-specific immunity, trigger the proliferation and CTL capabilities of cancer-specific CD8+ T cells, and inhibit tumor growth. Further advances in HSP-based anticancer immunotherapy appear to involve improving the properties of the molecular chaperone vaccines by enhancing their antigen-binding properties and combating the immunosuppressive tumor milieu to permit programming of active CTL capable of penetrating the tumor milieu and specifically targeting tumor cells.

  15. Plasma Heating by Strong Shock Waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    About 104 cm3 of plasma at T ∼ 1 keV, n ∼ 1 x 1016 cm-3, were created by fast collisional shock waves in an electromagnetic shock tube. The speed of these shock waves ranges up to 4 x 108cm/s, corresponding to an acoustic Mach number of 3200 and an Alfvén-Mach number of 15. These experiments were performed in a 3-metre-long coaxial electromagnetic shock tube, employing a 60-μf, 120-kV capacitor bank which produces a 2 x 106 -A drive current. The pre-shock hydrogen initial state was T = 239°K, p = 50 mTorr. The preshock 7.2- kG transverse magnetic field was used to keep the shock thickness small and retard plasma interaction with the walls. Separation of the transverse ionizing shock wave from the driving current was clearly observed, and a hot dense plasma was created behind the shock wave. The state of this plasma was determined by laser interferometer measurements, X-ray bremsstrahlung spectra, a particle energy analyser, probes, and neutron detectors. The shock-created plasma contained an azimuthal magnetic field of B ∼ 22 kG. When deuterium gas was used, neutrons were detected and we estimate a yield of about 5 x 105 neutrons per shot. The transverse ionizing shock thickness, as determined by magnetic field structure, was found to be from 5 to 80 cm thick, the larger values occurring at higher shock speeds. These thicknesses are found to agree with the calculations made from a two-fluid MHD computer code employing classical plasma transport properties. The calculated structure of these collisional shock waves predict that the ion temperature substantially exceeds the electron temperature. (author)

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of Syzygium cumini bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandan, S; Srinivasan, K; Chandra, S; Tandan, S K; Lal, J; Raviprakash, V

    2001-05-01

    The ethanolic extract of the bark of Syzygium cumini was investigated for its anti-inflammatory activity in animal models. The extract did not show any sign of toxicity up to a dose of 10.125 g/kg, p.o. in mice. Significant anti-inflammatory activity was observed in carrageenin (acute), kaolin-carrageenin (subacute), formaldehyde (subacute)-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma (chronic) tests in rats. The extract did not induce any gastric lesion in both acute and chronic ulcerogenic tests in rats. Thus, the present study demonstrated that S. cumini bark extract has a potent anti-inflammatory action against different phases of inflammation without any side effect on gastric mucosa. PMID:11395258

  17. IL-35 is a novel responsive anti-inflammatory cytokine--a new system of categorizing anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyuan; Mai, Jietang; Virtue, Anthony; Yin, Ying; Gong, Ren; Sha, Xiaojin; Gutchigian, Stefanie; Frisch, Andrew; Hodge, Imani; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2012-01-01

    It remains unknown whether newly identified anti-inflammatory/immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-35 (IL-35) is different from other anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in terms of inhibition of inflammation initiation and suppression of full-blown inflammation. Using experimental database mining and statistical analysis methods we developed, we examined the tissue expression profiles and regulatory mechanisms of IL-35 in comparison to other anti-inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that in contrast to TGF-β, IL-35 is not constitutively expressed in human tissues but it is inducible in response to inflammatory stimuli. We also provide structural evidence that AU-rich element (ARE) binding proteins and microRNAs target IL-35 subunit transcripts, by which IL-35 may achieve non-constitutive expression status. Furthermore, we propose a new system to categorize anti-inflammatory cytokines into two groups: (1) the house-keeping cytokines, such as TGF-β, inhibit the initiation of inflammation whereas (2) the responsive cytokines including IL-35 suppress inflammation in full-blown stage. Our in-depth analyses of molecular events that regulate the production of IL-35 as well as the new categorization system of anti-inflammatory cytokines are important for the design of new strategies of immune therapies.

  18. Heat shock transcription factors regulate heat induced cell death in a rat histiocytoma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kolla V, P Rasad; Aftab Taiyab; D Jyothi; Usha K Srinivas; Amere S Sreedhar

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock response is associated with the synthesis of heat shock proteins (Hsps) which is strictly regulated by different members of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs). We previously reported that a rat histiocytoma, BC-8 failed to synthesize Hsps when subjected to typical heat shock conditions (42°C, 60 min). The lack of Hsp synthesis in these cells was due to a failure in HSF1 DNA binding activity. In the present study we report that BC-8 tumor cells when subjected to heat shock at higher temperature (43°C, 60 min) or incubation for longer time at 42°C, exhibited necrosis characteristics; however, under mild heat shock (42°C, 30 min) conditions cells showed activation of autophagy. Mild heat shock treatment induced proteolysis of HSF1, and under similar conditions we observed an increase in HSF2 expression followed by its enhanced DNA binding activity. Inhibiting HSF1 proteolysis by reversible proteasome inhibition failed to inhibit heat shock induced autophagy. Compromising HSF2 expression but not HSF1 resulted in the inhibition of autophagy, suggesting HSF2 dependent activation of autophagy. We are reporting for the first time that HSF2 is heat inducible and functions in heat shock induced autophagic cell death in BC-8 tumor cells.

  19. The anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of proteins extracted from Acacia farnesiana seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S.S. LEAL

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Seeds of Acacia farnesiana are commonly sold in the local markets of northeastern Brazil as a therapeutic agent. The present work aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of proteins obtained from A. farnesiana seeds. Five different protein fractions (albumin, globulin, prolamin, acidic and basic glutelins were obtained and investigated for the protein pattern, the presence of hemagglutinating and proteolytic activities. The globulin fraction (GLB was also evaluated for anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities. Globulins reduced the paw edema induced by carrageenan in a dose-dependent manner, which was accompanied by a reduction of myeloperoxidase activity (p < 0.05. Additionally, GLB reduced the neutrophil peritoneal migration induced by carrageenan. However, GLB was not able to inhibit the edema triggered by dextran. Pre-treatment with globulins reduced the abdominal constrictions induced by acetic acid as well as the paw licking time induced by formalin (69.1% at first phase. However, it did not produce a significant antinociceptive effect in the hot plate test (55-56 °C. Treating the GLB with heat (at 100 °C for 30 min abolished its anti-edematogenic and hemagglutinating activities. Our results showed that seeds from A. farnesiana are a source of proteins with anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties.

  20. Anti-inflammatory new coumarin from the Ammi majus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Yasser Abdelaal; Ouf, Nabil Hassan

    2012-01-12

    Investigation of the aerial parts of the Egyptian medicinal plant Ammi majus L. led to isolation of new coumarin, 6-hydroxy-7-methoxy-4 methyl coumarin (2) and 6-hydroxy-7-methoxy coumarin (3); this is the first time they have been isolated from this plant. The structures of the compounds (2 &3) were elucidated by spectroscopic data interpretation and showed anti-inflammatory and anti-viral activity. GRAPHICAL An efficient, one-new coumarin (2) was isolated from the aerial parts of the A. Majus L. was evaluated for their anti-viral and anti-inflammatory activities.

  1. Heat shock response and autophagy--cooperation and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokladny, Karol; Myers, Orrin B; Moseley, Pope L

    2015-01-01

    Protein quality control (proteostasis) depends on constant protein degradation and resynthesis, and is essential for proper homeostasis in systems from single cells to whole organisms. Cells possess several mechanisms and processes to maintain proteostasis. At one end of the spectrum, the heat shock proteins modulate protein folding and repair. At the other end, the proteasome and autophagy as well as other lysosome-dependent systems, function in the degradation of dysfunctional proteins. In this review, we examine how these systems interact to maintain proteostasis. Both the direct cellular data on heat shock control over autophagy and the time course of exercise-associated changes in humans support the model that heat shock response and autophagy are tightly linked. Studying the links between exercise stress and molecular control of proteostasis provides evidence that the heat shock response and autophagy coordinate and undergo sequential activation and downregulation, and that this is essential for proper proteostasis in eukaryotic systems.

  2. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Neal L. Millar; George A. C. Murrell

    2012-01-01

    Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-as...

  3. Heat shock protein and heat shock factor 1 expression and localization in vaccinia virus infected human monocyte derived macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziedzic Jakub

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses remain one of the inducers of the stress response in the infected cells. Heat shock response induced by vaccinia virus (VV infection was studied in vitro in human blood monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs as blood cells usually constitute the primary site of the infection. Methods Human blood monocytes were cultured for 12 – 14 days. The transcripts of heat shock factor 1 (HSF1, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 and two viral genes (E3L and F17R were assayed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, and the corresponding proteins measured by Western blot. Heat shock factor 1 DNA binding activities were estimated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA and its subcellular localization analyzed by immunocytofluorescence. Results It appeared that infection with vaccinia virus leads to activation of the heat shock factor 1. Activation of HSF1 causes increased synthesis of an inducible form of the HSP70 both at the mRNA and the protein level. Although HSP90 mRNA was enhanced in vaccinia virus infected cells, the HSP90 protein content remained unchanged. At the time of maximum vaccinia virus gene expression, an inhibitory effect of the infection on the heat shock protein and the heat shock factor 1 was most pronounced. Moreover, at the early phase of the infection translocation of HSP70 and HSP90 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of the infected cells was observed. Conclusion Preferential nuclear accumulation of HSP70, the major stress-inducible chaperone protein, suggests that VV employs this particular mechanism of cytoprotection to protect the infected cell rather than to help viral replication. The results taken together with our previuos data on monocytes or MDMs infected with VV or S. aureus strongly argue that VV employs multiple cellular antiapoptotic/cytoprotective mechanisms to prolong viability and proinflammatory activity of the cells of monocytic

  4. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of yacon leaf extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rejane B. Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Smallanthus sonchifolius (Poepp. H. Rob. , Asteraceae, known as yacon, is an herb that is traditionally used for the treatment of diabetes in folk medicine. However, recent studies have demonstrated that this plant has other interesting properties such as anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory actions. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the topical anti-inflammatory property of different extracts prepared from yacon leaves and analyze the role of different chemical classes in this activity. Three yacon leaf extracts were obtained: aqueous extract, where chlorogenic acid derivatives and sesquiterpene lactones were detected; leaf rinse extract, rich in sesquiterpene lactones; and polar extract, rich in chlorogenic acid derivatives. All the extracts exhibited anti-edematogenic activity in vivo (aqueous extract: 25.9% edema inhibition at 0.50 mg/ear; polar extract: 42.7% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear; and leaf rinse extract: 44.1% inhibition at 0.25 mg/ear. The leaf rinse extract furnished the best results regarding neutrophil migration inhibition, and NO, TNF-α and PGE2 inhibition. These data indicate that both sesquiterpene lactones and chlorogenic acid derivatives contribute to the anti-inflammatory action, although sesquiterpene lactones seem to have more pronounced effects. In conclusion, yacon leaf extracts, particularly the sesquiterpene lactone-rich extract, has potential use as topical anti-inflammatory agent.

  5. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E.; Fernandez, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  6. Anti-inflammatory activity of some traditional medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R K; Joshi, V K; Gambhir, S S

    1998-10-01

    The ethanol extract of roots, fruits and roots of solanum indicum and saccharum munja respectively and water soluble resin of commiphora myrrha were studied for antiinflammatory activity against carrageenin induced oedema in rats, the significant antiinflammatory activity were found in former two plants will slight anti inflammatory activity was observed in latter plant.

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of N-(3-Florophenylethylcaffeamide in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Hsiung Kuo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of one synthetic product, N-(3-Florophenylethylcaffeamide (abbrev. FECA, by using animal model of λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of FECA was determined by measuring the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, and malondialdehyde (MDA in the edema paw tissue, and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and glutathione reductase (GRd in the liver. The results showed that FECA reduced the paw edema at three, four and five hours after λ-carrageenan administration. The levels of COX-2, NO, TNF-α, and MDA in the λ-carrageenan-induced edema paws were reduced and the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd in liver tissues were raised by FECA. These results suggested that FECA possessed anti-inflammatory activities and the anti-inflammatory mechanisms might be related to the decrease of the levels of COX-2, NO, and TNF-α in inflamed tissues and the increase in the MDA level by increasing the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd.

  8. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

    OpenAIRE

    Kidon Mona; Kang Liew; Chin Chiang; Hoon Lim; Hugo,, Argentiniensis, (ca. 1210-ca. 1270)

    2007-01-01

    Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA)-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction af...

  9. Glycosaminoglycan analogs as a novel anti-inflammatory strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, India C.; Soares, Adriano; Hantson, Jennifer; Teixeira, Mauro; Sachs, Daniela; Valognes, Delphine; Scheer, Alexander; Schwarz, Matthias K.; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Shaw, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Heparin, a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), has both anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties. The clinical use of heparin against inflammation, however, has been limited by concerns about increased bleeding. While the anti-coagulant activity of heparin is well understood, its anti-inflammatory properties are less so. Heparin is known to bind to certain cytokines, including chemokines, small proteins which mediate inflammation through their control of leukocyte migration and activation. Molecules which can interrupt the chemokine-GAG interaction without inhibiting coagulation could therefore, represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents. In the present study, two approaches were undertaken, both focusing on the heparin-chemokine relationship. In the first, a structure based strategy was used: after an initial screening of potential small molecule binders using protein NMR on a target chemokine, binding molecules were optimized through structure-based design. In the second approach, commercially available short oligosaccharides were polysulfated. In vitro, these molecules prevented chemokine-GAG binding and chemokine receptor activation without disrupting coagulation. However, in vivo, these compounds caused variable results in a murine peritoneal recruitment assay, with a general increase of cell recruitment. In more disease specific models, such as antigen-induced arthritis and delayed-type hypersensitivity, an overall decrease in inflammation was noted, suggesting that the primary anti-inflammatory effect may also involve factors beyond the chemokine system. PMID:23087686

  10. The Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Leonard H.; Rooney, Theodore W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action and clinical pharmacology of the new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help practitioners decide which to use and how to administer them. Indications for and effects of NSAIDs are described. (MT)

  11. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Compounds Isolated from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Perez G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This review shows over 300 compounds isolated and identified from plants that previously demonstrated anti-inflammatory activity. They have been classified in appropriate chemical groups and data are reported on their pharmacological effects, mechanisms of action, and other properties.

  12. Anti-inflammatory drug delivery from hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Sei K; Jelacic, Sandra; Maier, Ronald V; Stayton, Patrick S; Hoffman, Allan S

    2004-01-01

    Two different types of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels were synthesized by crosslinking HA with divinyl sulfone (DVS) and poly(ethylene glycol)-divinyl sulfone (VS-PEG-VS). Vitamin E succinate (VES), an anti-inflammatory drug, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model of anti-inflammatory protein drugs, were loaded into the gels and their release kinetics were measured in vitro. VES and BSA released with a burst from both HA hydrogels during the first few hours, and release continued gradually for several days. The rate of release from HA-VS-PEG-VS-HA hydrogels was faster than that from HA-DVS-HA hydrogels, presumably due to the lower crosslink density in the former. The anti-inflammatory action of released VES was tested by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) on HA hydrogels with and without VES in the gel. The number of cells adhering on HA hydrogels was very low compared to that on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), which might be one of the important advantages of using HA hydrogels for implant coatings or tissue engineering applications. ELISA test results showed that the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentration was very low in the supernatant of the wells containing the HA hydrogel with VES in contact with the activated macrophages compared to that without VES. This is probably the effect of the released VES reducing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha. HA hydrogels containing anti-inflammatory drugs may have potential for use in tissue engineering and also as biocompatible coatings of implants. PMID:15503629

  13. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  14. Identifying gene regulatory modules of heat shock response in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen-Hsiung

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A gene regulatory module (GRM is a set of genes that is regulated by the same set of transcription factors (TFs. By organizing the genome into GRMs, a living cell can coordinate the activities of many genes in response to various internal and external stimuli. Therefore, identifying GRMs is helpful for understanding gene regulation. Results Integrating transcription factor binding site (TFBS, mutant, ChIP-chip, and heat shock time series gene expression data, we develop a method, called Heat-Inducible Module Identification Algorithm (HIMIA, for reconstructing GRMs of yeast heat shock response. Unlike previous module inference tools which are static statistics-based methods, HIMIA is a dynamic system model-based method that utilizes the dynamic nature of time series gene expression data. HIMIA identifies 29 GRMs, which in total contain 182 heat-inducible genes regulated by 12 heat-responsive TFs. Using various types of published data, we validate the biological relevance of the identified GRMs. Our analysis suggests that different combinations of a fairly small number of heat-responsive TFs regulate a large number of genes involved in heat shock response and that there may exist crosstalk between heat shock response and other cellular processes. Using HIMIA, we identify 68 uncharacterized genes that may be involved in heat shock response and we also identify their plausible heat-responsive regulators. Furthermore, HIMIA is capable of assigning the regulatory roles of the TFs that regulate GRMs and Cst6, Hsf1, Msn2, Msn4, and Yap1 are found to be activators of several GRMs. In addition, HIMIA refines two clusters of genes involved in heat shock response and provides a better understanding of how the complex expression program of heat shock response is regulated. Finally, we show that HIMIA outperforms four current module inference tools (GRAM, MOFA, ReMoDisvovery, and SAMBA, and we conduct two randomization tests to show that

  15. Heat shock response in photosynthetic organisms: membrane and lipid connections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Horvath; A. Glatz; H. Nakamoto; M.L. Mishkind; T. Munnik; Y. Saidi; P. Goloubinoff; J.L. Harwood; L. Vigh

    2012-01-01

    The ability of photosynthetic organisms to adapt to increases in environmental temperatures is becoming more important with climate change. Heat stress is known to induce heat-shock proteins (HSPs) many of which act as chaperones. Traditionally, it has been thought that protein denaturation acts as

  16. Heat shock response improves heterologous protein secretion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Jin; Österlund, Tobias; Liu, Zihe;

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a widely used platform for the production of heterologous proteins of medical or industrial interest. However, heterologous protein productivity is often low due to limitations of the host strain. Heat shock response (HSR) is an inducible, global, cellular...... stress response, which facilitates the cell recovery from many forms of stress, e.g., heat stress. In S. cerevisiae, HSR is regulated mainly by the transcription factor heat shock factor (Hsf1p) and many of its targets are genes coding for molecular chaperones that promote protein folding and prevent...... the accumulation of mis-folded or aggregated proteins. In this work, we over-expressed a mutant HSF1 gene HSF1-R206S which can constitutively activate HSR, so the heat shock response was induced at different levels, and we studied the impact of HSR on heterologous protein secretion. We found that moderate and high...

  17. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manthripragada, Angelika D; Schernhammer, Eva S; Qiu, Jiaheng;

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD).......Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD)....

  18. Heating and generation of suprathermal particles at collisionless shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collisionless plasma shocks are different from ordinary collisional fluid shocks in several important respects. They do not in general heat the electrons and ions equally, nor do they produce Maxwellian velocity distributions downstream. Furthermore, they commonly generate suprathermal particles which propagate into the upstream region, giving advance warning of the presence of the shock and providing a ''seed'' population for further acceleration to high energies. Recent space observations and theory have revealed a great deal about the heating mechanisms which occur in collisionless shocks and about the origin of the various suprathermal particle populations which are found in association with them. An overview of the present understanding of these subjects is presented herein. 83 refs., 8 figs

  19. AGN Heating Through Cavities and Shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.J. Nulsen; C. Jones; W.R. Forman; L.P. David; B.R. McNamara; D.A. Rafferty; L. Bîrzan; M. Wise

    2007-01-01

    Three comments are made on AGN heating of cooling flows. A simple physical argument is used to show that the enthalpy of a buoyant radio lobe is converted to heat in its wake. Thus, a significant part of ``cavity'' enthalpy is likely to end up as heat. Second, the properties of the repeated weak sho

  20. Nuclear phenotype changes after heat shock in Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Simone L

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear phenotypes of Malpighian tubule epithelial cells of male nymphs of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus, subjected to short- and long-duration heat shocks at 40ºC were analyzed immediately after the shock and 10 and 30 days later. Normal nuclei with a usual heterochromatic body as well as phenotypes indicative of survival (unravelled heterochromatin, giants and death (apoptosis, necrosis responses were observed in control and treated specimens. However, all nuclear phenotypes, except the normal ones, were more frequent in shocked specimens. Similarly altered phenotypes have also been reported in Triatoma infestans following heat shock, although at different frequencies. The frequency of the various nuclear phenotypes observed in this study suggests that the forms of cell survival observed were not sufficient or efficient enough to protect all of the Malpighian tubule cells from the deleterious effects of stress. In agreement with studies on P. megistus survival following heat shock, only long-duration shock produced strongly deleterious effects.

  1. Study on Anti-inflammatory Efficacy Accompanied by Toxicity and Side Effects of Water Extraction Components of Sophorae Tonkinensis Radix et Rhizoma on Throat Excess-heat Syndrome Mice%山豆根水提组分对实热证小鼠抗炎及伴随毒副作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹利顺; 吕莉莉; 窦立雯; 李晓宇; 孙蓉

    2015-01-01

    Objective To srudy the toxicity and side effects accompanied with anti-inflammation of water extraction components of Sophorae tonkinensis Radix et Rhizoma on throat excess-heat syndrome model in mice, provide experimental basis of"efficacy-syndrome-toxicity"relevancy. Methods The method of throat excess-heat syndrome model in mice was built, which were administrated with different doses water extraction components of Sophorae tonkinensis Radix et Rhizoma, observing anti-inflammation and toxicity by the croton oil inducing ear swelling method. detecting the level of ALT, AST, BUN, Cr in serum and calculating the ratio of liver and kidney to body, to evaluate its efficacy with side effects. Results Water extraction components of Sophorae tonkinensis Radix et Rhizoma had strong inhibitory effect on the croton oil inducing ear swelling in throat excess-heat syndrome mice after multiple administration. ALT and AST levels in serum were obviously enhanced after 3 d administration, liver weight/body ratio enhanced. Conclusion The effective dose of water extraction components of Sophorae tonkinensis Radix et Rhizoma had obvious anti-inflammatory effect, and at the same time, accompanied by side effects and hepatotoxicity. Compared with normal animals, anti-inflammatory effect is stronger and hepatotoxicity is weaker, whose toxicity mechanism still needs further research under the background of syndrome.%目的:研究山豆根水提组分对咽喉实热证模型小鼠在抗炎作用下伴随出现的毒副作用,为其“功效-证候-毒性”相关性研究提供实验依据。方法制备咽喉实热证小鼠模型,采用巴豆油致小鼠耳肿胀法,灌胃不同剂量山豆根水提组分,观察其抗炎及伴随毒副作用,检测血清中丙氨酸氨基转移酶(ALT)、天门冬氨酸氨基转移酶(AST)活性和尿素氮(BUN)、肌酐(Cr)的含量,计算肝、肾、脾、胸腺脏体比值,评价其药效伴随毒副作用。结果

  2. Circuit architecture explains functional similarity of bacterial heat shock responses

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Masayo; Trusina, Ala

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock response is a stress response to temperature changes and a consecutive increase in amounts of unfolded proteins. To restore homeostasis, cells upregulate chaperones facilitating protein folding by means of transcription factors (TF). We here investigate two heat shock systems: one characteristic to gram negative bacteria, mediated by transcriptional activator sigma32 in E. coli, and another characteristic to gram positive bacteria, mediated by transcriptional repressor HrcA in L. lactis. We construct simple mathematical model of the two systems focusing on the negative feedbacks, where free chaperons suppress sigma32 activation in the former, while they activate HrcA repression in the latter. We demonstrate that both systems, in spite of the difference at the TF regulation level, are capable of showing very similar heat shock dynamics. We find that differences in regulation impose distinct constrains on chaperone-TF binding affinities: the binding constant of free sigma32 to chaperon DnaK, known to...

  3. Heat Shock Proteins in Tendinopathy: Novel Molecular Regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal L. Millar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tendon disorders—tendinopathies—are the primary reason for musculoskeletal consultation in primary care and account for up to 30% of rheumatological consultations. Whilst the molecular pathophysiology of tendinopathy remains difficult to interpret the disease process involving repetitive stress, and cellular load provides important mechanistic insight into the area of heat shock proteins which spans many disease processes in the autoimmune community. Heat shock proteins, also called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, are rapidly released following nonprogrammed cell death, are key effectors of the innate immune system, and critically restore homeostasis by promoting the reconstruction of the effected tissue. Our investigations have highlighted a key role for HSPs in tendion disease which may ultimately affect tissue rescue mechanisms in tendon pathology. This paper aims to provide an overview of the biology of heat shock proteins in soft tissue and how these mediators may be important regulators of inflammatory mediators and matrix regulation in tendinopathy.

  4. AGN feedback in clusters: shock and sound heating

    CERN Document Server

    Nulsen, P E J

    2013-01-01

    Observations support the view that feedback, in the form of radio outbursts from active nuclei in central galaxies, prevents catastrophic cooling of gas and rapid star formation in many groups and clusters of galaxies. Variations in jet power drive a succession of weak shocks that can heat regions close to the active galactic nuclei (AGN). On larger scales, shocks fade into sound waves. The Braginskii viscosity determines a well-defined sound damping rate in the weakly magnetized intracluster medium (ICM) that can provide sufficient heating on larger scales. It is argued that weak shocks and sound dissipation are the main means by which radio AGN heat the ICM, in which case, the power spectrum of AGN outbursts plays a central role in AGN feedback.

  5. Anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of boldine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhouse, N; Delporte, C; Givernau, M; Cassels, B K; Valenzuela, A; Speisky, H

    1994-10-01

    Boldine, an antioxidant alkaloid isolated from Peumus boldus, exhibits a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenan-induced guinea pig paw edema test with an oral ED50 of 34 mg/kg. Boldine also reduces bacterial pyrogen-induced hyperthermia in rabbits to an extent which varied between 51% and 98% at a dose of 60 mg/kg p.o. In vitro studies carried out in rat aortal rings revealed that boldine is an effective inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, promoting 53% inhibition at 75 microM. The latter in vitro effect may be mechanistically linked to the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of boldine exerted in vivo. PMID:7879695

  6. Novel anti-inflammatory therapies for the treatment of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Razi; Spagnoli, Vincent; Tardif, Jean-Claude; L'Allier, Philippe L

    2015-06-01

    The underlying role of inflammation in atherosclerosis has been characterized. However, current treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) predominantly consists of targeted reductions in serum lipoprotein levels rather than combating the deleterious effects of acute and chronic inflammation. Vascular inflammation acts by a number of different molecular and cellular pathways to contribute to atherogenesis. Over the last decades, both basic studies and clinical trials have provided evidence for the potential benefits of treatment of inflammation in CAD. During this period, development of pharmacotherapies directed towards inflammation in atherosclerosis has accelerated quickly. This review will highlight specific therapies targeting interleukin-1β (IL-1β), P-selectin and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO). It will also aim to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of serpin administration, colchicine and intravenous HDL-directed treatment of CAD. We summarize the mechanistic rationale and evidence for these novel anti-inflammatory treatments at both the experimental and clinical levels.

  7. Gastrointestinal Complications of Nnon-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    MH. Moradi Nejad

    2002-01-01

    Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are among the most commonly used drugs in rheumatic disorders. This group of drugs has been associated with various degrees of gastroduodenopathy (GD), which is due to inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) synthesis. There are several differences between their side effect in stomach and in duodenum. But all these drugs have gastrointestinal side effect. Several studies on preventing NSAIDs GD have been performed in Europe and north America. There are se...

  8. Two Anti-inflammatory Steroidal Saponins from Dracaena angustifolia Roxb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Hsiung Kuo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Two new steroidal saponins, named drangustosides A–B (1–2, together with eight known compounds 3–10 were isolated and characterized from the MeOH extract of Dracaena angustifolia Roxb. The structures of compounds were assigned based on 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analyses, including HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY. Compounds 1 and 2 showed anti-inflammatory activity by superoxide generation and elastase release by human neutrophils in response to fMLP/CB.

  9. Two Anti-inflammatory Steroidal Saponins from Dracaena angustifolia Roxb.

    OpenAIRE

    Yueh-Hsiung Kuo; Chung-Yi Ou; Chi-I Chang; Yao-Haur Kuo; Syh-Yuan Hwang; Tsong-Long Hwang; Hui-Chi Huang; Ming-Kuem Lin

    2013-01-01

    Two new steroidal saponins, named drangustosides A–B (1–2), together with eight known compounds 3–10 were isolated and characterized from the MeOH extract of Dracaena angustifolia Roxb. The structures of compounds were assigned based on 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analyses, including HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY. Compounds 1 and 2 showed anti-inflammatory activity by superoxide generation and elastase release by human neutrophils in response to fMLP/CB.

  10. Proteomic analysis of the anti-inflammatory action of minocycline

    OpenAIRE

    Dunston, Christopher R; Helen R Griffiths; Lambert, Peter A; Staddon, Susan; Vernallis, Ann B

    2010-01-01

    Minocycline possesses anti-inflammatory properties independently of its antibiotic activity although the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokines and pro-inflammatory protein expression are reduced by minocycline in cultured macrophages. Here, we tested a range of clinically important tetracycline compounds (oxytetracycline, doxycycline, minocycline and tigecycline) and showed that they all inhibited LPS-induced nitric oxide production. We made t...

  11. Anti-inflammatory cyclohexenyl chalcone derivatives in Boesenbergia pandurata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Reutrakul, Vichai; Claeson, Per; Pongprayoon, Ubonwan; Sematong, Tuanta; Santisuk, Thawatchai; Taylor, Walter C

    2002-01-01

    The cyclohexenyl chalcone derivative [(-)-hydroxypanduratin A], together with the previously known panduratin A, sakuranetin, pinostrobin, pinocembrin, and dihydro-5,6-dehydrokawain were isolated from the chloroform extract of the red rhizome variety of Boesenbergia pandurata (Robx.) Schltr. [currently known as Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf., Kulturpfl.]. Their structures were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. (-)-Hydroxypanduratin A and (-)-panduratin A showed significant topical anti-inflammatory activity in the assay of TPA-induced ear edema in rats. PMID:11809452

  12. Gastrointestinal and Cardiovascular Risk of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulwahed Al-Saeed

    2011-01-01

     Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) confer a gastrointestinal (GI) side effect profile and concerns regarding adverse cardiovascular effects have emerged associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. NSAIDs are highly effective in treating pain and inflammation, but it is well recognized that these agents are associated with substantial gastrointestinal toxicity. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors may also reduce the risk for gastrointestinal events, although they may increase ca...

  13. Hepatoprotective and anti-inflammatory activities of Plantago major L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turel Idris

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities of Plantago major L. (PM. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory activity: Control and reference groups were administered isotonic saline solution (ISS and indomethacin, respectively. Plantago major groups were injected PM in doses of 5 mg/kg (PM-I, 10 mg/kg (PM-II, 20 mg/kg (PM-III and 25 mg/kg (PM-IV. Before and three hours after the injections, the volume of right hind-paw of rats was measured using a plethysmometer. Hepatoprotective Activity: The hepatotoxicity was induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 administration. Control, CCl4 and reference groups received isotonic saline solution, CCl4 and silibinin, respectively. Plantago major groups received CCl4 (0.8 ml/kg and PM in doses of 10, 20 and 25 mg/kg, respectively for seven days. Blood samples and liver were collected on the 8th day after the animals were killed. Results: Plantago major had an anti-inflammatory effect matching to that of control group at doses of 20 and 25 mg/kg. It was found that reduction in the inflammation was 90.01% with indomethacin, 3.10% with PM-I, 41.56% with PM-II, 45.87% with PM-III and 49.76% with PM-IV. Median effective dose (ED50 value of PM was found to be 7.507 mg/kg. Plantago major (25 mg/kg significantly reduced the serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels when compared to the CCl4 group. The histopathological findings showed a significant difference between the PM (25 mg/kg and CCl4 groups. Conclusion: The results showed that PM had a considerable anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activities.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of novel pyrazole analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra Kumar, R; Arif, Ibrahim A; Ahamed, Anis; Idhayadhulla, Akbar

    2016-09-01

    A new sequence of pyrazole derivatives (1-6) was synthesized from condensation technique under utilizing ultrasound irradiation. Synthesized compounds were characterized from IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, Mass and elemental analysis. Synthesized compounds (1-6) were screened for antimicrobial activity. Among the compounds 3 (MIC: 0.25 μg/mL) was exceedingly antibacterially active against gram negative bacteria of Escherichia coli and compound 4 (MIC: 0.25 μg/mL) was highly active against gram positive bacteria of Streptococcus epidermidis compared with standard Ciprofloxacin. Compound 2 (MIC: 1 μg/mL) was highly antifungal active against Aspergillus niger proportionate to Clotrimazole. Synthesized compounds (1-6) were screened for anti-inflammatory activity and the compound 2-((5-hydroxy-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)(4-nitrophenyl)methyl)hydrazinecarboxamide (4) was better activity against anti-inflammatory when compared with standard drugs (Diclofenac sodium). Compounds (2, 3 and 4) are the most important molecules and hence the need to develop new drugs of antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:27579011

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Composition of Senecio salignus Kunth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuauhtemoc Pérez González

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA- induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36±4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%. The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9±2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity and composition of Senecio salignus Kunth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Cuauhtemoc Pérez; Vega, Roberto Serrano; González-Chávez, Marco; Sánchez, Miguel Angel Zavala; Gutiérrez, Salud Pérez

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h. PMID:23691512

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity in selected Antarctic benthic organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eMoles

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic benthos was prospected in search for anti-inflammatory activity in polar benthic invertebrates, in two different geographical areas: deep-bottoms of the Eastern Weddell Sea and shallow-waters of the South Shetland Islands. A total of 36 benthic algae and invertebrate species were selected to perform solubility tests in order to test them for anti-inflammatory activity. From these, ethanol extracts of ten species from five different phyla resulted suitable to be studied in cell macrophage cultures (RAW 264.7. Cytotoxicity (MTT method and production of inflammatory mediators (prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4, interleukin-1 were determined at three extract concentrations (50, 125, 250 g/mL. Bioassays resulted in four different species showing anti-inflammatory activity corresponding to three sponges: Mycale (Oxymycale acerata, Isodictya erinacea, and I. toxophila; and one hemichordate: Cephalodiscus sp. These results show that Antarctic sessile invertebrates may have great value as a source of lead compounds with potential pharmaceutical applications.

  18. Anti-inflammatory activities of selected synthetic homoisoflavanones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Mahidansha M; Kruger, Hendrik G; Bodenstein, Johannes; Smith, Peter; du Toit, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Four homoisoflavanones of the 3-benzylidene-4-chromanone type, some of which were previously isolated from Caesalpinia pulcherrima, were synthesised to determine their anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity. A range of four different homoisoflavanones (compounds 4a-4d) were synthesised from the corresponding substituted phenols. ¹H- and ¹³C-NMR data together with high-resolution mass spectroscopy data were employed to elucidate the structures. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined in mice with acute croton oil-induced auricular dermatitis. In vitro cytotoxicity was tested against a Chinese hamster ovarian cell line using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assay. Compound 4a exhibited a tendency to inhibit oedema in a dose-dependent manner after 3 and 6 h of treatment. Compounds 4b-4d also inhibited oedema, although a clear dose-response relationship was not observed. Compounds 4a-4c were found to be less cytotoxic than compound 4d. Compound 4b was the least cytotoxic. Compounds 4a-4d exhibited anti-inflammatory activity and varying levels of cytotoxicity. PMID:21950651

  19. Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial activity of Flacourtia Ramontchi Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulbha Lalsare

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature survey revealed that a very merge amount of pharmacological work has been carried out on Flacourtia ramontchi. Also it was observed from the Ayurvedic literature and Ethnobotanical studies that the plant is very useful in treating inflammation and infectious diseases but no scientific investigation has been done in such direction. Very merge work has been done regarding phytochemical and pharmacological effectiveness on this plant. Successive extraction of the leaves with solvents of increasing polarity; preliminary phytochemical studies of different extracts; screening of chloroform, methanol and hydromethanolic extracts for anti-inflammatory (by Carrageenan induced rat paw model and antimicrobial activity (by Cup and plate method and thin layer chromatographic studies of active extracts using mobile phase i.e. chloroform and methanol. The results clearly indicate that all three extracts i.e. chloroform, methanol and hydromethanolic, of the leaves having anti-inflammatory activity. But the chloroform and methano extract showed promising results and even chloroform extract at the dose 150mg/kg exhibits equipotent anti-inflammatory activity as that of the standard Indomethacin. Methanol extract possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at concentration 10000 mg/ml whereas hydromethanolic and chloroform extracts having more or less antimicrobial activity.

  20. Anti-inflammatory activity and chemical profile of Galphimia glauca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Cortazar, Manasés; Herrera-Ruiz, Maribel; Zamilpa, Alejandro; Jiménez-Ferrer, Enrique; Marquina, Silvia; Alvarez, Laura; Tortoriello, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    Galphimia glauca, commonly known as "flor de estrella", is a plant species used in Mexican traditional medicine for the treatment of different diseases that have an acute or chronic inflammatory process in common. Aerial parts of this plant contain nor-seco-triterpenoids with anxiolytic properties, which have been denominated galphimines. Other compounds identified in the plant are tetragalloyl-quinic acid, gallic acid, and quercetin, which are able to inhibit the bronchial obstruction induced by platelet-activating factor. The objective of this work was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of crude extracts from G. glauca and, by means of bioguided chemical separation, to identify the compounds responsible for this pharmacological activity. n-Hexane, ethyl acetate, dichloromethane, and methanol extracts showed an important anti-inflammatory effect. Chemical separation of the active methanol extract allowed us to identify the nor-seco-triterpenes galphimine-A (1) and galphimine-E (3) as the anti-inflammatory principles. Analysis of structure-activity relationships evidenced that the presence of an oxygenated function in C6 is absolutely necessary to show activity. In this work, the isolation and structural elucidation of two new nor-seco-triterpenes denominated as galphimine-K (4) and galphimine-L (5), together with different alkanes, fatty acids, as well as three flavonoids (17-19), are described, to our knowledge for the first time, from Galphimia glauca.

  1. Anti-inflammatory effect of thalidomide dithiocarbamate and dithioate analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Roba; El-Sayed, Waheba; Agwa, Hussein S; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; Moawia, Shaden; Zahran, Magdy A H

    2015-08-01

    Thalidomide has anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. It has been used to treat a variety of cancers and autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to characterize anti-inflammatory activities of novel thalidomide analogs by exploring their effects on splenocytes proliferation and macrophage functions and their antioxidant activity. MTT assay was used to assess the cytotoxic effect of thalidomide analogs against splenocytes. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB-P65) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nitric oxide (NO) was estimated by colorimetric assay. Antioxidant activity was examined by ORAC assay. Our results demonstrated that thalidomide dithioate analog 2 and thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 4 produced a slight increase in splenocyte proliferation compared with thalidomide. Thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 1 is a potent inhibitor of TNF-α production, whereas thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 5 is a potent inhibitor of both TNF-α and NO. Analog 2 has a pronounced inhibitory effect on NF-κB-P65 production level. All thalidomide analogs showed prooxidant activity against hydroxyl (OH) radical. Analog 1 and thalidomide dithioate analog 3 have prooxidant activity against peroxyl (ROO) radical in relation to thalidomide. On the other hand, analog 4 has a potent scavenging capacity against peroxyl (ROO) radical compared with thalidomide. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that thalidomide analogs might have valuable anti-inflammatory activities with more pronounced effect than thalidomide itself.

  2. ACUPUNCTURE-MOXIBUSTION, HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 AND CYTOPROTECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is a kind of non-specific cytoprotective protein, and its generation can be induced by acupuncture and moxibustion. In the present paper, the authors review the protective actions of HSP70 on the heart, gastric mucosa, liver, brain tissues, kidney, etc., and the relationship among acupuncture/moxibustion, heat shock protein and the cytoprotective actions. It is worth studying the cytoprotective effect of acupuncture and moxibustion by way of the resultant generation of HSP70 in the organism.

  3. Ischemic preconditioning inhibits development of edematous cerulein-induced pancreatitis: Involvement of cyclooxygenases and heat shock protein 70

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zygmunt Warzecha; Jerzy W Naskalski; Peter C Konturek; Artur Dembinski; Piotr Ceranowicz; Stanislaw J Konturek; Marcin Dembinski; Wieslaw W Pawlik; Romana Tomaszewska; Jerzy Stachura; Beata Kusnierz-Cabala

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether ischemic preconditioning (IP)affects the development of edematous cerulein-induced pancreatitis and to assess the role of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), COX-2, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) in this process.METHODS: In male Wistar rats, IP was performed by damping of celiac artery (twice for 5 min at 5-min intervals).Thirty minutes after IP or sham operation, acute pancreatitis was induced by cerulein. Activity of COX-1 or COX-2 was inhibited by resveratrol or rofecoxib, respectively (10 mg/kg).RESULTS: IP significantly reduced pancreatic damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis as demonstrated by the improvement of pancreas histology, reduction in serum lipase and poly-C ribonuclease activity, and serum concentration of pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL)-1β.Also, IP attenuated the pancreatitis-evoked fall in pancreatic blood flow and pancreatic DNA synthesis.Serum level of anti-inflammatory IL-10 was not affected by IP. Cerulein-induced pancreatitis and IP increased the content of HSP 70 in the pancreas. Maximal increase in HSP 70 was observed when IP was combined with cerulein-induced pancreatitis. Inhibition of COXs, especially COX-2, reduced the protective effect of IP in edematous pancreatitis.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that IP reduces pancreatic damage in cerulein-induced pancreatitis and this effect, at least in part, depends on the activity of COXs and pancreatic production of HSP 70.

  4. Variation of the ratio of specific heats across a detached bow shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, J. K.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    Equations are derived which allow the ratio of specific heats behind the earth's bow shock to be evaluated if several pre-shock parameters (the specific-heat ratio, the Alfvenic Mach number, the sonic Mach number, and the angle between the shock normal at the stagnation point and the magnetic field) and the density jump across the shock are known. Numerical examples show that the dependence of the post-shock ratio on the pre-shock ratio is weak.

  5. HEAT SHOCK PROTEINS IN DIABETES AND WOUND HEALING

    OpenAIRE

    Atalay, Mustafa; Oksala, Niku; Lappalainen, Jani; David E Laaksonen; Sen, Chandan K.; Roy, Sashwati

    2009-01-01

    The heat shock proteins (HSPs), originally identified as heat-inducible gene products, are a highly conserved family of proteins that respond to a wide variety of stress. Although HSPs are among the most abundant intracellular proteins, they are expressed at low levels under normal physiological conditions, and show marked induction in response to various stressors. HSPs function primarily as molecular chaperones, facilitating the folding of other cellular proteins, preventing protein aggrega...

  6. Circuit architecture explains functional similarity of bacterial heat shock responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat shock response is a stress response to temperature changes and a consecutive increase in amounts of unfolded proteins. To restore homeostasis, cells upregulate chaperones facilitating protein folding by means of transcription factors (TFs). We here investigate two heat shock systems: one characteristic to gram negative bacteria, mediated by transcriptional activator σ32 in E. coli, and another characteristic to gram positive bacteria, mediated by transcriptional repressor HrcA in L. lactis. We construct simple mathematical models of the two systems focusing on the negative feedbacks, where free chaperones suppress σ32 activation in the former, while they activate HrcA repression in the latter. We demonstrate that both systems, in spite of the difference at the TF regulation level, are capable of showing very similar heat shock dynamics. We find that differences in regulation impose distinct constraints on chaperone–TF binding affinities: the binding constant of free σ32 to chaperone DnaK, known to be in 100 nM range, set the lower limit of amount of free chaperone that the system can sense the change at the heat shock, while the binding affinity of HrcA to chaperone GroE set the upper limit and have to be rather large extending into the micromolar range. (paper)

  7. Topical glucocorticoid has no antinociceptive or anti-inflammatory effect in thermal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Møiniche, S; Kehlet, H

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of topical glucocorticoids in human thermal injury. The right and left legs of 12 healthy volunteers were allocated randomly to be treated with either 0.05% clobetasol propionate cream or placebo in a double-blind trial. Thermal...... injuries were induced with a thermode, which was heated to 49 degrees C for 5 min under standardized pressure. Clobetasol propionate or placebo cream was applied to the skin 1 h before burn injury, immediately after the injury and every 12 h for the next 3 days. Heat pain detection thresholds (HPDT), heat...... injury caused a decrease in HPDT, HPT and MPDT, an increase in EI and development of mechanical, secondary hyperalgesia. Clobetasol propionate had no effect on any of the nociceptive or inflammatory variables studied....

  8. A SIMPLE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF HEAT SHOCK RESPONSE IN RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufi Neder Meyer

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To obtain a simple model for the elicitation of the heat shock response in rats. Design: Laboratory study. Setting: University research laboratories. Sample: Seventy-nine adult male albino rats (weight range 200 g to 570 g. Procedures: Exposure to heat stress by heating animals in a warm bath for 5 min after their rectal temperatures reached 107.60 F (420 C. Liver and lung samples were collected for heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70 detection (Western analysis. Results: Western analysis was positive for HSP70 in the liver and in the lungs of heated animals. There was a temporal correlation between heating and HSP70 detection: it was strongest 1 day after heating and reduced afterwards. No heated animals died. Conclusion: These data show that heating rats in a warm (45o C bath, according to parameters set in this model, elicits efficiently the heat shock response.OBJETIVO: Obter um modelo simples para tentar esclarecer a resposta ao choque térmico em ratos. LOCAL: Laboratório de pesquisa da Universidade. MÉTODO: Amostra: 79 ratos albinos, adultos, entre 200g a 570g. Procedimentos: Exposição ao calor, em banho quente, por 5 minutos, após a temperatura retal chegar a 42 graus centigrados. Biópsias de fígado e pulmão foram obtidas para detectar a proteina 70 (HSP 70, pelo "Western blot". RESULTADOS: As análises foram positivas nos animais aquecidos, com uma correlação entre aquecimento e constatação da HSP 70. Foi mais elevada no primeiro dia e não houve óbitos nos animais aquecidos. CONCLUSÃO: Os ratos aquecidos a 45 graus centígrados respondem eficientemente ao choque térmico.

  9. Shock Waves and Turbulent Heating in Low-Density Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shock heating and shock structures are studied in theta-pinch-like devices in a wide range of plasma parameters ne, B1, mi, and of wave speeds u1 (3 x 106 cms-1 ≤ u1 ≤ 108 cm-1). Densities and temperatures were determined locally by interferometry and by Thomson scattering. Magnetic and electric fields were measured with small high-frequency probes. Previous investigations of perpendicular, hydromagnetic shocks at β1 A A, critical at densities above 1014 cm-3 are extended to densities close to 1013 cm-3 and to other mass ratios me/mi. Shocks are nearly collision-free even with respect to the initial state. A scaling law is obtained for the effective collision frequency veff, deduced from measured turbulent-heating rates and current densities. Results show that veff ≈ 10-3 (Te/Ti) (vd/cs) ωpi. Studies are extended to small Alfvén-Mach numbers, where shock structures are still collision-dominated. Comparison with theory shows good agreement. In the same density range, shocks are generated at β1 ≈ 0.3, and with MA >> MA critical- from the observed election heating rates and the electron density jump, together with the shock relations, estimates for turbulent ion-heating rates are obtained. Investigation of the structure of collision-dominated shocks in magnetic field-free plasma shows that electron temperature and density front are well separated; the width of separation agrees with theoretical estimates. Attempts are made to heat low-density (n ≤ 1013 cm-3), magnetic-field-free plasma by fast magnetic compression. In deuterium, an anomalously broad current sheath is observed. Nevertheless, deuteron temperatures of ≈ 10 keV and relatively high values of the local β (β ≈ 10) are achieved in a low-energy theta-pinch (≈ 10 kj) . Electric and magnetic field fluctuations of large amplitude occur. In argon, at large radii, a stationary electromagnetic sheath is found with a width of a few c/ωpe and an electric potential jump as required by theory. Ion

  10. Heat shock response and mammal adaptation to high elevation (hypoxia)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiaolin; XU; Cunshuan; WANG; Xiujie; WANG; Dongjie; WANG; Qingshang

    2006-01-01

    The mammal's high elevation (hypoxia) adaptation was studied by using the immunological and the molecular biological methods to understand the significance of Hsp (hypoxia) adaptation in the organic high elevation, through the mammal heat shock response. (1) From high elevation to low elevation (natural hypoxia): Western blot and conventional RT-PCR and real-time fluorescence quota PCR were adopted. Expression difference of heat shock protein of 70 (Hsp70) and natural expression of brain tissue of Hsp70 gene was determined in the cardiac muscle tissue among the different elevation mammals (yak). (2)From low elevation to high elevation (hypoxia induction):The mammals (domestic rabbits) from the low elevation were sent directly to the areas with different high elevations like 2300, 3300 and 5000 m above sea level to be raised for a period of 3 weeks before being slaughtered and the genetic inductive expression of the brain tissue of Hsp70 was determined with RT-PCR. The result indicated that all of the mammals at different elevations possessed their heat shock response gene. Hsp70 of the high elevation mammal rose abruptly under stress and might be induced to come into being by high elevation (hypoxia). The speedy synthesis of Hsp70 in the process of heat shock response is suitable to maintain the cells' normal physiological functions under stress. The Hsp70 has its threshold value. The altitude of 5000 m above sea level is the best condition for the heat shock response, and it starts to reduce when the altitude is over 6000 m above sea level. The Hsp70 production quantity and the cell hypoxia bearing capacity have their direct ratio.

  11. Tissue specificity of the heat-shock response in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, P; Ho, T H; Hauptmann, R M

    1984-06-01

    The tissue specificity of the heat-shock response in maize was investigated. The ability to synthesize heat shock proteins (hsp) at 40 degrees C, as well as the intensity and duration of that synthesis, was analyzed in coleoptiles, scutella, green and etiolated leaves, suspension-cultured cells, germinating pollen grains, and primary root sections at different stages of development. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis of extracted proteins revealed that most of the tissues synthesized the typical set of 10 hsp, but that the exact characteristics of the response depended upon the tissue type. While elongating portions of the primary root exhibited a strong heat shock response, the more mature portions showed a reduced ability to synthesize hsp. Leaves, whether green or etiolated, excised or intact, constitutively synthesized a low level of hsp at 25 degrees C, and high levels could be induced at 40 degrees C. Suspension-cultures of Black Mexican sweet corn synthesized, besides the typical set of hsp, two additional polypeptides. In contrast to all the other tissues, germinating pollen grains could not be induced to synthesize the typical set of hsp but did synthesize two new polypeptides of 92 and 56 kD molecular weight.The heat shock response was transient for most of the tissues which synthesized the standard set of hsp. Hsp synthesis was detected up to 2 to 3 hours, but not at 10 hours of continuous 40 degrees C treatment. The exception was suspension cultured cells, in which hsp synthesis showed only a slight reduction after 10 hours at 40 degrees C. Tissue-specific differences in the heat-shock response suggest that there are differences in the way a given tissue is able to adapt to high temperature.We have confirmed the previous suggestion that maize hsp do not accumulate in substantial quantities. Using two-dimensional gel analysis, hsp could be detected by autoradiography but not by sensitive silver staining techniques. PMID:16663639

  12. Shock Heating of the Merging Galaxy Cluster A521

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdin, H.; Mazzotta, P.; Markevitch, M.; Giacintucci, S.; Brunetti, G.

    2013-01-01

    A521 is an interacting galaxy cluster located at z = 0.247, hosting a low-frequency radio halo connected to an eastern radio relic. Previous Chandra observations hinted at the presence of an X-ray brightness edge at the position of the relic, which may be a shock front. We analyze a deep observation of A521 recently performed with XMM-Newton in order to probe the cluster structure up to the outermost regions covered by the radio emission. The cluster atmosphere exhibits various brightness and temperature anisotropies. In particular, two cluster cores appear to be separated by two cold fronts. We find two shock fronts, one that was suggested by Chandra and that is propagating to the east, and another to the southwestern cluster outskirt. The two main interacting clusters appear to be separated by a shock-heated region, which exhibits a spatial correlation with the radio halo. The outer edge of the radio relic coincides spatially with a shock front, suggesting that this shock is responsible for the generation of cosmic-ray electrons in the relic. The propagation direction and Mach number of the shock front derived from the gas density jump, M = 2.4 +/- 0.2, are consistent with expectations from the radio spectral index, under the assumption of Fermi I acceleration mechanism.

  13. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Bufalin in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of bufalin, a major component of “Chan-su.” We used a carrageenan-induced paw edema model to assess the anti-inflammatory activity of this compound, and Western blot analysis detected NF-κB signaling during this effect. The antinociceptive activities were evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, and hot-plate tests; open-field test investigated effects on the central nervous system. Our data showed that bufalin (0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg, i.p. potently decreased carrageenan-induced paw edema. Bufalin down regulated the expression levels of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α during these treatments. Further studies demonstrated that bufalin significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB signaling. Bufalin also reduced acetic acid-induced writhing and the licking time in the formalin test and increased hot-plate reaction latencies. Naloxone pretreatment (2 mg/kg, i.p. in the early phases of the formalin test and hot-plate test significantly attenuated the bufalin-induced antinociception effects, which suggests the involvement of the opioid system. A reduction in locomotion was not observed in the open-field test after bufalin administration. Taken together, bufalin treatment resulted in in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, and bufalin may be a novel, potential drug for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  14. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of Rhododendron arboreum bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, Muhammad; Ali, Sajid; Muhammad, Naveed; Gillani, Syed N; Shah, Muhmmad R; Khan, Haroon; Maione, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Rhododendron arboreum Smith. (Ericaceae), an evergreen small tree, is one of the 1000 species that belongs to genus Rhododendron distributed worldwide. In folk medicine, as various parts of this plant exhibit medicinal properties, it is used in the treatment of different ailments.The present study was designed to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of methanolic extract of R. arboreum bark, followed by activity-guided fractionation of n-hexane, n-butanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions.The ethyl acetate fraction (200 mg/kg i.p.) showed the maximum analgesic effect (82%) in acetic acid-induced writhing, followed, to a less extent, by crude extract and chloroform fraction both at a dose of 200 mg/kg i.p. (65.09% and 67.89%, respectively). In carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema, the crude extract and its related fractions displayed in a dose-dependent manner (50-200 mg/kg i.p.) an anti-inflammatory activity for all time-courses (1-5 hrs). For the active extract/fractions (200 mg/kg i.p.), the maximum effect was observed 5 h after carrageenan injection. These evidences were also supported by in vitro lipoxygenase inhibitory properties. In conclusion, R. arboreum crude methanolic extract and its fractions exhibited anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects. For these reasons, this plant could be a promising source of new compounds for the management of pain and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25501256

  15. Anti-inflammatory activity of Abutilon indicum extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Priyanka; Chauhan, N S; Patel, J R

    2012-01-01

    Abutilon indicum Linn. had been broadly used for its reported biological activities in indigenous system of medicine. The ethanolic extract of the whole plant of A. indicum Linn. was evaluated for its anti-inflammatory activity at doses 250, 500 and 750 mg kg⁻¹ using the carrageenan-induced paw oedema in healthy Wistar albino rats. Results of in vivo activity led to the conclusion that the ethanolic extract of A. indicum showed predominantly significant activity in a dose-dependent manner, which is comparable to the reference standard ibuprofen. The results prove the traditional use of plant in the treatment of inflammation. PMID:21999427

  16. Anti-inflammatory agents in the treatment of bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenblat, Joshua D; Kakar, Ron; Berk, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Inflammation has been implicated in the risk, pathophysiology, and progression of mood disorders and, as such, has become a target of interest in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD). Therefore, the objective of the current qualitative and quantitative review was to determine...... or significant treatment-emergent adverse events were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, a moderate antidepressant effect was observed for adjunctive anti-inflammatory agents compared with conventional therapy alone in the treatment of bipolar depression. The small number of studies, diversity of agents, and small...... sample sizes limited interpretation of the current analysis....

  17. Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism of Total Glycosides of Acanthopanax Giraldii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁芳; 陈杰; 许国敏; 郑加嘉; 龙启才

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To study the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of total glycosides of Acanthopanax Giraldii (TGA).Methods:The changes of prostaglandin E_2(PGE_2),tumor necrosis factor(TNF-α),nitric oxide(NO), and expressions of COX-1 mRNA and COX-2 mRNA in BALB/c mouse macrophages were observed by the radioimmunoassay,ELISA and nitric acid reduction and RT-PCR in the presence or absence of TGA.Results: (1) TGA could significantly decrease the production of PGE_2 and NO in mouse peritoneal macrophages.The inhibitory...

  18. Overexpression of colligin 2 in glioma vasculatureis associated with overexpression of heat shock factor 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.A.M. Mustafa (Dana); A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); P.P. Zheng (Pingpin); J.M. Kros (Johan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn previous studies we found expression of the protein collig in 2 (heat shock protein 47 (HSP47), SERPINH1) in glioma neovasculature while not in normal brain tissue. Generally, the regulation of heat shock gene expression in eukaryotes is mediated by heat shock factors (HSF). In mammal

  19. Anti-inflammatory properties of Streptococcus salivarius, a commensal bacterium of the oral cavity and digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaci, Ghalia; Goudercourt, Denise; Dennin, Véronique; Pot, Bruno; Doré, Joël; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Daniel, Catherine; Delorme, Christine

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus salivarius is one of the first colonizers of the human oral cavity and gut after birth and therefore may contribute to the establishment of immune homeostasis and regulation of host inflammatory responses. The anti-inflammatory potential of S. salivarius was first evaluated in vitro on human intestinal epithelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We show that live S. salivarius strains inhibited in vitro the activation of the NF-κB pathway on intestinal epithelial cells. We also demonstrate that the live S. salivarius JIM8772 strain significantly inhibited inflammation in severe and moderate colitis mouse models. These in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory properties were not found with heat-killed S. salivarius, suggesting a protective response exclusively with metabolically active bacteria. PMID:24271166

  20. Role of heat shock protein 70 in innate alloimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter G. eLand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly describes our own experience with the proven demonstration of heat shock protein 70 in reperfused renal allografts from brain-deaddonors and reflects about its potential role as a typical damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP in the setting of innate alloimmunity. In fact, our group was able to demonstrate a dramatic up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 expression after postischemic reperfusion of renal allografts. Of note, up-regulation of this stress protein expression, although to a lesser extent, was already observed after cold storage of the organ indicating that this molecule is already induced in the stressed organism of a brain-dead donor. However, whether or not the dramatic up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 expression contributes to mounting an innate alloimmune response cannot be judged in view of these clinical findings.Nevertheless, heat shock protein 70, since generated in association with postischemic reperfusion-induced allograft injury, can be called a typical DAMP - as can everymolecule be termed a DAMP that is generated in associationwith any stressful tissue injury regardless of its final positive or negative regulatory function within the innate immune response elicited by it.In fact, as we discuss in this article, the context-dependent, even contradistinctive activities of heat shock protein 70 reflect the biological phenomenon that, throughout evolution, mammals have developed an elaborate network of positive and negative regulatory mechanisms, which provide balance between defensive and protective measures against unwarranted destruction of the host. In this sense, up-regulated expression of heat shock protein 70 in an injured allograft might reflect a pure protective response against the severe oxidative injury of a reperfused donor organ. On the other hand, up-regulated expression of this stress protein in an injured allograft might reflect a(futile attempt of the innate immune system to

  1. The Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Eugenia Caryophllata Essential Oil: An animal model of anti-inflammatory activity

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is gas chromatographic analysis of Eugenia caryaphyllata (clove) essential oil and investigation of its anti-inflammatory effects. Methods: The study involved eight groups; Serum physiologic, ethyl alcohol, indomethacin (3 mg/kg), etodolac (50 mg/kg), cardamom (0.05 mL/kg), EC-I (0.025 mL/kg), EC-II (0.050 mL/kg), EC-III (0.100 mL/kg) and EC-IV (0.200mL/kg). After measuring the volumes of right hind-paws of rats using a plethysmometer, drugs were injected intraperit...

  2. Anti-inflammatory strategies in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a major mental illness with a lifetime prevalence of about 1%. Antipsychotic drugs, with a primary mechanism of action that involves dopamine receptor blockade, are the mainstay in the treatment of the disorder. However, despite optimum antipsychotic treatment, few patients return to pre-morbid levels; the treatment deficit includes refractory positive symptoms, negative symptoms, mood impairments, cognitive impairments, social impairments, and/or a variety of medication-related adverse effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms, metabolic disturbances, hyperprolactinemia, and others. To address these, antipsychotic treatment has been augmented with psychosocial interventions, cognitive rehabilitation, different kinds of electrical and magnetic brain stimulation, and a large range of drugs from the neuropsychiatric as well as, surprise, the general medical pharmacopeia. The pleomorphic pathophysiology of schizophrenia includes abnormalities in immunological and inflammatory pathways, and so it is not surprising that anti-inflammatory drugs have also been trialed as augmentation agents in schizophrenia. This article critically examines the outcomes after augmentation with conventional anti-inflammatory interventions; results from randomized controlled trials do not encourage the use of either aspirin (1000 mg/day) or celecoxib (400 mg/day), both of which have been studied for this indication during the past decade and a half.

  3. HU-444, a Novel, Potent Anti-Inflammatory, Nonpsychotropic Cannabinoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj, Christeene G; Sumariwalla, Percy F; Hanuš, Lumír; Kogan, Natalya M; Yektin, Zhana; Mechoulam, Raphael; Feldmann, Mark; Gallily, Ruth

    2015-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a component of cannabis, which does not cause the typical marijuana-type effects, but has a high potential for use in several therapeutic areas. In contrast to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC), it binds very weakly to the CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. It has potent activity in both in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory assays. Thus, it lowers the formation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a proinflammatory cytokine, and was found to be an oral antiarthritic therapeutic in murine collagen-induced arthritis in vivo. However, in acidic media, it can cyclize to the psychoactive Δ(9)-THC. We report the synthesis of a novel CBD derivative, HU-444, which cannot be converted by acid cyclization into a Δ(9)-THC-like compound. In vitro HU-444 had anti-inflammatory activity (decrease of reactive oxygen intermediates and inhibition of TNF-α production by macrophages); in vivo it led to suppression of production of TNF-α and amelioration of liver damage as well as lowering of mouse collagen-induced arthritis. HU-444 did not cause Δ(9)-THC-like effects in mice. We believe that HU-444 represents a potential novel drug for rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory diseases. PMID:26272937

  4. Develop Anti-Inflammatory Nanotherapies to Treat Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jun

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of disease-related death in the world, accounting for 30 % global mortality. The majority of CVD is caused by atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease of major arteries featured by the deposition of lipids and cholesterol. Inflammation of atherosclerosis is mainly promoted by the pathological macrophages and monocytes, and modulating their functions has been proposed as a promising therapeutic target. This dissertation first presents the development of a novel simvastatin-loaded high-density lipoprotein (HDL) based nanoparticle ([S]-rHDL), which was able to deliver anti-inflammatory simvastatin preferentially to inflammatory monocytes in the blood and to macrophages in advanced atherosclerotic plaques, leading to the reduced inflammation in the tissue. Second, extensive in vivo characterization of [S]-rHDL in a mouse atherosclerosis model revealed that the anti-inflammatory capability of [S]-rHDL derived from its effects on blood monocytes, endothelial layer, monocyte recruitment, and plaque macrophage function. Third, a translational study that integrated the use of [S]-rHDL into oral statin treatment demonstrated a great potential for this nanomedicine as an attractive addition to the current high-dose oral statin standard-of-care for acute coronary syndrome. Finally, preliminary results suggested potential applications of the rHDL platform to other macrophage-implicated diseases.

  5. A Novel Anti-Inflammatory Effect for High Density Lipoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Cameron

    Full Text Available High density lipoprotein has anti-inflammatory effects in addition to mediating reverse cholesterol transport. While many of the chronic anti-inflammatory effects of high density lipoprotein (HDL are attributed to changes in cell adhesion molecules, little is known about acute signal transduction events elicited by HDL in endothelial cells. We now show that high density lipoprotein decreases endothelial cell exocytosis, the first step in leukocyte trafficking. ApoA-I, a major apolipoprotein of HDL, mediates inhibition of endothelial cell exocytosis by interacting with endothelial scavenger receptor-BI which triggers an intracellular protective signaling cascade involving protein kinase C (PKC. Other apolipoproteins within the HDL particle have only modest effects upon endothelial exocytosis. Using a human primary culture of endothelial cells and murine apo-AI knockout mice, we show that apo-AI prevents endothelial cell exocytosis which limits leukocyte recruitment. These data suggest that high density lipoprotein may inhibit diseases associated with vascular inflammation in part by blocking endothelial exocytosis.

  6. Anti-inflammatory Cerebrosides from Cultivated Cordyceps militaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Peng; Liu, Shan-Chi; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Chan, You; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Lee, Chia-Lin; Du, Ying-Chi; Wu, Tung-Ying; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2016-02-24

    Cordyceps militaris (bei-chong-chaw, northern worm grass) is a precious and edible entomopathogenic fungus, which is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) as a general booster for the nervous system, metabolism, and immunity. Saccharides, nucleosides, mannitol, and sterols were isolated from this fungus. The biological activity of C. militaris was attributed to the saccharide and nucleoside contents. In this study, the aqueous methanolic fraction of C. militaris fruiting bodies exhibited a significant anti-inflammatory activity. Bioactivity-guided fractionation of the active fraction led to the isolation of eight compounds, including one new and two known cerebrosides (ceramide derivatives), two nucleosides, and three sterols. Cordycerebroside A (1), the new cerebroside, along with soyacerebroside I (2) and glucocerebroside (3) inhibited the accumulation of pro-inflammatory iNOS protein and reduced the expression of COX-2 protein in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophages. This is the first study on the isolation of cerebrosides with anti-inflammatory activity from this TCM. PMID:26853111

  7. Anti-inflammatory strategies in the treatment of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a major mental illness with a lifetime prevalence of about 1%. Antipsychotic drugs, with a primary mechanism of action that involves dopamine receptor blockade, are the mainstay in the treatment of the disorder. However, despite optimum antipsychotic treatment, few patients return to pre-morbid levels; the treatment deficit includes refractory positive symptoms, negative symptoms, mood impairments, cognitive impairments, social impairments, and/or a variety of medication-related adverse effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms, metabolic disturbances, hyperprolactinemia, and others. To address these, antipsychotic treatment has been augmented with psychosocial interventions, cognitive rehabilitation, different kinds of electrical and magnetic brain stimulation, and a large range of drugs from the neuropsychiatric as well as, surprise, the general medical pharmacopeia. The pleomorphic pathophysiology of schizophrenia includes abnormalities in immunological and inflammatory pathways, and so it is not surprising that anti-inflammatory drugs have also been trialed as augmentation agents in schizophrenia. This article critically examines the outcomes after augmentation with conventional anti-inflammatory interventions; results from randomized controlled trials do not encourage the use of either aspirin (1000 mg/day) or celecoxib (400 mg/day), both of which have been studied for this indication during the past decade and a half. PMID:26427750

  8. Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Ginger Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIA Yong-liang; XIE Qiang-min; ZHAO Jun-ming; ZHANG Lin-hui; SUN Bao-shan; BAO Meng-jing; LI Fen-fen; SHEN Jian; SHEN Hui-jun; ZHAO Yu-qing

    2011-01-01

    Objective Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is widely used as a spice in cooking and as a medicinal herb in traditional herbal medicine. The present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ginger oil in experimental animal models. Methods The analgesic effect of the oils was evaluated by the "acetic acid" and "hot-plate" test models of pain in mice. The anti-inflammatory effect of the oil was investigated in rats, using rat paw edema induced by carrageenan, adjuvant arthritis, and vascular permeability induced by bradykinin, arachidonic acid, and histamine. Indomethacin (1 mg/kg), Aspirin (0.5 g/kg) and Dexamethasone (2.5 mg/kg) were used respectively as reference drugs for comparison. Results The ginger oil (0.25-1.0 g/kg) produced significant analgesic effect against chemically- and thermally-induced nociceptive pain stimuli in mice (P < 0.05, 0.01). And the ginger oil (0.25-1.0 g/kg) also significantly inhibited carrageenan-induced paw edema, adjuvant arthritis, and inflammatory mediators-induced vascular permeability in rats (P < 0.05, 0.001). Conclusion These findings confirm that the ginger oil can be used to treat pain and chronic inflammation such as rheumatic arthritis.

  9. Topical anti-inflammatory activity of Solanum corymbiflorum leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piana, Mariana; Camponogara, Camila; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Machado, Michel Mansur; de Brum, Thiele Faccim; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; de Freitas Bauermann, Liliane

    2016-02-17

    Solanum corymbiflorum is popularly known as "baga-de-veado" and its leaves are applied on inflamed legs, scabies, tick bite, boils, mastitis, low back pain and otitis. The aim of this study was evaluate anti-inflammatory in vivo activity and relate this activity with antioxidant compounds present in the extract of S. corymbiflorum leaves. The extract from S. corymbiflorum leaves topically applied was able to reduce the croton oil-induced ear edema and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity with maximum inhibition of 87±3% and 45±7%, rescpectively in the dose of 1mg/ear. Similar results were found for positive control dexamethasone, which presented inhibitions of ear edema and MPO activity of 89±3% and 50±3%, respectively in a dose of 0.1mg/ear. These findings are due, at least in part, the presence of polyphenols (195.28mg GAE/g) and flavonoids, as chlorogenic acid (59.27mg/g), rutin (12.72mg/g), rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid and gallic acid found by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. This species showed potencial antioxidant by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and carbonyl groups in proteins methods which may be related with the presence of this compounds. This species possess anti-inflammatory activity confirming their popular use for the local treatment of skin inflammatory disorders. PMID:26721215

  10. ANTI INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ALPINIA GALANGA IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venuturumilli Lakshmi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present study the anti - inflammatory activity of Alpinia galanga is evaluated using rat paw edema, in comparison with Indomethacin using digital Plethysmometer. Male Wistar rats were grouped into 3 of 6 each. Test group given 250mg/kg Alpinia galang a suspended in 2% gum acacia, Standard group 20mg/kg Indomethacin orally. Hind paw edema was produced by sub plantar injection of 0.1ml of 1% carrageenin and the paw edema was measured at 0 and 3 hrs after injection using digital plethysmometer. Mean incre ase in paw volume and percentage inhibition were calculated. Data were represented as percentage inhibition of paw volume and Mean±S.E.M. Statistical analysis was done using student ‘t’ test. P values < 0.05 were considered significant. CONCLUSION: Alpinia galanga showed a 52.5% percentage of inhibition in comparison with Indomethacin which showed 68.75%. The test compound Alpinia galanga showed anti - inflammatory activity with a p value of <0.05 in comparison with Indomethacin with a p value of <0.001

  11. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic potential of Caesalpinia ferrea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Maria A. Lima

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Caesalpinia ferrea Mart. belongs to the family Fabaceae. Known as pau-ferro and jucá, it is used in folk medicine to treat diabetes, as antipyretic and antirheumatic. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of the ethanol extract of the fruits of C. ferrea (EECf. In the evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity, EECf (50 mg/kg produced significantly inhibition of ear edema by 66.6% compared to control. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg showed inhibition of 83.9% compared to control. EECf (50 mg/kg inhibited of vascular permeability induced by acetic acid and was also able to reduce of cell migration to the peritoneal cavity induced by thioglycolate. In the writhing test induced by acid acetic, EECf (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of contortions by 24.9, 46.9 and 74.2%, respectively. In the formalin test, EECf presented effects only in the second phase. The results provided experimental evidence for the effectiveness of the traditional use of C. ferrea in treating various diseases associated with inflammation and pain.

  12. Nanoliposomal Nitroglycerin Exerts Potent Anti-Inflammatory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardekani, Soroush; Scott, Harry A.; Gupta, Sharad; Eum, Shane; Yang, Xiao; Brunelle, Alexander R.; Wilson, Sean M.; Mohideen, Umar; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2015-11-01

    Nitroglycerin (NTG) markedly enhances nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. However, its ability to mimic the anti-inflammatory properties of NO remains unknown. Here, we examined whether NTG can suppress endothelial cell (EC) activation during inflammation and developed NTG nanoformulation to simultaneously amplify its anti-inflammatory effects and ameliorate adverse effects associated with high-dose NTG administration. Our findings reveal that NTG significantly inhibits human U937 cell adhesion to NO-deficient human microvascular ECs in vitro through an increase in endothelial NO and decrease in endothelial ICAM-1 clustering, as determined by NO analyzer, microfluorimetry, and immunofluorescence staining. Nanoliposomal NTG (NTG-NL) was formulated by encapsulating NTG within unilamellar lipid vesicles (DPhPC, POPC, Cholesterol, DHPE-Texas Red at molar ratio of 6:2:2:0.2) that were ~155 nm in diameter and readily uptaken by ECs, as determined by dynamic light scattering and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. More importantly, NTG-NL produced a 70-fold increase in NTG therapeutic efficacy when compared with free NTG while preventing excessive mitochondrial superoxide production associated with high NTG doses. Thus, these findings, which are the first to reveal the superior therapeutic effects of an NTG nanoformulation, provide the rationale for their detailed investigation for potentially superior vascular normalization therapies.

  13. Multiple mild heat-shocks decrease the Gompertz component of mortality in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Deqing; Cypser, James R; Yashin, Anatoli I; Johnson, Thomas E

    2009-09-01

    Exposure to mild heat-stress (heat-shock) can significantly increase the life expectancy of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. A single heat-shock early in life extends longevity by 20% or more and affects life-long mortality by decreasing initial mortality only; the rate of increase in subsequent mortality (Gompertz component) is unchanged. Repeated mild heat-shocks throughout life have a larger effect on life span than does a single heat-shock early in life. Here, we ask how multiple heat-shocks affect the mortality trajectory in nematodes and find increases of life expectancy of close to 50% and of maximum longevity as well. We examined mortality using large numbers of animals and found that multiple heat-shocks not only decrease initial mortality, but also slow the Gompertz rate of increase in mortality. Thus, multiple heat-shocks have anti-aging hormetic effects and represent an effective approach for modulating aging.

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects ofMorninga oleifera lam extract in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgewill OA; Georgewill UO; Nwankwoala RNP

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the acute and delayed anti-inflammatory effects ofMorning oleifera lam (MOL) crude methanolic extract.Methods: Compared the anti-inflammatory effects of MOL with that of standard anti-inflammatory agents like indomethacin and hydrocortisone using Air Pouch Model.Results: In both acute and delayed inflammation, the MOL extract produced dose dependent anti-inflammatory effect [acute IC50= (399.30 ±5.43) mg/kg; delayed IC50= (510.26±4.53) mg/kg]. The order of anti-inflammatory potency for the three drugs was hydrocortisone> indomethacin > MOL.Conclusions: These observations indicate that MOL possesses potential anti-inflammatory property.

  15. 壽The heat shock response and cytoprotection of the intestinal epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Malago, Joshua J.; Koninkx, Jos F. J. G.; van Dijk, Jaap E.

    2002-01-01

    Following heat stress, the mammalian intestinal epithelial cells respond by producing heat shock proteins that confer protection under stressful conditions, which would otherwise lead to cell damage or death. Some of the noxious processes against which the heat shock response protects cells include heat stress, infection, and inflammation. The mechanisms of heat shock response–induced cytoprotection involve inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine production and induction of cellular proliferat...

  16. Campylobacter jejuni induces an anti-inflammatory response in human intestinal epithelial cells through activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yiping; Vegge, Christina S.; Brøndsted, Lone;

    2011-01-01

    for cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) deficient mutants. Moreover, we demonstrated that heat-killed bacteria were able to induce IL-8 and IL-10 expression to a lower level than live bacteria. We therefore conclude that C. jejuni activate a PI3K/Akt-dependent anti-inflammatory pathway in human intestinal...

  17. Implication of Heat Shock Factors in Tumorigenesis: Therapeutical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thonel, Aurelie de [INSERM U866, Dijon (France); Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Burgundy, 21033 Dijon (France); Mezger, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.mezger@univ-paris-diderot.fr [CNRS, UMR7216 Epigenetics and Cell Fate, Paris (France); University Paris Diderot, 75013 Paris (France); Garrido, Carmen, E-mail: valerie.mezger@univ-paris-diderot.fr [INSERM U866, Dijon (France); Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, University of Burgundy, 21033 Dijon (France); CHU, Dijon BP1542, Dijon (France)

    2011-03-07

    Heat Shock Factors (HSF) form a family of transcription factors (four in mammals) which were named according to the discovery of their activation by a heat shock. HSFs trigger the expression of genes encoding Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) that function as molecular chaperones, contributing to establish a cytoprotective state to various proteotoxic stresses and in pathological conditions. Increasing evidence indicates that this ancient transcriptional protective program acts genome-widely and performs unexpected functions in the absence of experimentally defined stress. Indeed, HSFs are able to re-shape cellular pathways controlling longevity, growth, metabolism and development. The most well studied HSF, HSF1, has been found at elevated levels in tumors with high metastatic potential and is associated with poor prognosis. This is partly explained by the above-mentioned cytoprotective (HSP-dependent) function that may enable cancer cells to adapt to the initial oncogenic stress and to support malignant transformation. Nevertheless, HSF1 operates as major multifaceted enhancers of tumorigenesis through, not only the induction of classical heat shock genes, but also of “non-classical” targets. Indeed, in cancer cells, HSF1 regulates genes involved in core cellular functions including proliferation, survival, migration, protein synthesis, signal transduction, and glucose metabolism, making HSF1 a very attractive target in cancer therapy. In this review, we describe the different physiological roles of HSFs as well as the recent discoveries in term of non-cogenic potential of these HSFs, more specifically associated to the activation of “non-classical” HSF target genes. We also present an update on the compounds with potent HSF1-modulating activity of potential interest as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  18. Implication of Heat Shock Factors in Tumorigenesis: Therapeutical Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie de Thonel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Heat Shock Factors (HSF form a family of transcription factors (four in mammals which were named according to the discovery of their activation by a heat shock. HSFs trigger the expression of genes encoding Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs that function as molecular chaperones, contributing to establish a cytoprotective state to various proteotoxic stresses and in pathological conditions. Increasing evidence indicates that this ancient transcriptional protective program acts genome-widely and performs unexpected functions in the absence of experimentally defined stress. Indeed, HSFs are able to re-shape cellular pathways controlling longevity, growth, metabolism and development. The most well studied HSF, HSF1, has been found at elevated levels in tumors with high metastatic potential and is associated with poor prognosis. This is partly explained by the above-mentioned cytoprotective (HSP-dependent function that may enable cancer cells to adapt to the initial oncogenic stress and to support malignant transformation. Nevertheless, HSF1 operates as major multifaceted enhancers of tumorigenesis through, not only the induction of classical heat shock genes, but also of “non-classical” targets. Indeed, in cancer cells, HSF1 regulates genes involved in core cellular functions including proliferation, survival, migration, protein synthesis, signal transduction, and glucose metabolism, making HSF1 a very attractive target in cancer therapy. In this review, we describe the different physiological roles of HSFs as well as the recent discoveries in term of non-cogenic potential of these HSFs, more specifically associated to the activation of “non-classical” HSF target genes. We also present an update on the compounds with potent HSF1-modulating activity of potential interest as anti-cancer therapeutic agents.

  19. Role of Heat Shock Proteins in Stem Cell Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Guo-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Stress response is well appreciated to induce the expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps) in the cell. Numerous studies have demonstrated that Hsps function as molecular chaperones in the stabilization of intracellular proteins, repairing damaged proteins, and assisting in protein translocation. Various kinds of stem cells (embryonic stem cells, adult stem cells, or induced pluripotent stem cells) have to maintain their stemness and, under certain circumstances, undergo stress. Therefore, Hs...

  20. Transcription regulation of HYPK by Heat Shock Factor 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srijit Das

    Full Text Available HYPK (Huntingtin Yeast Partner K was originally identified by yeast two-hybrid assay as an interactor of Huntingtin, the protein mutated in Huntington's disease. HYPK was characterized earlier as an intrinsically unstructured protein having chaperone-like activity in vitro and in vivo. HYPK has the ability of reducing rate of aggregate formation and subsequent toxicity caused by mutant Huntingtin. Further investigation revealed that HYPK is involved in diverse cellular processes and required for normal functioning of cells. In this study we observed that hyperthermia increases HYPK expression in human and mouse cells in culture. Expression of exogenous Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1, upon heat treatment could induce HYPK expression, whereas HSF1 knockdown reduced endogenous as well as heat-induced HYPK expression. Putative HSF1-binding site present in the promoter of human HYPK gene was identified and validated by reporter assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed in vivo interaction of HSF1 and RNA polymerase II with HYPK promoter sequence. Additionally, acetylation of histone H4, a known epigenetic marker of inducible HSF1 binding, was observed in response to heat shock in HYPK gene promoter. Overexpression of HYPK inhibited cells from lethal heat-induced death whereas knockdown of HYPK made the cells susceptible to lethal heat shock-induced death. Apart from elevated temperature, HYPK was also upregulated by hypoxia and proteasome inhibition, two other forms of cellular stress. We concluded that chaperone-like protein HYPK is induced by cellular stress and under transcriptional regulation of HSF1.

  1. Anti-inflammatory drugs and uterine cervical cancer cells: Antineoplastic effect of meclofenamic acid

    OpenAIRE

    Soriano-Hernandez, Alejandro D; MADRIGAL-PÉREZ, DANIELA; GALVAN-SALAZAR, HECTOR R.; Martinez-Fierro, Margarita L; Laura L. Valdez-Velazquez; Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco; VAZQUEZ-VUELVAS, OSCAR F.; OLMEDO-BUENROSTRO, BERTHA A.; Guzman-Esquivel, Jose; Rodriguez-Sanchez, Iram P.; LARA-ESQUEDA, AGUSTIN; MONTES-GALINDO, DANIEL A.; Delgado-Enciso, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer (UCC) is one of the main causes of cancer-associated mortality in women. Inflammation has been identified as an important component of this neoplasia; in this context, anti-inflammatory drugs represent possible prophylactic and/or therapeutic alternatives that require further investigation. Anti-inflammatory drugs are common and each one may exhibit a different antineoplastic effect. As a result, the present study investigated different anti-inflammatory models of UCC ...

  2. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND MAST CELL PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF FICUS RELIGIOSA

    OpenAIRE

    Viswanathan, S; Thirugnanasambantham, P; Reddy, M. Kannappa; Narasimhan, S.; Subramaniam, G. Anantha

    1990-01-01

    The aqueous extract of bark of Ficus religiosa was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory effect and for its protective effect on mast cells against degranulation. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was observed in both acute and chronic models of inflammation. The extract also protected mast cells from degranulation induced by various degranulatiors. The observed anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect may be responsible for the beneficial effect of Ficus religiosa...

  3. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND DIURETIC EFFECT OF PLANT EXTRACTS OF PSEUDARTHRIA VISCIDA (L) WEIGHT & ARN.

    OpenAIRE

    Saravanan C.; Shantha kumar S.; Anandan R.; Narayanaswamy V.B.; Varunraj S.

    2010-01-01

    The ethanolic extracts prepared from aerial parts of Pseudarthria viscida was studied for anti-inflammatory and diuretic activities in albino rats. The results obtained were compared with that of standard drug indomethacin and frusemide for their anti-inflammatory and diuretic activities respectively. The present study demonstrated the diuretic effect of P.viscida by increasing the excretion of Na+, K+ and Cl- ions in the urine. The extract also showed significant anti-inflammatory effect by ...

  4. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-11-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfvén waves excited in the photosphere is the target of this study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfvén waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 per cent of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The importance of compressibility shown in this study would significantly impact on the prospects of successful MHD turbulence theory in the solar chromosphere.

  5. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-08-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfvén waves excited in the photosphere is the target of the present study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfvén waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 % of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The importance of compressibility shown in the present study would significantly impact on the prospects of successful MHD turbulence theory in the solar chromosphere.

  6. Competition between shock and turbulent heating in coronal loop system

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumoto, Takuma

    2016-01-01

    2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are performed with high spatial resolution in order to distinguish between competing models of the coronal heating problem. A single coronal loop powered by Alfv\\'{e}n waves excited in the photosphere is the target of the present study. The coronal structure is reproduced in our simulations as a natural consequence of the transportation and dissipation of Alfv\\'{e}n waves. Further, the coronal structure is maintained as the spatial resolution is changed from 25 to 3 km, although the temperature at the loop top increases with the spatial resolution. The heating mechanisms change gradually across the magnetic canopy at a height of 4 Mm. Below the magnetic canopy, both the shock and the MHD turbulence are dominant heating processes. Above the magnetic canopy, the shock heating rate reduces to less than 10 % of the total heating rate while the MHD turbulence provides significant energy to balance the radiative cooling and thermal conduction loss or gain. The i...

  7. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF NEWER MACROLIDES WITH ETORICOXIB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajendra Naidu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of macrolides and to compare with standard non- steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID etoricoxib. This study was conducted in male wistar albino rats by inducing edema with 1% carrageenan. Animals were divided into 5 groups with 6 in each and paw edema volume was measured by digital plethysmograph before and 3hrs after 1% carrageenan administration. Percentage of inhibition of paw edema was calculated. Results showed macrolides having significant anti-inflammatory activity & the anti-inflammatory activity of roxithromycin was almost equally comparable with etoricoxib

  8. Molecular genetics of heat tolerance and heat shock proteins in cereals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestri, Elena; Klueva, Natalya; Perrotta, Carla; Gulli, Mariolina; Nguyen, Henry T; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2002-01-01

    Heat stress is common in most cereal-growing areas of the world. In this paper, we summarize the current knowledge on the molecular and genetic basis of thermotolerance in vegetative and reproductive tissues of cereals. Significance of heat stress response and expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in thermotolerance of cereal yield and quality is discussed. Major avenues for increasing thermotolerance in cereals via conventional breeding or genetic modification are outlined. PMID:11999842

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Metformin Irrespective of Diabetes Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Amy R.; Morrison, Vicky L.; Levin, Daniel; Mohan, Mohapradeep; Forteath, Calum; Beall, Craig; McNeilly, Alison D.; Balfour, David J.K.; Savinko, Terhi; Wong, Aaron K.F.; Viollet, Benoit; Sakamoto, Kei; Fagerholm, Susanna C.; Foretz, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: The diabetes mellitus drug metformin is under investigation in cardiovascular disease, but the molecular mechanisms underlying possible benefits are poorly understood. Objective: Here, we have studied anti-inflammatory effects of the drug and their relationship to antihyperglycemic properties. Methods and Results: In primary hepatocytes from healthy animals, metformin and the IKKβ (inhibitor of kappa B kinase) inhibitor BI605906 both inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α–dependent IκB degradation and expression of proinflammatory mediators interleukin-6, interleukin-1β, and CXCL1/2 (C-X-C motif ligand 1/2). Metformin suppressed IKKα/β activation, an effect that could be separated from some metabolic actions, in that BI605906 did not mimic effects of metformin on lipogenic gene expression, glucose production, and AMP-activated protein kinase activation. Equally AMP-activated protein kinase was not required either for mitochondrial suppression of IκB degradation. Consistent with discrete anti-inflammatory actions, in macrophages, metformin specifically blunted secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, without inhibiting M1/M2 differentiation or activation. In a large treatment naive diabetes mellitus population cohort, we observed differences in the systemic inflammation marker, neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio, after incident treatment with either metformin or sulfonylurea monotherapy. Compared with sulfonylurea exposure, metformin reduced the mean log-transformed neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio after 8 to 16 months by 0.09 U (95% confidence interval, 0.02–0.17; P=0.013) and increased the likelihood that neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio would be lower than baseline after 8 to 16 months (odds ratio, 1.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.22–2.75; P=0.00364). Following up these findings in a double-blind placebo controlled trial in nondiabetic heart failure (trial registration: NCT00473876), metformin suppressed plasma cytokines including the aging

  10. Anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects of methyl palmitate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methyl palmitate (MP) has been shown earlier to inhibit Kupffer cells and rat peritoneal macrophages. To evaluate the potential of MP to inhibit the activation of other macrophages, RAW cells (macrophages of alveolar origin) were treated with varying concentrations of MP (0.25, 0.5, 1 mM). Assessment of cytotoxicity using MTT assay revealed that 0.25 and 0.5 mM are not toxic to RAW cells. MP was able to inhibit the phagocytic function of RAW cells. Treatment of cells with MP 24 hours prior to LPS stimulation significantly decreased nitric oxide release and altered the pattern of cytokines release; there was a significant decrease in TNF-α and a significant increase in IL-10 compared to the controls. However, there is a non-significant change in IL-6 level. Furthermore, phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (IκBα) protein was significantly decreased in RAW cells treated with 0.5 mM MP after LPS stimulation. Based upon the in-vitro results, it was examined whether MP treatment will be effective in preventing bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and fibrosis in-vivo. Bleomycin given by itself caused destruction of the lung architecture characterized by pulmonary fibrosis with collapse of air alveoli and emphysematous. Bleomycin induced a significant increase in hydroxyproline level and activated NF-κB, p65 expression in the lung. MP co-treatment significantly ameliorated bleomycin effects. These results suggest that MP has a potential of inhibiting macrophages in general. The present study demonstrated for the first time that MP has anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effect that could be through NF-kB inhibition. Thus MP like molecule could be a promising anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic drug. - Research highlights: →Methyl palmitate is a universal macrophage inhibitor. →It could be a promising nucleus of anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic drugs. →The underlying mechanism of these effects could be through NF-kB inhibition.

  11. Database Survey of Anti-Inflammatory Plants in South America: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leônia Maria Batista

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex event linked to tissue damage whether by bacteria, physical trauma, chemical, heat or any other phenomenon. This physiological response is coordinated largely by a variety of chemical mediators that are released from the epithelium, the immunocytes and nerves of the lamina propria. However, if the factor that triggers the inflammation persists, the inflammation can become relentless, leading to an intensification of the lesion. The present work is a literature survey of plant extracts from the South American continent that have been reported to show anti-inflammatory activity. This review refers to 63 bacterial families of which the following stood out: Asteraceae, Fabaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Apocynaceae and Celastraceae, with their countries, parts used, types of extract used, model bioassays, organisms tested and their activity.

  12. The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is readily biodegradable in agricultural soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Sabourin, Lyne [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada N5V 4T3 (Canada); Lapen, David R. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Ottawa ON, Canada K1A 0C6 (Canada); Topp, Edward, E-mail: ed.topp@agr.gc.ca [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, ON, Canada N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2010-12-01

    Diclofenac, 2-[2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino]phenyl]acetic acid, is an important non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug widely used for human and animals to reduce inflammation and pain. Diclofenac could potentially reach agricultural lands through the application of municipal biosolids or wastewater, and in the absence of any environmental fate data, we evaluated its persistence in agricultural soils incubated in the laboratory. {sup 14}C-Diclofenac was rapidly mineralized without a lag when added to soils varying widely in texture (sandy loam, loam, clay loam). Over a range of temperature and moisture conditions extractable {sup 14}C-diclofenac residues decreased with half lives < 5 days. No extractable transformation products were detectable by HPLC. Diclofenac mineralization in the loam soil was abolished by heat sterilization. Addition of biosolids to sterile or non-sterile soil did not accelerate the dissipation of diclofenac. These findings indicate that diclofenac is readily biodegradable in agricultural soils.

  13. [Anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic oral vaccines?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomholt, H B; Kilian, M

    1996-09-16

    Recent data suggest clinical efficacy of specific antigens delivered at mucosal sites in the treatment of certain organ specific autoimmune diseases. This approach appears non-toxic and has no side effects. Phase I/II human trials on multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis show positive outcomes. Furthermore, animal studies point to beneficial effects on uveitis, diabetes mellitus, transplantation reactions and allergic diseases. The immunological mechanism is oral tolerance, a well known principle for induction of a systemic hyporesponse to specific antigens. The tolerance is most pronounced on delayed type hypersensibility and IgE-mediated reactions. At least three different mechanisms mediate the tolerance. Low doses of antigen induce active suppression, intermediate doses induce clonal T-cell anergy, and high doses induce clonal T-cell deletion. The recent improvements in the understanding of the mechanisms of oral tolerance have fueled an interest in manipulating this principle to develop anti-inflammatory vaccines. PMID:8966773

  14. Hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Christoffer V; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Mørtz, Charlotte G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are reported to be the second most common cause of drug hypersensitivity. In 2011, experts from the EAACI/ENDA group and GA(2)LEN proposed a new classification system for NSAID hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to classify....... Medical records were retrospectively investigated with respect to the culprit NSAID(s), underlying diseases and symptoms at the primary reaction and during oral provocation tests (OPTs). Data was supplemented with a questionnaire. Classification according to EAACI guideline was based on these findings...... responders reacted to non-pyrazolone drugs. Only one patient could not be classified according to the EAACI/ENDA system. An overlap between respiratory and cutaneous symptoms was found in 15/39 (38%) of patients. CONCLUSIONS: All but one of our patients could be classified according to the EAACI...

  15. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of macrolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulska Magdalena

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrolides are a group of antibiotics whose activity is ascribable to the presence of the macrolide ring, to which one or more deoxy sugars may be attached. Two properties are inherent in this group of antibiotics, the immunomodulatory and the anti-inflammatory actions, ensuring great efficacy in a wide spectrum of infections. Macrolides demonstrate several immunomodulatory activities both in vitro and in vivo. They can down-regulate prolonged inflammation, increase mucus clearance, prevent the formation of bacterial biofilm and either enhance or reduce activation of the immune system. According to given properties and exceptional effects on bacterial phatogens, the macrolide antimicrobial agents have been found to serve a unique role in the management of chronic airway disorders, including diffuse panbronchiolitis, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Use of macrolides can result in clinical improvement in patients with severe, chronic inflammatory airway diseases, improving their spirometry indicators, gas exchange and overall quality of life.

  16. Further studies on the anti-inflammatory effect of insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottlecz, A; Koltai, M; Gecse, A

    1977-10-01

    Experiments performed on rats showed that insulin, when applied i.v. or s.c., inhibited the foot edema induced by carrageenin, thermic effect of 45.7 degrees C, compound 48/80 and 5-HT, but moderately increased the paw swelling evoked by kallikrein, a kinin-forming enzyme. The increased vascular permeability elicited by intradermal injection of histamine, 5-HT, bradykinin, PGE1, carrageenin and compound 48/80 was also suppressed. The anti-inflammatory effect was not significantly altered by propranolol and adrenalectomy on the thermal and carrageenin edema, it was variably inhibited on the skin test, and was completely abolished on the paw swelling induced by 5-HT and compound 48/80. Since insulin had little or no effect on the vascular response when given topically together with the vasoactive agents, its complex effect on the acute inflammation appears to be brought about via indirect mechanisms. PMID:930760

  17. Anti-inflammatory polyphenol constituents derived from Cissus pteroclada Hayata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Jie; Xu, Cheng-Ting; Lin, Dan-Dan; Qin, Jiang-Ke; Ye, Gao-Jie; Deng, Qing-Hua

    2016-08-01

    A new bergenin derivative, bergenin-11-O-α-d-galactopyranoside (compound 1), together with seven known polyphenolic compounds, were isolated from the stem of Cissus pteroclada Hayata. The structures of the 8 compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Moreover, the in vitro anti-inflammatory effects of compounds (1-8) in LPS-stimulated murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells were also investigated. Our results revealed that compound 1 inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory mediators NO and PGE2 and the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and COX-2. PMID:27374242

  18. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of azadirachtin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Darly G; Godin, Adriana M; Menezes, Raquel R; Nogueira, Rafaela D; Brito, Ana Mercy S; Melo, Ivo S F; Coura, Giovanna Maria E; Souza, Danielle G; Amaral, Flávio A; Paulino, Tony P; Coelho, Márcio M; Machado, Renes R

    2014-06-01

    Azadirachta indica (Meliaceae) extracts have been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties. However, the activities of azadirachtin, a limonoid and the major bioactive compound found in the extracts, have been poorly investigated in animal models. In the present study, we investigated the effects induced by azadirachtin in experimental models of pain and inflammation in mice. Carrageenan-induced paw edema and fibrovascular tissue growth induced by subcutaneous cotton pellet implantation were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of azadirachtin in mice. Zymosan-induced writhing and hot plate tests were employed to evaluate the antinociceptive activity. To explore putative mechanisms of action, the level of tumor necrosis factor-α in inflammatory tissue was measured and the effect induced by opioidergic and serotonergic antagonists was evaluated. Previous per os (p. o.) administration of azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) significantly reduced the acute paw edema induced by carrageenan. However, the concomitant increase of the paw concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α induced by this inflammatory stimulus was not reduced by azadirachtin. In addition to inhibiting the acute paw edema induced by carrageenan, azadirachtin (6, 60, and 120 mg/kg) inhibited the proliferative phase of the inflammatory response, as demonstrated by the reduced formation of fibrovascular tissue growth. Azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) also inhibited the nociceptive response in models of nociceptive (hot plate) and inflammatory (writhing induced by zymosan) pain. The activity of azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) in the model of nociceptive pain was attenuated by a nonselective opioid antagonist, naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i. p.), but not by a nonselective serotonergic antagonist, cyproheptadine. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the activity of azadirachtin in experimental models of nociceptive and inflammatory pain, and also in models of acute and chronic inflammation

  19. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS OF MAGNOLIAE FARGESII VOLATILE OIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng; CHEN Zhi-dong; XING Tao; WANG Nian-song

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the anti-inflammatory effects of magnoliae fargesii volatile oil.Methods Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were stimulated by TNF-α to express the adhesion molecules. Then the anti-adhesion effects of magnoliae fargesii volatile oil between HUVECs and human peripheral neutrophils were observed. The ischemia-reperfusion animal models were established by 60min renal ischemia followed by 1, 3, 6 and 24h reperfusion. Rats were randomly divided into the following groups: the sham-operation controls, ischemic group only treated with normal saline, and treated group infused magnoliae fargesii volatile oil before reperfusion. Then the renal injury of rats was detected. Results High rate of cell adhesion between HUVECs and neutrophils was observed. Magnoliae fargesii volatile oil could inhibit the adhesion process at the concentration of 0.5μL/mL (191.6±8.6), 1.0μL/mL (158.2±9.0) and 2.0μL/mL (155.2±9.7) (P<0.05). The anti-adhesion effects were strengthened with the increase of volatile oil concentration. Blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels of the animal models were significantly increased after 24h reperfusion while the increase was remarkably attenuated by the treatment with magnoliae fargesii volatile oil. The renal injury was severe after 1h reperfusion, which was significantly attenuated by the treatment of magnoliae fargesii volatile oil. Conclusion Magnoliae fargesii volatile oil has anti-inflammatory effects.

  20. Evaluation of the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of fixed dose combination: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Lahoti

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Combining paracetamol with ibuprofen enhances analgesic/anti-inflammatory activity over their individual component but potentiation of analgesic activity of diclofenac was not seen when paracetamol was added to it.

  1. Global transcriptome analysis of the heat shock response ofshewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haichun; Wang, Sarah; Liu, Xueduan; Yan, Tinfeng; Wu, Liyou; Alm, Eric; Arkin, Adam P.; Thompson, Dorothea K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2004-04-30

    Shewanella oneidensis is an important model organism for bioremediation studies because of its diverse respiratory capabilities. However, the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of S. oneidensis to survive and adapt to various environmentally relevant stresses is poorly understood. To define this organism's molecular response to elevated growth temperatures, temporal gene expression profiles were examined in cells subjected to heat stress using whole-genome DNA microarrays for S. oneidensis MR-1. Approximately 15 percent (711) of the predicted S. oneidensis genes represented on the microarray were significantly up- or down-regulated (P < 0.05) over a 25-min period following shift to the heat shock temperature (42 C). As expected, the majority of S. oneidensis genes exhibiting homology to known chaperones and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were highly and transiently induced. In addition, a number of predicted genes encoding enzymes in glycolys is and the pentose cycle, [NiFe] dehydrogenase, serine proteases, transcriptional regulators (MerR, LysR, and TetR families), histidine kinases, and hypothetical proteins were induced in response to heat stress. Genes encoding membrane proteins were differentially expressed, suggesting that cells possibly alter their membrane composition or structure in response to variations in growth temperature. A substantial number of the genes encoding ribosomal proteins displayed down-regulated co-expression patterns in response to heat stress, as did genes encoding prophage and flagellar proteins. Finally, based on computational comparative analysis of the upstream promoter regions of S.oneidensis heat-inducible genes, a putative regulatory motif, showing high conservation to the Escherichia coli sigma 32-binding consensus sequence, was identified.

  2. Integrative analysis of the heat shock response in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brakhage Axel A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus fumigatus is a thermotolerant human-pathogenic mold and the most common cause of invasive aspergillosis (IA in immunocompromised patients. Its predominance is based on several factors most of which are still unknown. The thermotolerance of A. fumigatus is one of the traits which have been assigned to pathogenicity. It allows the fungus to grow at temperatures up to and above that of a fevered human host. To elucidate the mechanisms of heat resistance, we analyzed the change of the A. fumigatus proteome during a temperature shift from 30°C to 48°C by 2D-fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE. To improve 2D gel image analysis results, protein spot quantitation was optimized by missing value imputation and normalization. Differentially regulated proteins were compared to previously published transcriptome data of A. fumigatus. The study was augmented by bioinformatical analysis of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in the promoter region of genes whose corresponding proteins were differentially regulated upon heat shock. Results 91 differentially regulated protein spots, representing 64 different proteins, were identified by mass spectrometry (MS. They showed a continuous up-, down- or an oscillating regulation. Many of the identified proteins were involved in protein folding (chaperones, oxidative stress response, signal transduction, transcription, translation, carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism. A correlation between alteration of transcript levels and corresponding proteins was detected for half of the differentially regulated proteins. Interestingly, some previously undescribed putative targets for the heat shock regulator Hsf1 were identified. This provides evidence for Hsf1-dependent regulation of mannitol biosynthesis, translation, cytoskeletal dynamics and cell division in A. fumigatus. Furthermore, computational analysis of promoters revealed putative binding sites for an AP-2alpha

  3. Stimulation of the Fibrillar Collagen and Heat Shock Proteins by Nicotinamide or Its Derivatives in Non-Irradiated or UVA Radiated Fibroblasts, and Direct Anti-Oxidant Activity of Nicotinamide Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Philips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In skin aging, from intrinsic factors or exposure to ultraviolet (UV radiation, there is loss of structural fibrillar collagen and regulatory heat shock proteins. Phenolic compounds, with hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic ring, have antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Nicotinamide is an amide derivative of niacin or vitamin B3, with an amide linked to an aromatic ring, with UV absorptive, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cell death/apoptosis properties. The goal of this research was to investigate the anti-skin aging mechanism of nicotinamide and its derivatives, 2,6-dihydroxynicotinamide, 2,4,5,6-tetrahydroxynicotinamide, and 3-hydroxypicolinamide (collectively niacin derivatives, through the stimulation of fibrillar collagens (type I, III and V, at protein and/or promoter levels and the expression of heat shock proteins (HSP-27, 47, 70, and 90 in non-irradiated or UVA radiated dermal fibroblasts; and from its direct antioxidant activity. UVA radiation inhibited the expression of types I and III collagen, and HSP-47 in dermal fibroblasts. The niacin derivatives significantly and similarly stimulated the expression of types I (transcriptionally, III and V collagens in non-irradiated, and UVA radiated fibroblasts indicating predominant effects. The 2,6-dihydroxynicotinamide had greater stimulatory effect on types I and III collagen in the non-irradiated, and UVA radiated fibroblasts, as well as greater direct antioxidant activity than the other niacin derivatives. The niacin derivatives, with a few exceptions, stimulated the expression of HSP-27, 47, 70 and 90 in non-irradiated, and UVA radiated fibroblasts. However, they had varied effects on the expression of the different HSPs in non-irradiated, and UVA radiated fibroblasts indicating non-predominant, albeit stimulatory, effect. Overall, nicotinamide and its derivatives have anti skin aging potential through the stimulation of fibrillar collagen and HSPs.

  4. Preventative oral methylthioadenosine is anti-inflammatory and reduces DSS-induced colitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methylthioadenosine (MTA) is a precursor of the methionine salvage pathway and has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties in various models of acute and chronic inflammation. However, the anti-inflammatory properties of MTA in models of intestinal inflammation are not defined. We hypothesiz...

  5. In-vitro anti- inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikumar, V.R.; Dhanamani, M.; Sudhamani, T.

    2009-01-01

    Aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (lour.) Spreng, which is traditionally used in the treatment of cough and cold was screened for its anti- inflammatory activity by HRBC membrane stabilisation model. Aqueous extract (500 mcg/ml) showed significant anti-inflammatory activity as compared to that of hydrocortisone sodium.

  6. In-vitro anti- inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (Lour.) Spreng.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, V R; Dhanamani, M; Sudhamani, T

    2009-04-01

    Aqueous extract of leaves of Plectranthus amboinicus (lour.) Spreng, which is traditionally used in the treatment of cough and cold was screened for its anti- inflammatory activity by HRBC membrane stabilisation model. Aqueous extract (500 mcg/ml) showed significant anti-inflammatory activity as compared to that of hydrocortisone sodium. PMID:22557324

  7. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTIOXIDANT COMPOUND, RUTIN IN CARDIOSPERMUM HALICACABUM LEAVES

    OpenAIRE

    Babu, K.C. Venkatesh; Krishnakumari, S.

    2005-01-01

    C.halicacabum is wide spread in tropical and sub-tropical Asia and Africa. Our laboratory results showed crude ethanolic extract of this plant exerted anti-inflammatory activity in chronic inflammatory models. In this present study, we tried to investigate the presence of anti-inflammatory compound in this extract.

  8. Anti-inflammatory properties of a novel peptide interleukin 1 receptor antagonist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klementiev, Boris; Li, Shizhong; Korshunova, Irina;

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide.......Interleukin 1 (IL-1) is implicated in neuroinflammation, an essential component of neurodegeneration. We evaluated the potential anti-inflammatory effect of a novel peptide antagonist of IL-1 signaling, Ilantide....

  9. DMPD: Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18086388 Molecular mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. Ko...varik P, Sauer I, Schaljo B. Immunobiology. 2007;212(9-10):895-901. Epub 2007 Nov 8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Molecular... mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory functions of interferons. PubmedID 18086388 Title Molecular

  10. Anti-inflammatory effect of interleukin-10 in rabbit immune complex-induced colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grool, TA; Van Dullemen, H; Meenan, J; Koster, F; Ten Kate, FJW; Lebeaut, A; Tytgat, GNJ; Van Deventer, SJH

    1998-01-01

    Background: Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that downregulates the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and additionally induces the secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines, thus possibly leading to reduction of chronic inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease. In this

  11. A Comprehensive Method of Identifying Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pielesz A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Because no model will ever completely replicate clinical human wound healing, it is essential that the model utilized be selected with care. Anatomically and physiologically, poultry skin is similar to human skin in many respects. Therefore, organic chicken skin (an ex-vivo burninjured skin model was analysed in this study. Acetate electrophoresis (CAE, microbiological procedure, Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR and scanning electron microscopy analysis (SEM were all carried out after heating samples of model chicken skin to a temperature simulating a burn incident and stimulating the release of Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs. Aggregates of smaller molecular weight, HSP37 proteins, were isolated by cellulose acetate electrophoresis. FTIR tests revealed that heating a dry organic chicken skin to boiling point leads to the production of β-sheet aggregates, which are the response of protein to thermal shock. Aggregates of HSP37 are produced in thermal injury and not all the antimicrobial activity of the skin is lost in this model. So, antimicrobial peptides found in the burnt skin, HSP proteins were confirmed by microscopic, microbiological, electrophoretic and spectroscopic examination.

  12. Effect of heat shock protein 70 on cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Yan; Xiulian Chen; Rui Chen; Shiming Xu; Lijuan Zhang; Hongjuan Wang; Chunyue Huo

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the relationship between heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and cerebral ischemia.DATA SOURCES: An online search of Medline database was undertaken to identify relevant articles published in English from January 1980 to December 2005 by using the keywords of "heat shock protein 70, ischemia". Meanwhile, Chinese relevant articles published from January 2000 to December 2005 were searched in China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) database and Chinese Journal of Clinical Rehabilitation with the keywords of "heat shock protein 70, cerebral ischemia" in Chinese.STUDY SELECTION: More than 100 related articles were screened, and 29 references mainly about HSP70and cerebral ischemia were selected, including basic and clinical researches. As to the articles with similar content, those published in the authoritative journals in recent 3 years were preferential.DATA EXTRACTION : A total of 29 articles were collected and classified according to the structure, function and clinical application of HSP70. Among them, 1 article is about the structure of HSP70, 27 about the relationship between HSP70 and cerebral ischemia, and 2 about the clinical application of HSP70.DATA SYNTHESTS: HSP70 is one of the most conservative proteins during biological evolution. Experiments in cerebral ischemia revealed that HSP70 expression was time-dependent, also correlated with the injured site and severity. The cerebral ischemia induced HSP70 gene expression in hippocampus of gerbil had protection to tolerance of fatal ischemic injury for neurons. The increase of HSP70 expression may be one of the endogenous protective mechanisms during cerebral ischemia, and can effectively alleviate cerebral ischemia. Thus HSP70 protein and HSP70 mRNA have been taken as important indexes extensively applied in the basic study of cerebral ischemia by some scholars abroad.CONCLUSTON: HSP70 plays a protective role in cerebral ischemia, and a deeper research into the biological function of

  13. Anti-inflammatory and opioid-like activities in methanol extract of Mikania lindleyana, sucuriju

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico A. Vanderlinde

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Mikania lindleyana DC., Asteraceae (sucuriju, grows in the Amazon region, where is frequently used to treat pain, inflammatory diseases and scarring. This study was carried out to investigate phytochemical profile accompanied by in vivo antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory screening of n-hexane (HE, dichloromethane (DME and methanol (ME extracts obtained from the aerial parts of the plant. The oral administration of ME (0.1, 0.3, 1 g/kg caused a dose-related reduction (16.2, 42.1 e 70.2% of acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing while HE and DME (1 g/kg, p.o. were ineffective. In the hot plate test, ME (300 mg/kg, p.o. increased the latency of heat stimulus between 30 and 120 min and inhibited the first (45% and second (60% phases of nociception in the formalin test. The antinociception induced by ME or positive control fentanyl (150 µg/kg, s.c. in hot plate and formalin tests was prevented by naloxone (3 mg/kg, s.c.. When submitted to the carrageenan-induced peritonitis test, ME (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 g/kg, p.o. impaired leukocyte migration into the peritoneal cavity by 46.8, 59.4 and 64.8% respectively, while positive control dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, s.c., inhibited leukocyte migration by 71.1%. These results indicate that the antinociception obtained after oral administration of methanol extract of M. lindleyana involves anti-inflammatory mechanisms accompanied with opioid-like activity which could explain the use of the specie for pain and inflammatory diseases.

  14. Intra-Binary Shock Heating of Black Widow Companions

    CERN Document Server

    Romani, Roger W

    2016-01-01

    The low mass companions of evaporating binary pulsars (black widows and their ilk) are strongly heated on the side facing the pulsar. However in high-quality photometric and spectroscopic data the heating pattern does not match that expected for direct pulsar illumination. Here we explore heating mediated by an intra-binary shock (IBS). We develop a simple analytic model and implement it in the popular `ICARUS' light curve code. The model is parameterized by the wind momentum ratio beta and velocity v_Rel v_orb and assumes that the reprocessed pulsar wind emits prompt particles or radiation to heat the companion surface. We illustrate an interesting range of light curve asymmetries controlled by these parameters. The code also computes the IBS synchrotron emission pattern, and thus can model black widow X-ray light curves. As a test we apply the results to the high quality asymmetric optical light curves of PSR J2215+5135; the resulting fit gives a substantial improvement upon direct heating models and produc...

  15. Intra-binary Shock Heating of Black Widow Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Sanchez, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    The low-mass companions of evaporating binary pulsars (black widows and similar) are strongly heated on the side facing the pulsar. However, in high-quality photometric and spectroscopic data, the heating pattern does not match that expected for direct pulsar illumination. Here we explore a model where the pulsar power is intercepted by an intra-binary shock (IBS) before heating the low-mass companion. We develop a simple analytic model and implement it in the popular “ICARUS” light curve code. The model is parameterized by the wind momentum ratio β and the companion wind speed {f}v{v}{{orb}}, and assumes that the reprocessed pulsar wind emits prompt particles or radiation to heat the companion surface. We illustrate an interesting range of light curve asymmetries controlled by these parameters. The code also computes the IBS synchrotron emission pattern, and thus can model black widow X-ray light curves. As a test, we apply the results to the high-quality asymmetric optical light curves of PSR J2215+5135; the resulting fit gives a substantial improvement upon direct heating models and produces an X-ray light curve consistent with that seen. The IBS model parameters imply that at the present loss rate, the companion evaporation has a characteristic timescale of {τ }{{evap}}≈ 150 Myr. Still, the model is not fully satisfactory, indicating that there are additional unmodeled physical effects.

  16. Stress-Specific Activation and Repression of Heat Shock Factors 1 and 2

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Anu; Mathur, Sameer K.; Jolly, Caroline; Fox, Susan G.; Kim, Soojin; Richard I Morimoto

    2001-01-01

    Vertebrate cells express a family of heat shock transcription factors (HSF1 to HSF4) that coordinate the inducible regulation of heat shock genes in response to diverse signals. HSF1 is potent and activated rapidly though transiently by heat shock, whereas HSF2 is a less active transcriptional regulator but can retain its DNA binding properties for extended periods. Consequently, the differential activation of HSF1 and HSF2 by various stresses may be critical for cells to survive repeated and...

  17. Report on the VIIth International Symposium on Heat Shock Proteins in Biology & Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Calderwood, Stuart K; Hightower, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    This seventh symposium in a series on heat shock proteins in biology and medicine was held November 1–5, 2014, at the Hilton Hotel in Old Town Alexandria, Virginia. Approximately 70 participants including principal investigators, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students were in attendance. The major themes were: new properties of heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock factor (HSF) and role in the etiology of cancer, molecular chaperones in aging, extracellular HSPs in inflammation and i...

  18. Heat Shock Protein 90 and Heat Shock Response%热激蛋白90与热激应答

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李娟; 杨惠; 周元国

    2008-01-01

    热激蛋白90(heat shock protein 90,HSP90)作为机体重要的分子伴侣之一,主要是维持机体内环境的稳态.在机体遭受内外界刺激时,体内氧化-抗氧化平衡失调诱发机体热激应答,诱导HSP90高表达来抵御刺激对机体造成的损伤.

  19. Heat Shock Protein 96 Induces Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunxia Cao; Wei Yang; Yonglie Chu; Qingguang Liu; Liang Yu; Cheng'en Pan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Heat shock protein (HSP) has the promiscuous abilities to chaperone and present a broad repertoire of tumor antigens to antigen presenting cells including DCs. In this report, we analyzed the modulation of immature DC by HSP 96 (gp96).Method: Murine bone marrow-derived DC was induced by GM-CSF plus IL-4, which aped the immunostimulatory effects of DC.Cocultured DC and gp96-peptide complexes (gp96-PC) or inactivated H22 cells, the expression of MHC class Ⅱ, CD40, CD80 was quantified by flow cytometry. The concentration of IL-12 and TNF- in culture supernatants were determined by ELISA.[51] Cr release assay was used to test specific cytotoxic T cell. Results: Our study demonstrated that the extent of DC maturation induced by gp96-PC, which was reflected in surface density of costimulatory and MHC Ⅱ molecules, was correlated with the secretion of IL-12 and with the T cellactivating potential in vitro. Conclusion: Heat shock protein 96 could be isolated and purified from H22 cells and could induce maturation of dendritic cell. Our findings might be relevance to the use of DC vaccine in therapy of human tumors.

  20. Modification of tooth development by heat shock protein 60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tamas Papp; Angela Polyak; Krisztina Papp; Zoltan Meszar; Roza Zakany; Eva Meszar-Katona; Palne Terdik Tu nde; Chang Hwa Ham; Szabolcs Felszeghy

    2016-01-01

    Although several heat shock proteins have been investigated in relation to tooth development, no available information is available about the spatial and temporal expression pattern of heat shock protein 60 (Hsp 60). To characterize Hsp 60 expression in the structures of the developing tooth germ, we used Western blotting, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Hsp 60 was present in high amounts in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, enamel knot (EK) and stratum intermedium (SI). Hsp 60 also appeared in odontoblasts beginning in the bell stage. To obtain data on the possible effect of Hsp 60 on isolated lower incisors from mice, we performed in vitro culturing. To investigate the effect of exogenous Hsp 60 on the cell cycle during culturing, we used the 5-bromo-2- deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation test on dental cells. Exogenously administered Hsp 60 caused bluntness at the apical part of the 16.5-day-old tooth germs, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of dental cells. We identified the expression of Hsp 60 in the developing tooth germ, which was present in high concentrations in the inner and outer enamel epithelia, EK, SI and odontoblasts. High concentration of exogenous Hsp 60 can cause abnormal morphology of the tooth germ, but it did not influence the proliferation rate of the dental cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of Hsp 60 may cause abnormalities in the morphological development of the tooth germ and support the data on the significance of Hsp during the developmental processes.

  1. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Chan-Gi, E-mail: changipack@amc.seoul.kr [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sang-Gun [Dept. of Pathology, College of Dentistry, Chosun University, Seosuk-dong, Dong-gu, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  2. Heat-shock-induced cellular responses to temperature elevations occurring during orthopaedic cutting

    OpenAIRE

    E.B Dolan; Haugh, M. G.; Tallon, D.; Casey, C.; McNamara, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Severe heat-shock to bone cells caused during orthopaedic procedures can result in thermal damage, leading to cell death and initiating bone resorption. By contrast, mild heat-shock has been proposed to induce bone regeneration. In this study, bone cells are exposed to heat-shock for short durations occurring during surgical cutting. Cellular viability, necrosis and apoptosis are investigated immediately after heat-shock and following recovery of 12, 24 h and 4 days, in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 ...

  3. An atypical unfolded protein response in heat shocked cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonneke Heldens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The heat shock response (HSR and the unfolded protein response (UPR are both activated by proteotoxic stress, although in different compartments, and share cellular resources. How these resources are allocated when both responses are active is not known. Insight in possible crosstalk will help understanding the consequences of failure of these systems in (age-related disease. RESULTS: In heat stressed HEK293 cells synthesis of the canonical UPR transcription factors XBP1s and ATF4 was detected as well as HSF1 independent activation of the promoters of the ER resident chaperones HSPA5 (BiP and DNAJB9 (ERdj4. However, the heat stress activation of the DNAJB9 promoter, a XBP1s target, was not blocked in cells expressing a dominant negative IRE1α mutant, and thus did not require XBP1s. Furthermore, the DNA element required for heat stress activation of the DNAJB9 promoter is distinct from the ATF4 and ATF6 target elements; even though inhibition of eIF2α phosphorylation resulted in a decreased activation of the DNAJB9 promoter upon heat stress, suggesting a role for an eIF2α phosphorylation dependent product. CONCLUSIONS: The initial step in the UPR, synthesis of transcription factors, is activated by heat stress but the second step, transcriptional transactivation by these factors, is blocked and these pathways of the UPR are thus not productive. Expression of canonical ER chaperones is part of the response of heat stressed cells but another set of transcription factors has been recruited to regulate expression of these ER chaperones.

  4. Endoscopical appearances of nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drug (NSAID- enteropathy

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    Marcellus Simadibrata

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAID have been associated with a sudden and sustained rise in the incidence of gastrointestinal ulcer complications. The aim of the study was to reveal the endoscopical abnormalities found in the duodenum & proximal jejunum due to NSAID. Thirty eight patients taking NSAID for their arthritis or rheumatism were included in this study. Gastro-duodeno-jejunoscopy was done with Olympus PCF-10. The endoscopical appearances of NSAID entero gastropathy were evaluated with a scoring system. The NSAID-entero-gastropathy appearances were endoscopically seen as hyperemia, erosion and ulcer. From all patient recruited, 7.9% complaint of diarrhea and 71.1% complaint of dyspepsia. Endoscopically, in the duodenal bulb we found 79% cases of hyperemia, 39.5% cases of erosion and 7.9% cases of ulcer. In the second part (descending part of the duodenum we found 28.9% cases of hyperemia, 15.8% cases of erosion and 2.6% case of ulcer. In the jejunum, we found 7.9% cases of hyperemia, 2.6% case of erosion and no ulcer. It is concluded that the most frequent abnormal endoscopical appearances in NSAID- enteropathy was hyperemia. The most frequent site of NSAID-enteropathy abnormal findings was in the duodenal bulb. (Med J Indones 2005; 14: 225-9Keywords: NSAID-enteropathy, endoscopical appearances.

  5. Anti-inflammatory Hydrolyzable Tannins from Myricaria bracteata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Bao; Ding, Ya-Si; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Jia-Bao; Cui, Bao-Song; Bai, Jin-Ye; Lin, Ming-Bao; Hou, Qi; Zhang, Pei-Cheng; Li, Shuai

    2015-05-22

    Twelve hydrolyzable tannins were obtained from the twigs of Myricaria bracteata, including two new hellinoyl-type dimers, bracteatinins D1 (1) and D2 (2); a new hellinoyl-type trimer, bracteatinin T1 (3); two known monomers, nilotinin M4 (4) and 1,3-di-O-galloyl-4,6-O-(aS)-hexahydroxydiphenoyl-β-d-glucose (5); six known dimers, tamarixinin A (6), nilotinin D8 (7), hirtellins A (10), B (9), and E (8), and isohirtellin C (11); and a known trimer, hirtellin T3 (12). The structures of the tannins were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis and comparisons to known tannins. All compounds were evaluated as free radical scavengers using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and hydroxy radicals and compared to the activity of BHT and Trolox. Compound 6 showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on croton oil-induced ear edema in mice (200 mg/kg, inhibition rate 69.8%) and on collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice (20 mg/kg, inhibition rate 46.0% at day 57). PMID:25918997

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Dimethylfumarate: A Potential New Therapy for Asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Seidel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, which results from the deregulated interaction of inflammatory cells and tissue forming cells. Beside the derangement of the epithelial cell layer, the most prominent tissue pathology of the asthmatic lung is the hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC bundles, which actively contributes to airway inflammation and remodeling. ASMCs of asthma patients secrete proinflammatory chemokines CXCL10, CCL11, and RANTES which attract immune cells into the airways and may thereby initiate inflammation. None of the available asthma drugs cures the disease—only symptoms are controlled. Dimethylfumarate (DMF is used as an anti-inflammatory drug in psoriasis and showed promising results in phase III clinical studies in multiple sclerosis patients. In regard to asthma therapy, DMF has been anecdotally reported to reduce asthma symptoms in patients with psoriasis and asthma. Here we discuss the potential use of DMF as a novel therapy in asthma on the basis of in vitro studies of its inhibitory effect on ASMC proliferation and cytokine secretion in ASMCs.

  7. Incorporation of anti-inflammatory agent into mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues Braz, Wilson; Lamec Rocha, Natállia; de Faria, Emerson H.; Silva, Márcio L. A. e.; Ciuffi, Katia J.; Tavares, Denise C.; Furtado, Ricardo Andrade; Rocha, Lucas A.; Nassar, Eduardo J.

    2016-09-01

    The unique properties of macroporous, mesoporous, and microporous systems, including their ability to accommodate molecules of different sizes inside their pores and to act as drug delivery systems, have been the object of extensive studies. In this work, mesoporous silica with hexagonal structure was obtained by template synthesis via the sol-gel process. The resulting material was used as support to accommodate the anti-inflammatory agent indomethacin. The alkaline route was used to prepare the mesoporous silica; cetyltrimethylammonium bromide was employed as porogenic agent. The silica particles were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane alkoxide (APTES) by the sol-gel post-synthesis method. Indomethacin was incorporated into the silica functionalized with APTES and into non-functionalized silica. The resulting systems were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), specific area, infrared spectroscopy, and thermal analyses (TGA). XRD attested to formation of mesoporous silica with hexagonal structure. This structure remained after silica functionalization with APTES and incorporation of indomethacin. Typical infrared spectroscopy vibrations and organic material decomposition during TGA confirmed silica functionalization and drug incorporation. The specific surface area and pore volume of the functionalized material incorporated with indomethacin decreased as compared with the specific surface area and pore volume of the non-functionalized silica containing no drug, suggesting both the functionalizing agent and the drug were present in the silica. Cytotoxicity tests conducted on normal fibroblasts (GM0479A) cells attested that the silica matrix containing indomethacin was less toxic than the free drug.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Components from the Root of Solanum erianthum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Hsiung Kuo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Two new norsesquiterpenoids, solanerianones A and B (1–2, together with nine known compounds, including four sesquiterpenoids, (−-solavetivone (3, (+-anhydro-β-rotunol (4, solafuranone (5, lycifuranone A (6; one alkaloid, N-trans-feruloyltyramine (7; one fatty acid, palmitic acid (8; one phenylalkanoid, acetovanillone (9, and two steroids, β-sitosterol (10 and stigmasterol (11 were isolated from the n-hexane-soluble part of the roots of Solanum erianthum. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of physical and spectroscopic data analyses. The anti-inflammatory activity of these isolates was monitored by nitric oxide (NO production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. The cytotoxicity towards human lung squamous carcinoma (CH27, human hepatocellular carcinoma (Hep 3B, human oral squamous carcinoma (HSC-3 and human melanoma (M21 cell lines was also screened by using an MTT assay. Of the compounds tested, 3 exhibited the strongest NO inhibition with the average maximum inhibition (Emax at 100 μM and median inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 98.23% ± 0.08% and 65.54 ± 0.18 μM, respectively. None of compounds (1–9 was found to possess cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines at concentrations up to 30 μM.

  9. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidon Mona

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction after ASA challenge is seen in 0 to 22% of asthmatic children so challenged, ibuprofen at antipyretic doses may cause acute respiratory problems only in a very small number of mild to moderate asthmatics. The recently elucidated mechanism of action of acetaminophen may explain some occurrences of adverse reactions in patients with cross-reactive NSAID hypersensitivity on the basis of its inhibitory activity on the newly described enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX-3. This nonspecific sensitivity to inhibition of COX is most likely genetically determined and shows a remarkable association with atopic disease even in the very young age group and possibly an increased predilection in specific ethnic groups. This review summarizes state-of-the-art published data on NSAID hypersensitivity in preschool children.

  10. Anti-inflammatory properties of drugs from saffron crocus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poma, Anna; Fontecchio, Gabriella; Carlucci, Giuseppe; Chichiriccò, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The medicinal uses of saffron (Crocus sativus Linnaeus) have a long history beginning in Asian countries since the Late Bronze Age. Recent studies have validated its potential to lower the risk of several diseases. Some metabolites derived from saffron stigmas exert numerous therapeutic effects due to hypolipidemic, antitussive, antioxidant, antidiabetic activities and many others. Water and ethanol extracts of Crocus sativus L. are cardioprotective and counteract neurodegenerative disorders. Many of these medicinal properties of saffron can be attributed to a number of its compounds such as crocetin, crocins and other substances having strong antioxidant and radical scavenger properties against a variety of radical oxygen species and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Botany, worldwide spreading of cultivars, biochemical pathways, active constituents and chemical detection methods are reviewed. Therapeutic uses of saffron principles with particular regard to those exhibiting antioxidant and thus anti-inflammatory features are discussed. To date, very few adverse health effects of saffron have been demonstrated. At high doses (more than 5 g/die day), it should be avoided in pregnancy owing to its uterine stimulation activity.

  11. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EVALUATION OF LEAF EXTRACT OF MORINGA OLEIFERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurvinder Pal Singh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera Lam. Is a small or medium-sized tree, about 10m high, found wild in the sub-Himalayan tract. The leaves are rich in vitamin A and C and are considered useful in scurvy and catarrhal affections. The leaves are rich in ascorbic acids, amino acids, sterols, isoquercetin glucoside, carotenes, rhamnetin, kaempferol and kaempferitrin. Flowers are traditionally used as tonic, diuretic and abortifacient considered as anthelmintic and also used to cure inflammation, muscle disease, tumors and enlargement of the spleen. All part of this plant is used for the treatment of ascites, rheumatism. Venomous bites and for enhancing cardiac function. In present study, the anti-inflammatory activity was investigated by employing main model Carrageenan induced paw odema (Winter et al., 1962. The results showed a dose dependent decrease in size of odema when observed at 0hr, 1hr, 2hr, 3hr, and 4hr. This effect corresponded with the maximum effect of test dose at 2 hr (Carrageenan-induced paw. The p value<0.0001 was considered to be statistically significant.

  12. Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs in Raptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaks, J. Lindsay; Meteyer, Carol U.

    2012-01-01

    The use of analgesia has become standard, and appropriate, practice in avian medicine. As in mammals, pain control in avian patients is usually accomplished with opioids and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) used singly or in combination for a multimodal approach. Despite their usefulness, widespread use, and relative safety in clinical use, few controlled studies in birds have been conducted on efficacy, safety, and dosing. The guidelines for the use of NSAIDs in raptors and other birds have mainly been empirical. More recently, NSAIDs in free-living raptors have emerged as a major conservation issue with the discovery that diclofenac sodium was responsible for the population crash of three species of Gyps vultures in southern Asia. In this context, residues of veterinary NSAIDs in domestic animals are now considered environmental contaminants that can be significantly toxic to vultures and possibly other avian scavengers. Ironically, the disaster with Asian vultures has led to a considerable body of research on NSAIDs in raptors to the benefit of clinicians who now have scientific information available to help assess dosing, safety, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics of NSAIDs in their raptor patients.

  13. Anti-inflammatory effects, nuclear magnetic resonance identification, and high-performance liquid chromatography isolation of the total flavonoids from Artemisia frigida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghu Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aerial parts of Artemisia frigida Willd. are used to treat joint swelling, renal heat, abnormal menstruation, and sore carbuncle. The anti-inflammatory effects of A. frigida have been well-known in folk medicine, suggesting that components extracted from A. frigida could potentially treat inflammatory disease. With the aim of discovering bioactive compounds, in this study, we extracted total flavonoids from the aerial parts of A. frigida and investigated their anti-inflammatory effects against inflammation induced by carrageenan and egg albumin in rats. At the doses studied, total flavonoids (100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg, and 400 mg/kg and some isolated compounds (30 mg/kg showed significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects. According to the high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of the total flavonoids from A. frigida, there are five major compounds, namely, 5-hydroxy-3′,4′-dimethoxy-7-O-β-d-glucuronide (F1, 5-hydroxy-3′,4′,5′-trimethoxy-7-O-β-d-glucuronide (F2, 5,7,3′-trihydroxy-6,4′-dimethoxyflavone (F3, 5,3′-dihydroxy-6,7,4′-trimethoxyflavone (F4, and 5,3′-dihydroxy-3,6,7,4′-tetramethoxyflavone (F5, which may explain the anti-inflammatory activity.

  14. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of Strobilanthus callosus Nees and Strobilanthus ixiocephala Benth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupali Vitthal Sarpate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Strobilanthus callosus Nees and Strobilanthus ixiocephala Benth belongs to family Acanthaceae. The plants have been the subject of scientific research which confirms its use in folk medicine as anti-inflammatory drugs showing potent anti-rheumatic effects. Previous research claims the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activities of Lupeol and 19α-H Lupeol isolated from Strobilanthus callosus and Strobilanthus ixiocephala roots. Based on the literature cited, the unexplored parts stems and leaves of the two species were selected for the present study. Aim: The present study is designed to isolate steroidal and alkaloidal components from the two species Strobilanthus callosus and Strobilanthus ixiocephala using the unexplored parts viz. stems and leaves and to investigate its anti-inflammatory effect. Settings and Design: The anti-inflammatory effect was investigated employing subacute anti-inflammatory models namely cotton pellet granuloma and carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory activity was carried out using isolated test components RVS-A (Lupeol, RVS-C (Doctriacantone and standard drug Diclofenac sodium (10 mg/kg. Results: The present study has dealt up with isolation of two phytoconstituents Lupeol and Dotriacontane which gave marked anti-inflammatory activity at the dose 20 mg/kg in both the models Carrageenan induced rat paw edema and Cotton pellet granuloma. Conclusion: The results confirm that the mechanism of the anti-inflammatory effect of RVS-A (Lupeol and RVS-C (Doctriacantone involves reduction of prostaglandins through inhibition of cyclooxygenase and suppression of proliferative phase of sub acute inflammation. Thus the steroidal and alkaloidal components Lupeol and Doctriacantone isolated from Strobilanthus callosus Nees and Strobilanthus ixiocephala Benth shows marked anti-inflammatory activity.

  15. DMPD: Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18336664 Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages...(.html) (.csml) Show Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macrophages. PubmedID 18...336664 Title Mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory effects of adiponectin in macro

  16. DMPD: Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mechanisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17981503 Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmol...) (.html) (.csml) Show Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mech...anisms. PubmedID 17981503 Title Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new in

  17. Assessment of anti-inflammatory potential of Sesbania bispinosa Linn. leaf extracts and fractions by acute and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh D. Boddawar

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study suggest that leaves of S. bispinosa possess significant level of anti-inflammatory activity and ethyl acetate fraction may be further explored as an anti-inflammatory remedy as it was found to possess higher anti-inflammatory activity among all extracts and fractions as demonstrated in both acute and chronic models.

  18. Potential analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu L. nut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandare, Amol M; Kshirsagar, Ajay D; Vyawahare, Neeraj S; Hadambar, Avinash A; Thorve, Vrushali S

    2010-12-01

    The hydroalcoholic extract of Areca catechu L. (ANE) nut was screened for its analgesic, anti-inflammatory and in vitro antioxidant potential. Three doses of ANE (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg orally) were tested for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Evaluation of analgesic activity of ANE was performed using hot plate and formalin test in mice. ANE showed maximum increase in hot plate reaction time (56.27%, pAreca catechu could be considered as a potential analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agent. PMID:20849907

  19. Anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect of ficus religiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S; Thirugnanasambantham, P; Reddy, M K; Narasimhan, S; Subramaniam, G A

    1990-10-01

    The aqueous extract of bark of Ficus religiosa was prepared and investigated for its anti-inflammatory effect and for its protective effect on mast cells against degranulation. A significant anti-inflammatory effect was observed in both acute and chronic models of inflammation. The extract also protected mast cells from degranulation induced by various degranulatiors. The observed anti-inflammatory and mast cell protective effect may be responsible for the beneficial effect of Ficus religiosa in kumkum dermatitis and other inflammatory conditions. PMID:22556521

  20. Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Essential Oils: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Graça Miguel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are complex mixtures isolated from aromatic plants which may possess antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of interest in thye food and cosmetic industries as well as in the human health field. In this work, a review was done on the most recent publications concerning their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. At the same time a survey of the methods generally used for the evaluation of antioxidant activity and some of the mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory activities of essential oils are also reported.

  1. 信息动态%Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of granule to pelvic inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of granucle to pelvic inflammation. Methods The anti-inflammatory effects were studied by dimethylbenzene-induced swelling oar in mouse, carrageenin induced paw edema and tampon-induced proliferation in rats. The analgesic effects were studied by acetic acid-induced writhing and optothermal-induced pain in mice. Results Granule to pelvic inflammation significantly reduced swelling oar in mouse, paw edema and proliferation in rats;prolonged latency of writhing test, reduced the writhing number and improved optothermal-induced analgesia percentage. Conclusion Granule to pelvic inflammation has anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects.

  2. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Arya; Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock induced gene expression and other cellular responses help limit the damage caused by stress and thus facilitate cellular recovery. Cellular damage also triggers apoptotic cell death through several pathways. This paper briefly reviews interactions of the major heat shock proteins with components of the apoptotic pathways. Hsp90, which acts as a chaperone for unstable signal transducers to keep them poised for activation, interacts with RIP and Akt and promotes NF-B mediated inhibition of apoptosis; in addition it also blocks some steps in the apoptotic pathways. Hsp70 is mostly anti-apoptotic and acts at several levels like inhibition of translocation of Bax into mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, formation of apoptosome and inhibition of activation of initiator caspases. Hsp70 also modulates JNK, NF-B and Akt signaling pathways in the apoptotic cascade. In contrast, Hsp60 has both anti- and pro-apoptotic roles. Cytosolic Hsp60 prevents translocation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax into mitochondria and thus promotes cell survival but it also promotes maturation of procaspase-3, essential for caspase mediated cell death. Our recent in vivo studies show that RNAi for the Hsp60D in Drosophila melanogaster prevents induced apoptosis. Hsp27 exerts its anti-apoptotic influence by inhibiting cytochrome c and TNF-mediated cell death. crystallin suppresses caspase-8 and cytochrome c mediated activation of caspase-3. Studies in our laboratory also reveal that absence or reduced levels of the developmentally active as well as stress induced non-coding hsr transcripts, which are known to sequester diverse hnRNPs and related nuclear RNA-binding proteins, block induced apoptosis in Drosophila. Modulation of the apoptotic pathways by Hsps reflects their roles as ``weak links” between various ``hubs” in cellular networks. On the other hand, non-coding RNAs, by virtue of their potential to bind with multiple proteins, can act as ``hubs” in

  3. Differential expression of heat shock transcription factors and heat shock proteins after acute and chronic heat stress in laying chickens (Gallus gallus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Xie

    Full Text Available Heat stress due to high environmental temperature negatively influences animal performances. To better understand the biological impact of heat stress, laying broiler breeder chickens were subjected either to acute (step-wisely increasing temperature from 21 to 35°C within 24 hours or chronic (32°C for 8 weeks high temperature exposure. High temperature challenges significantly elevated body temperature of experimental birds (P<0.05. However, oxidation status of lipid and protein and expression of heat shock transcription factors (HSFs and heat shock proteins (HSPs 70 and 90 were differently affected by acute and chronic treatment. Tissue-specific responses to thermal challenge were also found among heart, liver and muscle. In the heart, acute heat challenge affected lipid oxidation (P = 0.05 and gene expression of all 4 HSF gene expression was upregulated (P<0.05. During chronic heat treatment, the HSP 70 mRNA level was increased (P<0.05 and HSP 90 mRNA (P<0.05 was decreased. In the liver, oxidation of protein was alleviated during acute heat challenge (P<0.05, however, gene expression HSF2, 3 and 4 and HSP 70 were highly induced (P<0.05. HSP90 expression was increased by chronic thermal treatment (P<0.05. In the muscle, both types of heat stress increased protein oxidation, but HSFs and HSPs gene expression remained unaltered. Only tendencies to increase were observed in HSP 70 (P = 0.052 and 90 (P = 0.054 gene expression after acute heat stress. The differential expressions of HSF and HSP genes in different tissues of laying broiler breeder chickens suggested that anti-heat stress mechanisms might be provoked more profoundly in the heart, by which the muscle was least protected during heat stress. In addition to HSP, HSFs gene expression could be used as a marker during acute heat stress.

  4. Hormonal modulation of the heat shock response: insights from fish with divergent cortisol stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LeBlanc, Sacha; Höglund, Erik; Gilmour, Kathleen M.;

    2012-01-01

    shock response, we capitalized on two lines of rainbow trout specifically bred for their high (HR) and low (LR) cortisol response to stress. We predicted that LR fish, with a low cortisol but high catecholamine response to stress, would induce higher levels of HSPs after acute heat stress than HR trout......Acute temperature stress in animals results in increases in heat shock proteins (HSPs) and stress hormones. There is evidence that stress hormones influence the magnitude of the heat shock response; however, their role is equivocal. To determine whether and how stress hormones may affect the heat....... We found that HR fish have significantly higher increases in both catecholamines and cortisol compared with LR fish, and LR fish had no appreciable stress hormone response to heat shock. This unexpected finding prevented further interpretation of the hormonal modulation of the heat shock response...

  5. A minimal titration modelization of the mammalian dynamical heat shock response

    CERN Document Server

    Aude, Sivéry; Thommen, Quentin

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stress, such as oxidative or heat stress, induces the activation of the Heat Shock Response (HSR) which leads to an increase in the heat shock proteins (HSPs) level. These HSPs act as molecular chaperones to maintain proteostasis. Even if the main heat shock response partners are well known, a detailed description of the dynamical properties of the HSR network is still missing. In this study, we derive a minimal mathematical model of cellular response to heat shock that reproduces available experimental data sets both on transcription factor activity and cell viability. This simplistic model highlights the key mechanistic processes that rule the HSR network and reveals (i) the titration of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1) by chaperones as the guiding line of the network, (ii) that protein triage governs the fate of damaged proteins and (iii) three different temperature regimes describing normal, acute or chronic stress.

  6. The small heat shock protein, HSP30, is associated with aggresome-like inclusion bodies in proteasomal inhibitor-, arsenite-, and cadmium-treated Xenopus kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Saad; Khamis, Imran; Heikkila, John J

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, treatment of Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells with the proteasomal inhibitor, MG132, or the environmental toxicants, sodium arsenite or cadmium chloride, induced the accumulation of the small heat shock protein, HSP30, in total and in both soluble and insoluble protein fractions. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed the presence of relatively large HSP30 structures primarily in the perinuclear region of the cytoplasm. All three of the stressors promoted the formation of aggresome-like inclusion bodies as determined by immunocytochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy using a ProteoStat aggresome dye and additional aggresomal markers, namely, anti-γ-tubulin and anti-vimentin antibodies. Further analysis revealed that HSP30 co-localized with these aggresome-like inclusion bodies. In most cells, HSP30 was found to envelope or occur within these structures. Finally, we show that treatment of cells with withaferin A, a steroidal lactone with anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor, and proteasomal inhibitor properties, also induced HSP30 accumulation that co-localized with aggresome-like inclusion bodies. It is possible that proteasomal inhibitor or metal/metalloid-induced formation of aggresome-like inclusion bodies may sequester toxic protein aggregates until they can be degraded. While the role of HSP30 in these aggresome-like structures is not known, it is possible that they may be involved in various aspects of aggresome-like inclusion body formation or transport.

  7. The Epidemiology of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry Tenenbaum

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use has increased dramatically in the past two decades. A large proportion of the elderly population (more than 65 years of age holds a current or recent NSAID prescription, accounting for approximately 90% of all NSAID prescriptions. Despite studies that advise finding alternatives for NSAIDs for the management of osteoarthritis, physicians often prescribe NSAIDs first for such common musculoskeletal conditions. Despite being identified as risk factors for gastrointestinal complications, the simultaneous use of two NSAIDs and the coadministration of NSAIDs with corticosteroids and with coumadin continue to occur. The point prevalence of NSAID-induced ulcers is 10% to 30%, and 15% to 35% of all peptic ulcer complications are caused by NSAIDs. The increased risk of gastrointestinal complications when NSAIDs are used is 3% to 5%. This risk increases with other identified risk factors (eg, older age, previous gastrointestinal history, comorbid diseases and poor health. Gastrointestinal causes of hospitalization (eg, gastrointestinal hemorrhage and perforation and death have increased in parallel to increased NSAID use. ‘Antiulcer’ agents are prescribed twice as often in NSAID users, and the economic impact (eg, diagnostic tests and hospitalization is that about one-third of the arthritis budget has been dedicated to deal with gastrointestinal side effects of NSAIDs. Misoprostol and omeprazole have been shown to be cytoprotective for the gastroduodenal mucosa when NSAIDs are used, and misoprostol has been shown to reduce the risk of gastroduodenal ulcer complications. Economic evaluations have suggested that these agents are a cost effective means of dealing with such NSAID-associated problems. Although no NSAID is totally safe, a number of studies have demonstrated that NSAIDs may be ranked according to relative gastrointestinal toxicity. The role of Helicobacter pylori in NSAID-associated problems

  8. Determination of Teloschistes flavicans (sw norm anti-inflammatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênia C Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lichens produce a variety of substances that possesses pharmacological actions. However, rare products are submitted to rigorous scientific tests or have the risk potential or side effects evaluated. The lack of medical and sanitary control, absence of accurate botanical identification or purity certification, founded in diverse natural products, may represent great danger to population health. This work aimed to evaluate toxic effects and anti-inflammatory action in vivo of Teloschistes flavicans (Sw. Norm. (TFN unrefined extracts, as well as determinate its main constituents. Methods: The carrageenan induced paw edema and cotton pellet implant induced granuloma methods were utilized, besides a classic acute toxicity test. TFN acetone extract inhibited carrageenan paw edema on 60, 120, and 180 min (inhibition percentiles of 45.03%, 60.59% and 41.72%. Results: TFN ethereal (inhibition percentiles of 23.95% and 29.01% and chloroform (inhibition percentiles of 28.8% and 22.04% extracts inhibited edema on 120 and 180 min. None of the extract inhibited the granuloma development. None of the extract caused death or other acute toxicity signs. Vicanicine (60.26% in ethereal extract and 51.17% in acetone extract, parietine (9.60% in ethereal extract and 15.38% on second, falacinol (0.78% in ether and 14.95% in acetone and very low concentration of falacinal (0.15% in ethereal extract and 3.32% in acetone extract were detected in the medicine. Conclusions: The tested extracts have antiedematogenic activity, but are not effective on subchronic inflammation. The extracts do not present toxic effects in administered doses.

  9. Inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects of soybean agglutinin

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    Benjamin C.F.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean agglutinin (SBA lectin, a protein present in raw soybean meals, can bind to and be extensively endocytosed by intestinal epithelial cells, being nutritionally toxic for most animals. In the present study we show that SBA (5-200 µg/cavity injected into different cavities of rats induced a typical inflammatory response characterized by dose-dependent exudation and neutrophil migration 4 h after injection. This effect was blocked by pretreatment with glucocorticoid (0.5 mg/kg or by co-injection of N-acetyl-galactosamine (100 x [M] lectin, but not of other sugars (100 x [M] lectin, suggesting an inflammatory response related to the lectin activity. Neutrophil accumulation was not dependent on a direct effect of SBA on the macrophage population since the effect was not altered when the number of peritoneal cells was increased or decreased in vivo. On the other hand, SBA showed chemotactic activity for human neutrophils in vitro. A slight increase in mononuclear cells was observed 48 h after ip injection of SBA. Phenotypic analysis of these cells showed an increase in the CD4+/CD8- lymphocyte population that returned to control levels after 15 days, suggesting the development of an immune response. SBA-stimulated macrophages presented an increase in the expression of CD11/CD18 surface molecules and showed some characteristics of activated cells. After intravenous administration, SBA increased the number of circulating neutrophils and inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the neutrophil migration induced by ip injection of carrageenan into peritoneal cavities. The co-injection of N-acetyl-galactosamine or mannose, but not glucose or fucose, inhibited these effects. The data indicate that soybean lectin is able to induce a local inflammatory reaction but has an anti-inflammatory effect when present in circulating blood

  10. Anti-inflammatory effect of Momordica charantia in sepsis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Che-Yi; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Wang, Wei-Hsien; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung

    2014-01-01

    Wild bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L. var. abbreviate Seringe), a common vegetable in Asia, is used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases, including inflammation. Extant literature indicates that wild bitter gourds have components that activate PPARα and PPARγ. This research probed the influence of adding wild bitter gourd to diets on inflammation responses in mice with sepsis induced by intraperitoneal injection of LPS. Male BALB/c mice were divided normal, sepsis, positive control, and three experimental groups. The latter ate diets with low (1%), moderate (2%), and high (10%) ratios of wild bitter gourd lyophilized powder. Before mice were sacrificed, with the exception of the normal group, intraperitoneal injection of LPS induced sepsis in each group; positive control group was injected with LPS after PDTC. This experiment revealed starkly lower weights in groups with added wild bitter gourd than those of the remaining groups. Blood lipids (TG, cholesterol, and NEFA) were also lower in comparison to the sepsis group, and blood glucose concentrations recovered and approached normal levels. Blood biochemistry values related to inflammation reactions indicated GOT, GPT, C-RP, and NO concentrations of groups with added wild bitter gourd were all lower than those of the sepsis group. Secretion levels of the spleen pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α tallied significantly lower in comparison to the sepsis group, whereas secretion levels of IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokine increased. Expression level of proteins NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2 were significantly inhibited. Results indicate wild bitter gourd in diets promoted lipid metabolism, reducing fat accumulation, and improving low blood glucose in sepsis. Addition of wild bitter gourd can reduce inflammation biochemical markers or indicators and pro-inflammatory cytokines in the body, hence improving the inflammation responses in mice with sepsis. PMID:25153878

  11. Anti-inflammatory and antiviral effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Jiuan; Weng, Ching-Yi; Ding, Hsiou-Yu; Wu, Pei-Jong

    2005-01-21

    Glossogyne tenuifolia (Hsiang-Ju) is a traditional antipyretic and hepatoprotective herb used in Chinese medicine. The aim of this research is to investigate the pharmacological activities and potent components of the ethanol extract of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) in human primary cells and cell line. We found that GT (0.1 approximately 0.25 mg/ml) exerted dose-dependent inhibitions on the release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in LPS-activated human whole blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and IFN-gamma in PHA-stimulated human whole blood. The lack of cytotoxicity indicated that the inhibitory effects of GT on cytokine production were not due to cell death. Luteolin, the deglycosylated derivative of one of the major compositions, luteolin-7-glucoside, exerted inhibitory effects on TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma production in activated human whole blood with estimated IC(50)s of 42.73 microM, 44.86 microM and 3.34 microM, respectively. Furthermore, GT had potent anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV) effects on the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line, PLC/PRF/5. GT exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition on the release of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by repressing the expression of HBsAg with IC(50) of 0.093 mg/ml. We concluded that GT exerted combinatorial anti-inflammatory and antiviral effects, and the multiple actions may underlie its traditional hepatoprotective function. PMID:15620577

  12. Characterization of the heat shock response in Brucella abortus and isolation of the genes encoding the GroE heat shock proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, J.; Adams, L G; Ficht, T A

    1992-01-01

    In an effort to define the heat shock response in the bovine intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus, a rough variant lacking extensive lipopolysaccharide was pulse-labeled with [35S]methionine following exposure to elevated temperatures. The major heat shock proteins observed following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography migrate at 70, 62, 18, and 10 kDa. The maximum response was observed between 42 and 46 degrees C and within 2 to 3 h of the shif in...

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes Subjected to Heat Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyanira Pérez-Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is exposed to sudden temperature changes during its life cycle. Adaptation to these variations is crucial for parasite survival, reproduction, and transmission. Some of these conditions may change the pattern of genetic expression of proteins involved in homeostasis in the course of stress treatment. In the present study, the proteome of T. cruzi epimastigotes subjected to heat shock and epimastigotes grow normally was compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. Twenty-four spots differing in abundance were identified. Of the twenty-four changed spots, nineteen showed a greater intensity and five a lower intensity relative to the control. Several functional categories of the identified proteins were determined: metabolism, cell defense, hypothetical proteins, protein fate, protein synthesis, cellular transport, and cell cycle. Proteins involved in the interaction with the cellular environment were also identified, and the implications of these changes are discussed.

  14. HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN gp96 AND CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳培彬; 杨树德; 黄常志

    2002-01-01

    Heat shock protein gp96 is a highly conserved and monomorphic glycoprotein in the endoplasmic reticulum.It functions as molecular chaperone and can associate with a variety of antigenic peptides noncovalently in vivo and in vitro. Recent studies have indicated that gp96 molecules participate in major histocompatibility complex class I - restricted antigen presentation pathway. Immunization of mice with gp96 preparations isolated from cancer cells can elicit a cancer - specific protective T cell immune response that is recallable, which is a prerequisite for gp96 as a therapeutic vaccine against cancers. The immunogenicity of gp96 molecules has been attributed to the antigenic peptides associated with them. These phenomena provide a new pathway for cancer immunotherapy. The mechanism that the gp96 -peptide complex induces specific immune response and the explorations for gp96 - peptide complex as a therapeutic cancer vaccine are reviewed.

  15. Heat Shock Protein 90 regulates encystation in Entamoeba

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    Meetali eSingh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Enteric protozoan Entamoeba histolytica is a major cause of debilitating diarrheal infection worldwide with high morbidity and mortality. Even though the clinical burden of this parasite is very high, this infection is categorized as a neglected disease. Parasite is transmitted through feco-oral route and exhibit two distinct stages namely – trophozoites and cysts. Mechanism and regulation of encystation is not clearly understood. Previous studies have established the role of Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 in regulating stage transition in various protozoan parasites like Giardia, Plasmodium, Leishmania and Toxoplasma. Our study for the first time reports that Hsp90 plays a crucial role in life cycle of Entamoeba as well. We identify Hsp90 to be a negative regulator of encystation in Entamoeba. We also show that Hsp90 inhibition interferes with the process of phagocytosis in Entamoeba. Overall, we show that Hsp90 plays an important role in virulence and transmission of Entamoeba.

  16. Protein kinase A binds and activates heat shock factor 1.

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    Ayesha Murshid

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many inducible transcription factors are regulated through batteries of posttranslational modifications that couple their activity to inducing stimuli. We have studied such regulation of Heat Shock Factor 1 (HSF1, a key protein in control of the heat shock response, and a participant in carcinogenisis, neurological health and aging. As the mechanisms involved in the intracellular regulation of HSF1 in good health and its dysregulation in disease are still incomplete we are investigating the role of posttranslational modifications in such regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In a proteomic study of HSF1 binding partners, we have discovered its association with the pleiotropic protein kinase A (PKA. HSF1 binds avidly to the catalytic subunit of PKA, (PKAcα and becomes phosphorylated on a novel serine phosphorylation site within its central regulatory domain (serine 320 or S320, both in vitro and in vivo. Intracellular PKAcα levels and phosphorylation of HSF1 at S320 were both required for HSF1 to be localized to the nucleus, bind to response elements in the promoter of an HSF1 target gene (hsp70.1 and activate hsp70.1 after stress. Reduction in PKAcα levels by small hairpin RNA led to HSF1 exclusion from the nucleus, its exodus from the hsp70.1 promoter and decreased hsp70.1 transcription. Likewise, null mutation of HSF1 at S320 by alanine substitution for serine led to an HSF1 species excluded from the nucleus and deficient in hsp70.1 activation. CONCLUSIONS: These findings of PKA regulation of HSF1 through S320 phosphorylation add to our knowledge of the signaling networks converging on this factor and may contribute to elucidating its complex roles in the stress response and understanding HSF1 dysregulation in disease.

  17. The hexameric structures of human heat shock protein 90.

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    Cheng-Chung Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human 90-kDa heat shock protein (HSP90 functions as a dimeric molecular chaperone. HSP90 identified on the cell surface has been found to play a crucial role in cancer invasion and metastasis, and has become a validated anti-cancer target for drug development. It has been shown to self-assemble into oligomers upon heat shock or divalent cations treatment, but the functional role of the oligomeric states in the chaperone cycle is not fully understood. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the crystal structure of a truncated HSP90 that contains the middle segment and the carboxy-terminal domain, termed MC-HSP90. The structure reveals an architecture with triangular bipyramid geometry, in which the building block of the hexameric assembly is a dimer. In solution, MC-HSP90 exists in three major oligomer states, namely dimer, tetramer and hexamer, which were elucidated by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. The newly discovered HSP90 isoform HSP90N that lacks the N-terminal ATPase domain also exhibited similar oligomerization states as did MC-HSP90. CONCLUSIONS: While lacking the ATPase domain, both MC-HSP90 and HSP90N can self-assemble into a hexameric structure, spontaneously. The crystal structure of MC-HSP90 reveals that, in addition to the C-terminal dimerization domain, the residue W320 in the M domain plays a critical role in its oligomerization. This study not only demonstrates how the human MC-HSP90 forms a hexamer, but also justifies the similar formation of HSP90N by using 3D modeling analysis.

  18. Increased heat shock protein 70 expression in the pancreas of rats with endotoxic shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Lian Wang; Ying Li; Jin-Song Kuang; Yue Zhao; Pei Liu

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ultra-structural changes and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in the pancreas of rats with endotoxic shock and to detect their possible relationship.METHODS: A total of 33 Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control group (given normal saline), small dose lipopolysaccharide (LPS) group (given LPS 5 mg/kg) and large dose LPS group (given LPS 10mg/kg). Pancreas was explanted to detect the ultrastructural changes by TEM and the HSP70 expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blot.RESULTS: Rats given small doses of LPS showed swelling and loss of mitochondrial cristae of acinar cells and increased number of autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of acinar cells. Rats given large doses of LPS showed swelling, vacuolization, and obvious myeloid changes of mitochondrial cristae of acinar cells, increased number of autophagic vacuoles in the cytoplasm of acinar cells. HSP70 expression was increased compared to the control group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Small doses of LPS may induce stronger expression of HSP70, promote autophagocytosis and ameliorate ultra-structural injuries.

  19. Induced Levels of Heat Shock Proteins in dnaK mutants of Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Hammer, Karin; Vogensen, Finn K.;

    1998-01-01

    The bacterial heat shock response is characterized by the elevated expression of a number of chaperone complexes and proteases including the DnaK-GrpE-DnaJ and the GroELS chaperone complexes. In order to investigate the importance of the DnaK chaperone complex for the growth and the heat shock...

  20. Heat protective role and mechanism of heat shock protein Hpc60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A cytosolic heat shock protein named Hpc60 has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from pea leaves and its function has been examined in vitro. Results show that Hpc60 may suppress the aggregation of luciferase (LUC), protect lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) from thermal inactivation. It also shows that Mg2+, ATP and pH affect the protective function of Hpc60 in different manners.

  1. Studies on the mechanisms of anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts and fractions of Alchornea floribunda leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Festus BC.Okoye; Patience O.Osadebe

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Alchornea floribunda leaves are widely used in ethnomedicinal management of inflammatory disor-ders.The present work is aimed at investigating this folkloric use.Methods:The anti-inflammatory effect of the leaf extracts and fractions was investigated in experimental animal models of acute and chronic inflamma-tion.The possible mechanisms by which the two most active fractions,hexane (HE)and ethyl acetate (EF) exert their effects were also investigated.Results:The crude extract (200 mg/kg)showed moderate inhibition of egg albumen-induced edema in rats (% edema inhibition =54.69)at 4 h.HE and EF showed very high activity (% edema inhibition of 81.25 and 67.19 respectively at 200 mg/kg)at 4h as compared to the con-trol.Both fractions ameliorated arthritis induced by formaldehyde in rats.At 400 mg/kg,HE evoked a signifi-cant irritation of gastric mucosa in rats.EF (200 mg/kg,p.o.)significantly inhibited leucocytes (% inhibi-tion =36.79)migration in vivo,but could not stabilize heat and hypotonicity-induced lysis of human erythro-cyte at 200 and 400 μg/mL in vitro.Phytochemical investigation revealed the presence of terpenoids and ster-oids in HE and flavonoids,tannins and saponins in EF.Conclusion:These results suggest that the leaves of Alchornea floribunda possess anti-inflammatory activity in acute and chronic inflammation.The activity may de-rive from a combination of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis and leucocytes migration.The phytochemical constituents detected in HE and EF may account for the anti-inflammatory activity.

  2. Antinociceptive and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Orally Administrated Denatured Naja Naja Atra Venom on Murine Rheumatoid Arthritis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kou-Zhu Zhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of the denatured Naja Naja atra venom (NNAV in rheumatoid arthritis-associated models, the denatured NNAV (heat treated; 30, 90, 270 μg/kg, the native NNAV (untreated with heat; 90 μg/kg, and Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP, 15 mg/kg were administrated orally either prophylactically or therapeutically. We measured time of licking the affected paw in formaldehyde-induced inflammatory model, paw volume in egg-white-induced inflammation, and granuloma weight in formalin-soaked filter paper-induced granuloma. For adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA rats, paw edema, mechanical withdrawal threshold, serum levels of TNF-α and IL-10, and histopathological changes of the affected paw were assessed. We found that the denatured NNAV (90, 270 μg/kg significantly reduced time of licking paw, paw volume, and granuloma weight in above inflammatory models and also attenuated paw edema, mechanical hyperalgesia, and histopathology changes in AIA rats. Additionally, the increase in serum TNF-α and the decrease in serum IL-10 in AIA rats were reversed by the denatured NNAV. Although the native NNAV and TWP rendered the similar pharmacological actions on the above four models with less potency than that of the denatured NNAV, these findings demonstrate that oral administration of the denatured NNAV produces antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities on rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Anti-inflammatory Agents in the Treatment of Diabetes and Its Vascular Complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rena M; Donath, Marc Y; LeRoith, Derek; Leibowitz, Gil

    2016-08-01

    The association between hyperglycemia and inflammation and vascular complications in diabetes is now well established. Antidiabetes drugs may alleviate inflammation by reducing hyperglycemia; however, the anti-inflammatory effects of these medications are inconsistent and it is unknown whether their beneficial metabolic effects are mediated via modulation of chronic inflammation. Recent data suggest that immunomodulatory treatments may have beneficial effects on glycemia, β-cell function, and insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms underlying their beneficial metabolic effects are not always clear, and there are concerns regarding the specificity, safety, and efficacy of immune-based therapies. Herein, we review the anti-inflammatory and metabolic effects of current antidiabetes drugs and of anti-inflammatory therapies that were studied in patients with type 2 diabetes. We discuss the potential benefit of using anti-inflammatory treatments in diabetes and important issues that should be addressed prior to implementation of such therapeutic approaches. PMID:27440839

  4. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udaybhan Singh Paviaya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The present study indicates that root bark of G. asiatica exhibits peripheral and central analgesic effect and anti-inflammatory activity, which may be attributed to the various phytochemicals present in root bark of G. asiatica.

  5. IN VITRO ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF PTEROCARPUS MARSUPIUM ROXB. STEM BARK ON ALBINO RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Rageeb Mohammed Usman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are believed to be an important source of new chemical substance with potential therapeutic applicability. Several plant species traditionally used as anti-inflammatory.This research work is carryout for the anti-inflammatory activity of Pterocarpus marsupium roxb. Stem bark extracts using Carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method. Ibuprofen 60mg/kg p.o. was kept as standard. The research was carried out in Wister strain weighing 150-200gm. The Methanol (100mg/Kg and Aqueous extract (100mg/Kg has exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced rat paw oedema method. Flavonoids present in stem bark may be responsible for anti-inflammatory activity. However, it needs isolation, structural elucidation and screening of above active principles to pin point activity of drug.

  6. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities ofPassiflora foetida L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sasikala V; Saravanan S; Parimelazhagan T

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol extract of Passiflora foetida (P. foetida) leaves.Methods:Ethanol extract ofP. foetida leaf was evaluated for analgesic action by acetic acid-induced writhing and hot plate method in albino mice. The anti-inflammatory property of ethanolic leaf extract was tested by carrageenan induced acute paw edema and histamine induced acute paw edema in rats.Results:The dose200 mg/kg ofP. foetida leaf extract exhibited highest significant analgesic activity [(13.50±0.43) min] at a reaction time of20 min in hot plate method in mice. The ethanol extract of leaf dose 100 mg/kg produced a highly significant anti inflammatory effect [(1.302±0.079)mL] in rats.Conclusions: It is very clear thatP. foetidaalso has analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities for the pharmaceuticals.

  7. Anti-inflammatory potential of Agaricus in carrageenan-induced model of local inflammation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrazzag A. Elmajdoub

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: These data may indicate that Agaricus extract has the potential of anti-inflammatory activity that could be applied in acute inflammatory disorders. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2015; 4(3.000: 497-502

  8. INVESTIGATION OF ANTIMICROBIAL AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF CURCUMA LONGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Basir Khan , Md. Atai Rabby , Md Hasmat Ullah and Chowdhury Faiz Hossain*

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Turmeric (Curcuma longa is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant used as a food additive. It has been reported that rhizome of this plant have antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antitumor property. Methanol extract of Rhizome of Curcuma longa was investigated here to see the antimicrobial actions and anti-inflammatory effect. During the extraction process a purified single compound (D1 was isolated and investigated for its antimicrobial activity. Significant antimicrobial activity than penicillin were found for 500µg C. longa extract. Anti-inflammatory action of C. longa was also assessed using mice models. The purified compound D1 fraction showed antimicrobial action in 50µg concentration. Our study reveal that C. longa has antimicrobial activity against various gram positive and gram negative bacteria where curcumin may not be the only compound that is responsible for the antimicrobial activity. On the other hand, C. longa extract had shown significant anti-inflammatory action.

  9. Phenolic composition, anitproliferative and anti-inflammatory properties of conventional and organic cinnamon and peppermint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conventional and organic cinnamon and peppermint were investigated for their phenolic profile, antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant properties. Accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) with 75% acetone was a better method than Soxhlet and overnight extraction for phenolic content and a...

  10. Screening of Ficus religiosa leaves fractions for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities

    OpenAIRE

    Vishal Gulecha; Sivakumar, T.; Aman Upaganlawar; Manoj Mahajan; Chandrashekhar Upasani

    2011-01-01

    Objective : To evaluate the different fractions of dried leaves of Ficus religiosa Linn for analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity using different models of pain and inflammation Materials and Methods : The analgesic activity of F. religiosa carried out using acetic acid-induced writhing in mice and tail flick test in rats. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet-granuloma formation in rats. Five different fractions (FRI, FR...

  11. Does prolonged anti-inflammatory therapy reduce number of unnecessary repeat saturation prostate biopsy?

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Candiano; Pietro Pepe; Francesco Pietropaolo; Francesco Aragona

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The effect of a prolonged oral anti-inflammatory therapy on PSA values in patients with persistent abnormal PSA values after negative prostate biopsy (PBx) was evaluated. Material and methods. From September 2011 to September 2012, 70 patients (medi- an age 62 years), with persistent abnormal PSA values after negative extended PBx, were given an herbal extract with anti-inflammatory activity for 3 months (Lenidase®; 1 tablet daily constituted of baicalina, bromelina and esci...

  12. Role of Prooxidants and Antioxidants in the Anti-Inflammatory and Apoptotic Effects of Curcumin (Diferuloylmethane)

    OpenAIRE

    Sandur, Santosh K.; Ichikawa, Haruyo; Pandey, Manoj K.; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.; Sung, Bokyung; Sethi, Gautam; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research within last half a century has indicated that curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a yellow pigment in curry powder, exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and proapoptotic activities. Whether anti-inflammatory and proapoptotic activities assigned to curcumin, are mediated through its antioxidant mechanism was investigated. We found that TNF-mediated NF-κB activation was inhibited by curcumin; and glutathione reversed the inhibition. Similarly, suppression of TNF-induced AKT acti...

  13. AP-1/IRF-3 Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Andrographolide Isolated from Andrographis paniculata

    OpenAIRE

    Ting Shen; Woo Seok Yang; Young-Su Yi; Gi-Ho Sung; Man Hee Rhee; Haryoung Poo; Mi-Yeon Kim; Kyung-Woon Kim; Jong Heon Kim; Jae Youl Cho

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide (AG) is an abundant component of plants of the genus Andrographis and has a number of beneficial properties including neuroprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic effects. Despite numerous pharmacological studies, the precise mechanism of AG is still ambiguous. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of AG and its target proteins as they pertain to anti-inflammatory responses. AG suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO) an...

  14. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITIES OF SOME SPECIES OF ANDROGRAPHIS WALL. (ACANTHACEAE)

    OpenAIRE

    Balu, S.; Alagesaboopathi, C.

    1993-01-01

    The anti – inflammatory activities of the alcoholic extracts of three species of Andrographis Wall. were assayed at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight in Male albino rats using carrageenin induced rat paw edema. All the extracts were screened for their anti-inflammatory activities in Carrageenin induced inflammation in rats. The maximal anti-inflammatory activity was found with the alcoholic extract of Andrographis alata Nees.

  15. The marine plant thalassia testudinum possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Llanio, M.; Fernández, M.D.; Cabrera, B.; Bermejo, P.; Abad, M.J.; Payá, M; Alcaraz, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    The natural marine compounds represent a source of new chemical structures and of pharmacological substances with anti-inflammatory activity that will allow to deep in the knowledge of the inflammatory process and in novel mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents. In this work we carry out the study of a extract of a marine plant present in the Cuban coast, Thalassia testudinum (Tt) with the objective of detecting anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects by carrageena...

  16. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF WHOLE PLANT OF POLYGALA ROSMARINIFOLIA WIGHT & ARN (POLYGALACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Mohan et al

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, Polygala rosmarinifolia whole plant was extracted with ethanol and evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity in rats using a carrageenan induced paw edema method. Ethanol extract exhibits potent anti-inflammatory activity at 200mg/kg at 3rd hr after administration is compared with reference standard drug, Indomethacin. Observed pharmacological activity in the present study provides scientific validation of ethnomedicinal use of this plant in treating acute inflammation.

  17. Genetically Engineered Immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus Strains Producing Antioxidant Enzymes Exhibit Enhanced Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    OpenAIRE

    del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; LeBlanc, Jean Guy

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells...

  18. Anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity of mulberry (Morus alba L.) root bark

    OpenAIRE

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Park, Jae Ho; Park, Gwang Hun; Lee, Man Hyo; Lee, Jeong Rak; Koo, Jin Suk; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2014-01-01

    Background Root bark of mulberry (Morus alba L.) has been used in herbal medicine as anti-phlogistic, liver protective, kidney protective, hypotensive, diuretic, anti-cough and analgesic agent. However, the anti-cancer activity and the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of mulberry root bark have not been elucidated. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether mulberry root bark extract (MRBE) shows anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Methods In anti-inflammatory activity, NO was...

  19. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ETHANOLIC STEM EXTRACTS OF RUBIA CORDIFOLIA LINN. IN RATS

    OpenAIRE

    Tailor Chandra Shekhar; Bahuguna Y M; Singh Vijender

    2010-01-01

    In the present Study of Ethanolic extract of Stem of Rubia cordifolia Linn.(Rubiaceae) was screened for anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw oedema rats. The effect was assessed by Difference in paw oedema volume, before & after the low & high dose administration of the extract in Rats. Ethanolic extract of Rubia cordifolia stem (20 & 40 mg./kg./ml.) were administered orally. Anti-inflammatory effects were compared with Standard drug- Indomethacin (10mg./kg/ml.). These observ...

  20. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of Bauhinia monandra leaf lectin

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Janaína K. L.; Araújo, Chrisjacele S. F.; Araújo, Tiago F. S.; Santos, Andréa F. S.; Teixeira, J.A.; Vera L M Lima; Coelho, Luana C. B. B.

    2016-01-01

    A galactose-specific lectin from Bauhinia monandra leaves (BmoLL) have been purified through ammonium sulphate fractionation followed by guar gel affinity chromatography column. This study aimed to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity of pure BmoLL in mice. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by 1% carrageenan-induced inflammation in mice treated with BmoLL. Acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing and hot plate methods evaluated antinociceptive activity. B...

  1. Exercise-induced hippocampal anti-inflammatory response in aged rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; Simões, Priscila Santos Rodrigues; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; da Graça Naffah-Mazzacoratti, Maria; Arida, Ricardo Mario

    2013-01-01

    Aging is often accompanied by cognitive decline, memory impairment and an increased susceptibility to neurodegenerative disorders. Most of these age-related alterations have been associated with deleterious processes such as changes in the expression of inflammatory cytokines. Indeed, higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and lower levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines are found in the aged brain. This perturbation in pro- and anti-inflammatory balance can represent one of the mechanism...

  2. Topical ketorolac has no antinociceptive or anti-inflammatory effect in thermal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Pedersen, J L; Kehlet, H

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug in human thermal injury. Twelve healthy unmedicated volunteers had identical burn injuries produced on the medial side of both calves with a 49 degrees C 15 x 25 mm thermode...... and MPDT, an increase in EI and development of mechanical hyperalgesia (P < 0.05). Ketorolac gel had no effect on any of the nociceptive or inflammatory variables studies (P > 0.2)....

  3. Antioxidant, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Garcinia nervosa (Clusiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    N. M. U. Seruji; H. Y. Khong; C. J. Kutoi

    2013-01-01

    In our continuing interest on Sarawak Garcinia species, we carried out the evaluation of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities on the methanolic extracts of Garcinia nervosa. The extracts were prepared from its air-dried grounded leaves and barks. The evaluation of antioxidant activities was done using the (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) DPPH radical scavenging assay and the result showed high radical scavenging activities. Meanwhile, the anti-inflammatory evaluation was per...

  4. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism for the Medicinal Herb Folium Eriobotryae

    OpenAIRE

    Jingxiao Zhang; Yan Li; Su-Shing Chen; Lilei Zhang; Jinghui Wang; Yinfeng Yang; Shuwei Zhang; Yanqiu Pan; Yonghua Wang; Ling Yang

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases like diabetes, cancers, atherosclerosis and arthritis. Thus, lots of concerns have been raised toward developing novel anti-inflammatory agents. Many alternative herbal medicines possess excellent anti-inflammatory properties, yet their precise mechanisms of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, a novel systems pharmacology approach based on a large number of chemical, biological and pharmacological data was developed and exemplified by a probe her...

  5. [Advances in the research of effects of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway on vital organ function and its mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X H; Yao, Y M

    2016-07-20

    Serious major burns, trauma and surgical stress can easily develop into sepsis, and further result in septic shock or even multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). The mechanism of MODS is complicated, including excessive inflammation, immune dysfunction, coagulation disorder, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Recent studies have demonstrated that the nervous system could significantly and quickly suppress systemic inflammatory response via the vagus nerve, which might improve multiple organ damage following acute injury. This article is to brief our understanding concerning the structure characteristics of cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, and its effects on vital organ function and the regulatory mechanism, which might be of great significance to seek a novel way for interventional strategy of MODS. PMID:27464633

  6. Antimicrobial, Antiparasitic, Anti-Inflammatory, and Cytotoxic Activities of Lopezia racemosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cruz Paredes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates the potential benefits of the Mexican medicinal plant Lopezia racemosa (Onagraceae. Extracts and fractions from aerial parts of this plant were assessed to determine their antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities in vitro. Aerial parts of the plant were extracted with various solvents and fractionated accordingly. Extracts and fractions were tested against a panel of nine bacterial and four fungal species. The antiparasitic activity was tested against Leishmania donovani, whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was determined by measuring the secretion of interleukin-6 from human-derived macrophages. The same macrophage cell line was used to investigate the cytotoxicity of the compounds. Various extracts and fractions showed antibacterial, antifungal, antiparasitic, and anti-inflammatory activities. The hexanic fraction HF 11-14b was the most interesting fraction with antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory activities. The benefit of L. racemosa as a traditional medicinal plant was confirmed as shown by its antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory activities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the biological activities of L. racemosa, including antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory activities.

  7. [In vitro anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activities of flavans from Ilex centrochinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu-jun; Yu, Li-juan; Li, Yan-ci; Liu, Meng-yuan; Wu, Zheng-zhi

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activities of flavans from flex centrochinensis S. Y. Hu in vitro and their structure-activity relationship. LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophage was used as inflammatory model. MTT assay for cell availability, Griess reaction for nitric oxide (NO) production, the content of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 and PGE, were detected with ELISA kits; DPPH, superoxide anion and hydroxyl free radicals scavenging activities were also investigated. According to the result, all flavans tested exhibited anti-inflammatory effect in different levels. Among them, compounds 1, 3, 4 and 6 showed potent anti-inflammatory effect through the inhibition of NO, TNF-alpha, IL-lp and IL-6, of which 1 was the most effective inhibitor, however, 2 and 5 were relatively weak or inactive. The order of free radical scavenging activities was similar to that of anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, these results suggest that 3, 4 and 6, especially of 1, were,in part responsible for the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging activity of Ilex centrochinensis. Hydroxyl group at 4'-position of B-ring plays an important role in the anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging capacities. PMID:26281592

  8. Topical Anti-inflammatory Activity of New Hybrid Molecules of Terpenes and Synthetic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Theoduloz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess changes in the activity of anti-inflammatory terpenes from Chilean medicinal plants after the formation of derivatives incorporating synthetic anti-inflammatory agents. Ten new hybrid molecules were synthesized combining terpenes (ferruginol (1, imbricatolic acid (2 and oleanolic acid (3 with ibuprofen (4 or naproxen (5. The topical anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was assessed in mice by the arachidonic acid (AA and 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate (TPA induced ear edema assays. Basal cytotoxicity was determined towards human lung fibroblasts, gastric epithelial cells and hepatocytes. At 1.4 µmol/mouse, a strong anti-inflammatory effect in the TPA assay was observed for oleanoyl ibuprofenate 12 (79.9% and oleanoyl ibuprofenate methyl ester 15 (80.0%. In the AA assay, the best activity was observed for 12 at 3.2 µmol/mouse, with 56.8% reduction of inflammation, in the same range as nimesulide (48.9%. All the terpenyl-synthetic anti-inflammatory hybrids showed better effects in the TPA assay, with best activity for 6, 12 and 15. The cytotoxicity of the compounds 8 and 10 with a free COOH, was higher than that of 2. The derivatives from 3 were less toxic than the triterpene. Several of the new compounds presented better anti-inflammatory effect and lower cytotoxicity than the parent terpenes.

  9. In vitro antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory activity of seven common oats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Wise, Mitchell L; Gulvady, Apeksha A; Chang, Tony; Kendra, David F; Jan-Willem van Klinken, B; Shi, Yuhui; O'Shea, Marianne

    2013-08-15

    Oats are gaining increasing scientific and public interest for their purported antioxidant-associated health benefits. Most reported studies focused on specific oat extracts or particular oat components, such as β-glucans, tocols (vitamin E), or avenanthramides. Studies on whole oats with respect to antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities are still lacking. Here the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities from whole oat groats of seven common varieties were evaluated. All oat varieties had very similar oxygen radical absorption capacity compared with other whole grains. In an anti-inflammatory assay, oat variety CDC Dancer inhibited tumor necrosis factor-α induced nuclear factor-kappa B activation by 27.5% at 2 mg/ml, whereas variety Deiter showed 13.7% inhibition at a comparable dose. Avenanthramide levels did not correlate with the observed antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Further investigations are needed to pinpoint the specific antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds, and potential synergistic and/or matrix effects that may help explain the mechanisms of oat's anti-inflammatory actions.

  10. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of selected medicinal plants of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuda, Fazli; Iqbal, Zafar; Khan, Ayub; Zakiullah; Shah, Yasar; Ahmad, Lateef; Nasir, Fazli; Hassan, Muhammad; Ismail; Shah, Waheed Ali

    2014-03-01

    In present study, the anti-inflammatory potential of three medicinal plants, Xanthium strumarium, Achyranthes aspera and Duchesnea indica were evaluated, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. Carrageenan induced hind paw edema model was used to carry out the in vivo anti-inflammatory activity, while for in vitro screening lipoxygenase inhibition assay was used. Crude extract of all the selected plants depicted significant (plt;0.001) anti-inflammatory activity, at late phase of inflammation. Achyranthes aspera also showed considerable anti-inflammatory activity (47%) at relatively lower concentration (200 mg/ml), at the initial phase of inflammation. Similarly the ethyl acetate fraction of all the selected plants showed significant lipoxygenase inhibition activity when compared with the standard drug (Baicalein). The results obtained from both in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity suggest that the ethyl acetate fraction of the crude extract of all the selected plants can be used for the isolation of new lead compounds with better anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:24577927

  11. Rose geranium essential oil as a source of new and safe anti-inflammatory drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhatem, Mohamed Nadjib; Kameli, Abdelkrim; Ferhat, Mohamed Amine; Saidi, Fairouz; Mekarnia, Maamar

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the available anti-inflammatory drugs exert an extensive variety of side effects, the search for new anti-inflammatory agents has been a priority of pharmaceutical industries. Aims The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-inflammatory activities of the essential oil of rose geranium (RGEO). Methods The chemical composition of the RGEO was investigated by gas chromatography. The major components were citronellol (29.13%), geraniol (12.62%), and citronellyl formate (8.06%). In the carrageenan-induced paw edema, five different groups were established and RGEO was administered orally in three different doses. Results RGEO (100 mg/kg) was able to significantly reduce the paw edema with a comparable effect to that observed with diclofenac, the positive control. In addition, RGEO showed a potent anti-inflammatory activity by topical treatment in the method of croton oil-induced ear edema. When the dose was 5 or 10 µl of RGEO per ear, the inflammation was reduced by 73 and 88%, respectively. This is the first report to demonstrate a significant anti-inflammatory activity of Algerian RGEO. In addition, histological analysis confirmed that RGEO inhibited the inflammatory responses in the skin. Conclusion Our results indicate that RGEO may have significant potential for the development of novel anti-inflammatory drugs with improved safety profile. PMID:24103319

  12. Hsp27 enhances recovery of splicing as well as rephosphorylation of SRp38 after heat shock

    OpenAIRE

    Marin Vinader, L.; Shin, C.; Onnekink, C; Manley, J L; Lubsen, N H

    2005-01-01

    A heat stress causes a rapid inhibition of splicing. Exogenous expression of Hsp27 did not prevent that inhibition but enhanced the recovery of splicing afterward. Another small heat shock protein, αB-crystallin, had no effect. Hsp27, but not αB-crystallin, also hastened rephosphorylation of SRp38—dephosphorylated a potent inhibitor of splicing—after a heat shock, although it did not prevent dephosphorylation by a heat shock. The effect of Hsp27 on rephosphorylation of SRp38 required phosphor...

  13. Global analysis of heat shock response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkin, A. P. (Physical Biosciences Division, Berkeley, CA); Wall, J. D. (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO); Hazen, T. C. (Physical Biosciences Division, Berkeley, CA); He, Z. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Zhou, J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Huang, K. H. (Physical Biosciences Division, Berkeley, CA); Gaucher, Sara P.; He, Q. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Hadi, Masood Z.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Alm, Eric J. (Physical Biosciences Division, Berkeley, CA); Singh, A. K.

    2005-08-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature. Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation of metal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in the direction of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under a variety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of this organism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-cell transcriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-fold change or greater; Z {ge} 1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463 genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13 C from a growth temperature of 37 C for this organism and suggested both direct and indirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categories that were significantly affected included posttranslational modifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energy production and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport, metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; and biogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed the presence of features of both negative and positive regulation which included the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to the alternate sigma factors {sigma}{sup 32} and {sigma}{sup 54}. While mechanisms of heat shock control for some genes appeared to coincide with those established for Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique control schemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of protein expression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggested good agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shock proteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), and AhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility of posttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES (DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU

  14. Heating of Heavy Ions by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejection (ICME) Driven Collisionless Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Korreck, K E; Lepri, S T; Raines, J M

    2006-01-01

    Shock heating and particle acceleration processes are some of the most fundamental physical phenomena of plasma physics with countless applications in laboratory physics, space physics, and astrophysics. This study is motivated by previous observations of non-thermal heating of heavy ions in astrophysical shocks (Korreck et al. 2004). Here, we focus on shocks driven by Interplanetary Coronal Mass Ejections (ICMEs) which heat the solar wind and accelerate particles. This study focuses specifically on the heating of heavy ions caused by these shocks. Previous studies have focused only on the two dynamically dominant species, H+ and He2+ . This study utilizes thermal properties measured by the Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer (SWICS) aboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft to examine heavy ion heating. This instrument provides data for many heavy ions not previously available for detailed study, such as Oxygen (O6+, O7+), Carbon (C5+, C6+), and Iron (Fe10+). The ion heating is found to d...

  15. Effects of Heat Stress on Yeast Heat Shock Factor-Promoter Binding In Vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning LI; Le-Min ZHANG; Ke-Qin ZHANG; Jing-Shi DENG; Ralf PR(A)NDL; Fritz SCH(O)FFL

    2006-01-01

    Heat shock factor-DNA interaction is critical for understanding the regulatory mechanisms of stress-induced gene expression in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed the in vivo binding of yeast heat shock factor (HSF) to the promoters of target genes ScSSA1, ScSSA4, HSP30 and HSP104, using chromatin immunoprecipitation. Previous work suggested that yeast HSF is constitutively bound to DNA at all temperatures. Expression of HSF target genes is regulated at the post-transcriptional level. However, our results indicated that HSF does not bind to the promoters of ScSSA4 and HSP30 at normal temperature (23 ℃). Binding to these promoters is rapidly induced by heat stress at 39 ℃. HSF binds to ScSSA1 and HSP104 promoters under non-stress conditions, but at a low level. Heat stress rapidly leads to a notable increase in the binding of HSF to these two genes. The kinetics of the level of HSF-promoter binding correlate well with the expression of target genes, suggesting that the expression of HSF target genes is at least partially the result of HSF-promoter binding stability and subsequent transcription stimulation.

  16. Tissue-type-specific heat-shock response and immunolocalization of class I low-molecular-weight heat-shock proteins in soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung-Luo Jinn; Pi-Fang Linda Chang; Yih-Ming Chen [National Taiwan Univ. (China)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    A monospecific polyclonal antibody was used to study the tissue-type specificity and intracellular localization of class I low-molecular-weight (LMW) heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in soybean (Glycine max) under different heat-shock regimes. In etiolated soy-bean seedlings, the root meristematic regions contained the highest levels of LMW HSP. No tissue-type-specific expression of class I LMW HSP was detected using the tissue-printing method. In immunolocalization studies of seedlings treated with HS (40{degrees}C for 2 h) the class I LMW HSPs were found in the aggregated granular structures, which were distributed randomly in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. When the heat shock was released, the granular structures disappeared and the class I LMW HSPs became distributed homogeneously in the cytoplasm. When the seedlings were then given a more severe heat shock following the initial 40{degrees}C {yields} 28{degrees}C treatment, a large proportion of the class I LMW HSPs that originally localized in the cytoplasm were translocated into the nucleus and nucleolus. Class I LMW HSPs may assist in the resolubilization of proteins denatured or aggregated by heat and may also participate in the restoration of organellar function after heat shock.

  17. Expression profile of heat shock response factors during hookworm larval activation and parasitic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmedin, Verena; Delaney, Angela; Jennelle, Lucas; Hawdon, John M

    2015-07-01

    When organisms are exposed to an increase in temperature, they undergo a heat shock response (HSR) regulated by the transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1). The heat shock response includes the rapid changes in gene expression initiated by binding of HSF-1 to response elements in the promoters of heat shock genes. Heat shock proteins function as molecular chaperones to protect proteins during periods of elevated temperature and other stress. During infection, hookworm infective third stage larvae (L3) undergo a temperature shift from ambient to host temperature. This increased temperature is required for the resumption of feeding and activation of L3, but whether this increase initiates a heat shock response is unknown. To investigate the role of the heat shock in hookworm L3 activation and parasitic development, we identified and characterized the expression profile of several components of the heat shock response in the hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. We cloned DNAs encoding an hsp70 family member (Aca-hsp-1) and an hsp90 family member (Aca-daf-21). Exposure to a heat shock of 42°C for one hour caused significant up-regulation of both genes, which slowly returned to near baseline levels following one hour attenuation at 22°C. Neither gene was up-regulated in response to host temperature (37°C). Conversely, levels of hsf-1 remained unchanged during heat shock, but increased in response to incubation at 37°C. During activation, both hsp-1 and daf-21 are down regulated early, although daf-21 levels increase significantly in non-activated control larvae after 12h, and slightly in activated larvae by 24h incubation. The heat shock response modulators celastrol and KNK437 were tested for their effects on gene expression during heat shock and activation. Pre-incubation with celastrol, an HSP90 inhibitor that promotes heat shock gene expression, slightly up-regulated expression of both hsp-1 and daf-21 during heat shock. KNK437, an inhibitor of heat shock

  18. Errors in macromolecular synthesis after stress : a study of the possible protective role of the small heat shock proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin Vinader, L.

    2006-01-01

    The general goal of this thesis was to gain insight in what small heat shock proteins (sHsps) do with respect to macromolecular synthesis during a stressful situation in the cell. It is known that after a non-lethal heat shock, cells are better protected against a subsequent more severe heat shock,

  19. The pertinence of expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs) to the efficacy of cryopreservation in HELAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peitao; Shu, Zhiquan; He, Liqun; Cui, Xiangdong; Wang, Yuzhen; Gao, Dayong

    2005-01-01

    HELAs (Hela cells, passed cells of human cervical carcinoma) were heat or cold treated (named heat or cold shock) and then resumed normal culture for 2, 4 or 8 hours respectively. The expressions of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and 90 (HSP90) of the HELAs were measured by Northern and Western blotting. HELAs after 4-hour culture were exposed to or cryopreserved with different concentration of dimethyl sulfoxide (Me2SO, 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% respectively, V/V). Meanwhile, the HELAs after different culture time (2, 4 and 6 hours of culture) were cryopreserved with 5% Me2SO. After exposure or cryopreservation, the number of live HELAs was counted and the survival rate was calculated. The results showed that heat shock increased the expression of HSP70 and HSP90 of HELAs, while cold shock decreased the expression of the two proteins. When the concentrations of Me2SO were 10%, 15% and 20%, the survival rates of HELAs after exposure to Me2SO or cryopreservation were much lower than those when the concentrations were small. The survival rates of the heat shocked HELAs were significantly higher than those of the cold shocked and control HELAs. After cryopreservation with 5% Me2SO, the survival rate of heat shocked HELAs group with 2 hours culture time was the lowest among all the groups of HELAs with different cultural time. From the results of this study, we conclude that the expressions of HSP70 and HSP90 in HELAs increased significantly after heat shock, while cold shock decreased the expressions of these two proteins. The over-expressions of HSPs in the heat shocked HELAs could protect the cells from both injury caused by potential toxicity of high concentrations of Me2SO and cryoinjury caused by the freeze-thawing/cryopreservation procedure.

  20. The Transcriptional Heat Shock Response of Salmonella Typhimurium Shows Hysteresis and Heated Cells Show Increased Resistance to Heat and Acid Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pin, C.; Hansen, Trine; Munoz-Cuevas, M.;

    2012-01-01

    of 120 up-regulated genes during the heat shock remained up-regulated 30 minutes after the temperature was set back to 25uC, while only 86 out of 293 down regulated genes remained down regulated 30 minutes after the heat shock ceased. Thus, the majority of the induced genes exhibited hysteresis, i...

  1. Exercise-induced ROS in heat shock proteins response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimauro, Ivan; Mercatelli, Neri; Caporossi, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Cells have evolved multiple and sophisticated stress response mechanisms aiming to prevent macromolecular (including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) damage and to maintain or re-establish cellular homeostasis. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are among the most highly conserved, ubiquitous, and abundant proteins in all organisms. Originally discovered more than 50 years ago through heat shock stress, they display multiple, remarkable roles inside and outside cells under a variety of stresses, including also oxidative stress and radiation, recognizing unfolded or misfolded proteins and facilitating their restructuring. Exercise consists in a combination of physiological stresses, such as metabolic disturbances, changes in circulating levels of hormones, increased temperature, induction of mild to severe inflammatory state, increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). As a consequence, exercise is one of the main stimuli associated with a robust increase in different HSPs in several tissues, which appears to be also fundamental in facilitating the cellular remodeling processes related to the training regime. Among all factors involved in the exercise-related modulation of HSPs level, the ROS production in the contracting muscle or in other tissues represents one of the most attracting, but still under discussion, mechanism. Following exhaustive or damaging muscle exercise, major oxidative damage to proteins and lipids is likely involved in HSP expression, together with mechanically induced damage to muscle proteins and the inflammatory response occurring several days into the recovery period. Instead, the transient and reversible oxidation of proteins by physiological concentrations of ROS seems to be involved in the activation of stress response following non-damaging muscle exercise. This review aims to provide a critical update on the role of HSPs response in exercise-induced adaptation or damage in humans, focusing on experimental

  2. The Entamoeba histolytica methylated LINE-binding protein EhMLBP provides protection against heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Sophia; Kushnir, Oded; Tovy, Ayala; Siman Tov, Rama; Ankri, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to environmental stress is a key process that allows the unicellular parasite Entamoeba histolytica to survive in its human host. We previously characterized EhMLBP as an essential protein for the growth and the virulence of the parasite. EhMLBP binds to methylated repetitive DNA, and is one of the core proteins of the parasite's epigenetic machinery. Here, we show that EhMLBP and heat shock proteins have common properties. EhMLBP is induced by heat shock and its expression is regulated by a heat shock element binding site that is located in its 5' non-coding region. Following heat shock, the perinuclear localization of EhMLBP in control trophozoites is replaced by an even distribution within the nucleus alongside with an enhanced recruitment of EhMLBP to the reverse transcriptase of a long interspersed nucleotide element (LINE) DNA. Constitutive overexpression of EhMLBP protects trophozoites against heat shock and reduces protein aggregation. This protective function is lost in trophozoites that overexpress a mutated form of EhMLBP which is devoid of its heat shock domain. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a methyl DNA-binding protein that plays a protective role against heat shock.

  3. Heat-shock-induced cellular responses to temperature elevations occurring during orthopaedic cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, E B; Haugh, M G; Tallon, D; Casey, C; McNamara, L M

    2012-12-01

    Severe heat-shock to bone cells caused during orthopaedic procedures can result in thermal damage, leading to cell death and initiating bone resorption. By contrast, mild heat-shock has been proposed to induce bone regeneration. In this study, bone cells are exposed to heat-shock for short durations occurring during surgical cutting. Cellular viability, necrosis and apoptosis are investigated immediately after heat-shock and following recovery of 12, 24 h and 4 days, in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 and osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells, using flow cytometry. The regeneration capacity of heat-shocked Balb/c mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and MC3T3-E1s has been investigated following 7 and 14 day's recovery, by quantifying proliferation, differentiation and mineralization. An immediate necrotic response to heat-shock was shown in cells exposed to elevated temperatures (45°C, 47°C and most severe at 60°C). A longer-term apoptotic response is induced in MLO-Y4s and, to a lesser extent, in MC3T3-E1s. Heat-shock-induced differentiation and mineralization by MSCs. These findings indicate that heat-shock is more likely to induce apoptosis in osteocytes than osteoblasts, which might reflect their role as sensors detecting and communicating damage within bone. Furthermore, it is shown for the first time that mild heat-shock (less than equal to 47°C) for durations occurring during surgical cutting can positively enhance osseointegration by osteoprogenitors. PMID:22915633

  4. EVALUATION OF ANALGESIC AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF METHANOLIC EXTRACT OF COCCULUS HIRSUTUS LEAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sarvankumar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation and pain are the most common health problems treated with traditional remedies which mainly comprise medicinal plants. A number of natural products are used in the traditional medical systems in many countries. An alternative medicine for the treatment of various diseases is getting more popular. Many medicinal plants provide relief of symptoms comparable to that of obtained from allopathic medicines. Therefore agents of natural origin with very little side effects are required as substitute chemicals therapeutics. The methanolic leaf extract of Cocculus hirsutus (100& 200mg/kg Linn (Menispermaceae was investigated for its analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in laboratory animals. The analgesic activity of the methanolic leaf extract of Cocculus hirsutus was investigated by eddy’s hot plate model and acetic acid induced writhing in mice. Anti-inflammatory activity of Cocculus hirsutus was studied by both in-vitro and in vivo models. Human red blood cells membrane stabilization method was adopted for the in-vitro anti-inflammatory activity and for in-vivo, Carrageenan induced paw edema and cotton pellet induced granuloma in rats was employed. In eddy’s hot plate analgesic study, both the doses of Cocculus hirsutus showed significant (p<0.05 and p<0.01 respectively analgesic activity. In acetic acid induced writhing model, the onset of writhing was delayed and duration of writhing was shortened by the methanolic extract of Cocculus hirsutus.In-vitro anti-inflammatory activity of the methanolic leaf extract of Cocculus hirsutus showed significant anti inflammatory activity in a concentration dependent manner. Cocculus hirsutus showed significant anti-inflammatory activity on both carrgeenan as well as cotton pellet induced granuloma models in rats. From the results, it was concluded that the methanolic leaf extract of Cocculus hirsutus possess analgesic and anti-inflammatory.

  5. Mucosal delivery of anti-inflammatory IL-1Ra by sporulating recombinant bacteria

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    Ruggiero Paolo

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosal delivery of therapeutic protein drugs or vaccines is actively investigated, in order to improve bioavailability and avoid side effects associated with systemic administration. Orally administered bacteria, engineered to produce anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-1Ra, have shown localised ameliorating effects in inflammatory gastro-intestinal conditions. However, the possible systemic effects of mucosally delivered recombinant bacteria have not been investigated. Results B. subtilis was engineered to produce the mature human IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra. When recombinant B. subtilis was instilled in the distal colon of rats or rabbits, human IL-1Ra was found both in the intestinal lavage and in the serum of treated animals. The IL-1Ra protein in serum was intact and biologically active. IL-1-induced fever, neutrophilia, hypoglycemia and hypoferremia were inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion by intra-colon administration of IL-1Ra-producing B. subtilis. In the mouse, intra-peritoneal treatment with recombinant B. subtilis could inhibit endotoxin-induced shock and death. Instillation in the rabbit colon of another recombinant B. subtilis strain, which releases bioactive human recombinant IL-1β upon autolysis, could induce fever and eventually death, similarly to parenteral administration of high doses of IL-1β. Conclusions A novel system of controlled release of pharmacologically active proteins is described, which exploits bacterial autolysis in a non-permissive environment. Mucosal administration of recombinant B. subtilis causes the release of cytoplasmic recombinant proteins, which can then be found in serum and exert their biological activity in vivo systemically.

  6. [Small heat shock proteins and adaptation to hypertermia in various Drosophila species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, V Iu; Garbuz, D G; Evgen'ev, M B; Zatsepina, O G

    2006-01-01

    Expression level and kinetics of accumulation of small heat shock proteins (21-27 kDa group) have been investigated in three Drosophila species differing significantly by temperature niche and thermosensitivity. It was shown that low-latitude thermotolerant species D. virilis exceeds the high-latitude thermosensitive closely-related species D. lummei as well as distant thermosensitive species D. melanogaster in terms of small heat shock proteins expression and accumulation after temperature elevation. The data obtained enable to postulate an important role of small heat shock proteins in organism basal thermotolerance and general adaptation to adverse conditions of environment. PMID:16637267

  7. Heat shock response of the blue crab Portunus pelagicus:thermal stress and acclimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suhaila Qari

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To determine the effect of prior heat shock on the CTMax of differently acclimated Portunus pelagicus (P. pelagicus) as well as the time course of the changes in CTMax post heat shock. Methods: Crabs P. pelagicus were held in laboratory aquaria in tanks, which were supplied with filtered and aerated seawater. Crabs were acclimated at 20 °C, 25 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C for 3 weeks before their CTMax was determined. The CTMax was recorded for each crab as the median temperature during the 5 min period when a crab was not able to right itself, the average CTMax was calculated. The effect of heat shock on subsequent CTMax was measured. Crabs were heat shocked at temperature 1 °C lower than the CTMax for 20 min, followed by either 0.5 h, 1 h or 1.5 h recovery at 20 °C. The same procedure was repeated at other acclimation temperatures (25 °C, 30 °C and 35 °C). Results: Temperature acclimation of P. pelargicus from 20-35 °C progressively increased the CTMax. Acclimation at 35 °C the CTMax was 42.66 °C, whereas acclimation at 20 °C the CTMax was 39.8 °C. In P. pelagicus acclimated, at 20 °C the CTMax values after heat shock were significantly higher than crabs in control for 30 min, 1 h and 1.5 h after heat shock. In the 25 °C and 30 °C acclimated crabs, the CTMax values after heat shock were significantly higher than control only in 30 min and 1 h after heat shock. No significant differences in 35 °C acclimated crabs between control and heat shocked crabs were found after recovery for 30 min, 1 h, or 1.5 h. Conclusions: Heat shock caused significant rises in the CTMax, however, this increase was progressively reduced with longer recovery times at the acclimation temperature. For 20 °C acclimated crabs, the increased CTMax was still evident after 90 min, but for 25 °C and 30 °C crabs, the response was over after 90 min. Heat shock of 35 °C crabs was problematical, the CTMax gave no increased thermotolerance. It must be concluded that the

  8. Reassembly and protection of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles by heat shock proteins in yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bracken, A P; Bond, U

    1999-01-01

    The process of mRNA splicing is sensitive to in vivo thermal inactivation, but can be protected by pretreatment of cells under conditions that induce heat-shock proteins (Hsps). This latter phenomenon is known as "splicing thermotolerance". In this article we demonstrate that the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) are in vivo targets of thermal damage within the splicing apparatus in heat-shocked yeast cells. Following a heat shock, levels of the tri-snRNP (U4/U6.U5), free U6 ...

  9. Heat-Shock Protein 90-Targeted Nano Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochani, Ankit K; Ravindran Girija, Aswathy; Borah, Ankita; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D

    2016-04-01

    Suboptimal chemotherapy of anticancer drugs may be attributed to a variety of cellular mechanisms, which synergize to dodge the drug responses. Nearly 2 decades of heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-targeted drug discovery has shown that the mono-therapy with Hsp90 inhibitors seems to be relatively ineffective compared with combination treatment due to several cellular dodging mechanisms. In this article, we have tried to analyze and review the Hsp90 and mammalian target of rapamycin (m-TOR)-mediated drug resistance mechanisms. By using this information we have discussed about the rationale behind use of drug combinations that includes both or any one of these inhibitors for cancer therapy. Currently, biodegradable nano vector (NV)-loaded novel drug delivery systems have shown to resolve the problems of poor bioavailability. NVs of drugs such as paclitaxel, doxorubicin, daunorubicin, and others have been successfully introduced for medicinal use. Hence, looking at the success of NVs, in this article we have also discussed the progress made in the delivery of biodegradable NV-loaded Hsp90 and m-TOR-targeted inhibitors in multiple drug combinations. We have also discussed the possible ways by which the market success of biodegradable NVs can positively impact the clinical trials of anti-Hsp90 and m-TOR combination strategy. PMID:26886301

  10. Heat-shock protein 90 in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Researches on Candidal heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in recent years are summarized.Candida albicans is a commensal pathogen in human and animals.In immunocompromised individuals it behaves as an opportunist pathogen,giving rise to superficial or systemic infections.Systemic candidosis is a common cause of death among immunocompromised and debilitated patients,in which the mortality is as high as 70%.HSP90 is now recognized as an immunodominant antigen in C.albicans and plays a key role in systemic candidosis as a molecular chaperone.The 47-ku peptide is the breakdown product of HSP90.Patients who has recovered from systemic candidosis produce high titre of antibodies to 47-ku antigen,whereas the fatal cases have little antibody or falling titres.The three commonest epitopes of candidal HSP90 have been mapped,epitopes C,B and H.Epitopes C and H are immunogenic.The antibody probes of both epitopes may be developed into a new serological test agents for systemic candidosis due to rather high specificity and sensitivity.The recent results establish HSP90 as an ATP-dependent chaperone that is involved in the folding of cell regulatory proteins and in the refolding of stress-denatured polypeptides.Some researches on fungal HSP90 and the treatment of patients with candidosis are reviewed as well.

  11. The pleiotropic activity of heat-shock proteins

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    Arleta Kaźmierczuk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress or heat-shock proteins (HSPs are highly conserved proteins present in cells of both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, providing them with protection from cellular and environmental stress factors. Based on molecular-weight, HSPs can be divided into the large (HSP100: 100–110 kDa and HSP90: 75–96 kDa, intermediate (HSP70: 66–78 kDa, HSP60, and HSP40, and small (sHSP: 8.5–40 kDa subfamilies. These proteins play an essential role as molecular chaperones/co-chaperones by assisting the correct folding of nascent and stress-accumulated protein-substrate assembly, preventing the aggregation of these proteins, as well as transport across membranes and the degradation of other proteins. Members of HSP family display dual activity depending on their intra- or extracellular distribution. Intracellular HSPs mainly play a protective role. Extracellular or membrane-bound HSPs mediate immunological functions. Among the functions of HSPs is their participation in cell signaling. This review deals with the structure and properties of the main members of the HSPs and their role in a large number of cellular/extracellular processes.

  12. Small Heat Shock Proteins and Distal Hereditary Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedova, V V; Muranova, L K; Sudnitsyna, M V; Ryzhavskaya, A S; Gusev, N B

    2015-12-01

    Classification of small heat shock proteins (sHsp) is presented and processes regulated by sHsp are described. Symptoms of hereditary distal neuropathy are described and the genes whose mutations are associated with development of this congenital disease are listed. The literature data and our own results concerning physicochemical properties of HspB1 mutants associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. Mutations of HspB1, associated with hereditary motor neuron disease, can be accompanied by change of the size of HspB1 oligomers, by decreased stability under unfavorable conditions, by changes in the interaction with protein partners, and as a rule by decrease of chaperone-like activity. The largest part of these mutations is accompanied by change of oligomer stability (that can be either increased or decreased) or by change of intermonomer interaction inside an oligomer. Data on point mutation of HspB3 associated with axonal neuropathy are presented. Data concerning point mutations of Lys141 of HspB8 and those associated with hereditary neuropathy and different forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease are analyzed. It is supposed that point mutations of sHsp associated with distal neuropathies lead either to loss of function (for instance, decrease of chaperone-like activity) or to gain of harmful functions (for instance, increase of interaction with certain protein partners).

  13. The Involvement of Heat Shock Proteins in Murine Liver Regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Shi; Zhongjun Dong; Haiming Wei

    2007-01-01

    Partial hepatectomy (PHx) in mammals is a very common experimental model to investigate the process of liver regeneration. The surgery itself could give birth to a series of stresses, such as the temporary raise of body temperature and the ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were a family of stress-inducible proteins involved in maintaining cell homeostasis and regulating the immune system. In our study, we intended to investigate the expression and role of HSPs in liver regeneration. Using RT-PCR and Western blotting, we determined the expression in regenerating liver of HSP27, HSP60, HSP70 and HSP90 in mRNA level and protein level, respectively, with mice treated with sham operation as controls. We also used quercertin as an inhibitior of HSPs to explore their effects on liver regeneration. We found that hepatic expression of HSPs increased at the early phase of liver regeneration and declined to the constitutively low level later. Moreover, quercetin pretreatment delayed the progress of liver regeneration in mice via inhibition of HSPs. The results indicated that HSPs played an important role in liver regeneration.

  14. The role of small heat shock proteins in parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Espinoza, Bertha

    2015-09-01

    The natural life cycle of many protozoan and helminth parasites involves exposure to several hostile environmental conditions. Under these circumstances, the parasites arouse a cellular stress response that involves the expression of heat shock proteins (HSPs). Small HSPs (sHSPs) constitute one of the main families of HSPs. The sHSPs are very divergent at the sequence level, but their secondary and tertiary structures are conserved and some of its members are related to α-crystallin from vertebrates. They are involved in a variety of cellular processes. As other HSPs, the sHSPs act as molecular chaperones; however, they have shown other activities apparently not related to chaperone action. In this review, the diverse activities of sHSPs in the major genera of protozoan and helminth parasites are described. These include stress response, development, and immune response, among others. In addition, an analysis comparing the sequences of sHSPs from some parasites using a distance analysis is presented. Because many parasites face hostile conditions through its life cycles the study of HSPs, including sHSPs, is fundamental.

  15. Generation of the First TCR Transgenic Mouse with CD4+ T Cells Recognizing an Anti-inflammatory Regulatory T Cell-Inducing Hsp70 Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Manon A. A.; van Herwijnen, Martijn J. C.; van Kooten, Peter J. S.; Hoek, Aad; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) directed at self-antigens are difficult to study since suitable specific tools to isolate and characterize these cells are lacking. A T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic mouse would generate possibilities to study such ­antigen-specific T cells. As was shown previously, immunization with the mycobacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 70-derived peptide B29 and its mouse homologs mB29a and mB29b induced anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, B29 induced antigen-­specific Tregs in vivo. To study mB29b-specific Tregs, we isolated the TCR from T cell hybridomas generated against mB29b and produced a TCR transgenic mouse that expresses a MHC-class II restricted mB29b-specific TCR. These TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells were found to cross-react with the B29 epitope as identified with peptide-induced proliferation and IL-2 production. Thus, we have successfully generated a novel mouse model with antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that recognize self and bacterial Hsp 70-derived peptides. With this novel mouse model, it will be possible to study primary antigen-specific T cells with specificity for a regulatory Hsp70 T cell epitope. This will enable the isolation and characterization CD4+CD25+ Tregs with a proven specificity. This will provide useful knowledge of the induction, activation, and mode of action of Hsp70-specific Tregs, for instance, during experimental arthritis. PMID:27014269

  16. Generation of the First TCR Transgenic Mouse with CD4(+) T Cells Recognizing an Anti-inflammatory Regulatory T Cell-Inducing Hsp70 Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Manon A A; van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; van Kooten, Peter J S; Hoek, Aad; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) directed at self-antigens are difficult to study since suitable specific tools to isolate and characterize these cells are lacking. A T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic mouse would generate possibilities to study such -antigen-specific T cells. As was shown previously, immunization with the mycobacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 70-derived peptide B29 and its mouse homologs mB29a and mB29b induced anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, B29 induced antigen--specific Tregs in vivo. To study mB29b-specific Tregs, we isolated the TCR from T cell hybridomas generated against mB29b and produced a TCR transgenic mouse that expresses a MHC-class II restricted mB29b-specific TCR. These TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells were found to cross-react with the B29 epitope as identified with peptide-induced proliferation and IL-2 production. Thus, we have successfully generated a novel mouse model with antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that recognize self and bacterial Hsp 70-derived peptides. With this novel mouse model, it will be possible to study primary antigen-specific T cells with specificity for a regulatory Hsp70 T cell epitope. This will enable the isolation and characterization CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs with a proven specificity. This will provide useful knowledge of the induction, activation, and mode of action of Hsp70-specific Tregs, for instance, during experimental arthritis. PMID:27014269

  17. Estimation of thermal shock resistance of fine porous alumina by infrared radiation heating method

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamoto, Yuji; Honda, Sawao; Ogihara, Yuki; Kishi, Tsunego; イワモト, ユウジ; ホンダ, サワオ; 岩本, 雄二; 本多, 沢雄

    2009-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of α-alumina porous capillary, the support material for hydrogen-permselective microporous ceramic membrane was studied. To study the effect of porosity on the thermal shock resistance systematically, porous alumina with different porosities was fabricated, and the thermal shock resistance of the fabricated samples as well as the porous capillary was estimated by the infrared radiation heating method. The mechanical and thermal properties concerned to the thermal ...

  18. Enhancement of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcumin Using Phosphatidylserine-Containing Nanoparticles in Cultured Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are one kind of innate immune cells, and produce a variety of inflammatory cytokines in response to various stimuli, such as oxidized low density lipoprotein found in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. In this study, the effect of phosphatidylserine on anti-inflammatory activity of curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers was investigated using macrophage cultures. Different amounts of phosphatidylserine were used in the preparation of curcumin nanoparticles, their physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities were then compared. Cellular uptake of the nanoparticles was investigated using a confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry analysis in order to determine the optimal phosphatidylserine concentration. In vitro anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated in macrophages to test whether curcumin and phosphatidylserine have interactive effects on macrophage lipid uptake behavior and anti-inflammatory responses. Here, we showed that macrophage uptake of phosphatidylserine-containing nanostructured lipid carriers increased with increasing amount of phosphatidylserine in the range of 0%–8%, and decreased when the phosphatidylserine molar ratio reached over 12%. curcumin-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers significantly inhibited lipid accumulation and pro-inflammatory factor production in cultured macrophages, and evidently promoted release of anti-inflammatory cytokines, when compared with curcumin or phosphatidylserine alone. These results suggest that the delivery system using PS-based nanoparticles has great potential for efficient delivery of drugs such as curcumin, specifically targeting macrophages and modulation of their anti-inflammatory functions.

  19. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines Release in Mice Injected with Crotalus durissus terrificus Venom

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    A. Hernández Cruz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom (Cdt were analyzed with respect to the susceptibility and the inflammatory mediators in an experimental model of severe envenomation. BALB/c female mice injected intraperitoneally presented sensibility to Cdt, with changes in specific signs, blood biochemical and inflammatory mediators. The venom induced reduction of glucose and urea levels and an increment of creatinine levels in serum from mice. Significant differences were observed in the time-course of mediator levels in sera from mice injected with Cdt. The maximum levels of IL-6, NO, IL-5, TNF, IL-4 and IL-10 were observed 15 min, 30 min, 1, 2 and 4 hours post-injection, respectively. No difference was observed for levels of IFN-γ. Taken together, these data indicate that the envenomation by Cdt is regulated both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses at time-dependent manner. In serum from mice injected with Cdt at the two first hours revealed of pro-inflammatory dominance. However, with an increment of time an increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines was observed and the balance toward to anti-inflammatory dominance. In conclusion, the observation that Cdt affects the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines provides further evidence for the role played by Cdt in modulating pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance.

  20. A Systematic Review for Anti-Inflammatory Property of Clusiaceae Family: A Preclinical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Santos de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Clusiaceae family (sensu lato is extensively used in ethnomedicine for treating a number of disease conditions which include cancer, inflammation, and infection. The aim of this review is to report the pharmacological potential of plants of Clusiaceae family with the anti-inflammatory activity in animal experiments. Methods. A systematic review about experiments investigating anti-inflammatory activity of Clusiaceae family was carried out by searching bibliographic databases such as Medline, Scopus and Embase. In this update, the search terms were “anti-inflammatory agents,” “Clusiaceae,” and “animals, laboratory.” Results. A total of 255 publications with plants this family were identified. From the initial 255 studies, a total of 21 studies were selected for the final analysis. Studies with genera Allanblackia, Clusia, Garcinia or Rheedia, and Hypericum showed significant anti-inflammatory activity. The findings include a decrease of total leukocytes, a number of neutrophils, total protein concentration, granuloma formation, and paw or ear edema formation. Other interesting findings included decreased of the MPO activity, and inflammatory mediators such as NF-κB and iNOS expression, PGE2 and Il-1β levels and a decrease in chronic inflammation. Conclusion. The data reported suggests the anti-inflammatory effect potential of Clusiaceae family in animal experiments.

  1. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of some Libyan medicinal plants in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahar Lutfun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ballota pseudodictamnus (L. Benth. (Lamiaceae, Salvia fruticosa Mill. (Lamiaceae and Thapsia garganica L. (Apiaceae are three well-known medicinal plants from the Libyan flora, which have long been used for the treatment of inflammations. The aim of the present study was to investigate, for the first time, the anti-inflammatory property of the methanol (MeOH extracts of the aerial parts of these plants. Shade-dried and ground aerial parts of B. pseudodictamnus, S. fruticosa and T. garganica were Soxhlet-extracted with MeOH. The extracts were concentrated by evaporation under reduced pressure at 40°C. The anti-inflammatory activity of the extracts was evaluated using the carrageenan-induced mice paw edema model. The administration of the extracts at a dose of 500 mg/kg body weight produced statistically significant inhibition (p < 0.05 of edema within 3 h of carrageenan administration. The results demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory properties of the test extracts. Among the extracts, the S. fruticosa extract exhibited the most significant inhibition of inflammation after 3 h (62.1%. Thus, S. fruticosa could be a potential source for the discovery and development of newer anti-inflammatory ‘leads’ for drug development. The anti-inflammatory activity of B. pseudodictamnus and S. fruticosa could be assumed to be related to high levels of phenolic compounds, e.g., flavonoids, present in these plants.

  2. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of acetophenone semicarbazone and benzophenone semicarbazone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaikh M Mohsin Ali; Mele Jesmin; M Abul Kalam Azad; M Khairul Islam; Ronok Zahan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities in swiss albino mice, two schiff bases namely acetophenone semicarbazone (ASC) and benzophenone semicarbazone (BSC) were synthesized and characterized. Methods: Two doses of the test compounds 25 and 50 mg/kg (p.o) for each were selected throughout the research work. The anti-inflammatory activity of the test compounds was determined by ‘carragenan induced mice paw edema inhibition’ method. The analgesic activity was determined by both, ‘acetic acid induced writhing’ and ‘tail immersion' methods. All such data were compared with standard drugs at the dose of 10 mg/kg (p.o.). Results:Both ASC and BSC have showed positive effects as anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the test compounds at 50 mg/kg (p.o.) were quite comparable to those of standard drugs at 10 mg/kg (p.o.). Conclusion: Both ASC and BSC can be considered as potent anti-inflammatory and analgesic agents.

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Chemical Characterization of the Essential Oils of Four Citrus Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luis Amorim

    Full Text Available Citrus fruits have potential health-promoting properties and their essential oils have long been used in several applications. Due to biological effects described to some citrus species in this study our objectives were to analyze and compare the phytochemical composition and evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of essential oils (EO obtained from four different Citrus species. Mice were treated with EO obtained from C. limon, C. latifolia, C. aurantifolia or C. limonia (10 to 100 mg/kg, p.o. and their anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated in chemical induced inflammation (formalin-induced licking response and carrageenan-induced inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch model. A possible antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate model. Phytochemical analyses indicated the presence of geranial, limonene, γ-terpinene and others. EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by reducing cell migration, cytokine production and protein extravasation induced by carrageenan. These effects were also obtained with similar amounts of pure limonene. It was also observed that C. aurantifolia induced myelotoxicity in mice. Anti-inflammatory effect of C. limon and C. limonia is probably due to their large quantities of limonene, while the myelotoxicity observed with C. aurantifolia is most likely due to the high concentration of citral. Our results indicate that these EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia have a significant anti-inflammatory effect; however, care should be taken with C. aurantifolia.

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Properties and Chemical Characterization of the Essential Oils of Four Citrus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Jorge Luis; Simas, Daniel Luiz Reis; Pinheiro, Mariana Martins Gomes; Moreno, Daniela Sales Alviano; Alviano, Celuta Sales; da Silva, Antonio Jorge Ribeiro; Fernandes, Patricia Dias

    2016-01-01

    Citrus fruits have potential health-promoting properties and their essential oils have long been used in several applications. Due to biological effects described to some citrus species in this study our objectives were to analyze and compare the phytochemical composition and evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of essential oils (EO) obtained from four different Citrus species. Mice were treated with EO obtained from C. limon, C. latifolia, C. aurantifolia or C. limonia (10 to 100 mg/kg, p.o.) and their anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated in chemical induced inflammation (formalin-induced licking response) and carrageenan-induced inflammation in the subcutaneous air pouch model. A possible antinociceptive effect was evaluated in the hot plate model. Phytochemical analyses indicated the presence of geranial, limonene, γ-terpinene and others. EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by reducing cell migration, cytokine production and protein extravasation induced by carrageenan. These effects were also obtained with similar amounts of pure limonene. It was also observed that C. aurantifolia induced myelotoxicity in mice. Anti-inflammatory effect of C. limon and C. limonia is probably due to their large quantities of limonene, while the myelotoxicity observed with C. aurantifolia is most likely due to the high concentration of citral. Our results indicate that these EOs from C. limon, C. aurantifolia and C. limonia have a significant anti-inflammatory effect; however, care should be taken with C. aurantifolia.

  5. Anti-Inflammatory and Antioxidant Activities of Salvia fruticosa: An HPLC Determination of Phenolic Contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhary, Rima; Raafat, Karim; Ghoneim, Asser I; Aboul-Ela, Maha; El-Lakany, Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Salvia fruticosa Mill. (S. fruticosa) is widely used in folk medicine. Accordingly, the present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of S. fruticosa, and to determine the phenolic constituents of its extracts. Methods. The antioxidant activity was determined using 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl assay. Total phenolic contents were estimated using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, and high-performance liquid chromatography was performed to identify phenolic constituents. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced mouse paw edema was determined plethysmographically. Key Findings. Different plant extracts demonstrated strong radical scavenging activity, where the ethyl acetate extract had the highest value in the roots and the lowest in the aerial parts. This antioxidant activity was correlated to the total phenolic content of different extracts, where rutin and luteolin were the most abundant constituents. Interestingly, both the roots and aerial parts revealed a significant anti-inflammatory activity comparable to diclofenac. Conclusions. This study is the first to demonstrate pharmacologic evidence of the potential anti-inflammatory activity of S. fruticosa. This activity may partly be due to the radical scavenging effects of its polyphenolic contents. These findings warrant the popular use of the East Mediterranean sage and highlight the potential of its active constituents in the development of new anti-inflammatory drugs.

  6. Systems pharmacology dissection of the anti-inflammatory mechanism for the medicinal herb Folium eriobotryae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Su-Shing; Zhang, Lilei; Wang, Jinghui; Yang, Yinfeng; Zhang, Shuwei; Pan, Yanqiu; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Ling

    2015-01-28

    Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases like diabetes, cancers, atherosclerosis and arthritis. Thus, lots of concerns have been raised toward developing novel anti-inflammatory agents. Many alternative herbal medicines possess excellent anti-inflammatory properties, yet their precise mechanisms of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, a novel systems pharmacology approach based on a large number of chemical, biological and pharmacological data was developed and exemplified by a probe herb Folium Eriobotryae, a widely used clinical anti-inflammatory botanic drug. The results show that 11 ingredients of this herb with favorable pharmacokinetic properties are predicted as active compounds for anti-inflammatory treatment. In addition, via systematic network analyses, their targets are identified to be 43 inflammation-associated proteins including especially COX2, ALOX5, PPARG, TNF and RELA that are mainly involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, the rheumatoid arthritis pathway and NF-κB signaling pathway. All these demonstrate that the integrated systems pharmacology method provides not only an effective tool to illustrate the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of herbs, but also a new systems-based approach for drug discovery from, but not limited to, herbs, especially when combined with further experimental validations.

  7. Systems Pharmacology Dissection of the Anti-Inflammatory Mechanism for the Medicinal Herb Folium Eriobotryae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases like diabetes, cancers, atherosclerosis and arthritis. Thus, lots of concerns have been raised toward developing novel anti-inflammatory agents. Many alternative herbal medicines possess excellent anti-inflammatory properties, yet their precise mechanisms of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, a novel systems pharmacology approach based on a large number of chemical, biological and pharmacological data was developed and exemplified by a probe herb Folium Eriobotryae, a widely used clinical anti-inflammatory botanic drug. The results show that 11 ingredients of this herb with favorable pharmacokinetic properties are predicted as active compounds for anti-inflammatory treatment. In addition, via systematic network analyses, their targets are identified to be 43 inflammation-associated proteins including especially COX2, ALOX5, PPARG, TNF and RELA that are mainly involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway, the rheumatoid arthritis pathway and NF-κB signaling pathway. All these demonstrate that the integrated systems pharmacology method provides not only an effective tool to illustrate the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of herbs, but also a new systems-based approach for drug discovery from, but not limited to, herbs, especially when combined with further experimental validations.

  8. Systems pharmacology dissection of the anti-inflammatory mechanism for the medicinal herb Folium eriobotryae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingxiao; Li, Yan; Chen, Su-Shing; Zhang, Lilei; Wang, Jinghui; Yang, Yinfeng; Zhang, Shuwei; Pan, Yanqiu; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases like diabetes, cancers, atherosclerosis and arthritis. Thus, lots of concerns have been raised toward developing novel anti-inflammatory agents. Many alternative herbal medicines possess excellent anti-inflammatory properties, yet their precise mechanisms of action are yet to be elucidated. Here, a novel systems pharmacology approach based on a large number of chemical, biological and pharmacological data was developed and exemplified by a probe herb Folium Eriobotryae, a widely used clinical anti-inflammatory botanic drug. The results show that 11 ingredients of this herb with favorable pharmacokinetic properties are predicted as active compounds for anti-inflammatory treatment. In addition, via systematic network analyses, their targets are identified to be 43 inflammation-associated proteins including especially COX2, ALOX5, PPARG, TNF and RELA that are mainly involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway, the rheumatoid arthritis pathway and NF-κB signaling pathway. All these demonstrate that the integrated systems pharmacology method provides not only an effective tool to illustrate the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of herbs, but also a new systems-based approach for drug discovery from, but not limited to, herbs, especially when combined with further experimental validations. PMID:25636035

  9. Influence of selenium on heat shock protein 70 expression in heat stressed turkey embryos (Meleagris gallopavo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Rafael E; Christensen, V L; Edens, F W; Wineland, M J

    2005-12-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) family of proteins, which functions as molecular chaperones, has been associated with tolerance to stressors in avian species. Selenium (Se) is an essential trace mineral incorporated into the seleno-enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx). GSHpx reduces oxidized glutathione (GSSG) to reduced glutathione (GSH) in the GSH/GSSG antioxidant system and protects cells from oxidative damage. This study was conducted to examine if the relationship between dietary supplementation of selenium to turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) hens and the embryonic expression of hsp70 and GSHpx activity in heat stressed embryos. Livers of embryos developing in eggs from turkey hens fed diets with or without supplemental Se were analyzed for hsp70 concentration and GSHpx activity before and after recovery from a heating episode. Before heat stress, hsp70 concentrations were equivalent in each treatment, but GSHpx activity was maximized in the SE treatment group. After recovery from the heating episode, hsp70 concentrations were significantly higher (P<0.05) in the non-Se-supplemented groups, but in the Se-supplemented groups the hsp70 concentrations were not different from pre-stress concentrations. In the pre-stress Se-supplemented group, liver GSHpx activity was significantly higher than GSHpx activity in the non-Se-supplemented embryo livers, and in the livers from embryos recovering from heat stress, GSHpx activity in the non-Se-supplemented group was lower than the pre-stress activity and significantly lower than the GSHpx activity in liver from Se-supplemented embryos recovering from heat distress. Se supplementation to the dams resulted in a significant increase in their embryos and that condition would facilitate a decreased incidence of oxidative damage to cells. A more reduced redox status in embryos from Se-supplemented dams decreased the need for cellular protection attributed to stress induced hsp70 and presumably allows heat distressed embryos

  10. Heat shock suppresses mating and sperm transfer in the rice leaf folder Cnaphalocrocis medinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, H J; Qian, Q; Liu, X D

    2014-06-01

    Temperature is a key environmental factor in determining the population size of Cnaphalocrocis medinalis in summer. High temperatures inhibit survival, development and fecundity of this insect. However, biological responses of female and male adults to heat shock, and physiological mechanism of high temperature suppressing population development are still ambiguous. We experimentally tested the impact of heat shock (5 h day-1) on biological traits, spermatogenesis and sperm transfer of adults of C. medinalis. The result showed that heat exposure to 39 and 40 °C for 5 h reduced longevity and copulation frequency of adults, and hatchability of eggs. Immediate survival rate of males was lower than that of females after 3 days of exposure to 41 °C. The oviposition period, copulation frequency, fecundity of adults and hatchability of eggs were significantly lower when male adults were exposed to 40 or 41 °C for 3 days. Heat shock decreased frequency and success rate of mating when males were exposed, and it also resulted in postponement of mating behaviour and prolongation of mating duration as both the female and male adults were exposed. Heat shock did not affect spermatogenesis, but significantly inhibited sperms maturation. Moreover, males could not ejaculate sperm into females during copulation when these male moths received heat shock. Heat shock remarkably suppressed mating behaviour and sperm transfer, which led to a dramatic decline of rice leaf folder populations.

  11. Screening for anti-inflammatory components from Corydalis bungeana Turcz. based on macrophage binding combined with HPLC

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Zi-Bo; Zhang, Yong-Hong; Zhao, Bing-Jie; Li, Chao; Tian, Gang; Niu, Ben; Qi, Hong; Feng, Liang; Shao, Jian-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background Corydalis bungeana Turcz. (CB; family: Corydalis DC.) is an anti-inflammatory medicinal herb used widely in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for upper respiratory tract infection, etc., but its anti-inflammatory active molecules are unknown. This study was designed to screen for the anti-inflammatory components from CB based on macrophage binding combined with HPLC. Methods Xylene-induced ear edema in mouse and carrageenan-induced hind-paw edema in rats were used to evaluate the ...

  12. Mechanism of protonophores-mediated induction of heat-shock response in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saha Swati

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protonophores are the agents that dissipate the proton-motive-force (PMF across E. coli plasma membrane. As the PMF is known to be an energy source for the translocation of membrane and periplasmic proteins after their initial syntheses in cell cytoplasm, protonophores therefore inhibit the translocation phenomenon. In addition, protonophores also induce heat-shock-like stress response in E. coli cell. In this study, our motivation was to investigate that how the protonophores-mediated phenomena like inhibition of protein translocation and induction of heat-shock proteins in E. coli were correlated. Results Induction of heat-shock-like response in E. coli attained the maximum level after about 20 minutes of cell growth in the presence of a protonophore like carbonyl cyanide m-chloro phenylhydrazone (CCCP or 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP. With induction, cellular level of the heat-shock regulator protein sigma-32 also increased. The increase in sigma-32 level was resulted solely from its stabilization, not from its increased synthesis. On the other hand, the protonophores inhibited the translocation of the periplasmic protein alkaline phosphatase (AP, resulting its accumulation in cell cytosol partly in aggregated and partly in dispersed form. On further cell growth, after withdrawal of the protonophores, the previously accumulated AP could not be translocated out; instead the AP-aggregate had been degraded perhaps by an induced heat-shock protease ClpP. Moreover, the non-translocated AP formed binary complex with the induced heat-shock chaperone DnaK and the excess cellular concentration of DnaK disallowed the induction of heat-shock response by the protonophores. Conclusion Our experimental results suggested that the protonophores-mediated accumulation and aggregation of membrane proteins (like AP in cell cytosol had signaled the induction of heat-shock proteins in E. coli and the non-translocated protein aggregates were possibly

  13. Role of heat shock factor-1 activation in the doxorubicin-induced heart failure in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Vedam, Kaushik; Nishijima, Yoshinori; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Khan, Mahmood; Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Zweier, Jay L.; Ilangovan, Govindasamy

    2010-01-01

    Treating cancer patients with chemotherapeutics, such as doxorubicin (Dox), cause dilated cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure because of oxidative stress. On the other hand, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), a transcription factor for heat shock proteins (Hsps), is also known to be activated in response to oxidative stress. However, the possible role of HSF-1 activation and the resultant Hsp25 in chemotherapeutic-induced heart failure has not been investigated. Using HSF-1 wild-type (HSF-1...

  14. Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii is a novel suppressor of heat shock response in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ishihara, Keiichi; Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Saito, Youhei; TAKASAKI, Midori; Konoshima, Takao; Hatayama, Takumi

    2006-01-01

    Because heat shock proteins (Hsps) are involved in protecting cells and in the pathophysiology of diseases such as inflammation, cancer, and neurodegenerative disorders, the use of regulators of the expression of Hsps in mammalian cells seems to be useful as a potential therapeutic modality. To identify compounds that modulate the response to heat shock, we analyzed several natural products using a mammalian cell line containing an hsp promoter-regulated reporter gene. In this study, we found...

  15. Proteotoxic stress of cancer: implication of the heat-shock response in oncogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Chengkai; Dai, Siyuan; Cao, Junyue

    2012-01-01

    Organisms frequently encounter a wide variety of proteotoxic stressors. The heat-shock response, an ancient cytoprotective mechanism, has evolved to augment organismal survival and longevity in the face of proteotoxic stress from without and within. These broadly recognized beneficial effects, ironically, contrast sharply with its emerging role as a culprit in the pathogenesis of cancers. Here, we present an overview of the normal biology of the heat-shock response and highlight its implicati...

  16. Phosphoproteome dynamics reveal heat-shock protein complexes specific to the Leishmania donovani infectious stage

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, M. A.; Watanabe, R.; Dacher, M.; Chafey, P; Osorio y Fortea, J.; Scott, D A; Beverley, S.M.; van Ommen, G.; CLOS, J.; Hem, S.; Lenormand, P.; Rousselle, J.-C.; A. Namane; Spath, G. F.

    2010-01-01

    Leishmania is exposed to a sudden increase in environmental temperature during the infectious cycle that triggers stage differentiation and adapts the parasite phenotype to intracellular survival in the mammalian host. The absence of classical promoter-dependent mechanisms of gene regulation and constitutive expression of most of the heat-shock proteins (HSPs) in these human pathogens raise important unresolved questions as to regulation of the heat-shock response and stage-specific functions...

  17. Heat Shock Transcription Factor 1-Deficiency Attenuates Overloading-Associated Hypertrophy of Mouse Soleus Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoyuki Koya; Sono Nishizawa; Yoshitaka Ohno; Ayumi Goto; Akihiro Ikuta; Miho Suzuki; Tomotaka Ohira; Tatsuro Egawa; Akira Nakai; Takao Sugiura; Yoshinobu Ohira; Toshitada Yoshioka; Moroe Beppu; Katsumasa Goto

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli, such as mechanical stress and overloading, induce stress response, which is mediated by heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1), and up-regulate heat shock proteins (HSPs) in mammalian skeletal muscles. Therefore, HSF1-associated stress response may play a key role in loading-associated skeletal muscle hypertrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of HSF1-deficiency on skeletal muscle hypertrophy caused by overloading. Functional overloading on t...

  18. Anti Bacterial and Anti Inflammatory efficacy of Zingiber officinale and Decalepis hamiltonii ? In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun kumar M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the in vitro anti bacterial and anti inflammatory potential of Zingiber Officinale and Decalepis Hamiltonii against E. faecalis. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic extract of Zingiber and Decalepis was subjected to microbiological assay to determine its Maximum zone of inhibition using Agar disk diffusion test, minimum inhibitory concentration using serial broth dilution method and anti inflammatory potential using protein denaturation assay against E. faecalis. Results: Ethanolic extract of Zingiber and Decalepis showed: (a Maximum zone of inhibition of 20 mm and 24 mm respectively, (b MIC of 5% and 2.5%respectively, (C Protein denaturation assay value (IC50 of 115 and 80 respectively. Conclusion: Ethanolic extract of Zingiber and Decalepis was found to possess both anti bacterial and anti-inflammatory potential against E. faecalis.

  19. Optimization on Extraction Engineering of the Anti - inflammatory Bioactive Materials from Ainsliaea Fragrans Champ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Jie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ainsliaea fragrans Champ.(A.fragrans is a traditional Chinese herbal, phenolic compounds was the major anti - inflammatory bioactive constituents. To improve the bioavailability and enhanced the curative effect of A.fragrans, the anti - inflammatory effect of phenolic acids and the “non-active” group of control vectors constitute a new biomedical material, which is of great significance to the treatment of diseases inflammation. Hence, in this thesis, regarding the total phenolic acid transfer rate as the indicator, L9(34 orthogonal design was used to optimize the extraction process of total Phenolic acid from A.fragrans by reflux extraction method on solvent dosage, extraction times and extraction time.The optimal extraction technology was as follows: 15 times of water volume, reflux extraction 3 times, extraction time 60 min. The result of pharmacological activity indicated anti-inflammatory effect: 95% ethanol extraction > water extraction > 30% ethanol extraction > 60% ethanol extraction.

  20. Effect of Anti-inflammatory Treatment on Depression, Depressive Symptoms, and Adverse Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Ole; Benros, Michael E; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Several studies have reported antidepressant effects of anti-inflammatory treatment; however, the results have been conflicting and detrimental adverse effects may contraindicate the use of anti-inflammatory agents. OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the antidepressant and possible......) and odds ratios (ORs) were calculated. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Depression scores after treatment and adverse effects. RESULTS: Ten publications reporting on 14 trials (6262 participants) were included: 10 trials evaluated the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (n=4,258) and 4...... properties of the selective cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor celecoxib (SMD, -0.29; 95% CI, -0.49 to -0.08; I2=73%) on remission (OR, 7.89; 95% CI, 2.94 to 21.17; I2=0%) and response (OR, 6.59; 95% CI, 2.24 to 19.42; I2=0%). Among the 6 studies reporting on adverse effects, we found no evidence of an increased...

  1. Intravital Microscopic Methods to Evaluate Anti-inflammatory Effects and Signaling Mechanisms Evoked by Hydrogen Sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Exogenous application of H2S donors, administered either acutely during an inflammatory response or as an antecedent preconditioning intervention that invokes the activation of anti-inflammatory cell survival programs, effectively limits leukocyte rolling, adhesion and emigration, generation of reactive oxygen species, chemokine and cell adhesion molecule expression, endothelial barrier disruption,capillary perfusion deficits, and parenchymal cell dysfunction and injury. This chapter focuses on intravital microscopic methods that can be used to assess the anti-inflammatory effects exerted by H2S, as well as to explore the cellular signaling mechanisms by which this gaseous molecule limits the aforementioned inflammatory responses. Recent advances include use of intravital multiphoton microscopy and optical biosensor technology to explore signaling mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25747477

  2. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of some potential cyclic phenothiazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A; Ram, T; Tyagi, R; Goel, B; Bansal, E; Srivastava, V K

    1998-05-01

    Some new schiff's bases (IVa-IVe), thiazolidinones (Va-Ve), delta 2-triazolines (VIa-VIe) and formazans (VIIa-VIIe) of 2-chlorophenothiazine have been synthesized and screened against Carrageenin induced oedema in albino rats. Some compounds of the series have shown promising activity. The most active compound is 2-chloro-10[5-(2-fluorophenyl-2-oxo-4 thiazolidin-1-yl)-amino acetyl] phenothiazine was found to be most potent. This compound (Vb) was further evaluated in detail and compared with phenylbutazone for its relative anti inflammatory potency (ED50), ulcerogenic liabilities (UD50) and acute toxicity (ALD50). It was found to be almost comparable to phenylbutazone as regards anti-inflammatory activity was concerned but and minimum ulcerogenic liability and cardiovascular effects. Hence, it seems promising as an anti-inflammatory agent in our preliminary studies. PMID:9689901

  3. Phytochemical analysis, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of calyces from Physalis peruviana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Reina M; Aragón, Diana M; Ospina, Luis F; Ramos, Freddy A; Castellanos, Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    Physalis peruviana calyces are used extensively in folk medicine. The crude ethanolic extract and some fractions of calyces were evaluated in order to explore antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by the TPA-induced ear edema model. The antioxidant in vitro activity was measured by means of the superoxide and nitric oxide scavenging activity of the extracts and fractions. The butanolic fraction was found to be promising due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities. Therefore, a bio-assay guided approach was employed to isolate and identify rutin (1) and nicotoflorin (2) from their NMR spectroscopic and MS data. The identification of rutin in calyces of P. peruviana supports the possible use of this waste material for phytotherapeutic, nutraceutical and cosmetic preparations. PMID:25532284

  4. Study of Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Lappaconitine Gelata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ying-zi; XIAO YONG-qing; ZHANG Chao; SUN Xiu-mei

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To explore the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of lappaconitine gelata (LA). Methods:The writhing response induced by acetic acid, the pain response induced by formaldehyde and hot plate method in the mouse, and the paw edema induced by egg albumen in the rat and the ear edema induced by xylene in the mouse were used for investigation on the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of LA.Results: The writhing response induced by acetic acid, the pain response induced by formaldehyde and hot plate methods was significantly inhibited by LA. In addition, the paw edema induced by egg albumen in the rat and the ear edema induced by xylene in the mouse were all significantly suppressed by LA. Conclusion:LA has the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects.

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of the apolar extract from the seaweed Galaxaura marginata (Rhodophyta, Nemaliales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rozas

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The red seaweed Galaxaura marginata (Ellis & Solander Lamouroux, well known by the antibacterial activity of its polar extract and the cytotoxic activity of its oxygenated desmosterol, showed anti-inflammatory action in its apolar fraction. Topical anti-inflammatory activity was observed in samples collected at São Sebastião channel, northern littoral of São Paulo State, Brazil. The apolar extract and its fractions obtained through Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC reduced the topical inflammation produced by croton oil in mouse ear. Such data indicated that the apolar extract from the marine red alga G. marginata displayed anti-inflammatory activity (since 1mg/ear extract reduced 95±0.5% inflammation, which could be the result of the synergic activity of the four fractions present in the apolar extract.

  6. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among healthy people and specific cerebrovascular safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring;

    2014-01-01

    stroke). RESULTS: We selected 1,028,437 healthy individuals (median age 39 years). At least one nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug was claimed by 44·7% of the study population, and the drugs were generally used for a short period of time and in low doses. High-dose ibuprofen and diclofenac were......BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can increase bleeding and thrombosis, but little is known about the cerebrovascular safety of these drugs, especially among healthy people. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke associated with the use...... of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in healthy people. METHODS: By individual-level linkage of nationwide administrative registers in Denmark, information on hospital admissions, prescription claims, vital status, and cause of death were obtained. A cohort of healthy people without hospital admissions...

  7. EVALUATION OF ANTI INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF GARCINIA INDICA FRUIT RIND EXTRACTS IN WISTAR RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khatib N.A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Garcinia indica choisy (Kokum is known for its food, medicinal and commercial values. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of aqueous and ethanolic extract of Garcinia indica fruit rind (GIFR for its anti inflammatory activity in rats. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan induced paw odema. The serum enzymes like Acid phoshatase(ACP and Alkaline Phosphatase(ALP were estimated. Both extracts at dose (200 & 400 mg/kg p.o single dose shows significant (P<0.001 anti inflammatory activity in (Carrageenan induced paw odema acute inflammation. The extracts treatment also showed significant (p<0.001 reduction in the levels of serum enzymes ACP & ALP. Similar results were obtained from aspirin (200mg/kg treated group. The result obtained from the present study indicates both aqueous and ethanolic extracts possessing anti inflammatory activity and further study required to establish its mechanism of action.

  8. Exploitation of the nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway for the treatment of epithelial inflammatory diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A Scott; Michael Martin

    2006-01-01

    Discoveries in the first few years of the 21st century have led to an understanding of important interactions between the nervous system and the inflammatory response at the molecular level, most notably the acetylcholine (ACh)-triggered, α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-dependent nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway. Studies using the α7nAChR agonist, nicotine, for the treatment of mucosal inflammation have been undertaken but the efficacy of nicotine as a treatment for inflammatory bowel diseases remains debatable. Further understanding of the nicotinic anti-inflammatory pathway and other endogenous anti-inflammatory mechanisms is required in order to develop refined and specific therapeutic strategies for the treatment of a number of inflammatory diseases and conditions, including periodontitis, psoriasis,sarcoidosis, and ulcerative colitis.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of GLP-1-Based Therapies beyond Glucose Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sun Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 is an incretin hormone mainly secreted from intestinal L cells in response to nutrient ingestion. GLP-1 has beneficial effects for glucose homeostasis by stimulating insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells, delaying gastric emptying, decreasing plasma glucagon, reducing food intake, and stimulating glucose disposal. Therefore, GLP-1-based therapies such as GLP-1 receptor agonists and inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4, which is a GLP-1 inactivating enzyme, have been developed for treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to glucose-lowering effects, emerging data suggests that GLP-1-based therapies also show anti-inflammatory effects in chronic inflammatory diseases including type 1 and 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disorders, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, diabetic nephropathy, asthma, and psoriasis. This review outlines the anti-inflammatory actions of GLP-1-based therapies on diseases associated with chronic inflammation in vivo and in vitro, and their molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory action.

  10. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of 1-acylaminoalkyl-3,4-dialkoxybenzene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labanauskas, L; Brukstus, A; Udrenaite, E; Bucinskaite, V; Susvilo, I; Urbelis, G

    2005-03-01

    New 1-acylaminoalkyl-3,4-dialkoxybenzene derivatives 17-31 were synthesized by the acylation of amines 9-16 with acyl chlorides. Amines 9-16 were obtained from aryl ketones 1-8. Aryl ketones 1-8 were synthesized by the acylation of corresponding aromatic compounds. As it was preliminary predicted by PASS (Prediction of Activity Spectra for Substance) program, all 1-acylaminoalkyl-3,4-dimethoxy- and 3,4-diethoxybenzene derivatives possess anti-inflammatory activity. Activity of compounds 18, 19, 21, 24, 26, 27, 28, 29 was similar to that of acetylsalicylic acid or ibuprofen however their acute toxicity was less than that of mentioned anti-inflammatory drugs. A series of 1-acylaminoalkyl-3,4-dimethoxybenzene, 1-acylaminoalkyl-3,4-diethoxybenzene and 6-acylaminoalkyl-2,3-dihydro-1,4-benzodioxine derivatives have been synthesized. These compounds possess moderate or strong anti-inflammatory activity and low toxicity.

  11. DIURETIC AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF AQUEOUS EXTRACT OF AERVA SANGUINOLENTA (L. BLUME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Reddy K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to evaluate the diuretic and anti-inflammatory potency of aqueous extract of whole plant of Aerva sanguinolenta in wistar albino rats. Different parameters viz. total urine volume, urine concentration of electrolytes such as sodium; potassium and chloride have been evaluated for assessment of diuretic activity. Anti-inflammatory was performed against carrageenan induced paw oedema method by using indomethacin as standard.The results revealed that the aqueous extract showed significant diuretic activity at a dose of 400 mg/kg body weigh by increasing the total volume of urine and concentration of sodium, potassium and chloride ions in urine and also extract showed significant anti-inflammatory activity.

  12. Inflammation in Depression and the Potential for Anti-Inflammatory Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Karl Ole; Krogh, Jesper; Mors, Ole;

    2016-01-01

    the association between inflammation and depression together with the current evidence on use of anti-inflammatory treatment in depression. Based on this, we address the questions and challenges that seem most important and relevant to future studies, such as timing, most effective treatment lengths......Accumulating evidence supports an association between depression and inflammatory processes, a connection that seems to be bidirectional. Clinical trials have indicated antidepressant treatment effects for anti-inflammatory agents, both as add-on treatment and as monotherapy. In particular......, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cytokine-inhibitors have shown antidepressant treatment effects compared to placebo, but also statins, poly-unsaturated fatty acids, pioglitazone, minocycline, modafinil, and corticosteroids may yield antidepressant treatment effects. However, the complexity...

  13. Inflammation in Depression and the Potential for Anti-Inflammatory Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Ole; Krogh, Jesper; Mors, Ole;

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports an association between depression and inflammatory processes, a connection that seems to be bidirectional. Clinical trials have indicated antidepressant treatment effects for anti-inflammatory agents, both as add-on treatment and as monotherapy. In particular......, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and cytokine-inhibitors have shown antidepressant treatment effects compared to placebo, but also statins, poly-unsaturated fatty acids, pioglitazone, minocycline, modafinil, and corticosteroids may yield antidepressant treatment effects. However, the complexity of...... the inflammatory cascade, limited clinical evidence, and the risk for side effects stress cautiousness before clinical application. Thus, despite proof-of-concept studies of anti-inflammatory treatment effects in depression, important challenges remain to be investigated. Within this paper, we review...

  14. Heat shock proteins and hypometabolism: adaptive strategy for proteome preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Storey KB

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth B Storey, Janet M StoreyDepartments of Biology and Chemistry, Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, CanadaAbstract: To survive under harsh environmental conditions many organisms retreat into hypometabolic states where metabolic rate may be reduced by 80% or more and energy use is reprioritized to emphasize key functions that sustain viability and provide cytoprotection. ATP-expensive activities, such as gene expression, protein turnover (synthesis and degradation, and the cell cycle, are largely shut down. As a consequence, mechanisms that stabilize the existing cellular proteome can become critical for long-term survival. Heat shock proteins (HSPs are well-known for their actions as chaperones that act to fold new proteins or refold proteins that are damaged. Indeed, they are part of the “minimal stress proteome” that appears to be a ubiquitous response by all cells as they attempt, successfully or unsuccessfully, to deal with stress. The present review summarizes evidence that HSPs are also a conserved feature of natural animal hypometabolism including the phenomena of estivation, hibernation, diapause, cold-hardiness, anaerobiosis, and anhydrobiosis. That is, organisms that retreat into dormant or torpid states in anticipation that environmental conditions may become too difficult for normal life also integrate the use of HSPs to protect their proteome while hypometabolic. Multiple studies show a common upregulation of expression of hsp genes and/or HSP proteins prior to or during hypometabolism in organisms as diverse as ground squirrels, turtles, land snails, insects, and brine shrimp and in situations of both preprogrammed dormancies (eg, seasonal or life stage specific and opportunistic hypometabolism (eg, triggered by desiccation or lack of oxygen. Hence, HSPs are not just a “shock” response that attempts to rescue cells from damaging stress but are a key protective strategy that is an integral component of natural states of

  15. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory potential of leaf extracts of Skimmia anquetilia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vijender Kumar; Zulfiqar Ali Bhat; Dinesh Kumar; NA Khan; IA Chashoo

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate anti-inflammatory potential of leaf extract of Skimmia anquetilia by in-vitro and in-vivo anti-inflammatory models. Methods: Acute toxicity study was carried out to determine the toxicity level of different extract using acute toxic class method as described in Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development Guidelines No.423. Carrageenan (1%w/w) was administered and inflammation was induced in rat paw. The leaf extracts of Skimmiaanquetilia were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by in-vitro human red blood cell (HRBC) membrane stabilization method and in-vivo carrangeenan-induced rat paw edema method.Results:The in-vitro membrane stabilizing test showed petroleum ether (PE), chloroform (CE), ethyl acetate (EE), methanol (ME) and aqueous extracts (AE) showed 49.44%, 59.39%, 60.15%, 68.40%and 52.18 % protection, respectively as compared to control groups. The in-vivo results of CE, EE and ME showed 58.20%, 60.17% and 67.53% inhibition of inflammation after 6h administration of test drugs in albino rats. The potency of the leaf extracts of Skimmia anquetilia were compared with standard diclofenac (10 mg/kg) which showed 74.18% protection in in-vitro HRBC membrane stabilization test and 71.64% inhibition in in-vivo carrangeenan-induced rat paw edema model. The ME showed a dose dependent significant (P< 0.01) anti-inflammatory activity in human red blood cell membrane stabilization test and reduction of edema in carrageenan induced rat paw edema. Conclusions: The present investigation has confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity ofSkimmia anquetilia due to presence of bioactive phytoconstitutes for the first time and provide the pharmacological evidence in favor of traditional claim of Skimmia anquetilia as an anti-inflammatory agent.

  16. Genetically engineered immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus strains producing antioxidant enzymes exhibit enhanced anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; LeBlanc, Jean Guy

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti-inflammatory

  17. New isorhamnetin derivatives from Salsola imbricata Forssk. leaves with distinct anti-inflammatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir M Osman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Salsola imbricata Forssk. is a shrub widely growing in Egypt, used as a camel food, traditionally, used as anti-inflammatory agent. Literature survey showed no report about the anti-inflammatory activity of S. imbricata. Aim of the Study: This work was designed to study the phenolic constituents and to provide evidence for the traditional use of S. imbricata as an anti-inflammatory agent. Materials and Methods: The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of the total aqueous methanol extract and some isolated compounds were investigated in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using nitric oxide assay. All chemical structures were identified on the basis of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, one- and two-dimension nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: Nine phenolic compounds, among them two new natural products; isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronyl (1'''→4'' glucuronide (1 and its dimethyl ester; isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-di glucuronate dimethyl ester (2, two isorhamnetin glycosides: Isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (3, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4, and isorhamnetin (5. In addition, an alkaloidal phenolic; trans N-feruloyl tyramine (6, three phenolic acids: Isovanillic acid (7, ferulic acid (8, and p-hydroxy benzoic acid (9 were isolated from salsola imbricata leaves. All compounds were isolated and identified for the first time from this plant except compound (6. The extract and the tested compounds showed distintict anti-inflammatory activities with no toxicity on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Conclusion: The extract and the tested compounds showed distintict anti-inflammatory activities with no toxicity on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells.

  18. The effects of drying following heat shock exposure of the desert moss Syntrichia caninervis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shujun; Liu Chunjiang [School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jiang Pingan [College of Pratacultural and Environmental Science, Xinjiang Agricultural University, Urumqi 830052 (China); Cai Weimin [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang Yan [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: xusj@mail.sjtu.edu.cn

    2009-03-15

    Desert mosses are components of biological soil crusts (BSCs) and their ecological functions make assessment and protection of these mosses a high-ranking management priority in desert regions. Drying is thought to be useful for desert mosses surviving heat shock. In this study, we investigated the role of drying by monitoring the responses of physiological characters and asexual reproduction in the typical desert moss Syntrichia caninervis. Heat significantly decreased chlorophyll content and weakened rapid recovery of photochemical activity, and increased carotenoid content and membrane permeability. Lethal temperatures significantly destroyed shoot regeneration potential. In comparison with heat alone, drying significantly increased protonema emergence time and depressed protonema emergence area. Drying combined with heat accelerated water loss, followed by a decrease of photosynthetic activity. Drying had different influences on membrane permeability at different temperatures. When moss leaves were subjected to a combined stress of drying and heat shock, photosynthesis was maintained mainly due to the effects of drying on physiological activity although the cellular morphological integrity was affected. Drying caused opposing effects on moss physiological and reproductive characteristics. On the one hand, drying caused a positive synergistic effect with heat shock when the temperature was below 40 deg. C. On the other hand, drying showed antagonism with heat shock when the moss was subjected to temperatures higher than 40 deg. C. These findings may help in understanding the survival mechanism of dessert mosses under heat shock stress which will be helpful for the artificial reconstruction of BSCs.

  19. Variation in antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity of different growth forms of Malva parviflora and evidence for synergism of the anti-inflammatory compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shale, T L; Stirk, W A; van Staden, J

    2005-01-01

    Malva parviflora leaves and roots were collected from five sites within the Qacha's Nek District in Lesotho. These plants had two distinct growth forms--upright and prostrate. Hexane, methanol and water extracts were made from the plant material and tested for antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activity using the disc diffusion and cyclooxygenase-1 (Cox-1) bioassays, respectively. Hexane, methanol and water extracts made from Malva parviflora with a prostrate growth form inhibited the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, while extracts made from plants with an upright growth form inhibited the growth of Gram-positive bacteria only. Cox-1 anti-inflammatory activity of hexane, methanol and water extracts did not show any variation between the two growth forms. The hexane extracts of both the leaves and roots were the most inhibitory. The water extracts had the least inhibitory activity. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the root dichloromethane extract showed that Cox-1 anti-inflammatory activity was caused by at least two compounds that acted synergistically to produce the biological effect.

  20. Short communication: lack of breed differences in responses of bovine spermatozoa to heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandolia, R K; Reinertsen, E M; Hansen, P J

    1999-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to test whether the magnitude of effects of heat shock on spermatozoal function were less for thermotolerant breeds (Brahman and other breeds with Brahman influence) than for breeds that evolved in northern Europe (Angus and Holstein). Frozen spermatozoa were thawed, purified by Percoll gradient centrifugation and incubated at 38.5, 41, or 42 degrees C for 4 h. Sperm motility was then analyzed with a Hamilton Thorn Motility Analyzer. Heat shock reduced the percentage of sperm that were motile, mean track speed, and mean path velocity. There were no significant breed x temperature interactions for these traits. The mean frequency of tail beat tended to be reduced by heat shock in bulls of Brahman-influenced breeds and, to a lesser extent, in Brahman bulls, but it was not affected by heat shock in Angus or Holstein bulls. For no traits were there significant temperature x bull within breed interactions. Overall, results indicate that 1) heat shock reduces motility of bovine spermatozoa and 2) genetic effects are unlikely to be an important determinant of the function of ejaculated sperm following heat shock. PMID:10629808

  1. Impact of Heat-Shock Treatment on Yellowing of Pak Choy Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiang-yang; SHEN Lian-qing; YUAN Hai-na

    2004-01-01

    The physiological mechanism of maintaining the green colour of pak choy leaves (Brassica rapa var chinensis) with heat-shock treatment was studied. Chlorophyll in the outer leaves of pak choy degraded rapidly during storage at ambient temperature (20 ± 2℃), a slight yellow appeared. Heat-shock treatment (46- 50℃) had a mild effect on maintaining the green colour of outer leaves. Normal chlorophyll degradation was associated with a binding of chlorophyll with chlorophyll-binding-protein preceding chlorophyll breakdown.Heat-shock treatment was found to reduce the binding-capacity between chlorophyllbinding-protein and chlorophyll. In the chlorophyll degradation pathway, pheide dioxygenase was synthesized during leaf senescence which was considered to be a key enzyme in chlorophyll degradation. Activity of this enzyme was reduced following heat-shock treatment, which might explain the observed reduction in chlorophyll breakdown. Two groups of heat-shock proteins were detected in treated leaves, the first group containing proteins from 54KDa to 74 Kda, and the second group contained proteins from 15 KDa to 29KDa. Heat-shock treatment was also found to retard the decline of glucose and fructose (the main energy substrates) of outer leaves.

  2. Factors influencing the kinetics of heat shock protein expression in human lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: All organisms, from bacteria to humans, respond to various forms of environmental stresses by inducing the synthesis of a highly conserved set of proteins, the heat shock proteins (hsps) or stress proteins. Many hsps are also expressed constitutively at lower levels and in this capacity perform essential cellular functions including protein trafficking and chaperone activity. Our approach was to follow the kinetics of hsp expression in both control and heat shocked human peripheral lymphocytes from young and old individuals. Heat shock treatment was at 42 deg C for 1 h and samples were taken at various time points during heat shock and following recovery at 37 deg C. Samples were analysed using both 35[S] methionine-labelling and western blot analysis. In addition, we investigated the possible role of phosphorylation in modulating the activity of hsps utilising phospho-specific antibodies in western blot analysis as well as metabolic 32[P] phosphate-labelling. Our study showed that hsp expression is elevated at the end of heat shock treatment, but can be seen at a lower level from 30 min during heat shock. The time taken to reach maximal induction varied for different hsps. For example hsp 70 appeared to peak at 3 h following recovery, which is consistent with previous findings. The results from western blots using phospho-specific antibodies and also the de novo synthesis of 32[P] phosphate-labelled hsps are preliminary and experiments are currently in progress

  3. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of a Hydroethanolic Extract of Tamarindus indica Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadoriya, Santosh Singh; Mishra, Vijay; Raut, Sushil; Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Jain, Sunil K

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive potential of a hydroethanolic extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves (HTI) along with its possible mode of action. The anti-inflammatory activity of HTI was estimated by carrageenan-induced hind paw oedema in male Wistar albino rats. Furthermore, HTI was assessed to determine its effects on membrane stabilization. The antinociceptive action was determined by acetic acid-induced writhing, tail-flick, and the hot plate model. Oral administration of HTI at the dose of 500, 750, and 1000 mg/kg body weight produced significant (Pindica as were mentioned in Indian traditional and folklore practices.

  4. In-silico Design, Synthesis, Anti-inflammatory and Anticancer Evaluation of Pyrazoline Analogues of Vanillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Neethu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of novel pyrazoline derivatives of vanillin were synthesized. The hydroxyl group in vanillin was masked by converting into methyl vanillin. The methyl vanillin was allowed to condense with different acetophenone derivatives gave chalcone derivatives and finally cyclized with thiosemicarbazide to form the pyrazoline derivatives of vanillin. Docking studies were carried out against anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase receptor and anticancer farnesyl transferase receptor. Majority of the synthesized compounds showed good fitting with the active site of all the docked targets. The synthesized compounds had shown significant anti inflammatory and anticancer activities.

  5. Synthesis, anti-inflammatory evaluation and docking studies of some new fluorinated fused quinazolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, C; Lamba, P; Kishore, D Pran; Narayana, B Lakshmi; Rao, K Venkat; Rajwinder, K; Rao, A Raghuram; Shireesha, B; Narsaiah, B

    2010-11-01

    A series of novel 8/10-trifluoromethyl-substituted-imidazo[1,2-c] quinazolines have been synthesized and evaluated in vivo (rat paw edema) for their anti-inflammatory activity and in silico (docking studies) to recognize the hypothetical binding motif of the title compounds with the cyclooxygenase isoenzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) employing GOLD (CCDC, 4.0.1 version) software. The compounds, 9b and 10b, were found to have good anti-inflammatory activity [around 80% of the standard: indomethacin]. The binding mode of the title compounds has been proposed based on the docking studies.

  6. Cardiovascular disease event rates in patients with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, O; Skov, L; Gislason, G;

    2013-01-01

    disease events. We therefore examined the rate of cardiovascular disease events in patients with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Individual-level linkage of nationwide administrative databases was used to assess the event rates associated......OBJECTIVES: Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Systemic anti-inflammatory drugs, including biological agents, are widely used in the treatment of patients with moderate to severe psoriasis and may attenuate the risk of cardiovascular...... cardiovascular disease event rates compared to patients treated with other anti-psoriatic therapies....

  7. Enhancement of anti-inflammatory activity of bromelain by its encapsulation in katira gum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernela, Manju; Ahuja, Munish; Thakur, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Bromelain-loaded katira gum nanoparticles were synthesized using 3 level optimization process and desirability approach. Nanoparticles of the optimized batch were characterized using particle size analysis, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Investigation of their in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by employing carrageenan induced rat-paw oedema method showed that encapsulation of bromelain in katira gum nanoparticles substantially enhanced its anti-inflammatory potential. This may be attributed to enhanced absorption owing to reduced particle size or to protection of bromelain from acid proteases. PMID:27083339

  8. Marine soft corals as source of lead compounds for anti-inflammatories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masteria Yunovilsa Putra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine soft corals are known to produce a wide array of secondary metabolites, particularly diterpenoids and steroids, and often characterized by uncommon structural features and potent bioactivities. The remarkable abundance and diversity of bioactive small molecule which have been isolated from soft corals have made these organisms an important source of new drug candidates for human diseases, particularly for their anti-inflammatory activity. In this paper, the authors reported anti-inflammatory marine natural products isolated from diverse species of soft corals determined in vitro by their inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of inducible NO synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in murine macrophage cells (RAW 264.7.

  9. ANTI INFLAMMATORY, ANALGESIC AND PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF CLITORIA TERNATEA LINN FLOWER EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamkumar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Clitoria ternatea Linn is a well known bio active plant in the Ayurvedic medicine. The present study evaluates the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Clitoria ternatea Linn flower extract. The petroleum ether (60-80◦C extract poses significant anti inflammatory, analgesic properties. The extract is found to be safe even at the dose of 2000 mg/kg body weight by acute toxicity studies. Phytochemical investigation carried out on Petroleum ether(60-80◦C extract reveals the presence of Taraxerol, a pentacyclic triterpenoid which may impart the pharmacological activity of the extract.

  10. ANTI INFLAMMATORY, ANALGESIC AND PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF CLITORIA TERNATEA LINN FLOWER EXTRACT

    OpenAIRE

    Shyamkumar; Bhat Ishwar

    2012-01-01

    Clitoria ternatea Linn is a well known bio active plant in the Ayurvedic medicine. The present study evaluates the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of Clitoria ternatea Linn flower extract. The petroleum ether (60-80◦C) extract poses significant anti inflammatory, analgesic properties. The extract is found to be safe even at the dose of 2000 mg/kg body weight by acute toxicity studies. Phytochemical investigation carried out on Petroleum ether(60-80◦C) extract reveals the presence of...

  11. Synthesis, anti-inflammatory evaluation and docking studies of some new fluorinated fused quinazolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakumar, C; Lamba, P; Kishore, D Pran; Narayana, B Lakshmi; Rao, K Venkat; Rajwinder, K; Rao, A Raghuram; Shireesha, B; Narsaiah, B

    2010-11-01

    A series of novel 8/10-trifluoromethyl-substituted-imidazo[1,2-c] quinazolines have been synthesized and evaluated in vivo (rat paw edema) for their anti-inflammatory activity and in silico (docking studies) to recognize the hypothetical binding motif of the title compounds with the cyclooxygenase isoenzymes (COX-1 and COX-2) employing GOLD (CCDC, 4.0.1 version) software. The compounds, 9b and 10b, were found to have good anti-inflammatory activity [around 80% of the standard: indomethacin]. The binding mode of the title compounds has been proposed based on the docking studies. PMID:20800934

  12. Experimental Study of Shock Wave Interference Heating on a Cylindrical Leading Edge. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieting, Allan R.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental study of shock wave interference heating on a cylindrical leading edge representative of the cowl of a rectangular hypersonic engine inlet at Mach numbers of 6.3, 6.5, and 8.0 is presented. Stream Reynolds numbers ranged from 0.5 x 106 to 4.9 x 106 per ft. and stream total temperature ranged from 2100 to 3400 R. The model consisted of a 3" dia. cylinder and a shock generation wedge articulated to angles of 10, 12.5, and 15 deg. A fundamental understanding was obtained of the fluid mechanics of shock wave interference induced flow impingement on a cylindrical leading edge and the attendant surface pressure and heat flux distributions. The first detailed heat transfer rate and pressure distributions for two dimensional shock wave interference on a cylinder was provided along with insight into the effects of specific heat variation with temperature on the phenomena. Results show that the flow around a body in hypersonic flow is altered significantly by the shock wave interference pattern that is created by an oblique shock wave from an external source intersecting the bow shock wave produced in front of the body.

  13. THEORY AND EXPERIMENT ON THE VISCOUS HEATING OF FLUID DAMPER UNDER SHOCK ENVIRONMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Deying; ZHANG Zhiyi; WANG Gongxian; HUA Hongxing; WANG Yu

    2008-01-01

    A specially designed fluid damper used as negative shock pulse generator in the shock resistance test system to dissipate the shock input energy in transient time duration is presented. The theoretical modeling based on the three-dimensional equation of heat transfer through a fluid element is created to predict the viscous heating in the fluid damper under shock conditions. A comprehensive experimental program that investigates the problem of viscous heating in the fluid damper under different shock conditions is conducted on the shock test machine to validate the analytical expression. Temperature histories for the fluid within the damper at two locations, the annular-orifice and the-end-of stroke of the damper, are recorded. The experimental results show that the theoretical model can offer a very dependable prediction for the temperature histories in the damper for increasing input velocity. The theoretical model and experimental data both clearly indicate that the viscous heating in the damper is directly related to the maximum shock velocity input and the pressure between the two sides of the piston head.

  14. Network analysis of oyster transcriptome revealed a cascade of cellular responses during recovery after heat shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingling Zhang

    Full Text Available Oysters, as a major group of marine bivalves, can tolerate a wide range of natural and anthropogenic stressors including heat stress. Recent studies have shown that oysters pretreated with heat shock can result in induced heat tolerance. A systematic study of cellular recovery from heat shock may provide insights into the mechanism of acquired thermal tolerance. In this study, we performed the first network analysis of oyster transcriptome by reanalyzing microarray data from a previous study. Network analysis revealed a cascade of cellular responses during oyster recovery after heat shock and identified responsive gene modules and key genes. Our study demonstrates the power of network analysis in a non-model organism with poor gene annotations, which can lead to new discoveries that go beyond the focus on individual genes.

  15. Relationship between the induction of heat shock proteins and the decrease in glucocorticoid receptor during heat shock response in human osteosarcoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋亮年

    1995-01-01

    Previously,it has been found that glucocorticoid receptor(GR)binding activity decreasedrapidly during heat shock response in HOS-8603,a human osteosarcorna cell line.In this study,Therelationship between the induction of heat shock proteins(HSPs)and the decrease in GR was furtherstudied in the same cell line.It was found that even though quercetin could specifically inhibit the ex-pression of hsp90α and hsp70 mRNA,it could not prevent GR from the decrease in response to the heatshock treatment.This represents the first reported evidence that the induction of HSPs and the decrease inGR during heat shock response were 2 independent biological events.The results of the present study furthershowed that although the heat shock treatment alone had no effects on alkaline phosphatase(AKP)activity,itcould completely block the induction of AKP activity in HOS-8603 cells by dexamethasone(Dex),a syntheticglucocorticoid.These results demonstrate that the heat shock-induced alteration in GR was accompanied by adecrease in GR functional activity.Furthermore,when the induction of HSPs was inhibited by the treatmentof cells with quercetin,the stimulatory effects of Dex on AKP activity could still be inhibited completely bythe heat shock treatment.The results of this part,on the basis of GR functional activity,further demonstratethat quercetin could not inhibit the heat shock-induced decrease in GR,even though it could inhibit the induc-tion of HSPs.To clarify further the effects of quercetin alone on GR binding activity in HOS-8603 cells,theregulation of GR by quercetin was also studied.It was found for the first time that quercetin coulddown-regulate GR in a time-dependent manner significantly,and that the down-regulation of GR by quercetinin HOS-8603 cells paralelled with a decrease in glucocorticoid-mediated functional responses,suggesting thatthe down-regulation of GR by quercetin is of biological significance.

  16. Heat shock protein90 in lobular neoplasia of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patsouris Efstratios

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 overexpression has been implicated in breast carcinogenesis, with putative prognostic and therapeutic implications. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of Hsp90 and to examine whether Hsp90 expression is associated with estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha and beta (ER-beta immunostaining in lobular neoplasia (LN of the breast. Methods Tissue specimens were taken from 44 patients with LN. Immunohistochemical assessment of Hsp90, ER-alpha and ER-beta was performed both in the lesion and the adjacent normal breast ducts and lobules; the latter serving as control. As far as Hsp90 evaluation is concerned: i the percentage of positive cells, and ii the intensity was separately analyzed. Additionally, the Allred score was adopted and calculated. Accordingly, Allred score was separately evaluated for ER-alpha and ER-beta. The intensity was treated as an ordinal variable-score (0: negative, low: 1, moderate: 2, high: 3. Statistical analysis followed. Results Hsp90 immunoreactivity was mainly cytoplasmic in both the epithelial cells of normal breast (ducts and lobules and LN. Some epithelial cells of LN also showed nuclear staining, but all the LN foci mainly disclosed a positive cytoplasmic immunoreaction for Hsp90. In addition, rare intralobular inflammatory cells showed a slight immunoreaction. The percentage of Hsp90 positive cells in the LN areas was equal to 67.1 ± 12.2%, whereas the respective percentage in the normal adjacent breast tissue was 69.1 ± 11.6%; the difference was not statistically significant. The intensity score of Hsp90 staining was 1.82 ± 0.72 in LN foci, while in the normal adjacent tissue the intensity score was 2.14 ± 0.64. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.029, Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test. The Hsp90 Allred score was 6.46 ± 1.14 in the LN foci, significantly lower than in the normal adjacent tissue (6.91

  17. GanedenBC30™ cell wall and metabolites: anti-inflammatory and immune modulating effects in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter Steve G

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was performed to evaluate anti-inflammatory and immune modulating properties of the probiotic, spore-forming bacterial strain: Bacillus coagulans: GBI-30, (PTA-6086, GanedenBC30TM. In addition, cell wall and metabolite fractions were assayed separately to address whether biological effects were due to cell wall components only, or whether secreted compounds from live bacteria had additional biological properties. The spores were heat-activated, and bacterial cultures were grown. The culture supernatant was harvested as a source of metabolites (MTB, and the bacteria were used to isolate cell wall fragments (CW. Both of these fractions were compared in a series of in vitro assays. Results Both MTB and CW inhibited spontaneous and oxidative stress-induced ROS formation in human PMN cells and increased the phagocytic activity of PMN cells in response to bacteria-like carboxylated fluorospheres. Both fractions supported random PMN and f-MLP-directed PMN cell migration, indicating a support of immune surveillance and antibacterial defense mechanisms. In contrast, low doses of both fractions inhibited PMN cell migration towards the inflammatory mediators IL-8 and LTB4. The anti-inflammatory activity was strongest for CW, where the PMN migration towards IL-8 was inhibited down to dilutions of 1010. Both MTB and CW induced the expression of the CD69 activation marker on human CD3- CD56+ NK cells, and enhanced the expression of CD107a when exposed to K562 tumor cells in vitro. The fractions directly modulated cytokine production, inducing production of the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and inhibiting production of IL-2. Both fractions further modulated mitogen-induced cytokine production in the following manner: Both fractions enhanced the PHA-induced production of IL-6 and reduced the PHA-induced production of TNF-alpha. Both fractions enhanced the PWM-induced production of TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma. In addition, MTB

  18. Mapping temperature-induced conformational changes in the Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma 32 by amide hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rist, Wolfgang; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Roepstorff, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    Stress conditions such as heat shock alter the transcriptional profile in all organisms. In Escherichia coli the heat shock transcription factor, sigma 32, out-competes upon temperature up-shift the housekeeping sigma-factor, sigma 70, for binding to core RNA polymerase and initiates heat shock...... gene transcription. To investigate possible heat-induced conformational changes in sigma 32 we performed amide hydrogen (H/D) exchange experiments under optimal growth and heat shock conditions combined with mass spectrometry. We found a rapid exchange of around 220 of the 294 amide hydrogens at 37...

  19. Pirfenidone inhibits TGF-β1-induced over-expression of collagen type I and heat shock protein 47 in A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisatomi Keiko

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pirfenidone is a novel anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory agent that inhibits the progression of fibrosis in animal models and in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF. We previously showed that pirfenidone inhibits the over-expression of collagen type I and of heat shock protein (HSP 47, a collagen-specific molecular chaperone, in human lung fibroblasts stimulated with transforming growth factor (TGF-β1 in vitro. The increased numbers of HSP47-positive type II pneumocytes as well as fibroblasts were also diminished by pirfenidone in an animal model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin. The present study evaluates the effects of pirfenidone on collagen type I and HSP47 expression in the human alveolar epithelial cell line, A549 cells in vitro. Methods The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and E-cadherin mRNAs in A549 cells stimulated with TGF-β1 was evaluated by Northern blotting or real-time PCR. The expression of collagen type I, HSP47 and fibronectin proteins was assessed by immunocytochemical staining. Results TGF-β1 stimulated collagen type I and HSP47 mRNA and protein expression in A549 cells, and pirfenidone significantly inhibited this process. Pirfenidone also inhibited over-expression of the fibroblast phenotypic marker fibronectin in A549 cells induced by TGF-β1. Conclusion We concluded that the anti-fibrotic effects of pirfenidone might be mediated not only through the direct inhibition of collagen type I expression but also through the inhibition of HSP47 expression in alveolar epithelial cells, which results in reduced collagen synthesis in lung fibrosis. Furthermore, pirfenidone might partially inhibit the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  20. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by heat: a novel aspect of heat shock factor 1 function in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rossi

    Full Text Available The heat-shock response, a fundamental defense mechanism against proteotoxic stress, is regulated by a family of heat-shock transcription factors (HSF. In humans HSF1 is considered the central regulator of heat-induced transcriptional responses. The main targets for HSF1 are specific promoter elements (HSE located upstream of heat-shock genes encoding cytoprotective heat-shock proteins (HSP with chaperone function. In addition to its cytoprotective function, HSF1 was recently hypothesized to play a more complex role, regulating the expression of non-HSP genes; however, the non-canonical role of HSF1 is still poorly understood. Herein we report that heat-stress promotes the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, a key regulator of inflammation controlling prostanoid and thromboxane synthesis, resulting in the production of high levels of prostaglandin-E(2 in human cells. We show that heat-induced COX-2 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level via HSF1-mediated signaling and identify, by in-vitro reporter gene activity assay and deletion-mutant constructs analysis, the COX-2 heat-responsive promoter region and a new distal cis-acting HSE located at position -2495 from the transcription start site. As shown by ChIP analysis, HSF1 is recruited to the COX-2 promoter rapidly after heat treatment; by using shRNA-mediated HSF1 suppression and HSE-deletion from the COX-2 promoter, we demonstrate that HSF1 plays a central role in the transcriptional control of COX-2 by heat. Finally, COX-2 transcription is also induced at febrile temperatures in endothelial cells, suggesting that HSF1-dependent COX-2 expression could contribute to increasing blood prostaglandin levels during fever. The results identify COX-2 as a human non-classical heat-responsive gene, unveiling a new aspect of HSF1 function.

  1. Auraptene Acts as an Anti-Inflammatory Agent in the Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Okuyama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory activity of auraptene (AUR, a citrus coumarin, in peripheral tissues is well-known, and we previously demonstrated that AUR exerts anti-inflammatory effects in the ischemic brain; the treatment of mice with AUR for eight days immediately after ischemic surgery suppressed demise and neuronal cell death in the hippocampus, possibly through its anti-inflammatory effects in the brain. We suggested that these effects were at least partly mediated by the suppression of inflammatory mediators derived from astrocytes. The present study showed that (1 AUR, as a pretreatment for five days before and another three days after ischemic surgery, suppressed microglial activation, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression in astrocytes, and COX-2 mRNA expression in the hippocampus; (2 AUR suppressed the lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of COX-2 mRNA and the mRNA of pro-inflammatory cytokines in cultured astrocytes; (3 AUR was still detectable in the brain 60 min after its intraperitoneal administration. These results support our previous suggestion that AUR directly exerts anti-inflammatory effects on the brain.

  2. General unknown screening, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of Dendrobium macrostachyum Lindl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimisha Pulikkal Sukumaran

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The results showed a relatively high concentration of phenolics, high scavenger activity and high anti-inflammatory activity of the stem extract compared to the leaf extract. The results indicate that the plant can be a potential source of bioactive compounds.

  3. Antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of leaf extract of Valeriana wallichii DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuda, Fazli; Iqbal, Zafar; Zakiullah; Khan, Ayub; Nasir, Fazli

    2012-10-01

    Valeriana wallichii DC (Valerianaceae) is one of the most widely used traditional remedies for various complications associated with nervous system and digestion. No antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory studies have so far been carried out on the aerial parts of the plant. The present work was focused to evaluate the antimicrobial (antifungal and antibacterial) and anti-inflammatory properties of V. wallichii using reported methods. Chloroform fraction (VW-2) and hexane fraction (VW-3) exhibited significant activity against S. aureus and B. subtilus, respectively. The chloroform fraction (VW-2) showed significant activity against S. aureus with 0.27 mg/ml MIC, where 0.31 mg/ml MIC was deduced for VW-3 fraction against B. subtilus. VW-3 fraction was also found to be the most potent inhibitor of M. canis, showing 70% inhibition with an MIC value of 0.19 mg/ml. Considerable inhibitory activity was also observed for VW-2 and water fraction (VW-6) against M. canis and A. flavus. A remarkable anti-inflammatory like activity was observed for the crude extract at a dose of 200 mg/kg at all observed durations. Other doses of the sample also showed excellent activity. Looking to these results it may be concluded that V. wallichii may be a potential source for activity guided isolation of natural products with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory-like properties. PMID:23009985

  4. Anti-inflammatory mechanisms of bioactive milk proteins in the intestine of newborns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterton, Dereck E W; Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Bering, Stine Brandt;

    2013-01-01

    of proteins with anti-inflammatory properties and in this review we gather together some recent significant advances regarding the isolation and proteomic identification of these minor constituents of both human and bovine milk. We introduce the process of inflammation, with a focus on the immature gut...

  5. Pharmacological potential of Populus nigra extract as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardiovascular and hepatoprotective agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadjet Debbache-Benaida

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: The extract exerted significant anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and vasorelaxant activities, the latter being endothelium-independent believed to be mediated mainly by the ability of components present in the extract to exert antioxidant properties, probably related to an inhibition of Ca2+ influx.

  6. Pharmacological potential of Populus nigra extract as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardiovascular and hepatoprotective agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nadjet Debbache-Benaida; Dina Atmani-Kilani; Valrie Barbara Schini-Keirth; Nouredine Djebbli; Djebbar Atmani

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and vasorelaxant activities of Populus nigra flower buds ethanolic extract. Methods: Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the extract were assessed using respectively the ABTS test and the animal model of carrageenan-induced paw edema. Protection from hepatic toxicity caused by aluminum was examined by histopathologic analysis of liver sections. Vasorelaxant effect was estimated in endothelium-intact and-rubbed rings of porcine coronary arteries precontracted with high concentration of U46619. Results:The results showed a moderate antioxidant activity (40%), but potent anti-inflammatory activity (49.9%) on carrageenan-induced mice paw edema, and also as revealed by histopathologic examination, complete protection against AlCl3-induced hepatic toxicity. Relaxant effects of the same extract on vascular preparation from porcine aorta precontracted with high concentration of U46619 were considerable at 10-1 g/L, and comparable (P>0.05) between endothelium-intact (67.74%, IC50=0.04 mg/mL) and-rubbed (72.72%, IC50=0.075 mg/mL) aortic rings. Conclusions: The extract exerted significant anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective and vasorelaxant activities, the latter being endothelium-independent believed to be mediated mainly by the ability of components present in the extract to exert antioxidant properties, probably related to an inhibition of Ca2+influx.

  7. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of imidazo [1,2-a] pyrimidine derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Pei Zhou; Yi Wei Ding; Hui Bin Zhang; Lian Xu; Yue Dai

    2008-01-01

    A series of imidazo [1,2-a] pyrimidine derivatives substituted adjacently with two aryls at positions 2 and 3 were designed and synthesized in order to improve their anti-inflammatory activities. Biological tests suggested that these compounds have antiinflammatory activities with COX-2 selectivity to some extent.

  8. Anti-Inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Mechanism of Tanshinone IIA for Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinone IIA (Tan II A is widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases as an active component of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. It has been demonstrated to have pleiotropic effects for atherosclerosis. From the anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanism perspective, this paper reviewed major progresses of Tan IIA in antiatherosclerosis research, including immune cells, antigens, cytokines, and cell signaling pathways.

  9. Bioassay-guided evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, I; Küpeli, E; Aslan, M; Kartal, M; Yesilada, E

    2006-04-21

    The ethanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) as well as its oleoresin were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Among the extracts screened, only the oleoresin was shown to possess a marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice without inducing any gastric damage at both 250 and 500 mg/kg doses whereas the rest of the extracts were totally inactive. While the oleoresin was found to display significant antinociceptive activity at 500 mg/kg dose, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts belonging to fruit, leaf, branch and peduncle of Pistacia vera did not exhibit any noticeable antinociception in p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal contractions in mice. Fractionation of the oleoresin indicated the n-hexane fraction to be active, which further led to recognition of some monoterpenes, mainly alpha-pinene (77.5%) by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as the oleoresin itself. alpha-Pinene was also assessed for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in the same manner and exerted a moderate anti-inflammatory effect at 500 mg/kg dose.

  10. AP-1/IRF-3 Targeted Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Andrographolide Isolated from Andrographis paniculata

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    Ting Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (AG is an abundant component of plants of the genus Andrographis and has a number of beneficial properties including neuroprotective, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic effects. Despite numerous pharmacological studies, the precise mechanism of AG is still ambiguous. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of AG and its target proteins as they pertain to anti-inflammatory responses. AG suppressed the production of nitric oxide (NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, as well as the mRNA abundance of inducible NO synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, cyclooxygenase (COX-2, and interferon-beta (IFN-β in a dose-dependent manner in both lipopolysaccharide- (LPS- activated RAW264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. AG also substantially ameliorated the symptoms of LPS-induced hepatitis and EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis in mice. Based on the results of luciferase reporter gene assays, kinase assays, and measurement of nuclear levels of transcription factors, the anti-inflammatory effects of AG were found to be clearly mediated by inhibition of both (1 extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK/activator protein (AP-1 and (2 IκB kinase ε (IKKε/interferon regulatory factor (IRF-3 pathways. In conclusion, we detected a novel molecular signaling pathway by which AG can suppress inflammatory responses. Thus, AG is a promising anti-inflammatory drug with two pharmacological targets.

  11. Structural investigation of chitosan-based microspheres with some anti-inflammatory drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreve, Simina; Kacso, Iren; Popa, Adriana; Raita, Oana; Dragan, Felicia; Bende, A.; Borodi, Gh.; Bratu, I.

    2011-06-01

    The use of chitosan as an excipient in oral formulations, as a drug delivery vehicle for ulcerogenic anti-inflammatory drugs and as base in polyelectrolyte complex systems, to prepare solid release systems as sponges was investigated. The preparation by double emulsification of chitosan hydrogels carrying diclofenac, acetyl-salycilic acid and hydrocortisone acetate as anti-inflammatory drugs is reported. The concentration of anti-inflammatory drug in the chitosan hydrogel generating the sponges was 0.08 mmol. Chitosan-drug loaded sponges with anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared by freeze-drying at -60 °C and 0.009 atm. Structural investigations of the solid formulations were done by Fourier-transformed infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry. The results indicated that the drug molecules are forming temporary chelates in chitosan hydrogels and sponges. Electron paramagnetic resonance demonstrates the presence of free radicals in a wide range and the antioxidant activity for chitosan-drug supramolecular cross-linked assemblies.

  12. Anti-Tumor Effect and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Boschniakia rossica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the anti-tumor effect and anti-inflammatory activity of Boschniakia rossica (BR). Methods: The expression of tumor marker, GST-P, p53 and p21ras proteins in promotion stage of rat chemical hepatocarcinogenesis were examined by immunohistochemical technique ABC method. Anti-tumor effect of BR was investigated by inhibitory test on Sarcoma180. Anti-inflammatory activity of BR was tested by xylene-induced mouse ear swelling method. Results: BR-H2O extract (the H2O extract fractionated from BR-Methanol extract with CH2Cl2 and H2O) 500 mg/kg has inhibitory effect on the formation of diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced glutathione S-transferase placental form (GST-P) positive foci in rat liver with the expression of mutant p53 and p21ras proteins lower than those of non-treated hepatic preneoplastic lesions. BR extract showed inhibitory effect on Sarcoma180 and anti-inflammatory effect in mice by xylene-induced mouse ear swelling tests. Conclusion: BR- H2O extract exerted inhibitory effect on DEN-induced preneoplastic hepatic foci in promotion stage of rat chemical hepatocarcinogenesis and might suppress the growth of solid Sarcoma180 in mice. Both CH2Cl2 and H2O extract from BR exerted anti-inflammatory effect in mice.

  13. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of lavender essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Gabriela L da; Luft, Carolina; Lunardelli, Adroaldo; Amaral, Robson H; Melo, Denizar A da Silva; Donadio, Márcio V F; Nunes, Fernanda B; de Azambuja, Marcos S; Santana, João C; Moraes, Cristina M B; Mello, Ricardo O; Cassel, Eduardo; Pereira, Marcos Aurélio de Almeida; de Oliveira, Jarbas R

    2015-08-01

    Several studies have investigated the antinociceptive, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of compounds found in the lavender essential oil (LEO), however to date, there is still lack of substantial data. The objective of this study was to assess the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of lavender essential oil. The 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical decolorization assay was used for antioxidant activity evaluation. The anti-inflammatory activity was tested using two models of acute inflammation: carrageenan-induced pleurisy and croton oil-induced ear edema. The antinociceptive activity was tested using the pain model induced by formalin. LEO has antioxidant activity, which is dose-dependent response. The inflammatory response evoked by carrageenan and by croton oil was reduced through the pre-treatment of animals with LEO. In the pleurisy model, the drug used as positive control, dexamethasone, was more efficacious. However, in the ear swelling, the antiedematogenic effect of the oil was similar to that observed for dexamethasone. In the formalin test, LEO consistently inhibited spontaneous nociception and presented a similar effect to that of tramadol. The results of this study reveal (in vivo) the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of LEO and demonstrates its important therapeutic potential. PMID:26247152

  14. Doxycycline Is Anti-Inflammatory and Inhibits Staphylococcal Exotoxin-Induced Cytokines and Chemokines

    OpenAIRE

    Krakauer, Teresa; Buckley, Marilyn

    2003-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines mediate the toxic effect of superantigenic staphylococcal exotoxins (SE). Doxycycline inhibited SE-stimulated T-cell proliferation and production of cytokines and chemokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These results suggest that the antibiotic doxycycline has anti-inflammatory effects and is therapeutically useful for mitigating the pathogenic effects of SE.

  15. Rehabilitation of muscle after injury - the role of anti-inflammatory drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mackey, Abigail; Mikkelsen, U R; Magnusson, S P;

    2012-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely consumed among athletes worldwide in relation to muscle injury and soreness. This review aims to provide an overview of studies investigating their effects on skeletal muscle, in particular the repair processes in injured muscle. Muscle...

  16. Anti-Inflammatory and Antiarthritic Activity of Anthraquinone Derivatives in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay D. Kshirsagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aloe emodin is isolated compound of aloe vera which is used traditionally as an anti-inflammatory agent. In vitro pharmacokinetic data suggest that glucuronosyl or sulfated forms of aloe emodin may provide some limitations in its absorption capacity. Aloe emodin was reported to have in vitro anti-inflammatory activity due to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide (iNO and prostaglandin E2, via its action on murine macrophages. However, present work evidenced that molecular docking of aloe emodin modulates the anti-inflammatory activity, as well as expression of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2 in rodent. The AEC (4,5-dihydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2 carboxylic acid was synthesized using aloe emodin as starting material. The study was planned for evaluation of possible anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity in carrageenan rat induced paw oedema and complete Freund’s adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. The AE (aloe emodin and AEC significantly P<0.001 reduced carrageenan induced paw edema at 50 and 75 mg/kg. Complete Freund’s adjuvant induced arthritis model showed significant P<0.001 decrease in injected and noninjected paw volume, arthritic score. AE and AEC showed significant effect on various biochemical, antioxidant, and hematological parameters. Diclofenac sodium 10 mg/kg showed significant P<0.001 inhibition in inflammation and arthritis.

  17. Anti-inflammatory and immune-regulatory mechanisms prevent contact hypersensitivity to Arnica montana L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Christian; Vocanson, Marc; Wagner, Steffen; Schempp, Christoph M; Nicolas, Jean-Francois; Merfort, Irmgard; Martin, Stefan F

    2008-10-01

    Sesquiterpene lactones (SL), secondary plant metabolites from flowerheads of Arnica, exert anti-inflammatory effects mainly by preventing nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB activation because of alkylation of the p65 subunit. Despite its known immunosuppressive action, Arnica has been classified as a plant with strong potency to induce allergic contact dermatitis. Here we examined the dual role of SL as anti-inflammatory compounds and contact allergens in vitro and in vivo. We tested the anti-inflammatory and allergenic potential of SL in the mouse contact hypersensitivity model. We also used dendritic cells to study the activation of NF-kappaB and the secretion of interleukin (IL)-12 in the presence of different doses of SL in vitro. Arnica tinctures and SL potently suppressed NF-kappaB activation and IL-12 production in dendritic cells at high concentrations, but had immunostimulatory effects at low concentrations. Contact hypersensitivity could not be induced in the mouse model, even when Arnica tinctures or SL were applied undiluted to inflamed skin. In contrast, Arnica tinctures suppressed contact hypersensitivity to the strong contact sensitizer trinitrochlorobenzene and activation of dendritic cells. However, contact hypersensitivity to Arnica tincture could be induced in acutely CD4-depleted MHC II knockout mice. These results suggest that induction of contact hypersensitivity by Arnica is prevented by its anti-inflammatory effect and immunosuppression as a result of immune regulation in immunocompetent mice.

  18. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain - An updated Cochrane review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Pepijn D. D. M.; Deyo, Rick A.; Koes, Bart W.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Objectives. To assess the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 inhibitors in the treatment of nonspecific low back pain and to assess which type of NSAID is most effective. Summary of Background Data. NS

  19. Antinociceptive and Anti-inflammatory Effects of Pistacia vera LeafExtract in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Hossein; Behravan, Effat; M Soleimani, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Pistacia vera L., a member of Anacardiaceae family, has been used for sedation and analgesia in traditional medicine. In this study, the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects as well as acute toxicity of the aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. vera leaves were investigated in mice. The antinociceptive activity was studied using hot plate and writhing tests. The effect of the extracts against acute inflammation was determined using xylene-induced ear edema and the activity of the extracts, against chronic inflammation, was assessed using the cotton pellet test. The LD50 values of the infusion and maceration extracts were 0.8 g/Kg and 0.79 g/Kg, respectively. The aqueous and ethanolic maceration extracts of the P. vera leaves at the doses of 0.4 g/Kg and 0.5 g/Kg (IP), respectively, showed antinociceptive effects. The pretreatment of naloxone (2 mg/Kg, SC) inhibited the activities of extracts in hot plate test, but naloxone at the same dose could not inhibit the antinociceptive activity in writhing test. The extracts also showed anti-inflammatory effects in acute and chronic anti-inflammatory tests. The ethanolic extract was as effective as diclofenac in both inflammatory tests. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. vera leaves demonstrated central and peripheral antinociceptive activities dose-dependently and the central effect may be mediated by opioid system. The extracts also demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects against acute and chronic inflammation. PMID:24250418

  20. Bioassay-guided evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, I; Küpeli, E; Aslan, M; Kartal, M; Yesilada, E

    2006-04-21

    The ethanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) as well as its oleoresin were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Among the extracts screened, only the oleoresin was shown to possess a marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice without inducing any gastric damage at both 250 and 500 mg/kg doses whereas the rest of the extracts were totally inactive. While the oleoresin was found to display significant antinociceptive activity at 500 mg/kg dose, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts belonging to fruit, leaf, branch and peduncle of Pistacia vera did not exhibit any noticeable antinociception in p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal contractions in mice. Fractionation of the oleoresin indicated the n-hexane fraction to be active, which further led to recognition of some monoterpenes, mainly alpha-pinene (77.5%) by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as the oleoresin itself. alpha-Pinene was also assessed for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in the same manner and exerted a moderate anti-inflammatory effect at 500 mg/kg dose. PMID:16337351

  1. In vitro anti-inflammatory, mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of ethanolic extract of Clerodendrum paniculatum root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravaree Phuneerub

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clerodendrum paniculatum L. (Family Verbenaceae has been used as an antipyretic and anti-inflammatory drug in traditional Thai medicine. This present study investigated the in vitro anti-inflammatory, mutagenic and antimutagenic activities of the ethanolic extract of C. paniculatum (CPE dried root collected from Sa Kaeo Province of Thailand. Murine macrophage J774A.1 cells were stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS to evaluate nitric oxide (NO, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 production in the anti-inflammatory test while the mutagenic and antimutagenic potential was performed by the Ames test. The outcome of this study displayed that the CPE root significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO, TNF-α, and PGE 2 production in macrophage cell line. In addition, the CPE root was not mutagenic toward Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 and TA100 with and without nitrite treatment. Moreover, it inhibited the mutagenicity of nitrite treated 1-aminopyrene on both strains. The findings suggested the anti-inflammatory and antimutagenic potentials of CPE root.

  2. Amauroderma rugosum (Blume & T. Nees Torrend: Nutritional Composition and Antioxidant and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pui-Mun Chan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Amauroderma rugosum is a wild mushroom that is worn as a necklace by the indigenous communities in Malaysia to prevent fits and incessant crying by babies. The aim of this study was to investigate the nutritive composition and antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects of A. rugosum extracts on LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Nutritional analysis of freeze-dried mycelia of A. rugosum (KUM 61131 from submerged culture indicated a predominant presence of carbohydrates, proteins, dietary fibre, phosphorus, potassium, and sodium. The ethanol crude extract (EE, its hexane (HF, ethyl acetate (EAF, and aqueous (AF fractions of mycelia of A. rugosum grown in submerged culture were evaluated for antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects. EAF exhibited the highest total phenolic content and the strongest antioxidant activity based on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS assays. HF showed dose-dependent inhibition of NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and NO radical scavenging activity. Gas chromatographic analysis of HF revealed the presence of ethyl linoleate and ergosterol, compounds with known anti-inflammatory properties. In conclusion, the nutritive compositions and significant antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects of mycelia extracts of A. rugosum have the potential to serve as a therapeutic agent or adjuvant in the management of inflammatory disorders.

  3. Study of anti-inflammatory activities of α-D-glucosylated eugenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Erli; Xiao, Min; Chen, Chang; Xu, Weijian

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is an immune response against a variety of noxious stimuli, such as infection, chemicals, and physical injury. Eugenol, a natural phenolic extract, has drawn much attention for its various desirable pharmacological functions and is, therefore, broadly used in our daily life and medical practice. However, further usage of eugenol is greatly limited due to its unwanted properties, such as physicochemical instability, poor solubility, and high-dose cytotoxicity. In hopes of extending its applicability through glycosylation, we previously reported a novel, efficient, and high throughput way to biosynthesize α-D-glucosylated eugenol (α-EG). In this study, we further explored the potential superior properties of α-EG to its parent eugenol in terms of anti-inflammatory activities. We demonstrated that α-EG was an effective anti-inflammatory mediator in both non-cellular and cellular environments. In addition, the non-cellular inhibitory effect of α-EG could be amplified by α-glucosidase, which ubiquitously exists in cytoplasm. Furthermore, α-EG exhibited a superior anti-inflammatory effect to its parent eugenol in a cellular environment. In words, our findings collectively suggest that α-EG is a stronger anti-inflammatory mediator and may thereby serve as a desirable substitute for eugenol and a potential therapeutic prodrug in treating inflammatory diseases in the future.

  4. Feijoa sellowiana Berg fruit juice: anti-inflammatory effect and activity on superoxide anion generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monforte, Maria T; Fimiani, Vincenzo; Lanuzza, Francesco; Naccari, Clara; Restuccia, Salvatore; Galati, Enza M

    2014-04-01

    Feijoa sellowiana Berg var. coolidge fruit juice was studied in vivo for the anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenin-induced paw edema test and in vitro for the effects on superoxide anion release from neutrophils in human whole blood. The fruit juice was analyzed by the high-performance liquid chromatography method, and quercetin, ellagic acid, catechin, rutin, eriodictyol, gallic acid, pyrocatechol, syringic acid, and eriocitrin were identified. The results showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity of F. sellowiana fruit juice, sustained also by an effective antioxidant activity observed in preliminary studies on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test. In particular, the anti-inflammatory activity edema inhibition is significant since the first hour (44.11%) and persists until the fifth hour (44.12%) of the treatment. The effect on superoxide anion release was studied in human whole blood, in the presence of activators affecting neutrophils by different mechanisms. The juice showed an inhibiting response on neutrophils basal activity in all experimental conditions. In stimulated neutrophils, the higher inhibition of superoxide anion generation was observed at concentration of 10(-4) and 10(-2) mg/mL in whole blood stimulate with phorbol-myristate-13-acetate (PMA; 20% and 40%) and with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP; 15% and 48%). The significant reduction of edema and the inhibition of O2(-) production, occurring mainly through interaction with protein-kinase C pathway, confirm the anti-inflammatory effect of F. sellowiana fruit juice. PMID:24433073

  5. Antinociceptive anti-inflammatory effect of Monotropein isolated from the root of Morinda officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongwon; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Choi, Moo-Young; Nam, Jung-Hwan; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Sun-Kyu; Park, Hee-Juhn

    2005-10-01

    The root of Morinda officinalis (Rubiaceae) is used to treat rheumatoid arthritis and impotence in the traditional Oriental medicine. To identify the antinociceptive anti-inflammatory components of this crude drug, we adopted an activity-directed fractionation approach. The active fraction of the BuOH extract of M. officinalis root was subjected to silica gel and ODS column chromatography to yield two diterpenes, compounds 1 and 2 and these were identified as monotropein and deacetylasperulosidic acid, respectively. The iridoid glycoside, monotropein, was tested for its anti-inflammatory antinociceptive effects using hot plate- and writhing antinociceptive assays and by using carrageenan-induced anti-inflammatory assays in mice and rats. Pretreatment with monotropein (at 20, 30 mg/kg/d, p.o.) significantly reduced stretching episodes and prolonged action time in mice. It also significantly reduced acute paw edema by carrageenan in rats. These results indicate that monotropein contributes to the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory action of Morinda officinalis root. PMID:16204945

  6. AMP-activated protein kinase is activated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tanya S; Russe, Otto Quintus; Möser, Christine V; Ferreirós, Nerea; Kynast, Katharina L; Knothe, Claudia; Olbrich, Katrin; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2015-09-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) is a cellular energy sensor, which is activated in stages of increased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) consumption. Its activation has been associated with a number of beneficial effects such as decrease of inflammatory processes and inhibition of disease progression of diabetes and obesity. A recent study suggested that salicylate, the active metabolite of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) acetyl-salicylic acid (aspirin), is able to activate AMPK pharmacologically. This observation raised the question whether or not other NSAIDs might also act as AMPK activators and whether this action might contribute to their cyclooxygenase (COX)-independent anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we investigated mouse and human neuronal cells and liver tissue of mice after treatment with various NSAIDs. Our results showed that the non-selective acidic NSAIDs ibuprofen and diclofenac induced AMPK activation similar to aspirin while the COX-2 selective drug etoricoxib and the non-opioid analgesic paracetamol, both drugs have no acidic structure, failed to activate AMPK. In conclusion, our results revealed that AMPK can be activated by specific non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as salicylic acid, ibuprofen or diclofenac possibly depending on the acidic structure of the drugs. AMPK might therefore contribute to their antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:26049010

  7. New Concept of Neural Stem Cell Transplantation: Anti-inflammatory Role

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Park, Hee-Kwon; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2008-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) transplantation has been studied as a promising tool for replacing damaged neurons in various neurological disorders. However, recent growing data showed new therapeutic benefits of NSCs, which is that transplanted NSCs can modulate cerebral inflammation and protect the brain from further degeneration. We review recent discoveries regarding to the anti-inflammatory effects of NSCs and their future perspectives.

  8. Novel coumarin-benzimidazole derivatives as antioxidants and safer anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Radha Krishan; Kaur, Navneet; Bansal, Yogita; Bansal, Gulshan

    2014-10-01

    Inspired from occurrence of anti-inflammatory activity of 3-substituted coumarins and antiulcer activity of various 2-substituted benzimidazoles, novel compounds have been designed by coupling coumarin derivatives at 3-position directly or through amide linkage with benzimidazole nucleus at 2-position. The resultant compounds are expected to exhibit both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities along with less gastric toxicity profile. Two series of coumarin-benzimidazole derivatives (4a-e and 5a-e) were synthesized and evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity and antioxidant activity. Compounds 4c, 4d and 5a displayed good anti-inflammatory (45.45%, 46.75% and 42.85% inhibition, respectively, versus 54.54% inhibition by indomethacin) and antioxidant (IC50 of 19.7, 13.9 and 1.2 µmol/L, respectively, versus 23.4 µmol/L for butylatedhydroxytoluene) activities. Evaluation of ulcer index and in vivo biochemical estimations for oxidative stress revealed that compounds 4d and 5a remain safe on gastric mucosa and did not induce oxidative stress in tissues. Calculation of various molecular properties suggests the compounds to be sufficiently bioavailable. PMID:26579406

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjit Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous extract of Mirabilis jalapa Linn. (MJL (Nyctaginaceae leaves for scientific validation of the folklore claim of the plant. The leaves are used as traditional folk medicine in the south of Brazil to treat inflammatory and painful diseases. Cosmetic or dermo-pharmaceutical compositions containing MJL are claimed to be useful against inflammation and dry skin. Methods: Aqueous extract of the leaves was prepared by cold maceration. Results: The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated using carrageenan and formalin-induced paw edema models in Wistar albino rats. The anti-inflammatory activity was found to be dose dependent in carrageenan-induced paw edema model. The aqueous extract has shown significant (P < 0.05 inhibition of paw oedema, 37.5% and 54.0% on 4 th hour at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. Similar pattern of paw edema inhibition was seen in formalin-induced paw edema model. The maximum percentage inhibition in paw edema was 32.9% and 43.0% on 4 th day at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. Conclusion: The results of present study demonstrate that aqueous extract of the leaves possess significant (P < 0.05 anti-inflammatory potential.

  10. Anti-inflammatory Effect of Sodium Valproate on Carrageenan-Induced Paw Edema in Male Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mj Khoshnood

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available ABESTRACT: Introduction & objective: Inflammation is a body defensive response to the endogenous and exogenous stimulators such as chemical, radiation, trauma and invasive microorganism, which result pain and tissue necrosis. There are many natural and synthetic drugs for treatment of inflammation and lot of them are under investigation. Sodium valporate is an antiepileptic drug used particularly in the treatment of primary generalized seizure notably absence, myocolonic seizure, acute manic phase of bipolar disorder and prophylaxis of migraine. The previous observations showed sodium valporate increases level of gamma amino butyric acid (GABA in the central and peripheral nervous system. In acute inflammation, GABA showed a significant attenuation of paw edema and nociception. The aim of this study was evaluation of anti-inflammatory effect of sodium valporate. Materials & Methods: In order to evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antiexudative of sodium valporate doses of 200,400 and 600 mg/kg were investigated on rat paw edema that induced by carrageenan. In addition, the plasma leakage in the inflamed tissue was evaluated by application of trypan blue as intravenous injection. Dexamethason was used as positive control. Results: Results showed sodium valporate doses of 400 and 600 mg/kg decreased inflammatory and exudative effect as compared to control group. Conclusion: Although the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of this drug were not evident but we can say sodium valporate in addition to already proved effects has anti-inflammatory effect.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effect of the methanol extract from Anthocephalus cadamba stem bark in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodangala Subraya Chandrashekar

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anthocephalus cadamba (ReboxMiq. (Rubiaceae is widely distributed throughout the greater part of India, especially at low levels in wet place. Traditionally the bark is used as tonic, febrifuge and to reduce the pain and inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect of methanol extract obtained from  Anthocephalus cadamba  aerial parts, MEAC, were investigated in this study. Design and methods: The effects of MEAC on the acute and chronic phases of inflammation were studied in carrageenan, dextran and mediators (histamine and serotonin induced paw edema and cotton pallet-induced granuloma, respectively. The anti-edema effect of MEAC was compared with 10 mg/kg of indomethacin orally. Results: The results suggested that MEAC possess potent anti-inflammatory activity. The acute inflammatory model showed that all the doses of MEAC effectively suppressed the edema produced by histamine, so it may be suggested that its anti-inflammatory activity is possibly backed by its antihistaminic activity. In chronic inflammatory model the effect may be due to the cellular migration to injured sites and accumulation of collagen and mucopolysaccharide. Conclusions: On the basis of these findings, it may be inferred that  Anthocephalus cadamba  is an anti-inflammatory agent and the results are in agreement with its traditional use.

  12. Phytol: A chlorophyll component with anti-inflammatory and metabolic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Peter; Hultqvist, Malin; Hellgren, Lars I.;

    2014-01-01

    The naturally occurring dipterpene molecule Phytol is an alcohol that can be extracted from the chlorophyll of green plants. Phytol has been studied for decades and has been suggested to have both metabolic properties as well as potent anti-inflammatory effects. Phytol represents a molecule derived...

  13. Anti-inflammatory activities of the hydroalcoholic extracts from Erythrina velutina and E. mulungu in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvânia M. M. Vasconcelos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work studied the anti-inflammatory activities of the hydroalcoholic extracts (HAEs from Erythrina velutina Willd. (Ev and E. mulungu Mart. ex Benth. (Em in the carrageenan- and dextran-induced mice hind paw edema models. These medicinal plants belonging to the Fabaceae family are used in some Brazilian communities to treat pain, inflammation, insomnia and disorders of the central nervous system. In the present work, the extracts were administered orally in male mice at the doses of 200 or 400 mg/kg. In the carrageenan-induced test, only Em showed anti-inflammatory activity, decreasing the paw edema, at the doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg. No effect was observed with Ev in this model. On the other hand, in the dextran model, Ev demonstrated anti-inflammatory effect, showing decrease of the paw edema at the 1, 2, 3, 4 and 24th h. Em (200 or 400 mg/kg presented anti-inflammatory effect at the 2, 3 and 4th h after administration of dextran, as compared to control. In conclusion, the work showed that Ev and Em present anti-edematous actions, which possibly occurs by distinct mechanisms. While Ev seems to interfere especially in inflammatory processes in which mast cells have an important role, Em exerts greater activity in the inflammatory process that depends mainly on polymorphonuclear leucocytes. However, further studies are needed to determine the exact mechanism of action of the species investigated.

  14. Smoking status and anti-inflammatory macrophages in induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.I. Kunz; T.S. Lapperre; J.B. Snoeck-Stroband; S.E. Budulac; W. Timens; S. van Wijngaarden; J.A. Schrumpf; K.F. Rabe; D.S. Postma; P.J. Sterk; P.S. Hiemstra

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Macrophages have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD. M1 and M2 macrophages constitute subpopulations displaying pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that smoking cessation affects macrophage heterogeneity in the lung of patients with COPD. Our aim was

  15. Smoking status and anti-inflammatory macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage and induced sputum in COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, Lisette I Z; Lapperre, Thérèse S; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Budulac, Simona E; Timens, Wim; van Wijngaarden, Simone; Schrumpf, Jasmijn A; Rabe, Klaus F; Postma, Dirkje S; Sterk, Peter J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2011-01-01

    Background: Macrophages have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD. M1 and M2 macrophages constitute subpopulations displaying pro-and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that smoking cessation affects macrophage heterogeneity in the lung of patients with COPD. Our aim was to study m

  16. Neutrophilia and an Anti-Inflammatory Drug as Markers of Inflammation in Delayed Muscle Soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lucille L.; And Others

    This study reexamined the concept that delayed muscle soreness (DMS) is a form of inflammatory pain. This was accomplished by having 32 male volunteers perform exercise known to induce DMS and then assess the total and differential white blood cell changes. In addition, an anti-inflammatory drug, idomethacin, was administered to determine whether…

  17. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain - An updated Cochrane review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Pepijn D. D. M.; Deyo, Rick A.; Koes, Bart W.; Scholten, Rob J. P. M.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2008-01-01

    Study Design. A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Objectives. To assess the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 inhibitors in the treatment of nonspecific low back pain and to assess which type of NSAID is most effective. Summary of Background Data. NS

  18. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and molecular carcinogenesis of colorectal carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, G; Koornstra, JJ; Kleibeuker, JH

    2003-01-01

    Context Colorectal cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related mortality in the west. The high incidence and mortality make effective prevention an important public-health and economic issue. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can inhibit colorectal-carcinogenesis and are am

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Curcuminoids, Turmerones, and Aqueous Extract of Curcuma longa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Subhash Bagad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcuma longa is widely known for its anti-inflammatory activity in traditional system of medicine for centuries and has been scientifically validated extensively. The present study was conducted to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of curcuminoids and oil-free aqueous extract (COFAE of C. longa and compare it with that of curcuminoids and turmerones (volatile oil, the bioactive components of C. longa that are proven for the anti-inflammatory potential. The activity against inflammation was evaluated in xylene-induced ear edema, cotton pellet granuloma models in albino Swiss mice and albino Wistar rats, respectively. The results showed that COFAE of C. longa at three dose levels significantly (P≤0.05 inhibited inflammation in both models, as evidenced by reduction in ear weight and decrease in wet as well as dry weights of cotton pellets, when compared to the vehicle control. The COFAE of C. longa showed considerable anti-inflammatory effects against acute and chronic inflammation and the effects were comparable to those of curcuminoids and turmerones.

  20. Tissue Distribution and Anti-inflammatory Activity of DexamethasoneAcetate Incorporated In Lipid Emulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QuanDongqin; CuiGuanghua; DongHuajin; RuanJinxiu

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the anti-inflammatory activity and tissue distribution patterns of intravenousemulsion of dexamethasone acetate in mice. Methods: The anti-inflammatory solution for injection andLimethasone(Jepanese product) given intravenously were evaluated by using the preformed carrageenan granulomapouch method in rats. Results: The anti-inflammatory activity of dexamethasone acetate emulsion at low dose of 0.05mg.kg1 was as potent as dexamethasone sodium phosphate solution at high dose of 0.3 mg.kg1. The distributionpatterns in mice tissues of [3H]dexamethasone acetate emulsion and [3H]dexamethasone sodium phosphate solution inmice were markedly different. Dexamethasone acetate emulsion showed a much higher concentration in the liver,spleen, lung, and inflamed tissues, whereas dexamethasone sodium phosphate had a high concenti,mon in themuscles of vastus lateralis. These results may indicate that dexamethasone incoporated in lipid emulsion was taken upby the reticuloendothelial system and inflammatory cells much more than dexamethasone sodium phosphate solution.Conclusion: When dexamethasone acetate was incorporated in emulsion, the distribution patterns in tissues werechanged and they had a stronger anti-inflammatory activity.

  1. Variation in postoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory analgesic use after colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Klein, Mads; Burcharth, Jakob;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been proposed as part of a multimodal postoperative analgesia in patients operated for colorectal cancer. However, whether these drugs are prescribed and taken by the patients have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to...

  2. Pharmacognostic study and anti-inflammatory activity of Callistemon lanceolatus leaf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kumar S; Kumar V; Prakash OM

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study detail pharmacognosy and anti-inflammatory activity of Callistemonlanceolatus (C. lanceolatus) leaf. Methods: Leaf sample was studied by organoleptic, macroscopical, microscopical, phytochemical and other WHO recommended methods for standardizations. The methanolic leaf extract of the plant was also screened for anti-inflammatory activity on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rat at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg, orally. The detail pharmacognostic study of the C. lanceolatus leaf was carried out to lay down the standards which could be useful in future experimental studies. Results: C. lanceolatus methanolic leaf extract showed significant (P<0.05) anti-inflammatory activity at doses of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg. This significant anti-inflammatory of C. lanceolatus methanolic leaf extract at the dose of 400 mg/kg was comparable with diclofenac sodium. Conclusions: The pharmacognostic profile of the C. lanceolatus leaf is helpful in standardization for quality, purity and sample identification. The methanolic extract at a dose of 400 mg/kg shows a significant activity in comparison with the standard drug diclofenac sodium (50 mg/kg).

  3. A Novel Liposomal Dexamethasone Palmitate Formulation and Anti-inflammatory Effects on Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Ji; YANG, Jing; WANG, Wenxin; YU, Jichen; FU, Jingguo; WANG, Xiaolai

    2009-01-01

    A novel dexamethasone palmitate liposomal long-circulating (DPL long-circulating) drug delivery system was established. The DPL long-circulating and DPL (dexamethasone palmitate liposomal) systems were prepared by film-distributed extrusion with phospholipid and cholesterol. The formulation stability of DPL long-circulating and DPL were investigated. The anti-inflammatory activity and acute toxicity of DPL long-circulating, DPL and dexa- methasone sodium phosphate injection (DSP) were evaluated with mice. The DPL long-circulating systems were successfully prepared by film-distributed extrusion methods. The experimental results showed that the DPL long-circulating had uniform particle size and stable property. The DPL long-circulating and DPL showed stronger anti-inflammatory effect than DSP in an anti-inflammatory test. Acute toxicity tests showed that DSP injection had lower toxicity than the DPL long-circulating and DPL, which suggested that DPL long-circulating and DPL had higher bioavailability with passive targeting efficacy of liposomes. The DPL long-circulating formulation product can meet quality requirement. This formulation had stronger anti-inflammatory effect and higher acute toxicity.

  4. Antioxidant and in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of Mimusops elengi leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biswakanth Kar; RB Suresh Kumar; Indrajit Karmakar; Narayan Dolai; Asis Bala; Upal K Mazumder; Pallab K Haldar

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the antioxidant and in vitro anti-inflammatory activities of the alcoholic extract of Mimusops elengi L (M. elengi) leaves. Methods: In vitro antioxidant activity was evaluated for peroxynitrite, superoxide and hypochlorous acid scavenging activity. Total phenolic content also determined. Inhibition of protein denaturation and HRBC (Human Red Blood Cell) membrane stabilization method was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity. Results: The leave extract of M. elengi exhibited dose dependent free radical scavenging property in peroxynitrite, superoxide and hypochlorous acid models and the IC50 value were found to be (205.53 ± 2.30), (60.5±2.3), (202.4±5.3) μg/mL respectively. Total phenolic content was found to be 97.3 μg/mg of extract. The maximum membrane stabilization of M. elengi L was found to be (73.85±0.80)% at a dose of 1 000 μg/0.5 mL and that of protein denaturation was found to be 86.23% at a dose of 250 μg/mL with regards to standards in the anti-inflammatory activity. Conclusion: From the result it can conclude that M. elengi extract show good antioxidant and in vitro anti -inflammatory activities.

  5. Do nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease the risk for Alzheimer's disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K; Launer, L J; Ott, A;

    1995-01-01

    Based on reports that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce the risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), we studied the cross-sectional relation between NSAID use and the risk for AD in a population-based study of disease and disability in older people. After controlling...

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine in obesity and ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirchgessner Annette

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoke is a major risk factor for a number of diseases including lung cancer and respiratory infections. Paradoxically, it also contains nicotine, an anti-inflammatory alkaloid. There is increasing evidence that smokers have a lower incidence of some inflammatory diseases, including ulcerative colitis, and the protective effect involves the activation of a cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway that requires the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR on immune cells. Obesity is characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation, which contributes to insulin resistance. Nicotine significantly improves glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity in genetically obese and diet-induced obese mice, which is associated with suppressed adipose tissue inflammation. Inflammation that results in disruption of the epithelial barrier is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease, and nicotine is protective in ulcerative colitis. This article summarizes current evidence for the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine in obesity and ulcerative colitis. Selective agonists for the α7nAChR could represent a promising pharmacological strategy for the treatment of inflammation in obesity and ulcerative colitis. Nevertheless, we should keep in mind that the anti-inflammatory effects of nicotine could be mediated via the expression of several nAChRs on a particular target cell.

  7. Differential heat shock response of primary human cell cultures and established cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, W W; Issinger, O G

    1986-01-01

    degrees C treatment, whereas in immortalized cell lines usually 90% of the cells were found in suspension. Enhanced expression of the major heat shock protein (hsp 70) was found in all heat-treated cells. In contrast to the primary cell cultures, established and transformed cell lines synthesized a...

  8. DMPD: Endogenous anti-inflammatory substances, inter-alpha-inhibitor and bikunin. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17132099 Endogenous anti-inflammatory substances, inter-alpha-inhibitor and bikunin.... Kobayashi H. Biol Chem. 2006 Dec;387(12):1545-9. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Endogenous anti-inflam...matory substances, inter-alpha-inhibitor and bikunin. PubmedID 17132099 Title Endogenous anti-inflammatory s

  9. Anti-inflammatory activity of some extracts and isolates from leonotis nepetaefolia on TPA-induced edema model

    OpenAIRE

    Hortensia Parra Delgado; Gabriela García Ruiz; Antonio Nieto Camacho; Mariano Martínez Vázquez

    2004-01-01

    Several extracts of aerial parts of Leonotis nepetaefolia showed anti-inflammatory activity on TPA-induced edema model. The chromatography of the extracts led to the isolation of stigmasterol and leonotinin. Although the presence of leonotinin is in agreement with previous phytochemical studies of this species, this is the first time that its anti-inflammatory activity is determined.

  10. Cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of treatment with Adenocaine/Mg2+ in a porcine model of endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granfeldt, Asger

    Cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of treatment with Adenocaine/Mg2+ in a porcine model of endotoxemia American Heart Scientific sessions Resuscitation Science symposium 16-20 November......Cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of treatment with Adenocaine/Mg2+ in a porcine model of endotoxemia American Heart Scientific sessions Resuscitation Science symposium 16-20 November...

  11. DMPD: Molecular aspects of anti-inflammatory action of G-CSF. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 12005202 Molecular aspects of anti-inflammatory action of G-CSF. Boneberg EM, Hartu...ng T. Inflamm Res. 2002 Mar;51(3):119-28. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Molecular aspects of anti-infla...mmatory action of G-CSF. PubmedID 12005202 Title Molecular aspects of anti-inflammatory action of G-CSF. Aut

  12. New Isorhamnetin Derivatives from Salsola imbricata Forssk. Leaves with Distinct Anti-inflammatory Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Samir M.; El Kashak, Walaa A.; Wink, Michael; El Raey, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Salsola imbricata Forssk. is a shrub widely growing in Egypt, used as a camel food, traditionally, used as anti-inflammatory agent. Literature survey showed no report about the anti-inflammatory activity of S. imbricata. Aim of the Study: This work was designed to study the phenolic constituents and to provide evidence for the traditional use of S. imbricata as an anti-inflammatory agent. Materials and Methods: The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of the total aqueous methanol extract and some isolated compounds were investigated in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells using nitric oxide assay. All chemical structures were identified on the basis of electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, one- and two-dimension nuclear magnetic resonance. Results: Nine phenolic compounds, among them two new natural products; isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucuronyl (1’’’→4’’) glucuronide (1) and its dimethyl ester; isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-di glucuronate dimethyl ester (2), two isorhamnetin glycosides: Isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-galactopyranoside (3), isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (4), and isorhamnetin (5). In addition, an alkaloidal phenolic; trans N-feruloyl tyramine (6), three phenolic acids: Isovanillic acid (7), ferulic acid (8), and p-hydroxy benzoic acid (9) were isolated from salsola imbricata leaves. All compounds were isolated and identified for the first time from this plant except compound (6). The extract and the tested compounds showed distintict anti-inflammatory activities with no toxicity on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Conclusion: The extract and the tested compounds showed distintict anti-inflammatory activities with no toxicity on RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. SUMMARY Investigation of the chemical constituents of the leaves of Salsola imbricata led to isolation of two new isorhamnetin derivatives: isorhamnetin.3-O-β-D.glucuronyl (1’“→”) glucuronide (1) and its dimethyl ester (2), together with seven known phenolic compounds. The extract and the

  13. Stimulation of cysteinyl leukotriene production in mast cells by heat shock and acetylsalicylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Redegeld, Frank A; Dunsmore, Kathy; Odoms, Kelli; Wong, Hector R; Nijkamp, Frans P; Engels, Ferdi

    2007-04-30

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) E-dependent activation of mast cells is central to the allergic response. The engagement of IgE-occupied receptors initiates a series of molecular events that causes the release of preformed, and de novo synthesis of, allergic mediators. Cysteinyl leukotrienes are able to contract airway smooth muscle and increase mucus secretion and vascular permeability and recruit eosinophils. Mast cells have also recently been recognized as active participants in innate immune responses. Heat stress can modulate innate immunity by inducing stress proteins such as heat-shock proteins (HSPs). We previously demonstrated that treatment of mast cells with heat shock or acetylsalicylic acid results in an increase of TNF-alpha and IL-6 release. This effect was paralleled by expression of HSP70. In the current study, we further investigated the effects of heat shock and acetylsalicylic acid on the activation of mast cells and the release of cysteinyl leukotrienes. In mouse mast cells, derived from a culture of bone marrow cells, responsiveness to heat shock, acetylsalicylic acid and exogenous or endogenous HSP70 was monitored by measuring leukotriene C4 release. We show that after heat shock treatment and exposure to acetylsalicylic acid leukotriene production was increased. Moreover, exogenous rHSP70 also induced leukotriene production. Because it has been reported that leukotriene production in mast cells may be mediated by Toll like receptor (TLR) activation, and HSP70 also activates TLRs signaling, we further explored these issues by using mast cells that are not able to produce HSP70, i.e. heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) knockout cells. We found that in HSF-1 knockout bone marrow derived mast cells, heat shock and acetylsalicylic acid failed to induce release of leukotrienes. Moreover, in wild type cells the surface expression of TLR4 was attenuated, whereas the intracellular expression was up-regulated. We conclude that heat shock and acetylsalicylic acid induce

  14. Labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of TAK-1 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labdane derivatives obtained from the diterpenoid labdanediol suppressed NO and PGE2 production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. However, mechanisms involved in these inhibitory effects are not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) in peritoneal macrophages and examined its therapeutic effect in a mouse endotoxic shock model. LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE2 in LPS-activated macrophages. This effect involved the inhibition of NOS-2 and COX-2 gene expression, acting at the transcription level. Examination of the effects of the diterpene on NF-κB signaling showed that LAME inhibits the phosphorylation of IκBα and IκBβ, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. Moreover, inhibition of MAPK signaling was also observed. A further experiment revealed that LAME inhibited the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), an upstream signaling molecule required for IKK and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were downregulated in the presence of this compound after stimulation with LPS. Additionally, LAME also improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia and reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α). In conclusion, these results indicate that labdane diterpene LAME significantly attenuates the pro-inflammatory response induced by LPS both in vivo and in vitro. Highlights: ► LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE2 in LPS-activated macrophages. ► IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were also inhibited by LAME. ► Inhibition of TAK-1 activation is the mechanism involved in this process. ► LAME improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia. ► LAME reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α).

  15. Labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of TAK-1 activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuadrado, Irene [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cidre, Florencia; Herranz, Sandra [Unidad de Inflamación y Cáncer. Área de Biología Celular y Desarrollo. Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Estevez-Braun, Ana [Instituto Universitario de Bio-Orgánica “Antonio González”. Universidad de La Laguna. Avda. Astrofísico Fco. Sánchez 2. 38206. La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Instituto Canario de Investigaciones del Cáncer (ICIC) (Spain); Heras, Beatriz de las, E-mail: lasheras@farm.ucm.es [Departamento de Farmacología, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense, Plaza Ramón y Cajal s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hortelano, Sonsoles, E-mail: shortelano@isciii.es [Unidad de Inflamación y Cáncer. Área de Biología Celular y Desarrollo. Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-01-01

    Labdane derivatives obtained from the diterpenoid labdanediol suppressed NO and PGE{sub 2} production in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. However, mechanisms involved in these inhibitory effects are not elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathways involved in the anti-inflammatory effects of labdanolic acid methyl ester (LAME) in peritoneal macrophages and examined its therapeutic effect in a mouse endotoxic shock model. LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. This effect involved the inhibition of NOS-2 and COX-2 gene expression, acting at the transcription level. Examination of the effects of the diterpene on NF-κB signaling showed that LAME inhibits the phosphorylation of IκBα and IκBβ, preventing their degradation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. Moreover, inhibition of MAPK signaling was also observed. A further experiment revealed that LAME inhibited the phosphorylation of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), an upstream signaling molecule required for IKK and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) activation. Inflammatory cytokines such as IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were downregulated in the presence of this compound after stimulation with LPS. Additionally, LAME also improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia and reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α). In conclusion, these results indicate that labdane diterpene LAME significantly attenuates the pro-inflammatory response induced by LPS both in vivo and in vitro. Highlights: ► LAME reduced the production of NO and PGE{sub 2} in LPS-activated macrophages. ► IL-6, TNF-α and IP-10 were also inhibited by LAME. ► Inhibition of TAK-1 activation is the mechanism involved in this process. ► LAME improved survival in a mouse model of endotoxemia. ► LAME reduced the circulatory levels of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α).

  16. Sucrose esters from Physalis peruviana calyces with anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Luis A; Ocampo, Yanet C; Gómez, Harold A; De la Puerta, Rocío; Espartero, José L; Ospina, Luis F

    2014-11-01

    Physalis peruviana is a native plant from the South American Andes and is widely used in traditional Colombian medicine of as an anti-inflammatory medicinal plant, specifically the leaves, calyces, and small stems in poultice form. Previous studies performed by our group on P. peruviana calyces showed potent anti-inflammatory activity in an enriched fraction obtained from an ether total extract. The objective of the present study was to obtain and elucidate the active compounds from this fraction and evaluate their anti-inflammatory activity in vivo and in vitro. The enriched fraction of P. peruviana was purified by several chromatographic methods to obtain an inseparable mixture of two new sucrose esters named peruviose A (1) and peruviose B (2). Structures of the new compounds were elucidated using spectroscopic methods and chemical transformations. The anti-inflammatory activity of the peruvioses mixture was evaluated using λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats and lipopolysaccharide-activated peritoneal macrophages. Results showed that the peruvioses did not produce side effects on the liver and kidneys and significantly attenuated the inflammation induced by λ-carrageenan in a dosage-dependent manner, probably due to an inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2, which was demonstrated in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the presence of sucrose esters in P. peruviana that showed a potent anti-inflammatory effect. These results suggest the potential of sucrose esters from the Physalis genus as a novel natural alternative to treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:25338213

  17. Development and mechanism investigation of a new piperlongumine derivative as a potent anti-inflammatory agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lan-Di; Wang, Fu; Dai, Fang; Wang, Yi-Hua; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Bo

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation, especially chronic inflammation, is directly involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. An effective approach for managing inflammation is to employ chemicals to block activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key regulator for inflammatory processes. Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL), an electrophilic molecule isolated from Piper longum L., possesses excellent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, a new PL analogue (PL-0N) was designed by replacing nitrogen atom of lactam in PL with carbon atom to increase its electrophilicity and thus anti-inflammatory activity. It was found that PL-0N is more potent than the parent compound in suppressing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 as well as expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Mechanistic investigation implies that PL-0N exerts anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB transduction pathway, down-regulation of LPS-induced MAPKs activation and impairment of proteasomal activity, but also enhancement of LPS-induced autophagy; the inhibition of NF-κB by PL-0N is achieved at various stages by: (i) preventing phosphorylation of IKKα/β, (ii) stabilizing the suppressor protein IκBα, (iii) interfering with the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and (iv) inhibiting the DNA-binding of NF-κB. These data indicate that nitrogen-atom-lacking pattern is a successful strategy to improve anti-inflammatory property of PL, and that the novel molecule, PL-0N may be served as a promising lead for developing natural product-directed anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25850000

  18. Smoking status and anti-inflammatory macrophages in bronchoalveolar lavage and induced sputum in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabe Klaus F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages have been implicated in the pathogenesis of COPD. M1 and M2 macrophages constitute subpopulations displaying pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that smoking cessation affects macrophage heterogeneity in the lung of patients with COPD. Our aim was to study macrophage heterogeneity using the M2-marker CD163 and selected pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid and induced sputum from current smokers and ex-smokers with COPD. Methods 114 COPD patients (72 current smokers; 42 ex-smokers, median smoking cessation 3.5 years were studied cross-sectionally and underwent sputum induction (M/F 99/15, age 62 ± 8 [mean ± SD] years, 42 (31-55 [median (range] packyears, post-bronchodilator FEV1 63 ± 9% predicted, no steroids past 6 months. BAL was collected from 71 patients. CD163+ macrophages were quantified in BAL and sputum cytospins. Pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators were measured in BAL and sputum supernatants. Results Ex-smokers with COPD had a higher percentage, but lower number of CD163+ macrophages in BAL than current smokers (83.5% and 68.0%, p = 0.04; 5.6 and 20.1 ×104/ml, p = 0.001 respectively. The percentage CD163+ M2 macrophages was higher in BAL compared to sputum (74.0% and 30.3%, p + BAL macrophages (Rs = 0.38, p = 0.003. No significant differences were found between smokers and ex-smokers in the levels of pro-inflammatory (IL-6 and IL-8, and anti-inflammatory (elafin, and Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor [SLPI] mediators in BAL and sputum. Conclusions Our data suggest that smoking cessation partially changes the macrophage polarization in vivo in the periphery of the lung towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype, which is not accompanied by a decrease in inflammatory parameters.

  19. Novel 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazoles as anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ega Durgashivaprasad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: 1,3,4-oxadiazole ring is a versatile moiety with a wide range of pharmacological properties. The present work deals with the synthesis and evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity of two novel 2,5-disubstituted-1,3,4-oxadiazoles (OSD and OPD. Materials and Methods: Carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema was employed as an acute model of inflammation. For evaluating sub-acute anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced inflammation in rat air pouch was employed. Complete Freund′s adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats was used as a model of chronic inflammation. To evaluate in vitro anti-inflammatory activity, lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells were used. Results: OSD (100 mg/kg reduced carrageen-induced paw edema by 60%, and OPD (100 mg/kg produced a modest 32.5% reduction. OSD also reduced leukocyte influx and myeloperoxidase in carrageenan-induced rat air pouch model. In complete Freund′s adjuvant-induced arthritis model, both OSD and OPD (200 mg/kg for 14 days reduced paw edema and NO levels. In LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, OSD and OPD inhibited formation of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, with OPD showing a better activity in comparison to OSD. Conclusions: OSD was the better of the two compounds in in vivo models of inflammation. The o-phenol substitution at position 2 of oxadiazole ring in OSD may be responsible for its better in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. The ability of the compounds to inhibit LPS-induced pro-inflammatory mediator release suggests an anti-inflammatory mechanism targeting LPS-TLR4-NF-κB signalling pathway, which needs to be explored in detail. The disparate efficacy in vitro and in vivo also requires in-depth evaluation of the pharmacokinetics of these novel oxadiazoles.

  20. The SIRT1 modulators AROS and DBC1 regulate HSF1 activity and the heat shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Raynes

    Full Text Available The heat shock response, the cellular response to protein damaging stress, is critical in maintaining proteostasis. The heat shock response is regulated by the transcription factor HSF1, which is activated upon heat shock and other stresses to induce the expression of molecular chaperones. SIRT1 has previously been shown to activate HSF1 by deacetylating it, leading to increased DNA binding ability. We have investigated how the heat shock response may be controlled by factors influencing SIRT1 activity. We found that heat shock results in an increase in the cellular NAD(+/NADH ratio and an increase in recruitment of SIRT1 to the hsp70 promoter. Furthermore, we found that the SIRT1 modulators AROS and DBC1 have an impact on hsp70 transcription, HSF1 acetylation status, and HSF1 recruitment to the hsp70 promoter. Therefore, AROS and DBC1 are now two new targets available for therapeutic regulation of the heat shock response.

  1. Sleep deprivation increase the expression of inducible heat shock protein 70 in rat gastric mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Zhong Shen1; Marcel W.L. Koo; Chi-Hin Cho

    2001-01-01

    AIM To .investigate if sleep deprivation is able to increase the expression of inducible heat shock protein 70 in gastric mucosa and its possible role in mucosal defense. METHODS Rats for sleep disruption were placed inside a computerized rotating drum, gastric mucosa was taken from rats with 1, 3 and 7 d sleep deprivation. RT-PCR,immunohistochemistry and Western blotting were used to determine the expression of heat shock protein 70.Ethanol (500 mL@ L 1, I.g.) was used to induce gastric muceea damage. RESULTS RT-PCR, Western blotting and immunostaining confirmed that the sleep deprivation as a stress resulted in significantly greater expression of inducible heat shock protein 70 in gastric mucosa of rats. After the 500mL@ L-1 ethanol challenge, the ulcer area found in the rats with 7 d sleep deprivation (19.15 ± 4.2) mm2 was significantly lower (P<0.01) than the corresponding control (53.7 ± 8.1) mm2. CONCLUSION Sleep deprivation as a stress, in addition to lowering the gastric mucosal barrier, is able to stimulate the expression of inducible heat shock protein 70 in gastric mucosa of rats, the heat shock protein 70 may play an important role in gastric mucosal protection.

  2. Isolation and characterization of a small heat shock protein gene from maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, P S; Bouchard, R A; Casey, E S; Sinibaldi, R M

    1991-08-01

    A maize (Zea mays L.) genomic clone (Zmempr 9') was isolated on the basis of its homology to a meiotically expressed Lilium sequence. Radiolabeled probe made from the maize genomic clone detected complementary RNA at high fidelity. Furthermore, it hybridized to RNA isolated from staged (an interval that is coincident with meiotic prophase) maize tassel spikelets. Complimentary RNA was strongly (at least 50-fold) induced during heat shock of maize somatic tissue and appeared as a single size class in Northern blot hybridizations. Sequencing of the complete coding region of Zmempr 9' confirmed the homology of the inferred amino acid sequence to other small heat shock proteins. Consensus sequences found in the flanking regions corresponded to the usual signals for initiation of RNA transcription, polyadenylate addition, and the induction of heat shock genes. The latter sequences conferred heat shock-specific transient expression in electroporated protoplasts when cloned into promoterless reporter gene plasmid constructs. Hybrid-selected translations revealed specific translation products ranging from 15 to 18 kilodaltons, providing evidence that this gene is a member of a related multigene family. We therefore conclude that this maize genomic DNA clone, recovered through its homology to clones for meiotic transcripts in lily, represents a genuine maize small heat shock protein gene. PMID:16668329

  3. Impaired heat shock response in cells expressing full-length polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidhartha M Chafekar

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms by which polyglutamine (polyQ-expanded huntingtin (Htt causes neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD remain unclear. The malfunction of cellular proteostasis has been suggested as central in HD pathogenesis and also as a target of therapeutic interventions for the treatment of HD. We present results that offer a previously unexplored perspective regarding impaired proteostasis in HD. We find that, under non-stress conditions, the proteostatic capacity of cells expressing full length polyQ-expanded Htt is adequate. Yet, under stress conditions, the presence of polyQ-expanded Htt impairs the heat shock response, a key component of cellular proteostasis. This impaired heat shock response results in a reduced capacity to withstand the damage caused by cellular stress. We demonstrate that in cells expressing polyQ-expanded Htt the levels of heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 are reduced, and, as a consequence, these cells have an impaired a heat shock response. Also, we found reduced HSF1 and HSP70 levels in the striata of HD knock-in mice when compared to wild-type mice. Our results suggests that full length, non-aggregated polyQ-expanded Htt blocks the effective induction of the heat shock response under stress conditions and may thus trigger the accumulation of cellular damage during the course of HD pathogenesis.

  4. Impact of ecologically relevant heat shocks on Hsp developmental function in the vetigastropod Haliotis asinina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunter, Helen M; Degnan, Bernard M

    2008-07-15

    Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are essential for cellular maintenance, normal differentiation and morphogenesis, and protection against a range of environmental stresses. It is unknown which of these roles takes precedence when they are required simultaneously. Here we examined the impact of thermal stress on the complex developmental expression patterns of HasHsp70 and HasHsp90A in the vetigastropod Haliotis asinina. We find that near-lethal heat shocks do not alter the spatial demarcation of Hsp expression despite such treatments impacting on the external character of the embryos. Using a suite of molecular markers that are both coexpressed with the Hsps (i.e. in ventrolateral ectoderm and prototroch) and expressed in tissues that have lower (basal) Hsp expression (e.g. serotonergic nervous system and shell gland), we determined that Hsp-expressing tissues do not incur markedly less thermal damage than adjacent tissues. To explore the relationship of Hsp expression with sensitivity of specific cell territories to heat shock, we focused on the formation of the prototroch, a tissue where HasHsp70 and HasHsp90A are coexpressed. By heat shocking at specific developmental stages, we determined that the most sensitive period of prototroch development is during its early specification and differentiation, which overlaps with the time the Hsps are expressed at their highest levels in these cells. This correlation is consistent with heat shock impairing the function of Hsps in regions of the H. asinina embryo undergoing morphogenesis.

  5. Shock initiation of the TATB based explosive PBX 9502 heated to ~ 76∘C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, Richard; Gehr, Russell; Bucholtz, Scott; Pacheco, Adam; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Recently we reported on shock initiation of PBX 9502 (95 wt.% tri-amino-trinitro-benzene, 5 wt.% Kel-F800 binder) cooled to -55°C and to 77K Shock waves were generated by gas-gun driven plate impacts and reactive flow in the cooled PBX 9502 was measured with embedded electromagnetic gauges. Here we use similar methods to warm the explosive to ~ 76°C. The explosive sample is heated by warm air flowing through channels in an aluminum sample mounting plate and a copper tubing coil surrounding the sample. Temperature in the sample is monitored using six type-E thermocouples. Results show increased shock sensitivity; time and distance to detonation onset vs. initial shock pressure are shorter than when the sample is initially at ambient temperature. Our results are consistent with those reported by Dallman & Wackerle. Particle velocity wave profiles were also obtained during the shock-to-detonation transition and will be presented.

  6. Post-shock-revival evolutions in the neutrino-heating mechanism of core-collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Yu; Nagakura, Hiroki; Yamada, Shoichi

    2012-01-01

    We perform some experimental simulations in spherical symmetry and axisymmetry to understand the post-shock-revival evolution of core-collapse supernovae. Assuming that the stalled shock wave is relaunched by neutrino heating and employing the so-called light bulb approximation, we induce shock revival by raising the neutrino luminosity by hand up to the critical value, which is also determined by dynamical simulations. We incorporate nuclear network calculations with a consistent equation of state in the simulations to account for the energy release by nuclear reactions and their feedback to hydrodynamics. Varying the shock-relaunch time rather arbitrarily, we investigate the ensuing long-term evolutions systematically, paying particular attention to the explosion energy and nucleosynthetic yields as a function of this relaunch time, or equivalently the accretion rate at shock revival. We study in detail how the diagnostic explosion energy approaches the asymptotic value and which physical processes contribu...

  7. Expression of heat shock protein70 in oral submucous fibrosis and oral squamous cell carcinoma: An immunohistochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    M Thubashini; Malathi, N.; L Kannan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Heat shock proteins are a highly conserved group of protective cellular proteins whose synthesis is increased in response to a variety of environmental or pathophysiological stresses. Heat shock proteins are useful biomarkers for carcinogenesis in tissues and signal the degree of differentiation and the aggressiveness of cancers. Regulation of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) expression in oral submucous fibrosis is not known much, and the aim of this study was to evaluate HSP70 expr...

  8. Activation of the anti-inflammatory reflex blocks lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in synaptic inhibition in the temporal cortex of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Peña, David; Housini, Mohammad; Cheng, Derek; Lopez, Diego; Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Saderi, Nadia; Salgado Delgado, Roberto; Galindo Charles, Luis; Salgado Burgos, Humberto; Rose-John, Stefan; Flores, Gonzalo; Kilgard, Michael P; Atzori, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Stress is a potential trigger for a number of neuropsychiatric conditions, including anxiety syndromes and schizophrenic psychoses. The temporal neocortex is a stress-sensitive area involved in the development of such conditions. We have recently shown that aseptic inflammation and mild electric shock shift the balance between synaptic excitation and synaptic inhibition in favor of the former in this brain area (Garcia-Oscos et al., 2012), as well as in the prefrontal cortex (Garcia-Oscos et al., 2014). Given the potential clinical importance of this phenomenon in the etiology of hyperexcitable neuropsychiatric illness, this study investigates whether inactivation of the peripheral immune system by the "anti-inflammatory reflex" would reduce the central response to aseptic inflammation. For a model of aseptic inflammation, this study used i.p. injections of the bacterial toxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 µM) and activated the anti-inflammatory reflex either pharmacologically by i.p. injections of the nicotinic α7 receptor agonist PHA543613 or physiologically through electrical stimulation of the left vagal nerve (VNS). Patch-clamp recording was used to monitor synaptic function. Recordings from LPS-injected Sprague Dawley rats show that activation of the anti-inflammatory reflex either pharmacologically or by VNS blocks or greatly reduces the LPS-induced decrease of the synaptic inhibitory-to-excitatory ratio and the saturation level of inhibitory current input-output curves. Given the ample variety of pharmacologically available α7 nicotinic receptor agonists as well as the relative safety of clinical VNS already approved by the FDA for the treatment of epilepsy and depression, our findings suggest a new therapeutic avenue in the treatment of stress-induced hyperexcitable conditions mediated by a decrease in synaptic inhibition in the temporal cortex. PMID:25626997

  9. Numerical simulation of heat fluxes in a two-temperature plasma at shock tube walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Poniaev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a two-temperature three-component Xenon plasma flow is presented. A solver based on the OpenFOAM CFD software package is developed. The heat flux at the shock tube end wall is calculated and compared with experimental data. It is shown that the heat flux due to electrons can be as high as 14% of the total heat flux.

  10. Increased light intensity induces heat shock protein Hsp60 in coral species

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Ari M.; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine; Khalouei, Sam; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Brown, Ian R.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of increased light intensity and heat stress on heat shock protein Hsp60 was examined in two coral species using a branched coral and a laminar coral, selected for their different resistance to environmental perturbation. Transient Hsp60 induction was observed in the laminar coral following either light or thermal stress. Sustained induction was observed when these stresses were combined. The branched coral exhibited comparatively weak transient Hsp60 induction after heat stress an...

  11. The time development of a blast wave with shock heated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, R. J.; Cox, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    Accurate approximations are presented for the time development of both edge conditions and internal structures of a blast wave with shock heated electrons, and equal ion and electron temperatures at the shock. The cases considered evolve in cavities with power law ambient densities (including the uniform ambient density case) and have negligible external pressure. Account is taken of possible saturation of the thermal conduction flux. The structures evolve smoothly to the adiabatic structures.

  12. The time development of a blast wave with shock-heated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, R. J.; Cox, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate approximations are presented for the time development of both edge conditions and internal structures of a blast wave with shock heated electrons, and equal ion and electron temperatures at the shock. The cases considered evolve in cavities with power law ambient densities (including the uniform ambient density case) and have negligible external pressure. Account is taken of possible saturation of the thermal conduction flux. The structures evolve smoothly to the adiabatic structures.

  13. Inactivation of Aspergillus niger in mango nectar by high-pressure homogenization combined with heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribst, Alline A L; Franchi, Mark A; Cristianini, Marcelo; de Massaguer, Pilar R

    2009-01-01

    This research evaluated the inactivation of a heat-resistant Aspergillus niger conidia in mango nectar by high-pressure homogenization (HPH) combined with heat shock. A. niger were inoculated in mango nectar (10(6) conidia mL(-1)) and subjected to HPH (300 to 100 MPa) and heat shock (80 degrees C for 5 to 20 min) before or after HPH. Processes were evaluated according to number of decimal reductions reached by each isolated or combined process. Scanning electron microscopy was performed to observe conidia wall after pressure treatment. Pressures below 150 MPa did not inactivate A. niger while pressures of 200 and 300 MPa resulted in 2 and more than 6 log reductions, respectively. D(80 degrees C) of A. niger was determined as 5.03 min. A heat shock of 80 degrees C/15 min, reaching 3 decimal conidia reductions, was applied before or after a 200 MPa pressure treatment to improve the decimal reduction to 5 log cycles. Results indicated that HPH inactivated A. niger in mango nectar at 300 MPa (>6.24 log cycles) and that, with pressure (200 MPa) combined with post heat shock, it was possible to obtain the same decimal reduction, showing a synergistic effect. On the other hand, pre heat shock associated with HPH resulted in an additive effect. The observation of A. niger conidia treated by HPH at 100 and 200 MPa by scanning electron microscopy indicated that HPH promoted intense cell wall damage, which can sensitize the conidia to post heat shock and possibly explain the synergistic effect observed. Practical Application: The results obtained in this paper are relevant to elucidate the mechanism of conidia inactivation in order to develop the application of HPH as an alternative pasteurization process for the fruit nectar industry.

  14. Errors in macromolecular synthesis after stress : a study of the possible protective role of the small heat shock proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Marin Vinader, L.

    2006-01-01

    The general goal of this thesis was to gain insight in what small heat shock proteins (sHsps) do with respect to macromolecular synthesis during a stressful situation in the cell. It is known that after a non-lethal heat shock, cells are better protected against a subsequent more severe heat shock, a phenomenon known as thermotolerance and attributed to the presence of the heat shock proteins. The question we asked first is whether the error rate in macromolecular synthesis (transcription, RN...

  15. Sub-lethal heat stress causes apoptosis in an Antarctic fish that lacks an inducible heat shock response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleadd, Isaac M; Lee, Marissa; Hassumani, Daniel O; Stecyk, Tonya M A; Zeitz, Otto K; Buckley, Bradley A

    2014-08-01

    The endemic fish fauna of the Southern Ocean are cold-adapted stenotherms and are acutely sensitive to elevated temperature. Many of these species lack a heat shock response and cannot increase the production of heat shock proteins in their tissues. However, some species retain the ability to induce other stress-responsive genes, some of which are involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Here, the effect of heat on cell cycle stage and its ability to induce apoptosis were tested in thermally stressed hepatocytes from a common Antarctic fish species from McMurdo Sound in the Ross Sea. Levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen were also measured as a marker of progression through the cell cycle. The results of these studies demonstrate that even sub-lethal heat stress can have deleterious impacts at the cellular level on these environmentally sensitive species. PMID:25086982

  16. Conditions for shock revival by neutrino heating in core-collapse supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, H.-Th.

    2001-03-01

    Energy deposition by neutrinos can rejuvenate the stalled bounce shock and can provide the energy for the supernova explosion of a massive star. This neutrino-heating mechanism, though investigated by numerical simulations and analytic studies, is not finally accepted or proven as the trigger of the explosion. Part of the problem is that different groups have obtained seemingly discrepant results, and the complexity of the hydrodynamic models often hampers a clear and simple interpretation of the results. This demands a deeper theoretical understanding of the requirements of a successful shock revival. A toy model is developed here for discussing the neutrino heating phase analytically. The neutron star atmosphere between the neutrinosphere and the supernova shock can well be considered to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a layer of net neutrino cooling below the gain radius and a layer of net neutrino heating above. Since the mass infall rate to the shock is in general different from the rate at which gas is advected into the neutron star, the mass in the gain layer varies with time. Moreover, the gain layer receives additional energy input by neutrinos emitted from the neutrinosphere and the cooling layer. Therefore the determination of the shock evolution requires a time-dependent treatment. To this end the hydrodynamical equations of continuity and energy are integrated over the volume of the gain layer to obtain conservation laws for the total mass and energy in this layer. The radius and velocity of the supernova shock can then be calculated from global properties of the gain layer as solutions of an initial value problem, which expresses the fact that the behavior of the shock is controlled by the cumulative effects of neutrino heating and mass accumulation in the gain layer. The described toy model produces steady-state accretion and mass outflow from the nascent neutron star as special cases. The approach is useful to illuminate the conditions that can

  17. Initial crystallographic studies of a small heat-shock protein from Xylella fastidiosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial crystallographic studies of the X. fastidiosa small heat-shock protein HSP17.9 are reported. The ORF XF2234 in the Xylella fastidiosa genome was identified as encoding a small heat-shock protein of 17.9 kDa (HSP17.9). HSP17.9 was found as one of the proteins that are induced during X. fastidiosa proliferation and infection in citrus culture. Recombinant HSP17.9 was crystallized and surface atomic force microscopy experiments were conducted with the aim of better characterizing the HSP17.9 crystals. X-ray diffraction data were collected at 2.7 Å resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P4322, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.90, b = 68.90, c = 72.51 Å, and is the first small heat-shock protein to crystallize in this space group

  18. Suppression of first cleavage in the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) by heat shock or hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.L.; Armstrong, J.B.

    1981-12-01

    Androgenetic diploid axolotls were produced by ultraviolet inactivation of the egg pronucleus shortly after fertilization, followed by suppression of the first cleavage division by hydrostatic pressure or heat shock. After treatment at 14,000 psi for 8 minutes, diploidy was restored in 74% of the embryos, but only 0.8% survived to hatching. A 36-37 degrees C heat shock of 10-minutes duration, applied 5.5 hours after the eggs were collected, yielded a slightly lower percentage of diploids. However, the proportion surviving to hatching was significantly greater (up to 4.6%). A second generation of androgenetic diploids was produced from one of the oldest of the first generation males with a similar degree of success. The lack of significant improvement suggests that the low survival is due to the heat shock per se and not to the uncovering of recessive lethal genes carried by the parent.

  19. Effects of calmodulin on DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The DNA-binding activity of heat shock transcription factor (HSF) was induced by heat shock (HS) of a whole cell extract. Addition of antiserum, specific to CaM, to a whole cell extract reduced bind of the HSF to the heat shock element (HSE) with maize, and the re-addition of CaM to the sample restored the activity of the HSF for binding to HSE. In addition, DNA-binding activity of the HSF was also induced by directly adding CaM to a whole cell extract at non-HS temperature with maize. Similar results were obtained with wheat and tomato. Our observations provide the first example of the involvement of CaM in regulation of the DNA-binding activity of the HSF.

  20. Inflammatory Kinetics and Efficacy of Anti-inflammatory Treatments on Human Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Benjamin A; Purmessur, Devina; Likhitpanichkul, Morakot; Weinberg, Alan; Cho, Samuel K.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Iatridis, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Human nucleus pulposus (NP) cell culture study investigating response to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), effectiveness of clinically available anti-inflammatory drugs, and interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines. Objective To characterize the kinetic response of pro-inflammatory cytokines released by human NP cells to TNFα stimulation and the effectiveness of multiple anti-inflammatories with 3 sub-studies: Timecourse, Same-time blocking, Delayed blocking. Summary of Background Data Chronic inflammation is a key component of painful intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration. Improved efficacy of anti-inflammatories requires better understanding of how quickly NP cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and which pro-inflammatory mediators are most therapeutically advantageous to target. Methods Degenerated human NP cells (n=10) were cultured in alginate with or without TNFα (10ng/mL). Cells were incubated with one of four anti-inflammatories (anti-IL-6 receptor/atlizumab, IL-1 receptor anatagonist, anti-TNFα/infliximab and sodium pentosan polysulfate/PPS) in two blocking-studies designed to determine how intervention timing influences drug efficacy. Cell viability, protein and gene expression for IL-1β, IL-6 & IL-8 were assessed. Results Timecourse: TNFα substantially increased the amount of IL-6, IL-8 & IL-1β, with IL-1β and IL-8 reaching equilibrium within ~72 hours (IL-1β: 111±40pg/mL, IL-8: 8478±957pg/mL), and IL-6 not reaching steady state after 144 hours (1570±435 pg/mL). Anti-TNFα treatment was most effective at reducing the expression of all cytokines measured when added at the same time as TNFα stimulation. Similar trends were observed when drugs were added 72 hours after TNFα stimulation, however, no anti-inflammatories significantly reduced cytokine levels compared to TNF control. Conclusion IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 were expressed at different rates and magnitudes suggesting different roles for these cytokines in disease

  1. Transportable, Chemical Genetic Methodology for the Small Molecule-Mediated Inhibition of Heat Shock Factor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher L; Dewal, Mahender B; Nekongo, Emmanuel E; Santiago, Sebasthian; Lu, Nancy B; Levine, Stuart S; Shoulders, Matthew D

    2016-01-15

    Proteostasis in the cytosol is governed by the heat shock response. The master regulator of the heat shock response, heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and key chaperones whose levels are HSF1-regulated have emerged as high-profile targets for therapeutic applications ranging from protein misfolding-related disorders to cancer. Nonetheless, a generally applicable methodology to selectively and potently inhibit endogenous HSF1 in a small molecule-dependent manner in disease model systems remains elusive. Also problematic, the administration of even highly selective chaperone inhibitors often has the side effect of activating HSF1 and thereby inducing a compensatory heat shock response. Herein, we report a ligand-regulatable, dominant negative version of HSF1 that addresses these issues. Our approach, which required engineering a new dominant negative HSF1 variant, permits dosable inhibition of endogenous HSF1 with a selective small molecule in cell-based model systems of interest. The methodology allows us to uncouple the pleiotropic effects of chaperone inhibitors and environmental toxins from the concomitantly induced compensatory heat shock response. Integration of our method with techniques to activate HSF1 enables the creation of cell lines in which the cytosolic proteostasis network can be up- or down-regulated by orthogonal small molecules. Selective, small molecule-mediated inhibition of HSF1 has distinctive implications for the proteostasis of both chaperone-dependent globular proteins and aggregation-prone intrinsically disordered proteins. Altogether, this work provides critical methods for continued exploration of the biological roles of HSF1 and the therapeutic potential of heat shock response modulation.

  2. Riluzole increases the amount of latent HSF1 for an amplified heat shock response and cytoprotection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxian Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induction of the heat shock response (HSR and increased expression of the heat shock proteins (HSPs provide mechanisms to ensure proper protein folding, trafficking, and disposition. The importance of HSPs is underscored by the understanding that protein mis-folding and aggregation contribute centrally to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a cell-based hsp70-luciferease reporter gene assay system to identify agents that modulate the HSR and show here that clinically relevant concentrations of the FDA-approved ALS drug riluzole significantly increased the heat shock induction of hsp70-luciferse reporter gene. Immuno-Western and -cytochemical analysis of HSF1 show that riluzole increased the amount of cytosolic HSF1 to afford a greater activation of HSF1 upon heat shock. The increased HSF1 contributed centrally to the cytoprotective activity of riluzole as hsf1 gene knockout negated the synergistic activity of riluzole and conditioning heat shock to confer cell survival under oxidative stress. Evidence of a post-transcriptional mechanism for the increase in HSF1 include: quantitation of mRNA(hsf1 by RT-PCR showed no effect of either heat shock or riluzole treatment; riluzole also increased the expression of HSF1 from a CMV-promoter; analysis of the turnover of HSF1 by pulse chase and immunoprecipitation show that riluzole slowed the decay of [(35S]labeled-HSF1. The effect of riluzole on HSF1 was qualitatively different from that of MG132 and chloroquine, inhibitors of the proteasome and lysosome, respectively, and appeared to involve the chaperone-mediated autophagy pathway as RNAi-mediated knockdown of CMA negated its effect. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that riluzole increased the amount of HSF1 to amplify the HSR for cytoprotection. Our study provides novel insight into the mechanism that regulates HSF1 turnover, and identifies the degradation of HSF1 as a target for

  3. Plasma antibodies to heat shock protein 60 and heat shock protein 70 are associated with increased risk of electrocardiograph abnormalities in automobile workers exposed to noise

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Jing; Yang, Miao; Yao, Huiling; Zheng, Jianru; Yang, Qiaoling; Chen, Sheng; Wei, Qingyi; Tanguay, Robert M.; Wu, Tangchun

    2005-01-01

    In the living and working environment, stressful factors, such as noise, can cause health problems including cardiovascular diseases and noise-induced hearing loss. Some heat shock proteins (Hsps) play an important role in protecting cardiac cells against ischemic injury, and antibodies against these Hsps are associated with the development and prognosis of atherogenesis, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. Whether the presence of such antibodies is associated with abnormal electrocardi...

  4. A heat shock element in the phosphoglycerate kinase gene promoter of yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, P W; Curran, B; Davies, M W; Hirst, K; Lockheart, A; Ogden, J E; Stanway, C A; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1988-01-01

    The phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) promoter is often employed in yeast expression vectors due to its very high efficiency. Its activity in unstressed cells has been shown to be due to an upstream activator site (UASPGK) at -402 to -479. Since levels of PGK mRNA can sometimes be elevated by heat shock of yeast cultures this investigation determined how specific deletions of PGK promoter sequences effect levels of PGK mRNA both before and after heat shock. A series of PGK promoter deletions was ...

  5. Heat Shock proteins expression in different types of classical Hodgkin`s Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumanskiy V.O.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the study estimation of heat shock proteins hsp60 and hsp90 expression in tumor tissue were conducted in lymphocyte rich, mixed cellularity and ymphocyte depleted (reticular type variants of classical Hodgkins lymphoma. It was shown that HRS-cells and cellular microenvironment in the studied tumor tissues have in their cytoplasm heat shock proteins, what may cause resistance to inner and outer damage effects. Expression increases from lymphocyte rich to mixed cellularity and the most significant in tumor tissue of Hodgkin`s sarcoma.

  6. Heat shock pretreatment enhances porcine myoblasts survival after autotransplantation in intact skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Sheng; Thomas LAUMONIER; Jacques MENETREY

    2007-01-01

    Myoblast transplantation (MT) is a cell-based gene therapy treatment, representing a potential treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), cardiac failure and muscle trauma. The rapid and massive death of transplanted cells after MT is considered as a major hurdle which limits the efficacy of MT treatment. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are overexpressed when cells undergo various insults. HSPs have been described to protect cells in vivo and in vitro against diverse insults. The aim of our study is to investigate whether HSP overexpression could increase myoblast survival after autotransplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle. HSP expression was induced by warming the cells at 42℃ for 1 h. HSP70 expression was quantified by Western blot and flow cytometry 24 h after the treatment. To investigate the myogenic characteristics of myoblasts, desmin and CD56 were analysed by Western blot and flow cytometry; and the fusion index was measured. We also quantified cell survival after autologous transplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle and followed cell integration. Results showed that heat shock treatment of myoblasts induced a significative overexpression of the HSP70 (P<0.01) without loss of their myogenic characteristics as assessed by FACS and fusion index. In vivo (n=7), the myoblast survival rate was not significantly different at 24 h between heat shock treated and nontreated cells (67.69%±8.35% versus 58.79%±8.35%, P>0.05). However, the myoblast survival rate in the heat shocked cells increased by twofold at 48 h (53.32%±8.22% versus 28.27%±6.32%, P<0.01)and more than threefold at 120 h (26.33%±5.54% versus 8.79%±2.51%, P<0.01). Histological analysis showed the presence of non-heat shocked and heat shocked donor myoblasts fused with host myoblasts. These results suggested that heat shock pretreatment increased the HSP70 expression in porcine myoblasts, and improved the survival rate after autologous transplantation. Therefore, heat shock

  7. Heat shock pretreatment enhances porcine myoblasts survival after autotransplantation in intact skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Myoblast transplantation (MT) is a cell-based gene therapy treatment, representing a potential treat-ment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), cardiac failure and muscle trauma. The rapid and mas-sive death of transplanted cells after MT is considered as a major hurdle which limits the efficacy of MT treatment. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are overexpressed when cells undergo various insults. HSPs have been described to protect cells in vivo and in vitro against diverse insults. The aim of our study is to investigate whether HSP overexpression could increase myoblast survival after autotransplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle. HSP expression was induced by warming the cells at 42℃ for 1 h. HSP70 expression was quantified by Western blot and flow cytometry 24 h after the treatment. To investigate the myogenic characteristics of myoblasts, desmin and CD56 were analysed by Western blot and flow cytometry; and the fusion index was measured. We also quantified cell survival after autologous transplantation in pig intact skeletal muscle and followed cell integration. Results showed that heat shock treatment of myoblasts induced a significative overexpression of the HSP70 (P < 0.01) without loss of their myogenic characteristics as assessed by FACS and fusion index. In vivo (n=7), the myoblast survival rate was not significantly different at 24 h between heat shock treated and non- treated cells (67.69% ± 8.35% versus 58.79% ± 8.35%, P > 0.05). However, the myoblast survival rate in the heat shocked cells increased by twofold at 48 h (53.32% ± 8.22% versus 28.27% ± 6.32%, P < 0.01) and more than threefold at 120 h (26.33% ± 5.54% versus 8.79% ± 2.51%, P < 0.01). Histological analy-sis showed the presence of non-heat shocked and heat shocked donor myoblasts fused with host myoblasts. These results suggested that heat shock pretreatment increased the HSP70 expression in porcine myoblasts, and improved the survival rate after autologous transplantation

  8. Heat shock factor 1 binds to and transcribes satellite II and III sequences at several pericentromeric regions in heat-shocked cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eymery, Angeline, E-mail: aeymery@gmail.com [Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble I (France); INSERM Institut Albert Bonniot U823, La Tronche, F-38700 (France); Souchier, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.souchier@ujf-grenoble.fr [Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble I (France); INSERM Institut Albert Bonniot U823, La Tronche, F-38700 (France); Vourc' h, Claire, E-mail: claire.vourch@ujf-grenoble.fr [Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble I (France); INSERM Institut Albert Bonniot U823, La Tronche, F-38700 (France); Jolly, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.jolly@upmf-grenoble.fr [Universite Joseph Fourier-Grenoble I (France); INSERM Institut Albert Bonniot U823, La Tronche, F-38700 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Cells respond to stress by activating the synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which protect the cells against the deleterious effects of stress. This mechanism is controlled by the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). In parallel to HSP gene transcription, in human cells, HSF1 also binds to and transcribes satellite III repeated sequences present in numerous copies in the 9q12 pericentromeric region of chromosome 9. These HSF1 accumulation sites are termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). In tumor cells, however, the number of nSBs is higher than the number of 9q12 copies, suggesting the existence of other HSF1 targets. In this paper, we were interested in characterizing these other HSF1 binding sites. We show that HSF1 indeed binds to the pericentromeric region of 14 chromosomes, thereby directing the formation of 'secondary nSBs'. The appearance of secondary nSBs depends on the number of satellite sequences present in the target locus, and on the cellular amount of HSF1 protein. Moreover, secondary nSBs also correspond to transcription sites, thus demonstrating that heat shock induces a genome-wide transcription of satellite sequences. Finally, by analyzing published transcriptomic data, we show that the derepression of these large heterochromatic blocks does not significantly affect the transcription of neighboring genes.

  9. Heat shock factor 1 binds to and transcribes satellite II and III sequences at several pericentromeric regions in heat-shocked cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells respond to stress by activating the synthesis of heat shock proteins (HSPs) which protect the cells against the deleterious effects of stress. This mechanism is controlled by the heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). In parallel to HSP gene transcription, in human cells, HSF1 also binds to and transcribes satellite III repeated sequences present in numerous copies in the 9q12 pericentromeric region of chromosome 9. These HSF1 accumulation sites are termed nuclear stress bodies (nSBs). In tumor cells, however, the number of nSBs is higher than the number of 9q12 copies, suggesting the existence of other HSF1 targets. In this paper, we were interested in characterizing these other HSF1 binding sites. We show that HSF1 indeed binds to the pericentromeric region of 14 chromosomes, thereby directing the formation of 'secondary nSBs'. The appearance of secondary nSBs depends on the number of satellite sequences present in the target locus, and on the cellular amount of HSF1 protein. Moreover, secondary nSBs also correspond to transcription sites, thus demonstrating that heat shock induces a genome-wide transcription of satellite sequences. Finally, by analyzing published transcriptomic data, we show that the derepression of these large heterochromatic blocks does not significantly affect the transcription of neighboring genes.

  10. Differential transcript induction of parsley pathogenesis-related proteins and of a small heat shock protein by ozone and heat shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsley (Petroselinum (crispum L.) is known to respond to pathogen attack by the synthesis of furanocoumarins and to UV irradiation by the synthesis of flavone glycosides whereas ozone treatment results in the induction of both pathways. A cDNA library from parsley plants was differentially screened using labelled reverse-transcribed poly(A)+ RNA isolated from ozone-treated parsley plants. This resulted in the isolation of 13 independent cDNA clones representing ozone-induced genes and of 11 cDNA clones representing ozone-repressed genes. DNA sequencing of several clones resulted in the identification of pathogenesis-related protein 1-3 (PR1-3), of a new member of PR1 cDNAs (PRI-4) and of a small heat shock protein (sHSP). Northern blot analyses showed a transient induction of the three mRNA species after ozone fumigation. In contrast, heat shock treatment of parsley plants resulted in an increase of sHSP mRNA whereas no increase for transcripts of PR1-3 and PR1-4 could be observed. This is the first characterized sHSP cDNA clone for plants induced by heat shock, as well as by oxidative stress caused by ozone. (author)

  11. Heat shock factor 1 upregulates transcription of Epstein-Barr Virus nuclear antigen 1 by binding to a heat shock element within the BamHI-Q promoter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Feng-Wei [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Wu, Xian-Rui [Department of Surgery, Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Wen-Ju; Liao, Yi-Ji [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lin, Sheng [Laboratory of Integrated Biosciences, School of Life Science, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zong, Yong-Sheng; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Zeng, Yi-Xin [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mai, Shi-Juan, E-mail: maishj@sysucc.org.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Dan, E-mail: xied@mail.sysu.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2011-12-20

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) is essential for maintenance of the episome and establishment of latency. In this study, we observed that heat treatment effectively induced EBNA1 transcription in EBV-transformed B95-8 and human LCL cell lines. Although Cp is considered as the sole promoter used for the expression of EBNA1 transcripts in the lymphoblastoid cell lines, the RT-PCR results showed that the EBNA1 transcripts induced by heat treatment arise from Qp-initiated transcripts. Using bioinformatics, a high affinity and functional heat shock factor 1 (HSF1)-binding element within the - 17/+4 oligonucleotide of the Qp was found, and was determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Moreover, heat shock and exogenous HSF1 expression induced Qp activity in reporter assays. Further, RNA interference-mediated HSF1 gene silencing attenuated heat-induced EBNA1 expression in B95-8 cells. These results provide evidence that EBNA1 is a new target for the transcription factor HSF1.

  12. Effects of Heat Shock on Photosynthetic Properties, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Downy Mildew of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ting; Jin, Haijun; Zhang, Hongmei; He, Lizhong; Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Danfeng; Hui, Dafeng; Yu, Jizhu

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock is considered an abiotic stress for plant growth, but the effects of heat shock on physiological responses of cucumber plant leaves with and without downy mildew disease are still not clear. In this study, cucumber seedlings were exposed to heat shock in greenhouses, and the responses of photosynthetic properties, carbohydrate metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, osmolytes, and disease severity index of leaves with or without the downy mildew disease were measured. Results showed that heat shock significantly decreased the net photosynthetic rate, actual photochemical efficiency, photochemical quenching coefficient, and starch content. Heat shock caused an increase in the stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble sugar content, sucrose content, soluble protein content and proline content for both healthy leaves and downy mildew infected leaves. These results demonstrate that heat shock activated the transpiration pathway to protect the photosystem from damage due to excess energy in cucumber leaves. Potential resistance mechanisms of plants exposed to heat stress may involve higher osmotic regulation capacity related to an increase of total accumulations of soluble sugar, proline and soluble protein, as well as higher antioxidant enzymes activity in stressed leaves. Heat shock reduced downy mildew disease severity index by more than 50%, and clearly alleviated downy mildew development in the greenhouses. These findings indicate that cucumber may have a complex physiological change to resist short-term heat shock, and suppress the development of the downy mildew disease. PMID:27065102

  13. Effects of Heat Shock on Photosynthetic Properties, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Downy Mildew of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaotao; Jiang, Yuping; Hao, Ting; Jin, Haijun; Zhang, Hongmei; He, Lizhong; Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Danfeng; Hui, Dafeng; Yu, Jizhu

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock is considered an abiotic stress for plant growth, but the effects of heat shock on physiological responses of cucumber plant leaves with and without downy mildew disease are still not clear. In this study, cucumber seedlings were exposed to heat shock in greenhouses, and the responses of photosynthetic properties, carbohydrate metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, osmolytes, and disease severity index of leaves with or without the downy mildew disease were measured. Results showed that heat shock significantly decreased the net photosynthetic rate, actual photochemical efficiency, photochemical quenching coefficient, and starch content. Heat shock caused an increase in the stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble sugar content, sucrose content, soluble protein content and proline content for both healthy leaves and downy mildew infected leaves. These results demonstrate that heat shock activated the transpiration pathway to protect the photosystem from damage due to excess energy in cucumber leaves. Potential resistance mechanisms of plants exposed to heat stress may involve higher osmotic regulation capacity related to an increase of total accumulations of soluble sugar, proline and soluble protein, as well as higher antioxidant enzymes activity in stressed leaves. Heat shock reduced downy mildew disease severity index by more than 50%, and clearly alleviated downy mildew development in the greenhouses. These findings indicate that cucumber may have a complex physiological change to resist short-term heat shock, and suppress the development of the downy mildew disease. PMID:27065102

  14. Effects of Heat Shock on Photosynthetic Properties, Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, and Downy Mildew of Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotao Ding

    Full Text Available Heat shock is considered an abiotic stress for plant growth, but the effects of heat shock on physiological responses of cucumber plant leaves with and without downy mildew disease are still not clear. In this study, cucumber seedlings were exposed to heat shock in greenhouses, and the responses of photosynthetic properties, carbohydrate metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity, osmolytes, and disease severity index of leaves with or without the downy mildew disease were measured. Results showed that heat shock significantly decreased the net photosynthetic rate, actual photochemical efficiency, photochemical quenching coefficient, and starch content. Heat shock caused an increase in the stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble sugar content, sucrose content, soluble protein content and proline content for both healthy leaves and downy mildew infected leaves. These results demonstrate that heat shock activated the transpiration pathway to protect the photosystem from damage due to excess energy in cucumber leaves. Potential resistance mechanisms of plants exposed to heat stress may involve higher osmotic regulation capacity related to an increase of total accumulations of soluble sugar, proline and soluble protein, as well as higher antioxidant enzymes activity in stressed leaves. Heat shock reduced downy mildew disease severity index by more than 50%, and clearly alleviated downy mildew development in the greenhouses. These findings indicate that cucumber may have a complex physiological change to resist short-term heat shock, and suppress the development of the downy mildew disease.

  15. Heat shock proteins: in vivo heat treatments reveal adipose tissue depot-specific effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert S; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Wheatley, Joshua L; Wright, David C; Geiger, Paige C

    2015-01-01

    Heat treatments (HT) and the induction of heat shock proteins (HSPs) improve whole body and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity while decreasing white adipose tissue (WAT) mass. However, HSPs in WAT have been understudied. The purpose of the present study was to examine patterns of HSP expression in WAT depots, and to examine the effects of a single in vivo HT on WAT metabolism. Male Wistar rats received HT (41°C, 20 min) or sham treatment (37°C), and 24 h later subcutaneous, epididymal, and retroperitoneal WAT depots (SCAT, eWAT, and rpWAT, respectively) were removed for ex vivo experiments and Western blotting. SCAT, eWAT, and rpWAT from a subset of rats were also cultured separately and received a single in vitro HT or sham treatment. HSP72 and HSP25 expression was greatest in more metabolically active WAT depots (i.e., eWAT and rpWAT) compared with the SCAT. Following HT, HSP72 increased in all depots with the greatest induction occurring in the SCAT. In addition, HSP25 increased in the rpWAT and eWAT, while HSP60 increased in the rpWAT only in vivo. Free fatty acid (FFA) release from WAT explants was increased following HT in the rpWAT only, and fatty acid reesterification was decreased in the rpWAT but increased in the SCAT following HT. HT increased insulin responsiveness in eWAT, but not in SCAT or rpWAT. Differences in HSP expression and induction patterns following HT further support the growing body of literature differentiating distinct WAT depots in health and disease.

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of aqueous leaf extract of Chromolaena odorata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoyele, Victor B; Adediji, Joseph O; Soladoye, Ayodele O

    2005-01-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of the aqueous extract of Chromolaena odorata was investigated in rats using the carrageenan-induced oedema, cotton pellet granuloma and formalin-induced oedema methods. The extract was administered orally at doses of 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg. In the carrageenan method the paw oedema was significantly reduced by all the doses of the extract administered, with the 200 mg/kg dose producing the highest oedema inhibition (80.5%). In the cotton pellet method, granuloma weight was significantly reduced from 14 +/- 0.1 to 9.0 +/- 0.1 mg, while in the formaldehyde induced arthritis the extract inhibited the oedema during the 10-day period. In conclusion, this study has established the anti-inflammatory activity of C. odorata and, thus, justifies the traditional uses of the plant in the treatment of wounds and inflammation. PMID:16280100

  17. Hepatoprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of a traditional medicinal plant of Chile, Peumus boldus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanhers, M C; Joyeux, M; Soulimani, R; Fleurentin, J; Sayag, M; Mortier, F; Younos, C; Pelt, J M

    1991-04-01

    Dried hydro-alcoholic extract of Peumus boldus (Monimiaceae) has been evaluated for hepatoprotective, choleretic and anti-inflammatory effects in mice and rats, in order to validate or to invalidate traditional therapeutic indications. This extract exerted a significant hepatoprotection of tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced hepatotoxicity in isolated rat hepatocytes (in vitro technique) by reducing the lipid peroxidation and the enzymatic leakage of LDH; this in vitro efficacy was reinforced by a significant hepatoprotection on CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity in mice (in vivo technique), the plant extract reducing the enzymatic leakage of ALAT. Boldine, the main alkaloid of P. boldus appears to be implicated in this hepatoprotective activity. Choleretic effects, often mentioned in traditional indications, have not been confirmed in rats. Finally, significant and dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects were obtained on an acute inflammatory process (carrageenan-induced edema test in rats). Boldine does not appear to be involved in such properties. PMID:1891491

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of hyaluronan in arthritis therapy: Not just for viscosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayo Masuko

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Kayo Masuko1, Minako Murata2, Kazuo Yudoh2, Tomohiro Kato1, Hiroshi Nakamura31Department of Biochemistry; 2Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki-shi, Kanagawa, Japan; 3Department of Joint Disease and Rheumatism, Nippon Medical School, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA has been widely used for viscosupplementation of diseased or aged articular joints. However, recent investigations have revealed the active anti-inflammatory or chondroprotective effect of HA, suggesting its potential role in attenuation of joint damage. In particular, interactions between HA and other inflammatory mediators are attracting interest. This review summarizes several aspects of recent investigations of the anti-inflammatory effects of HA in arthritis.Keywords: hyaluronan, inflammation, chondroprotection

  19. A novel anti-inflammatory role of NCAM-derived mimetic peptide, FGL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Downer, Eric J; Cowley, Thelma R; Lyons, Anthony;

    2010-01-01

    novel anti-inflammatory agent. Administration of FGL to aged rats attenuated the increased expression of markers of activated microglia, the increase in pro-inflammatory interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and the impairment in long-term potentiation (LTP). We report that the age-related increase in microglial......Age-related cognitive deficits in hippocampus are correlated with neuroinflammatory changes, typified by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. We provide evidence that the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM)-derived mimetic peptide, FG loop (FGL), acts as a...... CD200 in vitro. We provide evidence that the increase in CD200 is reliant on IL-4-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction. These findings provide the first evidence of a role for FGL as an anti-inflammatory agent and identify a mechanism by which FGL controls...

  20. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic neoflavonoids and benzofurans from Pterocarpus santalinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shou-Fang; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Lee, Chia-Lin; Chen, Shu-Li; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2011-05-27

    Five new benzofurans, pterolinuses A-E (1-5), six new neoflavonoids, pterolinuses F-J (8-13), and five known compounds (6, 7, 14-16) were isolated from an extract of Pterocarpus santalinus heartwood. All new structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, and configurations were confirmed by CD spectral data and optical rotation values. The isolates were evaluated for anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. Six compounds (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, and 15) showed significant inhibition in at least one anti-inflammatory assay. Compound 2 showed the best selective effect against superoxide anion generation in human neutrophils with, an IC50 value of 0.19 μg/mL, and was 6.2-fold more potent than the positive control LY294002. Compound 14 showed the highest cytotoxicity against Ca9-22 cancer cells, with an IC50 value of 0.46 μg/mL. PMID:21488654

  1. Enteric neural pathways mediate the anti-inflammatory actions of glucagon-like peptide 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigalet, David L; Wallace, Laurie E; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2007-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) is an important regulator of nutritional absorptive capacity with anti-inflammatory actions. We hypothesized that GLP-2 reduces intestinal mucosal inflammation by activation of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) neurons of the submucosal plexus. Ileitis...... until inflammation was established, resulted in significant improvements in animal weights, mucosal inflammation indices (myeloperoxidase levels, histological mucosal scores), and reduced levels of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, IL-1beta) and inducible nitric oxide synthase...... neurons and to increase the number of cells expressing VIP in the submucosal plexus of the ileum. These findings suggest that GLP-2 acts as an anti-inflammatory agent through activation of enteric VIP neurons, independent of proliferative effects. They support further studies to examine the role of neural...

  2. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity of the ethanolic extract of Cymbidium aloifolium (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlader, Md Amran; Alam, Mahmudul; Ahmed, Kh Tanvir; Khatun, Farjana; Apu, Apurba Sarker

    2011-10-01

    The ethanol leaf extract of Cymbidium aloifolium (L.) was evaluated for its analgesic and antiinflammatory activities. The extract, at the dose of 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) body weight, exerted the analgesic activity by observing the number of abdominal contractions and anti-inflammatory activity against Carrageenin induced paw edema in mice by measuring the paw volume. The ethanolic extract of Cymbidium aloifolium (L.) showed statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction of percentage of writhing of 33.57 and 61.31% at 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) oral dose, respectively, when compared to negative control. The Ethanolic plant extract also showed significant (p < 0.05) dose dependent reduction of mean increase of formation of paw edema. The results of the experiment and its statistical analysis showed that the ethanolic plant extract had shown significant (p < 0.05) dose dependent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities when compared to the control. PMID:22518936

  3. In vivo anti-inflammatory and in vitro antioxidant activities of Mediterranean dietary plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Filomena; Sosa, Silvio; Marrelli, Mariangela; Menichini, Federica; Statti, Giancarlo A; Uzunov, Dimitar; Tubaro, Aurelia; Menichini, Francesco; Loggia, Roberto Della

    2008-02-28

    Five hydroalcoholic extracts of edible plants from Calabria region (Italy) used in local traditional medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases were evaluated for their in vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity (inhibition of croton oil-induced ear oedema in mice) and in vitro antioxidant and antiradical properties (inhibition of linoleic acid oxidation and bovine brain liposomes peroxidation, DPPH radical scavenging). All the extracts showed an anti-inflammatory effect: 300 microg/cm(2) provoked oedema reductions ranging from 21 to 27%. All the extracts exerted also radical scavenging and/or antioxidant properties, the most active plant being Mentha aquatica L. (Lamiaceae) which contained the highest amount of phenolics (337 mg/g) and of flavonoids (15.75 mg/g). Moreover, the content and the composition of sterols were assessed by GC-MS in the examined plants Borago officinalis L. (Boraginaceae) contained the highest number of sterols. PMID:18164564

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Citrus bergamia Derivatives: Where Do We Stand?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Ferlazzo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory diseases affect a large portion of the worldwide population, and chronic inflammation is a major risk factor for several dangerous pathologies. To limit the side effects of both synthetic and biological anti-inflammatory drugs, the use of herbal medicines, nutraceuticals and food supplements has increased tremendously as alternative and/or complementary medicine to treat several pathologies, including inflammation. During the last decades, the biological properties of Citrus bergamia (bergamot derivatives have obtained important scientific achievements, and it has been suggested their use in a context of a multitarget pharmacological strategy. Here, we present an overview of the anti-inflammatory properties of bergamot extracts that could represent the scientific basis for develop novel and alternative strategies to improve health status and attenuate inflammatory conditions.

  5. Cardiovascular outcomes and systemic anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with severe psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, O; Skov, L; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar;

    2015-01-01

    during long-term follow-up compared to patients treated with other antipsoriatic therapies. The treatment strategy in patients with severe psoriasis may have an impact on cardiovascular outcomes and randomized trials to evaluate the cardiovascular safety and efficacy of systemic antipsoriatic therapies......BACKGROUND: Psoriasis is a common disease and is associated with cardiovascular diseases. Systemic anti-inflammatory drugs may reduce risk of cardiovascular events. We therefore examined the rate of cardiovascular events, i.e. cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction and stroke, in patients...... with severe psoriasis treated with systemic anti-inflammatory drugs. METHODS: Individual-level linkage of administrative registries was used to perform a longitudinal nationwide cohort study. Time-dependent multivariable adjusted Cox regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence...

  6. Screening of Caesalpinia pulcherrima Linn Flowers for Analgesic and Anti-inflammatory Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Patel

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The flowers of Caesalpinia pulcherrima were extracted with methanol to determine their analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities. Intraperitoneal administration of methanolic extract (75, 150 and 225 mg/kg produced significant analgesic activity in acetic acid-induced writhing, tail immersion test and hot plate tests and anti-inflammatory effect against carrageenan-induced paw edema in experimental animals. Industrial relevance: The herbal medicines are getting more importance in the treatment of inflammation because of the side effect of the current therapy used to treat those inflammation using synthetic drugs. Herbal medicines have less side effects and less costly when compared to the synthetic drugs. The present study will help the industry to produce herbal drug with less side effect, less costly affordable and more effective in the treatment of pain and inflammation. Finally the phytochemical screening or elucidation of the bioactive compounds from the plant would be effective drug against pain and inflammation.

  7. Evaluation of Aloevera Gel for its Anti Inflammatory activity in Diabetes Mellitus using Animal Model System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Vanitha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti inflammatory potential of Aloe vera in alloxan induced diabetes in rats. Experimental Diabetes was induced in rats with alloxan. The animals were divided into four groups of six each (n=6. Group I: Normal, Group II: Alloxan induced diabetic rats, Group III: Diabetic rats supplemented with AV gel extract for 21 days, Group IV: diabetic rats treated with glibenclamide. All the drugs were administered orally (using an intra gastric tube in a single dose in the morning for 21 days. Blood samples were collected from the overnight fasted rats. Oral administration of Aloe barbadensis gel significantly decreased the level of homocysteine and the level of folic acid was significantly elevated when compared to diabetic control. The results suggest potent anti-inflammatory potential of Aloe barbadensis gel in experimental diabetes, and thus Aloe vera can be used as an alternative remedy for treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications.

  8. [Annexin-1: 2nd messanger of the anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Caldas, Margarida

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids have important immunosupressive properties, being used as anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents in a wide range of inflammatory and auto-immune pathologies. One of the best studied mechanisms by which glucocorticoids exert most of their anti-inflammatory actions involves the induction of the synthesis and the secretion of the mediator and effector protein annexin 1 (ANXA1). Here we review the molecular and cellular pathways involved on the glucocorticoid-induced synthesis and secretion of ANXA1 in a variety of cell types. Since its discovery as an anti-phospholipase A2 protein, ANXA1 has come a long way to encompass a wide range of cellular effects, the most relevant ones being those that directly modulate the inflammatory response. The results presented in this review open the way to further pharmacological studies which will allow the identification of the role of ANXA1 in inflamatory pathologies, namely rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of isoketocharbroic acid from brown alga, Sargassum micracanthum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Young Min; Yoon, Weon-Jong; Lee, Wook Jae; Kim, Sang-Cheol; Baik, Jong Seok; Kim, Jin Hwa; Lee, Geun Soo; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Chang-Gu

    2015-01-01

    During our on-going screening program designed to isolate natural compounds from marine environments, we isolated isoketochabrolic acid (IKCA) from Sargassum micracanthum, an important brown algae distributed in Jeju Island, Korea. Furthermore, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of IKCA on nitric oxide (NO) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-triggered macrophages. IKCA strongly inhibited NO production, with an IC50 value of 58.31 μM. Subsequent studies demonstrated that IKCA potently and concentration-dependently reduced prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-6 cytokine production. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show that IKCA isolated from S. micracanthum has a potent anti-inflammatory activity. Therefore, IKCA might be useful as an anti-inflammatory health supplement or functional cosmetics. PMID:26600756

  10. EVALUATION OF ANTI-NOCICEPTIVE AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF PUNICA GRANATUM SEED EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Jeetendra Kumar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The plant Punica granatum of family Punicaceae is distributed throughout India and reputed to have numerous applications in traditional medicine system. In order to justify its folkloric use in nociception and inflammation, the study was performed.In this study, the extraction of Punica granatum seed extract was carried out in aqueous media. In order to explore its potency, various experimental models of anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities were taken. The oral administration of the extract 100mg and 200mg per kg body weight showed significant pharmacological action. Furthermore the anti-ulcer activity was carried out with the help of Indomethacin induced ulceration model using Mesoprostol as standard drug and it showed no ulcerogenic effect in wistar albino rats.Overall, the extract was found to be significant anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity with no ulcerogenic adverse effect.

  11. Synthesis, Antimicrobial and Anti-inflammatory Activity of Some New Benzoxazinone and Quinazolinone Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hashash, Maher Abd El-Aziz; Azab, Mohammad Emad; Faty, Rasha Abd El-Aziz; Amr, Abd El-Galil Elsyed

    2016-01-01

    Benzoxazinones and quinazolinones have a wide spectrum of biological activity. In this paper we focused on studying the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities of some newly synthesized benzoxazinone and quinazolinone derivatives. Thus we prepared 2-[α-benzoylaminostyryl]-6,8-dibromo-3,1-benzoxazin-4(H)-one 2 which underwent a reaction with primary and secondary amines, and hydrazine hydrate to give compounds 3, 4 and 5, respectively. Treatment of 2 with hydroxylamine hydrochloride, formamide and/or NaN3/AcOH afforded compounds 7, 8, 11 and 12, respectively. Also, compound 2 reacted with maleic anhydride, aromatic hydrocarbons and/or active methylene compounds to produce compounds 13, 15a-c and 16, respectively. Most of the newly synthesized compounds showed significant antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities comparable to ampicillin, mycostatine and indomethacin positive controls. PMID:26699093

  12. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities of phenolic compounds from Desmodium caudatum leaves and stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Sun, Ya Nan; Yan, Xi Tao; Yang, Seo Young; Kim, Sohyun; Chae, Doobyeong; Hyun, Jin Won; Kang, Hee Kyoung; Koh, Young-Sang; Kim, Young Ho

    2014-06-01

    Four flavanonols (1-4), one xanthone (5), and three flavonoid glycosides (6-8), were isolated from the leaves and stems of Desmodium caudatum. Their structures were elucidated by comparing spectroscopic data with reported values. The anti-inflammatory activity of the isolated compounds was investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Among them, compounds 1 and 2 exhibited inhibitory effects on LPS-induced IL-6, IL-12 p40, and TNF-α production with IC50 values ranging from 6.0 to 29.4 μM. Compound 5 exhibited 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species scavenging activity in human HaCaT keratinocytes. These results warrant further studies of the potential anti-inflammatory and antioxidant benefits of compounds from D. caudatum. PMID:24026429

  13. Effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory meloxicam on stomach, kidney, and liver of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burukoglu, Dilek; Baycu, Cengiz; Taplamacioglu, Fulya; Sahin, Erhan; Bektur, Ezgi

    2016-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAI) drugs are the most commonly used group of drugs today. Increase in the use of standard NSAI for treating pain and inflammation was restricted by the fact that these drugs were proven to possibly cause gastrointestinal and renal toxicity. Meloxicam is a NSAI that has anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic effects. This study aims to investigate the effects of meloxicam on stomach, kidney, and liver of rats under light microscopy level. Based on the light microscopic observations, mononuclear cell infiltration and pseudolobular formation was established in liver samples of animals in the experimental group. Metaplasia in surface and glandular epithelia and atrophy were observed in stomach samples. Glomerular stasis-related hypertrophy and focal interstitial nephritis were found in kidneys. It was concluded in this study that meloxicam might cause hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and gastric metaplasia in rats at a used dose and duration. PMID:24958741

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of the glandular extracts ofThunnus alalunga

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.K. Azeem; C Dilip; S S Prasanth; V Junise Hanan Shahima; Kumsr Sajeev; C. Naseera

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the anti-inflamattory activity ofThunnus alalunga by bothin vitro and in vivomethods.Methods: Anti-inflammatory activity of the chloroform water extract ofThunnus alalunga was done by both in vitro andin vivo methods.In vitro method was done by human red blood cells membrane stabilization method(HRBC).In vivoevaluation was estimated on Wister albino rats. Acute toxicity studies were done on the extract and no toxicity was reported.Results:The percentage protection exhibited by 300 mg/mL concentration was more when compared to the other ones. The400 mg/mL concentration showed potent activity on comparison with the standard during in vivo evaluation.Conclusions: In both means of estimation the extract ofThunnus alalunga was found to possess significant anti-inflammatory activity.

  15. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity of the ethanolic extract of Cymbidium aloifolium (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlader, Md Amran; Alam, Mahmudul; Ahmed, Kh Tanvir; Khatun, Farjana; Apu, Apurba Sarker

    2011-10-01

    The ethanol leaf extract of Cymbidium aloifolium (L.) was evaluated for its analgesic and antiinflammatory activities. The extract, at the dose of 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) body weight, exerted the analgesic activity by observing the number of abdominal contractions and anti-inflammatory activity against Carrageenin induced paw edema in mice by measuring the paw volume. The ethanolic extract of Cymbidium aloifolium (L.) showed statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction of percentage of writhing of 33.57 and 61.31% at 200 and 400 mg kg(-1) oral dose, respectively, when compared to negative control. The Ethanolic plant extract also showed significant (p < 0.05) dose dependent reduction of mean increase of formation of paw edema. The results of the experiment and its statistical analysis showed that the ethanolic plant extract had shown significant (p < 0.05) dose dependent analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities when compared to the control.

  16. Pivotal role for skin transendothelial radio-resistant anti-inflammatory macrophages in tissue repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Olga; Cibrian, Danay; Clemente, Cristina; Alvarez, David; Moreno, Vanessa; Valiente, Íñigo; Bernad, Antonio; Vestweber, Dietmar; Arroyo, Alicia G; Martín, Pilar; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Sánchez Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity and functional specialization among skin-resident macrophages are incompletely understood. In this study, we describe a novel subset of murine dermal perivascular macrophages that extend protrusions across the endothelial junctions in steady-state and capture blood-borne macromolecules. Unlike other skin-resident macrophages that are reconstituted by bone marrow-derived progenitors after a genotoxic insult, these cells are replenished by an extramedullary radio-resistant and UV-sensitive Bmi1+ progenitor. Furthermore, they possess a distinctive anti-inflammatory transcriptional profile, which cannot be polarized under inflammatory conditions, and are involved in repair and remodeling functions for which other skin-resident macrophages appear dispensable. Based on all their properties, we define these macrophages as Skin Transendothelial Radio-resistant Anti-inflammatory Macrophages (STREAM) and postulate that their preservation is important for skin homeostasis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15251.001 PMID:27304075

  17. Alpha-1 antitrypsin: a potent anti-inflammatory and potential novel therapeutic agent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bergin, David A

    2012-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) has long been thought of as an important anti-protease in the lung where it is known to decrease the destructive effects of major proteases such as neutrophil elastase. In recent years, the perception of this protein in this simple one dimensional capacity as an anti-protease has evolved and it is now recognised that AAT has significant anti-inflammatory properties affecting a wide range of inflammatory cells, leading to its potential therapeutic use in a number of important diseases. This present review aims to discuss the described anti-inflammatory actions of AAT in modulating key immune cell functions, delineate known signalling pathways and specifically to identify the models of disease in which AAT has been shown to be effective as a therapy.

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of seeds of the tropical fruit camu-camu (Myrciaria dubia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Kazunaga; Suga, Katsumi; Honma, Atsushi; Shirosaki, Miyuki; Koyama, Tomoyuki

    2011-01-01

    The methanolic extract of seeds of the tropical fruit camu-camu was screened for its anti-inflammatory activity in carrageenan-induced paw edema model mice. The extract significantly suppressed both the formation of edema in mice by oral administration and the release of nitric oxide from macrophage-derived RAW 264.7 cells in vitro. Based on the results of a spectroscopic analysis, the active compound was identified by in vivo bioassay-guided fractionation to be 3β-hydroxy-lup-20(29)-en-28-oic acid, betulinic acid, known as an anti-inflammatory triterpenoid. These findings suggest that camu-camu seed extract is a potentially useful material as a source of betulinic acid and as a functional food for prevention of immune-related diseases. PMID:21512298

  19. Antimetastatic and anti-inflammatory potentials of essential oil from edible Ocimum sanctum leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manaharan, Thamilvaani; Thirugnanasampandan, Ramaraj; Jayakumar, Rajarajeswaran; Ramya, Gunasekar; Ramnath, Gogul; Kanthimathi, M S

    2014-01-01

    Antimetastatic and anti-inflammatory activities of Ocimum sanctum essential oil (OSEO) have been assessed in this study. OSEO at the concentration of 250 μg/mL and above showed a significant ((*) P < 0.05) decrease in the number of migrated cancer cells. In addition, OSEO at concentration of 250 μg/mL and above suppressed MMP-9 activity in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammatory cells. A dose-dependent downregulation of MMP-9 expression was observed with the treatment of OSEO compared to the control. Our findings indicate that OSEO has both antimetastatic and anti-inflammatory potentials, advocating further investigation for clinical applications in the treatment of inflammation associated cancer. PMID:25431779

  20. Synthesis and biological evaluation of piperlongumine derivatives as potent anti-inflammatory agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Young Hwa; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Jun, Jong-Gab

    2014-12-15

    Piperlongumine (PL) and its derivatives were synthesized by the direct reaction between acid chloride of 3,4,5-trimethoxycinnamic acid and various amides/lactams. Later their anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW-264.7 macrophages. Of the piperlogs prepared in this study, the maximum (91%) inhibitory activity was observed with PL (IC50=3 μM) but showed cytotoxicity whereas compound 3 (IC50=6 μM) which possess α,β-unsaturated γ-butyrolactam moiety offered good level (65%) of activity with no cytotoxicity. This study revealed that amide/lactam moiety connected to cinnamoyl group with minimum 3 carbon chain length and α,β-unsaturation is fruitful to show potent anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25453809

  1. Redox-dependent anti-inflammatory signaling actions of unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmastro-Greenwood, Meghan; Freeman, Bruce A; Wendell, Stacy Gelhaus

    2014-01-01

    Unsaturated fatty acids are metabolized to reactive products that can act as pro- or anti-inflammatory signaling mediators. Electrophilic fatty acid species, including nitro- and oxo-containing fatty acids, display salutary anti-inflammatory and metabolic actions. Electrophilicity can be conferred by both enzymatic and oxidative reactions, via the homolytic addition of nitrogen dioxide to a double bond or via the formation of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and epoxide substituents. The endogenous formation of electrophilic fatty acids is significant and influenced by diet, metabolic, and inflammatory reactions. Transcriptional regulatory proteins and enzymes can sense the redox status of the surrounding environment upon electrophilic fatty acid adduction of functionally significant, nucleophilic cysteines. Through this covalent and often reversible posttranslational modification, gene expression and metabolic responses are induced. At low concentrations, the pleiotropic signaling actions that are regulated by these protein targets suggest that some classes of electrophilic lipids may be useful for treating metabolic and inflammatory diseases. PMID:24161076

  2. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badrul Alam

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective:The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities ofthe methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves (MPBL. Materials and Methods: MPBL was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model. Analgesic activity of MPBL was evaluated by hot plate, writhing, and formalin tests. Total phenolic and flavonoids content, total antioxidant activity, scavenging of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical, peroxynitrate (ONOO- as well as  inhibition of total ROS generation, and assessment of reducing power were used to evaluate antioxidant potential of MPBL. Results: The extract of MPBL, at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg, produced a significant (p

  3. Screening of the topical anti-inflammatory activity of some Central American plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, S; Balick, M J; Arvigo, R; Esposito, R G; Pizza, C; Altinier, G; Tubaro, Aurelia

    2002-07-01

    Hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of seven herbal drugs used in the folk medicine of Central America against skin disorders (Aristolochia trilobata leaves and bark, Bursera simaruba bark, Hamelia patens leaves, Piper amalago leaves, and Syngonium podophyllum leaves and bark) were evaluated for their topical anti-inflammatory activity against the Croton oil-induced ear oedema in mice. Most of the extracts induced a dose-dependent oedema reduction. The chloroform extract of almost all the drugs exhibited interesting activities with ID(50) values ranging between 108 and 498 micro g/cm(2), comparable to that of indomethacin (93 micro g/cm(2)). Therefore, the tested plants are promising sources of principles with high anti-inflammatory activity.

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Citrus bergamia Derivatives: Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Cirmi, Santa; Calapai, Gioacchino; Ventura-Spagnolo, Elvira; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Navarra, Michele

    2016-09-23

    Inflammatory diseases affect a large portion of the worldwide population, and chronic inflammation is a major risk factor for several dangerous pathologies. To limit the side effects of both synthetic and biological anti-inflammatory drugs, the use of herbal medicines, nutraceuticals and food supplements has increased tremendously as alternative and/or complementary medicine to treat several pathologies, including inflammation. During the last decades, the biological properties of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) derivatives have obtained important scientific achievements, and it has been suggested their use in a context of a multitarget pharmacological strategy. Here, we present an overview of the anti-inflammatory properties of bergamot extracts that could represent the scientific basis for develop novel and alternative strategies to improve health status and attenuate inflammatory conditions.

  5. Mediators, Receptors, and Signalling Pathways in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antihyperalgesic Effects of Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. McDonald

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture has been used for millennia to treat allergic diseases including both intermittent rhinitis and persistent rhinitis. Besides the research on the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment for allergic rhinitis, research has also investigated how acupuncture might modulate immune function to exert anti-inflammatory effects. A proposed model has previously hypothesized that acupuncture might downregulate proinflammatory neuropeptides, proinflammatory cytokines, and neurotrophins, modulating transient receptor potential vallinoid (TRPV1, a G-protein coupled receptor which plays a central role in allergic rhinitis. Recent research has been largely supportive of this model. New advances in research include the discovery of a novel cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway activated by acupuncture. A chemokine-mediated proliferation of opioid-containing macrophages in inflamed tissues, in response to acupuncture, has also been demonstrated for the first time. Further research on the complex cross talk between receptors during inflammation is also helping to elucidate the mediators and signalling pathways activated by acupuncture.

  6. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI-ARTHRITIC ACTIVITIES OF DELONIX ELATA BARK EXTRACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Murugananthan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Delonix elata (D. elata, has long been used in traditional herbal medicine for the treatment of arthritis pain. In the present study an attempt was made to study the effect of D. elata barks for its anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic effect in animal models. Barks were subjected for extraction with pet. ether, chloroform and 40% hydroalcohol successively and evaporated under rotary evaporator to get the concentrated extract. All the extracts were subjected for acute oral toxicity studies in rats and found to be safe up to the dose of 5g/kg body weight. Anti-inflammatory screening by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet induced granuloma method, the hydro alcohol extract of D. elata barks showed significant protection against the inflammation. In Complete Freund’s Adjuvant induced arthritis model also the hydro alcohol exhibited significant protection on day 7 onwards.

  7. ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECT OF Myrtus nivellei Batt & Trab (MYRTACEAE METHANOLIC EXTRACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Touaibia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at evaluating the anti-inflammatory activity of an endemic species of the central sahara: Myrtus nivellei Batt & Trab. The methanolic extract of this plant was extracted by Soxhlet apparatus and concentrated under reduced pressure using a rotary evaporator. In the carrageenan-induced paw edema test, five different groups of mice were established and the extract was administered orally in three different doses. The dose of 400 mg/kg was able to reduce significantly the paw edema with a comparable effect to that observed with Diclofenac (positive control. This is the first report to demonstrate a significant anti-inflammatory activity of the methanolic extract prepared from Myrtus nivellei.

  8. Appearance of attenuated intestinal polyposis during chronic non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) may prevent sporadic colonic neoplasia and reduce the polyp burden in familial adenomatous polyposis. A 41-year-old pharmacologist with no family history of intestinal polyps or cancer chronically consumed daily aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for decades despite recurrent and multiple gastric ulcers. A cancerous polyp in the colon was endoscopically resected. Over the next 2 decades, almost 50 adenomatous polyps were removed from the rest of his colon and duodenum, typical of an attenuated form of adenomatous polyposis. Chronic and habitual use of aspirin or NSAIDS may have important significance in delaying the appearance of adenomas. The observations here emphasize the important implications for clinical risk assessment in screening programs designed to detect or prevent colon cancer.

  9. PP2A mediated AMPK inhibition promotes HSP70 expression in heat shock response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Under stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK plays a central role in energy balance, and the heat shock response is a protective mechanism for cell survival. The relationship between AMPK activity and heat shock protein (HSP expression under stress is unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that heat stress induced dephosphorylation of AMPKα subunit (AMPKα in various cell types from human and rodent. In HepG2 cells, the dephosphorylation of AMPKα under heat stress in turn caused dephosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and upregulation of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, two downstream targets of AMPK, confirming the inhibition of AMPK activity by heat stress. Treatment of HepG2 cells with phosphatase 2A (PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid or inhibition of PP2A expression by RNA interference efficiently reversed heat stress-induced AMPKα dephosphorylation, suggesting that heat stress inhibited AMPK through activation of PP2A. Heat stress- and other HSP inducer (CdCl(2, celastrol, MG132-induced HSP70 expression could be inhibited by AICAR, an AMPK specific activator. Inhibition of AMPKα expression by RNA interference reversed the inhibitory effect of AICAR on HSP70 expression under heat stress. These results indicate that AMPK inhibition under stress contribute to HSP70 expression. Mechanistic studies showed that activation of AMPK by AICAR had no effect on heat stress-induced HSF1 nuclear translocation, phosphorylation and binding with heat response element in the promoter region of HSP70 gene, but significantly decreased HSP70 mRNA stability. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that during heat shock response, PP2A mediated AMPK inhibition upregulates HSP70 expression at least partially through stabilizing its mRNA, which suggests a novel mechanism for HSP induction under stress.

  10. Chemical composition and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oil from Hallabong flower

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min-Jin; Yang, Kyong-Wol; Kim, Sang Suk; Park, Suk Man; Park, Kyung Jin; Kim, Kwang Sik; Choi, Young Hun; Cho, Kwang Keun; Lee, Nam Ho; Hyun, Chang-Gu

    2013-01-01

    A number of essential oils derived from plants are claimed to have several medicinal functions, including anti-cancer and anti-inflammation effects. However, the chemical composition and biological activities of flower-derived components have not been sufficiently characterized. Therefore, we investigated the composition of essential oils from Hallabong flower [(Citrus unshiu Marcov × Citrus sinensis Osbeck) × Citrus reticulata Blanco] and their anti-inflammatory effects. Hydro-dist ...

  11. Inhibition of Monoacylglycerol Lipase Attenuates Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug-Induced Gastric Hemorrhages in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Daniel K Nomura; O'Neal, Scott T.; Long, Jonathan Z.; Mahadevan, Anu; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; John R Grider; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used analgesics, but can cause gastric and esophageal hemorrhages, erosion, and ulceration. The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid; eCB) system possesses several potential targets to reduce gastric inflammatory states, including cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2), and enzymes that regulate the eCB ligands 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA). In the pres...

  12. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs prior to chronic renal replacement therapy initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Kamper, Anne-Lise; Køber, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may be associated with severe renal complications, including acute renal failure, reduced glomerular filtration rate and interstitial nephritis. Caution against NSAIDs is therefore recommended in advanced chronic kidney disease. In this study......, we examined NSAID use, aetiology and comorbidity among a national cohort of patients before the initiation of chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT). METHODS: Patients initiated on chronic RRT in the period 1997-2006 were identified in the Danish National Registry on Regular Dialysis...

  13. COX-Independent Mechanisms of Cancer Chemoprevention by Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

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    Gurpinar, Evrim; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX...

  14. COX-independent mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anti-inflammatory drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Evrim eGurpinar; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX...

  15. IN VIVO ANTI INFLAMMATORY AND ANTI ARTHRITIC ACTIVITY OF ETHANOLIC EXTRACT OF ASPARAGUS RACEMOSUS ROOTS

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    Suchita Mittal

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed to appraise the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic activity of ethanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus roots belonging to family Liliaceae. Carrageenan is used to induce inflammation and Freund’s Complete Adjuvant is used to induce arthritis. The result of this study revealed that Asparagus racemosus show potent effect on both the condition at a dose of 200mg/kg and 400mg/kg respectively.

  16. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of Grewia asiatica Linn. in rodents

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    Udaybhan Singh Paviaya; Parveen Kumar; Wanjari, Manish M.; Thenmozhi, S.; B R Balakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Grewia asiatica Linn. (Family: Tiliaceae), called Phalsa in Hindi is an Indian medicinal plant used for a variety of therapeutic and nutritional uses. The root bark of the plant is traditionally used in rheumatism (painful chronic inflammatory condition). Aims: The present study demonstrates the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of root bark of G. asiatica in rodents. Settings and Design: The methanolic extract of Grewia asiatica (MEGA) and aqueous extract of Grewia...

  17. Potential pathway of anti-inflammatory effect by New Zealand honeys

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    Tomblin V

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Tomblin,1 Lynnette R Ferguson,1 Dug Yeo Han,1 Pamela Murray,1 Ralf Schlothauer2 1Discipline of Nutrition, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand; 2Comvita New Zealand Ltd, Paengaroa, New Zealand Abstract: The role of honey in wound healing continues to attract worldwide attention. This study examines the anti-inflammatory effect of four honeys on wound healing, to gauge its efficacy as a treatment option. Isolated phenolics and crude extracts from manuka (Leptospermum scoparium, kanuka (Kunzea ericoides, clover (Trifolium spp., and a manuka/kanuka blend of honeys were examined. Anti-inflammatory assays were conducted in HEK-Blue™-2, HEK-Blue™-4, and nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD2-Wild Type (NOD2-WT cell lines, to assess the extent to which honey treatment impacts on the inflammatory response and whether the effect was pathway-specific. Kanuka honey, and to a lesser extent manuka honey, produced a powerful anti-inflammatory effect related to their phenolic content. The effect was observed in HEK-Blue™-2 cells using the synthetic tripalmitoylated lipopeptide Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4 ligand, suggesting that honey acts specifically through the toll-like receptor (TLR1/TLR2 signaling pathway. The manuka/kanuka blend and clover honeys had no significant anti-inflammatory effect in any cell line. The research found that kanuka and manuka honeys have an important role in modulating the inflammatory response associated with wound healing, through a pathway-specific effect. The phenolic content of honey correlates with its effectiveness, although the specific compounds involved remain to be determined. Keywords: Leptospermum scoparium, manuka, Kunzea ericoides, kanuka, Trifolium, clover, inflammatory response, phenolics, wound healing

  18. Analgesic, Anti-inflammatory and Antihyperlipidemic Activities of Commiphora molmol Extract (Myrrh

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    Mostafa Abbas Shalaby

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antihyperlipidemic activities of Commiphora molmol extract (CME and its effect on body weight. Material and Methods: The analgesic effect was assessed using thermal (hot plate test and chemical (writhing test stimuli to induce central and peripheral pain in mice. The anti-inflammatory activity was determined using formalin-induced paw edema in rats. For antihyperlipidemic effect, thirty five rats were randomized into five equal groups (n=7. Group (1 was fed on basal diet (Normal control, while the other 4 groups were fed on high-fat diet for 6 weeks to induce obesity and hyperlipidemia. Thereafter, group (2 was kept obese hyperlipidemic, and groups (3, (4 and (5 were orally given CME in doses of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg for 6 weeks, respectively. Body weight gains of rats were calculated and blood samples were collected for analysis of blood lipids. Results: CME produced a dose-dependent analgesic effect using both hot plate and writhing tests in mice. The hot plate method appeared to be more sensitive than writhing test. CME exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity as it reduced volume of paw edema induced by formalin in rats. This extract decreased body weight gains; normalized the high levels of blood lipids and decreased atherogenic index (LDL/HDL in obese hyperlipidemic rats. Conclusion: The results of this study denote that Commiphora molmol extract (Myrrh has significant analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antihyperlipidemic effects and decreases body weight. These results affirm the traditional use of Commiphora molmol for the treatment of pain, inflammations, and hyperlipidemia. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 56-62

  19. A Review on the Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pomegranate in the Gastrointestinal Tract

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    Elisa Colombo; Enrico Sangiovanni; Mario Dell'Agli

    2013-01-01

    Several biological activities of pomegranate have been widely described in the literature, but the anti-inflammatory effect in the gastrointestinal tract has not been reviewed till now. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the evidence for or against the efficacy of pomegranate for coping with inflammatory conditions of the gastro-intestinal tract. The paper has been organized in three parts: (1) the first one is devoted to the modifications of pomegranate active compounds in the gast...

  20. THE MICROBIOLOGICAL EFFICACY ESTIMATION OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS’ ANTI-INFLAMMATORY THERAPY

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    O.B. Ryba

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with microbiological status of patients with chronic generalized periodontitis of medium severity. On the basis of clinical and microbiological data the analysis of different methods efficacy of anti-inflammatory therapy was carried out. We studied antimicrobial effect of laser therapy, ozonotherapyandcombinations oflaser- ozonotherapyin comparison with influence ofchlorhexidine 0,2%. Combined laser and ozone influence on periodontium provided high antibacterial effect with increased local nonspecific resistance, and it extended remission term of patients with chronic periodontitis.