WorldWideScience

Sample records for anti-human cd25 antibody

  1. Cloning and expression of canine CD25 for validation of an anti-human CD25 antibody to compare T regulatory lymphocytes in healthy dogs and dogs with osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rissetto, K C; Rindt, H; Selting, K A; Villamil, J A; Henry, C J; Reinero, C R

    2010-05-15

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) are a unique subset of T helper cells that serve to modify/inhibit effector cells of the immune system and thus are essential to prevent autoimmunity. Overzealous Treg activity may contribute to impaired immune responses to cancer. Tregs can be phenotypically identified by proteins expressed on the cell surface (CD4 and CD25) and inside the cell (forkhead box3 (FoxP3)), although in dogs, no anti-canine CD25 antibody exists. We hypothesized that a mouse anti-human CD25 antibody definitively recognizes the canine protein and can be used to identify Tregs in dogs. We describe cloning and transfection of the canine CD25 gene into human HeLa cells with subsequent expression of the canine protein on the cell surface detected using an anti-human CD25 antibody in a flow cytometric assay. Validation of this antibody was used to identify CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs in 39 healthy dogs and 16 dogs with osteosarcoma (OSA). Results were expressed in five different ways and showed significantly fewer %CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes expressing FoxP3 in blood of older dogs (>/=7 years) compared with the other two age groups (<2 and 2-6 years) (p<0.001) and fewer %CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs in the tumor draining lymph nodes of OSA patients compared to the unrelated lymph node (p=0.049). However, there was no significant difference in % Tregs in the peripheral blood or lymph nodes between the control dogs and those with OSA. While the CD25 antibody can be successfully used in a flow cytometric assay to identify Tregs, this study does not support clinical utility of phenotypic recognition of Tregs in dogs with OSA. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. In ovo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibodies depletes CD4+CD25+ T cells in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2013-01-01

    The CD4(+)CD25(+) cells have T regulatory cell properties in chickens. This study investigated the effect of in ovo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibodies (0.5 mg/egg) on CD4(+)CD25(+) cell depletion and on amounts of interleukin-2 mRNA and interferon-γ mRNA in CD4(+)CD25(-) cells posthatch. Anti-chicken CD25 or PBS (control) was injected into 16-d-old embryos. Chicks hatched from eggs injected with anti-chicken CD25 antibodies had a lower CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the blood until 25 d posthatch. The anti-chicken CD25 antibody injection nearly depleted CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the blood until 16 d posthatch. At 30 d posthatch, the CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the anti-CD25-antibody-injected group was comparable with the percentage in the control group. At 16 d posthatch, the anti-chicken CD25 antibody injection decreased CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentages in the thymus, spleen, and cecal tonsils. Chickens hatched from anti-CD25-antibody-injected eggs had approximately 25% of CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the cecal tonsils and thymus compared with those in the cecal tonsils and thymus of the control group. The CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the spleen and cecal tonsils of chicks hatched from anti-chicken-CD25-injected eggs had higher amounts of interferon-γ and interleukin-2 mRNA than CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the control group. It could be concluded that injecting anti-chicken CD25 antibodies in ovo at 16 d of incubation nearly depleted the CD4(+)CD25(+) cells until 25 d posthatch.

  3. Effects of in vivo injection of anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibody on regulatory T cell depletion and CD4+CD25- T cell properties in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Revathi; Selvaraj, Ramesh K

    2012-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are defined as CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in chickens. This study examined the effects of an anti-chicken CD25 monoclonal antibody injection (0.5 mg/bird) on in vivo depletion of Tregs and the properties of CD4(+)CD25(-) cells in Treg-depleted birds. The CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentage in the blood was lower at 8 d post injection than at 0 d. Anti-CD25-mediated CD4(+)CD25(+) cell depletion in blood was maximum at 12 d post injection. The anti-CD25 antibody injection depleted CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in the spleen and cecal tonsils, but not in the thymus, at 12 d post antibody injection. CD4(+)CD25(-) cells from the spleen and cecal tonsils of birds injected with the anti-chicken CD25 antibody had higher proliferation and higher IL-2 and IFNγ mRNA amounts than the controls at 12 d post injection. At 20 d post injection, CD4(+)CD25(+) cell percentages in the blood, spleen and thymus were comparable to that of the 0 d post injection. It could be concluded that anti-chicken CD25 injection temporarily depleted Treg population and increased and IL-2 and IFNγ mRNA amounts in CD4(+)CD25(-) cells at 12d post injection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The importance of Foxp3 antibody and fixation/permeabilization buffer combinations in identifying CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jacqueline P; Hirschkorn, Dale F; Owen, Rachel E; Biswas, Hope H; Norris, Philip J; Lanteri, Marion C

    2009-12-01

    Foxp3 is a key marker for CD4(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) and was used in developing a multiparameter flow cytometric panel to identify T(regs). Achieving reproducible staining and analysis first required optimization of Foxp3 staining. We present a comparative study of PCH101, 236A/E7, 3G3, 206D, 150D, and 259D/C7 clones of anti-human-Foxp3 antibodies used in combination with five different fixation/permeabilization buffers. Staining for CD25, CD152, and CD127 was also compared between fixation/permeabilization treatments. Promising antibody/buffer combinations were tested in a panel of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 10 individuals, and then on fresh versus frozen cells from four individuals. Finally, different fluorochromes coupled to two representative antibodies were compared to optimize separation of Foxp3(+) from Foxp3(-) events. Foxp3 gates were set using two gating strategies based on CD127(+)CD25(-) "non-T(regs)" or based on isotype controls. For Foxp3 staining, the best conditions for fixation/permeabilization were obtained using the eBioscience Foxp3, Imgenex, BioLegend, and BD Foxp3 buffers. Comparing results from 10 subjects, 259D/C7, PCH101, 236A/E7, and 206D antibodies yielded statistically higher levels of Foxp3 cells than those by 150D and 3G3 antibodies (mean = 6.9, 5.1, 4.7, and 3.7% compared with 1.7, and 0.3% of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) events within CD4(+) cells, respectively). Importantly, the "nonspecificity" of some antibodies observed with a Foxp3 gate based on isotype controls could be eliminated by setting the Foxp3 gate on "non-T(regs)". Better separation of Foxp3(+) and Foxp3(-) populations was observed using the PCH101 clone coupled to Alexa647 compared with FITC or the 259D/C7 clone coupled to PE compared with Alexa488 fluorochrome. Foxp3 staining can be highly variable and depends on the choice of antibody/buffer pair and the fluorochrome used. Selecting the correct population for setting the Foxp3 gate is critical to avoid

  5. Development of new versions of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies with potentially reduced immunogenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Weizhu; Wang Ling; Li Bohua; Wang Hao; Hou Sheng; Hong Xueyu; Zhang Dapeng; Guo Yajun

    2008-01-01

    Despite the widespread clinical use of CD34 antibodies for the purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells, all the current anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are murine, which have the potential to elicit human antimouse antibody (HAMA) immune response. In the present study, we developed three new mouse anti-human CD34 mAbs which, respectively, belonged to class I, class II and class III CD34 epitope antibodies. In an attempt to reduce the immunogenicity of these three murine mAbs, their chimeric antibodies, which consisted of mouse antibody variable regions fused genetically to human antibody constant regions, were constructed and characterized. The anti-CD34 chimeric antibodies were shown to possess affinity and specificity similar to that of their respective parental murine antibodies. Due to the potentially better safety profiles, these chimeric antibodies might become alternatives to mouse anti-CD34 antibodies routinely used for clinical application

  6. First clinical evaluation of radioimmunoimaging using anti-human lung cancer monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qian

    1991-01-01

    Anti-human large cell lung cancer monoclonal antibodies (McAb) 2E3 and 6D1 were produced in the laboratory. Immunohistochemical studies and radiobinding assay showed these antibodies possessed high specificity against lung cancer cells. 28 patients with lung masses were investigated with 131 I-labeled McAb 6D1 and/or 2E3 scintigraphy. 19 of them were histologically proven and 13 were diagnosed primary lung carcinoma. Radioimmunoimaging visualized 10/13 of the primary lung cancers with a detection rate of 77%. Only 1 case of the non-cancer patients and a false localization, giving a true negative rate of 83%. Pathologically the squamous cell lung carcinoma had the highest localization and the small cell lung carcinoma next, but the detection rate was 100% for both. The adenocarcinoma of lung was less sensitive to these McAbs, with a detection rate of only 33% (1 of 3 cases). We conclude that radioimmunoimaging with anti-human large cell lung cancer McAbs is more specific and effective in detecting primary lung cancers and differentiating lung masses than with antibodies against other tumor associated antigens

  7. Production and characterization of anti-human IgG F(ab')2 antibody fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valedkarimi, Zahra; Nasiri, Hadi; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Esparvarinha, Mojghan; Majidi, Jafar

    2018-04-10

    In present study an optimized protocol for the separation of antibodies into antigen-binding fragments F(ab')2 using pepsin digestion was investigated. The production of these fragments is a consequential step in the development of medical research, treatment and diagnosis. For production of polyclonal antibody rabbit received antigen in four steps. The rabbit serum at 1/128000 dilution showed high absorbance in reaction with human IgG at the designed ELISA method. Rabbit IgG was purified by Ion-Exchange Chromatography (IEC) method. Purity was assessed by SDS-PAGE method. In non-reduced condition only one band was seen in about 150 kDa MW position and in reduced form, two bands were seen in 50 and 25 kDa MW positions. Rabbit IgG was digested by pepsin enzyme. The antibody fragments solution was applied to Gel filtration column to isolate the F(ab')2. Non-reduced SDS-PAGE for determining the purity of F(ab')2 fragment resulted in one band in 100 kDa corresponds to F(ab')2 fragment and a band in 150 kDa MW position corresponds to undigested IgG antibodies. The activities of FITC conjugated F(ab')2 fragment and commercial ones were compared using flowcytometry method. The activity results implied that the FITC conjugated- anti human F(ab')2 fragment worked as efficiently as the commercial one.

  8. [Preparation and preliminary application of rabbit anti-human PON2 antibodies(paraoxonase-2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao; Yang, Jin-Ju; Li, Shu-Zhen; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Gao, Jian-En; Sun, Qi-Hong

    2008-07-01

    To preparation and characterize the rabbit polyclonal antibodies against human PON2 (paraoxonase-2). A fragment of human PON2 gene which was of low homology with rabbits but of higher hydrophilicity and immunogenicity was selected for recombinant expression in prokaryotic expression system. The rabbits were immunized with the purified GST fusion protein 3 times. The specificity and sensitivity of the anti-human PON2 polyclonal antibodies were detected by Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence. The GST-PON2 fusion protein was highly expressed in Ecoli with a molecular weight of 46 kDa. Western blot analysis proved the rabbit polyclonal antibodies could specifically recognize 39 kDa native PON2 protein expressed in several cells and tissues, such as HeLa cells, U937 cells, and human liver tissue. Indirect immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that PON2 protein was located in the cytoplasm of SY5Y cells. The rabbit polyclonal antibodies against human PON2 can specifically recognize natural protein expressed in human cells and tissues, Which can be used for further study and clinical detection of human PON2.

  9. Clinical significance of serum anti-human papillomavirus 16 and 18 antibodies in cervical neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chay, Doo Byung; Cho, Hanbyoul; Kim, Bo Wook; Kang, Eun Suk; Song, Eunseop; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2013-02-01

    To estimate the clinical significance of serum anti-human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies and high-risk cervical HPV DNA in cervical neoplasia. The study population comprised patients who were histopathologically diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1 (n=64), CIN 2 and 3 (n=241), cervical cancer (n=170), and normal control participants (n=975). Cervical HPV DNA tests were performed through nucleic acid hybridization assay tests, and serum anti-HPV 16 and 18 antibodies were measured by competitive immunoassay. The associations of HPV DNA and anti-HPV antibodies were evaluated with demographic characteristics and compared according to the levels of disease severity. Anti-HPV antibodies were also investigated with clinicopathologic parameters, including survival data. Among various demographic characteristics, factors involving sexual behavior had a higher tendency of HPV DNA positivity and HPV seropositivity. Human papillomavirus DNA mean titer and positivity were both increased in patients with cervical neoplasia compared with those with normal control participants, but there was no statistical difference among types of cervical neoplasia. Serum anti-HPV 16 antibodies were also able to differentiate cervical neoplasia from a normal control participant and furthermore distinguished CIN 1 from CIN 2 and 3 (odd ratio 2.87 [1.43-5.78], P=.002). In cervical cancer, HPV 16 seropositivity was associated with prolonged disease-free survival according to the univariable analysis (hazard ratio=0.12 [0.01-0.94], P=.044). Serum anti-HPV 16 antibodies can distinguish cervical neoplasia from a normal control and has the advantage of identifying high-grade CIN. Moreover, in cervical cancer, HPV 16 seropositivity may be associated with a more favorable prognosis. II.

  10. Humanized versus murine anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies for immunoscintigraphic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Alvarez-Ruiz, Daniel; Becquer-Viart, Maria de Los Angeles; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando

    2000-02-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized antibody h-R3 (IgG{sub 1}), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R, was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. Results are compared with its murine version ior egf/r3 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intravenously with 10 {mu}g/100 {mu}Ci of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled mAbs. The mAb ior C5 that recognizes an antigen expressed preferentially on the surface of malignant and cytoplasm of normal colorectal cells was used as negative control. Immunoreactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled mAbs was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay on A431 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions determined by Lindmo method. Among all organs significant accumulation was found in tumor (6.14{+-}2.50 %ID/g, 5.06{+-}2.61 %ID/g for murine and humanized mAbs, respectively) 4 h after injection. The immunoreactive fractions were found to be 0.88 and 0.81 for murine and humanized mAb, respectively. Thus, we expect better results using the humanized mAb h-R3 for diagnostic immunoscintigraphy.

  11. Humanized versus murine anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies for immunoscintigraphic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, Alejo A. Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Alvarez-Ruiz, Daniel; Becquer-Viart, Maria de Los Angeles; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando

    2000-01-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized antibody h-R3 (IgG 1 ), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R, was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. Results are compared with its murine version ior egf/r3 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intravenously with 10 μg/100 μCi of 99m Tc-labeled mAbs. The mAb ior C5 that recognizes an antigen expressed preferentially on the surface of malignant and cytoplasm of normal colorectal cells was used as negative control. Immunoreactivity of 99m Tc-labeled mAbs was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay on A431 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions determined by Lindmo method. Among all organs significant accumulation was found in tumor (6.14±2.50 %ID/g, 5.06±2.61 %ID/g for murine and humanized mAbs, respectively) 4 h after injection. The immunoreactive fractions were found to be 0.88 and 0.81 for murine and humanized mAb, respectively. Thus, we expect better results using the humanized mAb h-R3 for diagnostic immunoscintigraphy

  12. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Inflammatory Rheumatoid Synovial Tissues Using Anti-Human Podoplanin Monoclonal Antibody Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomoto; Takakubo, Yuya; Oki, Hiroharu; Liu, Xing; Honma, Ryusuke; Naganuma, Yasushi; Goodman, Stuart B; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari; Takagi, Michiaki

    2018-02-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, which is expressed in several normal tissues and malignant tumors. Although PDPN expression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been reported, the role of PDPN in RA and other arthritic conditions has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined PDPN expression in inflammatory synovial tissues using an anti-human PDPN (hPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) panel to select the most useful one for evaluation of synovitis. Synovial tissue samples were obtained from 11 RA patients and 9 osteoarthritis (OA) patients undergoing joint surgery. PDPN-positive cells were immunostained by a panel of PDPN mAbs (NZ-1, LpMab-3, LpMab-7, LpMab-10, LpMab-12, LpMab-13, and LpMab-17), followed by cell grading of inflammation and cell counting of PDPN-positivity by a quantitative analyzer. Immunohistochemistry showed that PDPN was markedly expressed in both macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B lining cells of the hyperplastic synovial lining cell layer, and macrophages and fibroblasts in the stroma of RA. Among anti-PDPN mAbs, LpMab-12 showed the highest score. In inflammatory OA synovium, PDPN expression was also detectable. Although LpMab-12 also showed the highest score in OA, the difference was not statistically significant. The inflammatory synovitis score of RA was significantly higher than that of OA. PDPN was expressed in inflammatory lining cells and sublining stroma of RA and OA synovium. In the seven anti-hPDPN antibodies examined, LpMab-12 was the most stainable antibody for PDPN in RA synovitis. Thus, LpMab-12 for PDPN has a possible and promising specific biomarker for evaluating synovitis in RA and inflammatory OA.

  13. Differential effects of IL-2 and IL-21 on expansion of the CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T regulatory cells with redundant roles in natural killer cell mediated antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowda, Aruna; Ramanunni, Asha; Cheney, Carolyn; Rozewski, Darlene; Kindsvogel, Wayne; Lehman, Amy; Jarjoura, David; Caligiuri, Michael; Byrd, John C; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2010-01-01

    CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells are expanded in solid and hematological malignancies including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Several cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules are required for generation, survival and maintenance of their suppressive effect. We and others have shown direct cytotoxic effect of the novel common gamma chain cytokine interleukin (IL)-21 on primary B cells from CLL patients. Since members of this family of cytokines are known to exhibit their effects on diverse immune cells, we have examined the effects of IL-21 on CLL patient derived regulatory T cell (Treg) induction, expansion and the inhibitory effect on natural killer cells in vitro. We demonstrate here the expression of IL-21 receptor in CD4(+)CD25(High) regulatory cells from CLL patients. In contrast to IL-2, the IL-21 cytokine failed to mediate expansion of regulatory T cells or induced expression of Foxp3 in CD4(+)CD25(Intermediate) or CD4(+)CD25(Dim/-) T cells in whole blood derived from CLL patients. Interestingly, in contrast to their differential effects on expansion of the CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+)T cells, IL-2 and IL-21 exhibited a redundant role in Treg mediated suppression of NK cell mediated antibody dependent cytotoxicity function. Given the infusion related toxicities and pro-survival effect of IL-2 in CLL, these studies provide a rationale to explore IL-21 as an alternate gamma chain cytokine in CLL therapy.

  14. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Christian; Madshus, Inger Helene; Stang, Espen

    2012-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: ► Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. ► Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. ► Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. ► Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  15. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene [Institute of Pathology, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen, E-mail: espsta@rr-research.no [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-12-10

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  16. Reactivity of eleven anti-human leucocyte monoclonal antibodies with lymphocytes from several domestic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Larsen, Else Bang

    1988-01-01

    Nine commercially available monoclonal antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies from The American Type Culture Collection, raised against various human leucocyte surface antigens, were tested on lymphocytes from cow, sheep, goat, swine, horse, cat, dog, mink, and rabbit as well as man. Four...... antibodies bound to lymphocytes from some of the animals. These were the antibodies against CD8 and CD4 antigen, the antibody to C3b-receptor, and the antibody to the HLA-DR antigen. The CD8 antigen-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink, cat, dog, and sheep, while the CD4 antigen......-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink. The anti-C3b-R antibody reacted with lymphocytes from horse, swine, dog, and cat, and the anti-HLA-DR reacted with lymphocytes from cow, goat, sheep, horse, dog, cat, and mink....

  17. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey) by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Hugo Amorim dos Santos; Costa-Correa, Edmar Henrique; Bianco-Junior, Cesare; Andrade, Márcia Cristina Ribeiro; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas

    2017-01-01

    Non-human primates (NHP) are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα)—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model. PMID:29312325

  18. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Amorim dos Santos de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-human primates (NHP are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model.

  19. Dendritic cell vaccination in combination with anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody treatment, a phase I/II study in metastatic melanoma patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, J.F.; Punt, C.J.; Lesterhuis, W.J.; Sutmuller, R.P.; Brouwer, H.M.; Scharenborg, N.M.; Klasen, I.S.; Hilbrands, L.B.; Figdor, C.G.; Vries, I.J., de; Adema, G.J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The success of cancer immunotherapy depends on the balance between effector T cells and suppressive immune regulatory mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment. In this study we investigated whether transient monoclonal antibody–mediated depletion of CD25high regulatory T cells (Treg) is

  20. Anti-human T-lymphotropic virus type-I antibodies in atomic-bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Nakashima, Eiji; Carter, R.L. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan). Nagasaki Branch] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), induced by human T-lymphotropic virus type-I (HTLV-I), is endemic in Nagasaki, Japan. To investigate the effects of atomic-bomb radiation on development of this specific type of leukemia, 6182 individuals in the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) Adult Health Study sample in Hiroshima and Nagasaki were examined for positive rate of HTLV-I antibody. Several lymphocyte parameters were also studied for 70 antibody-positive subjects in Nagasaki. The HTLV-I antibody-positive rate was higher in Nagasaki (6.36%) than in Hiroshima (0.79%) and significantly increased with increasing age, but no association was observed with radiation dose. Whether relationship existed between antibody titer levels and radiation dose among antibody-positive subjects was not clear. The frequency of abnormal lymphocytes tended to be higher in antibody-positive subjects than in antibody-negative subjects, and higher in females than in males regardless of radiation dose. The lymphocyte count was lower in antibody-positive subjects than in antibody-negative subjects and lower in female than in male subjects. No evidence was found to suggest that atomic-bomb radiation plays an important role in HTLV-I infection. (author).

  1. Radiolabelled anti-human fibrin antibody: a new thrombus-detecting agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosnjakovic, V.; Jankovic, B.D.; Horvat, J.; Cvoric, J.

    1977-01-01

    Rabbit anti-human fibrin globulin (A.F.G.) was labelled with iodine ( 131 I) and used as a thrombus-detecting agent. 131 I-A.F.G. labelled thrombi were displayed by means of a gamma scintillation camera. Normal subjects and patients with thrombo-phlebitis of legs, acute fibrin depositions other than thrombi, and chronic varicosities were examined. The 131 I-A.F.G. technique detected both formed thrombi and those that were forming and could discriminate between acute thrombosis and chronic varicosities. Thrombo-phlebitis and extravascular fibrin depositions were best demonstrated between 24 and 72 hours after 131 I-A.F.G. injection. Radiolabelled A.F.G. in normal veins and chronic varicosities was best displayed within 6 hours of injection. (author)

  2. Anti-human SIRPα antibody is a new tool for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yoji; Tanaka, Daisuke; Hazama, Daisuke; Yanagita, Tadahiko; Saito, Yasuyuki; Kotani, Takenori; Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Matozaki, Takashi

    2018-02-23

    Interaction of signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα) expressed on the surface of macrophages with its ligand CD47 expressed on target cells negatively regulates phagocytosis of the latter cells by the former. We recently showed that blocking Abs to mouse SIRPα enhanced both the Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activity of mouse macrophages for Burkitt's lymphoma Raji cells opsonized with an Ab to CD20 (rituximab) in vitro as well as the inhibitory effect of rituximab on the growth of tumors formed by Raji cells in nonobese diabetic (NOD)/SCID mice. However, the effects of blocking Abs to human SIRPα in preclinical cancer models have remained unclear given that such Abs have failed to interact with endogenous SIRPα expressed on macrophages of immunodeficient mice. With the use of Rag2 -/- γ c -/- mice harboring a transgene for human SIRPα under the control of human regulatory elements (hSIRPα-DKO mice), we here show that a blocking Ab to human SIRPα significantly enhanced the ADCP activity of macrophages derived from these mice for human cancer cells. The anti-human SIRPα Ab also markedly enhanced the inhibitory effect of rituximab on the growth of tumors formed by Raji cells in hSIRPα-DKO mice. Our results thus suggest that the combination of Abs to human SIRPα with therapeutic Abs specific for tumor antigens warrants further investigation for potential application to cancer immunotherapy. In addition, humanized mice, such as hSIRPα-DKO mice, should prove useful for validation of the antitumor effects of checkpoint inhibitors before testing in clinical trials. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Monoclonal anti-human factor VII antibodies. Detection in plasma of a second protein antigenically and genetically related to factor VII.

    OpenAIRE

    Broze, G J; Hickman, S; Miletich, J P

    1985-01-01

    Several murine monoclonal anti-human Factor VII antibodies were produced using hybridoma technology. Two noncompetitive monoclonal antibodies were used to examine by Western blotting the Factor VII cross-reactive material (CRM) in normal human plasma and three commercially available congenitally Factor VII-deficient plasmas, and to construct a facile "sandwich" immunoassay for plasma Factor VII. A second, previously undescribed, form of Factor VII CRM was detected in human plasma, which on We...

  4. Preparation and functional studies of hydroxyethyl chitosan nanoparticles loaded with anti-human death receptor 5 single-chain antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang J

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jingjing Yang,1,3,* Xiaoping Huang,1,3,* Fanghong Luo,1 Xiaofeng Cheng,3 Lianna Cheng,3 Bin Liu,4 Lihong Chen,2 Ruyi Hu,1,3 Chunyan Shi,1,3 Guohong Zhuang,1,3 Ping Yin2 1Anti-Cancer Research Center, Medical College, Xiamen University, Fujian, People's Republic of China, 2The Department of Pathology, Zhongshan Hospital, Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China, 3Organ transplantation institution, Xiamen University, Xiamen, People's Republic of China, 4Jilin Vocational College of Industry and Technology, Jilin, People's Republic of China  *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: To prepare hydroxyethyl chitosan nanoparticles loaded with anti-human death receptor 5 single-chain antibody, and study their characteristics, functions, and mechanisms of action. Materials and methods: The anti-human death receptor 5 single-chain antibody was constructed and expressed. Protein-loaded hydroxyethyl chitosan nanoparticles were prepared, and their size, morphology, particle-size distribution and surface zeta potential were measured by scanning electron microscopy and laser particle-size analysis. Mouse H22 hepatocellular carcinoma cells were cultured, and growth inhibition was examined using the CellTiter-Blue cell-viability assay. Flow cytometry and Hoechst 33342 were employed to measure cell apoptosis. Kunming mice with H22 tumor models were treated with protein-loaded hydroxyethyl chitosan nanoparticles, and their body weight and tumor size were measured, while hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to detect antitumor effects in vivo and side effects from tumors. Results: The protein-loaded hydroxyethyl chitosan nanoparticles had good stability; the zeta potential was -24.2±0.205, and the dispersion index was 0.203. The inhibition of the protein-loaded hydroxyethyl chitosan nanoparticles on H22 growth was both time- and dose-dependent. Increased expressions of active caspase 8, active caspase 3, and BAX were detected

  5. Immunohistochemical evaluation of podoplanin in odontogenic tumours & cysts using anti-human podoplanin antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Namrata; Khanduri, Nitin; Kurup, Deepak; Gupta, Brijesh; Mitra, Pranjan; Chawla, Roshani

    2017-01-01

    Odontogenic Cysts & tumors originate through some aberration from the normal pattern of odontogenesis. Ameloblastoma is one of the most frequent intraosseous odontogenic tumors. However it is no longer appropriate to use the diagnosis of ameloblastoma without specifying the type. Varied-clinical entities of ameloblastoma differ in their biologic behaviour. Odontogenic cysts like dentigerous and radicular cysts are less aggressive in nature than odontogenic tumors. Recently, podoplanin commonly used as a lymphatic endothelial marker in cancers has recently been found to play a possible role in odontogenic tumorigenesis also. Therefore the purpose of this study was to immunohistochemically analyse the expression of podoplanin in ameloblastomas, KCOTs, dentigerous cysts, radicular cysts & dental follicles. Paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of 15 Ameloblastomas (7 follicular, 6 unicystic, 2 desmoplastic),10KCOTs, 5 dentigerous cysts, 5 radicular cysts & 5 dental follicles were immunohistochemically examined using antibody against podoplanin. All ameloblastomas displayed podoplanin expression in ameloblast-like cells of the epithelial islands while the stellate-reticulum like cells exhibited no or weak immunostaining. Expression of podoplanin in KCOTs was strongly positive in the cells of the basal and suprabasal layers & odontogenic epithelial nests. Positive immunoreaction for podoplanin was observed in the inflammatory radicular cysts and inflamed dentigerous cyst only and negative or weak expression in the lining epithelium of uninflamed dentigerous cysts and dental follicles. Our results suggest that podoplanin can be used as a potential proliferative marker to observe the aggressive behaviour of ameloblastomas and KCOTs.

  6. Signaling signatures and functional properties of anti-human CD28 superagonistic antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Waibler

    Full Text Available Superagonistic CD28 antibodies (CD28SAs activate T lymphocytes without concomitant perturbation of the TCR/CD3-complex. In rodents these reagents induce the preferential expansion of regulatory T cells and can be used for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Unexpectedly, the humanized CD28 superagonist TGN1412 caused severe and life threatening adverse effects during a recently conducted phase I clinical trail. The underlying molecular mechanisms are as yet unclear. We show that TGN1412 as well as the commercially available CD28 superagonist ANC28.1 induce a delayed but extremely sustained calcium response in human naïve and memory CD4+ T cells but not in cynomolgus T lymphocytes. The sustained Ca++-signal was associated with the activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways and together these events culminated in the rapid de novo synthesis of high amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines, most notably IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Importantly, sustained transmembranous calcium flux, activation of Src-kinases as well as activation of PI3K were found to be absolutely required for CD28SA-mediated production of IFN-gamma and IL-2. Collectively, our data suggest a molecular basis for the severe side effects caused by TGN1412 and impinge upon the relevance of non-human primates as preclinical models for reagents that are supposed to modify the function of human T cells.

  7. Anti-leukemic activity and tolerability of anti-human CD47 monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, E C; Dong, J; Cardoso, R; Zhang, X; Chin, D; Hawkins, R; Dinh, T; Zhou, M; Strake, B; Feng, P-H; Rocca, M; Santos, C Dos; Shan, X; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Shi, F; Kaiser, E; Millar, H J; Fenton, S; Swanson, R; Nemeth, J A; Attar, R M

    2017-01-01

    CD47, a broadly expressed cell surface protein, inhibits cell phagocytosis via interaction with phagocyte-expressed SIRPα. A variety of hematological malignancies demonstrate elevated CD47 expression, suggesting that CD47 may mediate immune escape. We discovered three unique CD47-SIRPα blocking anti-CD47 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with low nano-molar affinity to human and cynomolgus monkey CD47, and no hemagglutination and platelet aggregation activity. To characterize the anti-cancer activity elicited by blocking CD47, the mAbs were cloned into effector function silent and competent Fc backbones. Effector function competent mAbs demonstrated potent activity in vitro and in vivo, while effector function silent mAbs demonstrated minimal activity, indicating that blocking CD47 only leads to a therapeutic effect in the presence of Fc effector function. A non-human primate study revealed that the effector function competent mAb IgG1 C47B222-(CHO) decreased red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit and hemoglobin by >40% at 1 mg/kg, whereas the effector function silent mAb IgG2σ C47B222-(CHO) had minimal impact on RBC indices at 1 and 10 mg/kg. Taken together, our findings suggest that targeting CD47 is an attractive therapeutic anti-cancer approach. However, the anti-cancer activity observed with anti-CD47 mAbs is Fc effector dependent as are the side effects observed on RBC indices. PMID:28234345

  8. Anti-human neutrophil antigen-1a, -1b, and -2 antibodies in neonates and children with immune neutropenias analyzed by extracted granulocyte antigen immunofluorescence assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, Rie; Kurita, Emi; Taniguchi, Kikuyo; Karakawa, Shuhei; Okada, Satoshi; Kihara, Hirotaka; Fujii, Teruhisa; Kobayashi, Masao

    2017-11-01

    Anti-human neutrophil antigen (HNA) antibodies have been implicated in the development of neonatal alloimmune neutropenia (NAN) and autoimmune neutropenia (AIN). There are many conventional assay methods that detect anti-HNA antibodies. However, a method to measure multiple samples and detect several anti-HNA antibodies simultaneously is needed. We developed a new method, the extracted granulocyte antigen immunofluorescence assay (EGIFA), to analyze anti-HNA-1a, -1b, and -2 antibodies in sera. The results obtained by EGIFA were evaluated in comparison with those from several standard assay methods. Anti-HNA antibodies in serum samples from nine familial cases with suspected NAN (n = 19) and children with suspected AIN (n = 88) were also measured by EGIFA. The evaluation of nine serum samples with anti-HNA antibodies suggested that EGIFA demonstrated equivalent specificity and superior sensitivity to monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of granulocyte antigens and had comparable sensitivity to the granulocyte indirect immunofluorescence test. EGIFA successfully detected anti-HNA-1a or -1b antibodies in seven of nine familial cases with suspected NAN. EGIFA detected anti-HNA antibodies in 40.9% of children with suspected AIN. Among them, isolated anti-HNA-1a or -1b antibody was detected in 4.5 or 12.5% of children, respectively, and anti-HNA-2 antibody was identified in 3.4% of children. The 30.8% (16 of 52) of children negative for anti-HNA antibody by EGIFA were positive for anti-HLA antibody. EGIFA facilitated the measurement of anti-HNA-1a, -1b, and/or -2 antibodies in sera. The prompt measurement of anti-HNA antibodies will improve the diagnosis and clinical management of patients with suspected NAN or AIN. © 2017 AABB.

  9. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events.

  10. Development of a complete human anti-human transferrin receptor C antibody as a novel marker of oral dysplasia and oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Kentaro; Nakahata, Shingo; Shimosaki, Shunsuke; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kondo, Yuudai; Baba, Takashi; Taki, Tomohiko; Taniwaki, Masafumi; Kurosawa, Gene; Sudo, Yukio; Okada, Seiji; Sakoda, Sumio; Morishita, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. Up to 20% of oral dysplasia cases have been suggested to undergo malignant transformation to OSCC; however, there are no methods to predict OSCC development. In this study, to identify the genes associated with oral dysplasia progression, we performed genomic copy number analyses of genomic DNA samples isolated from primary oral dysplasia and OSCC via the microdissection method and found elevated expression of transferrin receptor C (TfR1/TFRC) with genomic amplification in oral dysplasia and OSCC. The expression rate of TFRC in OSCC was significantly higher than that in dysplasia, suggesting that OSCC disease progression might be related to TFRC expression. Additionally, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo impacts of a newly established anti-human TFRC monoclonal antibody, which was isolated from a human cDNA library using the phage-display method, on cell proliferation and survival. The anti-TFRC antibody blocked the interaction between transferrin and TFRC and consequently inhibited iron uptake, leading to the iron deprivation-mediated suppression of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. Moreover, we demonstrated that the anti-TFRC antibody efficiently inhibited tumor growth in a murine xenograft OSCC model. Therefore, we suggest our developed complete human anti-human TFRC antibody as a useful, novel treatment for oral dysplasia and OSCC

  11. Pretargeting vs. direct targeting of human betalox5 islet cells subcutaneously implanted in mice using an anti-human islet cell antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozheng; Dou Shuping; Akalin, Ali; Rusckowski, Mary; Streeter, Philip R.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Greiner, Dale L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: We previously demonstrated MORF/cMORF pretargeting of human islets and betalox 5 cells (a human beta cell line) transplanted subcutaneously in mice with the anti-human islet antibody, HPi1. We now compare pretargeting with direct targeting in the beta cell transplant model to evaluate the degree to which target/non-target (T/NT) ratios may be improved by pretargeting. Methods: Specific binding of an anti-human islet antibody HPi1 to the beta cells transplanted subcutaneously in mice was examined against a negative control antibody. We then compared pretargeting by MORF-HPi1 plus 111 In-labeled cMORF to direct targeting by 111 In-labeled HPi1. Results: HPi1 binding to betalox5 human cells in the transplant was shown by immunofluorescence. Normal organ 111 In backgrounds by pretargeting were always lower, although target accumulations were similar. More importantly, the transplant to pancreas and liver ratios was, respectively, 26 and 10 by pretargeting as compared to 9 and 0.6 by direct targeting. Conclusions: Pretargeting greatly improves the T/NT ratios, and based on the estimated endocrine to exocrine ratio within a pancreas, pretargeting may be approaching the sensitivity required for successful imaging of human islets within this organ.

  12. Study of chronic hemolytic anaemia patients in Rio de Janeiro: prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies and the developement aplastic crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANT'ANNA Anadayr L.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of anti-human parvovirus B19 IgG antibodies was determined in sera from 165 chronic hemolytic anemia patients, receiving medical care at Instituto Estadual de Hematologia (IEHE, Rio de Janeiro, during the year of 1994. This sample represents around 10% of the chronic hemolytic anemia patients attending at IEHE. Most of these patients (140 have sickle cell disease. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were detected in 32.1% of patients. No statistically significant difference (p > 0.05 was seen between IgG antibody prevalence in male (27.8% and female (35.5% patients. Anti-B19 IgG antibodies were more frequent in older (37.6% than younger (28.2% than 20 years old patients, although this difference had no statistical significance (p > 0.05. Anti-B19 IgG antibody prevalence showed that 67.9% of patients enrolled in the study were susceptible to B19 acute infection. With the aim to detect acute B19 infection, patients follow up continued until February 1996. During this period four patients presented transient aplastic crisis due to human parvovirus B19 as confirmed by the detection of specific IgM antibodies. All four patients were younger than 20 years old, and 3 were younger than 10 years old. Three of them were sickle cell disease patients. Three of the four acute B19 infection occurred during 1994 springtime.

  13. Application of four anti-human interferon-alpha monoclonal antibodies for immunoassay and comparative analysis of natural interferon-alpha mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, G.; Lundgren, E.; Ekre, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    Four different mouse monoclonal antibodies to human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) were evaluated for application in quantitative and comparative analysis of natural IFN-alpha mixtures. Binding to IFN-alpha subtypes in solution revealed individual reactivity patterns. These patterns changed if the IFN-alpha molecules were immobilized either passively to a surface or bound by another antibody. Also, substitution of a single amino acid in IFN-alpha 2 affected the binding, apparently by altering the conformation. Isoelectric focusing of three natural IFN-alpha preparations from different sources, followed by immunoblotting, resulted in individual patterns with each of the four mAbs and also demonstrated variation in the composition of the IFN-alpha preparations. None of the mAbs was subtype specific, but by combining the different mAbs, and also applying polyclonal anti-human IFN-alpha antibodies, it was possible to design sensitive sandwich ELISAs with broad or more limited IFN-alpha subtype specificity

  14. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody titers in injection drug users compared to sexually infected individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongertz Vera

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Sera from infected injection drug users (IDU have shown to have antibodies against synthetic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 envelope peptides more frequently. In this study, reactivity of 48 IDU plasma were compared to 60 plasmas obtained from sexually infected individuals (S. The overall reactivity of plasma from IDU compared to S was higher, and the reactivity titers were much higher for IDU plasma than S. IDU plasma also showed a broader antibody response. The higher reactivity titers were observed mainly for the gp41 immunodominant epitope and V3 peptides corresponding to the consensus sequences of HIV-1 subtypes/variants prevalent in Brazil (B, F, C indicating the specificity in the higher immune response of IDU.

  15. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus-1 antibody titers in injection drug users compared to sexually infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongertz, Vera; Ouverney, Elaine Priscilla; Teixeira, Sylvia L M; Silva-de-Jesus, Carlos; Hacker, Mariana A; Morgado, Mariza G; Bastos, Francisco I

    2003-03-01

    Sera from infected injection drug users (IDU) have shown to have antibodies against synthetic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) envelope peptides more frequently. In this study, reactivity of 48 IDU plasma were compared to 60 plasmas obtained from sexually infected individuals (S). The overall reactivity of plasma from IDU compared to S was higher, and the reactivity titers were much higher for IDU plasma than S. IDU plasma also showed a broader antibody response. The higher reactivity titers were observed mainly for the gp41 immunodominant epitope and V3 peptides corresponding to the consensus sequences of HIV-1 subtypes/variants prevalent in Brazil (B, F, C) indicating the specificity in the higher immune response of IDU.

  16. Establishment of H2Mab-119, an Anti-Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 Monoclonal Antibody, Against Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Itai, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Takuro; Chang, Yao-Wen; Harada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-12-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in breast cancer and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. In addition, HER2 expression has been reported in other cancers, such as gastric, colorectal, lung, and pancreatic cancers. An anti-HER2 humanized antibody, trastuzumab, leads to significant survival benefits in patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancers and gastric cancers. Herein, we established a novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb), H 2 Mab-119 (IgG 1 , kappa), and characterized its efficacy against pancreatic cancers using flow cytometry, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses. H 2 Mab-119 reacted with pancreatic cancer cell lines, such as KLM-1, Capan-2, and MIA PaCa-2, but did not react with PANC-1 in flow cytometry analysis. Western blot analysis also revealed a moderate signal for KLM-1 and a weak signal for MIA PaCa-2, although H 2 Mab-119 reacted strongly with LN229/HER2 cells. Finally, immunohistochemical analyses with H 2 Mab-119 revealed sensitive and specific reactions against breast and colon cancers but did not react with pancreatic cancers, indicating that H 2 Mab-119 is useful for detecting HER2 overexpression in pancreatic cancers using flow cytometry and Western blot analyses.

  17. Radiolabeling of anti-human prostatic specific membrane antigen antibody with 99Tcm and its biodistribution in nude mice bearing human prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Shaohua; Shen Jiangfan; Tao Rong; Ji Xiaowen; Wang Yancheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study the binding affinity of 99 Tc m labeled anti-human prostatic specific membrane antigen (PSMA) monoclonal antibody (McAb) J591 to prostate cancer cells and the biodistribution of 99 Tc m -J591 in nude mice bearing human prostate cancer. Methods: The McAb J591 was labeled with vTcm by improved Schwarz method and the labeled McAb was purified by Sephadex G-50. The binding affinity of J591 with prostate cancer cells was measured by Flow Cytometry. The nude mice bearing PSMA-positive C4-2 prostate carcinoma xenografts were served as experiment groups, mice with PSMA-negative pc3 tumors served as controls. The biodistribution of 99 Tc m -J591 were carried out in both model nude mice. Results: The radiolabeling efficiency of 99 Tc m -J591 was 78.9±6.2%, and radiochemical purity was more than 90% after purification. The 99 Tc m -J591 showed a good combination with PSMA-positive C4-2 cells and no combination with PSMA-negative PC3 cells in vitro. The biodistribution results showed that 99 Tcm-J591 was accumulated in tumor tissue during the 2-24 hours after injection in experiment groups, and no significant uptake in control group. The uptake of 99 Tcm-J591 in tumor tissue reached a maximum 15.91±5.16 % ID/g in experimental group at 12h post-injection. There was a significant difference compared with controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: The monoclonal antibody J591 exhibits an excellent immuno-reactivity and tumor targeting property, and it may be used in diagnosis and target therapy of prostate cancer. (authors)

  18. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor humanized monoclonal antibody R3 in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Normando Iznaga; Morales, Alejo Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Torres, Idania Caballero; Fernandez, Eduardo; Gomez, Jose A

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-hEGF-r) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) R3 was investigated following intravenous injection in normal Wistar rats. Serum disappearance curves were best fit by a two-compartment model having a mean distribution half-life (t{sub (1(2{alpha}}{sub ))}) of 0.250 h and a mean elimination (t{sub (1(2{beta}}{sub ))}) of 13.89 h. Among the various organs, a little accumulation of the radiolabeled antibody was found only in kidneys. Biodistribution and dosimetry studies in humans were performed by extrapolation of the animal data to humans. Absorbed dose to normal organs and the remainder of the whole body were estimated using the medical internal radiation dose formula, and dose contributions from radioactivity in transit through the gastrointestinal tract were estimated using a compartment model. Extrapolated values of radiation absorbed dose to normal organs in rads per millicurie administered were whole body, 0.0085; lower large intestine wall, 0.0898; small intestine, 0.0530; upper large intestine wall, 0.0731; and kidneys, 0.0455. The effective dose equivalent predicted was 0.0162 rem/mCi and the effective dose was found to be 0.015 rem/mCi. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry information obtained in this study, a diagnostic phase I clinical trial with {sup 99m}Tc-labeled humanized MAb R3 conjugate in patients should be supported.

  19. Pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor humanized monoclonal antibody R3 in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Normando Iznaga; Morales, Alejo Morales; Duconge, Jorge; Torres, Idania Caballero; Fernandez, Eduardo; Gomez, Jose A.

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of 99m Tc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-hEGF-r) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) R3 was investigated following intravenous injection in normal Wistar rats. Serum disappearance curves were best fit by a two-compartment model having a mean distribution half-life (t (1(2α)) ) of 0.250 h and a mean elimination (t (1(2β)) ) of 13.89 h. Among the various organs, a little accumulation of the radiolabeled antibody was found only in kidneys. Biodistribution and dosimetry studies in humans were performed by extrapolation of the animal data to humans. Absorbed dose to normal organs and the remainder of the whole body were estimated using the medical internal radiation dose formula, and dose contributions from radioactivity in transit through the gastrointestinal tract were estimated using a compartment model. Extrapolated values of radiation absorbed dose to normal organs in rads per millicurie administered were whole body, 0.0085; lower large intestine wall, 0.0898; small intestine, 0.0530; upper large intestine wall, 0.0731; and kidneys, 0.0455. The effective dose equivalent predicted was 0.0162 rem/mCi and the effective dose was found to be 0.015 rem/mCi. On the basis of the pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry information obtained in this study, a diagnostic phase I clinical trial with 99m Tc-labeled humanized MAb R3 conjugate in patients should be supported

  20. Anti-human tissue factor antibody ameliorated intestinal ischemia reperfusion-induced acute lung injury in human tissue factor knock-in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interaction between the coagulation and inflammation systems plays an important role in the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Anti-coagulation is an attractive option for ARDS treatment, and this has promoted development of new antibodies. However, preclinical trials for these antibodies are often limited by the high cost and availability of non-human primates. In the present study, we developed a novel alternative method to test the role of a humanized anti-tissue factor mAb in acute lung injury with transgenic mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human tissue factor knock-in (hTF-KI transgenic mice and a novel humanized anti-human tissue factor mAb (anti-hTF mAb, CNTO859 were developed. The hTF-KI mice showed a normal and functional expression of hTF. The anti-hTF mAb specifically blocked the pro-coagulation activity of brain extracts from the hTF-KI mice and human, but not from wild type mice. An extrapulmonary ARDS model was used by intestinal ischemia-reperfusion. Significant lung tissue damage in hTF-KI mice was observed after 2 h reperfusion. Administration of CNTO859 (5 mg/kg, i.v. attenuated the severity of lung tissue injury, decreased the total cell counts and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and reduced Evans blue leakage. In addition, the treatment significantly reduced alveolar fibrin deposition, and decreased tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 activity in the serum. This treatment also down-regulated cytokine expression and reduced cell death in the lung. CONCLUSIONS: This novel anti-hTF antibody showed beneficial effects on intestinal ischemia-reperfusion induced acute lung injury, which merits further investigation for clinical usage. In addition, the use of knock-in transgenic mice to test the efficacy of antibodies against human-specific proteins is a novel strategy for preclinical studies.

  1. Targeted radiotherapy potentiates the cytotoxicity of a novel anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody and the adenovirus encoding soluble TRAIL in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafat, W.; Arafat, W.; Zhou, T.; Naoum, G.E.; Buchsbaum, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) induces a death signal following binding to death receptors (DR4, DR5). We have developed a novel anti-human DR-5 monoclonal antibody (TRA-8) and adenoviral encoding TRAIL (Ad/TRAIL). Herein, we are testing the combined effect of radiotherapy and TRA-8 or Ad TRAIL in prostate cancer cells. Human prostate cancer cell lines LnCap, PC-3 and DU145 were used in this study. Cells were treated either with TRA-8 alone or Ad/TRAIL, radiation alone, or a combination of each at different doses and intervals. Cell survival using the MTS assay and colony forming assay were used to determine radiosensitization. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect bax and bcl-2. Real-time PCR was performed on mRNA of treated prostate cancer cell lines. Finally, a murine model of subcutaneous prostate cancer was used to evaluate the in vivo effect. Cell survival assays detected by MTS assay showed that prostate cell lines treated with a combination of radiation and TRA-8 showed significantly lower survival than cells treated with either radiation or TRA-8 alone. Colony forming assay and cell proliferation assays showed increased killing after combination treatment with TRA-8 or Ad/TRAIL and radiation, than either single agent alone. Mechanistic studies showed that the killing effect was due to induction of apoptosis mostly by increased expression of bax in TRA-8 or Ad/TRAIL treated cells. Additionally, RT-PCR showed an increased copy number of bax in most cells treated with TRA-8 and radiation. It is concluded that radiation and TRA-8 or Ad/ TRAIL produced a synergistic effect in refractory prostrate cancer.

  2. HAHA--nothing to laugh about. Measuring the immunogenicity (human anti-human antibody response) induced by humanized monoclonal antibodies applying ELISA and SPR technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechansky, Andreas

    2010-01-05

    Immunogenicity induced by passively applied proteins is a serious issue because it is directly related to the patient's safety. The out-come of an immune reaction to a therapeutic protein can range from transient appearance of antibodies without any clinical significance to severe life threatening conditions. Within this article, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methodology to measure immunogenicity are compared and the pros and cons are discussed.

  3. Labelling of anti-human bladder tumor chimeric antibody with 99Tcm and radioimmunoimaging of bladder carcinoma xenograft in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chunli; Wang Rongfu; Fu Zhanli; Bai Yin; Ding Yi; Yu Lizhang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro immunoreactivity and in vivo tissue distribution, tumor targeting property of anti-human bladder tumor human-murine chimeric antibody (ch-BDI) labeled with 99 Tc m and to investigate its possibility for being used in guiding diagnosis and guiding therapy of bladder cancer. Methods: The ch-BDI was labeled with 99 Tc m by improved Schwarz method and the labeled antibody was purified by Sephadex G-50. Labeling yield and radiochemical purity were measured by paper chromatography. The immunoreactive fraction and association constant (K a ) were measured by Lindmo method and Scatchard analysis, respectively. 11.1 MBq (30 μg) 99 Tc m -ch-BDI was intravenously injected into nude mice bearing human bladder cancer xenografts in the right thigh and radioimmunoimaging (RII) was performed 2, 6, 20 and 24 h postinjection. The images were processed by region of interest (ROI) method to acquire the counts of whole body and the tumor and the counts ratios of tumor to contralateral normal tissue or to tissues of other non-tumor bearing organs. The mice were killed after 24 h postinjection imaging and tissue distribution was measured. %ID/g and target to nontarget (T/NT) ratios were calculated. Results: The labeling yield and radiochemical purity of 99 Tc m -ch-BDI were (66.5±7.3)% and >90%, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was 76% and K a was 3.56 x 10 9 L/mol. RII showed that the tumor was clearly visualized 6 h postinjection and becoming clearer along with time prolonging. The radioactivity of whole body decreased rapidly with time, whereas the radioactivity of the tumor decreased slowly. The T/NT ratios was increased with time. Biodistribution results showed that tumor uptake was 17.4%ID/g 24 h postinjection. T/NT ratios were very high except for the kidney. T/NT ratios for brain, muscle, intestinal wall, bone and heart wall were 136.0, 55.1, 39.3, 29.7 and 27.9, respectively. Conclusion: 99 Tc m -ch-BDI exhibits excellent

  4. CD25+ B-1a Cells Express Aicda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Kaku

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available B-1a cells are innate-like B-lymphocytes producing natural antibodies. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, a product of the Aicda gene, plays a central role in class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation in B cells. Although a role for Aicda in B-1a cells has been suggested on the basis of experiments with knock out (KO mice, whether B-1a cells express Aicda, and if so, which B-1a cell subpopulation expresses Aicda, remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that B-1 cells express Aicda, but at a level below that expressed by germinal center (GC B cells. We previously reported that B-1a cells can be subdivided based on CD25 expression. We show here that B-1a cell Aicda expression is concentrated in the CD25+ B-1a cell subpopulation. These results suggest the possibility that previous studies of memory B cells identified on the basis of Aicda expression may have inadvertently included an unknown number of CD25+ B-1a cells. Although B-1a cells develop normally in the absence of Aicda, a competitive reconstitution assay reveals enhanced vigor for AID KO B-1a cell bone marrow (BM progenitors, as compared with wild-type BM B-1 cell progenitors. These results suggest that AID inhibits the development of B-1a cells from BM B-1 cell progenitors in a competitive environment.

  5. Chimeric Anti-Human Podoplanin Antibody NZ-12 of Lambda Light Chain Exerts Higher Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Compared with NZ-8 of Kappa Light Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Abe, Shinji; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Fujii, Yuki; Yamada, Shinji; Murata, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-02-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane 36-kDa glycoprotein, is expressed not only in normal cells, such as renal epithelial cells (podocytes), lymphatic endothelial cells, and pulmonary type I alveolar cells, but also in cancer cells, including brain tumors and lung squamous cell carcinomas. Podoplanin activates platelet aggregation by binding to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2) on platelets, and the podoplanin/CLEC-2 interaction facilitates blood/lymphatic vessel separation. We previously produced neutralizing anti-human podoplanin monoclonal antibody (mAb), clone NZ-1 (rat IgG 2a , lambda), which neutralizes the podoplanin/CLEC-2 interaction and inhibits platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis. Human-rat chimeric antibody, NZ-8, was previously developed using variable regions of NZ-1 and human constant regions of heavy chain (IgG 1 ) and light chain (kappa chain). Although NZ-8 showed high antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against human podoplanin-expressing cancer cells, the binding affinity of NZ-8 was lower than that of NZ-1. Herein, we produced a novel human-rat chimeric antibody, NZ-12, the constant regions of which consist of IgG 1 heavy chain and lambda light chain. Using flow cytometry, we demonstrated that the binding affinity of NZ-12 was much higher than that of NZ-8. Furthermore, ADCC and CDC activities of NZ-12 were significantly increased against glioblastoma cell lines (LN319 and D397) and lung cancer cell line (PC-10). These results suggested that NZ-12 could become a promising therapeutic antibody against podoplanin-expressing brain tumors and lung cancers.

  6. Generation of Affibody ligands binding interleukin-2 receptor alpha/CD25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönwall, Caroline; Snelders, Eveline; Palm, Anna Jarelöv; Eriksson, Fredrik; Herne, Nina; Ståhl, Stefan

    2008-06-01

    Affibody molecules specific for human IL-2Ralpha, the IL-2 (interleukin-2) receptor alpha subunit, also known as CD25, were selected by phage-display technology from a combinatorial protein library based on the 58-residue Protein A-derived Z domain. The IL-2R system plays a major role in T-cell activation and the regulation of cellular immune responses. Moreover, CD25 has been found to be overexpressed in organ rejections, a number of autoimmune diseases and T-cell malignancies. The phage-display selection using Fc-fused target protein generated 16 unique Affibody molecules targeting CD25. The two most promising binders were characterized in more detail using biosensor analysis and demonstrated strong and selective binding to CD25. Kinetic biosensor analysis revealed that the two monomeric Affibody molecules bound to CD25 with apparent affinities of 130 and 240 nM respectively. The Affibody molecules were, on biosensor analysis, found to compete for the same binding site as the natural ligand IL-2 and the IL-2 blocking monoclonal antibody 2A3. Hence the Affibody molecules were assumed to have an overlapping binding site with IL-2 and antibodies targeting the IL-2 blocking Tac epitope (for example, the monoclonal antibodies Daclizumab and Basiliximab, both of which have been approved for therapeutic use). Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy and flow-cytometric analysis of CD25-expressing cells demonstrated that the selected Affibody molecules bound to CD4+ CD25+ PMBCs (peripheral-blood mononuclear cells), the IL-2-dependent cell line NK92 and phytohaemagglutinin-activated PMBCs. The potential use of the CD25-binding Affibody molecules as targeting agents for medical imaging and for therapeutic applications is discussed.

  7. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human CD34 Monoclonal Antibody in Ascetic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Kazemi, Tohid; Aghebati Maleki, Ali; Sineh sepehr, Koushan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies or specific antibodies are now an essential tool of biomedical research and are of great commercial and medical value. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD34 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Methods: For large scale production of monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD34 were injected into t...

  8. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Ezzatifar; Jafar Majidi; Behzad Baradaran; Leili Aghebati Maleki; Jalal Abdolalizadeh; Mehdi Yousefi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies again...

  9. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human CD34 Monoclonal Antibody in Ascetic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Kazemi, Tohid; Aghebati Maleki, Ali; Sineh sepehr, Koushan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies or specific antibodies are now an essential tool of biomedical research and are of great commercial and medical value. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD34 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Methods: For large scale production of monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD34 were injected into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. 5 ml ascitic fluid was harvested from each mouse in two times. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. The ascitic fluid was examined for class and subclasses by ELISA mouse mAb isotyping Kit. mAb was purified from ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose. Purity of monoclonal antibody was monitored by SDS -PAGE and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD34 by hybridoma technology were prepared. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was kappa. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could be a useful tool for isolation, purification and characterization of human hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:24312838

  10. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human CD34 Monoclonal Antibody in Ascetic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushan Sineh sepehr

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies or specific antibodies are now an essential tool of biomedical research and are of great commercial and medical value. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD34 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Methods: For large scale production of monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD34 were injected into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. 5 ml ascitic fluid was harvested from each mouse in two times. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. The ascitic fluid was examined for class and subclasses by ELISA mouse mAb isotyping Kit. mAb was purified from ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose. Purity of monoclonal antibody was monitored by SDS -PAGE and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD34 by hybridoma technology were prepared. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was kappa. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could be a useful tool for isolation, purification and characterization of human hematopoietic stem cells.

  11. Different thresholds of T cell activation regulate FIV infection of CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25- cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Anjali; Garg, Himanshu; Tompkins, Mary B.; Tompkins, Wayne A.

    2005-01-01

    Cellular activation plays an important role in retroviral replication. Previously, we have shown that CD4 + CD25 + T cells by the virtue of their partially activated phenotype represent ideal candidates for a productive feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection. In the present study, we extended our previous observations with regard to FIV replication in CD4 + CD25 + and CD4 + CD25 - cells under different stimulation conditions. Both CD4 + CD25 + and CD4 + CD25 - cells remain latently infected in the absence of IL-2 or concanvalinA (ConA), respectively; harboring a replication competent provirus capable of reactivation several days post-infection. While CD4 + CD25 + cells require low levels of exogenous IL-2 and virus inputs for an efficient FIV replication, CD4 + CD25 - T cells can only be productively infected in the presence of either high concentrations of IL-2 or high virus titers, even in the absence of mitogenic stimulation. Interestingly, while high virus input activates CD4 + CD25 - cells to replicate FIV, it induces apoptosis in a high percentage of CD4 + CD25 + T cells. High IL-2 concentrations but not high virus inputs lead to surface upregulation of CD25 and significant cellular proliferation in CD4 + CD25 - cells. These results suggest that CD4 + CD25 + and CD4 + CD25 - T cells have different activation requirements which can be modulated by both viral and cytokine stimuli to reach threshold activation levels in order to harbor a productive FIV infection. This holds implications in vivo for CD4 + CD25 + and CD4 + CD25 - cells to serve as potential reservoirs of a productive and latent FIV infection

  12. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori. PMID:25789225

  13. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ezzatifar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori.

  14. Changes and clinical significance of CD4+CD25+CD127- regulatory T cells in Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jintao; Yu Peiling; Dong Jingwei; Liao Qihong; Liu Dongliang; Zeng Hongyi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of Graves disease by observing the changes of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - regulatory T cells (Treg) population in the patients. Methods: Flow cytometry was used to detect the proportion of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg of CD4 + T cells in 90 Graves disease patients (Graves disease group) and 50 healthy adults (control group). Thyroid function and autoantibody levels were determined simultaneously. The t test was adopted for comparison between groups. The relationship between CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg and thyroid function was analyzed by linear correlation analysis. Results: The percentages of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg in Graves disease group and control group were 1.39%±1.09% and 4.59%±1.14% separately. There was significant difference between the two groups (t=16.4, P<0.01). There were negative correlation between CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg percentages and total triiodothyronine, total thyroxine,free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine and thyrotropin receptor antibody,thyroglobulin antibody, thyroid microsomal antibody (r=-0.62, -0.65, -0.56, -0.71, -0.50, -0.15, all P<0.01). Conclusions: The reduction of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg percentages in Graves disease group and close relations of CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg with thyroid function and thyroid autoantibody levels suggest that CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - Treg decrease in the number may be associated with the onset of Graves disease. CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - may be the specific marker of Treg. (authors)

  15. Factors associated with anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies in patients supported with continuous-flow devices and effect on probability of transplant and post-transplant outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alba, Ana C; Tinckam, Kathryn; Foroutan, Farid

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One major disadvantage of ventricular assist device (VAD) therapy is the development of human-leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies. We aimed to identify factors associated with HLA antibodies during continuous flow (CF)-VAD support and assess the effect on transplant probability...

  16. CD4+ CD25+ cells in type 1 diabetic patients with other autoimmune manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia S. Abd Elaziz

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple autoimmune disorders in diabetics may indicate underlying primary defects of immune regulation. The study aims at estimation of defects of CD4+ CD25+high cells among diabetic children with multiple autoimmune manifestations, and identification of disease characteristics in those children. Twenty-two cases with type 1 diabetes associated with other autoimmune diseases were recruited from the Diabetic Endocrine and Metabolic Pediatric Unit (DEMPU, Cairo University along with twenty-one normal subjects matched for age and sex as a control group. Their anthropometric measurements, diabetic profiles and glycemic control were recorded. Laboratory investigations included complete blood picture, glycosylated hemoglobin, antithyroid antibodies, celiac antibody panel and inflammatory bowel disease markers when indicated. Flow cytometric analysis of T-cell subpopulation was performed using anti-CD3, anti-CD4, anti-CD8, anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies. Three cases revealed a proportion of CD4+ CD25+high below 0.1% and one case had zero counts. However, this observation did not mount to a significant statistical difference between the case and control groups neither in percentage nor absolute numbers. Significant statistical differences were observed between the case and the control groups regarding their height, weight centiles, as well as hemoglobin percentage, white cell counts and the absolute lymphocytic counts. We concluded that, derangements of CD4+ CD25+high cells may exist among diabetic children with multiple autoimmune manifestations indicating defects of immune controllers.

  17. Biodistribution of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody h-R3 in a xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Morales, Alejo; Duconge, Jorge; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando

    1999-01-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) h-R3 is an (IgG 1 ), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R. It was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with H-125 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Results were compared with its murine version of the MAb ior-egf/r3. Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10 μg/100 μCi of 99m Tc-labeled MAbs. Immunoreactivity of 99m Tc-labeled MAbs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on H-125 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions was determined by the Lindmo method. Among all organs, significant accumulation was found in serum (27.05 ± 2.08 %ID/g) and tumor (3.903 ± 0.89 %ID/g) at 4 h after injection. These values decreased to 5.03 ± 0.50 %ID/g and 2.19 ± 0.56 %ID/g for serum and tumor, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was found to be 0.70, with a correlation coefficient r=0.9984. With the good biodistribution and tumor uptake of the 99m Tc-labeled humanized antibody h-R3, a phase I diagnostic clinical trial of tumor with epithelial origin should be pursued

  18. Biodistribution of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody h-R3 in a xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Morales, Alejo; Duconge, Jorge; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando E-mail: normando@ict.cim.sld.cu

    1999-04-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) h-R3 is an (IgG{sub 1}), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R. It was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with H-125 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Results were compared with its murine version of the MAb ior-egf/r3. Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10 {mu}g/100 {mu}Ci of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled MAbs. Immunoreactivity of {sup 99m}Tc-labeled MAbs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on H-125 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions was determined by the Lindmo method. Among all organs, significant accumulation was found in serum (27.05 {+-} 2.08 %ID/g) and tumor (3.903 {+-} 0.89 %ID/g) at 4 h after injection. These values decreased to 5.03 {+-} 0.50 %ID/g and 2.19 {+-} 0.56 %ID/g for serum and tumor, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was found to be 0.70, with a correlation coefficient r=0.9984. With the good biodistribution and tumor uptake of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled humanized antibody h-R3, a phase I diagnostic clinical trial of tumor with epithelial origin should be pursued.

  19. Use of CD25 as an immunohistochemical marker for acquired ocular toxoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Miyamoto

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Toxoplasmosis is the most common cause of posterior infectious uveitis worldwide. It is often impossible to determine its congenital or acquired nature. Interleukin-2 (IL-2 in peripheral blood has been described as a possible marker for acquired toxoplasmosis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the histopathological characteristics of ocular toxoplasmosis cases using CD25 as a marker for the expression of interleukin-2. METHODS: Ten formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded enucleated globes from ten immunocompetent patients with clinical diagnosis of toxoplasmosis were evaluated. Four patients had the acquired form of ocular toxoplasmosis (positive IgM while six were IgM negative and IgG positive for toxoplasmosis. Histopathological slides were reviewed for the extension of the retinal necrosis, number of toxo cysts, the granulomatous inflammatory reaction, the presence of T and B cells within the choroid and the IL-2 expression. Immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies was performed to observe the expression of CD4, CD8, CD20, CD25, and CD68. RESULTS: The histopathological evaluation disclosed no differences between acquired and the other ocular toxoplasmosis cases regarding the characteristics studied. However, CD25 showed a higher expression of IL-2 on the 4 acquired cases of ocular toxoplasmosis compared to the remainders. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the use of CD25 as a marker for interleukin-2 could differentiate acquired ocular toxoplasmosis.

  20. Characterization of a Novel Anti-Human HB-EGF Monoclonal Antibody Applicable for Paraffin-Embedded Tissues and Diagnosis of HB-EGF-Related Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Ryo; Takagi, Mika; Akatsuka, Jun-Ichi; Ono, Ken-Ichiro; Kishi, Yoshiro; Mekada, Eisuke

    2016-04-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a member of the EGF family of growth factors that bind to and activate the EGF receptor (EGFR/ErbB1) and ErbB4. HB-EGF plays pivotal roles in pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Thus, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for HB-EGF detection could be an important tool in the therapeutic diagnosis of HB-EGF-related cancers and other diseases. However, few mAbs, especially those applicable for immunohistochemistry (IHC), have been established to date. In this study, we generated a clone of hybridoma-derived mAb 2-108 by immunizing mice with recombinant human HB-EGF protein expressed by human cells. The mAb 2-108 specifically bound to human HB-EGF but not to mouse HB-EGF and was successful in immunoblotting, even under reducing conditions, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence for unfixed as well as paraformaldehyde-fixed cells. Notably, this mAb was effective in IHC of paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. Epitope mapping analysis showed that mAb 2-108 recognized the N-terminal prodomain in HB-EGF. These results indicate that this new anti-HB-EGF mAb 2-108 would be useful in the diagnosis of HB-EGF-related cancers and would be a strong tool in both basic and clinical research on HB-EGF.

  1. Influence of radiotherapy on CD4+ CD25high regulatory cells in peripheral blood of NPC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Li; Ding Qian; Song Yingqiu; Cao Rubo; Yao Junxia; Huang Shiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The current study was designed to investigate the changes in peripheral CD4 + CD25 high regulatory T (CD4 + CD25 high Tr) cells in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and the influence of radiotherapy on immunity function. Methods: The peripheral blood was collected from 36 patients with NPC and 30 healthy controls. By using monoclonal antibodies, the blood samples were evaluated with flow cytometry for lymphocyte subsets and Tr cells. Results: The ratio of CD4 + /CD8 + in the NPC group was not significantly less than that in the healthy controls (P>0.05), but the prevalence of the CD4 + CD25 high Tr cells was significantly higher than that of the healthy group [(2.76 ± 1.06)% versus (2.06 ± 0.98)%, P + CD25 high Tr cells was higher than before it [(4.88 ± 1.02)%, P + CD25 high Tr cells in peripheral blood of NPC patients with or without radiotherapy was significantly higher than those in healthy controls, which may be related to immunosupression and tumor progression in such patients. This finding suggests that CD4 + CD25 high Tr cells in peripheral blood of NPC patients can be a useful index for monitoring the immunity function. (authors)

  2. Neuropilin-1highCD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Exhibit Primary Negative Immunoregulation in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lei Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs appear to be involved in sepsis-induced immune dysfunction; neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1 was identified as a surface marker for CD4+CD25+Tregs. In the current study, we investigated the negative immunoregulation of Nrp-1highCD4+CD25+Tregs and the potential therapeutic value of Nrp-1 in sepsis. Splenic CD4+CD25+Tregs from cecal ligation and puncture (CLP mouse models were further segregated into Nrp-1highTregs and Nrp-1lowTregs; they were cocultured with CD4+CD25−  T cells. The expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor-3 (Foxp-3, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4, membrane associated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-βm+, apoptotic rate, and secretive ability [including TGF-β and interleukin-10 (IL-10] for various types of Tregs, as well as the immunosuppressive ability of Tregs on CD4+CD25−  T cells, were determined. Meanwhile, the impact of recombinant Nrp-1 polyclonal antibody on the demethylation of Foxp-3-TSDR (Treg-specific demethylated region was measured in in vitro study. Sepsis per se markedly promoted the expression of Nrp-1 of CD4+CD25+Tregs. Foxp-3/CTLA-4/TGF-βm+ of Nrp-1highTregs were upregulated by septic challenge. Nrp-1highTregs showed strong resilience to apoptosis and secretive ability and the strongest immunosuppressive ability on CD4+CD25−  T cells. In the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the recombinant Nrp-1 polyclonal antibody reduced the demethylation of Foxp-3-TSDR. Nrp-1highTregs might reveal primary negative immunoregulation in sepsis; Nrp-1 could represent a new potential therapeutic target for the study of immune regulation in sepsis.

  3. Therapeutic Effect of CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Amplified In Vitro on Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Jie Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to explore whether the adoptive transfusion of autologous CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+ Tregs has a therapeutic effect on Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN model rats, and it provides new experimental and theoretical bases for the immunotherapy of Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. Methods: CD4+CD25+ Tregs were sorted from the spleens of rats using immunomagnetic bead separation techniques combined with flow cytometry. Their in vitro inhibitory function was determined using a lymphocyte proliferation inhibition test, and their purity was confirmed by flow cytometry. Cells were stimulated using CD3/CD28 monoclonal antibodies and were cultured in culture medium containing interleukin 2 (IL-2, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β and rapamycin. After 15 days of amplification, CD4+CD25+ Tregs were collected and transfused into EAN model rats. Changes in the pathology and electron microscopical morphology of rat sciatic nerves in the normal group, untreated group, low-dose group (2 × 107 and high-dose group (4 × 107 were observed, and the expression of CD4+CD25+FOXP3 in peripheral blood in the four groups of rats was detected by flow cytometry. Results: Compared with rats in the untreated group, rats in the treatment groups had significantly reduced infiltration of inflammatory cells in the sciatic nerve, as well as myelin and axonal damage. Additionally, the CD4+CD25+ Tregs levels in peripheral blood were significantly higher than those in the untreated group (P< 0. 05. Moreover, the therapeutic effect became more significant with an increase in the dose of adoptive transfusion. Conclusion: Adoptive transfusion of CD4+CD25+ Tregs into EAN model rats has significant therapeutic effects.

  4. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, or interferon (IFN)-γ on either protein or mRNA levels. The anergic state of CD4+CD25+ T cells is not reversible by the addition of anti-CD28, anti–CTLA-4, anti–transforming growth factor β, or anti–IL-10 antibody. However, the refractory state of CD4+CD25+ T cells was partially reversible by the addition of IL-2 or IL-4. These data demonstrate that human blood contains a resident T cell population with potent regulatory properties. PMID:11390435

  5. Comparison of the Number of Peripheral Blood CD4+CD25+ T Cells in Unexplained Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion Patients with Normal Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Eslami

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Undoubtedly, reproduction is a necessity for survival and successful pregnancy is an immunological paradox. In the present study, we investigated the proportional changes of CD4+CD25bright T cells, CD4+CD25dim T cells in peripheral blood in unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortions (URSA and compared it with normal pregnant women by antibody monoclonal method. Methods: The study group comprised of women with miscarriages of unexplained etiology who had normal karyotypes, anticardiolipin antibodies, prolactin levels and normal spousal spermograms. They did not have polycystic ovaries and also did not receive any drugs at the time of the study. PBLs lymphocytes were isolated, then FITC-conjugated and anti-CD4 and PE-conjugated anti-CD25 antibody levels were measured. Then results of the study and control group were analyzed and compared. Results: The absolute number of CD25 bright cells in the CD4‏+T cells in peripheral blood was statistically significantly lower in the study group as compared to the control group(P=0.000. The absolute number of CD4+CD25dimT cells in peripheral blood was statistically significantly higher in the study group as compared to the control group (P=0.000. Conclusion: As decrease in the number of CD4+CD25+Tcells or their functional deficiency may be linked with miscarriage, CD4+CD25+‏ Tells could serve as a novel biomarker for monitoring in URSA patients, but more studies are needed in this field.

  6. TLR5 signaling enhances the proliferation of human allogeneic CD40-activated B cell induced CD4hiCD25+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Lung Chan

    Full Text Available Although diverse functions of different toll-like receptors (TLR on human natural regulatory T cells have been demonstrated recently, the role of TLR-related signals on human induced regulatory T cells remain elusive. Previously our group developed an ex vivo high-efficient system in generating human alloantigen-specific CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells from naïve CD4(+CD25(- T cells using allogeneic CD40-activated B cells as stimulators. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR5-related signals on the generation and function of these novel CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. It was found that induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells expressed an up-regulated level of TLR5 compared to their precursors. The blockade of TLR5 using anti-TLR5 antibodies during the co-culture decreased CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells proliferation by induction of S phase arrest. The S phase arrest was associated with reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, TLR5 blockade did not decrease the CTLA-4, GITR and FOXP3 expressions, and the suppressive function of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. In conclusion, we discovered a novel function of TLR5-related signaling in enhancing the proliferation of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells by promoting S phase progress but not involved in the suppressive function of human CD40-activated B cell-induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells, suggesting a novel role of TLR5-related signals in the generation of induced regulatory T cells.

  7. CD25 shedding by human natural occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells does not inhibit the action of IL-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Lauritsen, Jens Peter Holst

    2009-01-01

    Tregs are known to inhibit CD4+ T cell in a contact-dependent manner, but at the same time, various suppressive factors are secreted. We, here, demonstrate that human naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Tregs are able to shed large amounts of soluble CD25 upon activation. Secretion of sCD25 could add......Regulatory T (Treg) cells are important for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance and inhibition of pathogenic T-cell responses. Therefore, they are important for the limitation of chronic inflammation but can also be deleterious by e.g. limiting antitumour immune responses. Natural occurring...... to the inhibitory effect of Tregs as such secretion in other settings has been proposed to act as a sink for local IL-2. However, we here demonstrate that supernatant from human Tregs containing high concentration of sCD25 does not inhibit proliferation of CD4+CD25(-) T cells or inhibit the action of IL-2...

  8. Preferential replication of FIV in activated CD4+CD25+T cells independent of cellular proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Anjali; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W.; Garg, Himanshu; Tompkins, Wayne A.F.; Tompkins, Mary B.

    2004-01-01

    Studies attempting to identify reservoirs of HIV-1 latency have documented that the virus persists as both a latent and productive infection in subsets of CD4 + cells. Reports regarding establishment of a stable HIV-1 infection in quiescent T cells in vitro, however, are controversial. In the present study, we investigated the susceptibility of naive and activated CD4 + cell subsets (distinguished by differential expression of CD25) to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection, their ability to replicate the virus, and potentially act as a reservoir for virus persistence in infected animals. While both CD4 + CD25 + and CD4 + CD25 - cells are susceptible to FIV infection in vitro and in vivo, only CD4 + CD25 + cells produce infectious virions when cultured with interleukin-2 (IL-2). Latently infected CD4 + CD25 - cells produce infectious virions following ConcanvalinA (ConA) stimulation, which correlates with upregulated surface expression of CD25. In contrast to CD4 + CD25 - cells, CD4 + CD25 + cells remain unresponsive to mitogen stimulation and are relatively resistant to apoptosis whether or not infected with FIV. The ability of CD4 + CD25 + cells to replicate FIV efficiently in the presence of IL-2 but remain anergic and unresponsive to apoptotic signaling suggests that these cells may provide a reservoir of productive FIV infection. On the contrary, CD4 + CD25 - cells seem to establish as latent viral reservoirs capable of being reactivated after stimulation

  9. Changes in Reactivity In Vitro of CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25− T Cell Subsets in Transplant Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Bruce M.; Robinson, Catherine M.; Plain, Karren M.; Verma, Nirupama D.; Tran, Giang T.; Nomura, Masaru; Carter, Nicole; Boyd, Rochelle; Hodgkinson, Suzanne J.

    2017-01-01

    Transplant tolerance induced in adult animals is mediated by alloantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ T cells, yet in many models, proliferation of CD4+ T cells from hosts tolerant to specific-alloantigen in vitro is not impaired. To identify changes that may diagnose tolerance, changes in the patterns of proliferation of CD4+, CD4+CD25+, and CD4+CD25− T cells from DA rats tolerant to Piebald Virol Glaxo rat strain (PVG) cardiac allografts and from naïve DA rats were examined. Proliferation of CD4+ T cells from both naïve and tolerant hosts was similar to both PVG and Lewis stimulator cells. In mixed lymphocyte culture to PVG, proliferation of naïve CD4+CD25− T cells was greater than naïve CD4+ T cells. In contrast, proliferation of CD4+CD25− T cells from tolerant hosts to specific-donor PVG was not greater than CD4+ T cells, whereas their response to Lewis and self-DA was greater than CD4+ T cells. Paradoxically, CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant hosts did not proliferate to PVG, but did to Lewis, whereas naïve CD4+CD25+ T cells proliferate to both PVG and Lewis but not to self-DA. CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant, but not naïve hosts, expressed receptors for interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-5 and these cytokines promoted their proliferation to specific-alloantigen PVG but not to Lewis or self-DA. We identified several differences in the patterns of proliferation to specific-donor alloantigen between cells from tolerant and naïve hosts. Most relevant is that CD4+CD25+ T cells from tolerant hosts failed to proliferate or suppress to specific donor in the absence of either IFN-γ or IL-5. The proliferation to third-party and self of each cell population from tolerant and naïve hosts was similar and not affected by IFN-γ or IL-5. Our findings suggest CD4+CD25+ T cells that mediate transplant tolerance depend on IFN−γ or IL-5 from alloactivated Th1 and Th2 cells. PMID:28878770

  10. Anti-human α-synuclein N-terminal peptide antibody protects against dopaminergic cell death and ameliorates behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-synuclein rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Shahaduzzaman

    Full Text Available The protein α-synuclein (α-Syn has a central role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD and immunotherapeutic approaches targeting this molecule have shown promising results. In this study, novel antibodies were generated against specific peptides from full length human α-Syn and evaluated for effectiveness in ameliorating α-Syn-induced cell death and behavioral deficits in an AAV-α-Syn expressing rat model of PD. Fisher 344 rats were injected with rAAV vector into the right substantia nigra (SN, while control rats received an AAV vector expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP. Beginning one week after injection of the AAV-α-Syn vectors, rats were treated intraperitoneally with either control IgG or antibodies against the N-terminal (AB1, or central region (AB2 of α-Syn. An unbiased stereological estimation of TH+, NeuN+, and OX6 (MHC-II immunostaining revealed that the α-Syn peptide antibodies (AB1 and AB2 significantly inhibited α-Syn-induced dopaminergic cell (DA and NeuN+ cell loss (one-way ANOVA (F (3, 30 = 5.8, p = 0.002 and (F (3, 29 = 7.92, p = 0.002 respectively, as well as decreasing the number of activated microglia in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F = 14.09; p = 0.0003. Antibody treated animals also had lower levels of α-Syn in the ipsilateral SN (one-way ANOVA F (7, 37 = 9.786; p = 0.0001 and demonstrated a partial intermediate improvement of the behavioral deficits. Our data suggest that, in particular, an α-Syn peptide antibody against the N-terminal region of the protein can protect against DA neuron loss and, to some extent behavioral deficits. As such, these results may be a potential therapeutic strategy for halting the progression of PD.

  11. Percentage and function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in patients with hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ting-Jun; Cao, Xue-Liang; Luan, Sha; Cui, Wan-Hui; Qiu, Si-Huang; Wang, Yi-Chao; Zhao, Chang-Jiu; Fu, Peng

    2018-01-01

    The current study observed the percentage of peripheral blood (PB) CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the influence of CD4+CD25+ Tregs on the proliferation of naïve CD4 T cells in patients with hyperthyroidism. Furthermore, preliminary discussions are presented on the action mechanism of CD4+CD25+ Tregs on hyperthyroidism attacks. The present study identified that compared with the percentage of PB CD4+CD25+ Tregs in healthy control subjects, no significant changes were observed in the percentage of PB CD4+CD25+ Tregs in patients with hyperthyroidism (P>0.05). For patients with hyperthyroidism, CD4+CD25+ Tregs exhibited significantly reduced inhibition of the proliferation of naïve CD4 T cells and decreased secretion capacity on the cytokines of CD4 T cells, compared with those of healthy control subjects (Phyperthyroidism was significantly improved (Phyperthyroidism before treatment, no significant changes were observed in the percentage of PB CD4+CD25+ Tregs in hyperthyroidism patients following treatment (P>0.05). In the patients with hyperthyroidism, following treatment, CD4+CD25+ Tregs exhibited significantly increased inhibition of the proliferation of naïve CD4 T cells and increased secretion capacity of CD4 T cell cytokines, compared with those of the patients with hyperthyroidism prior to treatment (Phyperthyroidism, and its non-proportional decrease may be closely associated with the occurrence and progression of hyperthyroidism. PMID:29207121

  12. The 1.7 Å X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain and binding analysis to anti-human C2 domain antibodies and phospholipid surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caileen M Brison

    Full Text Available The factor VIII C2 domain is essential for binding to activated platelet surfaces as well as the cofactor activity of factor VIII in blood coagulation. Inhibitory antibodies against the C2 domain commonly develop following factor VIII replacement therapy for hemophilia A patients, or they may spontaneously arise in cases of acquired hemophilia. Porcine factor VIII is an effective therapeutic for hemophilia patients with inhibitor due to its low cross-reactivity; however, the molecular basis for this behavior is poorly understood. In this study, the X-ray crystal structure of the porcine factor VIII C2 domain was determined, and superposition of the human and porcine C2 domains demonstrates that most surface-exposed differences cluster on the face harboring the "non-classical" antibody epitopes. Furthermore, antibody-binding results illustrate that the "classical" 3E6 antibody can bind both the human and porcine C2 domains, although the inhibitory titer to human factor VIII is 41 Bethesda Units (BU/mg IgG versus 0.8 BU/mg IgG to porcine factor VIII, while the non-classical G99 antibody does not bind to the porcine C2 domain nor inhibit porcine factor VIII activity. Further structural analysis of differences between the electrostatic surface potentials suggest that the C2 domain binds to the negatively charged phospholipid surfaces of activated platelets primarily through the 3E6 epitope region. In contrast, the G99 face, which contains residue 2227, should be distal to the membrane surface. Phospholipid binding assays indicate that both porcine and human factor VIII C2 domains bind with comparable affinities, and the human K2227A and K2227E mutants bind to phospholipid surfaces with similar affinities as well. Lastly, the G99 IgG bound to PS-immobilized factor VIII C2 domain with an apparent dissociation constant of 15.5 nM, whereas 3E6 antibody binding to PS-bound C2 domain was not observed.

  13. Increased Numbers of CD4+CD25+ and CD8+CD25+ T-Cells in Peripheral Blood of Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis with Parvovirus B19 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naciute, Milda; Maciunaite, Gabriele; Mieliauskaite, Diana; Rugiene, Rita; Zinkeviciene, Aukse; Mauricas, Mykolas; Murovska, Modra; Girkontaite, Irute

    2017-01-01

    To investigate T-cell subpopulations in peripheral blood of human parvovirus B19 DNA-positive (B19 + ) and -negative (B19 - ) patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy persons. Blood samples were collected from 115 patients with RA and 47 healthy volunteers; 27 patients with RA and nine controls were B19 + Cluster of differentiation (CD) 4, 8, 25 and 45RA were analyzed on blood cells. CD25 expression on CD4 + CD45RA + , CD4 + CD45RA - , CD8 + CD45RA + , CD8 + CD45RA - subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. The percentage of CD25 low and CD25 hi cells was increased on CD4 + CD45RA + , CD4 + CD45RA - T-cells and the percentage of CD25 + cells was increased on CD8 + CD45RA + , CD8 + CD45RA - T-cells of B19 + patients with RA in comparison with B19 - patients and controls. Raised levels of CD4 and CD8 regulatory T-cells in B19 + RA patients could cause down-regulation of antiviral clearance mechanisms and lead to activation of persistent human parvovirus B19 infection in patients with RA. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Protective Effect of CXCR3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells in Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao Jun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress excessive immune responses and are potential therapeutic targets in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation rejection. However, their role in renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI is unclear. Levels of Tregs and expression of CXCR3 in Tregs were analyzed to investigate their function in the early phase of renal IRI. Mice were randomly divided into Sham, IRI, and anti-CD25 (PC61 + IRI groups. The PC61 + IRI group was established by i.p. injection of PC61 monoclonal antibody (mAb to deplete Tregs before renal ischemia. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs and CXCR3 on Tregs were analyzed by flow cytometry. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN, serum creatinine (Scr levels, and tubular necrosis scores, all measures of kidney injury, were greater in the IRI group than in the Sham group. Numbers of Tregs were increased at 72 h after reperfusion in kidney. PC61 mAb preconditioning decreased the numbers of Tregs and aggravated kidney injury. There was no expression of CXCR3 on Tregs in normal kidney, while it expanded at 72 h after reperfusion and inversely correlated with BUN, Scr, and kidney histology score. This indicated that recruitment of Tregs into the kidney was related to the recovery of renal function after IRI and CXCR3 might be involved in the migration of Tregs.

  15. Quantitative variations of CD4 + CD25 + cells in Peking duckwhite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative variations of CD4 + CD25 + cells in Peking duckwhite leghorn chimeras based on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced ...

  16. Anti-CD25 mAb administration prevents spontaneous liver transplant tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Carper, K; Liang, Y; Zheng, X X; Kuhr, C S; Reyes, J D; Perkins, D L; Thomson, A W; Perkins, J D

    2006-12-01

    Liver allografts are accepted spontaneously in all mouse strain combinations without immunosuppressive therapy. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain largely undefined. In this study, we examined the effect of CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells (Treg) on the induction of mouse liver transplant tolerance. Orthotopic liver transplantation was performed from B10 (H2b) to C3H (H2k) mice. Depleting rat anti-mouse CD25 mAb (PC61) was given to the donors or recipients (250 microg/d IP) pretransplant or to the recipients postoperatively. At day 5 posttransplantation, both effector T cells (mainly CD8) and CD4+ CD25+ Treg were increased in the liver allografts and host spleens compared to naïve mice. Anti-CD25 mAb administration, either pretransplantation or posttransplantation, reduced the ratio of CD4+ CD25+ Treg to the CD3 T cells of liver grafts and recipient spleens and induced liver allograft acute rejection compared to IgG treatment. Anti-CD25 mAb administration elevated anti-donor T-cell proliferative responses and CTL and NK activities of graft infiltrates and host splenocytes; reduced CTLA4, Foxp3, and IDO mRNA levels; increased IL-10 and IFN-gamma; and decreased IL-4 mRNA levels in the livers or host spleens. The number of apoptotic T cells was reduced significantly in the liver grafts and treated host spleens. Therefore, anti-CD25 mAb administration changed the balance of CD4+ CD25+ Treg to activated T cells of liver graft recipients, preventing liver transplant tolerance. This was associated with enhanced anti-donor immune reactivity, downregulated Treg gene expression, and reduced T cell apoptosis in the grafts and host spleens.

  17. Clinical Translation and Validation of a Predictive Biomarker for Patritumab, an Anti-human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 3 (HER3) Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Jeanne; Freeman, Daniel J; Feng, Wenqin; Hettmann, Thore; Schneider, Matthias; Blum, Sabine; Ruhe, Jens; Bange, Johannes; Nakamaru, Kenji; Chen, Shuquan; Tsuchihashi, Zenta; von Pawel, Joachim; Copigneaux, Catherine; Beckman, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    During early clinical development, prospective identification of a predictive biomarker and validation of an assay method may not always be feasible. Dichotomizing a continuous biomarker measure to classify responders also leads to challenges. We present a case study of a prospective-retrospective approach for a continuous biomarker identified after patient enrollment but defined prospectively before the unblinding of data. An analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and the challenges encountered in its practical application are also provided. HERALD (NCT02134015) was a double-blind, phase 2 study in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) randomized to erlotinib with placebo or with high or low doses of patritumab, a monoclonal antibody targeted against human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3). While the primary objective was to assess safety and progression-free survival (PFS), a secondary objective was to determine a single predictive biomarker hypothesis to identify subjects most likely to benefit from the addition of patritumab. Although not identified as the primary biomarker in the study protocol, on the basis of preclinical results from 2 independent laboratories, expression levels of the HER3 ligand heregulin (HRG) were prospectively declared the predictive biomarker before data unblinding but after subject enrollment. An assay to measure HRG mRNA was developed and validated. Other biomarkers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status, were also evaluated in an exploratory fashion. The cutoff value for high vs. low HRG mRNA levels was set at the median delta threshold cycle. A maximum likelihood analysis was performed to evaluate the provisional cutoff. The relationship of HRG values to PFS hazard ratios (HRs) was assessed as a measure of internal validation. Additional NSCLC samples were analyzed to characterize HRG mRNA distribution. The subgroup of patients with high HRG mRNA levels ("HRG

  18. Effects of estrogen on CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cell in peripheral blood during pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Huan Xiong; Zhen Yuan; Li He

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of estrogen (E2) level on regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral blood during pregnancy. Methods:A total of 30 healthy non-pregnant women were selected as control group, 90 pregnant women of early, middle and late pregnancy and 30 postpartum women at 1 month after parturition were selected as experimental groups including early pregnancy group, middle pregnancy group and late pregnancy group;the proportions of CD4+CD25+Treg and CD4+CD25+CD127-Treg among CD4+T cells were detected by flow cytometry;the serum estrogen content in peripheral blood was detected by electrochemical immune luminescence method. Results: E2 level was coincident with the change of Tregs number during pregnancy. The estrogen content in peripheral blood increased gradually from early pregnancy to late pregnancy, then decreased significantly after parturition, and the level at 1 month after parturition down to the level in non-pregnancy group (P>0.05);the level of E2 in pregnancy groups were significantly higher than those in non-pregnancy group (P0.05);the proportions in middle and late pregnancy groups were significantly higher than those in early pregnancy group (P0.05). There was correlation between Tregs number with estrogen level during pregnancy. The proportion of CD4+CD25+ Treg and CD4+CD25+CD127- Treg were positively correlated with estrogen level. Conclusions:High proportion of CD4+CD25+Treg and CD4+CD25+CD127-Treg is closely related to the high level of E2 during pregnancy. It suggested that high level of estrogen may induce an increase of CD4+CD25+Treg in peripheral blood, and then influence the immune function of pregnant women. The results of this experiment might play an important role of estrogen in immune-modulation during pregnancy.

  19. Low dose radiation induced protein and its effect on expression of CD25 molecule in lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Duicai; Su Liaoyuan

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To find the substantial basis for effects of low dose radiation, on development, extraction, and the biogical activity of the low-dose radiation-induced proteins, and the effects of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Methods: 1. Healthy Kumning male mice exposed to radiation of 226 Ra γ-rays at 5, 10 and 15 cGy respectively. The mice were killed 2 hours after exposure, the spleen cells were broken with ultrasonic energy and then ultra-centrifugalized at low temperature (4 degree C). The LDR-induced proteins were obtained in the supernatant solution. Then the changes of CD25 molecule was measured by flow cytometry (FCM) with immunofluorescence technique, which was used to reflect the effect of LDR induced proteins on CD25 molecule expression of human lymphocytes. Results: LDR induced proteins were obtained from spleen cells in mice exposed to 5-15 cGy whole body radiation. Conclusion: The expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes was increased significantly after use of LDR induced proteins. LDR induced proteins can enhance expression of CD25 molecule of lymphocytes slightly

  20. Evaluation of PLGA containing anti-CTLA4 inhibited endometriosis progression by regulating CD4+CD25+Treg cells in peritoneal fluid of mouse endometriosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Ma, Pingchuan; Liu, Lanxia; Ma, Guilei; Ma, Jingjing; Liu, Xiaoxuan; Liu, Yijin; Lin, Wanjun; Zhu, Yingjun

    2017-01-01

    Our study investigated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) as protein delivery vehicles encapsulate CTLA-4-antibody (anti-CTLA-4) which is essential for CD4+CD25+Treg cells suppressive function exposing superior potential for inhibiting endometriosis progress in mouse model than single anti-CTLA-4. Anti-CTLA-4 loaded PLGA combined to ligands CTLA-4 in surface of CD4+CD25+Treg cells which distributed in peritoneal fluid of mouse endometriosis model. The particle size, zeta potential of the anti-CTLA-4 loaded nanoparticles was detected by dynamic light scattering. Morphology of nanoparticles was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) indicated distribution of anti-CTLA-4 with PLGA or without in peritoneal fluid. Cumulative anti-CTLA-4 release from nanoparticles was evaluated by Micro BCA assay. The percentage of CD4+CD25+Treg cells in peritoneal fluid was demonstrated by flow cytometer. In vitro experiment we co-culture ectopic endometrial cells (EEC) with isolated CD4+CD25+Treg cells in peritoneal fluid (PF), proliferation and invasion of ectopic endometrial cells (EEC) was measured by BrdU ELISA assay and Matrigel invasion assay. In comparison with anti-CTLA-4 without nanoparticles, the bioconjugates PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 were tolerated in peritoneal fluid with a controlled release of anti-CTLA-4 in 3, 7, 14days. Moreover, PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 had superior protective regulation ability to reduce level of CD4+CD25+Treg cells in peritoneal fluid. Most strikingly, in vitro experiment, PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 exhibited better ability in inhibiting proliferation and invasion of ectopic endometrial cells in co-culture system compared with anti-CTLA-4. Progressively, PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 had better suppressive activity to inhibited IL-10 and TGF-beta secreted by CD4+CD25+Treg cells which indicating that PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 suppressed cells proliferation and invasion through reduced IL-10 and TGF-beta production. Thus, PLGA/anti-CTLA-4 may

  1. Apoptosis Signaling Is Altered in CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T Regulatory Lymphocytes in Pre-Eclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Oleszczuk

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to estimate the surface expressions of CD95 (APO-1/Fas antigen and the intracellular expressions of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bax in CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory lymphocytes (Tregs as well as the percentage of CD8+CD28+ T cytotoxic cells in peripheral blood of patients with pre-eclampsia in comparison with healthy pregnant women in the third trimester of physiological pregnancy. Twenty-four women with pre-eclampsia and 20 normal third trimester pregnant women were included in the study. The lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood samples and labeled with monoclonal antibodies. The expressions of surface antigens and intracellular proteins were estimated using flow cytometry. The population of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells was significantly lower in peripheral blood of patients with pre-eclampsia when compared to normal third trimester pregnant women. The percentages of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells that express Bcl-2 protein were significantly lower in peripheral blood of patients with pre-eclampsia when compared to healthy pregnant women, whereas the percentages of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells with the expressions of Bax protein did not differ in both groups. Moreover, the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI of Bcl-2 protein in CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells was significantly lower and MFI of Bax protein significantly higher in pre-eclampsia when compared to the control group. The percentage of CD8+CD28+ T cells did not differ in both studied groups but MFI of CD28 antigen on T CD8+ cells was significantly higher in pre-eclampsia when compared to the control group. The obtained results suggest that the deficit of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg

  2. Downregulation of IL-12 and a novel negative feedback system mediated by CD25+CD4+ T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kojiro; Tateishi, Shoko; Kubo, Kanae; Mimura, Toshihide; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kanda, Hiroko

    2005-01-01

    CD25 + CD4 + regulatory T cells suppress immune responses and are believed to play roles in preventing autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanism(s) underlying the suppression and the regulation of their homeostasis remain to be elucidated. Here we show that these regulatory T cells downregulated CD25 - CD4 + T-cell-mediated production of IL-12 from antigen-presenting cells, which can act as a growth factor for CD25 - CD4 + T cells. We further found that CD25 + CD4 + T cells, despite their well-documented 'anergic' nature, proliferate significantly in vitro only when CD25 - CD4 + T cells are present. Notably, this proliferation was strongly dependent on IL-2 and relatively independent of IL-12. Thus, CD25 + CD4 + T cells suppress CD25 - CD4 + T-cell responses, at least in part, by inhibiting IL-12 production while they themselves can undergo proliferation with the mediation of CD25 - CD4 + T cells in vitro. These results offer a novel negative feedback system involving a tripartite interaction among CD25 + CD4 + and CD25 - CD4 + T cells, and APCs that may contribute to the termination of immune responses

  3. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D. [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Furlong, Suzanne J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Lin, Tong-Jun [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Hoskin, David W., E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Department of Surgery, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2011-04-22

    Highlights: {yields} Curcumin inhibits CD4{sup +} T-lymphocyte proliferation. {yields} Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes. {yields} Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. {yields} IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4{sup +} T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 ({alpha} chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release to inhibit I{kappa}B phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF{kappa}B. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  4. Curcumin blocks interleukin (IL)-2 signaling in T-lymphocytes by inhibiting IL-2 synthesis, CD25 expression, and IL-2 receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forward, Nicholas A.; Conrad, David M.; Power Coombs, Melanie R.; Doucette, Carolyn D.; Furlong, Suzanne J.; Lin, Tong-Jun; Hoskin, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Curcumin inhibits CD4 + T-lymphocyte proliferation. → Curcumin inhibits interleukin-2 (IL-2) synthesis and CD25 expression by CD4 + T-lymphocytes. → Curcumin interferes with IL-2 receptor signaling by inhibiting JAK3 and STAT5 phosphorylation. → IL-2-dependent regulatory T-lymphocyte function and Foxp3 expression is downregulated by curcumin. -- Abstract: Curcumin (diferulomethane) is the principal curcuminoid in the spice tumeric and a potent inhibitor of activation-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation; however, the molecular basis of this immunosuppressive effect has not been well studied. Here we show that micromolar concentrations of curcumin inhibited DNA synthesis by mouse CD4 + T-lymphocytes, as well as interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 (α chain of the high affinity IL-2 receptor) expression in response to antibody-mediated cross-linking of CD3 and CD28. Curcumin acted downstream of protein kinase C activation and intracellular Ca 2+ release to inhibit IκB phosphorylation, which is required for nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NFκB. In addition, IL-2-dependent DNA synthesis by mouse CTLL-2 cells, but not constitutive CD25 expression, was impaired in the presence of curcumin, which demonstrated an inhibitory effect on IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling. IL-2-induced phosphorylation of STAT5A and JAK3, but not JAK1, was diminished in the presence of curcumin, indicating inhibition of critical proximal events in IL-2R signaling. In line with the inhibitory action of curcumin on IL-2R signaling, pretreatment of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T-cells with curcumin downregulated suppressor function, as well as forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression. We conclude that curcumin inhibits IL-2 signaling by reducing available IL-2 and high affinity IL-2R, as well as interfering with IL-2R signaling.

  5. Reactivity of naive CD4+CD25- T cells against gut microflora in healthy mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Lundsgaard, Dorthe; Kjellev, Stine

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that conventional as well as germ-free CD4+ T cells depleted of CD25+ cells from the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and the periphery proliferate specifically in response to enterobacterial antigen exposure whereas unfractionated CD4+ T cells are not reactive under...

  6. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduce atherosclerosis in apoE(−/−) mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianchang; Dimayuga, Paul C.; Zhao, Xiaoning; Yano, Juliana; Lio, Wai Man; Trinidad, Portia; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K.; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh, E-mail: Chyuk@cshs.org

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •The role of a sub-population of CD8{sup +} T cells with suppressor functions was investigated in atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from adult apoE(−/−) mice had phenotype characteristics of T suppressor cells. •These CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and CD8{sup +} cytotoxic activity in vitro. •Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells significantly reduced atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells have a suppressive function in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Background: It is increasingly evident that CD8{sup +} T cells are involved in atherosclerosis but the specific subtypes have yet to be defined. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells exert suppressive effects on immune signaling and modulate experimental autoimmune disorders but their role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. The phenotype and functional role of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis were investigated in this study. Methods and results: CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were observed in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE(−/−) mice fed hypercholesterolemic diet. Characterization by flow cytometric analysis and functional evaluation using a CFSE-based proliferation assays revealed a suppressive phenotype and function of splenic CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from apoE(−/−) mice. Depletion of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} from total CD8{sup +} T cells rendered higher cytolytic activity of the remaining CD8{sup +}CD25{sup −} T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells into apoE(−/−) mice suppressed the proliferation of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and significantly reduced atherosclerosis in recipient mice. Conclusions: Our study has identified an athero-protective role for CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis.

  7. Demonstration of strong enterobacterial reactivity of CD4+CD25- T cells from conventional and germ-free mice which is counter-regulated by CD4+CD25+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Pedersen, Anders Elm; Kristensen, Nanna N

    2004-01-01

    Unfractionated CD4+ T cells from the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and peripheral lymph nodes are unresponsive when exposed to enterobacterial antigens in vitro. Under similar conditions, CD4+ T cells depleted in vivo or in vitro of CD4+CD25+ T cells proliferate extensively. The CD4+CD25- T...

  8. CD25 is expressed by canine cutaneous mast cell tumors but not by cutaneous connective tissue mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A; Gruber, A D; Klopfleisch, R

    2012-11-01

    Canine cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCT) of different histological grades have distinct biological behaviors. However, little is known about underlying molecular mechanisms that lead to tumor development and increasing malignancy with higher tumor grade. Recent studies have identified the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) subunits CD25 and CD2 as markers that distinguish nonneoplastic from neoplastic mast cells in human systemic mastocytosis. In this study, their potential as a marker for canine MCT and their possible impact on MCT carcinogenesis were evaluated. mRNA expression levels of both genes were compared between grade 1 (n = 12) and grade 3 (n = 8) MCT, and protein expression levels of CD25 were compared in 90 MCT of different tumor grades. mRNA expression levels of both CD25 and CD2 were upregulated in grade 3 MCT. In contrast, CD25 protein was expressed by fewer tumor cells and at decreased levels in grade 3 tumors, while most grade 1 MCT had strong CD25 protein expression. Moreover, CD25 was not expressed by nonneoplastic, resting cutaneous mast cells, while few presumably activated mast cells in tissue samples from dogs with allergic dermatitis had weak CD25 expression. Taken together, these findings suggest that CD25 may play a critical role in early MCT development and may be a stimulatory factor in grade 1 MCT, while grade 3 MCT seem to be less dependent on CD25. Because of the low number of CD25-positive tumor cells in high-grade tumors, the usefulness of CD25 as a tumor marker is, however, questionable.

  9. CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs express an increased LAG-3 and CTLA-4 in anterior chamber-associated immune deviation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, X.F.; Yang, P.Z.; Zhou, H.Y.; Li, B.; Huang, X.K.; Meng, Q.L.; Wang, L.; Kijlstra, A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells have been proven to be essential for maintenance of peripheral tolerance and autoimmune diseases. ACAID is a model of immune privilege in the eye. Relatively little is known about the role and phenotype of these regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells in ACAID. Methods

  10. Glucocorticoid induced TNFR-related protein (GITR as marker of human regulatory T cells: expansion of the GITR+CD25- cell subset in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bartoloni Bocci

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Regulatory T cells (TREG represent a T cell subset able to modulate immune response by suppressing autoreactive T-lymphocytes. The evidence of a reduced number and an impaired function of this cell population in autoimmune/ inflammatory chronic diseases led to the hypothesis of its involvement in the pathogenesis of these disorders. Glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR is a well known marker of murine TREG cells, but little is known in humans. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of TREG cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and the potential role of GITR as marker of human TREG. Methods: Nineteen SLE patients and 15 sex- and age-matched normal controls (NC were enrolled. CD4+ T cells were magnetic sorted from peripheral blood by negative selection. Cell phenotype was analyzed through flow-cytometry using primary and secondary antibodies and real time polymerase-chain reaction (PCR using TaqMan probes. Results: The CD25highGITRhigh subset was significantly decreased in SLE patients with respect to NC (0.37±0.21% vs 0.72±0.19%; p<0.05. On the opposite, the CD25-GITRhigh cell population was expanded in the peripheral blood of SLE patients (3.5±2.25 vs 0.70±0.32%, p<0.01. Interestingly, FoxP3 at mRNA level was expressed in both CD25- GITRhigh and CD25highGITRhigh cells, suggesting that both cell subsets have regulatory activity. Conclusions: CD4+CD25-GITRhigh cells are increased in SLE as compared to NC. The expression of high level of GITR, but not CD25, on FoxP3+ cells appears to point to a regulatory phenotype of this peculiar T cell subset.

  11. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: II. Origin, disease models and clinical aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases afflict approximately 5% of the population and reflect a failure in the immune system to discriminate between self and non-self resulting in the breakdown of self-tolerance. Regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) have been shown to play an important role in the maintenance ...... in disease models such as autoimmune gastritis and inflammatory bowel disease. Finally, we will consider some aspects of the therapeutic potential of Treg cells....

  12. [Increased expressions of peripheral PD-1+ lymphocytes and CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells in gastric adenocarcinoma patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Li, Songyan; Hu, Shidong; Zou, Guijun; Hu, Zilong; Wei, Huahua; Wang, Yufeng; Du, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Objective To detect the frequencies of peripheral programmed death-1 + (PD-1 + ) lymphocytes and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods The study enrolled 29 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma and 29 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Frequencies of PD-1 + lymphocytes and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells were detected using flow cytometry. Results The number of PD-1 + lymphocytes and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells in peripheral blood was higher in patients with gastric adenocarcinoma than that in the control group. Moreover, linear correlation analysis indicated a positive correlation between PD-1 expression and frequency of CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells in peripheral blood of the patients. Conclusion Gastric adenocarcinoma patients present with increased PD-1 + lymphocytes and CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + regulatory T cells in the peripheral blood.

  13. Function and regulation of LAG3 on CD4+CD25- T cells in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qin-Yun; Huang, Da-Yu; Zhang, Hui-Jun; Wang, Shaohua; Chen, Xiao-Feng

    2017-11-15

    LAG3 is a surface molecule found on a subset of immune cells. The precise function of LAG3 appears to be context-dependent. In this study, we investigated the effect of LAG3 on CD4 + CD25 - T cells from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. We found that in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of NSCLC patients, LAG3 was significantly increased in CD4 + T cells directly ex vivo and primarily in the CD4 + CD25 - fraction, which was regulated by prolonged TCR stimulation and the presence of IL-27. TCR stimulation also increased CD25 expression, but not Foxp3 expression, in LAG3-expressing CD4 + CD25 - cells Compared to LAG3-nonexpressing CD4 + CD25 - cells, LAG3-expressing CD4 + CD25 - cells presented significantly higher levels of PD1 and TIM3, two inhibitory receptors best described in exhausted CD8 + T effector cells. LAG3-expressing CD4 + CD25 - cells also presented impaired proliferation compared with LAG3-nonexpressing CD4 + CD25 - cells but could be partially rescued by inhibiting both PD1 and TIM3. Interestingly, CD8 + T cells co-incubated with LAG3-expressing CD4 + CD25 - cells at equal cell numbers demonstrated significantly lower proliferation than CD8 + T cells incubated alone. Co-culture with CD8 + T cell and LAG3-expressing CD4 + CD25 - T cell also upregulated soluble IL-10 level in the supernatant, of which the concentration was positively correlated with the number of LAG3-expressing CD4 + CD25 - T cells. In addition, we found that LAG3-expressing CD4 + CD25 - T cells infiltrated the resected tumors and were present at higher frequencies of in metastases than in primary tumors. Taken together, these data suggest that LAG3-expressing CD4 + CD25 - T cells represent another regulatory immune cell type with potential to interfere with anti-tumor immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells: I. Phenotype and physiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Thomas Lindebo; Nielsen, Janne; Claesson, Mogens H

    2004-01-01

    it has become increasingly clear that regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells) play an important role in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance, and that this cell subset exerts its function by suppressing the proliferation or function of autoreactive T cells. Based on human and murine......The immune system protects us against foreign pathogens. However, if fine discrimination between self and non-self is not carried out properly, immunological attacks against self may be launched leading to autoimmune diseases, estimated to afflict up to 5% of the population. During the last decade...

  15. CD 4 + CD 25 + T cells maintain homeostasis by promoting TER - 119 cell development and inhibiting T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhaimin Rifa’i

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells involved in the regulation of self- tolerance and normality of homeostasis. CD122 deficient mice are model animals that have an abnormal immune system characteristically have a high number of activated T cells and TER-119 cell decreased. Here we showed evidence that the transfer of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells derived from normal mice to CD122- defficient neonates prevent the development of activated memory T cells and elicit TER-119 differentiation. Bone marrow reconstitution derived from CD122-/- mice to normal mice resulting tolerance to individual that genetically different. Importantly, CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells derived from normal mice can replace CD4+ CD25+ cells derived from CD122-/- mice. The results of this experiment suggest that regulatory T cells from normal mice exert a critical role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and controlling hematopoietic disorder.

  16. CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells from FIV+ cats induce a unique anergic profile in CD8+ lymphocyte targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tompkins Mary B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using the FIV model, we reported previously that CD4+CD25+ T regulatory (Treg cells from FIV+ cats are constitutively activated and suppress CD4+CD25- and CD8+ T cell immune responses. In an effort to further explore Treg-mediated suppression, we asked whether Treg cells induce anergy through the alteration of production of cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinases and their inhibitors. Results Lymphocytes were obtained from control or FIV+ cats and sorted by FACS into CD4+CD25+ and CD8+ populations. Following co-culture with CD4+CD25+ cells, CD8+ targets were examined by Western blot for changes in cyclins D3, E and A, retinoblastoma (Rb protein, as well as the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21cip1. Following co-culture with CD4+CD25+cells, we observed up-regulation of p21cip1 and cyclin E, with down-regulation of cyclin D3, in CD8+ cells from FIV+ cats. As expected, CD8+ targets from control cats were quiescent with little up-regulation of p21cip1 and cyclin E. There was also a lack of Rb phosphorylation in CD8+ targets consistent with late G1 cell cycle arrest. Further, IL-2 mRNA was down regulated in CD8+ cells after co-culture with CD4+CD25+ Treg cells. Following CD4+CD25+ co-culture, CD8+ targets from FIV+ cats also had increased Foxp3 mRNA expression; however, these CD8+Foxp3+ cells did not exhibit suppressor function. Conclusions Collectively, these data suggest that CD4+CD25+ Treg cells from FIV+ cats induce CD8+ anergy by disruption of normal G1 to S cell cycle progression.

  17. CD25 targeted therapy of chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells using DR5 specific TRAIL peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakasam Madhumathi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells (LSCs are being targeted as a modern therapeutic approach to prevent disease relapse. LSCs isolated from methotrexate resistant side population (SP of leukemic cell lines HL60 and MOLT4 exhibited high levels of CD25 and TRAIL R2/DR5 which are potential targets. Recombinant immunotoxin conjugating IL2α with TRAIL peptide mimetic was constructed for DR5 receptor specific targeting of LSCs and were tested in total cell population and LSCs. IL2-TRAIL peptide induced apoptosis in drug resistant SP cells from cell lines and showed potent cytotoxicity in PBMCs derived from leukemic patients with an efficacy of 81.25% in AML and 100% in CML, ALL and CLL. IL2-TRAIL peptide showed cytotoxicity in relapsed patient samples and was more effective than TRAIL or IL2-TRAIL proteins. Additionally, DR5 specific IL2-TRAIL peptide was effective in targeting and killing LSCs purified from cell lines [IC50: 952 nM in HL60, 714 nM in MOLT4] and relapsed patient blood samples with higher efficacy (85% than IL2-TRAIL protein (46%. Hence, CD25 and DR5 specific targeting by IL2-TRAIL peptide may be an effective strategy for targeting drug resistant leukemic cells and LSCs.

  18. Nanoscale Relationship Between CD4 and CD25 of T Cells Visualized with NSOM/QD-Based Dual-Color Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jinping; Lu, Xiaoxu; Liu, Shengde; Zhong, Liyun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, by using of near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM)/immune-labeling quantum dot (QD)-based dual-color imaging system, we achieved the direct visualization of nanoscale profiles for distribution and organization of CD4 and CD25 molecules in T cells. A novel and interesting finding was that though CD25 clustering as nanodomains were observed on the surface of CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells, these CD25 nanodomains were not co-localized with CD4 nanodomains. This result presented that the formation of these CD25 nanodomains on the surface of CD4+CD25high T cells were not associated with the response of T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3-dependent signal transduction. In contrast, on the surface of CD4+CD25low T cells, CD25 molecules distributed randomly without forming nanodomains while CD4 clustering as nanodomains can be observed; on the surface of CD8+CD25+ T cells, CD25 clustering as nanodomains and co-localization with CD8 nanodomains were observed. Collectively, above these results exhibited that TCR/CD3-based microdomains were indeed required for TCR/CD3-mediated T cells activation and enhanced the immune activity of CD4+CD25low T cells or CD8+CD25+ T cells. In particular, it was found that the formation of CD25 nanodomains and their segregation from TCR/CD3 microdomains were the intrinsic capability of CD4+CD25high T cells, suggesting this specific imaging feature of CD25 should be greatly associated with the regulatory activity of CD4+CD25high T cells. Importantly, this novel NSOM/QD-based dual-color imaging system will provide a useful tool for the research of distribution-function relationship of cell-surface molecules.

  19. Virus-induced dysfunction of CD4+CD25+ T cells in patients with HTLV-I-associated neuroimmunological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamano, Yoshihisa; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Li, Hong-Chuan; Tomaru, Utano; Yao, Karen; Grant, Christian W; Maric, Dragan A; Jacobson, Steven

    2005-05-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs are important in the maintenance of immunological self tolerance and in the prevention of autoimmune diseases. As the CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell population in patients with human T cell lymphotropic virus type I-associated (HTLV-I-associated) myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) has been shown to be a major reservoir for this virus, it was of interest to determine whether the frequency and function of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs in HAM/TSP patients might be affected. In these cells, both mRNA and protein expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxp3, a specific marker of Tregs, were lower than those in CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from healthy individuals. The virus-encoded transactivating HTLV-I tax gene was demonstrated to have a direct inhibitory effect on Foxp3 expression and function of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. This is the first report to our knowledge demonstrating the role of a specific viral gene product (HTLV-I Tax) on the expression of genes associated with Tregs (in particular, foxp3) resulting in inhibition of Treg function. These results suggest that direct human retroviral infection of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells may be associated with the pathogenesis of HTLV-I-associated neurologic disease.

  20. Chemokines involved in protection from colitis by CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Brudzewsky, Dan; Gad, Monika

    2006-01-01

    /chemokine receptor-specific gene expression profiling system of 67 genes, the authors have determined the expression profile of chemokine and chemokine receptor genes in the rectum of colitic mice and in mice that have been protected fromcolitis by CD4CD25 regulatory T cells. In mice protected from colitis......, the authors found down regulation of the mRNA expression of the inflammatory chemokine receptors CCR1 and CXCR3 and their ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, CCL5, and CCL7. Also the transcripts for CCR9, CCL25, CCL17, and CXCL1 are found down regulated in protected compared with colitic animals. In addition, the authors......' results suggest that CCL20 is used by CCR6 regulatory T cells in the complex process of controlling colitis because transcripts for this chemokine were expressed to a higher level in protected animals. The chemokine pathways identified in the present study may be of importance for the development of new...

  1. IL-5 promotes induction of antigen-specific CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells that suppress autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Giang T; Hodgkinson, Suzanne J; Carter, Nicole M; Verma, Nirupama D; Plain, Karren M; Boyd, Rochelle; Robinson, Catherine M; Nomura, Masaru; Killingsworth, Murray; Hall, Bruce M

    2012-05-10

    Immune responses to foreign and self-Ags can be controlled by regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD4 and IL-2Rα chain (CD25). Defects in Tregs lead to autoimmunity, whereas induction of Ag-specific CD4+CD25+ Tregs restores tolerance. Ag-specific CD4+CD25+ FOXP3+Tregs activated by the T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine, IL-4, and specific alloantigen promote allograft tolerance. These Tregs expressed the specific IL-5Rα and in the presence of IL-5 proliferate to specific but not third-party Ag. These findings suggest that recombinant IL-5 (rIL-5) therapy may promote Ag-specific Tregs to mediate tolerance. This study showed normal CD4+CD25+ Tregs cultured with IL-4 and an autoantigen expressed Il-5rα. Treatment of experimental autoimmune neuritis with rIL-5 markedly reduced clinical paralysis, weight loss, demyelination, and infiltration of CD4+ (Th1 and Th17) CD8+ T cells and macrophages in nerves. Clinical improvement was associated with expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs that expressed Il-5rα and proliferated only to specific autoantigen that was enhanced by rIL-5. Depletion of CD25+ Tregs or blocking of IL-4 abolished the benefits of rIL-5. Thus, rIL-5 promoted Ag-specific Tregs, activated by autoantigen and IL-4, to control autoimmunity. These findings may explain how Th2 responses, especially to parasitic infestation, induce immune tolerance. rIL-5 therapy may be able to induce Ag-specific tolerance in autoimmunity.

  2. Immunophenotype and increased presence of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    WU, CUI-PING; QING, XI; WU, CUI-YUN; ZHU, HONG; ZHOU, HAI-YAN

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cancer of the white blood cells, is a heterogeneous disease that mainly occurs due to the malignant cloning of original and naive lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to explore the immunophenotype, the percentage of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with ALL. The immunophenotype and levels of CD4+CD25+ Tregs were detected using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 35 ...

  3. Identification and Functional Characterization of Human Cd4+Cd25+ T Cells with Regulatory Properties Isolated from Peripheral Blood

    OpenAIRE

    Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Stassen, Michael; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Knop, Jurgen; Enk, Alexander H.

    2001-01-01

    A subpopulation of peripheral human CD4+CD25+ T cells that expresses CD45RO, histocompatibility leukocyte antigen DR, and intracellular cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA) 4 does not expand after stimulation and markedly suppresses the expansion of conventional T cells in a contact-dependent manner. After activation, CD4+CD25+ T cells express CTLA-4 on the surface detectable for several weeks. These cells show a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest and no production of interleukin (IL)-2, IL-...

  4. CD4+ CD25+ CD127low Regulatory T Cells as Indicator of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Sahar S; El-Saied, Amany M; Mohammed, Rehab A; Mohamed, Eman E

    2016-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by disturbed immune regulation, inducing a progressive cartilage and bone destruction. Despite enrichment of T regulatory cell (T-regs) in synovial fluid, conflicting results are reported concerning T-regs in peripheral blood (PB) of RA patients. To determine possible correlation between the frequency of PB CD4+ CD25+CD127low (T-regs) with RA disease activity. Forty females with RA, classified according to the Disease Activity Score 28 (DAS-28), as highly active, mild-moderate or low disease activity; and 20 age and sex matched healthy controls, were enrolled to study CD4+ CD25+ CD127low T- regs in PB by flow cytometry. Active RA patients had lower frequency of the CD4+ CD25+ CD127low T- regs compared to those with mild-moderate or low disease activity (P <0.001). The frequencies of the T- regs showed negative correlation with the DAS-28 (P<0.01). In conclusion, CD4+ CD25+ CD127low T-regs is significantly lower in highly active RA patients compared to patients with lower activity or controls. Copyright© by the Egyptian Association of Immunologists.

  5. Detection and Significance of CD4+CD25+CD127dim Regulatory T Cells in Individuals with Severe Aplastic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Qi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the relationship between CD4+CD25+CD127dim regulatory T cells (Tregs and immune imbalance in acquired severe aplastic anemia (SAA. Materials and Methods: The quantity of CD4+CD25+CD127dim Tregs in 44 SAA patients and 23 normal controls was measured by flow cytometry. Correlations between Tregs and T cell subsets, dendritic cell (DC subsets, granulocyte counts, and percentage of reticulocytes (RET% were analyzed. Results: The percentage of CD4+CD25+CD127dim Tregs in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs of untreated patients was lower than in recovery patients and normal controls (0.83±0.44% vs. 2.91±1.24% and 2.18±0.55%, respectively, p<0.05. The percentage of CD4+CD25+CD127dim Tregs in CD4+ T lymphocytes of recovery patients was higher than that of untreated patients and normal controls (9.39±3.51% vs. 7.61±5.3% and 6.83±1.4%, respectively, p<0.05. The percentage of CD4+ T lymphocytes in PBLs of untreated patients was lower than in recovery patients and normal controls (13.55±7.37% vs. 31.82±8.43% and 32.12±5.88%, respectively, p<0.05. T cell subset (CD4+/CD8+ ratio was 0.41±0.24 in untreated patients, which was lower than in recovery patients (1.2±0.4 and normal controls (1.11±0.23 (p<0.05. DC subset (myeloid DC/plasmacytoid DC ratio, DC1/DC2 ratio was 3.08±0.72 in untreated patients, which was higher than in recovery patients (1.61±0.49 and normal controls (1.39±0.36 (p<0.05. The percentage of CD4+CD25+CD127dim Tregs in PBLs was positively associated with T cell subset (r=0.955, p<0.01 and negatively associated with DC subset (r=-0.765, p<0.01. There were significant positive correlations between CD4+CD25+CD127dim Tregs/PBL and granulocyte counts and RET% (r=0.739 and r=0.749, respectively, p<0.01. Conclusion: The decrease of CD4+CD25+CD127dim Tregs in SAA patients may cause excessive functioning of T lymphocytes and thus lead to hematopoiesis failure in SAA.

  6. Prevention of diabetes: effect of mycophenolate mofetil and anti-CD25 on onset of diabetes in the DRBB rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugrasbul, Figen; Moore, Wayne V; Tong, Pei Ying; Kover, Karen L

    2008-12-01

    Anti-CD25 and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) treatment of patients with new-onset diabetes is currently being tested as one of the trials in TrialNet. We tested the effectiveness of MMF and anti-CD25 in preventing autoimmune diabetes in the diabetes-resistant biobreeding (DRBB) rat. Autoimmune diabetes in the DRBB rat was induced with a Treg cell depletion regimen starting at 24-26 d of age. Treatment was started on the first day of the depletion regimen in the following groups: (i) control (vehicle); (ii) MMF 25 mg/kg/d intramuscularly daily for 8 wk; (iii) anti-CD25 0.8 mg/kg/d intraperitoneally 5 d/wk for 3 wk; and (iv) combination of MMF and anti-CD25. In a second set of experiments, treatments were started on day 5 of the depletion regimen (delayed treatment) with groups 1, 3, and 4. Rats that had diabetes-free survival for at least 30 d after the treatment was stopped underwent a second Treg depletion (redepletion). In each of the three treatment groups (n = 10/group), onset of diabetes was delayed or prevented in 20, 40 and 80% in groups 2, 3, and 4, respectively. After redepletion, diabetes-free survival was unchanged in group 2 and decreased to 10 and 30% in groups 3 and 4, respectively. With delayed treatment, groups 3 and 4 had 33 and 50% diabetes-free survival that decreased to 0 and 33% after redepletion. MMF and anti-CD25 alone or in combination are effective in delaying and preventing diabetes in the DRBB rat especially if treatment is started before stimulation and expansion of the autoreactive T cells.

  7. CD4+CD25+ T cells expressing FoxP3 in Icelandic horses affected with insect bite hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Eman; Steinbach, Falko; Marti, Eliane

    2012-07-15

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an IgE-mediated dermatitis caused by bites of midges from the genus Culicoides. We have shown previously that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from IBH-affected horses produce higher levels of IL-4 and lower levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 than those from healthy horses, suggesting that IBH is associated with a reduced regulatory immune response. FoxP3 is a crucial marker of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Here we have determined the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells by flow cytometry in PBMC directly after isolation or after stimulation with Culicoides extract or a control antigen (Tetanus Toxoid). There were no differences between healthy and IBH horses either in the proportion of FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) cells in freshly isolated PBMC or in the following stimulation with Tetanus Toxoid. However, upon stimulation of PBMC with the allergen, expression of FoxP3 by CD4(+)CD25(+high) and CD4(+)CD25(+dim) cells was significantly higher in healthy than in IBH horses. Addition of recombinant IL-4 to PBMC from healthy horses stimulated with the allergen significantly decreased the proportion of FoxP3 expressing cells within CD4(+)CD25(+high). These results suggest that IBH is associated with a decreased number of allergen-induced Tregs. This could be a consequence of the increased IL-4 production by PBMC of IBH-affected horses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells control CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation by modulating IL-2 homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Alice; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sparwasser, Tim; Thomas, Ranjeny; Steptoe, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in the regulation of immune responses. Although many mechanisms of Treg suppression in vitro have been described, the mechanisms by which Treg modulate CD8+ T cell differentiation and effector function in vivo are more poorly defined. It has been proposed, in many instances, that modulation of cytokine homeostasis could be an important mechanism by which Treg regulate adaptive immunity; however, direct experimental evidence is sparse. Here we demonstrate that CD4+CD25+ Treg, by critically regulating IL-2 homeostasis, modulate CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation. Expansion and effector differentiation of CD8+ T cells is promoted by autocrine IL-2 but, by competing for IL-2, Treg limit CD8+ effector differentiation. Furthermore, a regulatory loop exists between Treg and CD8+ effector T cells, where IL-2 produced during CD8+ T-cell effector differentiation promotes Treg expansion. PMID:21502514

  9. Immunophenotype and increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cui-Ping; Qing, Xi; Wu, Cui-Yun; Zhu, Hong; Zhou, Hai-Yan

    2012-02-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cancer of the white blood cells, is a heterogeneous disease that mainly occurs due to the malignant cloning of original and naive lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to explore the immunophenotype, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the expression of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with ALL. The immunophenotype and levels of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs were detected using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 35 ALL patients, with 18 healthy individuals being selected as controls. The results suggested that 22 patients had B cell ALL (B-ALL) and 13 had T cell ALL (T-ALL) among the 35 ALL patients. In B-ALL patients, the surface antigen CD19 was most commonly expressed; in T-ALL patients, CD7 was most common. Furthermore, the percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells in the peripheral blood of B-ALL and T-ALL patients was higher compared to that of healthy individuals (Pcell culture supernatants from B-ALL and T-ALL patients were higher compared to those in the controls (Pcells, IL-2, IL-10 or TGF-β in B-ALL versus T-ALL patients. The authors concluded that CD19 and CD7 may serve as diagnostic markers of B-ALL and T-ALL, respectively. The increased presence of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells and the altered levels of secreted cytokines are indicative of an immunosuppressive mechanism in the pathogenesis of ALL.

  10. Ex vivo generation of human alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells from CD4(posCD25(high T cells for immunotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorieke H Peters

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regulatory T cell (Treg based immunotherapy is a potential treatment for several immune disorders. By now, this approach proved successful in preclinical animal transplantation and auto-immunity models. In these models the success of Treg based immunotherapy crucially depends on the antigen-specificity of the infused Treg population. For the human setting, information is lacking on how to generate Treg with direct antigen-specificity ex vivo to be used for immunotherapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that in as little as two stimulation cycles with HLA mismatched allogeneic stimulator cells and T cell growth factors a very high degree of alloantigen-specificity was reached in magnetic bead isolated human CD4(posCD25(high Treg. Efficient increases in cell numbers were obtained. Primary allogeneic stimulation appeared a prerequisite in the generation of alloantigen-specific Treg, while secondary allogeneic or polyclonal stimulation with anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 monoclonal antibodies enriched alloantigen-specificity and cell yield to a similar extent. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ex vivo expansion protocol that we describe will very likely increase the success of clinical Treg-based immunotherapy, and will help to induce tolerance to selected antigens, while minimizing general immune suppression. This approach is of particular interest for recipients of HLA mismatched transplants.

  11. Modulation of phenotype and function of human CD4+CD25+ T regulatory lymphocytes mediated by cAMP elevating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Riccomi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that Cholera Toxin (CT and other cyclic AMP (cAMP elevating agents induce up-regulation of the inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 in human resting CD4+ T lymphocytes, which following the treatment acquired suppressive functions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of cAMP elevating agents on human CD4+CD25+ T cells, which include the T regulatory (Treg cells that play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immunological tolerance. We found that cAMP elevating agents induce up-regulation of CTLA-4 in CD4+CD25- and further enhance its expression in CD4+CD25+ T cells. We observed an increase of two isoforms of mRNA coding for the membrane and the soluble CTLA-4 molecules, suggesting that the regulation of CTLA-4 expression by cAMP is at the transcriptional level. In addition, we found that the increase of cAMP in CD4+CD25+ T cells converts the CD4+CD25+Foxp3- T cells in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, whereas the increase of cAMP in CD4+CD25- T cells did not up-regulate Foxp3 in the absence of activation stimuli. To investigate the function of these cells, we performed an in vitro suppression assay by culturing CD4+CD25+ T cells untreated or pre-treated with CT with anti-CD3 mAbs-stimulated autologous PBMC. We found that CT enhances the inhibitory function of CD4+CD25+ T cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation and IFNγ production are strongly inhibited by CD4+CD25+ T cells pre-treated with cAMP elevating agents. Furthermore, we found that CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes pre-treated with cAMP elevating agents induce the up-regulation of CD80 and CD86 co-stimulatory molecules on immature dendritic cells (DCs in the absence of antigenic stimulation, however without leading to full DC maturation. These data show that the increase of intracellular cAMP modulates the phenotype and function of human CD4+CD25+ T cells.

  12. Expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in infants of mothers with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luopajärvi, Kristiina; Nieminen, Janne K; Ilonen, Jorma; Akerblom, Hans K; Knip, Mikael; Vaarala, Outi

    2012-08-01

    Reduced risk for type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been reported in the offspring of mothers with T1D when compared with children of affected fathers. To evaluate the hypothesis that exposure of the offspring to maternal insulin therapy induces regulatory mechanisms in utero, we compared the FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells in cord blood (CB) of infants born to mothers with or without T1D. Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMCs) from 20 infants with maternal T1D and from 20 infants with an unaffected mother were analyzed for the numbers of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ cells ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation with human insulin by flow cytometry. The mRNA expression of FOXP3, NFATc2, STIM1, interleukin (IL)-10, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β was measured by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The percentage of FOXP3+ cells in CD4+CD25(high) cells was higher in the CB of the infants with maternal T1D when compared with the infants of unaffected mothers (p = 0.023). After in vitro insulin stimulation an increase in the percentage of FOXP3+ cells in CD4+CD25(high) cells (p = 0.0002) as well as upregulation of FOXP3, NFATc2, STIM1, IL-10, and TGF-β transcripts in CBMCs (p mothers with T1D, in whom the disease-related PTPN22 allele was associated with reduced STIM1 and NFATc2 response in insulin-stimulated CBMCs (p = 0.007 and p = 0.014). We suggest that maternal insulin treatment induces expansion of regulatory T cells in the fetus, which might contribute to the lower risk of diabetes in children with maternal vs. paternal diabetes. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Evaluation of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells during treatment of patients with brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanjani Roushan, M R; Bayani, M; Soleimani Amiri, S; Mohammadnia-Afrouzi, M; Nouri, H R; Ebrahimpour, S

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) plays a critical role in the control of brucellosis. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a functional character in modulating the balance between host immune response and tolerance, which can eventually lead to chronic infection or relapse. The aim of this study was to assess the alteration of Tregs in cases of brucellosis before and after treatment. Thirty cases of acute brucellosis with the mean age of 41.03±15.15 years (case group) and 30 healthy persons with the mean age of 40.63±13.95 years (control group) were selected and assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from peripheral blood of all individuals. We analyzed the alteration of Treg cell count using flow cytometry for CD4, CD25, and FoxP3 markers. The level of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg cells was increased in active patients compared with controls (2.5±0.99% vs 1.6±0.84%, p= 0.0004), but it had declined in the treated cases (1.83±0.73%, p=0.02). The level of Tregs was elevated in three relapsed cases. The frequency of Tregs and Treg/Teff (effector T cell) ratio was correlated with inverse serum agglutination test (SAT) and, 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME) titers as markers of treatment in brucellosis. Based on our findings, we suggest that regulatory cells, such as CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg cells, may contribute to the development of infection processes involving immune responses in brucellosis, and evaluation of regulatory T-cell levels may be a potential diagnostic strategy for the treatment outcome in chronic and relapsed cases of brucellosis.

  14. Glutamic acid decarboxylase-derived epitopes with specific domains expand CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojiang Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD4(+CD25(+ regulatory T cell (Treg-based immunotherapy is considered a promising regimen for controlling the progression of autoimmune diabetes. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of Tregs in response to the antigenic epitope stimulation depend on the structural properties of the epitopes used. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Splenic lymphocytes from nonobese diabetic (NOD mice were stimulated with different glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-derived epitopes for 7-10 days and the frequency and function of Tregs was analyzed. We found that, although all expanded Tregs showed suppressive functions in vitro, only p524 (GAD524-538-expanded CD4(+CD25(+ T cells inhibited diabetes development in the co-transfer models, while p509 (GAD509-528- or p530 (GAD530-543-expanded CD4(+CD25(+ T cells had no such effects. Using computer-guided molecular modeling and docking methods, the differences in structural characteristics of these epitopes and the interaction mode (including binding energy and identified domains in the epitopes between the above-mentioned epitopes and MHC class II I-A(g7 were analyzed. The theoretical results showed that the epitope p524, which induced protective Tregs, possessed negative surface-electrostatic potential and bound two chains of MHC class II I-A(g7, while the epitopes p509 and p530 which had no such ability exhibited positive surface-electrostatic potential and bound one chain of I-A(g7. Furthermore, p524 bound to I-A(g7 more stably than p509 and p530. Of importance, we hypothesized and subsequently confirmed experimentally that the epitope (GAD570-585, p570, which displayed similar characteristics to p524, was a protective epitope by showing that p570-expanded CD4(+CD25(+ T cells suppressed the onset of diabetes in NOD mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that molecular modeling-based structural analysis of epitopes may be an instrumental tool for prediction of

  15. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  16. TNFR2 expression on CD25hiFOXP3+ T cells induced upon TCR stimulation of CD4 T cells identifies maximal cytokine-producing effectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chindu eGovindaraj

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we show that CD25hiTNFR2+ cells can be rapidly generated in vitro from circulating CD4 lymphocytes by polyclonal stimuli anti-CD3 in the presence of anti-CD28. The in vitro induced CD25hiTNFR2+ T cells express a conventional Treg phenotype FOXP3+CTLA4+CD127lo/-, but produce effector and immunoregulatory cytokines including IL-2, IL-10 and IFN-g. These induced CD25hiTNFR2+ T cells do not suppress target cell proliferation, but enhance it instead. Thus the CD25hiTNFR2+ phenotype induced rapidly following CD3/28 cross linking of CD4 T cells identifies cells with maximal proliferative and effector cytokine producing capability. The in vivo counterpart of this cell population may play an important role in immune response initiation.

  17. In vitro induction of functional allergen-specific CD4+ CD25high Treg cells in horses affected with insect bite hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, E; Akdis, C A; Wagner, B; Steinbach, F; Marti, E

    2013-08-01

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is a recurrent allergic dermatitis of horses with similarities to human atopic eczema, caused by bites of insects of the genus Culicoides. Previous studies suggested a dysregulated T cell tolerance to Culicoides allergen in IBH-affected horses. We have investigated whether the suppressive function of CD4(+) CD25(high) cells is impaired in IBH-affected horses and possible ways to restore it. CD4(+) CD25(-) cells sorted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated with irradiated autologous PBMC pulsed with Culicoides or tetanus toxoid as control antigen, in the presence of CD4(+) CD25(high) cells. Furthermore, Culicoides-specific CD4(+) CD25(high) regulatory cells were expanded or induced from CD4(+) CD25(-) cells in vitro in the presence of a combination of rIL-2 and rTGF-β1 (rIL-2/rTGF-β1) or of retinoic acid and rapamycin (RetA/Rapa). Proliferation was determined by [(3) H] thymidine incorporation and cytokine production measured by flow cytometry. The ability of Culicoides- but not tetanus-stimulated CD4(+) CD25(high) cells to suppress proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(-) cells was significantly lower in IBH-affected horses (28%) than in healthy controls (86%). The decreased suppression in IBH-affected horses was associated with a significantly higher proportion of IL-4(+) cells and a lower percentage of FoxP3(+) IL-10(+) compared to controls. Addition of rIL-2/rTGF-β1 or of RetA/Rapa to Culicoides-stimulated CD4(+) CD25(high) cells from IBH-affected horses significantly increased the proportion of FoxP3(+) IL-10(+) cells. We also found that RetA/Rapa induced a more significant decrease in the frequency of IL-4(+) cells than rIL-2/rTGF-β1. Moreover, the suppressive activity of Culicoides-stimulated CD4(+) CD25(high) cells was significantly restored by both rIL-2/rTGF-β1and RetA/Rapa, albeit in an antigen-unspecific manner. In contrast, in vitro induced Culicoides-specific CD4(+) CD25(high) cells suppressed

  18. Study on immobilizations of ovine anti-human IgG and MCAb against EHF on radiation-modified silicone films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinhui, Guo; Hongfei, Ha; Yuhua, Zhang [Beijing Univ., BJ (China). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1990-08-01

    Films of silicone (silastic) were grafted by monomer acrylamide vis {gamma}-radiation technology and then the ovine anti-human IgG, Epidemic hemorrhagic fever (EHF)-MCAb were immobilized on the silastic-AAM films with different grafting yields passthrough associate reactions. Measruements of relationships between grafting yields. Contents of immobilized antibodies and immunoactivities for immobilized silastic-AAM films were performed by using {sup 125}I method ELISA method was used to measure the immunoactivities for the immobilized monoantibody. The results showed that the antibodies used can be immobilized on radiation-grafted silicone films and this immobilization method has its potential significance in clinical practice.

  19. Study on immobilizations of ovine anti-human IgG and MCAb against EHF on radiation-modified silicone films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jinhui; Ha Hongfei; Zhang Yuhua

    1990-01-01

    Films of silicone (silastic) were grafted by monomer acrylamide vis γ-radiation technology and then the ovine anti-human IgG, Epidemic hemorrhagic fever (EHF)-MCAb were immobilized on the silastic-AAM films with different grafting yields passthrough associate reactions. Measruements of relationships between grafting yields. Contents of immobilized antibodies and immunoactivities for immobilized silastic-AAM films were performed by using 125 I method ELISA method was used to measure the immunoactivities for the immobilized monoantibody. The results showed that the antibodies used can be immobilized on radiation-grafted silicone films and this immobilization method has its potential significance in clinical practice

  20. An experimental study on inhibiting graft rejection following high-risk penetrating keratoplasty by CD25 siRNA nanocarrier in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-jie SHI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of CD25 siRNA nanoparticles against immune rejection and prolongation of corneal graft survival time after high-risk corneal grafting in rats. Methods Orthotopic corneal transplantation was performed in SD rats with alkali burned corneas to mimic high-risk rat models. Donor cornea (Wistar rats was grafted into the right cornea of SD recipients on day 14 after alkali burn. The grafted rats were randomly divided into control group (Group A, EntransterTM-control CD25siRNA instillation treatment (Group B, EntransterTM-CD25siRNA instillation treatment (Group C and EntransterTM-CD25siRNA twice instillation treatment (Group D, first administration at 2-hour post-surgery and second on day 7 post-surgery. The recipient eyes were examined using a slit lamp microscope. Then, the mean survival time and rejection index (RI were calculated. The morphologies of grafts were microscopically examined with HE staining, and TEM. CD25 expression after operation was determined by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results The survival curves of transplanted cornea showed that the mean survival time in rats of groups C and D was significantly longer than that in groups A and B (P<0.05. No significant difference was found in survival time between group A and group B, and the same between group C and group D. The grafts in groups A and B showed obvious edema and thickening, with irregular arrangement of collagen fibers and infiltration of a large amount of inflammatory cells. Immunohistochemical results showed that expression of CD25 was found in the corneal epithelium, stroma and endothelium in all rats, and higher CD25 expression was observed in groups A and B. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the degree of stromal fibroblast apoptosis and necrosis in corneal graft was obviously lower in groups C and D than that of groups A and B, with a significant statistical difference. The expression of CD25 m

  1. The diabetes type 1 locus Idd6 modulates activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogner, Ute Christine; Lepault, Françoise; Gagnerault, Marie-Claude; Vallois, David; Morin, Joëlle; Avner, Philip; Boitard, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The genetic locus Idd6 confers susceptibility to the spontaneous development of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse. Our studies on disease resistance of the congenic mouse strain NOD.C3H 6.VIII showed that Idd6 influences T-cell activities in the peripheral immune system and suggest that a major mechanism by which the Idd6 locus modifies diabetes development is via modulation of regulatory T-cell activities. Our transfer experiments using total splenocytes and purified T-cells demonstrated that the locus specifically controls the efficiency of disease protection mediated by the regulatory CD4(+)CD25(+) T-cell subset. Our data also implicate the Idd6 locus in controlling the balance between infiltrating lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells within the pancreatic islet.

  2. Non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ regulatory T cells are correlated to leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiao-su; Wang, Xu-hua; Zhao, Xiang-yu; Chang, Ying-jun; Xu, Lan-ping; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Huang, Xiao-jun

    2014-07-01

    Non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells were found to be involved in disease progression in tumor-bearing mouse models and cancer patients recently. We attempted to define whether this subset of T cells were related to leukemia relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells among the CD4+ T cell population from the bone marrow of relapsed patients, patients with positive minimal residual disease (MRD+) and healthy donors was examined by flow cytometry. The CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells were also stained with the intracellular markers to determine the cytokine (TGF-β, IL-2 and IL-10) secretion. The results showed that the frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69 + T cells was markedly increased in patients in the relapsed group and the MRD + group compared to the healthy donor group. The percentage of this subset of T cells was significantly decreased after effective intervention treatment. We also analyzed the reconstitution of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells at various time points after allo-HSCT, and the results showed that this subset of T cells reconstituted rapidly and reached a relatively higher level at +60 d in patients compared to controls. The incidence of either MRD+ or relapse in patients with a high frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells (>7%) was significantly higher than that of patients with a low frequency of CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells at +60 d, +90 d and +270 d after transplant. However, our preliminary data indicated that CD4+CD25-CD69+ T cells may not exert immunoregulatory function via cytokine secretion. This study provides the first clinical evidence of a correlation between non-traditional CD4+CD25-CD69+ Tregs and leukemia relapse after allo-HSCT and suggests that exploration of new methods of adoptive immunotherapy may be beneficial. Further research related to regulatory mechanism behind this phenomenon would be necessary.

  3. IL-33 Effect on Quantitative Changes of CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Children with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Ryba-Stanisławowska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IL-33 is an IL-1 cytokine family member, with ability to induce both Th1 and Th2 immune responses. It binds to ST2 receptor, whose deficiency is associated with enhanced inflammatory response. The most recent studies have shown the immunoregulatory effect of IL-33 on Tregs in animal models. As type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune, inflammatory disease, where Treg defects have been described, we aimed to analyze the in vitro influence of recombinant IL-33 on quantitative properties of regulatory CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ T cells. CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ as well as CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ST2+ Tregs were analyzed by flow cytometry. In a group of patients with type 1 diabetes in vitro IL-33 treatment induced regulatory CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ cell frequencies as well as upregulating the surface expression of ST2 molecule. In addition, the number of CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ cells carrying ST2 receptor increased significantly. Similar effect was observed in case of the FOXP3 expression. We did not observe any significant changes in IL-33 treated cells of healthy controls. The level of ST2 was higher in serum of patients with type 1 diabetes in comparison to their healthy counterparts. We propose that IL-33 becomes an additional immunostimulatory factor used to induce Treg expansion in future clinical trials of adoptive therapy in type 1 diabetes.

  4. FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells with regulatory properties can be cultured from colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, J; Agnholt, J; Hoffmann, H J; Rømer, J L; Hvas, C L; Dahlerup, J F

    2005-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance and ensure a balanced immune response competent of fighting pathogens and at the same time recognizing commensals as harmless. This feature is lost in Crohn's disease (CD). The forkhead/winged helix transcription factor FoxP3 is a master gene for Treg function and defects in the FoxP3 gene lead to a clinical picture similar to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Murine colitis can be cured by adoptive transfer of Tregs and ex vivo-generated gut-specific Tregs represent an attractive option for therapy in CD. Thus, defective Tregs could contribute to the development of CD. We cultured biopsies of colonic mucosa in the presence of high concentrations of interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-4 to overcome the anergic nature of naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ Tregs in the mucosa. We investigated the expression of FoxP3 and regulatory potential of gut-derived CD4+CD25+ T cells cultured from patients with CD and healthy individuals. The FoxP3 expression was analysed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the suppressive effect of FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells on proliferation and cytokine production of autologous CD4+ T cells was assessed by flow cytometry. Cultured gut-derived T cells with CD4+CD25+ phenotype expressed FoxP3 and were able as the freshly isolated Tregs from peripheral blood to suppress proliferation and cytokine production of autologous CD4+ T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that FoxP3+CD4+CD25+ T cells with regulatory properties can be propagated in vitro from inflamed mucosa of CD patients, which may be of interest in adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:16045746

  5. [Change of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK Cells in peripheral blood of children with acute leukemia and its possible significance in tumor immunity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ze-Lin; Hu, Guan-Yu; Chen, Fu-Xiong; Lu, Hui-Min; Wu, Zi-Liang; Li, Hua-Mei; Wei, Feng-Gui; Guan, Jing-Ming; Wu, Li-Ping

    2010-06-01

    This study was purposed to investigate the changes of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK cells in peripheral blood of acute leukemia children at different stages, the function of immune system and the possible roles of the CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells as well as NK cells in leukemia immunity. The number and proportion of CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T cells and NK cells were detected by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 53 acute leukemia children, including 25 patients in new diagnosis and 28 patients in continuous complete remission (CCR), and were compared with that of 20 normal children. The results indicated that the mean proportion of CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(+) in CD4(+) T cells of peripheral blood in newly diagnosed patients, patients with CCR and normal children were (9.55 +/- 2.41)%, (8.54 +/- 2.51)% and (6.25 +/- 0.85)% respectively, the mean proportions of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(+) in newly diagnosed patients and patients with CCR were higher than that in normal children, the mean proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(+) in newly diagnosed patients were higher than that in patients with CCR (p cell count in patients with acute leukaemia decreased as compared with normal control, while after achieving CCR, the NK cell count in patients were also less than that in normal control (4.11 +/- 3.87% and 10.41 +/- 7.20% vs 14.06 +/- 5.95%, p regulatory T cells is a simple, reproductive and accurate method, and the CD4(+) CD25(+) CD127(+) T cells can better reflect the proportion of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells. The increase of regulatory T cells and decrease of NK cells in pediatric patients with acute leukemia indicate that the function of NK cells may be depressed. Treg T cells play a role in occurrence and development of leukemia, and are involved in down-regulating NK cell function.

  6. FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells with regulatory properties can be cultured from colonic mucosa of patients with Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Johanne Lade

    2005-01-01

    Summary CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (T(regs)) are involved in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance and ensure a balanced immune response competent of fighting pathogens and at the same time recognizing commensals as harmless. This feature is lost in Crohn's disease (CD). The forkhead/wing......(+) T cells. Thus, we demonstrate that FoxP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells with regulatory properties can be propagated in vitro from inflamed mucosa of CD patients, which may be of interest in adoptive immunotherapy....

  7. CD4~+Foxp3~+ regulatory T cells converted by rapamycin from peripheral CD4~+ CD25~-naive T cells display more potent regulatory ability in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-fei; GAO Jie; ZHANG Dong; WANG Zi-han; ZHU Ji-ye

    2010-01-01

    Background Rapamycin (RAPA) is a relatively new immunosuppressant drug that functions as a serine/threonine kinase inhibitor to prevent rejection in organ transplantation. RAPA blocks activation of T-effector (Teff) cells by inhibiting the response to interleukin-2. Recently, RAPA was also shown to selectively expand the T-regulator (Treg) cell population. To date, no studies have examined the mechanism by which RAPA converts Teff cells to Treg cells. Methods Peripheral CD4~+CD25~- naive T cells were cultivated with RAPA and B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vitro. CD4~+CD25~- T cells were harvested after 6 days and analyzed for expression of forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) using flow cytometry. CD4~+CD25~+CD127~- subsets as the converted Tregs were isolated from the mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) with CD127 negative selection, followed by CD4 and CD25 positive selection using microbeads and magnetic separation column (MSC). Moreover, mRNA was extracted from converted Tregs and C57BL/6 naive CD4~+CD25~+ T cells and Foxp3 levels were examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (rt-PCR). A total of 1×10~5 carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-labeled naive CD4~+CD25~- T cells/well from C57BL/6 mice were cocultured with DBA/2 or C3H maturation of dendritic cells (mDCs) (0.25×10~5/well) in 96-well round-bottom plates for 6 days. Then 1×10~5 or 0.25×10~5 converted Treg cells were added to every well as regulatory cells. Cells were harvested after 6 days of culture and analyzed for proliferation of CFSE-labeled naive CD4~+CD25~- T cells using flow cytometry. Data were analyzed using CellQuest software.Results We found that RAPA can convert peripheral CD4~+CD25~- naive T Cells to CD4~+Foxp3~+ Treg cells using B cells as APCs, and this subtype of Treg can potently suppress Teff proliferation and maintain antigenic specificity. Conclusion Our findings provide evidence that RAPA induces Treg cell conversion from Teff cells and

  8. Anti-Human Endoglin (hCD105 Immunotoxin—Containing Recombinant Single Chain Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Musarmin 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Barriuso

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Endoglin (CD105 is an accessory component of the TGF-β receptor complex, which is expressed in a number of tissues and over-expressed in the endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. Targeting endoglin with immunotoxins containing type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins has proved an effective tool to reduce blood supply to B16 mice tumor xenografts. We prepared anti-endoglin immunotoxin (IT—containing recombinant musarmin 1 (single chain ribosome-inactivating proteins linked to the mouse anti-human CD105 44G4 mouse monoclonal antibody via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio propionate (SPDP. The immunotoxin specifically killed L929 fibroblast mouse cells transfected with the short form of human endoglin with IC50 values in the range of 5 × 10−10 to 10−9 M.

  9. Anti-Human Endoglin (hCD105) Immunotoxin-Containing Recombinant Single Chain Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Musarmin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriuso, Begoña; Antolín, Pilar; Arias, F Javier; Girotti, Alessandra; Jiménez, Pilar; Cordoba-Diaz, Manuel; Cordoba-Diaz, Damián; Girbés, Tomás

    2016-06-10

    Endoglin (CD105) is an accessory component of the TGF-β receptor complex, which is expressed in a number of tissues and over-expressed in the endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. Targeting endoglin with immunotoxins containing type 2 ribosome-inactivating proteins has proved an effective tool to reduce blood supply to B16 mice tumor xenografts. We prepared anti-endoglin immunotoxin (IT)-containing recombinant musarmin 1 (single chain ribosome-inactivating proteins) linked to the mouse anti-human CD105 44G4 mouse monoclonal antibody via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP). The immunotoxin specifically killed L929 fibroblast mouse cells transfected with the short form of human endoglin with IC50 values in the range of 5 × 10(-10) to 10(-9) M.

  10. Expansion of CD25-Negative Forkhead Box P3-Positive T Cells during HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matías T. Angerami

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB and HIV alter the immune system, and coinfected (HIV-TB individuals usually present deregulations of T-lymphocytic immune response. We previously observed an increased frequency of “unconventional” CD4+CD25−FoxP3+ Treg (uTreg population during HIV-TB disease. Therefore, we aimed to explore the phenotype and function of uTreg and conventional CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg subsets (cTreg in this context. We evaluated the expression of CD39, programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1, glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR, and the effector/memory distribution by flow cytometry in cTreg and uTreg. Also, IL-10, TGF-β, IFN-γ production, and the suppressor capacity of uTregs were analyzed in cocultures with effector lymphocytes and compared with the effect of regulatory T cells (Tregs. We found diminished expression of CD39 and higher levels of PD1 on uTreg compared to cTreg in both HIV-TB and healthy donors (HD. In addition, uTreg and cTreg showed differences in maturation status in both HIV-TB and HD groups, due to the expansion of effector memory uTregs. Interestingly, both HIV-TB and HD showed a pronounced production of IFN-γ in uTreg population, though no significant differences were observed for IL-10 and TGF-β production between uTreg and cTreg. Moreover, IFN-γ+ cells were restricted to the CD39− uTreg population. Finally, when the suppressor capacity was evaluated, both uTreg and cTreg inhibited polyclonal T cell-proliferation and IFN-γ production in a similar extent. These findings suggest that uTregs, which are expanded during HIV-TB coinfection, exert regulatory functions in a similar way to cTregs despite an altered surface expression of Treg characteristic markers and differences in cytokine production.

  11. Saudi anti-human cancer plants database (SACPD): A collection of plants with anti-human cancer activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Ateeq Ahmed

    2018-01-30

    Several anticancer drugs have been developed from natural products such as plants. Successful experiments in inhibiting the growth of human cancer cell lines using Saudi plants were published over the last three decades. Up to date, there is no Saudi anticancer plants database as a comprehensive source for the interesting data generated from these experiments. Therefore, there was a need for creating a database to collect, organize, search and retrieve such data. As a result, the current paper describes the generation of the Saudi anti-human cancer plants database (SACPD). The database contains most of the reported information about the naturally growing Saudi anticancer plants. SACPD comprises the scientific and local names of 91 plant species that grow naturally in Saudi Arabia. These species belong to 38 different taxonomic families. In Addition, 18 species that represent16 family of medicinal plants and are intensively sold in the local markets in Saudi Arabia were added to the database. The website provides interesting details, including plant part containing the anticancer bioactive compounds, plants locations and cancer/cell type against which they exhibit their anticancer activity. Our survey revealed that breast, liver and leukemia were the most studied cancer cell lines in Saudi Arabia with percentages of 27%, 19% and 15%, respectively. The current SACPD represents a nucleus around which more development efforts can expand to accommodate all future submissions about new Saudi plant species with anticancer activities. SACPD will provide an excellent starting point for researchers and pharmaceutical companies who are interested in developing new anticancer drugs. SACPD is available online at https://teeqrani1.wixsite.com/sapd.

  12. CD25, CD28 and CD38 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes as a tool to predict acute rejection after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boleslawski, Emmanuel; BenOthman, Samia; Grabar, Sophie; Correia, Leonor; Podevin, Philippe; Chouzenoux, Sandrine; Soubrane, Olivier; Calmus, Yvon; Conti, Filomena

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of CD25, CD28 and CD38 (which reflects the degree of T-cell activation) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells constitutes a useful means of measuring the immune status of liver transplant recipients. Fifty-two patients enrolled in a prospective randomized study comparing cyclosporine and tacrolimus as the principal immunosuppressive drugs were monitored prospectively. The expression of CD25, CD28 and CD38 was analyzed on CD3-, CD4- and CD8-positive cells from whole blood using flow cytometry. The prognostic value of baseline and day 14 measurements regarding acute rejection was examined using Kaplan-Meier estimates for univariate analyses and the Cox model for multivariate analyses. The mean frequencies of CD28 and CD38-expressing T cells were significantly higher in patients with acute rejection (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), whereas the frequency CD25-expressing T cells did not differ significantly. Under univariate analysis, baseline CD25 levels, the type of calcineurin inhibitor, as well as the CD28 and CD38 frequencies obtained at day 14 were associated with the subsequent development of acute rejection. Under multivariate analysis, only CD28 and CD38 frequencies obtained at day 14 were independently associated with acute rejection. The evaluation of CD28 and CD38 expression in peripheral blood lymphocytes is a simple marker that could be used routinely in clinical practice to assess the level of immunosuppression.

  13. Identification and monitoring of effector and regulatory T cells during experimental arthritis based on differential expression of CD25 and CD134

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte-'t Hoen, E.N.M.; Boot, E.P.J.; Wagenaar-Hilbers, J.P.A.; Bilsen, J.H.M. van; Arkesteijn, G.J.A.; Storm, G.; Everse, L.A.; Eden, W. van; Wauben, M.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Major problems in the analysis of CD4+ effector cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) populations in an activated immune system are caused by the facts that both cell types can express CD25 and that the discriminatory marker forkhead box p3 can only be analyzed in nonviable (permeabilized) cells. Here,

  14. High soluble CD30, CD25 and IL-6 may identify patients with worse survival in CD30+ cutaneous lymphomas and early mycosis fungoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadin, Marshall E.; Pavlov, Igor; Delgado, Julio C.; Vonderheid, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Histopathology alone cannot predict outcome of patients with CD30+ primary cutaneous lymphoproliferative disorders (CD30CLPD) and early mycosis fungoides (MF). To test the hypothesis that serum cytokines/cytokine receptors provide prognostic information in these disorders, we measured soluble CD30 (sCD30), sCD25, and selected cytokines in cell cultures and sera of 116 patients with CD30CLPD and 96 patients with early MF followed up to 20 years. Significant positive correlation was found between sCD30 levels and sCD25, CD40L, IL-6, and IL-8, suggesting CD30+ neoplastic cells secrete these cytokines, but not Th2 cytokines. In vitro studies confirmed sCD30, sCD25, IL-6 and IL-8 are secreted by CD30CLPD-derived cell lines. CD30CLPD patients with above normal sCD30 and sCD25 had worse overall and disease-related survivals, but only sCD30 retained significance in Cox models that included advanced age. High sCD30 also identified patients with worse survival in early MF. Increased IL-6 and IL-8 correlated with poor disease-related survival in CD30CLPD patients, We conclude that: (1) neoplastic cells of some CD30CLPD patients do not resemble Th2 cells, (2) high serum sCD30, sCD25, IL-6, and perhaps IL-8 levels may provide prognostic information useful for patient management. PMID:22071475

  15. High Levels of IL-10 and CD4+CD25hi+ Treg Cells in Endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfred Futagbi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interplay between Epstein-Barr virus infection, malaria, and endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma is not well understood. Reports show diminished EBV-specific Th1 responses in children living in malaria endemic areas and deficiency of EBNA1-specific IFN-γ T cell responses in children with endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma (eBL. This study, therefore, examined some factors involved in the loss of EBNA-1-specific T cell responses in eBL. Methods: T-cell subset frequencies, activation, and IFN-γ- or IL-4-specific responses were analyzed by flow-cytometry. Plasma cytokine levels were measured by ELISA. Results: CD4+ and CD8+ cells in age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 3 expressed more IFN-γ in response to all immunostimulants than in pediatric endemic BL (eBL patients (n = 4. In healthy controls, IFN-γ expression was higher than IL-4 expression, whereas in eBL patients the expression of IL-4 by CD4+ cells to EBNA-1 was slightly higher than IFN-γ. Moreover, the blood levels of TNF-α was significantly lower (p = 0.004 while IL-10 was significantly higher (p = 0.038, in eBL patients (n = 21 compared to controls (n = 16. Additionally, the frequency of CD4+CD25hi+ T cells was higher in both age-matched acute uncomplicated malaria (n = 26 and eBL (n = 14 patients compared to healthy controls (n = 19; p = 0.000 and p = 0.027, respectively. Conclusion: The data suggest that reduced Th1 response in eBL might be due to increased levels of IL-10 and T reg cells.

  16. High Levels of IL-10 and CD4+CD25hi+ Treg Cells in Endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagbi, Godfred; Gyan, Ben; Nunoo, Harriet; Tetteh, John K.A.; Welbeck, Jennifer E.; Renner, Lorna Awo; Ofori, Michael; Dodoo, Daniel; Edoh, Dominic A.; Akanmori, Bartholomew D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The interplay between Epstein-Barr virus infection, malaria, and endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma is not well understood. Reports show diminished EBV-specific Th1 responses in children living in malaria endemic areas and deficiency of EBNA1-specific IFN-γ T cell responses in children with endemic Burkitt’s Lymphoma (eBL). This study, therefore, examined some factors involved in the loss of EBNA-1-specific T cell responses in eBL. Methods: T-cell subset frequencies, activation, and IFN-γ- or IL-4-specific responses were analyzed by flow-cytometry. Plasma cytokine levels were measured by ELISA. Results: CD4+ and CD8+ cells in age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n = 3) expressed more IFN-γ in response to all immunostimulants than in pediatric endemic BL (eBL) patients (n = 4). In healthy controls, IFN-γ expression was higher than IL-4 expression, whereas in eBL patients the expression of IL-4 by CD4+ cells to EBNA-1 was slightly higher than IFN-γ. Moreover, the blood levels of TNF-α was significantly lower (p = 0.004) while IL-10 was significantly higher (p = 0.038), in eBL patients (n = 21) compared to controls (n = 16). Additionally, the frequency of CD4+CD25hi+ T cells was higher in both age-matched acute uncomplicated malaria (n = 26) and eBL (n = 14) patients compared to healthy controls (n = 19; p = 0.000 and p = 0.027, respectively). Conclusion: The data suggest that reduced Th1 response in eBL might be due to increased levels of IL-10 and T reg cells. PMID:28536409

  17. High Levels of IL-10 and CD4+CD25hi+ Treg Cells in Endemic Burkitt's Lymphoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagbi, Godfred; Gyan, Ben; Nunoo, Harriet; Tetteh, John K A; Welbeck, Jennifer E; Renner, Lorna Awo; Ofori, Michael; Dodoo, Daniel; Edoh, Dominic A; Akanmori, Bartholomew D

    2015-08-04

    The interplay between Epstein-Barr virus infection, malaria, and endemic Burkitt's Lymphoma is not well understood. Reports show diminished EBV-specific Th1 responses in children living in malaria endemic areas and deficiency of EBNA1-specific IFN-γ T cell responses in children with endemic Burkitt's Lymphoma (eBL). This study, therefore, examined some factors involved in the loss of EBNA-1-specific T cell responses in eBL. T-cell subset frequencies, activation, and IFN-γ- or IL-4-specific responses were analyzed by flow-cytometry. Plasma cytokine levels were measured by ELISA. CD4+ and CD8+ cells in age- and sex-matched healthy controls ( n = 3) expressed more IFN-γ in response to all immunostimulants than in pediatric endemic BL (eBL) patients ( n = 4). In healthy controls, IFN-γ expression was higher than IL-4 expression, whereas in eBL patients the expression of IL-4 by CD4+ cells to EBNA-1 was slightly higher than IFN-γ. Moreover, the blood levels of TNF-α was significantly lower ( p = 0.004) while IL-10 was significantly higher ( p = 0.038), in eBL patients ( n = 21) compared to controls ( n = 16). Additionally, the frequency of CD4+CD25hi+ T cells was higher in both age-matched acute uncomplicated malaria ( n = 26) and eBL ( n = 14) patients compared to healthy controls ( n = 19; p = 0.000 and p = 0.027, respectively). The data suggest that reduced Th1 response in eBL might be due to increased levels of IL-10 and T reg cells.

  18. Abnormally high levels of virus-infected IFN-gamma+ CCR4+ CD4+ CD25+ T cells in a retrovirus-associated neuroinflammatory disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihisa Yamano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus associated with both HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP, which is a chronic neuroinflammatory disease, and adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. The pathogenesis of HAM/TSP is known to be as follows: HTLV-1-infected T cells trigger a hyperimmune response leading to neuroinflammation. However, the HTLV-1-infected T cell subset that plays a major role in the accelerated immune response has not yet been identified. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that CD4(+CD25(+CCR4(+ T cells are the predominant viral reservoir, and their levels are increased in HAM/TSP patients. While CCR4 is known to be selectively expressed on T helper type 2 (Th2, Th17, and regulatory T (Treg cells in healthy individuals, we demonstrate that IFN-gamma production is extraordinarily increased and IL-4, IL-10, IL-17, and Foxp3 expression is decreased in the CD4(+CD25(+CCR4(+ T cells of HAM/TSP patients as compared to those in healthy individuals, and the alteration in function is specific to this cell subtype. Notably, the frequency of IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+CD25(+CCR4(+Foxp3(- T cells is dramatically increased in HAM/TSP patients, and this was found to be correlated with disease activity and severity. CONCLUSIONS: We have defined a unique T cell subset--IFN-gamma(+CCR4(+CD4(+CD25(+ T cells--that is abnormally increased and functionally altered in this retrovirus-associated inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system.

  19. EFFECT OF LIPOSOMAL CLODRONATE-DEPENDENT DEPLETION OF PROFESSIONAL ANTIGEN PRESENTING CELLS ON NUMBERS AND PHENOTYPE OF CANINE CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ REGULATORY T CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kriston F.; Stokes, John V.; Gunnoe, Sagen A.; Follows, Joyce S.; Shafer, Lydia; Ammari, Mais G.; Archer, Todd M.; Thomason, John M.; Mackin, Andrew J.; Pinchuk, Lesya M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are known to control autoreactivity during and subsequent to the development of the peripheral immune system. Professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes, have an important role in inducing Tregs. For the first time, this study evaluated proportions and phenotypes of Tregs in canine peripheral blood depleted of professional APCs, utilizing liposomal clodronate (LC) and multicolor flow cytometry analysis. Our results demonstrate that LC exposure promoted short term decreases followed by significant increases in the proportions or absolute numbers of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs in dogs. In general, the LC-dependent Treg fluctuations were similar to the changes in the levels of CD14+ monocytes in Walker hounds. However, the proportions of monocytes showed more dramatic changes compared to the proportions of Tregs that were visually unchanged after LC treatment over the study period. At the same time, absolute Treg numbers showed, similarly to the levels of CD14+ monocytes, significant compensatory gains as well as the recovery during the normalization period. We confirm the previous data that CD4+ T cells with the highest CD25 expression were highly enriched for FOXP3. Furthermore, for the first time, we report that CD4+CD25lowFOXP3+ is the major regulatory T cell subset affected by LC exposure. The increases within the lowest CD25 expressers of CD4+FOXP3+ cells together with compensatory gains in the proportion of CD14+ monocytes during compensatory and normalization periods suggest the possible direct or indirect roles of monocytes in active recruitment and generation of Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells. PMID:25950023

  20. Expression of Th17 and CD4+ CD25+ T regulatory cells in peripheral blood of acute leukemia patients and their prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Mingli; Guo, Li; Ma, Yan; Li, Yi

    2016-11-01

    To discuss the expression of T helper cell 17 (Th17) cells and CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) in peripheral blood (PB) of patients with acute leukemia (AL), and to explore the relationship between them and disease prognosis. 40 patients diagnosed with acute leukemia in The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from July 2012 to August 2014 were selected as the observation group. Meanwhile, 40 healthy people were taken as the control group. Flow Cytometry Method (FCM) was used to detect the level of Th17 cells and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells in peripheral blood of the two groups, and enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) method was used to test the level of IL17 and TGF-β in peripheral blood of two groups; reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was adopted to analyze the mRNA levels of RORγT and Foxp3 in peripheral blood. In addition, we examined the levels of Th17 and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells and associated factor levels in patients with remission after AL chemotherapy. the Th17 cells (CD3 + CD4 + IL-17 + ) in acute leukemia patients accounted for (1.51±0.27)%, which was significantly higher than that of control group (0.36±0.23)%, with statistical significance (t=20.51, Pcells in AL patients was (3.37±0.48)%, which was significantly higher than that of control group of (1.26±0.27)%, with statistical significance (t=24.23, Pt=7.83, Pt=7.83, Pt=12.27, Pt=7.89, Pcells and CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + cells, and the serum levels of IL-17 and TGF-β in acute leukemia patients all decreased significantly after 6 months of chemotherapy, and the difference was statistically significant (Pcells, CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3 + cells and their secretory proteins IL-17, TGF-β and transcription factors were significantly increased in AL patients. Therefore, regular detection of peripheral blood Th17 and Treg cells, as well as their secretory proteins are useful for monitoring the immune status and prognosis of patients.

  1. In-vitro inhibition of IFNγ+ iTreg mediated by monoclonal antibodies against cell surface determinants essential for iTreg function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Volker

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IFNγ-producing CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ PBL represent a subtype of iTreg that are associated with good long-term graft outcome in renal transplant recipients and suppress alloresponses in-vitro. To study the mechanism of immunosuppression, we attempted to block cell surface receptors and thereby inhibited the function of this iTreg subset in-vitro using monoclonal antibodies and recombinant proteins. Methods PBL of healthy control individuals were stimulated polyclonally in-vitro in the presence of monoclonal antibodies or recombinant proteins against/of CD178, CD152, CD279, CD28, CD95, and HLA-DR. Induction of IFNγ+ iTreg and proliferation of effector cells was determined using four-color fluorescence flow cytometry. Blockade of iTreg function was analyzed using polyclonally stimulated co-cultures with separated CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL. Results High monoclonal antibody concentrations inhibited the induction of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+IFNγ+ PBL (anti-CD152, anti-CD279, anti-CD95: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL (anti-CD178, anti-CD152, anti-CD279, anti-CD95: p +CD25+Foxp3+IFNγ+ PBL (rCD152 and rCD95: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL showed lower cell proliferation than co-cultures with CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL (p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL-containing co-cultures in the presence of monoclonal antibody (anti-CD28, anti-CD152, anti-CD279: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL (with the exception anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody: p +CD25+CD127-IFNγ- PBL but do not efficiently block suppressive iTreg function in co-cultures with CD4+CD25+CD127-IFNγ+ PBL. Conclusions CD178, CD152, CD279, CD28, CD95, and HLA-DR determinants are important for induction and suppressive function of IFNγ+ iTreg.

  2. The prognostic value of peripheral CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes among early stage and triple negative breast cancer patients receiving dendritic cells-cytokine induced killer cells infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Qing-Kun; Ren, Jun; Zhou, Xin-Na; Wang, Xiao-Li; Song, Guo-Hong; Di, Li-Jun; Yu, Jing; Hobeika, Amy; Morse, Michael A; Yuan, Yan-Hua; Yang, Hua-Bing; Lyerly, Herbert Kim

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the prognostic value of CD4+CD25+ T lymphocyte in peripheral blood among breast cancer patients treated with adoptive T lymphocytes immunotherapy. 217 patients participated in the follow-up study. CD4+CD25+ proportion was measured by flow cytometry in peripheral T cells. The median survival was estimated by Kaplan-Meier curve, Log-rank test and Cox hazard proportion regression model, between groups of CD4+CD25+ proportion more than 5% and less than or equal to 5% in peripheral T cells. Peripheral CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes had not a relationship with progression-free survival. It was featured that above 5% peripheral CD4+CD25+ proportion of T cells was related with the median overall survival by a shorten of 51 months (p < 0.05) with the HR 1.65 (95%CI 1.04, 2.62). Above 5% CD4+CD25+proportion of T cells produced the HR to be 1.76 (95%CI 1.07, 2.87) In stage 0-II patients, and 3.59 (95%CI 1.05, 12.29) in triple negative breast cancer patients. Cellular immunity restoration recovered by adoptive T cell infusions which resulted in less proportion of peripheral CD4+CD25+T lymphocytes could be a potential prognostic indicator among early stage and triple negative patients.

  3. [Changes of FoxP3, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, TLR2 and TLR9 in children with infectious mononucleosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wang, Zuo-Feng; Cao, Mei; Wang, Zhi-Ying

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TLR2, TLR9, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) and transcription factor FoxP3 in the pathogenesis of children with infectious mononucleosis (IM). Thirty-five acute IM patients admitted in our hospital from April 2010 to January 2011 were enrolled in this study. Thirty-five healthy subjects were taken as control. The thirty-five patients before treatment were considered as patients in acute stage, after treatment and without clinical symptom they were thought as patients in recovery stage. The expression levels of TLR2, TLR9 and FoxP3 mRNA were detected by real time PCR using SYBR Green I. The expression of T lymphocyte subset CD4(+)CD25(+) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was detected by flow cytometry. The results showed that the relative levels of TLR2 mRNA (4.03 ± 0.56), TLR9 mRNA (8.88 ± 1.56) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of IM patients in acute stage were significantly higher than those of the controls [TLR2 mRNA (2.22 ± 0.57), TLR9 mRNA (3.63 ± 1.30)] and IM patients in recovery stage [TLR2 mRNA (2.76 ± 0.83), TLR9 mRNA (5.34 ± 1.60)] (P 0.05). It is concluded that the expression of CD4(+)CD25(+)regulatory T cells is reduced, and its special transcription factor FoxP3 mRNA is down-regulated, but expression levels of TLR2 mRNA, TLR9 mRNA are up-regulated in IM patients of acute stage.

  4. Dysregulation of CD4+CD25+CD127lowFOXP3+ regulatory T cells in HIV-infected pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Lilian; Gaardbo, Julie C; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy represents a major challenge to immunologic tolerance. How the fetal "semiallograft" evades maternal immune attack is unknown. Pregnancy success may involve alteration of both central (thymic) and peripheral tolerance mechanisms. HIV infection is characterized by CD4(+) T-cell depletion...... prospectively during pregnancy and postpartum. A significant expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells indicating alteration of peripheral tolerance was seen during second trimester, but only in HIV-negative women. HIV-infected women had lower CD4 counts, lower thymic output and Th-2...

  5. Slow desensitization of imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions and dynamic changes of drug-specific CD4+CD25+CD134+ lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaewsongkram, Jettanong; Thantiworasit, Pattarawat; Sodsai, Pimpayao; Buranapraditkun, Supranee; Mongkolpathumrat, Pungjai

    2016-11-01

    Imatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and certain neoplastic diseases; however, nonimmediate adverse reactions are common. To describe the process of imatinib slow desensitization in patients who experienced nonimmediate reactions to imatinib and the dynamic change in drug-specific CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T-lymphocyte percentages. Five patients diagnosed as having GISTs and with a recent history of imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions (maculopapular exanthema with eosinophilia, exfoliative dermatitis, palmar-plantar erythrodysesthesia, and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms) were desensitized using a slow desensitization protocol. The reintroduced imatinib dosage was stepped up every week starting from 10 mg/d and increasing to 25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 200, and 300 mg/d until the target dose of 400 mg/d was achieved. Prednisolone of up to 30 mg/d was allowed if allergic reactions recurred. The percentages of CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells present after incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with imatinib, at baseline and after successful desensitization, were analyzed using flow cytometric analysis. By using a slow desensitization technique, all patients were able to receive 400 mg/d of imatinib, and prednisolone was gradually tapered off. The percentages of imatinib-induced CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells decreased from a mean (SD) of 11.3% (6.5%) and 13.4% (7.3%) at baseline to 3.2% (0.7%) and 3.0% (1.1%) after successful desensitization, when stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with 1 and 2 μM of imatinib, respectively. Slow desensitization is a helpful procedure in treating patients with imatinib-induced nonimmediate reactions other than simple maculopapular exanthema. The reduced percentages of imatinib-induced CD4 + CD25 + CD134 + T cells in these patients may be associated with immune tolerance. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  6. IL-15 augments TCR-induced CD4+ T cell expansion in vitro by inhibiting the suppressive function of CD25 High CD4+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom L Van Belle

    Full Text Available Due to its critical role in NK cell differentiation and CD8(+ T cell homeostasis, the importance of IL-15 is more firmly established for cytolytic effectors of the immune system than for CD4(+ T cells. The increased levels of IL-15 found in several CD4(+ T cell-driven (auto- immune diseases prompted us to examine how IL-15 influences murine CD4(+ T cell responses to low dose TCR-stimulation in vitro. We show that IL-15 exerts growth factor activity on both CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells in a TCR-dependent and Cyclosporin A-sensitive manner. In CD4(+ T cells, IL-15 augmented initial IL-2-dependent expansion and once IL-15Rα was upregulated, IL-15 sustained the TCR-induced expression of IL-2/15Rβ, supporting proliferation independently of secreted IL-2. Moreover, IL-15 counteracts CD4(+ T cell suppression by a gradually expanding CD25(HighCD4(+ T cell subset that expresses Foxp3 and originates from CD4(+CD25(+ Tregs. These in vitro data suggest that IL-15 may dramatically strengthen the T cell response to suboptimal TCR-triggering by overcoming an activation threshold set by Treg that might create a risk for autoimmune pathology.

  7. LAP TGF-Beta Subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg Cells is Increased and Overexpresses LAP TGF-Beta in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islas-Vazquez, Lorenzo; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Galicia-Velasco, Miriam; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Camacho-Mendoza, Catalina; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed histologic type of lung cancer, is associated with smoking. Cigarette smoke promotes inflammation on the airways, which might be mediated by Th17 cells. This inflammatory environment may contribute to tumor development. In contrast, some reports indicate that tumors may induce immunosuppressive Treg cells to dampen immune reactivity, supporting tumor growth and progression. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether chronic inflammation or immunosuppression predominates at the systemic level in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and several cytokines and Th17 and Treg cells were studied. Higher proportions of IL-17-producing CD4+ T-cells were found in smoking control subjects and in lung adenocarcinoma patients compared to nonsmoking control subjects. In addition, lung adenocarcinoma patients increased both plasma concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and proportions of Latency Associated Peptide (LAP) TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells, which overexpressed LAP TGF-β. This knowledge may lead to the development of immunotherapies that could inhibit the suppressor activity mediated by the LAP TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells to promote reactivity of immune cells against lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:26582240

  8. LAP TGF-Beta Subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg Cells is Increased and Overexpresses LAP TGF-Beta in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Islas-Vazquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed histologic type of lung cancer, is associated with smoking. Cigarette smoke promotes inflammation on the airways, which might be mediated by Th17 cells. This inflammatory environment may contribute to tumor development. In contrast, some reports indicate that tumors may induce immunosuppressive Treg cells to dampen immune reactivity, supporting tumor growth and progression. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether chronic inflammation or immunosuppression predominates at the systemic level in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and several cytokines and Th17 and Treg cells were studied. Higher proportions of IL-17-producing CD4+ T-cells were found in smoking control subjects and in lung adenocarcinoma patients compared to nonsmoking control subjects. In addition, lung adenocarcinoma patients increased both plasma concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and proportions of Latency Associated Peptide (LAP TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells, which overexpressed LAP TGF-β. This knowledge may lead to the development of immunotherapies that could inhibit the suppressor activity mediated by the LAP TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells to promote reactivity of immune cells against lung adenocarcinoma cells.

  9. Immunoradiometric assay for cytomegalovirus-specific IgG antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapper, P.E.; Cleator, G.M.; Prinja-Wolks, D.; Morris, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (radio-immunosorbent test; RIST) for the detection of IgG antibodies to human herpesvirus 4 [human cytomegalovirus (CMV)] has been developed. The technique utilizes CMV antigen passively adsorbed to a polyvinyl microtitration plate and a radiolabelled murine monoclonal anti-human IgG antibody to detect binding of human antibody to the 'solid phase' reagent. The assay was optimized, and its specifity confirmed by testing paired acute and convalescent sera from patients with acute CMV or other human herpesvirus infections. To determine the assay's sensitivity 1433 blood donor sera were examined. The RIST was more sensitive than a standard complement fixation (CFT). Use of a monoclonal anti-human IgG antibody in the RIST reduced non-specific binding to the control uninfected cell antigen such that blood donor sera could be tested in the assay using only a CMV antigen without generating an unacceptable false positive rate. (author). 23 refs.; 1 tab

  10. Auditory stimulation of opera music induced prolongation of murine cardiac allograft survival and maintained generation of regulatory CD4+CD25+ cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchiyama Masateru

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between the immune response and brain functions such as olfactory, auditory, and visual sensations are likely. This study investigated the effect of sounds on alloimmune responses in a murine model of cardiac allograft transplantation. Methods Naïve CBA mice (H2k underwent transplantation of a C57BL/6 (B6, H2b heart and were exposed to one of three types of music--opera (La Traviata, classical (Mozart, and New Age (Enya--or one of six different single sound frequencies, for 7 days. Additionally, we prepared two groups of CBA recipients with tympanic membrane perforation exposed to opera for 7 days and CBA recipients exposed to opera for 7 days before transplantation (pre-treatment. An adoptive transfer study was performed to determine whether regulatory cells were generated in allograft recipients. Immunohistochemical, cell-proliferation, cytokine, and flow cytometry assessments were also performed. Results CBA recipients of a B6 cardiac graft that were exposed to opera music and Mozart had significantly prolonged allograft survival (median survival times [MSTs], 26.5 and 20 days, respectively, whereas those exposed to a single sound frequency (100, 500, 1000, 5000, 10,000, or 20,000 Hz or Enya did not (MSTs, 7.5, 8, 9, 8, 7.5, 8.5 and 11 days, respectively. Untreated, CBA mice with tympanic membrane perforations and CBA recipients exposed to opera for 7 days before transplantation (pre-treatment rejected B6 cardiac grafts acutely (MSTs, 7, 8 and 8 days, respectively. Adoptive transfer of whole splenocytes, CD4+ cells, or CD4+CD25+ cells from opera-exposed primary allograft recipients resulted in significantly prolonged allograft survival in naive secondary recipients (MSTs, 36, 68, and > 100 days, respectively. Proliferation of splenocytes, interleukin (IL-2 and interferon (IFN-γ production was suppressed in opera-exposed mice, and production of IL-4 and IL-10 from opera-exposed transplant recipients increased

  11. Radioimmunological proof of thyroglobulin antibodies in humans by the use of a double antibody method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, V.

    1982-01-01

    Thyroid antibodies, especially thyroglobulin antibodies, allow themselves to be proven with the double antibody method, in competitive radio binding assays and with the solid phase technique. These methods offer advantages relative to sensitivity and quantifiability. In this work a sensitive radioimmunoassay as a double antibody method was worked out whereby a 125 I-thyroglobulin/thyroglobulin antibody immune complex was precipitated out using anti-human immunoglobulin. The measured results from the radioimmunoassay show a good correlation with the results of the immune histological findings. A high to very high Tg antibody level occurs with autoimmune thyroiditis (80%), primary hypothyroidism (74%) and hyperthyroidism (70%). The control values with healthy people came to less than 5% specific binding. In correlation with the results of other authors this method is advantageous relative to test start and evaluation procedures. (orig.) [de

  12. Inhibition of Allograft Inflammatory Factor-1 in Dendritic Cells Restrains CD4+ T Cell Effector Responses and Induces CD25+Foxp3+ T Regulatory Subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M. Elizondo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF1 is a cytoplasmic scaffold protein shown to influence immune responses in macrophages and microglial cells. The protein contains Ca2+ binding EF-hand and PDZ interaction domains important for mediating intracellular signaling complexes. This study now reports that AIF1 is expressed in CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC and silencing of expression restrains induction of antigen-specific CD4+ T cell effector responses. AIF1 knockdown in murine DC resulted in impaired T cell proliferation and skewed polarization away from T helper type 1 and 17 fates. In turn, there was a parallel expansion of IL-10-producing and CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory subsets. These studies are the first to demonstrate that AIF1 expression in DC serves as a potent governor of cognate T cell responses and presents a novel target for engineering tolerogenic DC-based immunotherapies.

  13. Dysregulation of CD4+CD25+CD127lowFOXP3+ regulatory T cells in HIV-infected pregnant women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolte, Lilian; Gaardbo, Julie C; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy represents a major challenge to immunologic tolerance. How the fetal "semiallograft" evades maternal immune attack is unknown. Pregnancy success may involve alteration of both central (thymic) and peripheral tolerance mechanisms. HIV infection is characterized by CD4(+) T-cell depletion......, chronic immune activation, and altered lymphocyte subsets. We studied immunologic consequences of pregnancy in 20 HIV-infected women receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), and for comparison in 16 HIV-negative women. Lymphocyte subsets, thymic output, and cytokine profiles were measured...... prospectively during pregnancy and postpartum. A significant expansion of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells indicating alteration of peripheral tolerance was seen during second trimester, but only in HIV-negative women. HIV-infected women had lower CD4 counts, lower thymic output and Th-2...

  14. Naturally occurring CD4+ CD25+ FOXP3+ T-regulatory cells are increased in chronic myeloid leukemia patients not in complete cytogenetic remission and can be immunosuppressive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Jose M; Wang, Lihui; Owen, Sally; Knight, Katy; Watmough, Sarah J; Clark, Richard E

    2010-12-01

    Clinical presentation of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) requires not only the deregulated tyrosine kinase BCR-ABL, but also the failure of an immune response against BCR-ABL-expressing cells. T-cell responses against BCR-ABL and other antigens are well-described, but their relevance to the in vivo control of CML is unclear. The suppressive role of naturally occurring T regulatory (T-reg) cells in antitumor immunity is well-established, although little is known about their role in modulating the T-cell response to BCR-ABL. Naturally occurring T-reg cells were characterized and quantified by flow cytometry in 39 CML patients and 10 healthy donors. Their function was studied by observing their effect on responses to purified protein derivative, a recall antigen, and on the response of an autologous T-cell line recognizing BCR-ABL. T-reg cells were CD4(+), CD25(+), FOXP3(+), CD127(low), and CD62L(high). T-reg numbers in patients in complete cytogenetic remission were significantly lower than in patients not in complete cytogenetic remission (p T-reg cell depletion using anti-CD25 selection enhanced proliferative responses to purified protein derivative. Furthermore, the interferon-γ and/or granzyme-B production of effector cells specific for viral peptides or a BCR-ABL HLA-A3-restricted peptide was inhibited when autologous T-reg cells were present. Taken together, these data suggest a role for T-reg cells in limiting immune responses in CML patients and this may include immune responses to BCR-ABL. The increased frequency of T-reg cells in patients with high levels of BCR-ABL transcripts indicates that an immune mechanism may be important in the control of CML. Copyright © 2010 ISEH - Society for Hematology and Stem Cells. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An increase in CD3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells after administration of umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells during sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Chao

    Full Text Available Sepsis remains an important cause of death worldwide, and vigorous immune responses during sepsis could be beneficial for bacterial clearance but at the price of collateral damage to self tissues. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been found to modulate the immune system and attenuate sepsis. In the present study, MSCs derived from bone marrow and umbilical cord were used and compared. With a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP model, the mechanisms of MSC-mediated immunoregulation during sepsis were studied by determining the changes of circulating inflammation-associated cytokine profiles and peripheral blood mononuclear cells 18 hours after CLP-induced sepsis. In vitro, bone marrow-derived MSCs (BMMSCs and umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UCMSCs showed a similar morphology and surface marker expression. UCMSCs had stronger potential for osteogenesis but lower for adipogenesis than BMMSCs. Compared with rats receiving PBS only after CLP, the percentage of circulating CD3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells and the ratio of Treg cells/T cells were elevated significantly in rats receiving MSCs. Further experiment regarding Treg cell function demonstrated that the immunosuppressive capacity of Treg cells from rats with CLP-induced sepsis was decreased, but could be restored by administration of MSCs. Compared with rats receiving PBS only after CLP, serum levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α were significantly lower in rats receiving MSCs after CLP. There were no differences between BMMSCs and UCMSCs. In summary, this work provides the first in vivo evidence that administering BMMSCs or UCMSCs to rats with CLP-induced sepsis could increase circulating CD3+CD4+CD25+ Treg cells and Treg cells/T cells ratio, enhance Treg cell suppressive function, and decrease serum levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α, suggesting the immunomodulatory association of Treg cells and MSCs during sepsis.

  16. Assessment of the frequency of regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+CD127-) in children with hemophilia A: relation to factor VIII inhibitors and disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Asrar, Mohamed Abo; Hamed, Ahmed El-Saeed; Darwish, Yasser Wagih; Ismail, Eman Abdel Rahman; Ismail, Noha Ali

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly growing evidence showed that regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in tolerance to coagulation factors and may be involved in the pathogenesis of inhibitor formation in patients with hemophilia. We determined the percentage of Tregs (CD4CD25CD127) in 45 children with hemophilia A compared with 45 healthy controls, and assessed their relation to the clinical characteristics of patients and factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitors. Patients were studied stressing on frequency of bleeding attacks, joint pain, history of viral hepatitis, and the received therapy (FVIII precipitate/cryotherapy). FVIII activity and FVIII inhibitors were assessed with flow cytometric analysis of CD4CD25CD127 Tregs. According to residual FVIII activity levels, 30 patients (66.7%) had mild/moderate hemophilia A, whereas 15 (33.3%) patients had severe hemophilia A. The frequency of Tregs was significantly lower among all patients with hemophilia A compared with controls (2.59 ± 1.1 versus 3.73 ± 1.12%; P = 0.002). Tregs were significantly decreased among patients with FVIII inhibitors compared with the inhibitor-negative group (P hemophilia A had lower Tregs levels than those without (P = 0.34 and P = 0.011, respectively). A significant positive correlation was found between the percentage of Tregs and FVIII among hemophilia A patients. ROC curve analysis revealed that the cut-off value of Tregs at 1.91% could differentiate patients with and without FVIII inhibitors, with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 91.3%. We suggest that alteration in the frequency of Tregs in young patients with hemophilia A may contribute to inhibitor formation and disease severity.

  17. Interplay of T Helper 17 Cells with CD4+CD25high FOXP3+ Tregs in Regulation of Allergic Asthma in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is evidence that Tregs are important to prevent allergic diseases like asthma but limited literature exists on role of TH17 cells in allergic diseases. Methods. Fifty children with asthma and respiratory allergy (study group and twenty healthy children (control group were recruited in this study. Total IgE levels and pulmonary function tests were assessed. The expression of Tregs and cytokines was determined by flow cytometry. Results. The average level of total IgE in study group (316.8 ± 189.8 IU/mL was significantly higher than controls (50 ± 17.5 IU/mL, P<0.0001. The frequency of TH17 cells and culture supernatant level of IL-17 in study group (12.09 ± 8.67 pg/mL was significantly higher than control group (2.01 ± 1.27 pg/mL, P<0.001. Alternatively, the frequency of FOXP3 level was significantly lower in study group [(49.00 ± 13.47%] than in control group [(95.91 ± 2.63%] and CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ to CD4+CD25+ ratio was also significantly decreased in study group [(6.33 ± 2.18%] compared to control group [(38.61 ± 11.04%]. The total serum IgE level is negatively correlated with FOXP3 level (r=-0.5273, P<0.0001. The FOXP3 expression is negatively correlated with the IL-17 levels (r=-0.5631, P<0.0001 and IL-4 levels (r=-0.2836, P=0.0460. Conclusions. Imbalance in TH17/Tregs, elevated IL-17, and IL-4 response and downregulation of FOXP3 were associated with allergic asthma.

  18. The flame retardants tetrabromobisphenol A and tetrabromobisphenol A-bisallylether suppress the induction of interleukin-2 receptor α chain (CD25) in murine splenocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pullen, Sabine; Boecker, Ronald; Tiegs, Gisa

    2003-01-01

    Polybrominated flame retardants (PBF) are frequently used additives in electronical equipment. They are ubiquitous environmental contaminants which bioaccumulate with several health effects for humans and the environment. This study investigated immunotoxic effects of the PBF tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBP A), tetrabromobisphenol A-bisallylether (TBBP A-AE), tetrabromobisphenol A-bis-(2,3-dibromopropyl-ether) (TBBP A-PE), decabromodiphenylether (DBDE), and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP) in vitro. The structurally related polychlorinated aromatic hydrocarbon 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB77) and dioxins mediate their immunotoxicity via the Ah-receptor gene complex. A highly relevant function of the Ah receptor, the induction of CYP 1A1 in hepatocytes of C57BL/6 mice by the established inducers 3-methylcholanthrene (MC) and PCB77 was compared to the effect of PBF by measurement of ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) activity. The PBF did not show any induction of CYP 1A1, while EROD activity of hepatocytes exposed to MC and PCB77 was induced 10.8- and 8.7-fold, respectively. To investigate immunotoxic effects of the flame retardants, splenocytes of C57BL/6 mice were incubated with subtoxic doses of the flame retardants and PCB77 and activated by concanavalin A (Con A). The flame retardants TBBP A and TBBP A-AE significantly inhibited the expression of interleukin-2 receptor α chain (CD25) in contrast to TBBP A-PE, DBDE, TBP, and PCB77 as shown by immunohistochemistry and quantitative analysis by laser scanning cytometry. None of the substances had any effect on the Con A-induced production of cytokines. Hence, TBBP A and TBBP A-AE may act as immunotoxic compounds by specifically inhibiting the expression of CD25

  19. Experimental immunotargeting therapy for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma using anti-human esophageal monoclonal antibody KIS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Teruhiko; Yamana, Hideaki; Higaki, Kensaku; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo; Morimatsu, Minoru

    1997-01-01

    In recent years, several MoAbs with high specificity to tumor associated antigens, have been produced and investigated for diagnosis and immunotherapy of tumors. We produced murine MoAb KIS1 against human squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus, and we evaluated it and its F (ab') 2 fragment for experimental radioimmunotherapy (RIT), RIT combined with hyperthermia (HT) and KIS1-vindesine (VDS) conjugate using tumor bearing nude mice. KIS1 has been shown to react specifically with an antigen of human squamous cell carcinoma. Scintigraphy produced high quality tumor images on 3 days following the injection of 131 I-KIS1F (ab') 2 . By 14 days following injection, tumor bearing mice treated with RIT+HT group showed significant tumor growth inhibition about 1.5, 2.1 and 1.7 times greater than that of the KIS1-VDS group, 131 I-intact KIS1 group and 131 I-KIS1F (ab') 2 group. These results suggest that RIT combined with hyperthermia may be clinically useful for tumor targeting therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. (author)

  20. Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang exerts effects on a rat model of postpartum depression by regulating inflammatory cytokines and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li JY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jingya Li,1,* Ruizhen Zhao,1,* Xiaoli Li,1 Wenjun Sun,1 Miao Qu,1 Qisheng Tang,1 Xinke Yang,1 Shujing Zhang2 1Third Affiliated Hospital, 2School of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang (SJF is composed of eight Chinese medicinal herbs. It is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating postpartum depression (PPD. Previous studies have shown that SJF treats PPD through the neuroendocrine mechanism. Aim: To further investigate the effect of SJF on the immune system, including the inflammatory response system and CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells. Materials and methods: Sprague Dawley rats were used to create an animal model of PPD by inducing hormone-simulated pregnancy followed by hormone withdrawal. After hormone withdrawal, the PPD rats were treated with SJF or fluoxetine for 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Levels of Treg cells in peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry analysis. Serum interleukin (IL-1β and IL-6 were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gene and protein expressions of IL-1RI, IL-6Rα, and gp130 in the hippocampus were observed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Results: Serum IL-1β in PPD rats increased at 2 weeks and declined from then on, while serum IL-6 increased at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Both IL-1β and IL-6 were downregulated by SJF and fluoxetine. Changes in gene and protein expressions of IL-1RI and gp130 in PPD rats were consistent with changes in serum IL-1β, and were able to be regulated by SJF and fluoxetine. The levels of Treg cells were negatively correlated with serum IL-1β and IL-6, and were decreased in PPD rats. The levels of Treg cells were increased by SJF and fluoxetine. Conclusion: Dysfunction of proinflammatory cytokines and Tregs in different stages of PPD was attenuated by SJF and fluoxetine through

  1. Antimitochondrial antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  2. 4-1BB Signaling in Conventional T Cells Drives IL-2 Production That Overcomes CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T Regulatory Cell Suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampartsoum B Barsoumian

    Full Text Available Costimulation with the recombinant SA-4-1BBL agonist of 4-1BB receptor on conventional CD4+ T cells (Tconvs overcomes the suppression mediated by naturally occurring CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs. The mechanistic basis of this observation has remained largely unknown. Herein we show that Tconvs, but not Tregs, are the direct target of SA-4-1BBL-mediated evasion of Treg suppression. IL-2 produced by Tconvs in response to 4-1BB signaling is both necessary and sufficient for overcoming Treg suppression. Supernatant from Tconvs stimulated with SA-4-1BBL contains high levels of IL-2 and overcomes Treg suppression in ex vivo Tconv:Treg cocultures. Removal of IL-2 from such supernatant restores Treg suppression and repletion of Tconv:Treg cocultures with exogenous recombinant IL-2 overcomes suppression. This study establishes 4-1BB signaling as a key circuit that regulates physical and functional equilibrium between Tregs and Tconvs with important implications for immunotherapy for indications where a fine balance between Tregs and Teffs plays a decisive role.

  3. Regulatory T cells (CD4(+)CD25(bright)FoxP3(+)) expansion in systemic sclerosis correlates with disease activity and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobodin, Gleb; Ahmad, Mohammad Sheikh; Rosner, Itzhak; Peri, Regina; Rozenbaum, Michael; Kessel, Aharon; Toubi, Elias; Odeh, Majed

    2010-01-01

    The role and function of T regulatory (Treg) cells have not been fully investigated in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Ten patients with SSc donated 20ml of peripheral blood. Activity (Valentini) and severity (Medsger) scores for SSc were calculated for all patients. Healthy volunteers (controls) were matched to each patient by gender and age. CD4(+) cells were separated using the MACS system. The numbers of Treg cells were estimated by flow cytometry after staining for CD4, CD25, and FoxP3 and calculated as patient-to-control ratio separately for each experiment. Correlations with activity and severity indices of the disease were performed. Twenty-four-hour production of TGF-beta and IL-10 by activated CD4(+) cells was measured by ELISA in culture supernatants. The numbers of Treg cells, expressed as patient-to-control ratio, correlated significantly with both activity and severity indices (r=0.71, p=0.034 and r=0.67, p=0.044, respectively). ELISA-measured production of TGF-beta and IL-10 by CD4(+) cells was similar in patients and controls. Increased numbers of Treg cells are present in patients with SSc, correlating with activity and severity of the disease. This expansion of Treg cells was not accompanied, however, by heightened TGF-beta or IL-10 production. Further studies to elaborate the causes and functional significance of Treg cell expansion in SSc are needed. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Frequency of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells in peripheral blood in relation to urinary bladder cancer malignancy indicators before and after surgical removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwicki, Wojciech; Brożyna, Anna A; Siekiera, Jerzy; Slominski, Andrzej T

    2016-03-08

    Tumor cells communicate with stromal cells, including cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), to form microenvironment inhibiting immune responses. Regulatory T cells (Tregs, CD4+CD25+FoxP3+) stimulate immune tolerance and facilitate tumor progression. We analyzed the changes in Treg frequencies assessed using flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of patients with urothelial bladder cancer before and after tumor-removal. Changes in Treg frequency were investigated in relation to clinicopathomorphological indicators of tumor malignancy and expression of RCAS1 on CAFs and TAMs. Higher Treg frequencies were observed in early phase of tumor growth (pTa-pT2), in larger tumors, with more aggressive type of invasion, and with expression of RCAS1. The later phase of tumor development, accompanied by a nonclassic differentiations and pT3-pT4 advancement, had lower number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and lower Treg frequency. Furthermore, in pT2-pT4 tumors, a decreased post-surgery Treg frequency was associated with poorer prognosis: patients with the lowest frequency of Tregs died first. These findings strongly suggest that the Treg frequencies at later phase of tumor growth, associated with a low anti-tumor response, represent a new and important prognostic indicator in urinary bladder cancer.

  5. Antigen-specific tolerance inhibits autoimmune uveitis in pre-sensitized animals by deletion and CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Bharati; Jha, Purushottam; Bora, Puran S; Bora, Nalini S

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to inhibit experimental autoimmune anterior uveitis (EAAU) by establishing antigen-specific immune tolerance in animals pre-sensitized with melanin-associated antigen (MAA). Intravenous administration of MAA on days 6, 7, 8 and 9 post-immunization induced tolerance and inhibited EAAU in all Lewis rats. The number of cells (total T cells, CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells) undergoing apoptosis dramatically increased in the popliteal lymph nodes (LNs) of the tolerized animals compared with non-tolerized animals. In addition, Fas ligand (FasL), TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) and caspase-8 were upregulated in tolerized rats. Proliferation of total lymphocytes, CD4(+)T cells and CD8(+) T cells (harvested from the popliteal LNs) in response to antigenic stimulation was drastically reduced in the state of tolerance compared with the cells from non-tolerized animals. The level of interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-2 decreased, whereas TGF-beta2 was elevated in the state of tolerance. Furthermore, the number of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) increased in the popliteal LNs of tolerized animals compared with non-tolerized animals. In conclusion, our results suggest that deletion of antigen-specific T cells by apoptosis and active suppression mediated by Tregs has an important role in the induction of antigen specific immune tolerance in animals with an established immune response against MAA.

  6. T Helper 17 Cells Interplay with CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ Tregs in Regulation of Inflammations and Autoimmune Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Jietang; Wang, Hong; Yang#, Xiao-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin-17 (IL-17)-secreting T helper 17 cells (Th17) are a recently identified CD4+ T helper subset that has been implicated in various inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Th17, along with CD4+CD25high Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and other newly emergent T helper subsets, Th9 and Tfh, have expanded the Th1-Th2 paradigm. Although this newly proposed six-subset paradigm significantly improved our understanding on the differentiation of CD4+ T helper cell subsets and the regulation of T helper cells in inflammation and autoimmunity, many questions remain to be answered. In this overview, we will briefly review the following issues: a) Old Th1-Th2 paradigm versus new multi-subset paradigm; b) Structural features of IL-17 family cytokines; c) Th17 cells; d) Effects of IL-17 on various cell types and tissues; e) IL-17 receptor and signaling pathways; f) Th17-mediated inflammations; and g) Protective mechanisms of IL-17 in infections. Lastly, we will look into the interaction of Th17 and Treg in autoimmune diseases and inflammation: Th17 cells interplay with Tregs. Regulation of autoimmunity and inflammation lies in the interplays of the different T helper subsets, therefore, better understanding of these subsets’ interactions with one another would greatly improve our approaches in developing therapy to combat inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:20515737

  7. Ageing effect on the magnetocaloric properties of Gd, Gd5Si1.9Ge2.1 and on the eutectic composition Gd75Cd25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canepa, F; Cirafici, S; Napoletano, M; Cimberle, M R; Tagliafico, L; Scarpa, F

    2008-01-01

    The ageing effects due to the interaction with typical working fluids (water and air) of magnetic refrigerant materials have been analysed for up to one year. Among the many compounds reported to exhibit a sufficiently high magnetocaloric effect, we decided to artificially age Gd, which represents the first choice high magnetocaloric element, Gd 5 Si 1.9 Ge 2.1 , belonging to the series Gd 5 (Si x Ge 4-x ) 4 which for x ∼ 0.5 displays a giant magnetocaloric effect, and finally, the eutectic Gd 75 Cd 25 alloy, presenting an almost constant adiabatic temperature rise in an interesting temperature span (260-280 K). Magnetothermal results give evidence that corrosion and corrosion/erosion processes take place with different results on the refrigerant properties of all the materials. The adiabatic temperature rise is strongly reduced due to surface oxidation which lowers thermal conduction while the effect on the refrigerant capacity Q is definitely smaller. The effects of corrosion/erosion processes are confirmed by quantitative chemical analysis performed on the refrigerant fluid before and after the ageing process. Employing working fluids with a reduced corrosive effect but with comparable thermal properties may be a viable way of avoiding corrosion damage; alternatively the use of additives to decrease the corrosive properties of the fluids is strongly suggested

  8. Orally-Induced Intestinal CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg Controlled Undesired Responses towards Oral Antigens and Effectively Dampened Food Allergic Reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Lorena Smaldini

    Full Text Available The induction of peripheral tolerance may constitute a disease-modifying treatment for allergic patients. We studied how oral immunotherapy (OIT with milk proteins controlled allergy in sensitized mice (cholera toxin plus milk proteins upon exposure to the allergen. Symptoms were alleviated, skin test was negativized, serum specific IgE and IgG1 were abrogated, a substantial reduction in the secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 by antigen-stimulated spleen cells was observed, while IL-13 gene expression in jejunum was down-regulated, and IL-10 and TGF-β were increased. In addition, we observed an induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ cells and IL-10- and TGF-β-producing regulatory T cells in the lamina propria. Finally, transfer experiments confirmed the central role of these cells in tolerance induction. We demonstrated that the oral administration of milk proteins pre- or post-sensitization controlled the Th2-immune response through the elicitation of mucosal IL-10- and TGF-β-producing Tregs that inhibited hypersensitivity symptoms and the allergic response.

  9. A Model System for Concurrent Detection of Antigen and Antibody Based on Immunological Fluorescent Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Cheng Cao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a combined antigen/antibody immunoassay implemented in a 96-well plate using fluorescent spectroscopic method. First, goat anti-human IgG was used to capture human IgG (model antigen; goat anti-human IgG (Cy3 or FITC was used to detect the model antigen; a saturating level of model antigen was then added followed by unlabelled goat anti-human IgG (model antibody; finally, Cy3 labelled rabbit anti-goat IgG was used to detect the model antibody. Two approaches were applied to the concomitant assay to analyze the feasibility. The first approach applied FITC and Cy3 when both targets were present at the same time, resulting in 50 ng/mL of the antibody detection limit and 10 ng/mL of antigen detection limit in the quantitative measurements of target concentration, taking the consideration of FRET efficiency of 68% between donor and acceptor. The sequential approach tended to lower the signal/noise (S/N ratio and the detection of the model antigen (lower than 1 ng/mL had better sensitivity than the model antibody (lower than 50 ng/mL. This combined antigen/antibody method might be useful for combined detection of antigens and antibodies. It will be helpful to screen for both antigen and antibody particularly in the situations of the multiserotype and high-frequency mutant virus infections.

  10. Relationship of the Content of Systemic and Endobronchial Soluble Molecules of CD25, CD38, CD8, and HLA-I-CD8 and Lung Function Parameters in COPD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nailya Kubysheva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The definition of new markers of local and systemic inflammation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the priority directions in the study of pathogenesis and diagnostic methods improvement for this disease. We investigated 91 patients with COPD and 21 healthy nonsmokers. The levels of soluble CD25, CD38, CD8, and HLA-I-CD8 molecules in the blood serum and exhaled breath condensate (EBC in moderate-to-severe COPD patients during exacerbation and stable phase were studied. An unidirectional change in the content of sCD25, sCD38, and sCD8 molecules with increasing severity of COPD was detected. The correlations between the parameters of lung function and sCD8, sCD25, and sHLA-I-CD8 levels in the blood serum and EBC were discovered in patients with severe COPD. The findings suggest a pathogenetic role of the investigated soluble molecules of the COPD development and allow considering the content of sCD8, sCD25, and sHLA-I-CD8 molecules as additional novel systemic and endobronchial markers of the progression of chronic inflammation of this disease.

  11. Plasmodium falciparum-mediated induction of human CD25Foxp3 CD4 T cells is independent of direct TCR stimulation and requires IL-2, IL-10 and TGFbeta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Scholzen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (Tregs regulate disease-associated immunity and excessive inflammatory responses, and numbers of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ Tregs are increased during malaria infection. The mechanisms governing their generation, however, remain to be elucidated. In this study we investigated the role of commonly accepted factors for Foxp3 induction, TCR stimulation and cytokines such as IL-2, TGFbeta and IL-10, in the generation of human CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ T cells by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Using a co-culture system of malaria-infected red blood cells (iRBCs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals, we found that two populations of Foxp3(hi and Foxp3(int CD4(+CD25(hi T cells with a typical Treg phenotype (CTLA-4(+, CD127(low, CD39(+, ICOS(+, TNFRII(+ were induced. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production was confined to the Foxp3(int subset (IFNgamma, IL-4 and IL-17 and inversely correlated with high relative levels of Foxp3(hi cells, consistent with Foxp3(hi CD4 T cell-mediated inhibition of parasite-induced effector cytokine T cell responses. Both Foxp3(hi and Foxp3(int cells were derived primarily from proliferating CD4(+CD25(- T cells with a further significant contribution from CD25(+Foxp3(+ natural Treg cells to the generation of the Foxp3(hi subset. Generation of Foxp3(hi, but not Foxp3(int, cells specifically required TGFbeta1 and IL-10. Add-back experiments showed that monocytes expressing increased levels of co-stimulatory molecules were sufficient for iRBC-mediated induction of Foxp3 in CD4 T cells. Foxp3 induction was driven by IL-2 from CD4 T cells stimulated in an MHC class II-dependent manner. However, transwell separation experiments showed that direct contact of monocytes with the cells that acquire Foxp3 expression was not required. This novel TCR-independent and therefore antigen-non specific mechanism for by-stander CD4(+CD25(hiFoxp3(+ cell induction is likely to reflect a

  12. The effect of extracorporeal photopheresis alone or in combination therapy on circulating CD4+Foxp3+CD25- T-cells in patients with leukemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Lisa H.; Couturier, Jacob; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Wei, Caimiao; Ni, Xiao; Duvic, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) alone or in combination therapy is effective for treatment of leukemic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (L-CTCL), but its mechanism(s) of action remain unclear. This study was designed to investigate the effect of ECP on regulatory T-cell and CD8+ T-cells in L-CTCL patients. Experimental Design Peripheral blood from 18 L-CTCL patients at baseline, Day 2, 1-month, 3-month, and 6-month post-ECP therapy were analyzed by flow cytometry for CD4+CD25+/high, CD4+Foxp3+CD25+/-, CD3+CD8+, CD3+CD8+CD69+, and CD3+CD8+IFN-γ+ T-cells. Clinical responses were assessed and correlated with changes in these T-cell subsets. Results Twelve of 18 patients achieved clinical responses. The average baseline number of CD4+CD25+/high T-cells of PBMCs in L-CTCL patients was normal (2.2%), but increased at 6-month post-therapy (4.3%, p<0.01). The average baseline number of CD4+Foxp3+ T-cells out of CD4+ T-cells in 9 evaluable patients was high (66.8±13.7%), mostly CD25 negative. The levels of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells in responders were higher (n=6, 93.1±5.7%) than non-responders (n=3, 14.2±16.0%, p<0.01), and they declined in parallel with malignant T-cells. The numbers of CD3+CD8+CD69+ and CD3+CD8+ IFN-γ+ T-cells increased at 3-month post-therapy in 5 of 6 patients studied. Conclusions ECP alone or in combination therapy might be effective in L-CTCL patients whose malignant T-cells have a CD4+Foxp3+CD25- phenotype. PMID:25772268

  13. Antibodies to poliovirus detected by immunoradiometric assay with a monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, M.; Fossati, C.A.; Schild, G.C.; Spitz, L.; Brasher, M.

    1982-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the assay of antibodies to poliovirus antigens is described. Dilutions of the test sera or whole (finger prick) blood samples were incubated with the poliovirus antigen bound to a solid phase and the specific antibody was detected by the addition of a mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal antibody (McAb), which was itself revealed by iodinated sheep IgG antimouse F(ab). The authors have shown that this technique is suitable for the estimation of IgG anti-poliovirus antibodies induced in children following polio vaccine. The present study shows that SPRIA provides a simple and inexpensive method for serological studies with poliovirus particularly for use in large-scale surveys. (Auth.)

  14. Antibodies to poliovirus detected by immunoradiometric assay with a monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, M.; Fossati, C.A.; Schild, G.C.; Spitz, L.; Brasher, M. (National Inst. for Biological Standards and Control, London (UK))

    1982-10-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the assay of antibodies to poliovirus antigens is described. Dilutions of the test sera or whole (finger prick) blood samples were incubated with the poliovirus antigen bound to a solid phase and the specific antibody was detected by the addition of a mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal antibody (McAb), which was itself revealed by iodinated sheep IgG antimouse F(ab). The authors have shown that this technique is suitable for the estimation of IgG anti-poliovirus antibodies induced in children following polio vaccine. The present study shows that SPRIA provides a simple and inexpensive method for serological studies with poliovirus particularly for use in large-scale surveys.

  15. Low-dose temozolomide before dendritic-cell vaccination reduces (specifically) CD4+CD25++Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells in advanced melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Laura; Petrini, Massimiliano; Granato, Anna Maria; Gentilcore, Giusy; Simeone, Ester; Ascierto, Paolo Antonio; Pancisi, Elena; Ancarani, Valentina; Fiammenghi, Laura; Guidoboni, Massimo; de Rosa, Francesco; Valmorri, Linda; Scarpi, Emanuela; Nicoletti, Stefania Vittoria Luisa; Baravelli, Stefano; Riccobon, Angela; Ridolfi, Ruggero

    2013-05-31

    In cancer immunotherapy, dendritic cells (DCs) play a fundamental role in the dialog between innate and adaptive immune response, but several immunosuppressive mechanisms remain to be overcome. For example, a high number of CD4+CD25++Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells (Foxp3+Tregs) have been observed in the peripheral blood and tumor microenvironment of cancer patients. On the basis of this, we conducted a study on DC-based vaccination in advanced melanoma, adding low-dose temozolomide to obtain lymphodepletion. Twenty-one patients were entered onto our vaccination protocol using autologous DCs pulsed with autologous tumor lysate and keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Patients received low-dose temozolomide before vaccination and 5 days of low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) after vaccination. Circulating Foxp3+Tregs were evaluated before and after temozolomide, and after IL-2. Among the 17 evaluable patients we observed 1 partial response (PR), 6 stable disease (SD) and 10 progressive disease (PD). The disease control rate (PR+SD = DCR) was 41% and median overall survival was 10 months. Temozolomide reduced circulating Foxp3+Treg cells in all patients. A statistically significant reduction of 60% was observed in Foxp3+Tregs after the first cycle, whereas the absolute lymphocyte count decreased by only 14%. Conversely, IL-2 increased Foxp3+Treg cell count by 75.4%. Of note the effect of this cytokine, albeit not statistically significant, on the DCR subgroup led to a further 33.8% reduction in Foxp3+Treg cells. Our results suggest that the combined immunological therapy, at least as far as the DCR subgroup is concerned, effectively reduced the number of Foxp3+Treg cells, which exerted a blunting effect on the growth-stimulating effect of IL-2. However, this regimen, with its current modality, would not seem to be capable of improving clinical outcome.

  16. CD25 and CD69 induction by α4β1 outside-in signalling requires TCR early signalling complex proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimo, Ann-Marie; Ahmed, Zamal; McIntyre, Bradley W.; Lewis, Dorothy E.; Ladbury, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Distinct signalling pathways producing diverse cellular outcomes can utilize similar subsets of proteins. For example, proteins from the TCR (T-cell receptor) ESC (early signalling complex) are also involved in interferon-α receptor signalling. Defining the mechanism for how these proteins function within a given pathway is important in understanding the integration and communication of signalling networks with one another. We investigated the contributions of the TCR ESC proteins Lck (lymphocyte-specific kinase), ZAP-70 (ζ-chain-associated protein of 70 kDa), Vav1, SLP-76 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa] and LAT (linker for activation of T-cells) to integrin outside-in signalling in human T-cells. Lck, ZAP-70, SLP-76, Vav1 and LAT were activated by α4β1 outside-in signalling, but in a manner different from TCR signalling. TCR stimulation recruits ESC proteins to activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase). α4β1 outside-in-mediated ERK activation did not require TCR ESC proteins. However, α4β1 outside-in signalling induced CD25 and co-stimulated CD69 and this was dependent on TCR ESC proteins. TCR and α4β1 outside-in signalling are integrated through the common use of TCR ESC proteins; however, these proteins display functionally distinct roles in these pathways. These novel insights into the cross-talk between integrin outside-in and TCR signalling pathways are highly relevant to the development of therapeutic strategies to overcome disease associated with T-cell deregulation. PMID:23758320

  17. Isolation of highly suppressive CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory cells from G-CSF-mobilized donors with retention of cytotoxic anti-viral CTLs: application for multi-functional immunotherapy post stem cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R Samuel

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated the effective control of cytomegalovirus (CMV infections post haematopoietic stem cell transplant through the adoptive transfer of donor derived CMV-specific T cells (CMV-T. Strategies for manufacturing CMV immunotherapies has involved a second leukapheresis or blood draw from the donor, which in the unrelated donor setting is not always possible. We have investigated the feasibility of using an aliquot of the original G-CSF-mobilized graft as a starting material for manufacture of CMV-T and examined the activation marker CD25 as a targeted approach for identification and isolation following CMVpp65 peptide stimulation. CD25+ cells isolated from G-CSF-mobilized apheresis revealed a significant increase in the proportion of FoxP3 expression when compared with conventional non-mobilized CD25+ cells and showed a superior suppressive capacity in a T cell proliferation assay, demonstrating the emergence of a population of Tregs not present in non-mobilized apheresis collections. The expansion of CD25+ CMV-T in short-term culture resulted in a mixed population of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells with CMV-specificity that secreted cytotoxic effector molecules and lysed CMVpp65 peptide-loaded phytohaemagglutinin-stimulated blasts. Furthermore CD25 expanded cells retained their suppressive capacity but did not maintain FoxP3 expression or secrete IL-10. In summary our data indicates that CD25 enrichment post CMV stimulation in G-CSF-mobilized PBMCs results in the simultaneous generation of both a functional population of anti-viral T cells and Tregs thus illustrating a potential single therapeutic strategy for the treatment of both GvHD and CMV reactivation following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The use of G-CSF-mobilized cells as a starting material for cell therapy manufacture represents a feasible approach to alleviating the many problems incurred with successive donations and procurement of cells from

  18. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... Another milestone in the history of antibodies was the work of Porter and Edelman ... transgenic animals (Lonberg et al., 1994; Green et al.,. 1994) or .... create and to screen human recombinant antibodies libraries, that is ...

  19. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked with an increased risk ...

  20. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  1. Effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on Th1/Th2 cytokines and the number of spleen CD4⁺ CD25⁺ Foxp3⁺ Treg in asthma Balb/c mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Xiang; Shang, Yunxiao; Li, Miao

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is a chronic airway inflammatory disease that involves T lymphocytes. In order to explore the effect of Lactobacillus salivarius on Th1/Th2 cytokines and the number of spleen CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg in asthma Balb/c mouse, we constructed acute asthma model with ovalbumin to observe the mouse behavior change in Balb/c mice. The expression of GATA-3 mRNA and T-bet mRNA was measured by real-time PCR. The proportion of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg/CD4(+) was determined by flow cytometry. The results demonstrated that oral gavage with Lactobacillus salivarius before sensitization could alleviate the clinical symptoms, airway hyper-reactivity and airway inflammation in asthma mouse to some extent; Lactobacillus salivarius may improve the imbalance of Th1/Th2 in asthma mouse through increasing the expression of T-bet mRNA at the transcriptional level and inhibiting the expression of GATA-3 mRNA simultaneously. CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Treg cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma, and may be the upstream regulatory mechanism of the improvement of Th1/Th2 imbalance by Lactobacillus salivarius.

  2. Human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells suppress proliferation of PHA-activated lymphocytes in vitro by inducing CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RA(+) regulatory T cell production and modulating cytokine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongna; Sun, Jinhua; Li, Yan; Duan, Wei-Ming; Bi, Jianzhong; Qu, Tingyu

    2016-04-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidate cells for therapeutic application in autoimmune diseases due to their immunomodulatory properties. Unused human umbilical cords (UC) offer an abundant and noninvasive source of MSCs without ethical issues and are emerging as a valuable alternative to bone marrow tissue for producing MSCs. We thus investigated the immunomodulation effect of umbilical cord-derived MSCs (UC-MSCs) on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), T cells in particular, in a co-culture system. We found that UC-MSCs efficiently suppressed the proliferation of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated PBMCs (pMSCs primarily inhibited the division of generation 3 (G3) and 4 (G4) of PBMCs. In addition, UC-MSCs augmented the expression of CD127(+) and CD45RA(+) but reduced the expression of CD25(+) in PBMCs stimulated by PHA (pMSCs inhibited PHA-resulted increase in the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low/-) Tregs significantly (pMSCs are able to suppress mitogen-induced PBMC activation and proliferation in vitro by altering T lymphocyte phenotypes, increasing the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(high)CD45RA(+) Tregs, and modulating the associated cytokine production. Further studies are warranted to investigate the therapeutic potential of UC-MSCs in immunologically-diseased conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Administration of anti-CD25 mAb leads to impaired alpha-galactosylceramide-mediated induction of IFN-gamma production in a murine model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rosalia, Rodney Alexander; Štěpánek, Ivan; Polláková, Veronika; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Moravcová, Simona; Přibylová, Hana; Bontkes, H.; Bubeník, Jan; Sparwasser, T.; Reiniš, Milan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 218, č. 6 (2013), s. 851-859 ISSN 0171-2985 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA301/07/1410; GA ČR GAP301/10/2174 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : cancer immunotherapy * DEREG mice * interferon γ * natural killer T cells * PC61 monoclonal antibody * T regulatory cells Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.180, year: 2013

  4. General approach to standardization of the solid-phase radioimmunoassay for quantitation of class-specific antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zollinger, W D; Boslego, J W [Walter Reed Army Inst. of Research, Washington, DC (USA)

    1981-10-30

    The feasibility of using an anti-human immunoglobulin/human immunoglobulin/(/sup 125/I)anti-human immunoglobulin 'sandwich' in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay to produce a standard curve which could be used to quantitate antigen-specific antibody of a particular immunoglobulin class was investigated. The amount of secondary antibody (SAb) bound was determined as a function of whether the primary antibody (PAb) was bound to its specific solid-phase antigen or by a solid-phase anti-human immunoglobulin. No significant difference between the two values was observed. Quantitation of anti-tetanus toxoid antibody by this method was in a good agreement with quantitative precipitin tests. Comparison of SAb binding as a function of the way the PAb is bound was extended to class-specific PAb by use of murine monoclonal antibodies to meningococcal antigens. In most cases somewhat greater binding of SAb occurred when PAb was bound to antigen, but in several cases where low avidity antibody and/or poor quality antigens were used, greater SAb binding occurred when PAb was bound by anti-mouse immunoglobulin. The results indicate that this approach may be useful as a general method for standardizing the SPRIA and other solid-phase immunoassays such as the ELISA to measure class-specific antibody.

  5. Anthocyanin contents in the seed coat of black soya bean and their anti-human tyrosinase activity and antioxidative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhan, J-K; Chung, Y-C; Chen, G-H; Chang, C-H; Lu, Y-C; Hsu, C-K

    2016-06-01

    The seed coat of black soya bean (SCBS) contains high amount of anthocyanins and shows antioxidant and anti-mushroom tyrosinase activities. The objectives of this study were to analyse the anthocyanins in SCBS with different solvents and to find the relationship between anthocyanin profile with anti-human and anti-mushroom tyrosinase activities. SCBS was extracted with hot water, 50 and 80% ethanol, 50 and 80% acetone and 50 and 80% acidified acetone. Total phenol and total flavonoid contents in the extracts were determined. Anthocyanins in the extracts were analysed using HPLC and LC/MS/MS. A genetically engineered human tyrosinase was used to evaluate the anti-tyrosinase potential of the extracts from SCBS. 80% acetone extract from SCBS obtained the highest total phenol, total flavonoid and cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (C3G) contents among all the extracts, whereas the hot water extract showed the lowest antioxidant contents. Three anthocyanin compounds were found in all the extracts from SCBS, and the analysis of HPLC and LC/MS/MS indicated that they were C3G, delphinidin-3-O-glucoside (D3G) and peonidin-3-O-glucoside (P3G). The ratios of C3G (2.84 mg g(-1) ), D3G (0.34 mg g(-1) ) and P3G (0.35 mg g(-1) ) in 80% acidified acetone extract were 76.6, 9.1 and 9.3%, respectively. All the extracts from SCBS possessed anti-human tyrosinase activity. Moreover, a good correlation was found between the anti-human tyrosinase activities and C3G contents in the extracts. Antioxidants in SCBS also possess anti-human and anti-mushroom tyrosinase activities. © 2015 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  6. Identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using IgG platelet antibody detection and crossmatch system assay with Galileo Echo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cristofaro, Julie; Frassati, Coralie; Montagnie, Rolande; Basire, Agnes; Merieux, Yves; Picard, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Fetal/neonatal allo-immune thrombocytopenia is the most frequent and the most dangerous clinical condition involving anti-human platelet antigens (HPA)-1a allo-antibodies. Anti-HPA-1a allo-immunization requires rapid and accurate diagnosis to determine appropriate treatment. The Capture-P Ready-Screen assay (C-PRS) is a new qualitative immunoassay to detect IgG anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and anti-HPA allo-antibodies. The aim of this study is to assess the identification of anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies using the C-PRS assay, associated with HLA class I stripping reagents, on the automated benchtop analyzer Galileo Echo. Forty-nine sera were analyzed: without anti-HLA class I or anti-HPA allo-antibodies, with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies, with anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies, among which with anti-HLA class I allo-antibodies. None of the samples without allo-antibodies were reactive. Only anti-HLA antibodies, detected by cytotoxicity-dependent complement and not by Luminex, remained positive before and after stripping reagents. Of the 13 samples, anti-HPA-1a allo-antibodies that were correctly identified before and after incubation with HLA assassin reagent were 70% and 85%, respectively. Anti-glycoprotein auto-antibodies and anti-HLA allo-antibodies do not interfere with the detection of anti-HPA-1a antibodies. This preliminary study indicates that further improvement of the test will be helpful in developing a clinically useful assay in the future.

  7. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  8. Over-expression of Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice via up-regulation of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Yulan; Purohit, Sharad; Chen, Xueqin; Yi, Bing; She, Jin-Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This is the first study to provide direct evidence of the role of Stat5b in NOD mice. ► Over-expression of wild type Stat5b transgene protects NOD mice against diabetes. ► This protection may be mediated by the up-regulation of CD4 + CD25 + Tregs. -- Abstract: The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins play a critical role in cytokine signaling required for fine tuning of immune regulation. Previous reports showed that a mutation (L327M) in the Stat5b protein leads to aberrant cytokine signaling in the NOD mice. To further elaborate the role of Stat5b in diabetes, we established a NOD transgenic mouse that over-expresses the wild type Stat5b gene. The incidences of spontaneous diabetes as well as cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes were significantly reduced and delayed in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice compared to their littermate controls. The total cell numbers of CD4 + T cells and especially CD8 + T cells in the spleen and pancreatic lymph node were increased in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice. Consistent with these findings, CD4 + and CD8 + T cells from the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice showed a higher proliferation capacity and up-regulation of multiple cytokines including IL-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-10 as well as anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the number and proportion of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells were significantly increased in transgenic mice although in vitro suppression ability of the regulatory T-cells was not affected by the transgene. Our results suggest that Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the NOD mice by regulating the numbers and function of multiple immune cell types, especially by up-regulating CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells.

  9. ''reverse'' solid-phase radioimmunoasssay for IgM-antibodies to hepatitis A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meurman, O H; Matter, L; Krishna, R V; Krech, U H [Institute of Medical Microbiology, St. Gallen, Switzerland

    1981-01-01

    A ''reverse'' solid-phase radio-immuno-assay for IgM antibodies to hepatitis A virus (HAV) was developed. Anti-human IgM immunoglobulins were bound on the wells of polyvinylchloride microtiter plates. Serum specimens were incubated in the anti-human IgM coated wells and bound IgM antibodies were then assayed for antigen specificity by subsequent incubations with HAV antigen and /sup 125/I-labelled human anti-HAV IgG. The test showed a high sensitivity and specificity for anti-HAV IgM antibodies. No false-positive reactions were observed either in the sera from patients with hepatobiliary disorders other than HAV infection or in the sera containing both rheumatoid factor and anti-HAV IgG antibodies. In acute HAV infections specific IgM antibodies were present already in the first specimens taken within a few days after the onset of jaundice. The persistence of the IgM antibodies was from 4 to 6 months. IgM antibody titers up to 1,000,000 were observed in the acute phase of HAV infection. In routine diagnostic work the titration of the sera was not necessary, since a reliable qualitative result was obtained by testing the sera in a single dilution of 1:100. A similar reverse immuno-assay principle may be adaptable for the diagnostic determination of IgM antibodies to different viral and microbial antigens.

  10. (99) Tc-methylene diphosphonate improves rheumatoid arthritis disease activity by increasing the frequency of peripheral γδ T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dinglei; Shen, Minning; Gu, Bingjie; Wang, Xiaoqin; Wang, Dandan; Li, Xia; Sun, Lingyun

    2016-06-01

    γδ T cells exhibit important functions in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In recent years, numerous studies harnessed the γδ T cell-activating capacity of aminobiphosphonates for the treatment of malignant tumors. As (99) Tc-methylene diphosphonate ((99) Tc-MDP) has long been widely used for the treatment of RA in China with good efficacy, we are interested in whether this drug exerts its therapeutic effect on RA by modulating peripheral γδ T cells of RA patients. To investigate the effect of (99) Tc-MDP on the frequency of γδ T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs in the peripheral blood of patients with active RA. Nineteen patients with active RA were treated with (99) Tc-MDP intravenously at a dose of 20 μg/day consecutively for 10-14 days. Before and after treatment, the main clinical and laboratory parameters for each patient were evaluated. The frequency of CD3(+) γδ(+) T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs was detected by flow cytometry. Serum levels of interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After intravenous (99) Tc-MDP therapy, the frequency of peripheral CD3(+) γδ(+) T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs were significantly elevated, paralleled with decreased serum levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and increased level of serum TGF-β. The elevation of peripheral CD3(+) γδ(+) T cells was positively correlated with increased serum TGF-β and decreased disease activity. (99) Tc-MDP may improve the activity of RA through upregulating the frequency of peripheral γδ T cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs as well as affecting the serum cytokine environment by increasing TGF-β and decreasing TNF-α and IL-6. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Increase of circulating CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma during treatment with dendritic cell vaccination and low-dose interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Annika; Brimnes, Marie Klinge; thor Straten, Per

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an important role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and may be one of the obstacles of successful tumor immunotherapy. In this study, we analyzed the impact of administration of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in combination with low-dose interleukin (IL)-2...... in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma on the frequency of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ Treg cells in peripheral blood. We found that the treatment increased the frequency of Treg cells more than 7-fold compared with pretreatment levels (P...

  12. CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+ cells in cord blood of neonates born from filaria infected mother are negatively associated with CD4+Tbet+ and CD4+RORγt+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateba-Ngoa, Ulysse; Mombo-Ngoma, Ghyslain; Zettlmeissl, Eva; van der Vlugt, Luciën E P M; de Jong, Sanne E; de Jong, Sanne; Matsiegui, Pierre-Blaise; Ramharter, Michael; Kremsner, Peter G; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Adegnika, Ayola Akim

    2014-01-01

    Children who have been exposed in utero to maternal filarial infection are immunologically less responsive to filarial antigens, have less pathology, and are more susceptible to acquire infection than offspring of uninfected mothers. Moreover children from filaria infected mothers have been shown to be less responsive to vaccination as a consequence of an impairment of their immune response. However, it is not well known how in utero exposure to parasite antigens affects cellular immune responses. Here, 30 pregnant women were examined for the presence of microfilaria of Loa loa and Mansonella perstans in peripheral blood. At delivery, cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) were obtained and the CD4+T cells were phenotyped by expression of the transcription factors Tbet, RORγt, and FOXP3. No significant difference was observed between newborns from infected versus uninfected mothers in the frequencies of total CD4+T cells and CD4+T cells subsets including CD4+Tbet+, CD4+RORγt+ T and CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+ T cells. However, there was a negative association between CD4+CD25hiFOXP3+T cells and CD4+Tbet+ as well as CD4+RORγt+ T cells in the infected group only (B = -0.242, P = 0.002; B = -0.178, P = 0.013 respectively). Our results suggest that filarial infection during pregnancy leads to an expansion of functionally active regulatory T cells that keep TH1 and TH17 in check.

  13. Effects of oral Lactobacillus administration on antioxidant activities and CD4+CD25+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells in NZB/W F1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzang, Bor-Show; Liu, Chung-Hsien; Hsu, Kuo-Ching; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Huang, Chih-Yang; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2017-09-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease that is characterised by a dysregulation of the immune system, which causes inflammation responses, excessive oxidative stress and a reduction in the number of cluster of differentiation (CD)4+CD25+forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)+ T cells. Supplementation with certain Lactobacillus strains has been suggested to be beneficial in the comprehensive treatment of SLE. However, little is known about the effect and mechanism of certain Lactobacillus strains on SLE. To investigate the effects of Lactobacillus on SLE, NZB/W F1 mice were orally gavaged with Lactobacillus paracasei GMNL-32 (GMNL-32), Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-89 (GMNL-89) and L. reuteri GMNL-263 (GMNL-263). Supplementation with GMNL-32, GMNL-89 and GMNL-263 significantly increased antioxidant activity, reduced IL-6 and TNF-α levels and significantly decreased the toll-like receptors/myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 signalling in NZB/W F1 mice. Notably, supplementation with GMNL-263, but not GMNL-32 and GMNL-89, in NZB/W F1 mice significantly increased the differentiation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T cells. These findings reveal beneficial effects of GMNL-32, GMNL-89 and GMNL-263 on NZB/W F1 mice and suggest that these specific Lactobacillus strains can be used as part of a comprehensive treatment of SLE patients.

  14. Zinc supplementation induces CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ antigen-specific regulatory T cells and suppresses IFN-γ production by upregulation of Foxp3 and KLF-10 and downregulation of IRF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maywald, Martina; Rink, Lothar

    2017-08-01

    The essential trace element zinc plays a fundamental role in immune function and regulation since its deficiency is associated with autoimmunity, allergies, and transplant rejection. Thus, we investigated the influence of zinc supplementation on the Th1-driven alloreaction in mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC), on generation of antigen-specific T cells, and analyzed underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production were monitored by [ 3 H]-thymidine proliferation assay and ELISA, respectively. Analysis of surface and intracellular T cell marker was performed by flow cytometry. Western blotting and mRNA analysis were used for Foxp3, KLF-10, and IRF-1 expression. Zinc supplementation on antigen-specific T cells in physiological doses (50 µM) provokes a significant amelioration of cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production after reactivation compared to untreated controls. Zinc administration on MLC results in an increased induction and stabilization of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + and CD4 + CD25 + CTLA-4 + T cells (p zinc-induced upregulation of Foxp3 and KLF-10 and downregulation of IRF-1. However, in resting lymphocytes zinc increases IRF-1. In summary, zinc is capable of ameliorating the allogeneic immune reaction by enhancement of antigen-specific iTreg cells due to modulation of essential molecular targets: Foxp3, KLF-10, and IRF-1. Thus, zinc can be seen as an auspicious tool for inducing tolerance in adverse immune reactions.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against human angiotensinogen, their characterization and use in an angiotensinogen enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, I; Lykkegaard, S; Olsen, A A; Selmer, J; Ballegaard, M

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were produced against human angiotensinogen. An enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed using a high affinity monoclonal antibody as catching antibody and a polyclonal rabbit anti human angiotensinogen antibody as detecting antibody in a "sandwich" ELISA. Linear range of the ELISA was 15-450 pmol/l of human angiotensinogen. Intra- and inter- assay variation coefficients were in the range of 2% to 8%. A correlation coefficient, r = 0.97, (n = 20), with values obtained by radioimmunoassay. This correlation coefficient, obtained by using both normal and pregnant sera, confirmed that the ELISA fulfill the requirements for clinical useful assay. Characterization of the antibodies were performed with respect to affinity constant and epitopes.

  16. Determination of antibody levels to Candida albicans in healthy and hospitalised adults using a radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, S.J.; Parratt, D.

    1978-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay for antibody to Candida albicans is described. The test uses whole, killed of organisms as the antigen and radiolabelled sheep anti-human globulins to quantitate different classes of antibody to C. albicans. The assay has been compared with an Ouchterlony precipitin method and found to be simpler, more rapid, and more sensitive than the latter. Results obtained from two groups of symptomless adults indicated that the range of antibody level was wider for a hospitalised group than for a group of blood transfusion donors, particularly in respect of IgG and IgA antibody. The reason for the increase of antibody in hospital patients was not clear but may have been related to antibiotic therapy. The difficulties in interpretation of Candida serology have therefore been re-assessed in the light of more detailed knowledge of the range and type of antibody to be expected in normal individuals. (author)

  17. Characterization of immobilization methods of antiviral antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huy, Tran Quang, E-mail: huytq@nihe.org.vn [National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), No1 Yersin St., Hanoi (Viet Nam); International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No1 Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Hanh, Nguyen Thi Hong; Van Chung, Pham; Anh, Dang Duc; Nga, Phan Thi [National Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology (NIHE), No1 Yersin St., Hanoi (Viet Nam); Tuan, Mai Anh, E-mail: tuanma-itims@mail.hut.edu.vn [International Training Institute for Materials Science (ITIMS), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), No1 Dai Co Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we describes different methods to immobilize Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) antibodies in human serum onto the interdigitated surface of a microelectrode sensor for optimizing electrochemical detection: (1) direct covalent binding to the silanized surface, (2) binding to the silanized surface via a cross-linker of glutaraldehyde (GA), (3) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via goat anti-human IgG polyclonal antibody and (4) binding to glutaraldehyde/silanized surface via protein A (PrA). Field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, and fluorescence microscopy are used to verify the characteristics of antibodies on the interdigitated surface after the serum antibodies immobilization. The analyzed results indicate that the use of protein A is an effective choice for immobilization and orientation of antibodies in serum for electrochemical biosensors. This study provides an advantageous immobilization method of serum containing antiviral antibodies to develop electrochemical biosensors for preliminary screening of viruses in clinical samples from outbreaks.

  18. Impact of Uniform Methods on Interlaboratory Antibody Titration Variability: Antibody Titration and Uniform Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachegowda, Lohith S; Cheng, Yan H; Long, Thomas; Shaz, Beth H

    2017-01-01

    -Substantial variability between different antibody titration methods prompted development and introduction of uniform methods in 2008. -To determine whether uniform methods consistently decrease interlaboratory variation in proficiency testing. -Proficiency testing data for antibody titration between 2009 and 2013 were obtained from the College of American Pathologists. Each laboratory was supplied plasma and red cells to determine anti-A and anti-D antibody titers by their standard method: gel or tube by uniform or other methods at different testing phases (immediate spin and/or room temperature [anti-A], and/or anti-human globulin [AHG: anti-A and anti-D]) with different additives. Interlaboratory variations were compared by analyzing the distribution of titer results by method and phase. -A median of 574 and 1100 responses were reported for anti-A and anti-D antibody titers, respectively, during a 5-year period. The 3 most frequent (median) methods performed for anti-A antibody were uniform tube room temperature (147.5; range, 119-159), uniform tube AHG (143.5; range, 134-150), and other tube AHG (97; range, 82-116); for anti-D antibody, the methods were other tube (451; range, 431-465), uniform tube (404; range, 382-462), and uniform gel (137; range, 121-153). Of the larger reported methods, uniform gel AHG phase for anti-A and anti-D antibodies had the most participants with the same result (mode). For anti-A antibody, 0 of 8 (uniform versus other tube room temperature) and 1 of 8 (uniform versus other tube AHG), and for anti-D antibody, 0 of 8 (uniform versus other tube) and 0 of 8 (uniform versus other gel) proficiency tests showed significant titer variability reduction. -Uniform methods harmonize laboratory techniques but rarely reduce interlaboratory titer variance in comparison with other methods.

  19. Monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects of monoclonal antibodies are described, centering on studies made by the author and those presented at the Second International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer held in March this year (1987). The history of immuno-nuclear medicine and procedures for producing monoclonal antibodies are briefly outlined. Monoclonal antibodies are immunoglobulins. Here, the structure of IgG, which is used most frequently, is described. An IgG is composed of two antigen binding fragments (Fab) and one crystallizable fragment (Fc). The end portion of a Fab reacts with an antigen. One of the major applications of immuno-nuclear medicine is the diagnosis of cancer. As label nucleides, 131 I and 111 I were selected in most cases in the past while 123 I and 99m Tc are currently used more often. Advantages and disadvantages of this diagnosis method is discussed citing studies presented at the First (1986) and Second (1987) International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer. The present status of the application of monoclonal antibodies to treatment of cancer is also described. (Nogami, K.)

  20. In vivo fluctuation of Tax, Foxp3, CTLA-4, and GITR mRNA expression in CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells of patients with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, E; Cartier, L; Rodriguez, L; Alberti, C; Valenzuela, M A

    2010-11-01

    HTLV-1 Tax expression exerts an inhibitory effect on the Foxp3 transcription factor in CD4(+)CD25(+) T-regulatory cells (Treg). For a better understanding of the role of Tax mRNA in the gene expression of cellular markers we measured Tax, Foxp3, CTLA-4, GITR, TGF-β, and IL-10 mRNA in Treg cells of 50 patients with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP; 27 women and 23 men; mean age: 56.7 years). The control group consisted of 23 non-infected subjects (12 women and 11 men) with a mean age of 51.3 years. Real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA of Tax proteins and several cellular markers of Treg function. Determinations revealed a high level of Tax mRNA in HAM/TSP (124.35 copies/100 CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells). Foxp3, GITR, and CTLA-4 mRNA levels were lower in HAM/TSP patients (mean ± SD, 22.07 ± 0.78, 9.63 ± 0.36, and 4.54 ± 0.39, respectively) than in non-infected controls (47.15 ± 12.94, 22.14 ± 1.91, and 21.07 ± 2.31). Both groups had similar levels of TGF-β and IL-10. An inverse relationship was found between Tax levels and Foxp3, CTLA-4, and GITR levels. Conversely, there was a direct correlation between levels of Foxp3, GITR, and CTLA-4. Disease severity and evolution time did not correlate with Tax or Foxp3 levels. The present results suggest that Tax and Foxp3 mRNA vary with the same degree of disease severity in HAM/TSP patients. Tax fluctuations may affect CTLA-4 and GITR expression via the Foxp3 pathway, causing virus-induced dysfunction of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells in HAM/TSP patients.

  1. In vivo fluctuation of Tax, Foxp3, CTLA-4, and GITR mRNA expression in CD4+CD25+ T cells of patients with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ramirez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available HTLV-1 Tax expression exerts an inhibitory effect on the Foxp3 transcription factor in CD4+CD25+ T-regulatory cells (Treg. For a better understanding of the role of Tax mRNA in the gene expression of cellular markers we measured Tax, Foxp3, CTLA-4, GITR, TGF-β, and IL-10 mRNA in Treg cells of 50 patients with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP; 27 women and 23 men; mean age: 56.7 years. The control group consisted of 23 non-infected subjects (12 women and 11 men with a mean age of 51.3 years. Real-time PCR was used to measure mRNA of Tax proteins and several cellular markers of Treg function. Determinations revealed a high level of Tax mRNA in HAM/TSP (124.35 copies/100 CD4+CD25+ T cells. Foxp3, GITR, and CTLA-4 mRNA levels were lower in HAM/TSP patients (mean ± SD, 22.07 ± 0.78, 9.63 ± 0.36, and 4.54 ± 0.39, respectively than in non-infected controls (47.15 ± 12.94, 22.14 ± 1.91, and 21.07 ± 2.31. Both groups had similar levels of TGF-β and IL-10. An inverse relationship was found between Tax levels and Foxp3, CTLA-4, and GITR levels. Conversely, there was a direct correlation between levels of Foxp3, GITR, and CTLA-4. Disease severity and evolution time did not correlate with Tax or Foxp3 levels. The present results suggest that Tax and Foxp3 mRNA vary with the same degree of disease severity in HAM/TSP patients. Tax fluctuations may affect CTLA-4 and GITR expression via the Foxp3 pathway, causing virus-induced dysfunction of CD4+CD25+ T cells in HAM/TSP patients.

  2. Over-expression of Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice via up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Yulan; Purohit, Sharad [Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States); Department of Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States); Chen, Xueqin; Yi, Bing [Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States); She, Jin-Xiong, E-mail: jshe@georgiahealth.edu [Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States); Department of Pathology, Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Health Sciences University, GA (United States)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first study to provide direct evidence of the role of Stat5b in NOD mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Over-expression of wild type Stat5b transgene protects NOD mice against diabetes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This protection may be mediated by the up-regulation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} Tregs. -- Abstract: The signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) family of proteins play a critical role in cytokine signaling required for fine tuning of immune regulation. Previous reports showed that a mutation (L327M) in the Stat5b protein leads to aberrant cytokine signaling in the NOD mice. To further elaborate the role of Stat5b in diabetes, we established a NOD transgenic mouse that over-expresses the wild type Stat5b gene. The incidences of spontaneous diabetes as well as cyclophosphamide-induced diabetes were significantly reduced and delayed in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice compared to their littermate controls. The total cell numbers of CD4{sup +} T cells and especially CD8{sup +} T cells in the spleen and pancreatic lymph node were increased in the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice. Consistent with these findings, CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells from the Stat5b transgenic NOD mice showed a higher proliferation capacity and up-regulation of multiple cytokines including IL-2, IFN-{gamma}, TNF-{alpha} and IL-10 as well as anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the number and proportion of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells were significantly increased in transgenic mice although in vitro suppression ability of the regulatory T-cells was not affected by the transgene. Our results suggest that Stat5b confers protection against diabetes in the NOD mice by regulating the numbers and function of multiple immune cell types, especially by up-regulating CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells.

  3. Design of indirect solid-phase immunosorbent methods for detecting arenavirus antigens and antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A P; Rezapkin, G V; Dzagurova, T K; Tkachenko, E A

    1984-05-01

    Specifications have been elaborated for formulating indirect solid-phase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) methods that employ anti-human and anti-mice G class immunoglobulin (IgG), conjugated with horseradish peroxidase and /sup 125/I for detecting the arenaviruses Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, Amalpari, Tamiami, Lassa, and LCM (lymphocytic choriomeningitis). These methods make it possible to identify with a high degree of sensitivity arenavirus antigens and antibodies in various kinds of material.

  4. Antibodies from a Human Survivor Define Sites of Vulnerability for Broad Protection Against Ebolaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    search, analyzed data, and wrote and/or edited the paper . E.G. and L.M.W. designed the germline-reverted constructs and E.G., L.M.W., A.Z.W., D.M.A... albumin (PBSA), and incubated with dilutions of test antibody (5, 50 nM). Bound Abs were detected with anti-human IgG conjugated to horseradish

  5. Lymphocyte-dependent antibody-mediated cytotoxicity in Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Elizabeth A.; Penhale, W. J.; McLeman, Dena; Barnes, E. W.; Irvine, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    In the presence of normal human lymphocytes, decomplemented sera from twentynine out of thirty-nine patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis caused significant lysis of thyroglobulin-coated chicken red blood cells, as estimated by the release of 51Cr; the mean% specific 51Cr release being 14·1 ± 1·9 (SEM). Serum from twenty-one control subjects studied concurrently caused no significant lysis of thyroglobulin-coated chicken red blood cells; the mean% specific 51Cr release being −1·6±0·7 (SEM). The degree of cytotoxicity correlated with the titre of thyroglobulin antibodies in the serum, determined by tanned red cell haemagglutination. The active component in the Hashimoto serum was localized in the 19S fraction, was unaffected by pre-absorption with anti-human IgM serum, but was neutralized by pre-absorption with anti-human IgG serum. These findings suggest that the cytotoxic activity of serum from patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis is due to the presence of thyroglobulin antibody of the IgG class in the form of complexes, either alone or with antigen. It is postulated that non-specific lymphocytes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Hashimoto thyroiditis, being activated by the presence in the gland of thyroglobulin antibody, either alone or in the form of complexes attached to thyroid cells. PMID:4740445

  6. Increase of Circulating CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Regulatory T Cells in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma During Treatment With Dendritic Cell Vaccination and Low-Dose Interleukin-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Annika; Brimnes, M.K.; Straten, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an important role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and may be one of the obstacles of successful tumor immunotherapy. In this study, we analyzed the impact of administration of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in combination with low-dose interleukin (IL)-2...... in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma on the frequency of CD4(+) CD25(high)Foxp3(+) Treg cells in peripheral blood. We found that the treatment increased the frequency of Treg cells more than 7-fold compared with pretreatment levels (P cells decreased when patients...... had been off IL-2 treatment for only 8 days, but remained higher than pretreatment levels. A functional assay showed that isolated Treg cells were capable of inhibiting proliferation of responder cells. Also, in vitro studies showed that coculture of mature DCs, autologous T cells and IL-2 leads...

  7. TL1A increases expression of CD25, LFA-1, CD134 and CD154, and induces IL-22 and GM-CSF production from effector CD4 T-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichwald, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Tina Z.; Skov, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Elevated levels of the cytokine TL1A is associated with several autoimmune diseases e.g. rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the exact role of TL1A remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the function of TL1A in a pro-inflammatory setting. We show that TL1A toget...... of CD25 (IL-2Rα) and CD11a (α-chain of LFA-1) on CD4 T-cells, likely governing increased IL-2/IL-15 sensitivity and cell-cell contact. Along with this, TL1A co-stimulation caused a specific induction of IL-22 and GM-CSF from the activated T-cells. These results substantially contribute...

  8. [Preparation and characterization of mouse polyclonal antibody against conserved region of human FOXO3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Lyu, Dan

    2017-06-01

    Objective To purify the recombinant protein specific to conserved region of forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) and prepare mouse anti-human FOXO3 polyclonal antibody. Methods The DNA fragment (aa290-472) encoding conserved domain of FOXO3 was amplified by PCR, and subsequently cloned into pET28a vector. Following transformation into E.coli BL21, the soluble fusion protein His-FOXO3 was induced by IPTG and purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The purified protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice to generate polyclonal antibody. The characteristics of the polyclonal antibody were assessed by ELISA, Western blotting and immunoprecipitation assays. Results We successfully prepared the expression vector pET28a-FOXO3 (aa290-472) and expressed the purified fusion protein in a soluble form. By immunizing mice with the fusion protein, we obtained anti-human FOXO3 polyclonal antibody. ELISA and Western blotting showed that the mouse antibody could recognize specifically the endogenous FOXO3 protein. Conclusion The polyclonal antibody against conserved domain of FOXO3 can identify the endogenous FOXO3 protein. It can be used to analyze the endogenous FOXO3 expression level.

  9. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    biological processes and is intended to catalyze a reaction for which no real enzyme is ... the reaction. In order to enhance the rates of chemical reactions, enzymes, ..... of such antibodies has already been exploited in the production of a biosensor. ..... tant to the pharmaceutical and fine chemical industries for the synthesis ...

  10. A ''reverse'' solid-phase radio-immuno-assay for IgM-antibodies to hepatitis A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meurman, O.H.; Matter, L.; Krishna, R.V.; Krech, U.H.

    1981-01-01

    A ''reverse'' solid-phase radio-immuno-assay for IgM antibodies to hepatitis A virus (HAV) was developed. Anti-human IgM immunoglobulins were bound on the wells of polyvinylchloride microtiter plates. Serum specimens were incubated in the anti-human IgM coated wells and bound IgM antibodies were then assayed for antigen specificity by subsequent incubations with HAV antigen and 125 I-labelled human anti-HAV IgG. The test showed a high sensitivity and specificity for anti-HAV IgM antibodies. No false-positive reactions were observed either in the sera from patients with hepatobiliary disorders other than HAV infection or in the sera containing both rheumatoid factor and anti-HAV IgG antibodies. In acute HAV infections specific IgM antibodies were present already in the first specimens taken within a few days after the onset of jaundice. The persistence of the IgM antibodies was from 4 to 6 months. IgM antibody titers up to 1,000,000 were observed in the acute phase of HAV infection. In routine diagnostic work the titration of the sera was not necessary, since a reliable qualitative result was obtained by testing the sera in a single dilution of 1:100. A similar ''reverse'' immuno-assay principle may be adaptable for the diagnostic determination of IgM antibodies to different viral and microbial antigens. (author)

  11. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; ...

  12. Cross-Linking GPVI-Fc by Anti-Fc Antibodies Potentiates Its Inhibition of Atherosclerotic Plaque- and Collagen-Induced Platelet Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Jamasbi, RPh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the antithrombotic properties of recombinant glycoprotein VI fragment crystallizable (GPVI-Fc, the authors incubated GPVI-Fc with anti-human Fc antibodies to cross-link the Fc tails of GPVI-Fc. Cross-linking potentiated the inhibition of human plaque- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation by GPVI-Fc under static and flow conditions without increasing bleeding time in vitro. Cross-linking with anti-human-Fc Fab2 was even superior to anti-human-Fc immunoglobulin G (IgG. Advanced optical imaging revealed a continuous sheath-like coverage of collagen fibers by cross-linked GPVI-Fc complexes. Cross-linking of GPVI into oligomeric complexes provides a new, highly effective, and probably safe antithrombotic treatment as it suppresses platelet GPVI-plaque interaction selectively at the site of acute atherothrombosis.

  13. The Plasticity of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+CD127low T Cells in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in the Course of Interferon-Alpha Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Sayapina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine changes in subpopulation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+CD127low T lymphocytes (Treg and their association with the efficiency of the IFN-α therapy. Materials and Methods. Pts with mRCC who had undergone nephrectomy were treated with IFN-α at a dose of 6×106 U/day three times a week (n = 18. An immunophenotypic analysis of lymphocytes in peripheral blood expressing CD4, CD25, CD127, and Foxp3 antigens could be performed in 18 pts before, 2 weeks, and 2 mo after IFN-α therapy and 22 normal volunteers. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 2 mo after treatment start. Serum levels of TGF-β1, IL-17A, and Epo were measured by ELISA. Results. PR was achieved in 3 (16.6% pts who received first-line therapy. Long-lasting SD (≥6 months was noted in 6 (33.3% pts. The median progression free survival (PFS was 4 mo (95% CI: 2-NE. The study of the population of Treg indicated that there were no significant differences in the groups depending on the effect (p = 0.71. In one patient, the reduction of Treg cells was associated with increased TGF-β and IL-17 levels, whereas in other two pts the increase in Treg cells was associated with decreased TGF-β and IL-17 levels. The endogenous levels of Epo did not show significant correlation with response to IFN-α immunotherapy. In the patient subgroup with an initial value of MCH > 31 pg, the median PFS was not achieved, but in the subgroup with an initial value of MCH < 31 pg, the median PFS was 2 months (p = 0.032. Conclusions. In our study, we have described functional plasticity of Treg cells, which prevents them from being used as a prognostic marker. The conversion of Treg cells into Th17 can serve as a basis for the development of a new specific immunotherapeutic method in oncology after confirmation in the experiment in vitro. Given the small dataset, the results will need further validation.

  14. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  15. A Unique Report: Development of Super Anti-Human IgG Monoclone with Optical Density Over Than 3

    OpenAIRE

    Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Baradaran, Behzad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies and related conjugates are key reagents used in biomedical researches as well as, in treatment, purification and diagnosis of infectious and non- infectious diseases. Methods: Balb/c mice were immunized with purified human IgG. Spleen cells of the most immune mouse were fused with SP2/0 in the presence of Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG). Supernatant of hybridoma cells was screened for detection of antibody by ELISA. Then, the sample was assessed for cross-reactivity ...

  16. Serological analysis of human IgG and IgE anti-insulin antibodies by solid-phase radioimmunoassays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, R.G.; Rendell, M.; Adkinson, N.F. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A single solid-phase assay system which is useful for quantitative measurement of both IgG and IgE anti-insulin antibodies in human serum has been developed. Insulin-specific immunoglobulins are absorbed from human serum by excess quantities of insulin-agarose. After washes to remove unbound immunoglobulins, radioiodinated Staph A or rabbit anti-human IgE is added to detect bound IgG or IgE anbitodies, respectively

  17. CD4+CD25highCD127low Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood Are Not an Independent Factor for Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta B. Perz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The therapeutic efficacy of allogeneic hemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT largely relies on the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL effect. Uncontrolled graft-versus-host disease (GVHD is a feared complication of HSCT. Regulatory T cells (Treg are a subset of CD4+ T-helper cells believed to maintain tolerance after HSCT. It remains unclear whether low peripheral blood Treg have an impact on the risk for acute (aGVHD and chronic GVHD (cGVHD. Methods. In this paper we enumerated the CD4+CD25highCD127low Treg in the peripheral blood of 84 patients after at least 150 days from HSCT and in 20 healthy age-matched controls. Results. Although similar mean lymphocyte counts were found in patients and controls, CD3+CD4+ T-cell counts were significantly lower in patients. Patients also had significantly lower Treg percentages among lymphocytes as compared to controls. Patients with cGVHD had even higher percentages of Treg if compared to patients without cGVHD. In multivariate analysis, Treg percentages were not an independent factor for cGVHD. Conclusions. This paper did not show a relation between deficient peripheral blood Treg and cGVHD, therefore cGVHD does not seem to occur as a result of peripheral Treg paucity.

  18. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, De-Hua; Dou, Li-Ping; Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong; Shi, Bing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-γ by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4 + CD25 high Foxp3 + regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  19. Freeze and Thaw of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Results in Loss of CD62L Expression and a Reduced Capacity to Protect against Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mareike Florek

    Full Text Available The adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs in murine models of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT has been shown to protect recipient mice from lethal acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD and this approach is being actively investigated in human clinical trials. Here, we examined the effects of cryopreservation on Tregs. We found that freeze and thaw of murine and human Tregs is associated with reduced expression of L-selectin (CD62L, which was previously established to be an important factor that contributes to the in vivo protective effects of Tregs. Frozen and thawed murine Tregs showed a reduced capacity to bind to the CD62L binding partner MADCAM1 in vitro as well as an impaired homing to secondary lymphoid organs in vivo. Upon adoptive transfer frozen and thawed Tregs failed to protect against lethal GVHD compared with fresh Tregs in a murine model of allogeneic HCT across major histocompatibility barriers. In summary, the direct administration of adoptively transferred frozen and thawed Tregs adversely affects their immunosuppressive potential which is an important factor to consider in the clinical implementation of Treg immunotherapies.

  20. Uptake of donor lymphocytes treated with 8-methoxypsoralen and ultraviolet A light by recipient dendritic cells induces CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells and down-regulates cardiac allograft rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, De-Hua [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Dou, Li-Ping [Department of Hematology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, No. 28 Fu-Xing Road, Beijing 100853 (China); Wei, Yu-Xiang; Du, Guo-Sheng; Zou, Yi-Ping; Song, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Dong; Cai, Ming; Qian, Ye-Yong [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China); Shi, Bing-Yi, E-mail: shibingyi@medmail.com.cn [Organ Transplant Center, Chinese PLA 309th Hospital, No. 17A Hei-Shan-Hu Road, Beijing 100091 (China)

    2010-05-14

    Extracorporeal photopheresis (ECP) is an effective immunomodulatory therapy and has been demonstrated to be beneficial for graft-vs-host disease and solid-organ allograft rejection. ECP involves reinfusion of a patient's autologous peripheral blood leukocytes treated ex vivo with 8-methoxypsoralen and UVA light radiation (PUVA). Previous studies focused only on ECP treatment of recipient immune cells. Our study is the first to extend the target of ECP treatment to donor immune cells. The results of in vitro co-culture experiments demonstrate uptake of donor PUVA-treated splenic lymphocytes (PUVA-SPs) by recipient immature dendritic cells (DCs). Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SPs does not stimulate phenotype maturation of recipient DCs. In the same co-culture system, donor PUVA-SPs enhanced production of interleukin-10 and interferon-{gamma} by recipient DCs and impaired the subsequent capability of recipient DCs to stimulate recipient naive T cells. Phagocytosis of donor PUVA-SP (PUVA-SP DCs) by recipient DCs shifted T-cell responses in favor of T helper 2 cells. Infusion of PUVA-SP DCs inhibited cardiac allograft rejection in an antigen-specific manner and induced CD4{sup +}CD25{sup high}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells. In conclusion, PUVA-SP DCs simultaneously deliver the donor antigen and the regulatory signal to the transplant recipient, and thus can be used to develop a novel DC vaccine for negative immune regulation and immune tolerance induction.

  1. The anti-human trafficking collaboration model and serving victims: Providers' perspectives on the impact and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hea-Won; Park, Taekyung; Quiring, Stephanie; Barrett, Diana

    2018-01-01

    A coalition model is often used to serve victims of human trafficking but little is known about whether the model is adequately meeting the needs of the victims. The purpose of this study was to examine anti-human trafficking collaboration model in terms of its impact and the collaborative experience, including challenges and lessons learned from the service providers' perspective. Mixed methods study was conducted to evaluate the impact of a citywide anti-trafficking coalition model from the providers' perspectives. Web-based survey was administered with service providers (n = 32) and focus groups were conducted with Core Group members (n = 10). Providers reported the coalition model has made important impacts in the community by increasing coordination among the key agencies, law enforcement, and service providers and improving quality of service provision. Providers identified the improved and expanded partnerships among coalition members as the key contributing factor to the success of the coalition model. Several key strategies were suggested to improve the coalition model: improved referral tracking, key partner and protocol development, and information sharing.

  2. Detection of serum anti-sperm antibody in infertile couples with dot-immunogold filtration assay (DIGFA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Xiaoxian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To develop a new method for rapid detection of serum anti-sperm antibody in infertile couples. Methods: Human sperm antigen was prepared from pooled semen specimens of fertile males. Nitro-cellulose membrane was used as solid-phase carrier of the antigen. Colloidal gold pellet combined goat anti-human IgG was taken as labelled antibody. A dot-immunogold filtration assay system was established for test of serum anti-human sperm antibody. Serum specimens from 137 infertile couples were tested and the result compared with flat from ELISA. Results: The human sperm antigen would react with the anti-sperm antibody in the tested serum over the cellulose membrane through filtration and the result could be read with naked eye within 6 minutes. In this study of 137 infertile coupled, the anti-sperm antibody was positive in 21.9% of the female serum specimens and 13.19% of the males. Compared with the result from ELISA, the consistency rate was 96.1%. The sensitivity of the assay was 90.2% and specificity was 95.4%. The p reparation was stable after 6 months refrigerator storage. Conclusion: This newly developed DIGFA is very adequate for rap id detection of anti-sperm antibody and deserves popularization. (authors)

  3. A radioimmunoassay for human antibody specific for microbial antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tew, J.G.; Burmeister, J.; Greene, E.J.; Pflaumer, S.K.; Goldstein, J.

    1977-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method for detecting and quantitating antibody specific or microbial antigens is described. Bacterial, fungal, parasitic or viral antigens attached to bromoacetyl cellulose or the intact cells themselves were added to a series of two-fold dilutions of human serum. After a short incubation period, which allowed human antibody to attach to the antigens, the complex was thoroughly washed and carbon-14 labeled anti-human light chain antibody was added to each dilution. The resulting complex was washed, collected on a filter pad, placed in a scintillation vial and radioassayed. The relationship between radioactivity bound and -log 2 of the serum dilution was linear. The endpoint for each assay and a confidence interval was calculated by doing inverse prediction from simple linear regression. Results obtained using this assay indicated the presence of antibody in a pool of normal human sera specific for herpes virus and for both cell surface and intracellular antigens of Streptococcus mutans, Naegleria fowleri and Cryptococcus neoformans. In general the dominant response was against the intracellular antigens rather than cell surface antigens

  4. A Unique Report: Development of Super Anti-Human IgG Monoclone with Optical Density Over Than 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Aghebati Maleki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies and related conjugates are key reagents used in biomedical researches as well as, in treatment, purification and diagnosis of infectious and non- infectious diseases. Methods: Balb/c mice were immunized with purified human IgG. Spleen cells of the most immune mouse were fused with SP2/0 in the presence of Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG. Supernatant of hybridoma cells was screened for detection of antibody by ELISA. Then, the sample was assessed for cross-reactivity with IgM & IgA by ELISA and confirmed by immunoblotting. The subclasses of the selected mAbs were determined. The best clone was injected intraperitoneally to some pristane-injected mice. Anti-IgG mAb was purified from the animals' ascitic fluid by Ion exchange chromatography and then, mAb was conjugated with HRP. Results: In the present study, over than 50 clones were obtained that 1 clone had optical density over than 3. We named this clone as supermonoclone which was selected for limiting dilution. The result of the immunoblotting, showed sharp band in IgG position and did not show any band in IgM&IgA position. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis of infectious diseases like Toxoplasmosis, Rubella and IgG class of other infectious and non- infectious diseases.

  5. A Unique Report: Development of Super Anti-Human IgG Monoclone with Optical Density Over Than 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Baradaran, Behzad; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies and related conjugates are key reagents used in biomedical researches as well as, in treatment, purification and diagnosis of infectious and non- infectious diseases. Methods: Balb/c mice were immunized with purified human IgG. Spleen cells of the most immune mouse were fused with SP2/0 in the presence of Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG). Supernatant of hybridoma cells was screened for detection of antibody by ELISA. Then, the sample was assessed for cross-reactivity with IgM & IgA by ELISA and confirmed by immunoblotting. The subclasses of the selected mAbs were determined. The best clone was injected intraperitoneally to some pristane-injected mice. Anti-IgG mAb was purified from the animals' ascitic fluid by Ion exchange chromatography and then, mAb was conjugated with HRP. Results: In the present study, over than 50 clones were obtained that 1 clone had optical density over than 3. We named this clone as supermonoclone which was selected for limiting dilution. The result of the immunoblotting, showed sharp band in IgG position and did not show any band in IgM&IgA position. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis of infectious diseases like Toxoplasmosis, Rubella and IgG class of other infectious and non- infectious diseases. PMID:24312857

  6. Sensitive radioimmunoassay for detection of antibodies to recombinant human interferon-alpha A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palleroni, A.V.; Trown, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay (RIA) for the detection of antibodies to recombinant human leukocyte interferon A (rHuIFN-alpha A) in human serum has been developed and validated against the standard antiviral neutralization bioassay (ANB). The assay measures the binding of 125 I-labeled rHuIFN-alpha A to immunoglobulins in serum. Aliquots of patients' sera are incubated with 125 I-rHuIFN-alpha A and the complexes formed between antibodies in the sera and the 125 I-rHuIFN-alpha A are precipitated with goat anti-human IgG serum. The radioactivity in the immune precipitate is a measure of the quantity of antibody (if present) in the serum. The sensitivity of this RIA is 5 ng of IgG/ml of serum

  7. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology.

  8. The effect of high antigen density on solid-phase radioimmunoassays for antibody regardless of immunoglobulin class

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, R.L.; Hardtke, M.A.; Carr, R.I.

    1980-01-01

    Human sera containing antibody to casein or to bovine serum albumin were used to assess the validity and utility of a solid-phase assay for quantitating antibody activity. Rabbit anti-human immunoglobulin radiolabeled with 125 I and capable of reacting with all human immunoglobulin classes was used to detect antibody bound to antigen immobilized to polystyrene tubes by a new covalent technique. This method results in very high antigen concentrations in highly stable association with polystyrene tubes. Kinetic and absorption studies demonstrated that low avidity antibodies are better detected when antigen is immobilized by the covalent method than when passively adsorbed. Conditions are described for minimizing artifactual interactions and for obtaining results similar to those obtained with conventional, liquid-phase assays. Failure to reach equilibrium in solid-phase assays and other problems are proposed to explain, in part, the inability to obtain a better correlation between solid- and liquid-phase immunoassays. (Auth.)

  9. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  10. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  11. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood of ...

  12. Nuclear medicine: Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Sakahara, H.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Torizuka, K.; Yokoyama, A.

    1986-01-01

    Antitumor monoclonal antibody was successfully labeled with Tc-99m by using dithiosemicarbazone (DTS) as a bifunctional chelating agent. In the first step, DTS was coupled to antibody without loss of immunoreactivity; the compound then efficiently formed a neutral 1:1 chelate with pentavalent or tetravalent Tc-99m. Imaging with Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody to human osteosarcoma (OST-7) clearly displayed a small tumor in nude mice at 6 and 24 hours after intravenous administration. The tumor-to-blood ratio of the Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody was higher than that of a radioiodinated antibody and similar to that of an In-111-labeled antibody. Thus, conjugation of DTS to monoclonal antibody followed by radiometalation is a simple and efficient method of preparing Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody

  13. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  14. Immunoradiometric assay for cytomegalovirus-specific IgG antibodies; Assay development and evaluation in blood transfusion practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klapper, P.E.; Cleator, G.M.; Prinja-Wolks, D.; Morris, D.J. (Medical School, Manchester (United Kingdom). Department of Medical microbiology, Virology Unit); Morell, G. (Regional Blood Transfusion Centre, manchester (United Kingdom))

    1990-03-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (radio-immunosorbent test; RIST) for the detection of IgG antibodies to human herpesvirus 4 (human cytomegalovirus (CMV)) has been developed. The technique utilizes CMV antigen passively adsorbed to a polyvinyl microtitration plate and a radiolabelled murine monoclonal anti-human IgG antibody to detect binding of human antibody to the 'solid phase' reagent. The assay was optimized, and its specifity confirmed by testing paired acute and convalescent sera from patients with acute CMV or other human herpesvirus infections. To determine the assay's sensitivity 1433 blood donor sera were examined. The RIST was more sensitive than a standard complement fixation (CFT). Use of a monoclonal anti-human IgG antibody in the RIST reduced non-specific binding to the control uninfected cell antigen such that blood donor sera could be tested in the assay using only a CMV antigen without generating an unacceptable false positive rate. (author). 23 refs.; 1 tab.

  15. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  16. Hepatitis A virus antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, J.; Kselikova, M.; Urbankova, J.

    1980-01-01

    A description is presented of a radioimmunoassay designed to prove the presence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus (HA Ab, anti-Ha) using an Abbott HAVAB set. This proof as well as the proof of the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis B virus is based on competition between a normal antibody against hepatitis A virus and a 125 I-labelled antibody for the binding sites of a specific antigen spread all over the surface of a tiny ball; this is then indirect proof of the antibody under investigation. The method is described of reading the results from the number of impulses per 60 seconds: the higher the titre of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in the serum examined, the lower the activity of the specimen concerned. The rate is reported of incidence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in a total of 68 convalescents after hepatitis A; the antibody was found in 94.1%. The immunoglobulin made from the convalescents' plasma showed the presence of antibodies in dilutions as high as 1:250 000 while the comparable ratio for normal immunoglobulin Norga was only 1:2500. Differences are discussed in the time incidence of the antibodies against the hepatitis A virus, the antibodies against the surface antigen of hepatitis B, and the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis V virus. (author)

  17. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. ... different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  18. Development and characterization of a TAPIR-like mouse monoclonal antibody to amyloid-beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hara, Hideo; Makifuchi, Takao; Tabira, Takeshi

    2008-06-01

    Tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody was better related to the effect of immunotherapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) than ELISA antibody. Here we used a hybridoma technique to develop a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid-beta (Abeta) mouse monoclonal antibody. The obtained monoclonal antibody, 3.4A10, was an IgG2b isotype and recognized N-terminal portion of Abeta1-42 without binding denatured or native amyloid-beta protein precursor. It had higher affinity to Abeta1-42 than to Abeta1-40 by Biacore affinity analysis and stained preferably the peripheral part of senile plaques and recognized the plaque core less than 4G8. It inhibited the Abeta1-42 fibril formation as well as degraded pre-aggregated Abeta1-42 peptide in a thioflavin T fluorescence spectrophotometry assay. The in vivo studies showed that 3.4A10 treatment decreased amyloid burden compared to the control group and significantly reduced Abeta42 levels rather than Abeta40 levels in brain lysates as well as the Abeta*56 oligomer (12mer) in TBS fraction of the brain lysates. 3.4A10 entered brain and decorated some plaques, which is surrounded by more Iba1-positive microglia. 3.4A10 therapy did not induce lymphocytic infiltration and obvious increase in microhemorrhage. We conclude that 3.4A10 is a TAPIR-like anti-human amyloid monoclonal antibody, and has a potential of therapeutic application for AD.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  20. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  1. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  2. The frequency of CD127low expressing CD4+CD25high T regulatory cells is inversely correlated with human T lymphotrophic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 proviral load in HTLV-1-infection and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chieia Marco

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD4+CD25high regulatory T (TReg cells modulate antigen-specific T cell responses, and can suppress anti-viral immunity. In HTLV-1 infection, a selective decrease in the function of TReg cell mediated HTLV-1-tax inhibition of FOXP3 expression has been described. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and phenotype of TReg cells in HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers and in HTLV-1-associated neurological disease (HAM/TSP patients, and to correlate with measures of T cell activation. Results We were able to confirm that HTLV-I drives activation, spontaneous IFNγ production, and proliferation of CD4+ T cells. We also observed a significantly lower proportion of CTLA-4+ TReg cells (CD4+CD25high T cells in subjects with HAM/TSP patients compared to healthy controls. Ki-67 expression was negatively correlated to the frequency of CTLA-4+ TReg cells in HAM/TSP only, although Ki-67 expression was inversely correlated with the percentage of CD127low TReg cells in healthy control subjects. Finally, the proportion of CD127low TReg cells correlated inversely with HTLV-1 proviral load. Conclusion Taken together, the results suggest that TReg cells may be subverted in HAM/TSP patients, which could explain the marked cellular activation, spontaneous cytokine production, and proliferation of CD4+ T cells, in particular those expressing the CD25highCD127low phenotype. TReg cells represent a potential target for therapeutic intervention for patients with HTLV-1-related neurological diseases.

  3. THE RELATIONSHIP OF FoxP3+ T REGULATORY CELLS TO DISEASE ACTIVITY AND ANTIBODY LEVELS IN EARLY RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Avdeeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the relationship of the count of FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Tregs to the clinical and laboratory parameters of disease activity and the levels of antibodies in a group of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA.Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 45 patients with early RA (2010 ACR/EULAR criteria who had not previously received treatment with methotrexate, including 39 women; median age was 52.0 [32.5; 57.5] years; disease duration, 5 [4; 6] months, DAS28 5.01 [4.18; 5.8]; 71.1% of the patients were rheumatoid factor (RF positive and 88.9% were anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide positive. The relative and absolute counts of Treg (FoxP3+CD25+; CD152+surface; CD152+intracellular; FoxP3+CD127-; CD25+CD127-; FoxP3+ICOS+; FoxP3+CD154+; FoxP3+CD274+ were measured by immunofluorescence staining and multicolor flow cytometry. A control group consisted of 20 healthy donors who were matched for sex and age with the examined patients.Results and discussion. DАS28 was high, moderate, and low in 22 (48.9%, 20 (44.4%, and 3 (6.7% patients, respectively. As compared with the healthy donors, the patients with early RA were observed to have lower values in the percentage of FoxP3+CD25+ cells, in the percentage and absolute count of FoxP3+ICOS+ cells, in the percentage and absolute count of FoxP3+CD154+ and FoxP3+ CD274+ T cells; p<0.05 in all cases. Negative correlation was recorded between the percentage of FoxP3+CD25+ and C-reactive protein (CRP (r=-0.4; that of CD152+intracellular and DAS28 (r=-0.35, ESR (r=-0.46, CRP (r=-0.54; that of FoxP3+CD127 and CRP (r=-0.42; that of CD25+CD127 and DAS28 (r=-0.38, SDAI (r=-0.41, CDAI (r=-0.36, ESR (r=-0.39, CRP (r=-0.47; p<0.05 in all cases.The patients who were seronegative for RF were found to have higher values in the percentage of CD25+CD127, in the percentage and absolute count of Foxp3+CD154+ and Foxp3+CD274+ T lymphocytes.Conclusion. The given data may indicate that the

  4. The possible role of CD4⁺CD25(high)Foxp3⁺/CD4⁺IL-17A⁺ cell imbalance in the autoimmunity of patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Haibo; Yu, Xiurong; Ma, Lei; Song, Shoujun; Li, Yuanbin; Zhang, Li; Yang, Tingting; Liu, Huan

    2015-12-01

    Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) is a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune thyroid disease, for which the exact etiology remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate dynamic changes in regulatory T cell (Treg) and T helper 17 cell (Th17) populations in patients with HT at different stages of thyroid dysfunction, as well as to analyze the possible correlation between the Treg/Th17 cell axis and autoimmune status in HT. We assessed thyroid function and autoantibody serology both in HT patients and in healthy controls (HCs) and divided HT patients into three subgroups according to thyroid function. We then determined the percentages of Treg and Th17 cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and analyzed mRNA expression of the Treg and Th17 cell-defining transcription factors Foxp3 and RORγt. In addition, serum levels of TGF-β and IL-17A were assessed. We found that the percentage of Treg cells, Foxp3 mRNA levels, and the ratio of Treg/Th17 cells were all significantly lower in HT patients, while Th17 cell percentages and RORγt mRNA levels were significantly higher. Interestingly, we also observed significant differences in these measurements between HT patient subgroups. Serum IL-17A levels were markedly increased in HT patients, while serum concentrations of TGF-β were lower, compared to HCs. The ratio of Treg/Th17 cells was negatively correlated with the levels of serum thyroperoxidase antibody, thyroglobulin antibody, and thyrotropin (TSH) in HT patients. Taken together, our data suggest that the balance between Treg and Th17 cells shifts in favor of Th17 cells during clinical progression of HT, which is negatively correlated with levels of thyroid-specific autoantibodies and TSH, implying that Treg/Th17 cell imbalance may contribute to thyroid damage in HT.

  5. Analysis of anti-HLA antibodies in sensitized kidney transplant candidates subjected to desensitization with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobashevsky, Andrew L; Higgins, Nancy G; Rosner, Kevin M; Mujtaba, Muhammad A; Goggins, William C; Taber, Tim E

    2013-07-27

    Preexisting donor-specific antibodies against human leukocyte antigens are major risk factors for acute antibody-mediated and chronic rejection of kidney transplant grafts. Immunomodulation (desensitization) protocols may reduce antibody concentration and improve the success of transplant. We investigated the effect of desensitization with intravenous immunoglobulin and rituximab on the antibody profile in highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates. In 31 transplant candidates (calculated panel-reactive antibody [cPRA], 34%-99%), desensitization included intravenous immunoglobulin on days 0 and 30 and a single dose of rituximab on day 15. Anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies were analyzed before and after desensitization. Reduction of cPRA from 25% to 50% was noted for anti-class I (5 patients, within 20-60 days) and anti-class II (3 patients, within 10-20 days) antibodies. After initial reduction of cPRA, the cPRA increased within 120 days. In 24 patients, decrease in mean fluorescence intensity of antibodies by more than 50% was noted at follow-up, but there was no reduction of cPRA. Rebound occurred in 65% patients for anti-class I antibodies at 350 days and anti-class II antibodies at 101 to 200 days. Probability of rebound effect was higher in patients with mean fluorescence intensity of more than 10,700 before desensitization, anti-class II antibodies, and history of previous transplant. The desensitization protocol had limited efficacy in highly sensitized kidney transplant candidate because of the short period with antibody reduction and high frequency of rebound effect.

  6. Antitumor effect of novel anti-podoplanin antibody NZ-12 against malignant pleural mesothelioma in an orthotopic xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika Kato; Tsuchihashi, Yuki; Izumi, Toshihiro; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Okada, Naoto; Sato, Chiemi; Tobiume, Makoto; Otsuka, Kenji; Miyamoto, Licht; Tsuchiya, Koichiro; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Kato, Yukinari; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-09-01

    Podoplanin (aggrus) is highly expressed in several types of cancers, including malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Previously, we developed a rat anti-human podoplanin mAb, NZ-1, and a rat-human chimeric anti-human podoplanin antibody, NZ-8, derived from NZ-1, which induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity against podoplanin-positive MPM cell lines. In this study, we showed the antitumor effect of NZ-1, NZ-8, and NZ-12, a novel rat-human chimeric anti-human podoplanin antibody derived from NZ-1, in an MPM orthotopic xenograft SCID mouse model. Treatment with NZ-1 and rat NK (CD161a(+) ) cells inhibited the growth of tumors and the production of pleural effusion in NCI-H290/PDPN or NCI-H226 orthotopic xenograft mouse models. NZ-8 and human natural killer (NK) (CD56(+) ) cells also inhibited tumor growth and pleural effusion in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. Furthermore, NZ-12 induced potent ADCC mediated by human MNC, compared with either NZ-1 or NZ-8. Antitumor effects were observed following treatment with NZ-12 and human NK (CD56(+) ) cells in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. In addition, combined immunotherapy using the ADCC activity of NZ-12 mediated by human NK (CD56(+) ) cells with pemetrexed, led to enhanced antitumor effects in MPM orthotopic xenograft mice. These results strongly suggest that combination therapy with podoplanin-targeting immunotherapy using both NZ-12 and pemetrexed might provide an efficacious therapeutic strategy for the treatment of MPM. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Critical assessment of the efficiency of CD34 and CD133 antibodies for enrichment of rabbit hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vašíček, Jaromír; Shehata, Medhat; Schnabl, Susanne; Hilgarth, Martin; Hubmann, Rainer; Jäger, Ulrich; Bauer, Miroslav; Chrenek, Peter

    2018-06-08

    Rabbits have many hereditary diseases common to humans and are therefore a valuable model for regenerative disease and hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) therapies. Currently, there is no substantial data on the isolation and/or enrichment of rabbit HSCs. This study was initiated to evaluate the efficiency of the commercially available anti-CD34 and anti-CD133 antibodies for the detection and potential enrichment of rabbit HSCs from peripheral blood. PBMCs from rabbit and human blood were labelled with different clones of anti-human CD34 monoclonal antibodies (AC136, 581 and 8G12) and rabbit polyclonal CD34 antibody (pCD34) and anti-human CD133 monoclonal antibodies (AC133 and 293C3). Flow cytometry showed a higher percentage of rabbit CD34 + cells labelled by AC136 in comparison to the clone 581 and pCD34 (Penrichment of rabbit CD34 + cells using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS). The enrichment of the rabbit CD34 + cells after sorting was low in comparison to human samples (2.4% vs. 39.6%). PCR analyses confirmed the efficient enrichment of human CD34 + cells and the low expression of CD34 mRNA in rabbit positive fraction. In conclusion, the tested antibodies might be suitable for detection, but not for sorting the rabbit CD34 + HSCs and new specific anti-rabbit CD34 antibodies are needed for efficient enrichment of rabbit HSCs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  8. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Baum, R.P.; Staib-Sebler, E.; Lorenz, M.; Niesen, A.; Hoer, G.

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99m Tc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, B J; Baum, R P; Staib-Sebler, E; Lorenz, M; Niesen, A; Hör, G

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99mTc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%.

  10. Human monoclonal antibody {sup 99m}Tc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, B.J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Baum, R.P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Staib-Sebler, E. [Department of General and Abdominal Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Lorenz, M. [Department of General and Abdominal Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Niesen, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hoer, G. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of {sup 99m}Tc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Targeted delivery of polyamidoamine-paclitaxel conjugate functionalized with anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 trastuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma P

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pengkai Ma,1 Xuemei Zhang,1 Ling Ni,2 Jinming Li,2 Fengpu Zhang,1 Zheng Wang,1 Shengnan Lian,1 Kaoxiang Sun1 1School of Pharmacy, Yantai University, Yantai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 2State Key Laboratory of Long-acting and Targeting Drug Delivery System, Yantai, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China Background: Antibody-dendrimer conjugates have the potential to improve the targeting and release of chemotherapeutic drugs at the tumor site while reducing adverse side effects caused by drug accumulation in healthy tissues. In this study, trastuzumab (TMAB, which binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, was used as a targeting agent in a TMAB-polyamidoamine (PAMAM conjugate carrying paclitaxel (PTX specifically to cells overexpressing HER2. Methods: TMAB was covalently linked to a PAMAM dendrimer via bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG. PTX was conjugated to PAMAM using succinic anhydride as a cross-linker, yielding TMAB-PEG-PAMAM-PTX. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the conjugates. The cellular uptake and in vivo biodistribution were studied by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and Carestream In Vivo FX, respectively. Results: Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated that PEG, PTX, fluorescein isothiocyanate, and cyanine7 were conjugated to PAMAM. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that TMAB was conjugated to PEG-PAMAM. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy measurements revealed that the different conjugates ranged in size between 10 and 35 nm and had a spherical shape. In vitro cellular uptake demonstrated that the TMAB-conjugated PAMAM was taken up by HER2-overexpressing BT474 cells more efficiently than MCF-7 cells that expressed lower levels of HER2. Co-localization experiments indicated that TMAB-conjugated PAMAM was

  12. Naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies binding to Globo H-expressing cells identify ovarian cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Alam, Shahidul; Schötzau, Andreas; Chinarev, Alexander; Bovin, Nicolai V; Hacker, Neville F; Jacob, Francis; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2017-02-10

    Glycosphingolipids are important compounds of the plasma membrane of mammalian cells and a number of them have been associated with malignant transformation and progression, reinforcing tumour aggressiveness and metastasis. Here we investigated the levels of naturally occurring anti-glycan antibodies to Globo H in blood plasma obtained from high-grade serous ovarian cancer patients (SOC) and women without gynaecological malignancies (control) using suspension glycan array technology employing chemically synthesized glycans as antibody targets. We found that anti-human Globo H IgG antibodies were able to significantly discriminate SOC from controls (P anti-Globo H antibodies highly correlated (r = 0.992). The incubation of plasma-derived anti-glycan antibodies with chemically synthesized (presented on fluorescence microspheres) and native Globo H (expressed on Globo H-positive cell lines) revealed strong reactivity of naturally occurring human anti-Globo H antibodies towards its antigen expressed on ovarian cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that human plasma-derived antibodies to Globo H as well as the presence of the antigen might be considered as therapeutic option in ovarian cancer.

  13. Detection of antibodies in human serum using trimellityl-erythrocytes: direct and indirect haemagglutination and haemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, E S; Pruzansky, J J; Patterson, R; Zeiss, C R; Roberts, M

    1980-02-01

    Utilizing trimellityl-erythrocytes (TM-E), antibodies were detected in sera of seven workers with trimellitic anhydride (TMA) induced airway syndromes by direct haemagglutination, indirect haemagglutination with anti-human IgG, IgA or IgM or by haemolysis. Detectable levels of antibody were obtained with all three methods. The most sensitive technique was indirect haemagglutination using anti-IgG. When added as an inhibitor, TM-human serum albumin produced a 10- to 800-fold reduction in titres. TM-ovalbumin of similar epitope density was less inhibitory and sodium trimellitate the least inhibitory on a molar basis. All of the assays using haptenized human red cells were also capable of detecting anti-TM antibodies in Rhesus monkeys whose airways had been exposed to TMA. These assays are useful for detecting anti-TM antibodies and may also be adapted to demonstrate antibodies induced against other inhaled haptens in sera of environmentally exposed individuals or in animal models of such exposure.

  14. Rheumatoid factor interference in immunogenicity assays for human monoclonal antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarewicz, Suzanna; Miller, Jill M; Swanson, Steven J; Moxness, Michael S

    2010-05-31

    Rheumatoid factors (RFs) are endogenous human antibodies that bind to human gamma globulins. RFs demonstrate preferential binding to aggregated gamma globulins and are involved in the clearing mechanism of immune complexes. Immunoassays designed to measure human anti-human antibodies (HAHA) after administration of monoclonal antibody therapeutics are thus vulnerable to interference from RFs. When using a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) bridging immunoassay, samples from subjects with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrated much higher baseline reactivity than healthy subjects. Interference was found to be dependent on the aggregation state of the therapeutic antibody that had been conjugated with the detection reagent (ruthenium). Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) demonstrated that of the total integrated peaks, as little as 0.55% high molecular weight aggregates (>600kDa) were sufficient to cause increased reactivity. Stability studies of the ruthenium and biotin conjugated therapeutic antibody indicated that storage time, temperature and buffer formulation were critical in maintaining the integrity of the reagents. Through careful SE-HPLC monitoring we were able to choose appropriate storage and buffer conditions which led to a reduction in the false reactivity rate in therapeutic-naïve serum from a rheumatoid arthritis population.

  15. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  16. Expression of recombinant Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André eFrenzel

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with human-like post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  17. Antilaminaribioside and antichitobioside antibodies in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejchrt, S; Drahosová, M; Kopácová, M; Cyrany, J; Douda, T; Pintér, M; Bures, J

    2008-01-01

    Testing antilaminaribioside (ALCA) and antichitobioside (ACCA) antibodies in 89 Crohn's disease (CD), 31 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 50 controls, mean values were 38.6 and 53.0 ELISA units for CD, 34.0 and 32.6 for UC, 34.5 and 36.4 for controls, respectively. There was no significant difference of ALCA values between CD and UC (p = 0.401), CD and control subjects (p = 0.698) or UC and controls (p = 0.898). ACCA were significantly higher in CD compared with UC (p = 0.011) but not with the controls (p = 0.095). No significant difference of ACCA values between UC and controls (p = 0.107) was found. ALCA and ACCA values significantly correlated in CD (r = 0.548, p ACCA), the negative ones (to exclude CD) 25 (ALCA) and 86 % (ACCA). Small and/or large bowel involvement or disease type (i.e. stenosing, perforating or inflammatory) of CD did not differ in the two values. The idea that ALCA and ACCA may be useful either to differentiate between CD, UC and healthy subjects or to stratify CD was not confirmed.

  18. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  19. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Also known as What Is Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders ...

  20. Agonistic Human Antibodies Binding to Lecithin-Cholesterol Acyltransferase Modulate High Density Lipoprotein Metabolism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardane, Ruwanthi N.; Fordstrom, Preston; Piper, Derek E.; Masterman, Stephanie; Siu, Sophia; Liu, Dongming; Brown, Mike; Lu, Mei; Tang, Jie; Zhang, Richard; Cheng, Janet; Gates, Andrew; Meininger, David; Chan, Joyce; Carlson, Tim; Walker, Nigel; Schwarz, Margrit; Delaney, John; Zhou, Mingyue

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery opportunities where loss-of-function alleles of a target gene link to a disease-relevant phenotype often require an agonism approach to up-regulate or re-establish the activity of the target gene. Antibody therapy is increasingly recognized as a favored drug modality due to multiple desirable pharmacological properties. However, agonistic antibodies that enhance the activities of the target enzymes are rarely developed because the discovery of agonistic antibodies remains elusive. Here we report an innovative scheme of discovery and characterization of human antibodies capable of binding to and agonizing a circulating enzyme lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT). Utilizing a modified human LCAT protein with enhanced enzymatic activity as an immunogen, we generated fully human monoclonal antibodies using the XenoMouseTM platform. One of the resultant agonistic antibodies, 27C3, binds to and substantially enhances the activity of LCAT from humans and cynomolgus macaques. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the 2.45 Å LCAT-27C3 complex shows that 27C3 binding does not induce notable structural changes in LCAT. A single administration of 27C3 to cynomolgus monkeys led to a rapid increase of plasma LCAT enzymatic activity and a 35% increase of the high density lipoprotein cholesterol that was observed up to 32 days after 27C3 administration. Thus, this novel scheme of immunization in conjunction with high throughput screening may represent an effective strategy for discovering agonistic antibodies against other enzyme targets. 27C3 and other agonistic human anti-human LCAT monoclonal antibodies described herein hold potential for therapeutic development for the treatment of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26644477

  1. Radiolabelled antibodies in imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent technological advances make it possible to produce pure (monoclonal) antibodies in unlimited quantities without the need for continuous immunization of animals and to label these antibodies with a variety of radionuclides which can be traced by single-photon computed tomography. An outline review of the state of the art is presented, with particular reference to the imaging of myocardial infarcts and to tumour imaging studies using labelled monoclonal antibodies (sup(99m)Tc and 125 I). Lengthy bibliography. (U.K.)

  2. Antiviral Activity of HIV gp120 Targeting Bispecific T Cell Engager (BiTE®) Antibody Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozy, Johannes; Schlaepfer, Erika; Mueller, Christina K S; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Rampini, Silvana K; Myburgh, Renier; Raum, Tobias; Kufer, Peter; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Muenz, Markus; Speck, Roberto F

    2018-05-02

    Today's gold standard in HIV therapy is the combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). It requires strict adherence by patients and life-long medication, which can lower the viral load below detection limits and prevent HIV-associated immunodeficiency, but cannot cure patients. The bispecific T cell engaging (BiTE®) antibody technology has demonstrated long-term relapse-free outcomes in patients with relapsed and refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia. We here generated BiTE® antibody constructs that target the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 (HIV gp120) using either the scFv B12 or VRC01, the first two extracellular domains (1+2) of human CD4 alone or joined to the single chain variable fragment (scFv) of the antibody 17b fused to an anti-human CD3ϵ scFv. These engineered human BiTE® antibody constructs showed engagement of T cells for redirected lysis of HIV gp120-transfected CHO cells. Furthermore, they substantially inhibited HIV-1 replication in PBMCs as well as in macrophages co-cultured with autologous CD8+ T-cells, the most potent being the human CD4(1+2) BiTE® antibody construct and the CD4(1+2)L17b BiTE® antibody construct. The CD4(1+2) h BiTE® antibody construct promoted HIV infection of human CD4-/CD8+ T cells. In contrast, the neutralizing B12 and the VRC01 BiTE® antibody constructs as well as the CD4(1+2)L17b BiTE® antibody construct did not. Thus, BiTE® antibody constructs targeting HIV gp120 are very promising for constraining HIV and warrant further development as novel antiviral therapy with curative potential. Importance HIV is a chronic infection well controlled with the current cART. However, we lack cure of HIV, and the HIV pandemic goes on. Here we showed in vitro and ex vivo t hat a bispecific T-cell engaging (BiTE®) antibody construct targeting HIV gp120 resulted in substantially reduced HIV replication. In addition, these BiTE® antibody constructs display efficient killing of gp120 expressing cells and inhibited replication in ex vivo

  3. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.Y.T.; Sikora, K.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. (Auth.)

  4. Future of antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Duncan; O'Leary, Rhona; Pujar, Narahari S

    2007-03-15

    Antibody purification seems to be safely ensconced in a platform, now well-established by way of multiple commercialized antibody processes. However, natural evolution compels us to peer into the future. This is driven not only by a large, projected increase in the number of antibody therapies, but also by dramatic improvements in upstream productivity, and process economics. Although disruptive technologies have yet escaped downstream processes, evolution of the so-called platform is already evident in antibody processes in late-stage development. Here we perform a wide survey of technologies that are competing to be part of that platform, and provide our [inherently dangerous] assessment of those that have the most promise.

  5. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  6. Antibody tumor penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Greg M.; Schmidt, Michael M.; Wittrup, K. Dane

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have proven to be effective agents in cancer imaging and therapy. One of the major challenges still facing the field is the heterogeneous distribution of these agents in tumors when administered systemically. Large regions of untargeted cells can therefore escape therapy and potentially select for more resistant cells. We present here a summary of theoretical and experimental approaches to analyze and improve antibody penetration in tumor tissue. PMID:18541331

  7. Quantitation of anti-tetanus and anti-diphtheria antibodies by enzymoimmunoassay: methodology and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virella, G; Hyman, B

    1991-01-01

    We have developed enzymoimmunoassays (EIA) for the quantitation of antibodies (Ab) to tetanus and diphtheria toxoids (TT, DT) using Immulon I plates coated with the appropriate toxoid. A preparation of human tetanus immunoglobulin with a known concentration of anti-TT Ab was used as calibrator of the anti-TT antibody assay. The assay of anti-DT Ab is calibrated with a pool of human sera whose anti-DT Ab concentration was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using a horse anti-DT with known Ab concentration as calibrator. A peroxidase-conjugated anti-human IgG was used in both assays. ABTS was used as substrate, and the reaction was stopped after 1 min incubation with citric acid and the OD measured at 414 nm on a Vmax reader. The assays have been applied to a variety of clinical situations. In patients suspected of having tetanus, the quantitation of antibodies has been helpful in establishing a diagnosis. In patients with a history of hypersensitivity to tetanus toxoid, verification of the levels of anti-TT antibody may prevent unnecessary and potentially harmful immunizations. The assays have also been used for the diagnostic evaluation of the humoral immune response to TT and DT, both in pediatric patients and in immunosuppressed patients. Several non-responders have been detected, and we have recently used the assay to monitor the effects of fish oil administration on the humoral immune response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. The vagina of women infected with Trichomonas vaginalis has numerous proteinases and antibody to trichomonad proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, J F; Newton, E; Dennis, C; Neale, K A

    1991-12-01

    Patients with trichomoniasis have serum antibody to numerous T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases, indicating that the proteinases are expressed in vivo. It was important, therefore, to examine for the presence of soluble trichomonad proteinases and/or antibody to the proteinases in the vagina of infected women. Vaginal washes (VWs) from 20 women were examined for the presence of proteinases by electrophoresis using acrylamide co-polymerised with gelatin as the indicator system. Antibody to proteinases in VWs was detected by an immunoprecipitation assay involving protein A-bearing Staphylococcus aureus first coated with anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody, which was then added to VWs. For VWs having soluble proteinases, the bacteria were used to determine whether immune complexes between antibody and proteinases were present. VWs without soluble proteinases were incubated with the anti-human IgG treated bacteria before adding to detergent extracts of T. vaginalis. Individual isolates from the patients examined in this study were also analysed by one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis for their proteinase content. Finally, VWs were from patients without any history of other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) as well as from individuals having numerous other STDs, including yeast, group B streptococcus, chlamydia, and syphilis. Approximately one-third of patients had soluble proteinases in the VWs; the remaining two-thirds (70%) of patients and normal women had no detectable proteinases in VWs. Half of the patients without soluble proteinases had IgG which, when bound to S. aureus, immunoprecipitated many proteinases from a detergent extract of T. vaginalis. All soluble proteinases and those precipitated from trichomonal extracts were inhibited by inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. Finally, patients having trichomoniasis in addition to numerous other STD agents, including yeast, group B streptococcus, chlamydia, and syphilis did not have soluble proteinases

  9. Anti-Human Trafficking Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, a significant number of programs and policies have been developed and implemented to prevent and combat human trafficking. At the international, regional and national levels, government, and international, and nongovernment organizations have established plans of action, conducted training, developed policy tools, and…

  10. Radiolabelled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    A steadily growing number of tumor-associated antigens are used to raise antibodies used for the detection of human tumors by external imaging, a technique termed immunoscintigraphy. The majority of these clinical antibody studies are performed using Iodine-131, which is cheap, readily available and easily attached to protein. It has the disadvantage of having a high energy gamma emission (365 keV) which is poorly detected by modern cameras, so that increasing use is now being made of more appropriate labels with lower energies for imaging, such as Iodine-123, Indium-111 and Technetium-99m. A number of research centres in the United Kingdom are currently involved in the production of tumor-associated monoclonal antibodies, only a small number of which are finally selected for diagnostic use. These developments represent a major area of advancement in Nuclear Medicine and when used for imaging are capable of providing diagnostic information complimentary to other diagnostic techniques

  11. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  12. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  13. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  14. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity...... to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  15. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    Yeast surface display is an effective tool for antibody affinity maturation because yeast can be used as an all-in-one workhorse to assemble, display and screen diversified antibody libraries. By employing the natural ability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently recombine multiple DNA...... laboratory conditions. A particular emphasis was put on using molecular techniques in conjunction with microenvironmental measurements (O2, pH, irradiance), a combination that is rarely found but provides a much more detailed understanding of “cause and effect” in complex natural systems...

  16. Interleukin-9 receptor α chain mRNA formation in CD8+ T cells producing anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 substance(s)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.M.; Tsuchie, H.; Detorio, M.A.; Shirono, H.; Hara, C.; Nishimoto, A.; Saji, A.; Koga, J.; Takata, N.; Maniar, J.K.; Saple, D.G.; Taniguchi, K.; Kageyama, S.; Ichimura, H.; Kurimura, T.

    1998-01-01

    A search for gene(s) associated with anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-l) activity of CD8 + T cells was attempted using molecular cloning and the relation between the anti-HIV activity of CD8 + T cells and the interleukin-9 receptor a chain (IL-9R-α) mRNA expression from the cDNA clones obtained was examined. The anti-HIV-l activity of CD8 + T cell culture supernatants was assessed by measuring the level of HIV-l replication in a CD4 + T cell line transfected with an infectious HIV-l DNA clone. IL-9R-a mRNA was assayed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Of 5 cases showing high level of anti-HIV-l activity (more than 80% suppression of HIV-l replication), the mRNA was detected in 4 cases. Of 10 cases showing low level of anti-HIV-l activity (less than 80% suppression of HIV-l replication), the mRNA was detected in one case. Soluble recombinant human IL-9 receptor (rhIL-9sR) did not suppress HIV-l replication at a concentration of 1 μg/ml. These data suggest that the IL-9R-a mRNA formation in CD8 + T cells may correlate with and play some role in the anti-HIV-l activity of CD8+ T cells from HIV-l-infected individuals. Key words: CD8+ T cells; anti-HIV-l activity; cytokines; interleukin-9 receptor (authors)

  17. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  18. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a Potent, Orally Bioavailable, and Selective Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 with Broad-Spectrum Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades a...

  19. A four-step sandwich radioimmunoassay for direct selection of monoclonal antibodies to allergen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley, V.; Corbi, A.L.; Sanchez-Madrid, F.; Carreira, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    A 4-step radioimmunoassay has been devised for direct identification of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) directed to IgE-binding molecules. Polyvinyl chloride wells coated with purified anti-mouse kappa chain MAb (187-1) were successively incubated with: (1) MAb-containing hybridoma supernatants, (2) allergen extract, (3) allergic patients' serum pool, and (4) 125 I-labeled anti-human IgE antiserum, to detect MAb-allergen-IgE complexes. MAb to allergens from Parietaria judaica pollen and Dermatophagoides mites have been selected with this screening procedure. The affinity-purified allergen molecules competed the binding of IgE to allergen extracts coated to paper discs in a RAST inhibition assay, confirming the anti-allergen specificity of the selected MAb. This screening method is sensitive enough to allow detection of MAb directed to poorly represented allergens. (Auth.)

  20. Development of electrochemical immunosensors based on different serum antibody immobilization methods for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Quang Huy; Hanh Nguyen, Thi Hong; Phan, Thi Nga; Mai, Anh Tuan; Nguyen, Thi Thuy; Vu, Quang Khue

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of electrochemical immunosensors based on human serum antibodies with different immobilization methods for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV). Human serum containing anti-JEV antibodies was used to immobilize onto the surface of silanized interdigitated electrodes by four methods: direct adsorption (APTES-serum), covalent binding with a cross linker of glutaraldehyde (APTES-GA-serum), covalent binding with a cross linker of glutaraldehyde combined with anti-human IgG (APTES-GA-anti-HIgG-serum) and covalent binding with a cross linker of glutaraldehyde combined with a bioaffinity of protein A (APTES-GA-PrA-serum). Atomic force microscopy was used to verify surface characteristics of the interdigitated electrodes before and after treatment with serum antibodies. The output signal of the immunosensors was measured by the change of conductivity resulting from the specific binding of JEV antigens and serum antibodies immobilized on the electrodes, with the help of horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled secondary antibody against JEV. The results showed that the APTES-GA-PrA-serum method provided the highest signal of the electrochemical immunosensor for detection of JEV antigens, with the linear range from 25 ng ml −1 to 1 μg ml −1 , and the limit of detection was about 10 ng ml −1 . This study shows a potential development of novel electrochemical immunosensors applied for virus detection in clinical samples in case of possible outbreaks

  1. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  2. Human monoclonal antibodies: the residual challenge of antibody immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2014-01-01

    One of the major reasons for seeking human monoclonal antibodies has been to eliminate immunogenicity seen with rodent antibodies. Thus far, there has yet been no approach which absolutely abolishes that risk for cell-binding antibodies. In this short article, I draw attention to classical work which shows that monomeric immunoglobulins are intrinsically tolerogenic if they can be prevented from creating aggregates or immune complexes. Based on these classical studies two approaches for active tolerization to therapeutic antibodies are described.

  3. ANA (Antinuclear Antibody Test)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as ratios. For example, the result 1:320 means that one part blood sample was mixed with 320 parts of a diluting ... name "antinuclear". My doctor told me my ANA test is ... normal concentration of these antibodies. This is one of the tools in diagnosing lupus as well ...

  4. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  5. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    these unusual antibodies can effectively be displayed on the cell surface. 5 Additionally, we successfully prepared cDNA from lymphocytes derived...from cow peripheral blood, spleen, and lymph nodes, amplified this cDNA by PCR with VH gene specific primers, and this “library” has been cloned into

  6. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... out for sure? If antibody tests and/or symptoms suggest celiac disease, the physician needs to establish the diagnosis by ... who is still experiencing symptoms, to establish the diagnosis or to rule out celiac disease as a part of establishing another diagnosis. Find ...

  7. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MACRA MACRAlerts MACRA FAQs MACRA Glossary MACRA Resources Position Statements Insurance Advocacy Current Issues Tools & Resources Practice Resources ... a medical or health condition. Resources Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA) in Spanish (Español) Download Print-Friendly PDF ... Join Donate © 2018 American College ...

  8. Next Generation Antibody Therapeutics Using Bispecific Antibody Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Nearly fifty monoclonal antibodies have been approved to date, and the market for monoclonal antibodies is expected to continue to grow. Since global competition in the field of antibody therapeutics is intense, we need to establish novel antibody engineering technologies to provide true benefit for patients, with differentiated product values. Bispecific antibodies are among the next generation of antibody therapeutics that can bind to two different target antigens by the two arms of immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecule, and are thus believed to be applicable to various therapeutic needs. Until recently, large scale manufacturing of human IgG bispecific antibody was impossible. We have established a technology, named asymmetric re-engineering technology (ART)-Ig, to enable large scale manufacturing of bispecific antibodies. Three examples of next generation antibody therapeutics using ART-Ig technology are described. Recent updates on bispecific antibodies against factor IXa and factor X for the treatment of hemophilia A, bispecific antibodies against a tumor specific antigen and T cell surface marker CD3 for cancer immunotherapy, and bispecific antibodies against two different epitopes of soluble antigen with pH-dependent binding property for the elimination of soluble antigen from plasma are also described.

  9. Serum anti-glycan antibodies in paediatric-onset Crohn's disease: association with disease phenotype and diagnostic accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sładek, Małgorzata; Wasilewska, Agata; Swiat, Agnieszka; Cmiel, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies reacting with various microbial epitopes have been described in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and are associated with a specific diagnosis and clinical presentation. To evaluate the profile of new anti-glycan antibodies, their potential association with disease phenotype and diagnostic accuracy in paediatric Crohn's disease (CD). Blood samples from 134 paediatric IBD patients (109 CD, 25 ulcerative colitis (UC)) and 67 controls were blindly analysed for anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ASCA), anti-chitobioside carbohydrate (ACCA), anti-laminaribioside carbohydrate (ALCA), and anti-mannobioside carbohydrate (AMCA) antibodies using commercially available assays. The serological response to glycans was correlated with clinical disease characteristics. At least one of the tested anti-glycan antibodies was present in 75% of CD patients. Despite the high frequency of reactivity to glycan epitopes, a limited overlap of serological markers was observed. In total, 49% of ASCA-negative patients presented with one of the following: ACCA, ALCA, or AMCA. The occurrence of one antibody from the anti-glycan panel was independently associated with complicated disease phenotype and ileocolonic disease location. A higher level of immune response as assessed by the quartile sum scores for ACCA, ALCA, and AMCA was linked with older age at diagnosis (10-17 years) and ileocolonic disease location. The ASCA had the greatest accuracy for diagnosis and differentiation of CD. Qualitative and quantitative serologicalal response to glycan epitopes was associated with distinct clinical presentation in paediatric CD patients. This raises the possibility for the use of these markers to differentiate subgroups of CD patients with more sever clinical presentation. The ASCA was the most accurate serological marker for CD; however, testing for the new anti-glycan antibodies may constitute an adjunctive tool in a specific group of patients to aid in the differentiation of CD with absent

  10. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  11. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2014-01-01

    for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http

  12. Flow cytometric immunophenotyping of regulatory T cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: comparative assessment of various markers and use of novel antibody panel with CD127 as alternative to transcription factor FoxP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Alakananda; Mahapatra, Manoranjan; Saxena, Renu

    2013-04-01

    This study analyzed the frequency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) by multiparameter flow cytometric immunophenotyping. Patients showed significantly increased frequencies of Tregs as compared to controls, a significantly higher percentage than that identified by previous studies, possibly indicating a different prognosis of CLL in different parts of the world and, more precisely, a worse prognosis of CLL in the Indian population. A higher frequency of Tregs was also seen in advanced stage of disease with significantly reduced frequencies of Tregs in patients with CLL after chemotherapy. A significant proportion of CD127low/-FoxP3+ Tregs expressed only low levels of CD25. Thus, CD127 appears to be a better marker than CD25 for the identification of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells as potential Tregs. Our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of CD4+CD127low/- cells are comparable to those of CD4+FoxP3+, which is the gold standard, and can be used as an alternative. This novel flow cytometric antibody panel with fewer number of antibodies is cost-effective and can be used to enumerate Tregs in resource-limited settings.

  13. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Edgue, G.; Twyman, R.M.; Beiss, V.; Fischer, R.; Sack, M.

    2017-01-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of a...

  14. Anti-human CD73 monoclonal antibody inhibits metastasis formation in human breast cancer by inducing clustering and internalization of CD73 expressed on the surface of cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terp, Mikkel G; Olesen, Kristina A; Christensen, Eva Arnspang

    2013-01-01

    -linking of CD73, because both whole IgG anti-CD73 AD2 mAb and Fab' fragments thereof exhibited this effect. Ex vivo treatment of different breast cancer cell lines with anti-CD73 AD2 mAb before i.v. injection into mice inhibited extravasation/colonization of circulating tumor cells and significantly reduced...

  15. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  16. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii r...

  18. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed.

  19. Panel reactive HLA antibodies, soluble CD30 levels, and acute rejection six months following renal transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Elizabeth M F L; Matuck, Teresa; Graciano, Miguel L; Souza, Edison; Rioja, Suzimar; Falci, Mônica C; Monteiro de Carvalho, Deise B; Porto, Luís Cristóvão

    2010-01-01

    Specific anti-human leukocyte antigen antibodies (HLA) in the post-transplant period may be present with acute rejection episodes (ARE), and high soluble CD30 (sCD30) serum levels may be a risk factor for ARE and graft loss. HLA cross-matching, panel reactive antibodies (PRA), and sCD30 levels were determined prior to transplantation in 72 patients. Soluble CD30 levels and PRA were re-assessed at day 7, 14, 21, and 28, and monthly up to the sixth.   Twenty-four subjects had a positive PRA and 17 experienced ARE. Nine of 17 ARE subjects demonstrated positive PRA and 16 had HLA mismatches. Positive PRA was more frequent in ARE subjects (p = 0.03). Eight subjects with ARE had donor-specific antibodies (DSA) in serum samples pre-transplantation, two subjects developed DSA. Three subjects without ARE had positive PRA only in post-transplantation samples. Soluble CD30 levels were higher in pre-transplant samples and ARE subjects than non-ARE subjects (p = 0.03). Post-transplant sCD30 levels were elevated in subjects who experienced rejection and were significantly higher at seven d (p = 0.0004) and six months (p = 0.03). Higher sCD30 levels following transplant were associated with ARE. Elevated sCD30 levels may represent a risk factor for acute rejection. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Development of Anti-Human Mesothelin-Targeted Chimeric Antigen Receptor Messenger RNA-transfected Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes for Ovarian Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Xu, Xuequn; Li, Linhong; Ma, Ying; Jin, Qiu; Viley, Angelia; Allen, Cornell; Natarajan, Pachai; Shivakumar, Rama; Peshwa, Madhusudan V; Emens, Leisha A

    2018-04-02

    CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T/natural killer (NK)-cell therapies can result in durable clinical responses in B-cell malignancies. However, CAR-based immunotherapies have been much less successful in solid cancers, in part due to "on-target off-tumor" toxicity related to expression of target tumor antigens on normal tissue. Based on preliminary observations of safety and clinical activity in proof-of-concept clinical trials, tumor antigen-specific messenger RNA (mRNA) CAR transfection into selected, activated, and expanded T/NK cells may permit prospective control of "on-target off-tumor" toxicity. To develop a commercial product for solid tumors, mesothelin was selected as an antigen target based on its association with poor prognosis and overexpression in multiple solid cancers. It was hypothesized that selecting, activating, and expanding cells ex vivo prior to mRNA CAR transfection would not be necessary, thus simplifying the complexity and cost of manufacturing. Now, the development of anti-human mesothelin mRNA CAR transfected peripheral blood lymphocytes (CARMA-hMeso) is reported, demonstrating the manufacture and cryopreservation of multiple cell aliquots for repeat administrations from a single human leukapheresis. A rapid, automated, closed system for cGMP-compliant transfection of mRNA CAR in up to 20 × 10 9 peripheral blood lymphocytes was developed. Here we show that CARMA-hMeso cells recognize and lyse tumor cells in a mesothelin-specific manner. Expression of CAR was detectable over approximately 7 days in vitro, with a progressive decline of CAR expression that appears to correlate with in vitro cell expansion. In a murine ovarian cancer model, a single intraperitoneal injection of CARMA-hMeso resulted in the dose-dependent inhibition of tumor growth and improved survival of mice. Furthermore, repeat weekly intraperitoneal administrations of the optimal CARMA-hMeso dose further prolonged disease control and survival

  1. Clinical use of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Hoer, Gustav; Cox, P.H.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies as tumour specific carrier molecules for therapeutic agents or as in vivo diagnostic reagents when labelled with radionuclides or NMR signal enhancers is attracting more and more attention. The potential is enormous but the technical problems are also considerable requiring the concerted action of many different scientific disciplines. This volume is based upon a symposium organised in Frankfurt in 1990 under the auspices of the European Association of Nuclear Medicines' Specialist Task Groups on Cardiology and the Utility of Labelled Antibodies. It gives a multidisciplinary review of the state of the art and of problems to be solved as well as recording the not inconsiderable successes which have been booked to date. The book will be of value as a reference to both clinicians and research scientists. refs.; figs.; tabs

  2. Delta antibody radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kselikova, M; Urbankova, J

    1985-11-15

    The principle and procedure are described of the radioimmunoassay of delta antibody (delta-Ab) using the ABBOTT ANTI-DELTA kit by Abbott Co. A description is given of the kit, the working procedure and the method of evaluation. The results are reported of the incidence of delta-Ab in sera of patients with viral hepatitis B, in haemophiliacs, carriers of the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) and blood donors. The presence was detected of delta-Ab in one HBsAg carrier. The necessity is emphasized of delta-Ab determinations in the blood of donors in view of the antibody transfer with blood and blood preparations.

  3. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially.

  4. Quantitative relationship between antibody affinity and antibody avidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griswold, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between antibody avidity, measured by the dissociation of the antigen-antibody bond in antigen excess, and antibody affinity was studied. Complexes of radiolabelled antigen and antibody of known affinity were prepared in vitro and allowed to stand for seven days to reach equilibrium. Then nonlabelled antigen in one hundred fold excess was added to dissociate the complexes. After an appropriate incubation the fraction of antigen bound to antibody was measured by the ammonium sulfate precipitation method. The dissociation index was the fraction bound in the experimental sample divided by the fraction bound in the control. The correlation coefficient between the dissociation index and the antibody binding constant was 0.92 for early dissociation and 0.98 for late dissociation. The regression equation relating the binding constant to the dissociation index was K = 6.4(DI) + 6.25, where DI is the late dissociation index and K is the logarithm to the base 10 of the binding constant. There is a high correlation between avidity and affinity of antibody. Antibody affinity can be estimated from avidity data. The stability of antigen-antibody complexes can be predicted from antibody affinity

  5. Surface modification of polyacrylonitrile fiber for immobilization of antibodies and detection of analyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Swati, E-mail: swatijain.iitd@gmail.com [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, 110016 (India); Chattopadhyay, Sruti, E-mail: srutic@hotmail.com [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, 110016 (India); Jackeray, Richa, E-mail: richajackeray.iitd@gmail.com [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, 110016 (India); Singh, Harpal, E-mail: harpal2000@yahoo.com [Center for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, 110016 (India)

    2009-11-10

    Pendent nitrile groups of multifilamentous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers were reduced to amino groups using lithium aluminum hydride for different time of reduction and amine content was estimated by performing acid-base titrations. Attenuated total reflection-fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) were used for the characterization of the generated amino groups and thermal properties of the reduced fibers, respectively. The surface morphology of the fibers after reduction and immobilization was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The newly formed amino groups of the fibers were activated by using glutaraldehyde for the covalent linking of Goat anti-Rabbit IgG-HRP (GAR-HRP) antibody enzyme conjugate. Modified PAN fibers were evaluated as a matrix for sandwich ELISA by using Goat anti-Rabbit antibody (GAR-IgG), Rabbit anti-Goat (RAG-IgG) as analyte and enzyme conjugate GAR-HRP. The fibers reduced for 24 h were able to detect the analyte RAG-IgG at a concentration as low as 3.75 ng mL{sup -1} with 12% skimmed milk as blocking reagent for the optimized concentration of primary antibody GAR-IgG 3 {mu}g mL{sup -1} and peroxidase conjugate GAR-HRP dilution of 8000 fold. The sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility of the developed immunoassay was further established with antibodies present in human blood using Rabbit anti-Human (RAH-IgG) antibody and the corresponding HRP enzyme conjugate. As low as 0.1 {mu}L of human blood was sufficient to perform the assay with the modified fibers.

  6. Vaccination of B-CLL patients with autologous dendritic cells can change the frequency of leukemia antigen-specific CD8+ T cells as well as CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells toward an antileukemia response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hus, I; Schmitt, M; Tabarkiewicz, J; Radej, S; Wojas, K; Bojarska-Junak, A; Schmitt, A; Giannopoulos, K; Dmoszyńska, A; Roliński, J

    2008-05-01

    Recently, we described that vaccination with allogeneic dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with tumor cell lysate generated specific CD8+ T cell response in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). In the present study, the potential of autologous DCs pulsed ex vivo with tumor cell lysates to stimulate antitumor immunity in patients with B-CLL in early stages was evaluated. Twelve patients at clinical stage 0-2 as per Rai were vaccinated intradermally up to eight times with a mean number of 7.4 x 10(6) DCs pulsed with B-CLL cell lysate. We observed a decrease of peripheral blood leukocytes and CD19+/CD5+ leukemic cells in five patients, three patients showed a stable disease and four patients progressed despite DC vaccination. A significant increase of specific cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes against the leukemia-associated antigens RHAMM or fibromodulin was detected in four patients after DC vaccination. In patients with a clinical response, an increase of interleukin 12 (IL-12) serum levels and a decrease of the frequency of CD4+CD25(+)FOXP3+ T regulatory cells were observed. Taken together, the study demonstrated that vaccination with autologous DC in CLL patients is feasible and safe. Immunological and to some extend hematological responses could be noted, justifying further investigation on this immunotherapeutical approach.

  7. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  8. Scintigraphic detection of metastatic melanoma using indium 111/DTPA conjugated anti-gp240 antibody (ZME-018)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkwood, J.M.; Neumann, R.D.; Zoghbi, S.S.; Ernstoff, M.S.; Cornelius, E.A.; Shaw, C.; Ziyadeh, T.; Fine, J.A.; Unger, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated the toxicity, pharmacokinetics, and localization of a monoclonal IgG2 alpha murine anti-human melanoma (gp240) antibody (ZME-018) that recognizes a tumor-associated cell surface glycoprotein of 240,000 molecular weight present in most melanomas. The antibody was conjugated with DTPA (diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) and labeled by chelation of 111 In. One mg of antibody labeled with 5 mCi of 111 In was infused, together with 0 to 40 mg of cold carrier ZME-018. The blood clearance, urinary excretion, and in vivo localization were determined in 26 patients. Scintigraphic images were obtained at 24 hours and 72 hours in all patients. Mild toxicity occurred in one patient. The half-time clearance of labeled monoclonal murine antibody (MoAb) from the blood increased from 16.1 hours at an antibody dose of 1 mg to 35.9 hours at 40 mg. Males showed faster clearance from the blood than did females or a single castrated male, perhaps due to selective concentration of antibody in the testes. Nonspecific uptake in liver, spleen, bone marrow, and intestine was seen in all patients. The percentage of known metastatic foci detected increased with the total dosage of antibody, from 23% at doses less than or equal to 5 mg, to 65%, 87% and 78% for 10, 20, and 40 mg, respectively. We conclude that at doses of greater than or equal to 10 mg, ZME-018 is a safe and potentially useful agent for the scintigraphic detection of metastatic malignant melanoma

  9. Microbials for the production of monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadiut, Oliver; Capone, Simona; Krainer, Florian; Glieder, Anton; Herwig, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody fragments represent the most important biopharmaceutical products today. Because full length antibodies are glycosylated, mammalian cells, which allow human-like N-glycosylation, are currently used for their production. However, mammalian cells have several drawbacks when it comes to bioprocessing and scale-up, resulting in long processing times and elevated costs. By contrast, antibody fragments, that are not glycosylated but still exhibit antigen binding properties, can be produced in microbial organisms, which are easy to manipulate and cultivate. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the expression systems, strain engineering, and production processes for the three main microbials used in antibody and antibody fragment production, namely Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris, and Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radioimmunoassay with heterologous antibody (hetero-antibody RIA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, Atsushi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Itoh, Zen; Wakabayashi, Katsumi

    1991-01-01

    To develop a homologous radioimmunoassay (RIA) for a hormone of a small or rare animal often meets difficulty in collecting a large amount of purified antigen required for antibody production. On the other hand, to employ a heterologous RIA to estimate the hormone often gives poor sensitivity. To overcome this difficulty, a 'hetero-antibody' RIA was studied. In a hetero-antibody RIA system, a purified preparation of a hormone is used for radioiodination and standardization and a heterologous antibody to the hormone is used for the first antibody. Canine motilin and rat LH were selected as examples, and anti-porcine motilin and anti-hCG, anti-hCGβ or anti-ovine LHβ was used as the heterologous antibody. The sensitivities of the hetero-antibody RIAs were much higher than those of heterologous RIAs in any case, showing that these hetero-antibody RIA systems were suitable for practical use. To clarify the principle of hetero-antibody RIA, antiserum to porcine motilin was fractionated on an affinity column where canine motilin was immobilized. The fraction bound had greater constants of affinity with both porcine and canine motilins than the rest of the antibody fractions. This fraction also reacted with a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence common to porcine and canine motilins in a competitive binding test with labeled canine motilin. These results suggest that an antibody population having high affinity and cross-reactivity is present in polyclonal antiserum and indicate that the population can be used in hetero-antibody RIA at an appropriate concentration. (author)

  11. Human antibody technology and the development of antibodies against cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlin, Mats; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a virus that causes chronic infections in a large set of the population. It may cause severe disease in immunocompromised individuals, is linked to immunosenescence and implied to play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Modulation of the immune system's abilities to manage the virus represent a highly viable therapeutic option and passive immunotherapy with polyclonal antibody preparations is already in clinical use. Defined monoclonal antibodies offer many advantages over polyclonal antibodies purified from serum. Human CMV-specific monoclonal antibodies have consequently been thoroughly investigated with respect to their potential in the treatment of diseases caused by CMV. Recent advances in human antibody technology have substantially expanded the breadth of antibodies for such applications. This review summarizes the fundamental basis for treating CMV disease by use of antibodies, the basic technologies to be used to develop such antibodies, and relevant human antibody specificities available to target this virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...

  13. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenberg, D.M.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas

  14. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  15. Validation of anti-FXR1 antibodies in the canine species and application to an immunohistochemical study of canine oral melanomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Nordio

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available FXR1 (Fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 is a cytoplasmic RNA binding protein, which genetic expression has been related to metastatic potential in human melanoma. The aims of the present study were: the validation of two commercially available clones of polyclonal anti-human FXR1 antibody in dogs; their application to investigate FXR1 expression in a group of canine oral melanomas. Anti-FXR1 antibody was not previously validated in the canine species. Two different commercially available polyclonal anti-FXR1 antibodies (respectively made in goat and in rabbit were used. FXR1 protein in canine serum was identified by western blot after SDS-PAGE, using human serum as control. FXR1 immunohistochemical expression was tested in a series of normal tissues, that are expected to express FXR1, and in 31 cases of oral melanomas. The final immunohistochemical protocol used heat-induced unmasking and overnight incubation. FXR1 protein bands in canine serum were detected by tested antibodies, in a more specific way by the rabbit antibody. FXR1 immunohistochemical staining was positive in all tested organs, with different levels of expression. FXR1 was also expressed in 31/31 tested melanomas, with variable intensity and percentage of positive cells (Figure 1. Equal results were achieved with the two antibodies in 8 cases of melanoma, whereas there were variable differences in 22, and one case stained only with goat antibody. The rabbit antibody gave less background staining. This study validated anti-FXR1 antibodies for use in the canine species. This protein was expressed in various normal tissues, as well as in the tested neoplasms. Significance of different level of expression is undergoing evaluation with further studies.

  16. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  17. Oriented immobilized anti-LDL antibody carrying poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) cryogel for cholesterol removal from human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereli, Nilay; Sener, Guelsu; Yavuz, Handan; Denizli, Adil

    2011-01-01

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a major ingredient of the plaque that collects in the coronary arteries and causes coronary heart diseases. Among the methods used for the extracorporeal elimination of LDL from intravasal volume, immunoaffinity technique using anti-LDL antibody as a ligand offers superior selectivity and specificity. Proper orientation of the immobilized antibody is the main issue in immunoaffinity techniques. In this study, anti-human β-lipoprotein antibody (anti-LDL antibody) molecules were immobilized and oriented through protein A onto poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) cryogel in order to remove LDL from hypercholesterolemic human plasma. PHEMA cryogel was prepared by free radical polymerization initiated with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED). PHEMA cryogel with a swelling degree of 8.89 g H 2 O/g and 67% macro-porosity was characterized by swelling studies, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and blood compatibility tests. All the clotting times were increased when compared with control plasma. The maximum immobilized anti-LDL antibody amount was 63.2 mg/g in the case of random antibody immobilization and 19.6 mg/g in the case of oriented antibody immobilization (protein A loading was 57.0 mg/g). Random and oriented anti-LDL antibody immobilized PHEMA cryogels adsorbed 111 and 129 mg LDL/g cryogel from hypercholesterolemic human plasma, respectively. Up to 80% of the adsorbed LDL was desorbed. The adsorption-desorption cycle was repeated 6 times using the same cryogel. There was no significant loss of LDL adsorption capacity. - Research highlights: → LDL cholesterol is a risk factor in the development of coronary heart diseases. → Antibodies against LDL are used for the selective extracorporeal removal of LDL. → Protein A is used for the oriented immobilization of anti LDL onto PHEMA cryogel. → PHEMA cryogels are biocompatible, exhibit a low pressure drop, lack diffusion resistance and viscous samples can be

  18. Oriented immobilized anti-LDL antibody carrying poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) cryogel for cholesterol removal from human plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereli, Nilay [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Sener, Guelsu [Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Division, Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey); Yavuz, Handan, E-mail: handany@hacettepe.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Department of Chemistry, Hacettepe University, Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-07-20

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a major ingredient of the plaque that collects in the coronary arteries and causes coronary heart diseases. Among the methods used for the extracorporeal elimination of LDL from intravasal volume, immunoaffinity technique using anti-LDL antibody as a ligand offers superior selectivity and specificity. Proper orientation of the immobilized antibody is the main issue in immunoaffinity techniques. In this study, anti-human {beta}-lipoprotein antibody (anti-LDL antibody) molecules were immobilized and oriented through protein A onto poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) cryogel in order to remove LDL from hypercholesterolemic human plasma. PHEMA cryogel was prepared by free radical polymerization initiated with N,N,N',N'-tetramethylene diamine (TEMED). PHEMA cryogel with a swelling degree of 8.89 g H{sub 2}O/g and 67% macro-porosity was characterized by swelling studies, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and blood compatibility tests. All the clotting times were increased when compared with control plasma. The maximum immobilized anti-LDL antibody amount was 63.2 mg/g in the case of random antibody immobilization and 19.6 mg/g in the case of oriented antibody immobilization (protein A loading was 57.0 mg/g). Random and oriented anti-LDL antibody immobilized PHEMA cryogels adsorbed 111 and 129 mg LDL/g cryogel from hypercholesterolemic human plasma, respectively. Up to 80% of the adsorbed LDL was desorbed. The adsorption-desorption cycle was repeated 6 times using the same cryogel. There was no significant loss of LDL adsorption capacity. - Research highlights: {yields} LDL cholesterol is a risk factor in the development of coronary heart diseases. {yields} Antibodies against LDL are used for the selective extracorporeal removal of LDL. {yields} Protein A is used for the oriented immobilization of anti LDL onto PHEMA cryogel. {yields} PHEMA cryogels are biocompatible, exhibit a low pressure drop, lack diffusion

  19. Crystal structure of a human single domain antibody dimer formed through V(H-V(H non-covalent interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toya Nath Baral

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs derived from human V(H are considered to be less soluble and prone to aggregate which makes it difficult to determine the crystal structures. In this study, we isolated and characterized two anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2 sdAbs, Gr3 and Gr6, from a synthetic human V(H phage display library. Size exclusion chromatography and surface plasmon resonance analyses demonstrated that Gr3 is a monomer, but that Gr6 is a strict dimer. To understand this different molecular behavior, we solved the crystal structure of Gr6 to 1.6 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed that the homodimer assembly of Gr6 closely mimics the V(H-V(L heterodimer of immunoglobulin variable domains and the dimerization interface is dominated by hydrophobic interactions.

  20. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... antibodies may or may not be associated with adverse reactions, and identification of the specific type of RBC ... the only things that can cause a transfusion reaction. The recipient's immune ... or to drugs that the donor may have taken. Rarely, antibodies in the plasma ...

  1. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery....... To better understand the underlying mechanisms of antibody-antigen interaction here we present a pipeline developed by us to structurally classify immunoglobulin antigen binding sites and to infer key sequence residues and other variables that have a prominent role in each structural class....

  2. Thermodynamic and kinetic approaches for evaluation of monoclonal antibody - Lipoprotein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multia, Evgen; Sirén, Heli; Andersson, Karl; Samuelsson, Jörgen; Forssén, Patrik; Fornstedt, Torgny; Öörni, Katariina; Jauhiainen, Matti; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2017-02-01

    Two complementary instrumental techniques were used, and the data generated was processed with advanced numerical tools to investigate the interactions between anti-human apoB-100 monoclonal antibody (anti-apoB-100 Mab) and apoB-100 containing lipoproteins. Partial Filling Affinity Capillary Electrophoresis (PF-ACE) combined with Adsorption Energy Distribution (AED) calculations provided information on the heterogeneity of the interactions without any a priori model assumptions. The AED calculations evidenced a homogenous binding site distribution for the interactions. Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) studies were used to evaluate thermodynamics and kinetics of the Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and anti-apoB-100 Mab interactions. High affinity and selectivity were observed, and the emerging data sets were analysed with so called Interaction Maps. In thermodynamic studies, the interaction between LDL and anti-apoB-100 Mab was found to be predominantly enthalpy driven. Both techniques were also used to study antibody interactions with Intermediate-Density (IDL) and Very Low-Density (VLDL) Lipoproteins. By screening affinity constants for IDL-VLDL sample in a single injection we were able to distinguish affinity constants for both subpopulations using the numerical Interaction Map tool. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of monoclonal antibodies reactive with molecules upregulated or expressed only on activated lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, W C; Naessens, J; Brown, W C; Ellis, J A; Hamilton, M J; Cantor, G H; Barbosa, J I; Ferens, W; Bohach, G A

    1996-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies potentially specific for antigens expressed or upregulated on activated leukocytes were selected for further analysis from the panel submitted to the third international workshop on ruminant leukocyte antigens. The kinetics of expression of these activation antigens on resting peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMC) and PBMC stimulated with concanavalin A or staphylococcal superantigen SECI for 4, 24 or 96 h were compared, as well as their appearance on various subsets of cells. For some of them, a molecular mass could be determined after immunoprecipitation from radio-labeled, lectin-stimulated cells. Based on the results from the clustering, kinetic studies and biochemical data, evidence was gathered for assigning two additional mAbs to cluster BoCD25 (IL-2 receptor) and two mAbs to cluster BoCD71 (transferrin receptor). Four mAbs recognized an early activation antigen predominantly expressed on gamma delta T cells in short-term cultures. A number of other activation antigens were further characterized.

  4. Radiolabeled antibodies in cancer. Oncology Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-11-01

    Oncology Overviews are a service of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute, intended to facilitate and promote the exchange of information between cancer scientists by keeping them aware of literature related to their research being published by other laboratories through the world. Each Oncology Overview represents a survey of the literature associated with a selected area of cancer research. It contains abstracts of articles which have been selected and organized by researchers associated with the field. Contents: Radiolabeled antibodies--labeling and imaging techniques; Radiolabeled antibodies--carcinoembryonic antigen; Radiolabeled antibodies--alpha-fetoprotein; Radiolabeled antibodies--human chorionic gonadotropin; Radiolabeled antibodies--ferritin; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of colorectal tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of malignant melanoma; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of urogenital tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--imaging of thyroid tumors; Radiolabeled antibodies--other clinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--selected preclinical studies; Radiolabeled antibodies--reviews

  5. New perspectives on recombinant human antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Kruif (John); A.-R. van der Vuurst de Vries (Anne); L. Cilenti (L.); E. Boel (E.); W. van Ewijk (Willem); T. Logtenberg (Ton)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe limited potential of murine monoclonal antibodies for human immunotherapy has driven recent progress in recombinant antibody technology. Here, de Kruif and colleagues report on advances in the development and use of phage-antibody-display libraries.

  6. Measurement of antibodies to tubulin by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, G M; Cowin, P; Whitehouse, J M.A. [CRC Medical Oncology Unit, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, U.K.

    1979-07-24

    A solid-phase double antibody radioimmunoassay capable of measuring antibody to tubulin, the principal component of microtubules, is described. This assay is simple, combining sensitivity with specificity and also allowing determination of antibody subclasses.

  7. Nature of the bifunctional chelating agent used for radioimmunotherapy with yttrium-88 monoclonal antibodies: critical factors in determining in vivo survival and organ toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozak, R.W.; Raubitschek, A.; Mirzadeh, S.; Brechbiel, M.W.; Junghaus, R.; Gansow, O.A.; Waldmann, T.A. (Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, FDA, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-05-15

    One factor that is critical to the potential effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy is the design of radiometal-chelated antibodies that will be stable in vivo. Stability in vivo depends on the condition that both the chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures not alter antibody specificity and biodistribution. In addition, synthesis and selection of the chelating agent is critical for each radiometal in order to prevent inappropriate release of the radiometal in vivo. In the present study, we compare the in vivo stability of seven radioimmunoconjugates that use different polyaminocarboxylate chelating agents to complex yttrium-88 to the mouse anti-human interleukin-2 receptor monoclonal antibody, anti-Tac. Chelate linkage and radiolabeling procedures did not alter the immunospecificity of anti-Tac. In order to assess whether yttrium was inappropriately released from the chelate-coupled antibody in vivo, iodine-131-labeled and yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies were simultaneously administered to the same animals to correlate the decline in yttrium and radioiodinated antibody activity. The four stable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies studied displayed similar iodine-131 and yttrium-88 activity, indicating minimal elution of yttrium-88 from the complex. In contrast, the unstable yttrium-88 chelate-coupled antibodies had serum yttrium-88 activities that declined much more rapidly than their iodine-131 activities, suggesting loss of the radiolabel yttrium-88 from the chelate. Furthermore, high rates of yttrium-88 elution correlated with deposition in bone. Four chelating agents emerged as promising immunotherapeutic reagents: isothiocyanate benzyl DTPA and its derivatives 1B3M, MX, and 1M3B.

  8. The humanized anti-human AMHRII mAb 3C23K exerts an anti-tumor activity against human ovarian cancer through tumor-associated macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougherara, Houcine; Némati, Fariba; Nicolas, André; Massonnet, Gérald; Pugnière, Martine; Ngô, Charlotte; Le Frère-Belda, Marie-Aude; Leary, Alexandra; Alexandre, Jérôme; Meseure, Didier; Barret, Jean-Marc; Navarro-Teulon, Isabelle; Pèlegrin, André; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Prost, Jean-François; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Decaudin, Didier

    2017-11-21

    Müllerian inhibiting substance, also called anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH), inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of AMH type II receptor-positive tumor cells, such as human ovarian cancers (OCs). On this basis, a humanized glyco-engineered monoclonal antibody (3C23K) has been developed. The aim of this study was therefore to experimentally confirm the therapeutic potential of 3C23K in human OCs. We first determined by immunofluorescence, immunohistochemistry and cytofluorometry analyses the expression of AMHRII in patient's tumors and found that a majority (60 to 80% depending on the detection technique) of OCs were positive for this marker. We then provided evidence that the tumor stroma of OC is enriched in tumor-associated macrophages and that these cells are responsible for 3C23K-induced killing of tumor cells through ADCP and ADCC mechanisms. In addition, we showed that 3C23K reduced macrophages induced-T cells immunosuppression. Finally, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of 3C23K alone and in combination with a carboplatin-paclitaxel chemotherapy in a panel of OC Patient-Derived Xenografts. In those experiments, we showed that 3C23K significantly increased the proportion and the quality of chemotherapy-based in vivo responses. Altogether, our data support the potential interest of AMHRII targeting in human ovarian cancers and the evaluation of 3C23K in further clinical trials.

  9. Feasibility study of the Fab fragment of a monoclonal antibody against tissue factor as a diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumura, Ryo; Sato, Ryuta; Furuya, Fumiaki; Koga, Yoshikatsu; Yamamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fujiwara, Yuki; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is expressed strongly in various types of cancer, especially cancers that are often refractory to treatment, such as pancreatic cancer. In this study, we compared the differences in the biophysical and pharmacological properties of whole IgG and the Fab fragment of anti-human TF monoclonal antibody (1849 antibodies), in order to determine their suitability for application in the diagnosis and treatment of cancers. In the biophysical examination, we investigated the characteristics of 1849-whole IgG and 1849-Fab by SPR sensing and confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis using recombinant human TF antigen and TF-overexpressing human pancreatic cancer cell line, BxPC3, respectively. After conjugation with Alexa-Flour-647, in vivo imaging was conducted in mice bearing BxPC3 xenograft tumors. Furthermore, the distribution of the conjugates in tumors and major organs was evaluated by ex vivo study. The in vitro experiments showed that 1849 antibodies had high affinity against TF antigen. In addition, 1849-Fab showed a faster dissociation rate from the antigen than 1849-whole IgG. In mice, 1849-Fab-Alexa-Flour-647 showed rapid renal clearance and faster tumor accumulation, achieving a high contrast signal over nearby normal tissues in the early phase and enhanced tumor penetration after administration. On the other hand, 1849-whole IgG-Alexa-Flour-647 showed slow clearance from the blood and sustained high tumor accumulation. These results suggest that 1849-Fab may be a useful tool for pancreatic cancer diagnosis.

  10. High risk of graft failure in patients with anti-HLA antibodies undergoing haploidentical stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciurea, Stefan O; de Lima, Marcos; Cano, Pedro; Korbling, Martin; Giralt, Sergio; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Wang, Xuemei; Thall, Peter F; Champlin, Richard E; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo

    2009-10-27

    BACKGROUND.: Although donor-specific anti-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies (DSA) have been implicated in graft rejection in solid organ transplantation, their role in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation remains unclear. METHODS.: To address the hypothesis that the presence of DSA contributes to the development graft failure, we tested 24 consecutive patients for the presence of anti-HLA antibodies determined by a sensitive and specific solid-phase/single-antigen assay. The study included a total of 28 haploidentical transplants, each with 2 to 5 HLA allele mismatches, at a single institution, from September 2005 to August 2008. RESULTS.: DSA were detected in five patients (21%). Three of four (75%) patients with DSA before the first transplant failed to engraft, compared with 1 of 20 (5%) without DSA (P=0.008). All four patients who experienced primary graft failure had second haploidentical transplants. One patient developed a second graft failure with persistent high DSA levels, whereas three engrafted, two of them in the absence of DSA. No other known factors that could negatively influence engraftment were associated with the development of graft failure in these patients. CONCLUSIONS.: These results suggest that donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies are associated with a high rate of graft rejection in patients undergoing haploidentical stem-cell transplantation. Anti-HLA sensitization should be evaluated routinely in hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation with HLA mismatched donors.

  11. Prevalence of Anti Human Herpes Virus-6 IgG and its Receptor in Acute Leukemia (Membrane Cofactor Protein: MCP, CD46)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assem, M.M; El-Sharkawy, N.M.; Tarek, H.; Kamel, A.M.; Gad, W.H.; El-Rouby, M.N.; Ghaleb, F.M.

    2005-01-01

    CD46 is a membrane cofactor protein, which acts as a cofactor for factor I proteolytic cleavage of C3, so it protects the cells expressing it on their surface from autologous complement attack. It has been recently described as a receptor for HHV-6. Also, it has been shown to be highly expressed on malignant cells as compared to normal cells, thus playing a major role by which these cells, either cells of haematological malignancy or cells of other body cancers, can protect themselves against complement attack so they can survive and metastasize. Patients and methods: This study has been done to detect the sero prevalence of HHV-6 among 47 Egyptian adult cases of acute leukemia using the anti-HHV-6 IgG ELISA serological technique. CD46 receptor expression and immuno phenotyping technique were performed using FCM. Twenty nine of the cases were ANLL, while 18 were ALL cases. Sixteen age- and sex-matched control cases were also studied for both anti-HHV-6 IgG and CD46 receptor expression. HHV-6 IgG antibodies were encountered in 29 (100%), 14 (77.8%) and 12 (75%) of the ANLL, ALL and the control group, cases, respectively. CD46 expression was encountered in 21 (72.4%) of the ANLL cases and in 10 (55.6%) of the ALL cases. Concordance between HHV6 sero positivity and CD46 expression was encountered in 31 cases (29 positive and 2 negative). Dis concordance was encountered in 16 cases with 14 showing HHV-6 IgG sero positivity with no CD46 expression and 2 showing the reverse. The lack of significant correlation between CD46 expression and sero positivity would exclude CD46 expression as a cause of contracting HHV-6 infection in leukemic patients

  12. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  13. Human Monoclonal Islet Cell Antibodies From a Patient with Insulin- Dependent Diabetes Mellitus Reveal Glutamate Decarboxylase as the Target Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Wiltrud; Endl, Josef; Eiermann, Thomas H.; Brandt, Michael; Kientsch-Engel, Rosemarie; Thivolet, Charles; Jungfer, Herbert; Scherbaum, Werner A.

    1992-09-01

    The autoimmune phenomena associated with destruction of the β cell in pancreatic islets and development of type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus (IDDM) include circulating islet cell antibodies. We have immortalized peripheral blood lymphocytes from prediabetic individuals and patients with newly diagnosed IDDM by Epstein-Barr virus transformation. IgG-positive cells were selected by anti-human IgG-coupled magnetic beads and expanded in cell culture. Supernatants were screened for cytoplasmic islet cell antibodies using the conventional indirect immunofluorescence test on cryostat sections of human pancreas. Six islet cell-specific B-cell lines, originating from a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM, could be stabilized on a monoclonal level. All six monoclonal islet cell antibodies (MICA 1-6) were of the IgG class. None of the MICA reacted with human thyroid, adrenal gland, anterior pituitary, liver, lung, stomach, and intestine tissues but all six reacted with pancreatic islets of different mammalian species and, in addition, with neurons of rat cerebellar cortex. MICA 1-6 were shown to recognize four distinct antigenic epitopes in islets. Islet cell antibody-positive diabetic sera but not normal human sera blocked the binding of the monoclonal antibodies to their target epitopes. Immunoprecipitation of 35S-labeled human islet cell extracts revealed that a protein of identical size to the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15) was a target of all MICA. Furthermore, antigen immunotrapped by the MICA from brain homogenates showed glutamate decarboxylase enzyme activity. MICA 1-6 therefore reveal glutamate decarboxylase as the predominant target antigen of cytoplasmic islet cell autoantibodies in a patient with newly diagnosed IDDM.

  14. Antibodies to watch in 2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplon, Hélène; Reichert, Janice M.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The pace of antibody therapeutics development accelerated in 2017, and this faster pace is projected to continue through 2018. Notably, the annual number of antibody therapeutics granted a first approval in either the European Union (EU) or United States (US) reached double-digits (total of 10) for the first time in 2017. The 10 antibodies granted approvals are: brodalumab, dupilumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, benralizumab, ocrelizumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, avelumab, duvalumab, and emicizumab. Brodalumab, however, had already been approved in Japan in 2016. As of December 1, 2017, nine antibody therapeutics (ibalizumab, burosumab, tildrakizumab, caplacizumab, erenumab, fremanezumab, galcanezumab, romosozumab, mogamulizumab) were in regulatory review in the EU or US, and regulatory actions on their marketing applications are expected by the end of 2018. Based on company announcements and estimated clinical study primary completion dates, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 12 antibody therapeutics that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted by the end of 2018. Of the 12 candidates, 8 are for non-cancer indications (lanadelumab, crizanlizumab, ravulizumab, eptinezumab, risankizumab, satralizumab, brolucizumab, PRO140) and 4 are for cancer (sacituzumab govitecan, moxetumomab pasudotox, cemiplimab, ublituximab). Additional antibody therapeutics to watch in 2018 include 19 mAbs undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies with primary completion dates in late 2017 or during 2018. Of these mAbs, 9 are for non-cancer indications (lampalizumab, roledumab, emapalumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, etrolizumab, NEOD001, gantenerumab, anifrolumab) and 10 are for cancer indications (tremelimumab, isatuximab, BCD-100, carotuximab, camrelizumab, IBI308, glembatumumab vedotin, mirvetuximab soravtansine, oportuzumab monatox, L19IL2/L19TNF). Positive clinical study results may enable marketing application

  15. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  16. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed.

  18. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  19. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  20. Method of stably radiolabeling antibodies with technetium and rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, C.H.; Reba, R.C.; Eckelman, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    A method is described for labeling antibodies or antibody fragments with radionuclides of technetium or rhenium to obtain stable labeling, comprising: reacting a reduced radioisotope of technetium or rhenium with an antibody or antibody fragment, or a diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated antibody or antibody fragment, in the presence of free or carrier-bound diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA). The amount of DTPA is sufficient to substantially completely inhibit binding of the reduced technetium or rhenium to nonstable binding sites of the antibody or antibody fragment, or the DTPA-conjugated antibody or antibody fragment. The resultant stably labeled antibody or antibody fragment, or DTPA[conjugated antibody or antibody fragment is recovered

  1. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibody T1h and variant anti-CD6 murine 10D12 in healthy animals and in experimental arthritis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    León, M; Hernández, I; Aldana, L; Ayra, F; Castro, Y; Leyva, R; García, L; Pérez, S.; Casaco, A.

    2016-01-01

    Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic of two radio labeled monoclonal antibodies was performed with the help of imaging techniques. Isotopic labeling was carried out by means of standardized methods. Pharmacokinetic evaluation was performed using the population approach and sparse data design. Introduction: Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) is an efficient option for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Th1 is a MAb anti human CD6 developed for the treatment of autoimmune disease and 10D12 is its counterpart anti murine CD6 developed as a pharmacological tool to get deep into the response mechanisms in animals models of rheumatoid arthritis.To investigate the behavior of both antibodies in the assay system, molecules were labeled with 125I to evaluate pharmacokinetic in healthy animals and with 99mTc to evaluate the antibody uptake in inflamed area of induced arthritis. Materials and methods: Antibodies were supplied by the Center of Molecular immunology. Iodination was performed by the iodogen method and technetium labeling was carried out directly by Schwarz method. Female C57BL6 from CENPALAB were used for experiments. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetic was performed by a sparse data design using the population approach. Uptake in region of inflammation was quantified by gammagraphy at the same time points of blood sampling. A compartmental model was build to quantify uptake kinetic. Pharmacokinetic profiles were analyzed using MONOLIX software version 4.2. Results: Minor pharmacokinetic differences were found between monoclonal antibodies labeled with 125I and 99mTc. As a humanized antibody, T1h shows a faster clearance than 10D12 and a biodistribution pattern reflecting preference for excretion mechanisms. The arthritis accumulation was not consistent with a targeted mediated uptake. On the other hand, radio labeled 10D12 shows an accumulation profile in arthritis with two peaks of maximum concentration representing an initial transit to

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies 13A4 and AC133 Do Not Recognize the Canine Ortholog of Mouse and Human Stem Cell Antigen Prominin-1 (CD133.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Thamm

    Full Text Available The pentaspan membrane glycoprotein prominin-1 (CD133 is widely used in medicine as a cell surface marker of stem and cancer stem cells. It has opened new avenues in stem cell-based regenerative therapy and oncology. This molecule is largely used with human samples or the mouse model, and consequently most biological tools including antibodies are directed against human and murine prominin-1. Although the general structure of prominin-1 including its membrane topology is conserved throughout the animal kingdom, its primary sequence is poorly conserved. Thus, it is unclear if anti-human and -mouse prominin-1 antibodies cross-react with their orthologs in other species, especially dog. Answering this issue is imperative in light of the growing number of studies using canine prominin-1 as an antigenic marker. Here, we address this issue by cloning the canine prominin-1 and use its overexpression as a green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to determine its immunoreactivity with antibodies against human or mouse prominin-1. We used immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and immunoblotting techniques and surprisingly found no cross-species immunoreactivity. These results raise some caution in data interpretation when anti-prominin-1 antibodies are used in interspecies studies.

  3. Radioiodination of antibodies for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the great potential of radioiodinated antibody for the detection and treatment of cancer, the present article deals with the various techniques of radioiodination of antibody and their uses. Topics include methods of iodination of antibody, advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and effects of radioiodination on the antibody molecules with respect to their physiochemical and immunologic reactivity. In addition, the clinical usefulness of radioiodinated antibodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  4. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgue, Gueven; Twyman, Richard M; Beiss, Veronique; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as 'green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of antibodies, ranging from laboratory-scale expression to industrial-scale manufacturing. The key features of plant-based production include safety, speed, low cost, and convenience, allowing newcomers to rapidly master the technology and use it to its full advantage. Manufacturing in plants has recently achieved significant milestones and offers more than just an alternative to established microbial and mammalian cell platforms. The use of plants for product development in particular offers the power and flexibility to easily coexpress many different genes, allowing the plug-and-play construction of novel bionanomaterials, perfectly complementing existing approaches based on plant virus-like particles. As well as producing single antibodies for applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry, plants can be used to produce antibody-based supramolecular structures and scaffolds as a new generation of green bionanomaterials that promise a bright future based on clean and renewable nanotechnology applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1462. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1462 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Monoclonal antibody hapten radiopharmaceutical delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, D.A.; McTigue, M.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred μg of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CHA255 with a binding constant Kb of 4 x 10 9 was complexed with indium-111 labelled BLEDTA II, BLEDTA IV, benzyl EDTA, and an EDTA conjugate of Fab. The 24-h tumour and organ distribution of BALB/c mice bearing KHJJ tumours was studied for each compound alone, the antibody complex, and 3 h following a chelate chase of the antibody complex. Whole body biological half-life was measured for 7 days with and without a chelate chase for each antibody complex. The 24-h whole body counts dropped 20 to 60% and blood concentration fell over 89% within 3 h of administering the chelate chase. Theoretical equivalent human organ doses were calculated from the 24-h organ concentrations, effective half-life, and MIRD 11 S values (absorbed dose per cumulated activity). Liver and spleen were the target organs, with the dose ranging from 0.50 to 3.91 rads mCi -1 . The reduction in organ radiation dose varied up to 95% following the chelate chase. Rapid selective renal clearance of chelate labelled radiopharmaceuticals by competitive inhibition (chelate chase) of their reversible binding to monoclonal antibodies enhances tumour imaging and improves the radiation dosimetry. (author)

  6. Immuno-PET of undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma with radioiodine-labelled antibody cMAb U36: application to antibody tumour uptake studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Marc-Andre [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec and Laval University, Laboratory for Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Quebec City (Canada); Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology, and Clinical Immunology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Salnikov, Alexei V. [Uppsala University, BMC, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala (Sweden); German Cancer Research Center, Division of Molecular Immunology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nestor, Marika [Uppsala University, Division of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Heldin, Nils-Erik [Uppsala University, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden); Rubin, Kristofer [Uppsala University, BMC, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Lundqvist, Hans [Uppsala University, Biomedical Radiation Sciences, Department of Oncology, Radiology, and Clinical Immunology, Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2007-09-15

    We tested the suitability of the chimeric monoclonal anti-human CD44 splice version 6 antibody (cMAb U36) for targeting and visualising human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma with PET. We also performed experiments aimed at elucidating the relation between tumour interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) and the tumour uptake of antibodies. The affinity and specificity of the cMAb U36 for KAT-4 cells were evaluated in vitro, as was the Na{sup +}/I{sup -} symporter (NIS) expression. Biodistribution studies were performed on KAT-4 carcinoma-bearing mice injected with {sup 124}I-cMAb U36 or free iodine. Biodistribution studies were also performed in animals treated with the specific TGF-{beta}1 and -{beta}3 inhibitor Fc:T{beta}RII, which lowers TIFP. Treated and non-treated animals were scanned by microPET. Cultured human undifferentiated/anaplastic thyroid carcinoma KAT-4 cells expressed low levels of NIS and uptake of free iodine was insignificant. The cMAb U36 expressed an affinity (K{sub D}) of 11 {+-} 2 nM. Tumour radioactivity uptake reached maximum values 48 h after injection of {sup 124}I-cMAb U36 ({proportional_to}22%IA/g). KAT-4 carcinomas were readily identified in all {sup 124}I-immuno-PET images. Radioactivity tumour uptake in Fc:T{beta}RII-treated animals was significantly lower at 24 and 48 h after injection, and five times higher thyroid uptake was also noted. We successfully used {sup 124}I-cMAb U36 to visualise CD44v6-expressing human anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Given the lack of NIS expression in KAT-4, tumour visualisation is not due to free iodine uptake. Lowering the TIFP in KAT-4 carcinomas did not increase the uptake of mAbs into tumour tissue. (orig.)

  7. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  8. Refolding Technologies for Antibody Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Arakawa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Refolding is one of the production technologies for pharmaceutical grade antibody fragments. Detergents and denaturants are primarily used to solubilize the insoluble proteins. The solubilized and denatured proteins are refolded by reducing the concentration of the denaturants or detergents. Several refolding technologies have been used for antibody fragments, comprising dilution, dialysis, solid phase solvent exchange and size exclusion chromatography, as reviewed here. Aggregation suppressor or folding-assisting agents, including arginine hydrochloride, ionic liquids and detergents or denaturants at low concentrations, are included in the refolding solvent to enhance refolding yield.

  9. Serum Antibody Biomarkers for ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    typically developing control. US, unaffected sibling control. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...typically developing (TD) children (e.g., Warren et al., 1990; Singh, 2009). The goal of this study is to identify a serum antibody biomarker for ASD using...50% less IgG1 antibody in ASD boys vs . TD boys (p=0.0096). The level of ASD1 binding to the AM group was the same as to the ASD boys. These data

  10. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, P; Reischl, U

    1998-01-01

    An immunoassay may be defined as an assay that employs an immunological reagent, usually an antibody, to confer specificity for the ligand being measured. As a corollary to this, the discovery, and subsequent development, of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has greatly expanded the application and use of immunoassays. Polyclonal reagents, with their associated problems of specificity and quality control, have now been largely replaced by readily available MAbs of potential immortality and well-defined specificity and affinity. This has resulted, in the last two decades, in a great expansion in the range of immunoassays available and also a significant improvement in their reproducibility and reliability.

  11. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  12. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  13. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  14. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  15. Tumor detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moldofsky, P.J.; Powe, J.; Hammond, N.D.

    1987-01-01

    Radioisotope conjugated to monoclonal antibody products has been used for imaging tumors targeted by the antibody. As imaging progresses, new sets of procedural and technical questions arise. In this chapter, we discuss several current problems in imaging tumor with radiolabeled monoclonal antibody. These include (1) methods for selection of specific antibody and, once the particular antibody is selected, which fragment form is to be used; (2) imaging procedures: what are the optimum imaging parameters, such as optimum time for imaging after administration of tracer and considerations regarding background subtraction; and (3) noninvasive quantitative techniques: quantitation of localization of antibody indirectly from quantitative information in the images.100 references

  16. Bispecific antibodies targeting human CD73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bispecific antibody targeting CD73. In particular, the present invention relates to a bispecific antibody targeting different epitopes on CD73 or a bispecific antibody targeting an epitope on CD73 and an epitope on a different antigen.......The present invention relates to a bispecific antibody targeting CD73. In particular, the present invention relates to a bispecific antibody targeting different epitopes on CD73 or a bispecific antibody targeting an epitope on CD73 and an epitope on a different antigen....

  17. High-affinity, noninhibitory pathogenic C1 domain antibodies are present in patients with hemophilia A and inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsuli, Glaivy; Deng, Wei; Healey, John F.; Parker, Ernest T.; Baldwin, W. Hunter; Cox, Courtney; Nguyen, Brenda; Kahle, Joerg; Königs, Christoph; Li, Renhao; Lollar, Pete

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor formation in hemophilia A is the most feared treatment-related complication of factor VIII (fVIII) therapy. Most inhibitor patients with hemophilia A develop antibodies against the fVIII A2 and C2 domains. Recent evidence demonstrates that the C1 domain contributes to the inhibitor response. Inhibitory anti-C1 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been identified that bind to putative phospholipid and von Willebrand factor (VWF) binding epitopes and block endocytosis of fVIII by antigen presenting cells. We now demonstrate by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry that 7 of 9 anti-human C1 mAbs tested recognize an epitope distinct from the C1 phospholipid binding site. These mAbs, designated group A, display high binding affinities for fVIII, weakly inhibit fVIII procoagulant activity, poorly inhibit fVIII binding to phospholipid, and exhibit heterogeneity with respect to blocking fVIII binding to VWF. Another mAb, designated group B, inhibits fVIII procoagulant activity, fVIII binding to VWF and phospholipid, fVIIIa incorporation into the intrinsic Xase complex, thrombin generation in plasma, and fVIII uptake by dendritic cells. Group A and B epitopes are distinct from the epitope recognized by the canonical, human-derived inhibitory anti-C1 mAb, KM33, whose epitope overlaps both groups A and B. Antibodies recognizing group A and B epitopes are present in inhibitor plasmas from patients with hemophilia A. Additionally, group A and B mAbs increase fVIII clearance and are pathogenic in a hemophilia A mouse tail snip bleeding model. Group A anti-C1 mAbs represent the first identification of pathogenic, weakly inhibitory antibodies that increase fVIII clearance. PMID:27381905

  18. Antibodies to Both Terminal and Internal B-Cell Epitopes of Francisella tularensis O-Polysaccharide Produced by Patients with Tularemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaohua; Perkins, Hillary M.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, is considered a potential bioterrorism threat due to its low infectivity dose and the high morbidity and mortality from respiratory disease. We previously characterized two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the O-polysaccharide (O antigen [OAg]) of F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS): Ab63, which targets a terminal epitope at the nonreducing end of OAg, and Ab52, which targets a repeating internal OAg epitope. These two MAbs were protective in a mouse model of respiratory tularemia. To determine whether these epitope types are also targeted by humans, we tested the ability of each of 18 blood serum samples from 11 tularemia patients to inhibit the binding of Ab63 or Ab52 to F. tularensis LPS in a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Although all serum samples had Ab63- and Ab52-inhibitory activities, the ratios of Ab63 to Ab52 inhibitory potencies varied 75-fold. However, the variation was only 2.3-fold for sequential serum samples from the same patient, indicating different distributions of terminal- versus internal-binding antibodies in different individuals. Western blot analysis using class-specific anti-human Ig secondary antibodies showed that both terminal- and internal-binding OAg antibodies were of the IgG, IgM, and IgA isotypes. These results support the use of a mouse model to discover protective B-cell epitopes for tularemia vaccines or prophylactic/therapeutic antibodies, and they present a general strategy for interrogating the antibody responses of patients and vaccinees to microbial carbohydrate epitopes that have been characterized in experimental animals. PMID:24351753

  19. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity by endowing IgG with FcαRI (CD89) binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrok, M Jack; Luheshi, Nadia M; Beyaz, Nurten; Davies, Gareth C; Legg, James W; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Tsui, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Fc effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) are crucial to the efficacy of many antibody therapeutics. In addition to IgG, antibodies of the IgA isotype can also promote cell killing through engagement of myeloid lineage cells via interactions between the IgA-Fc and FcαRI (CD89). Herein, we describe a unique, tandem IgG1/IgA2 antibody format in the context of a trastuzumab variable domain that exhibits enhanced ADCC and ADCP capabilities. The IgG1/IgA2 tandem Fc format retains IgG1 FcγR binding as well as FcRn-mediated serum persistence, yet is augmented with myeloid cell-mediated effector functions via FcαRI/IgA Fc interactions. In this work, we demonstrate anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 antibodies with the unique tandem IgG1/IgA2 Fc can better recruit and engage cytotoxic polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells than either the parental IgG1 or IgA2. Pharmacokinetics of IgG1/IgA2 in BALB/c mice are similar to the parental IgG, and far surpass the poor serum persistence of IgA2. The IgG1/IgA2 format is expressed at similar levels and with similar thermal stability to IgG1, and can be purified via standard protein A chromatography. The tandem IgG1/IgA2 format could potentially augment IgG-based immunotherapeutics with enhanced PMN-mediated cytotoxicity while avoiding many of the problems associated with developing IgAs.

  20. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  1. Purification of immunoreactive radiolabeled moniclonal antibodies with anti-iodiotypic moniclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temponi, M.; Pupa, S.; Ferrone, S.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described to purify immunoreactive moniclonal antibodies from radiolabeled monoclonal antibody preparations. The method is based on incubation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies with insolubilized anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to idiotopes within the antigen-combining site of monoclonal antibodies to be purified an elution of bound monoclonal antibodies with a low pH buffer. The immunoreactive fraction of the purified monoclonal antibodies was at least 82%; the yeald was at least 73%. The purification procedure did not cause any detectable change in the affinity constant of the eluted monoclonal antibodies. The method is simple and rapid; the requirement for anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to idiotopes within the antigen-combining site of the antibodies to be purified is not likely to represent a major limitation in the broad application of the present method, since the hybridoma technology has greatly facilitated the development of anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies. (author). 12 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  2. Dengue antibodies in blood donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas-Silva, Rejane Cristina; Eid, Andressa Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is an urban arbovirus whose etiologic agent is a virus of the genus Flavorius with four distinct antigen serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4) that is transmitted to humans through the bite of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. The Campo Mourão region in Brazil is endemic for dengue fever. OBTECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of IgG and IgM antibodies specific to the four serotypes of dengue in donors of the blood donor service in the city of Campo Mourão. Epidemiological records were evaluated and 4 mL of peripheral blood from 213 blood donors were collected in tubes without anticoagulant. Serum was then obtained and immunochromatographic tests were undertaken (Imuno-Rápido Dengue IgM/IgG(TM)). Individuals involved in the study answered a social and epidemiological questionnaire on data which included age, gender and diagnosis of dengue. Only three (1.4%) of the 213 blood tests were positive for IgG anti-dengue antibodies. No donors with IgM antibody, which identifies acute infection, were identified. The results of the current analysis show that the introduction of quantitative or molecular serological methods to determine the presence of anti-dengue antibodies or the detection of the dengue virus in blood donors in endemic regions should be established so that the quality of blood transfusions is guaranteed.

  3. Generation and characterization of a human-mouse chimeric high-affinity antibody that detects the DYKDDDDK FLAG peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Koki; Koga, Tomoaki; Sasaki, Fumiyuki; Ueno, Ayumi; Saeki, Kazuko; Okuno, Toshiaki; Yokomizo, Takehiko

    2017-05-13

    DYKDDDDK peptide (FLAG) is a useful tool for investigating the function and localization of proteins whose antibodies (Abs) are not available. We recently established a high-affinity monoclonal antibody (mAb) for FLAG (clone 2H8). The 2H8 Ab is highly sensitive for detecting FLAG-tagged proteins by flowcytometry and immunoprecipitation, but it can yield nonspecific signals in immunohistochemistry of mouse tissues because it is of mouse origin. In this study, we reduced nonspecific signals by generating a chimeric 2H8 Ab with Fc fragments derived from human immunoglobulin. We fused a 5' terminal cDNA fragments for the Fab region of 2H8 mAb with 3' terminal cDNA fragments for Fc region of human IgG1. We transfected both chimeric plasmids and purified the resulting human-mouse chimeric 2H8. The chimeric 2H8 Ab successfully detected FLAG-tagged proteins in flowcytometry with anti-human IgG secondary Ab with comparable sensitivity to 2H8 mAb. Importantly, chimeric 2H8 detected specific FLAG peptide signals without nonspecific signals in immunohistochemical analysis with mouse tissues. This human-mouse chimeric high-affinity anti-FLAG Ab will prove useful for future immunohistochemical analysis of mouse tissues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Suppression of Aggrus/podoplanin-induced platelet aggregation and pulmonary metastasis by a single-chain antibody variable region fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyata, Kenichi; Takagi, Satoshi; Sato, Shigeo; Morioka, Hiroshi; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Minamisawa, Tamiko; Takami, Miho; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    Almost all highly metastatic tumor cells possess high platelet aggregating abilities, thereby form large tumor cell-platelet aggregates in the microvasculature. Embolization of tumor cells in the microvasculature is considered to be the first step in metastasis to distant organs. We previously identified the platelet aggregation-inducing factor expressed on the surfaces of highly metastatic tumor cells and named as Aggrus. Aggrus was observed to be identical to the marker protein podoplanin (alternative names, T1α, OTS-8, and others). Aggrus is frequently overexpressed in several types of tumors and enhances platelet aggregation by interacting with the platelet receptor C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). Here, we generated a novel single-chain antibody variable region fragment (scFv) by linking the variable regions of heavy and light chains of the neutralizing anti-human Aggrus monoclonal antibody MS-1 with a flexible peptide linker. Unfortunately, the generated KM10 scFv failed to suppress Aggrus-induced platelet aggregation in vitro. Therefore, we performed phage display screening and finally obtained a high-affinity scFv, K-11. K-11 scFv was able to suppress Aggrus-induced platelet aggregation in vitro. Moreover, K-11 scFv prevented the formation of pulmonary metastasis in vivo. These results suggest that K-11 scFv may be useful as metastasis inhibitory scFv and is expected to aid in the development of preclinical and clinical examinations of Aggrus-targeted cancer therapies

  5. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Multiplex serology of paraneoplastic antineuronal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Maat (Peter); E. Brouwer (Eric); E. Hulsenboom (Esther); M.M. van Duijn (Martijn); M.W.J. Schreurs (Marco); H. Hooijkaas (Herbert); P.A. Smitt (Peter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractParaneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are devastating neurological disorders secondary to cancer, associated with onconeural autoantibodies. Such antibodies are directed against neuronal antigens aberrantly expressed by the tumor. The detection of onconeural antibodies in a patient

  7. Alternative affinity tools: more attractive than antibodies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, V.J.B.; Levisson, M.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Smidt, H.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies are the most successful affinity tools used today, in both fundamental and applied research (diagnostics, purification and therapeutics). Nonetheless, antibodies do have their limitations, including high production costs and low stability. Alternative affinity tools based on nucleic acids

  8. [Neuroimmunological diseases associated with VGKC complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels(VGKC) were first identified by radioimmunoassay of radioisotope labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were found only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in Morvan's syndrome and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins(for example LGI-1, Caspr-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. Caspr-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability.

  9. Radioimmunoassay method for detection of gonorrhea antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A novel radioimmunoassay for the detection of gonorrhea antibodies in serum is described. A radionuclide is bound to gonorrhea antigens produced by a growth culture. In the presence of gonorrhea antibodies in the serum, an antigen-antibody conjugate is formed, the concentration of which can be measured with conventional radiometric methods. The radioimmunoassay is highly specific

  10. Immunoglobulin G4: an odd antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberse, R. C.; Stapel, S. O.; Schuurman, J.; Rispens, T.

    2009-01-01

    Despite its well-known association with IgE-mediated allergy, IgG4 antibodies still have several poorly understood characteristics. IgG4 is a very dynamic antibody: the antibody is involved in a continuous process of half-molecules (i.e. a heavy and attached light-chain) exchange. This process, also

  11. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  12. T cell activation and differentiation is modulated by a CD6 domain 1 antibody Itolizumab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usha Bughani

    Full Text Available CD6 is associated with T-cell modulation and is implicated in several autoimmune diseases. We previously demonstrated that Itolizumab, a CD6 domain 1 (CD6D1 specific humanized monoclonal antibody, inhibited the proliferation and cytokine production by T lymphocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody or when co-stimulated with ALCAM. Aberrant IL-17 producing CD4+ helper T-cells (Th17 have been identified as pivotal for the pathogenesis of certain inflammatory autoimmune disorders, including psoriasis. Itolizumab has demonstrated efficacy in human diseases known to have an IL-17 driven pathogenesis. Here, in in vitro experiments we show that by day 3 of human PBMC activation using anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 co-stimulation in a Th17 polarizing milieu, 15-35% of CD4+ T-cells overexpress CD6 and there is an establishment of differentiated Th17 cells. Addition of Itolizumab reduces the activation and differentiation of T cells to Th17 cells and decreases production of IL-17. These effects are associated with the reduction of key transcription factors pSTAT3 and RORγT. Further, transcription analysis studies in these conditions indicate that Itolizumab suppressed T cell activation by primarily reducing cell cycle, DNA transcription and translation associated genes. To understand the mechanism of this inhibition, we evaluated the effect of this anti-human CD6D1 mAb on ALCAM-CD6 as well as TCR-mediated T cell activation. We show that Itolizumab but not its F(ab'2 fragment directly inhibits CD6 receptor hyper-phosphorylation and leads to subsequent decrease in associated ZAP70 kinase and docking protein SLP76. Since Itolizumab binds to CD6 expressed only on human and chimpanzee, we developed an antibody binding specifically to mouse CD6D1. This antibody successfully ameliorated the incidence of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in the mice model. These results position CD6 as a key molecule in sustaining the activation and differentiation of T cells and an

  13. Antiphospholipid Antibody Induced by Nivolumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Aburahma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody against the programmed death protein 1 and is used for patients with advanced melanoma. It is associated with potentially immune-related adverse events, including disorders of the skin, GI tract, and the thyroid; these disorders were successfully treated with prednisone and infliximab. Other immunotherapeutic agents were observed to induce the formation of antiphospholipid antibody (APA including α-interferon and interleukin-2. We present a case of APA development after the third dose of nivolumab in a 71-year-old male with advanced melanoma. The APA was detected after finding a prolonged aPTT; the lupus anticoagulant assay tested positive. The patient was treated with prednisone but, unfortunately, he expired a few days later.

  14. Solid phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niswender, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is concerned with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for assaying body fluid content of an antigenic substance which may either be an antigen itself or a hapten capable of being converted, such as by means of reaction with a protein, to an antigenic material. The present invention is concerned with a novel and improved modification of a double-antibody RIA technique in which there is a first antibody that is specific to the antigenic substance suspected to be present in a body fluid from which the assay is intended. The second antibody, however, is not specific to the antigenic substance or analyte, but is an antibody against the first antibody

  15. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Wertz, N.; Šinkora, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, FEB 17 (2017), s. 255-279 ISSN 2165-8102 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09296S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : swine * pre-immune antibody repertoire * ileal Peyer's patches Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.708, year: 2016

  16. Development of antibody against sulfamethazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ziying; Xi Wenge; Liu Yibing; Zhang Liling; Guo Weizheng; Han Shiquan

    2004-01-01

    Sulfamethazine (SMT) is widely used to treat bacterial and protozoan infections in food animals. So its residue has been detected in various food products, and in Europe, the tolerance level for sulfonamides in meat and milk is 100 ng/g. To ensure that residues in animal food products do not exceed this limit, a simple, sensitive, and rapid method to determinate their residues in animal tissues is needed. In this paper the development of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies against sulfamethazine (SMT) and a simplified method to identify residual sulfamethazine by radio immunoassay (RIA) is presented. Polyclonal antibodies (PcAbs) against sulfamethazine (SMT) were obtained by immunizing rabbits with SMT-conjugated bovine serum albumin (BSA). The association constants (Ka) of the PcAbs were higher than 108 and the cross-reactivities with Sulfadiazine(SD), Sulfaquinoxaline(SQX) which were structurally related compounds were lower than 0.05%(RIA). Simultaneous, six strains of hybridoma cell were prepared which can secrete monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against SMT . The Ka of the McAbs against SMT were higher than 107 and the cross-reactivities with SD, SQX were lower than 0.1%(RIA). (authors)

  17. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic antigens...

  18. Modification of Antibody Function by Mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasch, James R; Dasch, Amy L

    2017-09-01

    The ability to "fine-tune" recombinant antibodies by mutagenesis separates recombinant antibodies from hybridoma-derived antibodies because the latter are locked with respect to their properties. Recombinant antibodies can be modified to suit the application: Changes in isotype, format (e.g., scFv, Fab, bispecific antibodies), and specificity can be made once the heavy- and light-chain sequences are available. After immunoglobulin heavy and light chains for a particular antibody have been cloned, the binding site-namely, the complementarity determining regions (CDR)-can be manipulated by mutagenesis to obtain antibody variants with improved properties. The method described here is relatively simple, uses commercially available reagents, and is effective. Using the pComb3H vector, a commercial mutagenesis kit, PfuTurbo polymerase (Agilent), and two mutagenic primers, a library of phage with mutagenized heavy and light CDR3 can be obtained. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Designing two-in-one antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Ignacio Garcia; Espinoza, Luis R

    2009-09-01

    Evaluation of: Bostrom J, Shang-Fan Y, Kan D et al.: Variants of the antibody Herceptin that interact with HER2 and VEGF at the antigen binding site. Science 323, 1610-1614 (2009). The longstanding held notion that one antibody equals one antigen and, hence, one function has been challenged in recent years. Improved technology in antibody production, especially the accumulation of sequence data of immunoglobulin genes and the advent of PCR have made it possible to clone antibody gene repertoires. The current paper provides further challenge to the notion of one antibody = one antigen by developing 'two-in-one' antibodies with an antigen-binding site that binds two distinct proteins with high affinity. A therapeutic variant antibody of Herceptin (Genentech, CA, USA) was isolated that binds the human EGF receptor (HER)2 and also to VEGF. This development may represent a breakthrough discovery and may have significant implications in the therapy of malignant, infectious, allergic and autoimmune disorders.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity investigation of a human anti-interleukin-17 monoclonal antibody in non-naïve cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Gunn, George R; Marini, Joseph C; Shankar, Gopi; Han Hsu, Helen; Davis, Hugh M

    2015-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) of biologic therapeutics, especially monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), in monkeys generally presents the most relevant predictive PK information for humans. However, human mAbs, xenogeneic proteins to monkeys, are likely to be immunogenic. Monkeys previously treated with a human mAb (non-naïve) may have developed antidrug antibodies (ADAs) that cross-react with another test mAb in subsequent studies. Unlike PK studies for small-molecule therapeutics, in which animals may be reused, naïve monkeys have been used almost exclusively for preclinical PK studies of biologic therapeutics to avoid potential pre-existing immunologic cross-reactivity issues. The propensity and extent of pre-existing ADAs have not been systematically investigated to date. In this study, the PK and immunogenicity of mAb A, a human anti-human interkeukin-17 mAb, were investigated in a colony of 31 cynomolgus monkeys previously exposed to other human mAbs against different targets. We screened the monkeys for pre-existing antibodies to mAb A prior to the PK study and showed that 44% of the monkeys had pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies to mAb A, which could affect the PK characterization of the antibody. In the subcolony of monkeys without measurable pre-existing ADAs, PK and immunogenicity of mAb A were successfully characterized. The impact of ADAs on mAb A PK was also demonstrated in the monkeys with pre-existing ADAs. Here we report the results and propose a pragmatic approach for the use of non-naïve monkeys when conducting PK studies of biologic therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Phase I dose escalation pharmacokinetic assessment of intravenous humanized anti-MUC1 antibody AS1402 in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegram, Mark D; Borges, Virginia F; Ibrahim, Nuhad; Fuloria, Jyotsna; Shapiro, Charles; Perez, Susan; Wang, Karen; Schaedli Stark, Franziska; Courtenay Luck, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    MUC1 is a cell-surface glycoprotein that establishes a molecular barrier at the epithelial surface and engages in morphogenetic signal transduction. Alterations in MUC1 glycosylation accompany the development of cancer and influence cellular growth, differentiation, transformation, adhesion, invasion, and immune surveillance. A 20-amino-acid tandem repeat that forms the core protein of MUC1 is overexpressed and aberrantly glycosylated in the majority of epithelial tumors. AS1402 (formerly R1550) is a humanized IgG1k monoclonal antibody that binds to PDTR sequences within this tandem repeat that are not exposed in normal cells. AS1402 is a potent inducer of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), specifically against MUC1-expressing tumor cells. The objective of this study was to determine the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetic (PK) characteristics of AS1402 monotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic MUC1-positive breast cancer that had progressed after anthracyclines- and taxane-based therapy. Patients received AS1402 over a 1- to 3-hour intravenous (i.v.) infusion at doses between 1 and 16 mg/kg, with repeated dosing every 1 to 3 weeks (based on patient-individualized PK assessment) until disease progression. Serum AS1402 levels were measured at multiple times after i.v. administration. Human anti-human antibody (HAHA) responses were measured to determine the immunogenicity of AS1402. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic parameters were determined and were used to assess dose dependency across the dose range studied. Twenty-six patients were treated. AS1402 was generally well tolerated. Two grade 3/4 drug-related adverse events were reported, both at the 3-mg/kg dose. Neither was observed in expanded or subsequent dosing cohorts. No anti-human antibodies were detected. Plasma concentrations of AS1402 appeared to be proportional to dose within the 1- to 16-mg/kg dose range assessed, with a mean terminal half-life of 115.4 +/- 37.1 hours

  2. Donor-derived HLA antibody production in patients undergoing SCT from HLA antibody-positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Hayashi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Onuma, T; Fujii, N; Kusunoki, Y; Soma, T; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-10-01

    Pre-existing donor-specific HLA antibodies in patients undergoing HLA-mismatched SCT have increasingly been recognized as a risk factor for primary graft failure. However, the clinical implications of the presence of HLA antibodies in donors remain unknown. We prospectively examined 123 related donors for the presence of HLA antibodies by using a Luminex-based single antigen assay. Of these, 1/57 (1.8%) male, 6/27 (22%) parous female and 0/39 (0%) nonparous female donors were HLA antibody-positive. Then, we determined the presence of HLA antibodies in seven patients who received SCT from antibody-positive donors. Of these, four became HLA antibody-positive after SCT. The specificities of the antibodies that emerged in the patients closely resembled those of the antibodies found in the donors, indicating their production by donor-derived plasma cells. Moreover, the kinetics of the HLA antibody levels were similar in all four patients: levels started increasing within 1 week after SCT and peaked at days 10-21, followed by a gradual decrease. These results suggest that donor-derived HLA antibody production frequently occurs in patients undergoing SCT from antibody-positive donors. Further studies are warranted for clarifying the clinical significance of donor-derived HLA antibodies, including the role of these antibodies in post transplant platelet transfusion refractoriness.

  3. DARPA Antibody Technology Program. Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 ScFv Antibody Produced by Illumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ECBC-TR-1395 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR... ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION: CHARACTERIZATION OF AN MS2 SCFV ANTIBODY PRODUCED BY ILLUMINA Patricia E. Buckley Alena M. Calm Heather Welsh Roy...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 ScFv

  4. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AK, Litchman AH, Pillai S, eds. Cellular and Molecular Immunology . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ... D, Brostoff J, Roth DB, Roitt IM, eds. Immunology . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap ...

  5. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a potent, orally bioavailable, and selective small-molecule inhibitor of chemokine receptor CCR5 with broad-spectrum anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2005-11-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades and diverse geographic origin (geometric mean 90% inhibitory concentration of 2.0 nM). Maraviroc was active against 200 clinically derived HIV-1 envelope-recombinant pseudoviruses, 100 of which were derived from viruses resistant to existing drug classes. There was little difference in the sensitivity of the 200 viruses to maraviroc, as illustrated by the biological cutoff in this assay (= geometric mean plus two standard deviations [SD] of 1.7-fold). The mechanism of action of maraviroc was established using cell-based assays, where it blocked binding of viral envelope, gp120, to CCR5 to prevent the membrane fusion events necessary for viral entry. Maraviroc did not affect CCR5 cell surface levels or associated intracellular signaling, confirming it as a functional antagonist of CCR5. Maraviroc has no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity and is highly selective for CCR5, as confirmed against a wide range of receptors and enzymes, including the hERG ion channel (50% inhibitory concentration, >10 microM), indicating potential for an excellent clinical safety profile. Studies in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models predicted maraviroc to have human pharmacokinetics consistent with once- or twice-daily dosing following oral administration. Clinical trials are ongoing to further investigate the potential of using maraviroc for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS.

  6. Correlation between levels of human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 and 18 antibodies in serum and cervicovaginal secretions in girls and women vaccinated with the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Tino F; Kocken, Mariëlle; Petäjä, Tiina

    2010-01-01

    and CVS samples were collected from a subset of women aged 10-65 years (N=350) at pre-specified time-points from 7 to 36 months post-vaccination. Anti-HPV-16/18 antibody levels in serum and CVS were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Pearson correlation coefficients between serum and CVS...... in serum were substantially higher at all time-points than those in a control group of women who had cleared a natural HPV infection in another trial. In women with detectable antibodies in both serum and CVS, good correlation was seen between HPV-16/18 antibody levels at all time-points (Pearson......This pooled analysis of data from four Phase III clinical trials was undertaken to assess the correlation between levels of anti-human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 antibodies in serum and cervicovaginal secretions (CVS) in girls and women vaccinated with the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine. Serum...

  7. Monoclonal anti-melanoma antibodies and their possible clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, K.E.; Hellstroem, Ingegerd; Washington Univ., Seattle; Washington Univ., Seattle

    1985-01-01

    Cell surface antigens of human melanoma, as defined by monoclonal antibodies, are discussed and in particular the three antigens p97, a GD3 ganglioside and a proteoglycan. The potential diagnostic uses of antibodies to melanoma antigens are reviewed including in vitro diagnosis by immuno-histology, in vitro diagnosis by serum assays and in vivo diagnosis by tumour imaging using radioactively labelled antibodies. The potential therapeutic uses of monoclonal antibodies to melanoma antigens are also reviewed including targets for antibody therapy, the use of antibodies alone, radiolabelled antibodies, antibody-toxin conjugates, antibody-drug conjugates, anti-idiotypic antibodies and vaccines. (UK)

  8. Anticardiolipin antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, A; Woods, R; Dowding, V; Roden, D; Barry, C

    1987-10-01

    Anticardiolipin antibody (ACA) was present in the sera of 49% of 90 consecutive patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The ACA was absent in 30 control patients with osteoarthritis. C-reactive protein levels equal to or exceeding 7 mg/dl were found in 10 patients all of whom were ACA positive. ACA was present in a larger proportion of rheumatoid factor (RF) positive than of RF negative patients. Male sex and extra-articular manifestations of RA were both more common in ACA positive than ACA negative patients. In the ACA positive group the lupus anticoagulant and VDRL tests were negative. However, a small number of patients had evidence of vascular events.

  9. Radiometallating antibodies and autoantigenic peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercer-Smith, J.A.; Lewis, D.; Cole, D.A.; Newmyer, S.L.; Schulte, L.D.; Mixon, P.L.; Schreyer, S.A.; Burns, T.P.; Roberts, J.C.; Figard, S.D.; McCormick, D.J.; Lennon, V.A.; Hayashi, M.; Lavallee, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    We have developed methods to radiolabel large molecules, using porphyrins as bifunctional chelating agents for radiometals. The porphyrins are substituted with an N- benzyl group to activate them for radiometallation under mild reaction conditions. Porphyrins that have one functional group for covalent attachment to other molecules cannot cause crosslinking. We have examined the labeling chemistry for antibodies and have developed methods to label smaller biologically active molecules, such as autoantigenic peptides (fragments of the acetylcholine receptor), which are pertinent to myasthenia gravis research. The methods of covalent attachment of these bifunctional chelating agents to large molecules, the radiometallation chemistry, and biological characterization of the radiolabeled compounds will be discussed

  10. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Michelle Remião Ugolini; Danowski, Adriana; Funke, Andreas; Rêgo, Jozelia; Levy, Roger; Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira de

    2017-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations) add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  11. Preparation of antibody coated tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles Berrueta, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: 1. Purification of IgG: 2-4 ml serum at pH 8 with Buffer tris 1M pH 8. Let serum pass through the column of Sepharose Prot. A (1-2 ml). Wash with: a) Buffer tris 0.1M pH 8; b) Buffer tris 0.01M pH 8. Elute with Glycine 0.1M pH 3 adding eluant at 0.5 ml fractions and collect in eppendorf tubes containing 50μ1 Buffer tris 1M pH 8 to neutralize. 20 fractions are collected. Absorbency at 280nm is measured in each fraction. Pool is formed with protein factions. Dialysis against water is done during 48 hours changing water twice during that lapse. Regenerate column for future use with 1 wash Urea 2M, second with LiCl 1M and third wash with Glycine 0.1 M pH 2.5. 2. Antibody Immobilization on an Activated Solid Phase: NUNC maxisorp, Star tube 75x12 mm is trade mark for polystyrene tubes from Pharmacia with less than 5% CV% inhomogeneity in adsorption of IgG and less than 10% for random bias of any result from mean value. They are kept closed until use. They are not reusable. The antibody is diluted to a working dilution with buffer carbonate-bi carbonate 0.1M, pH 9.6 (BCBic). Adequate volume is pipetted into maxisorb NUNC tubes paying attention not to produce droplets (1/200 dilution and 0.3 ml/tube are used for TSH assays). An incubation overnight is enough to get maximum IgG binding. Antibody solution is recovered for further use (after mixing with additional antibody). Solid phase is subject to washing with phosphate buffer with non-Ionic detergent (1 ml PB.5 + 0.5% Tween 20) and then with pure water. Tubes are left two hours upside down and kept tightly closed with dissicant at - 20 deg. C

  12. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors......, including solid-phase peptide-carrier conjugation and peptide-carrier conjugation in solution. Upon immunization, adjuvants such as Al(OH)(3) are added together with the immunogenic peptide-carrier conjugate, which usually leads to high-titred antisera. Following immunization and peptide antibody...

  13. Conference scene: progress with promising human antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrick, James W

    2012-03-01

    Antibodies and antibody-based therapeutics have become big business, with annual sales over US$50 billion, accounting for >6% of worldwide pharmaceutical revenues. Ten molecules have blockbuster status (>US$1 billion), with six generating more than US$6 billion in sales. In excess of 300 products based on this rapidly maturing technology are in clinical trials. The generation and manufacture of human antibodies is now routine, although the cost of goods remains an issue. Optimizing combinations of antibodies with other therapeutics (e.g., chemotherapy) is a major short-term goal, while target validation and product differentiation remain significant hurdles if growth is to continue. Some of the notable highlights of the recent 16th International Conference on Human Antibodies and Hybridomas meeting in Cannes, France are described below. The conference was sponsored by the international journal Human Antibodies, in association with the Integrative Medical Sciences Association (IMSA). The Program Chairman was Professor Mark Glassy, IMSA, San Diego, CA, USA.

  14. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies specific for Progesterone

    OpenAIRE

    YÜCEL, Fatıma

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone levels in milk and serum are indicators of pregnancy in cattle. The progesterone level reaches a peak on the 21 st and 22 nd days of pregnancy. Monoclonal antibodies specific to progesterone could be used for the immunodetection of milk and serum progesterone levels. We report here the development of hybrid cells prdoducing monoclonal antibodies specific for progesterone using hybridoma technology. Hybridoma cells secreting monoclonal antibodies against progesterone (MAM 2H1...

  15. [Ma2 antibody and multiple mononeuropathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayrignac, X; Castelnovo, G; Landrault, E; Fayolle, H; Pers, Y-M; Honnorat, J; Campello, C; Figarella-Branger, D; Labauge, P

    2008-01-01

    Anti-Ma2 antibodies belong to a family of onconeuronal antibodies that target proteins expressed in brain, testis and several tumors. Previously observed in patients presenting with limbic encephalitis, they seem to be associated with several other paraneoplastic syndromes. We report the case of a 73-year-old woman presenting sensory and motor neuropathy associated with non-small-cell lung cancer who had Ma2-antibodies.

  16. An anti vimentin antibody promotes tube formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mathias Lindh; Møller, Carina Kjeldahl; Rasmussen, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    antibody technology, promotes tube formation of endothelial cells in a 2D matrigel assay. By binding vimentin, the antibody increases the tube formation by 21% after 5 hours of incubation. Addition of the antibody directly to cultured endothelial cells does not influence endothelial cell migration...... or proliferation. The enhanced tube formation can be seen for up to 10 hours where after the effect decreases. It is shown that the antibody-binding site is located on the coil 2 domain of vimentin. To our knowledge this is the first study that demonstrates an enhanced tube formation by binding vimentin in a 2D...

  17. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody...... 1 cephalosporinase. We found a wide range of chromosomal beta-lactamase activity in the sputum samples, with no correlation with basal or induced activity of beta-lactamase expression. The presence of anti-beta-lactamase antibodies in endobronchial sputum could be an important factor in the defense...

  18. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2018-04-10

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  19. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Gearhart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  20. Immune Antibody Libraries: Manipulating The Diverse Immune Repertoire for Antibody Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Theam Soon; Chan, Soo Khim

    2016-01-01

    Antibody phage display is highly dependent on the availability of antibody libraries. There are several forms of libraries depending mainly on the origin of the source materials. There are three major classes of libraries, mainly the naïve, immune and synthetic libraries. Immune antibody libraries are designed to isolate specific and high affinity antibodies against disease antigens. The pre-exposure of the host to an infection results in the production of a skewed population of antibodies against the particular infection. This characteristic takes advantage of the in vivo editing machinery to generate bias and specific immune repertoire. The skewed but diverse repertoire of immune libraries has been adapted successfully in the generation of antibodies against a wide range of diseases. We envisage immune antibody libraries to play a greater role in the discovery of antibodies for diseases in the near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  2. Stratification of Antibody-Positive Subjects by Antibody Level Reveals an Impact of Immunogenicity on Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A.; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J.; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic....

  3. Anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus antibodies in commercial immunoglubulin preparations, human serum and milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hahn-Zoric; B. Carlsson; S. Jeansson; H.P. Ekre; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D. Roberton; L.A. Hanson

    1993-01-01

    textabstractOur previous studies have suggested that fetal antibody production can be induced by maternal antiidiotypic antibodies transferred to the fetus via the placenta. We tested commercial Ig, sera, and milk for the presence of anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus type 1, using affinity

  4. Antibody or Antibody Fragments : Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xenaki, Katerina T; Oliveira, Sabrina; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    2017-01-01

    The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are

  5. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  6. Antibody Characterization Process | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program (ACP) is to have three monoclonal antibodies produced for each successfully expressed/purified recombinant antigen and one antibody per peptide (1 to 3 peptides per protein). To date, over 4000 clones have been screened before selecting the current 393 antibodies. They are winnowed down based on the projected end use of the antibody.

  7. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera of...

  8. Open-label, dose escalation phase I study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of a human monoclonal antibody to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claribel P; Tummala, Sanjeev; Molrine, Deborah; Davidson, Lisa; Farrell, Richard J; Lembo, Anthony; Hibberd, Patricia L; Lowy, Israel; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2008-06-25

    Recent data suggest that Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is becoming more severe and difficult to treat. Antibody responses to C. difficile toxin A are protective against symptomatic disease and recurrence. We examined the safety and pharmacokinetics (pk) of a novel neutralizing human monoclonal antibody against C. difficile toxin A (CDA1) in healthy adults. Five cohorts with 6 subjects each received a single intravenous infusion of CDA1 at escalating doses of 0.3, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg. Safety evaluations took place on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 post-infusion. Samples for pk analysis were obtained before and after infusion, and at each safety evaluation. Serum CDA1 antibody concentrations and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) titers were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A noncompartmental model was used for pk analysis. Thirty subjects were enrolled. The median age was 27.5 yrs. There were no serious adverse events (AE) related to CDA1. Twenty-one of the 48 reported non-serious adverse events were possibly related to CDA1, and included transient blood pressure changes requiring no treatment, nasal congestion, headache, abdominal cramps, nausea, and self-limited diarrhea. Serum CDA1 concentrations increased with escalating doses: mean C(max) ranged from 6.82 microg/ml for the 0.3 mg/kg cohort to 511 microg/ml for the 20 mg/kg cohort. The geometric mean values of the half-life of CDA1 ranged between 25.3 and 31.8 days, and the volume of distribution approximated serum. No subject formed detectable HAHA titers. Administration of CDA1 as a single intravenous infusion was safe and well tolerated. C(max) increased proportionally with increasing doses. A randomized study of CDA1 in patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea is underway.

  9. BF*F allotype of the alternative pathway of complement: A marker of protection against the development of antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picceli, V F; Skare, T L; Nisihara, R M; Nass, F R; Messias-Reason, I T; Utiyama, S R R

    2016-04-01

    B factor (BF) from the alternative complement pathway seems to participate in the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To study the allotypic variability of BF in SLE and their associations with clinical and autoantibodies profile. BF allotypes were determined by high-voltage agarose gel electrophoresis, under constant cooling, followed by immunofixation with anti-human BF antibody, in 188 SLE patients and 103 controls. Clinical and serological data were obtained from medical examination and records. No significant differences of BF variants between patients and controls were found, neither in relation to epidemiologic or clinical manifestations. Associations of phenotype BF SS07 and allotype BF*S07 were found with anticardiolipin IgM (aCl-IgM) antibodies (p = 0.014 and p = 0.009 respectively), but not with aCl-IgG, lupus anticoagulant (LA), anti β2GPI or clinical APS. A significant decrease in BF*F allotype (p = 0.043) and BF SF phenotype (p = 0.018) was detected in patients with anti-phospholipid antibodies as a whole (aCl-IgG, aCl-IgM, LA and anti β2GPI). There is a link between phenotype BF SS07 and allotype BF*S07 with aCl-IgM in SLE patients; BF*F allotype could be considered a marker of protection against the development of antiphospholipid antibodies in these patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  11. Applications of recombinant antibodies in plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Angelika; Torrance, Lesley

    2002-09-01

    Summary Advances in molecular biology have made it possible to produce antibody fragments comprising the binding domains of antibody molecules in diverse heterologous systems, such as Escherichia coli, insect cells, or plants. Antibody fragments specific for a wide range of antigens, including plant pathogens, have been obtained by cloning V-genes from lymphoid tissue, or by selection from large naive phage display libraries, thus avoiding the need for immunization. The antibody fragments have been expressed as fusion proteins to create different functional molecules, and fully recombinant assays have been devised to detect plant viruses. The defined binding properties and unlimited cheap supply of antibody fusion proteins make them useful components of standardized immunoassays. The expression of antibody fragments in plants was shown to confer resistance to several plant pathogens. However, the antibodies usually only slowed the progress of infection and durable 'plantibody' resistance has yet to be demonstrated. In future, it is anticipated that antibody fragments from large libraries will be essential tools in high-throughput approaches to post-genomics research, such as the assignment of gene function, characterization of spatio-temporal patterns of protein expression, and elucidation of protein-protein interactions.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  13. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy...

  14. Antibody therapies for lymphoma in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Zwart, Verena; Gouw, Samantha C.; Meyer-Wentrup, Friederike A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas are the third most common malignancy in childhood. Cure rates are high but have reached a plateau. Therefore new treatment modalities should be developed. Antibody therapy is a successful new treatment option in adult lymphoma. However, none of the therapeutic antibodies available for

  15. Immunoscintigraphy of metastases with radiolabelled human antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Azzawi, F.; Smith, J.; Stimson, W.H.

    1987-02-28

    It was concluded that Epstein-Barr virus transformation of committed lymphocytes offers great potential in the production of antitumour antibodies of human origin. An outline case report is presented where the human I/sup 131/ labelled antibody was used as a targeting agent to delineate the extent of secondary growth in the liver. (U.K.).

  16. Nanobodies - the new concept in antibody engineering

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-17

    Jun 17, 2009 ... These heavy-chain antibodies contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two ... clonal antibody products were on the market and more than 100 in ..... genous showing no sign of spontaneous dimerisation in contrast to scFv ...

  17. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  18. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  19. Anti‑livin antibodies in Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann-Antczak, Aleksandra; Kosowicz, Jerzy; Zamysłowska, Hanna; Ruchała, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Livin belongs to the family of apoptosis inhibitors. High livin expression is observed in malignancies of the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, breast, and kidneys, but it is not present in differentiated adult tissues. In some malignant processes, anti‑livin antibodies are present. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of anti‑livin antibodies in Hashimoto thyroiditis, a disease characterized by rapid and widespread thyrocyte apoptosis. The study comprised 65 women with Hashimoto thyroiditis and the control group of 40 healthy women. In the majority of the patients, clinical manifestations of hypothyroidism were observed; all patients had high levels of serum antithyroid peroxidase antibodies. A solid‑phase radioimmunoassay in livin‑coated polyethylene tubes using 125I-labeled protein A was used to determine anti-livin antibodies. Significant amounts of anti-livin antibodies were reported in 18 patients (26.8%); 3 patients (4.6%) had borderline antibody levels; while in controls only 1 patient was positive (2.5%, P Hashimoto thyroiditis, an autoimmune process is more general and involves numerous autoantibodies including an antibody against apoptosis inhibitor - livin. Anti‑livin antibodies cannot serve only as a marker of malignancy because they are also present in autoimmune processes.

  20. A novel polyclonal antibody against human cytomegalovirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Future research should be directed to epitope screening of synthetic HMCV peptides, which could help to understand HCMV infection and virus-neutralising antibodies more fully and to prepare HCMV vaccines and antiviral drugs. Key words: Human cytomegalovirus, AD169 strain, Towne strains, polyclonal antibody.

  1. Nano antibody therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachallam, M.; Sivakumar, T.; Nazeema; Venkateswari, P.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomedicine, an offshoot of nanotechnology, refers to highly specific medical intervention at the molecular scale for curing disease or repairing damaged tissues, such as bone, muscle, or nerve. Nanotechnology can have an early, paradigm-changing impact on how clinicians will detect cancer in its earliest stages. Exquisitely sensitive devices constructed of nanoscale components-such as nanocantilevers, nanowires and nanochannels-offer the potential for detecting even the rarest molecular signals associated with malignancy. One of the most pressing needs in clinical oncology is for imaging agents that can identify tumors that are far smaller than is possible with today's technology, at a scale of 100,000 cells rather than 1,000,000,000 cells. A new approach in nanotechnology for treating cancer incorporates nano iron particles and attaches them to an antibody that has targets only cancer cells and not healthy cells. The treatment works in two steps. This treatment is an ingenious way to make localized tumor ablation a systemic treatment. The advantages are incredible. There are absolutely no side effects from this treatment. It is not painful or even uncomfortable. The iron particles get flushed harmlessly from the body. It is not a drug and so the cancer cannot build up a resistance to the treatment. It is a systematic treatment; even cancer cells and tumors that are not known about get heated up and ablated. This treatment can even be used to enhance imaging of the cancer because once the cancer cells are coated with the iron particles, they are easy to identify. Everything depends on how reliably the antibodies target cancer cells and not healthy cells. When used in conjunction with other systemic treatments, such as vaccine treatments, we could be looking at a time when even advanced cancers can be brought under control. (author)

  2. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  3. Preparation of 188Re labelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Minghua; Cao Rongzhen; Li Wenxin; Sheng Rong; Yin Duanzhi; He Weiyu; Zhou Wei; Wang Yongxian

    1998-01-01

    A simple technique of directly labelling antibodies with 188 Re has been developed. The reduction of antibody disulfide groups was achieved by incubation of antibody with ascorbic acid (pH = 6.5) for an hour at room temperature and a solution of excess SnCl 2 in sodium gluconate was added to the AA-reduced antibody followed by the addition of perrhenate. Some factors that influence labelling efficiency, such as the pH of the reaction mixture, the labelling time, and the amount of antibodies and reductive agent, were studied experimentally and a better labelling method was established. The labelling yields, as determined by paper chromatography, were greater than 80%

  4. Taking aim at cancer with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klausner, A.

    1986-01-01

    Conjugating radioisotopes to monoclonal antibodies could have certain advantages in cancer therapy. Radioactive compounds have the double-edged ability to kill cells that are up to centimeter or more away. This is a plausible way to overcome tumor heterogeneity, but it also means that normal cells near the tumor could be affected. Hybritech (San Diego, CA) has been supplying antibody linked to the radioisotope yttrium-90 for a number of clinical trials. Work at Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore, MD) has focused on polyclonal antibodies to hepatoma. Monoclonal antibodies will be used there soon, and trials could be expanded eventually to include breast, lung, and prostate cancer as well. Hybritech also expects that the yttrium-antibody conjugates developed with NCI will enter the clinic later this year for treating leukemia and lymphoma systems; treatments for melanomas should follow

  5. Dgroup: DG02651 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ody Monoclonal antibody IL2RA (CD25) [HSA:3559] [KO:K05068] ... ... DG02651 Chemical ... DGroup Daclizumab ... D03639 ... Daclizumab (USAN/INN) ... Immunosuppressant, Anti-CD25 antib

  6. Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.; Suzuki, M.; Adachi, S.

    1983-01-01

    Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The antibody activity of antibody was not affected by irradiation at an irradiation dose of below 8 MR and low temperatures. Immobilization of peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG goat IgG, anti-peroxidase, peroxidase, and anti-alpha-fetoprotein was carried out with hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The activity of the immobilized enzyme-labeled antibody membranes varied with the thickness of the membranes and increased with decreasing membrane thickness. The activity of the immobilized antibody particles was varied by particle size. Immobilized anti-alpha-fetoprotein particles and membranes can be used for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein by the antigen-antibody reaction, such as a solid-phase sandwich method with high sensitivity

  7. Monoclonal antibody form and function: manufacturing the right antibodies for treating drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eric; Owens, S Michael; Henry, Ralph L

    2006-05-26

    Drug abuse continues to be a major national and worldwide problem, and effective treatment strategies are badly needed. Antibodies are promising therapies for the treatment of medical problems caused by drug abuse, with several candidates in preclinical and early clinical trials. Monoclonal antibodies can be designed that have customized affinity and specificity against drugs of abuse, and because antibodies can be designed in various forms, in vivo pharmacokinetic characteristics can be tailored to suit specific clinical applications (eg, long-acting for relapse prevention, or short-acting for overdose). Passive immunization with antibodies against drugs of abuse has several advantages over active immunization, but because large doses of monoclonal antibodies may be needed for each patient, efficient antibody production technology is essential. In this minireview we discuss some of the antibody forms that may be effective clinical treatments for drug abuse, as well as several current and emerging production systems that could bridge the gap from discovery to patient use.

  8. Docking of Antibodies into Cavities in DNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quyang, X; Stefano, Mattia De; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart

    2017-01-01

    microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) validated efficient antibody immobilization in the origami structures. The increased ability to control the orientation of antibodies in nanostructures and at surfaces has potential for directing the interactions of antibodies with targets...

  9. Prevalence of serum celiac antibodies in a multiracial Asian population--a first study in the young Asian adult population of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Theresa Wan-Chen; Chan, Weng-Kai; Leow, Alex Hwong-Ruey; Azmi, Ahmad Najib; Loke, Mun-Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disorder induced by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible persons. The prevalence of CD in Malaysia is unknown. We aim to determine the seroprevalence of CD antibodies and also investigate the correlation between H. pylori infection and CD in the young and healthy multiracial Malaysian population. Healthy young adult volunteers between the ages of 18-30 years were consecutively recruited from June 2012 to May 2014 at the University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur. Serum samples from all the participants were tested for anti-gliadin antibody immunoglobulin A/immunoglobulin G (IgA/IgG) and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG) IgA/IgG. Samples positive for both anti-gliadin and anti-tTG were further validated for anti-human endomysial IgA antibodies (EmA). Serological diagnosis of CD was made when anti-gliadin, anti-tTG and anti-EmA were positive. 562 qualified participants with mean age 24 ± 2.4 years old were recruited into our study. CD was found in 7 participants where most of them were asymptomatic and unaware of their CD status. The median of anti-gliadin and anti-tTG IgA/IgG value was 38.2 U/ml (interquartile range, 28.3-60.4 U/ml) and 49.2 U/ml (interquartile range, 41.1-65.9 U/ml), respectively. Seroprevalence of CD antibodies was 1.9% (6 out of 324) in female while only 0.4% (1 out of 238) in male. Seroprevalence among Malay was 0.8% (2 of 236), Chinese was 1.7% (3 of 177) and Indian was 1.3% (2 of 149). Overall, seroprevalence of CD antibodies in healthy asymptomatic adults in the Malaysian population was 1.25% (95% CI, 0.78%-1.72%). No significant relationship was discovered between CD and H. pylori infection. The seroprevalence of CD antibodies in healthy young adults in the Malaysian population was 1.25% (1 in 100). CD is underdiagnosed and it could be a much greater problem in Malaysia than previously thought.

  10. Prevalence of Serum Celiac Antibodies in a Multiracial Asian Population-A First Study in the Young Asian Adult Population of Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Theresa Wan-Chen; Chan, Weng-Kai; Leow, Alex Hwong-Ruey; Azmi, Ahmad Najib; Loke, Mun-Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated disorder induced by the ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible persons. The prevalence of CD in Malaysia is unknown. We aim to determine the seroprevalence of CD antibodies and also investigate the correlation between H. pylori infection and CD in the young and healthy multiracial Malaysian population. Methods Healthy young adult volunteers between the ages of 18–30 years were consecutively recruited from June 2012 to May 2014 at the University of Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC), Kuala Lumpur. Serum samples from all the participants were tested for anti-gliadin antibody immunoglobulin A/immunoglobulin G (IgA/IgG) and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG) IgA/IgG. Samples positive for both anti-gliadin and anti-tTG were further validated for anti-human endomysial IgA antibodies (EmA). Serological diagnosis of CD was made when anti-gliadin, anti-tTG and anti-EmA were positive. Results 562 qualified participants with mean age 24 ± 2.4 years old were recruited into our study. CD was found in 7 participants where most of them were asymptomatic and unaware of their CD status. The median of anti-gliadin and anti-tTG IgA/IgG value was 38.2 U/ml (interquartile range, 28.3–60.4 U/ml) and 49.2 U/ml (interquartile range, 41.1–65.9 U/ml), respectively. Seroprevalence of CD antibodies was 1.9% (6 out of 324) in female while only 0.4% (1 out of 238) in male. Seroprevalence among Malay was 0.8% (2 of 236), Chinese was 1.7% (3 of 177) and Indian was 1.3% (2 of 149). Overall, seroprevalence of CD antibodies in healthy asymptomatic adults in the Malaysian population was 1.25% (95% CI, 0.78%-1.72%). No significant relationship was discovered between CD and H. pylori infection. Conclusions The seroprevalence of CD antibodies in healthy young adults in the Malaysian population was 1.25% (1 in 100). CD is underdiagnosed and it could be a much greater problem in Malaysia than previously thought. PMID:25799401

  11. Monoclonal antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis: comparative effectiveness of tocilizumab with tumor necrosis factor inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka T

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Toshio Tanaka,1,2 Yoshihiro Hishitani,3 Atsushi Ogata2,3 1Department of Clinical Application of Biologics, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan; 2Department of Immunopathology, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan; 3Department of Respiratory Medicine, Allergy and Rheumatic Diseases, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka, Japan Abstract: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by persistent joint inflammation, systemic inflammation, and immunological abnormalities. Because cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interleukin (IL-6 play a major role in the development of RA, their targeting could constitute a reasonable novel therapeutic strategy for treating RA. Indeed, worldwide clinical trials of TNF inhibiting biologic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs including infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, certolizumab pegol, and etanercept as well as the humanized anti-human IL-6 receptor antibody, tocilizumab, have demonstrated outstanding clinical efficacy and tolerable safety profiles, resulting in worldwide approval for using these bDMARDs to treat moderate to severe active RA in patients with an inadequate response to synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (sDMARDs. Although bDMARDs have elicited to a paradigm shift in the treatment of RA due to the prominent efficacy that had not been previously achieved by sDMARDs, a substantial percentage of patients failed primary or secondary responses to bDMARD therapy. Because RA is a heterogeneous disease in which TNF-α and IL-6 play overlapping but distinct pathological roles, further studies are required to determine the best use of TNF inhibitors and tocilizumab in individual RA patients. Keywords: interleukin-6, rheumatoid arthritis, adalimumab, biologic

  12. Immunohistochemical Examination of Novel Rat Monoclonal Antibodies against Mouse and Human Podoplanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Chiaki; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Kato Kaneko, Mika; Kato, Yukinari; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to develop new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse and human podoplanin. Rats were immunized with synthetic peptides, corresponding to amino acids 38–51 of mouse podoplanin or human podoplanin which is 100% homologous to the same site of monkey podoplanin; anti-mouse podoplanin mAb PMab-1 (IgG 2a ) and anti-human mAb NZ-1.2 (IgG 2a ) were established. In immunocytochemistry, the mouse melanoma B16-F10 and mouse podoplanin (mPDPN)-expressed CHO transfectant were stained by PMab-1; human lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) and human podoplanin (hPDPN)-expressed squamous cell carcinoma HSC3 transfectant, were stained by NZ-1.2. Western-blot analysis detected an about 40-kDa protein in CHO-mPDPN and B16-F10 by PMab-1, and in HSC3-hPDPN and LEC by NZ-1.2. In frozen sections, PMab-1 reacted with mouse kidney, pulmonary alveoli, pulmonary pleura, and salivary gland myoepithelial cells while NZ-1.2 reacted to the human salivary gland myoepithelial cells. The immunostaining of paraffin-embedded sections also showed the reaction of PMab-1 or NZ-1.2 to the mouse or monkey kidney glomerulus, pulmonary alveoli, and lung lymphatic vessels. These results indicate that the two novel rat mAbs to the mouse and human/monkey podoplanin are useful for Western-blot and immunostaining of somatic tissues on paraffin-embedded sections as well as frozen sections

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and coupling reagents to cell membrane proteins for leukocyte labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAfee, J.G.; Gagne, G.; Subramanian, G.; Schneider, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Current gamma-emitting agents for tagging leukocytes, In-111 oxine or tropolone, label all cell types indiscriminantly, and nuclear localization in lymphocytes results in radiation damage. Coupling reagents and murine monoclonal antibodies (Mab) specific for cell surface antigens of human leukocytes were tried as cell labeling agents to avoid nuclear localization. 10/sup 8/ mixed human leukocytes in Hepes buffer were added to tubes coated with 5 mg of dry cyclic dianhydride of DTPA for 15 minutes at room temperature. After washing, 0.1 ml of In-111 Cl in ACD (pH 6.8) was added. After 30 minutes, a cell labeling yield of 23% was obtained. Washing the cells in an elutriation centrifuge showed that this label was irreversible. Mab for cell surface antigens of human granulocytes were labeled with 300 μCi of I-125 using the Iodobead technic and unbound activity was removed by gel column chromatography. 1-10 μg were added to 10/sup 8/ mixed leukocytes in 0.5 ml plasma or saline for 1 hr. With Mab anti-leu M4 (clone G7 E11), an IgM, the cell labeling yield was 21%, irreversible, and specific for granulocytes. With anti-human leukocyte Mab NEI-042 (clone 9.4), and IgG2a, and anti-granulocyte Mab MAS-065 (clone FMCl1) an IgG1, the cell labeling was relatively unstable. Labeling of leukocyte subpopulations with Mab is feasible, and the binding of multivalent IgM is stronger than that of other immunoglobulins. DTPA cyclic anhydride is firmly bound to cell membranes, but the labeling is non-specific

  14. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  15. Glycosylation profiles of therapeutic antibody pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Christoph; Berger, Christoph N; Girard, Philippe; Meier, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are often used as therapeutics and represent a major class of drug products. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of antibody complexes resulting in the elimination of a target molecule or the modulation of specific signalling pathways. The physiological effects of antibody therapeutics are known to depend on the structural characteristics of the antibody molecule, specifically on the glycosylation which is the result of posttranslational modifications. Hence, production of therapeutic antibodies with a defined and consistent glycoform profile is needed which still remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. To provide an insight into the industries capability to control their manufacturing process and to provide antibodies of highest quality, we conducted a market surveillance study and compared major oligosaccharide profiles of a number of monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals sampled on the Swiss market. Product lot-to-lot variability was found to be generally low, suggesting that a majority of manufacturers have implemented high quality standards in their production processes. However, proportions of G0, G1 and G2 core-fucosylated chains derived from different products varied considerably and showed a bias towards the immature agalactosidated G0 form. Interestingly, differences in glycosylation caused by the production cell type seem to be of less importance compared with process related parameters such as cell growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  17. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David M; Koup, Richard A; Ferrari, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However, antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Furthermore, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small-molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Stratification of antibody-positive subjects by antibody level reveals an impact of immunogenicity on pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic. The antibody responses displayed a wide range of relative concentrations (30 ng/mL to >13 μg/mL) and peaked at various times during the study. To evaluate the impact of immunogenicity on PK, AMG 317 concentration data were analyzed following stratification by dose group, time point, antibody status (positive or negative), and antibody level (relative concentration). With dose group as a stratifying variable, a moderate reduction in AMG 317 levels (AMG 317 levels was revealed when antibody data was stratified by both time point and antibody level. In general, high ADA concentrations (>500 ng/mL) and later time points (week 12) were associated with significantly (up to 97%) lower trough AMG 317 concentrations. The use of quasi-quantitative antibody data and appropriate statistical methods was critical for the most comprehensive evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity on PK.

  19. Effect of antibody charge and concentration on deposition of antibody to glomerular basement membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madaio, M.P.; Salant, D.J.; Adler, S.; Darby, C.; Couser, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    Fixed anionic sites within the glomerular capillary wall influence the permeation of serum proteins, the localization of various antigens, and the deposition of antibody in the subepithelial space. In anti-GBM nephritis antibody deposition occurs very rapidly to antigenic sites located relatively proximal in the glomerular capillary wall. The authors examined the influence of the glomerular charge barrier on anti-GBM antibody deposition by comparing the rate of deposition of antibodies with cationic and anionic isoelectric points. Purified sheep anti-rat GBM IgG was isolated from acid eluates of kidneys obtained 24 hr after rats were injected with sheep antiserum to rat GBM. Anti-GBM IgG was separated into cationic (pI 6.4-8.5) and anionic (pI 4.2-6.8) fractions, which were radiolabelled with 131 I and 125 I, respectively, shown to have equal antibody contents measured by in vitro binding to normal glomeruli, mixed in equal amounts, and injected in incremental doses to ten rats. At 1 hr the glomerular antibody binding of each fraction was directly related to the blood level (r . 0.95, r . 0.97) and delivery of antibody (r . 0.98, r . 0.98). Glomerular binding of cationic antibody was four times greater than anionic antibody over the entire range of deliveries studied (P less than 0.001). The authors conclude that glomerular deposition of anti-GBM antibody is directly related to blood concentration and delivery of antibody. Furthermore, the deposition of cationic antibodies to GBM antigens was significantly greater than the deposition of anionic antibodies

  20. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  1. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  2. Immunotherapy with GD2 specific monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.K.V.; Medof, E.M.; Munn, D.

    1988-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapy focuses anti-tumor activity of antibodies and effector cells, which are actively developed by the host or adoptively transferred, onto tumor cells and into tumor sites. Such tumor selective therapy can be more specific and efficient. The value of such an approach is evident in the classical interaction of antibodies. This paper reports that the ganglioside G D2 is an ideal antigen for specific tumor targeting because of its relative lack of heterogeneity among human neuroblastoma, its high density on tumor cells, its lack of antigen modulation upon binding to antibody, and its restricted distribution in normal tissues

  3. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  4. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  5. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  6. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated

  7. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  8. Reshaping Human Antibodies: Grafting an Antilysozyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeyen, Martine; Milstein, Cesar; Winter, Greg

    1988-03-01

    The production of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology has proved difficult, and this has prompted the ``humanizing'' of mouse monoclonal antibodies by recombinant DNA techniques. It was shown previously that the binding site for a small hapten could be grafted from the heavy-chain variable domain of a mouse antibody to that of a human myeloma protein by transplanting the hypervariable loops. It is now shown that a large binding site for a protein antigen (lysozyme) can also be transplanted from mouse to human heavy chain. The success of such constructions may be facilitated by an induced-fit mechanism.

  9. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today.

  10. Systemic radiotherapy with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L.; Matzku, S.; Bihl, H.

    1993-01-01

    In this experimental study, feasibility and efficiency of systematic radiotherapy with the I-131 labelled monoclonal antibody BW575/9 (radioimmunotherapy) are investigated using human SK-N-SH neuroblastoma transplated into nude mice. Series of six nude mice were treated with intravenous application of 400 μCi (group 1), 700 μCi (group 2) of the I-131 labelled and of the unlabelled MAb (group 3). An untreated group (group 4) served as control. Tumors of group (3) and (4) showed an identical growth. In group (1), tumor growth was arrested for seven days. In group (2), the tumor showed complete regression after eight days which lasted for 55 days. Thereafter, the tumor started to regrow. This growth characteristics are correlated with the doses achieved in the tumor using a medical radiation dose (MIRD) formulation. The biodistribution data necessary for MIRD calculation were obtained by previously performed experiments with the I-125 labelled MAb. The doses assessed in the tumor turned out to be five to ten times greater than those in normal tissues (liver, bone, etc.) These results confirm feasibility, selectivity and efficiency of radioimmunotherapy in the above described model. Moreover, this in vivo model seems suitable for further investigations concerning fundamental issues of radioimunotherapy. (orig.) [de

  11. Monoclonal antibodies against plant viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandler, E.; Dietzgen, R.G.

    1984-01-01

    Ever since antigenic properties of plant viruses were discovered antisera have been raised and used for plant virus diagnosis and for the analysis of virus structure as well. From the early qualitative diagnosis method of precipitating the virus in clarified sap of an infected plant and the first quantitative application of the precipitin test vast progress has been made with regard to the development of highly sensitive and highly quantitative methods for virus detection. Of equal importance was the improvement of methods for separating virus from host cell components since the specificity of antisera raised against a virus could be increased by using an antigen for immunization highly concentrated and largely freed from contaminating host substances. The introduction of the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) into plant virology allows detection of virus in nanogram quantities. Still, the conventionally raised antisera, no matter how pure an antigen was used for immunization, are polyclonal. They contain products of thousands of different antibody-secreting plasma cell clones which can be directed against all antigenic determinants (epitopes) of the virus, but also against antigens of the host plant that may not have been entirely separated from the immunizing virus during the purification procedure. Even after cross adsorption of polyclonal antisera some residual heterogeneity can be expected to remain. Within these boundaries the information gained with polyclonal antisera on virus structure and on virus diagnosis has to be interpreted

  12. Preparación de un conjugado peroxidasa-anti IgG humana (cadena en conejo Preparation of a peroxidase-anti human IgG conjugate (chain g in rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio C Merlín Linares

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Se preparó un conjugado con peroxidasa a partir de los anticuerpos específicos aislados de un suero de conejo anti cadenas g de la IgG humana. Los anticuerpos específicos se aislaron por cromatografía de afinidad, y el conjugado se preparó por el método de oxidación con peryodato. El conjugado obtenido presentó una relación molar IgG/peroxidasa de 1,07, un valor de RZ de 0,33 y resultó evaluado satisfactoriamente en cuanto a su especificidad y reactividad en los ensayos inmunoenzimáticos realizadosA peroxidase conjugate was prepared starting from the specific antibodies isolated from an anti-chain rabbit serum and from human IgG. The specific antibodies were isolated by affinity chromatography and the conjugate was prepared by the method of oxidation with periodate. The conjugate obtained presented a molar IgG/peroxidase relation of 1.07, a RZ value of 0.33 and it was satisfactorily evaluated as regards its specificity and reactivity in the immunoenzimatic assays carried out

  13. Basics of Antibody Phage Display Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledsgaard, Line; Kilstrup, Mogens; Karatt-Vellatt, Aneesh; McCafferty, John; Laustsen, Andreas H

    2018-06-09

    Antibody discovery has become increasingly important in almost all areas of modern medicine. Different antibody discovery approaches exist, but one that has gained increasing interest in the field of toxinology and antivenom research is phage display technology. In this review, the lifecycle of the M13 phage and the basics of phage display technology are presented together with important factors influencing the success rates of phage display experiments. Moreover, the pros and cons of different antigen display methods and the use of naïve versus immunized phage display antibody libraries is discussed, and selected examples from the field of antivenom research are highlighted. This review thus provides in-depth knowledge on the principles and use of phage display technology with a special focus on discovery of antibodies that target animal toxins.

  14. A novel polyclonal antibody against human cytomegalovirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... The identification of the synthetic peptide antibody was confirmed by ... cell virus transmission and fusion of infected cells, as well ..... Cytomegalovirus and Epstein-. Barr virus subtypes-The search for clinical significance.

  15. Localization of tumors by radiolabelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, H.J.; Primus, F.J.

    1975-01-01

    A method of utilizing radiolabelled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigens for determining the site of tumors which produce or are associated with carcinoembryonic antigen is disclosed. 3 claims, no drawings

  16. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology. Review article

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, S Y.T.; Sikora, K

    1986-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. 69 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs.

  18. Monoclonal antibody therapy of inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Camoglio, L.

    1997-01-01

    Animal models of inflammatory bowel disease have provided insight in the regulation of mucosal inflammation. This has resulted in novel therapeutic approaches that specifically target a single inflammatory mediator. Monoclonal antibody therapy has been used in steroid refractory Crohn's disease

  19. Antibody conjugate radioimmunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Alan; Hopper, Melanie; Murray, Andrea; Frier, Malcolm; Bishop, Mike

    2002-01-01

    The administration of antibody conjugates for cancer therapy is now proving to be of clinical value. We are currently undertaking a programme of clinical studies using the monoclonal antibody C 595 (gG3) which reacts with the MUC1 glycoprotein antigen that is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of bladder tumours. Radio immuno conjugates of the C 595 antibody have been produced with high radiolabelling efficiency and immuno reactivity using Tc-99 m and In-111 for diagnostic imaging, and disease staging and the cytotoxic radionuclides Cu-67 and Re-188 for therapy of superficial bladder cancer. A Phase I/II therapeutic trail involving the intravesical administration of antibody directly into the bladder has now begun. (author)

  20. Enhanced Phagocytosis and Antibody Production by Tinospora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... antibody production through in vitro and in vivo studies. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Collection ..... components with candidicidal activity in human, rabbit and guinea pig leukocytes. Infect. Immun., 11: 1226-1234. Manjrekar ...

  1. Determination of antiphospholipid antibodies and Thrombophilia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of antiphospholipid antibodies and Thrombophilia in women ... frequency of the primary and secondary antiphospholipid syndrome and the ... in between or with medical termination of pregnancy were excluded from this study.

  2. [Possibilities of differentiation of antinuclear antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W; Rosenthal, M; Stojan, B

    1975-10-15

    Antinuclear antibodies can give diagnostic informations according to their titre values, the belonging to different classes of immune globulins and on the basis of different patterns of immunofluorescence connection. The determination of granulocyte-specific antibodies which frequently appear in progressive chronic polyarthritis further contributes to the differential-diagnostic classification of diseases of the connective tissue. An antibody against extractable nuclear antigen is specific for the so-called mixed connective tissue disease, an antimitochondrial antibody for the pseudo-LE-syndrome. Moreover, the own examinations resulted in a particularly high and frequent ability of complement fixation of the antinuclear factors in systematic lupus erythematosus and sclerodermy. In contrast to this in the progressive chronic polyarthritis the complement fixation was clearly more insignificant.

  3. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  4. Imaging of colorectal carcinoma with radiolabeled antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, D M; Goldenberg, H; Sharkey, R M; Lee, R E; Higgenbotham-Ford, E; Horowitz, J A; Hall, T C; Pinsky, C M; Hansen, H J

    1989-10-01

    Colorectal cancer has been the tumor type most frequently studied with radiolabeled antibodies. Among the various antibodies, a majority of patients with colorectal cancer have received xenogeneic polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies against carcino-embryonic antigen. This review summarizes the current status of colorectal cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies, ie, radioimmunodetection (RAID), and examines the published studies involving carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) antibodies and 17-1A, 19-9, and B72.3, and other monoclonal antibodies. In order to better address the issue of the current and future clinical usefulness of this emerging technology, particular attention is given to the protocols, methods, and results of the published studies. Despite differences in study parameters, antibodies and forms, labels, administration routes and doses, and scanning instruments and methods, it has been found that (1) almost no adverse reactions have been evident; (2) antibody fragments are preferred over whole immunoglobulin G reagents because they achieve higher tumor-to-background ratios earlier, thus reducing or precluding the need for dual-isotope subtraction methods or long delays before imaging; (3) use of antibody fragments, including the monovalent Fab' form, permits imaging with short-lived radionuclides of excellent photon properties, such as 123I and 99mTc; (4) circulating antigens against which the imaging antibody is directed can complex with the injected antibody, but such complexes have not prevented successful RAID; (5) patients with high serum titers of the appropriate antigen target usually have higher rates of positive RAID; (6) patients who are seronegative for the tumor antigen being studied can have positive RAID findings, which can represent the detection of occult lesions; (7) single photon emission computed tomography appears to provide better image resolution than planar scanning; (8) regardless of the sensitivity reported in any particular

  5. Generalized Platform for Antibody Detection using the Antibody Catalyzed Water Oxidation Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, M. Elizabeth; Ritzert, Nicole L.; Chen, Hongjun; Smith, Norah L.; Tague, Michele E.; Xu, Youyong; Baird, Barbara A.; Abru?a, H?ctor D.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases, such as influenza, present a prominent global problem including the constant threat of pandemics that initiate in avian or other species and then pass to humans. We report a new sensor that can be specifically functionalized to detect antibodies associated with a wide range of infectious diseases in multiple species. This biosensor is based on electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide generated through the intrinsic catalytic activity of all antibodies: the antibody ...

  6. An indirect antibody assay using haptenated antigen and 125I-labelled anti-hapten antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalberse, R.C.; Amsterdam Univ.

    1978-01-01

    Hapten (trinitrophenyl) was coupled to antigen (ovalbumin). The haptenated antigen was bound by anti-ovalbumin antibody and binding was quantitated with 125 I-labelled anti-hapten antibodies. Thus, with a single radioactive reagent, antibodies against a variety of antigens can be detected while the problems inherent in a labelled antiglobulin binding test are avoided. In the ovalbumin system, the haptenated antigen binding test proved to be approximately 20 times as sensitive as the iodinated ovalbumin binding test

  7. Transfer of copper from a chelated 67Cu-antibody conjugate to ceruloplasmin in lymphoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirick, Gary R.; O'Donnell, Robert T.; DeNardo, Sally J.; Shen Sui; Meares, Claude F.; DeNardo, Gerald L.

    1999-01-01

    The Lym-1 monoclonal antibody was conjugated with the bifunctional chelating agent 6-[p-(bromoacetamido)benzyl]-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N' -tetraacetic acid (BAT), using 2IT as a linker, and radiolabeled with 67 Cu to make the radiopharmaceutical, 67 Cu-2IT-BAT-Lym-1. Ten patients received a total of 18 doses of 67 Cu-2IT-BAT-Lym-1 as targeted, systemic radiotherapy. The beta phase of blood clearance, when corrected for 67 Cu decay, was positive or flat, a phenomenon not observed in similar patients treated with 131 I-Lym-1. The flat beta phase of blood clearance suggested recycling of 67 Cu from 67 Cu-2IT-BAT-Lym-1 to another plasma protein. Therefore, the amount of 67 Cu transferred from the radiopharmaceutical to CP, Alb, and TF was measured using affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies. The fraction of plasma 67 Cu precipitated by anti-human CP increased daily; most blood radioactivity was 67 Cu-CP after a median of 4 days (range 2-7 days). The transfer of 67 Cu to CP was observed in all patients and was consistent from dose to dose within the same patient. An average of 2.8±1.5% (range 0.8-7.8%) of the 67 Cu dose (%ID) was transferred to CP. The release rate of 67 Cu-CP from the liver into the blood was 0.9±0.4 %ID/day for the first 3 days. The 67 Cu-CP effective clearance half-life was 3.7 ± 0.7 days. Subtraction of the 67 Cu-CP activity from the total blood radioactivity yielded a biphasic blood clearance similar to that obtained for patients given 131 I-Lym-1. Cu-67-CP increased the AUC for whole blood by 24 ± 10%. The %ID of 67 Cu recycled correlated with GGT, ALT, and alkaline phosphatase levels; r=0.958 (p 67 Cu-2IT-BAT-Lym-1 and recycles a small fraction of the 67 Cu, transferring it to CP

  8. Antibody recognition of Z-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafer, E.M.; Moeller, A.; Valle, R.P.C.; Nordheim, V.A.; Rich, A.; Stollar, B.D.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge)

    1983-01-01

    To measure serological reactions under physiological ionic strength, we prepared a brominated (Bl) poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC), which forms a stable Z helix in solutions of low salt concentration. Mice and rabbits were immunized with this polymer complexed with the basic protein methylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA), and it was discovered that the Z-DNA helix is a strong immunogen. Various antibody populations were purified from the rabbit serum by quantitative immunoprecipitation. Spleen cells from the mice were used for the preparation of hybridoma cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies. Anti-Z-DNA antibodies were also raised by immunizing animals with poly(dG-dm 5 C).poly(dG-dm 5 C) under conditions where it was reported to be in the left-handed Z conformation as well as unmodified poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) that was in the right-handed B conformation: both were complexed with MBSA. Z-DNA reactive antibodies were found in both murine and human SLE. A Z-DNA-specific as well as a dDNA and Z-DNA cross-reactive antibody population were distinguished by affinity chromatography of the SLE sera. The specificities of the various anti-Z-DNA antibody populations were measured by direct-binding and competitive radioimmunoassays, using synthetic polymers of defined structure under various ionic strengths. These studies allow us to map the possible antigenic sites for these antibodies, which serve as a model for DNA-protein recognition. The findings also established the usefulness of the antibodies as biochemical probes for Z-DNA. 29 references, 6 figures, 1 table

  9. Radioimmunoassay of measles virus antibodies in SSPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, M.A.; Gut, W.; Kantoch, M.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) was introduced for detecting measles virus IgG and IgM antibodies. The hyperimmune response to the measles virus could be demonstrated more accurately by RIA than by haemagglutination inhibition (HI). The ratio between RIA and HI antibody titres was decidedly higher in sera and cerebrospinal fluids of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis than in those of other groups tested. (author)

  10. Brain-Reactive Antibodies and Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Diamond, B.; Honig, G.; Mader, S.; Brimberg, L.; Volpe, B.T.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases currently affect 5–7% of the world's population; in most diseases there are circulating autoantibodies. Brain-reactive antibodies are present in approximately 2–3% of the general population but do not usually contribute to brain pathology. These antibodies penetrate brain tissue only early in development or under pathologic conditions. This restriction on their pathogenicity and the lack of correlation between serum titers and brain pathology have, no doubt, contributed to...

  11. Antibody repertoire profiling with mimotope arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Pashova, Shina; Schneider, Christoph; von Gunten, Stephan; Pashov, Anastas

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale profiling and monitoring of antibody repertoires is possible through next generation sequencing (NGS), phage display libraries and microarrays. These methods can be combined in a pipeline, which ultimately maps the antibody reactivities onto defined arrays of structures - peptides or carbohydrates. The arrays can help analyze the individual specificities or can be used as complex patterns. In any case, the targets recognized should formally be considered mimotopes unless they are ...

  12. [Limbic encephalitis with antibodies against intracellular antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Akihiko; Kamei, Satoshi

    2010-04-01

    Limbic encephalitis is a paraneoplastic syndrome that is often associated with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), breast cancer, testicular tumors, teratoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and thymoma. The common clinical manifestations of limbic encephalitis are subacute onset, cognitive dysfunction, seizures and psychiatric symptoms. Paraneoplastic neurological disorders are considered to occur because of cytotoxic T cell responses and antibodies against target neuronal proteins that are usually expressed by an underlying tumor. The main intracellular antigens related to limbic encephalitis are Hu, Ma2, and less frequently CV2/CRMP5 and amphiphysin. The anti-Hu antibody, which is involved in cerebellar degeneration and extensive or multifocal encephalomyelitis such as limbic encephalitis is closely associated with a history of smoking and SCLC. The anti-Ma2 antibody is associated with encephalitis of the limbic system, hypothalamus and brain-stem. For this reason, some patients with limbic encephalitis have sleep disorders (including REM sleep abnormalities), severe hypokinesis and gaze palsy in addition to limbic dysfunction. In men aged less than 50 years, anti-Ma2 antibody encephalitis is almost always associated with testicular germ-cell tumors that are occasionally difficult to detect. In older men and women, the most common tumors are non-SCLC and breast cancer. Limbic encephalitis associated with cell-surface antigens (e.g., voltage-gated potassium channels, NMDA receptors) is mediated by antibodies and often improves after a reduction in the antibody titer and after tumor resection. Patients with antibodies against intracellular antigens, except for those with anti-Ma2 antibodies and testicular tumors, are less responsive. Early diagnosis and treatment with immunotherapy, tumor resection or both are important for improving or stabilizing the condition of limbic encephalitis.

  13. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  14. [Screening serum response special antibodies of U251 cell line from surface display phage antibody library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Min; Tan, De-Yong; Qian, Wei; Lai, Jian-Hua; Sun, Gui-Lin

    2004-05-01

    U251 cell is a sensitive cell line to serum, which stops at G0 phase of cell cycle in no-serum medium, and recovers growth when the serum is added into no-serum medium. The cell can express corresponding proteins in different phase of cell cycle. Therefore it is very signification for the study of cell cycle regulation mechanism that explores these proteins. In this paper, the mouse antibody phage display library was added into the bottle in which the serum starvation U251 cells had been cultured, and the special antibody phages were absorbed. Then the absorbed antibody phages were amplified by adding E. coli TG1 and helper phage M13K07. Amplified antibody phages were added into bottle in which the serum cultured cell after serum starvation (follow named as serum recovered cells) were incubated, so that the cell absorbed the no-special antibody phages for the serum starvation cell and the special antibody phages were in supernatant. The remaining no-special antibody phages in the supernatant were discarded by repeating above program 3-4 times. The pure special antibody phages were gotten, and amplified by adding the host cell E. coli TG1 and helper phage M13K07. Then the host bacterium infected special antibody phage was spread on the plate medium with ampicillin, and the monoclonal antibody phages were gotten. Using same as above program, the monoclonal antibody phages absorbed specially for serum recovered U251 cells were obtained when the serum recovered cells instead of serum starvation cells and serum starvation cells instead of serum recovered cells. In this study, ninety-six positive monoclonal antibody phages that absorbed specially the serum starvation cells and eighty-two positive monoclonal antibody phages that absorbed specially the serum recovered cells were obtained. By using cell immunochemistry assay, two special signification antibodies were obtained. one (No.11) was the strong response in serum starvation cells, the other (No.2) was the strong

  15. Complement-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA and MICA antigens are associated with antibody mediated rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Junchao; Terasaki, Paul I; Zhu, Dong; Lachmann, Nils; Schönemann, Constanze; Everly, Matthew J; Qing, Xin

    2016-02-01

    We have found antibodies against denatured HLA class I antigens in the serum of allograft recipients which were not significantly associated with graft failure. It is unknown whether transplant recipients also have denatured HLA class II and MICA antibodies. The effects of denatured HLA class I, class II, and MICA antibodies on long-term graft outcome were further investigated based on their ability to fix complement c1q. In this 4-year retrospective cohort study, post-transplant sera from 975 kidney transplant recipients were tested for antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens and these antibodies were further classified based on their ability to fix c1q. Thirty percent of patients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, or MICA antigens. Among them, 8.5% and 21.5% of all patients had c1q-fixing and non c1q-fixing antibodies respectively. There was no significant difference on graft survival between patients with or without antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA. However, when these antibodies were further classified according to their ability to fix c1q, patients with c1q-fixing antibodies had a significantly lower graft survival rate than patients without antibodies or patients with non c1q-fixing antibodies (p=0.008). In 169 patients who lost renal grafts, 44% of them had c1q-fixing antibodies against denatured HLA/MICA antigens, which was significantly higher than that in patients with functioning renal transplants (25%, pantibodies were more significantly associated with graft failure caused by AMR (72.73%) or mixed AMR/CMR (61.9%) as compared to failure due to CMR (35.3%) or other causes (39.2%) (p=0.026). Transplant recipients had antibodies against denatured HLA class I, II, and MICA antigens. However, only c1q-fixing antibodies were associated with graft failure which was related to antibody mediated rejection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Generation of HER2 monoclonal antibodies using epitopes of a rabbit polyclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2014-01-25

    One of the issues in using polyclonal antibodies is the limited amount of reagent available from an immunisation, leading to batch-to-batch variation and difficulties in obtaining the same antibody performance when the same antigen is re-immunised into several separate animals. This led to the development of hybridoma technology allowing, at least theoretically, for an unlimited production of a specific binder. Nevertheless, polyclonal antibodies are widely used in research and diagnostics and there exists a need for robust methods to convert a polyclonal antibody with good binding performance into a renewable monoclonal with identical or similar binding specificity. Here we have used precise information regarding the functional recognition sequence (epitope) of a rabbit polyclonal antibody with attractive binding characteristics as the basis for generation of a renewable mouse monoclonal antibody. First, the original protein fragment antigen was used for immunisation and generation of mouse hybridoma, without obtaining binders to the same epitope region. Instead a peptide designed using the functional epitope and structural information was synthesised and used for hybridoma production. Several of the monoclonal antibodies generated were found to have similar binding characteristics to those of the original polyclonal antibody. These monoclonal antibodies detected native HER2 on cell lines and were also able to stain HER2 in immunohistochemistry using xenografted mice, as well as human normal and cancer tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. [Construction of human phage antibody library and screening for human monoclonal antibodies of amylin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian; Li, Chang-ying; Chang, Ji-wu; Zhu, Tie-hong

    2012-06-01

    To screen monoclonal antibodies to amylin from a constructed human phage antibody library and identify their antigenic specificity and combining activities. The heavy chain Fd fragment and light chain of human immunoglobulin genes were amplified from peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors using RT-PCR, and then inserted into phagemid pComb3XSS to generate a human phage antibody library. The insertion of light chain or heavy chain Fd genes were identified by PCR after the digestion of Sac I, Xba I, Xho Iand Spe I. One of positive clones was analyzed by DNA sequencing. The specific anti-amylin clones were screened from antibody library against human amylin antigens and then the positive clones were determined by Phage-ELISA analysis. A Fab phage antibody library with 0.8×10(8); members was constructed with the efficacy of about 70%. DNA sequence analysis indicated V(H); gene belonged to V(H);3 gene family and V(λ); gene belonged to the V(λ); gene family. Using human amylin as panning antigen, specific anti-amylin Fab antibodies were enriched by screening the library for three times. Phage-ELISA assay showed the positive clones had very good specificity to amylin antigen. The successful construction of a phage antibody library and the identification of anti-amylin Fab antibodies provide a basis for further study and preparation of human anti-amylin antibodies.

  18. Microangiopathic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex IgM antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yumi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    Herein we describe a case of microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome (MAPS) due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) IgM antibody successfully treated with rituximab. A significant correlation was observed between the clinical course and the aPS/PT IgM antibody titer, which can rise earlier before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Rituximab can be safely and effectively used for MAPS. Although detection of only aPS/PT IgM antibody is rare, aPS/PT IgM antibody might be associated with the pathogenesis of MAPS and might be a useful marker of disease activity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  19. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Kügler, Jonas; Wilke, Sonja; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antibody phage display is the most commonly used in vitro selection technology and has yielded thousands of useful antibodies for research, diagnostics, and therapy.The prerequisite for successful generation and development of human recombinant antibodies using phage display is the construction of a high-quality antibody gene library. Here, we describe the methods for the construction of human immune and naive scFv gene libraries.The success also depends on the panning strategy for the selection of binders from these libraries. In this article, we describe a panning strategy that is high-throughput compatible and allows parallel selection in microtiter plates.

  20. Lichen planus, liver kidney microsomal (LKM1) antibodies and hepatitis C virus antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divano, M C; Parodi, A; Rebora, A

    1992-01-01

    No anti-liver kidney microsomal (LKM1) antibodies were detected in 46 patients with LP, 16 of whom had also a chronic liver disease (CLD). In contrast, anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibodies were found in 10% of patients with LP and in 50% of those with LP and CLD. Anti-HCV antibodies may be considered as a false-positive reaction in 56% of cases, especially when anti-LKM1 antibodies are present. Our findings do not support such a hypothesis, but suggest that CLD in LP patients is, at least in Italy, mostly a postviral chronic active hepatitis.

  1. Boosting antibody developability through rational sequence optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeliger, Daniel; Schulz, Patrick; Litzenburger, Tobias; Spitz, Julia; Hoerer, Stefan; Blech, Michaela; Enenkel, Barbara; Studts, Joey M; Garidel, Patrick; Karow, Anne R

    2015-01-01

    The application of monoclonal antibodies as commercial therapeutics poses substantial demands on stability and properties of an antibody. Therapeutic molecules that exhibit favorable properties increase the success rate in development. However, it is not yet fully understood how the protein sequences of an antibody translates into favorable in vitro molecule properties. In this work, computational design strategies based on heuristic sequence analysis were used to systematically modify an antibody that exhibited a tendency to precipitation in vitro. The resulting series of closely related antibodies showed improved stability as assessed by biophysical methods and long-term stability experiments. As a notable observation, expression levels also improved in comparison with the wild-type candidate. The methods employed to optimize the protein sequences, as well as the biophysical data used to determine the effect on stability under conditions commonly used in the formulation of therapeutic proteins, are described. Together, the experimental and computational data led to consistent conclusions regarding the effect of the introduced mutations. Our approach exemplifies how computational methods can be used to guide antibody optimization for increased stability.

  2. Antibody-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arruebo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way into the fields of Biotechnology and Medicine. Nanoparticles by themselves offer specific physicochemical properties that they do not exhibit in bulk form, where materials show constant physical properties regardless of size. Antibodies are nanosize biological products that are part of the specific immune system. In addition to their own properties as pathogens or toxin neutralizers, as well as in the recruitment of immune elements (complement, improving phagocytosis, cytotoxicity antibody dependent by natural killer cells, etc., they could carry several elements (toxins, drugs, fluorochroms, or even nanoparticles, etc. and be used in several diagnostic procedures, or even in therapy to destroy a specific target. The conjugation of antibodies to nanoparticles can generate a product that combines the properties of both. For example, they can combine the small size of nanoparticles and their special thermal, imaging, drug carrier, or magnetic characteristics with the abilities of antibodies, such as specific and selective recognition. The hybrid product will show versatility and specificity. In this review, we analyse both antibodies and nanoparticles, focusing especially on the recent developments for antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, offering the researcher an overview of the different applications and possibilities of these hybrid carriers.

  3. Anti-glucagon antibodies in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gergely, A; Koranyi, L; Halmos, T; Zsombok, M; Peterfy, F; Csizer, Z; Salamon, F; Tako, J

    1973-01-01

    Anti-insulin antibodies appear in the sera of patients treated with insulin lastingly. A high anti-insulin antibody level results in the development of insulin resistance. Most of the insulin preparations available on the market contain also glucagon as an impurity. It was therefore to be expected that in part of the patients, who had been treated with insulin lastingly, antibodies would be produced also against glucagon, and the presence of these was actually demonstrated. It is to be assumed that the anti-glucagon antibodies play a role in the pathomechanism of diabetes mellitus, mainly in its labile form. The possible presence of anti-glucagon antibodies must be taken into account when the glucagon concentration in the sera of diabetics is to be determined by means of radioimmunoassay (RIA). The specific antibodies in the serum give false results in the quantitative determination of glucagon. We have tested the sera of 10 diabetics who had been treated with insulin for at least 6 years. All patients were given protamine zinc and crystalline insulin preparations.

  4. Decay of maternal antibodies in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Mahmoud, Kamel

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the decay rate of maternal antibodies against major broiler chicken pathogens. A total of 30 one-day-old broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and reared in isolation. These chicks were retrieved from a parent flock that received a routine vaccination program. Chicks were bled at hatch and sequentially thereafter every 5 d through 30 d of age. Maternal antibody titers were measured by ELISA for avian encephalomyelitis (AEV), avian influenza virus (AIV), chicken anemia virus (CAV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), and reovirus (Reo). Maternal antibody titers for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition test. Half-life estimates of maternal antibody titers were 5.3, 4.2, 7, 5.1, 3.9, 3.8, 4.9, 4.1, 6.3, and 4.7 d for AEV, AIV, CAV, IBDV, IBV, ILTV, MG, MS, NDV, and Reo, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences among half-lives of maternal antibody titers against certain pathogens. Furthermore, all maternal antibody titers were depleted by 10 d of age except for IBDV.

  5. Metabolomics reveals distinct, antibody-independent, molecular signatures of MS, AQP4-antibody and MOG-antibody disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurynczyk, Maciej; Probert, Fay; Yeo, Tianrong; Tackley, George; Claridge, Tim D W; Cavey, Ana; Woodhall, Mark R; Arora, Siddharth; Winkler, Torsten; Schiffer, Eric; Vincent, Angela; DeLuca, Gabriele; Sibson, Nicola R; Isabel Leite, M; Waters, Patrick; Anthony, Daniel C; Palace, Jacqueline

    2017-12-06

    The overlapping clinical features of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), aquaporin-4 (AQP4)-antibody (Ab) neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-Ab disease mean that detection of disease specific serum antibodies is the gold standard in diagnostics. However, antibody levels are not prognostic and may become undetectable after treatment or during remission. Therefore, there is still a need to discover antibody-independent biomarkers. We sought to discover whether plasma metabolic profiling could provide biomarkers of these three diseases and explore if the metabolic differences are independent of antibody titre. Plasma samples from 108 patients (34 RRMS, 54 AQP4-Ab NMOSD, and 20 MOG-Ab disease) were analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy followed by lipoprotein profiling. Orthogonal partial-least squares discriminatory analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify significant differences in the plasma metabolite concentrations and produce models (mathematical algorithms) capable of identifying these diseases. In all instances, the models were highly discriminatory, with a distinct metabolite pattern identified for each disease. In addition, OPLS-DA identified AQP4-Ab NMOSD patient samples with low/undetectable antibody levels with an accuracy of 92%. The AQP4-Ab NMOSD metabolic profile was characterised by decreased levels of scyllo-inositol and small high density lipoprotein particles along with an increase in large low density lipoprotein particles relative to both RRMS and MOG-Ab disease. RRMS plasma exhibited increased histidine and glucose, along with decreased lactate, alanine, and large high density lipoproteins while MOG-Ab disease plasma was defined by increases in formate and leucine coupled with decreased myo-inositol. Despite overlap in clinical measures in these three diseases, the distinct plasma metabolic patterns support their distinct serological profiles and confirm that these

  6. Antibody Scientific Committee | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Antibody Scientific Committee provides scientific insight and guidance to the NCI's Antibody Characterization Program. Specifically, the members of this committee evaluate request from the external scientific community for development and characterization of antibodies by the program. The members of the Antibody Scientific Committee include:

  7. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular nuclear...

  8. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  9. Trastuzumab mediates antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and phagocytosis to the same extent in both adjuvant and metastatic HER2/neu breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricevic, Branka; Laengle, Johannes; Singer, Josef; Sachet, Monika; Fazekas, Judit; Steger, Guenther; Bartsch, Rupert; Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Bergmann, Michael

    2013-12-12

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb), such as trastuzumab are a valuable addition to breast cancer therapy. Data obtained from neoadjuvant settings revealed that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a major mechanism of action for the mAb trastuzumab. Conflicting results still call into question whether disease progression, prolonged treatment or concomitant chemotherapy influences ADCC and related immunological phenomena. We analyzed the activity of ADCC and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) positive breast cancer patients receiving trastuzumab therapy either in an adjuvant (n = 13) or metastatic (n = 15) setting as well as from trastuzumab treatment-naive (t-naive) HER2/neu negative patients (n = 15). PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 24) were used as controls. ADCC and ADCP activity was correlated with the expression of antibody binding Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR)I (CD64), FcγRII (CD32) and FcγRIII (CD16) on CD14+ (monocytes) and CD56+ (NK) cells, as well as the expression of CD107a+ (LAMP-1) on CD56+ cells and the total amount of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ (Treg) cells. In metastatic patients, markers were correlated with progression-free survival (PFS). ADCC activity was significantly down regulated in metastatic, adjuvant and t-naive patient cohorts as compared to healthy controls. Reduced ADCC activity was inversely correlated with the expression of CD107a on CD56+ cells in adjuvant patients. ADCC and ADCP activity of the patient cohorts were similar, regardless of treatment duration or additional chemotherapy. PFS in metastatic patients inversely correlated with the number of peripheral Treg cells. The reduction of ADCC in patients as compared to healthy controls calls for adjuvant strategies, such as immune-enhancing agents, to improve the activity of trastuzumab. However, efficacy of trastuzumab-specific ADCC and ADCP appears not to

  10. Choice of radionuclide for antibody labelling: new perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazra, D.K.; Dass, S.

    1983-01-01

    The expanding horizons of labelled antibody techniques in diagnostic imaging or assay, therapy and research and the availabilities of monoclonal antibodies is resulting in a demand for suitable radionuclides as antibody labels. An outline is given of the different criteria for choosing an appropriate radionuclide for labelling an antibody depending on its particular field of use. The requirements of procedures for firmly linking radionuclides to antibodies are also given. (U.K.)

  11. Stability of rhenium-188 labeled antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, B. K.; Jung, J. M.; Jung, J. K.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    For clinical application of beta-emitter labeled antibody, high specific activity is important. Carrier-free Re-188 from W-188/Re-188 generator is an ideal radionuclide for this purpose. However, low stability of Re-188 labeled antibody, especially in high specific activity, due to radiolytic decomposition by high energy (2.1 MeV) beta ray was problem. We studied the stability of Re-188 labeled antibody, and stabilizing effect of several nontoxic radical-quenching agents. Pre-reduced monoclonal antibody (CEA79.4) was labeled with Re-188 by incubating with generator-eluted Re-188-perrhenate in the presence of stannous tartrate for 2 hr at room temperature. Radiochemical purity of each preparation was determined by chromatography (ITLC-SG/acetone, ITLC-SG/Umezawa, Whatman No.1/saline). Human serum albumin was added to the labeled antibodies(2%). Stability of Re-188-CEA79.4 was investigated in the presence of vitamin C, ethanol, or Tween 80 as radical-quenching agents. Specific activities of 4.29∼5.11 MBq/μg were obtained. Labeling efficiencies were 88±4%(n=12). Very low stability after removal of stannous tartrate from the preparation was observed. If stored after purging with N 2 , all the preparations were stable for 10 hr. However, if contacted with air, stability decreased. Perrhenate and Re-188-tartrate was major impurity in declined preparation (12∼47 and 9∼38% each, after 10 hr). Colloid-formation was not a significant problem in all cases. Addition of vitamin C stabilized the labeled antibodies either under N 2 or under air by reducing the formation of perrhenate. High specific activity Re-188 labeled antibody is unstable, especially, in the presence of oxygen. Addition of vitamin C increased the stability

  12. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell

  13. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan; Choe, MuHyeon

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G 4 S) between the Fab fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38] 2 ) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.

  14. Immunogenicity of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies - toward improved methods of anti-antibody measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarden, Lucien; Ruuls, Sigrid R.; Wolbink, Gertjan

    2008-01-01

    To date, millions of people have been treated with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (TmAbs) for various indications. It is becoming increasingly clear that TmAbs can be immunogenic, which may reduce efficacy or induce adverse effects. Over the years, the importance of antibody formation has been

  15. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody