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Sample records for anti-homocysteic acid antibody

  1. Treatment of Alzheimer's disease with anti-homocysteic acid antibody in 3xTg-AD male mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tohru Hasegawa

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disorder with dementia, the exact pathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. We previously reported that homocysteic acid (HA may be one of the pathological biomarkers in the brain with AD and that the increased levels of HA may induce the accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid-beta (Abeta peptides. In this study, we further investigated the pathological role of HA in a mouse model of AD. Four-month-old prepathological 3xTg-AD mice exhibited higher levels of HA in the hippocampus than did age-matched nontransgenic mice, suggesting that HA accumulation may precede both Abeta and tau pathologies. We then fed 3-month-old 3xTg-AD mice with vitamin B6-deficient food for 3 weeks to increase the HA levels in the brain. Concomitantly, mice received either saline or anti-HA antibody intraventricularly via a guide cannula every 3 days during the course of the B6-deficient diet. We found that mice that received anti-HA antibody significantly resisted cognitive impairment induced by vitamin B6 deficiency and that AD-related pathological changes in their brains was attenuated compared with the saline-injected control group. A similar neuroprotective effect was observed in 12-month-old 3xTg-AD mice that received anti-HA antibody injections while receiving the regular diet. We conclude that increased brain HA triggers memory impairment and that this condition deteriorates with amyloid and leads to subsequent neurodegeneration in mouse models of AD.

  2. Treatment of Alzheimer's disease with anti-homocysteic acid antibody in 3xTg-AD male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tohru; Mikoda, Nobuyuki; Kitazawa, Masashi; LaFerla, Frank M

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disorder with dementia, the exact pathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. We previously reported that homocysteic acid (HA) may be one of the pathological biomarkers in the brain with AD and that the increased levels of HA may induce the accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. In this study, we further investigated the pathological role of HA in a mouse model of AD. Four-month-old prepathological 3xTg-AD mice exhibited higher levels of HA in the hippocampus than did age-matched nontransgenic mice, suggesting that HA accumulation may precede both Abeta and tau pathologies. We then fed 3-month-old 3xTg-AD mice with vitamin B6-deficient food for 3 weeks to increase the HA levels in the brain. Concomitantly, mice received either saline or anti-HA antibody intraventricularly via a guide cannula every 3 days during the course of the B6-deficient diet. We found that mice that received anti-HA antibody significantly resisted cognitive impairment induced by vitamin B6 deficiency and that AD-related pathological changes in their brains was attenuated compared with the saline-injected control group. A similar neuroprotective effect was observed in 12-month-old 3xTg-AD mice that received anti-HA antibody injections while receiving the regular diet. We conclude that increased brain HA triggers memory impairment and that this condition deteriorates with amyloid and leads to subsequent neurodegeneration in mouse models of AD. PMID:20098691

  3. Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease with Anti-Homocysteic Acid Antibody in 3xTg-AD Male Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Tohru Hasegawa; Nobuyuki Mikoda; Masashi Kitazawa; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated progressive neurodegenerative disorder with dementia, the exact pathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. We previously reported that homocysteic acid (HA) may be one of the pathological biomarkers in the brain with AD and that the increased levels of HA may induce the accumulation of intraneuronal amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptides. In this study, we further investigated the pathological role of HA in a mouse model of AD. Four-month-old prepathol...

  4. Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure Suppresses T-independent Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to  3.75mg/kg of perfluoroocatnoic acid (PFOA) for 15d suppresses T-dependent antibody responses (TDAR), suggesting that T helper cells and/or B cells/plasma cells may be impacted. This study evaluated effects of PFOA exposure on the T cell-independent antibody response...

  5. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positive neurological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohid, Hassaan

    2016-07-01

    A rare kind of antibody, known as anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) autoantibody, is found in some patients. The antibody works against the GAD enzyme, which is essential in the formation of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), an inhibitory neurotransmitter found in the brain. Patients found with this antibody present with motor and cognitive problems due to low levels or lack of GABA, because in the absence or low levels of GABA patients exhibit motor and cognitive symptoms. The anti-GAD antibody is found in some neurological syndromes, including stiff-person syndrome, paraneoplastic stiff-person syndrome, Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), limbic encephalopathy, cerebellar ataxia, eye movement disorders, and epilepsy. Previously, excluding MFS, these conditions were calledhyperexcitability disorders. However, collectively, these syndromes should be known as "anti-GAD positive neurological syndromes." An important limitation of this study is that the literature is lacking on the subject, and why patients with the above mentioned neurological problems present with different symptoms has not been studied in detail. Therefore, it is recommended that more research is conducted on this subject to obtain a better and deeper understanding of these anti-GAD antibody induced neurological syndromes. PMID:27356651

  6. Computational structural analysis of an anti-l-amino acid antibody and inversion of its stereoselectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Ranieri, Daniel I.; Hofstetter, Heike; Hofstetter, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    The binding site of a monoclonal anti-l-amino acid antibody was modeled using the program SWISS-MODEL. Docking experiments with the enantiomers of phenylalanine revealed that the antibody interacts with l-phenylalanine via hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts, whereas the d-enantiomer is rejected due to steric hindrance. Comparison of the sequences of this antibody and an anti-d-amino acid antibody indicates that both immunoglobulins derived from the same germline progenitor. Substitution ...

  7. "Clickable" LNA/DNA probes for fluorescence sensing of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna S; Gupta, Pankaj; Wengel, Jesper; Astakhova, I Kira

    2013-01-01

    Herein we describe fluorescent oligonucleotides prepared by click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA) strands and a series of fluorescent azides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies.......Herein we describe fluorescent oligonucleotides prepared by click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA) strands and a series of fluorescent azides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies....

  8. ANTI DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID AND ANTINUCLEAR ANTIGEN ANTIBODIES IN GRAVES’ DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    H. Mostafavi

    2005-01-01

    Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by presence of antibodies directed against thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor or nearby region. Other serological abnormalities like antibodies to double stranded DNA (ds–DNA) and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) have also been observed. We studied antibodies to ds-DNA and ANA in our patients with Graves’ disease and compared them with control group. Sera of 84 patients (29 males, 55 females) with diagnosis of Graves’ disease were pr...

  9. ANTI DEOXYRIBONUCLEIC ACID AND ANTINUCLEAR ANTIGEN ANTIBODIES IN GRAVES’ DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mostafavi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Graves’ disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by presence of antibodies directed against thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH receptor or nearby region. Other serological abnormalities like antibodies to double stranded DNA (ds–DNA and antinuclear antibodies (ANA have also been observed. We studied antibodies to ds-DNA and ANA in our patients with Graves’ disease and compared them with control group. Sera of 84 patients (29 males, 55 females with diagnosis of Graves’ disease were prepared and level of antibodies to ds-DNA and ANA were measured and compared with 41 healthy persons (15 males, 26 females. The level of antibodies to ds-DNA and ANA in patients and control group did not show any significant difference. Our results were different from other studies in other countries. The difference may be explained by difference in our method of antibody measurement or genetic background which needs to be confirmed by HLA studies of our population.

  10. Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  11. Antibody-Specific Model of Amino Acid Substitution for Immunological Inferences from Alignments of Antibody Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, hig...

  12. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

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    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  13. In vivo detection of prostatic carcinoma with antibodies against prostatic acid phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serum prostatic acid phosphates (PAP) immunoassay is used to evaluate patients with prostatic carcinoma; however, as with other tumor markers, the enzyme levels do not necessarily reflect the presence or extent of tumor. The authors investigated the use of radiolabeled PAP antibodies for the in vivo detection of prostatic carcinoma by external scintillation imaging. Nine patients with prostatic carcinoma were entered into the study. Each received from 2.0 to 2.5 mCi of I-131 labeled antibody to PAP, administered i.v. The immunogen (PAP) was purified from normal human seminal fluid. Antiserum was prepared in rabbits by injecting the purified PAP. The antibodies were labeled with I-131 by chloramine-T method (10 to 20 Ci/g of IgG). Total body images were obtained at 24 and 48 hrs following administration of the labeled antibody. Nontarget I-131 activity was diminished by computer processing. Tumor sites detected by I-131 antibodies were correlated with other diagnostic procedures. In 7 of 9 patients primary and metastatic sites of cancer were detected by antibody imaging, however, no bone lesions were detected (6 cases). In 3 patients with concomitant pulmonary tumors, one was identified as of prostate origin. The serum PAP was normal in 4 patients; however, the primary tumor was identified in 3 of these. These findings suggest that the localization of prostatic carcinoma by means of in-vivo imaging of labeled antibodies to PAP is feasible and offers diagnostic opportunities based upon the functional characteristics

  14. Gamma-aminobutyric-acid-B receptor antibodies in limbic encephalitis with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Qin Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis associated with antibodies to gamma-aminobutyric-acid B (GABA-B is a subgroup of autoimmune synaptic encephalitis with typical features of limbic encephalitis and small cell lung cancer (SCLC. We report a case of anti-GABA-B receptor encephalitis in a 57-year-old man who presented with seizures, memory loss, and abnormal behavior. He developed partially neurological responses to immunotherapy, but refused comprehensive tumor screening. The symptoms were aggravated again 4 months later. Workup showed antibodies to GABA-B receptors and tumor screening revealed SCLC. It highlights the importance of early screening of underlying tumor and anti-tumor treatment in paraneoplastic cases.

  15. Clinical value of antibodies to lysobisphosphatidic acid in patients with primary antiphospholipid sindrome

    OpenAIRE

    S. Giunco; S. Cuffaro; E. Salvan; A. Cavazzana; A. Bontadi; A. Ruffatti; Olivieri, S.; L. Punzi

    2011-01-01

    To assess the clinical value of anti-lysobisphosphatidic acid (anti-LBPA) antibodies in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), the sera of 140 primary APS patients were tested and compared with those of 70 control subjects affected with rheumatic systemic diseases (n. 24) or autoimmune thyroiditis (n. 46). Anti-LBPA anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-β2 Glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI) antibodies were determined using a “home made” ELISA method. Lupus anticoagulant (LA) was assessed us...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies targeted to alpha-oligonucleotides. Characterisation and application in nucleic acid detection.

    OpenAIRE

    Cros, P.; Kurfürst, R; Allibert, P; Battail, N; Piga, N; Roig, V; Thuong, N T; Mandrand, B; Hélène, C

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the antigenicity of alpha-deoxyribonucleotides in order to develop a new tool for the detection of nucleic acid sequences for use in diagnostic applications. We describe four monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) which recognize alpha-deoxyribonucleotides. Two were raised against a poly(alpha-dT) sequence and specifically recognized the alpha-dT nucleotide. Two were raised against a sequence containing all four common nucleotides as alpha-nucleotides and, surpr...

  17. Production of anti-Gordonia amarae mycolic acid polyclonal antibody for detection of mycolic acid-containing bacteria in activated sludge foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahori, K; Miyata, N; Takata, N; Morisada, S; Mochizuki, T

    2001-01-01

    Mycolic acid-containing actinomycetes (mycolata) are considered the causative agents of foaming of activated sludge and scum formation in activated sludge treatment plants. In this study, the production of anti-Gordonia amarae mycolic acid polyclonal antibodies was investigated. Rabbits were immunized with a conjugate of keyhole limpet hemocyanin and mycolic acids of G. amarae, which contained 48 to 56 carbon atoms (average, 52.0). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) demonstrated that the polyclonal antibodies could recognize cells of G. amarae ranging from 0.1 to 10 microg. The antibodies also reacted with other tested mycolata strains belonging to the genera Nocardia, Rhodococcus, Dietzia, Mycobacterium and Tsukamurella. However, reactivities against other gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria not containing mycolic acid were negligible or much lower. The results indicate that the anti-G. amarae mycolic acid antibodies show a reactivity selective for a group of mycolata involved in the foaming of activated sludge. PMID:16233121

  18. Intrathecal-specific glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies at low titers in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Chu, Kon; Byun, Jung-Ick; Moon, Jangsup; Lim, Jung-Ah; Kim, Tae-Joon; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Park, Kyung-Il; Jeon, Daejong; Jung, Ki-Young; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun

    2016-01-15

    Autoantibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (Gad-Abs) are implicated in various neurological syndromes. The present study aims to identify intrathecal-specific GAD-Abs and to determine clinical manifestations and treatment outcomes. Nineteen patients had GAD-Abs in cerebrospinal fluid but not in paired serum samples. Neurological syndromes included limbic encephalitis, temporal lobe epilepsy, cerebellar ataxia, autonomic dysfunction, and stiff-person syndrome. Immunotherapy had beneficial effects in 57.1% of patients, and the patients with limbic encephalitis responded especially well to immunotherapy. Intrathecal-specific antibodies to GAD at low titers may appear as nonspecific markers of immune activation within the central nervous system rather than pathogenic antibodies causing neuronal dysfunction. PMID:26711563

  19. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Torkashvand

    Full Text Available Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44 cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  20. Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-positive paraneoplastic stiff limb syndrome associated with carcinoma of the breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Pankaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stiff limb syndrome (SLS is a rare "focal" variant of stiff person syndrome which presents with rigidity and painful spasms of a distal limb, and abnormal fixed foot or hand postures. Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Ab are variably present in most cases. Most reported cases of SLS are unassociated with cancer. We describe a patient with SLS as a paraneoplastic manifestation of breast carcinoma, in whom GAD-Ab was present. The patient responded very well to oral diazepam, baclofen and steroids.This is the third reported case of SLS as a paraneoplastic accompaniment to cancer.

  1. Detection of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in acid mine environments by indirect fluorescent antibody staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, W A; Dugan, P R; Filppi, J A; Rheins, M S

    1976-07-01

    An indirect fluorescent antibody (FA) staining technique was developed for the rapid detection of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. The specificity of the FA stain for T. ferrooxidans was demonstrated with both laboratory and environmental samples. Coal refuse examined by scanning electron microscopy exhibited a rough, porous surface, which was characteristically covered by water-soluble crystals. Significant numbers of T. ferrooxidans were detected in the refuse pores. A positive correlation between numbers of T. ferrooxidans and acid production in coal refuse in the laboratory was demonstrated with the FA technique. PMID:61736

  2. A Tat-grafted anti-nucleic acid antibody acquires nuclear-localization property and a preference for TAR RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We generate 'H3Tat-3D8' by grafting Tat48-60 peptide to VH CDR of 3D8 scFv antibody. → H3Tat-3D8 antibody retains nucleic acid binding and hydrolyzing activities. → H3Tat-3D8 acquires a preference for TAR RNA structure. → Properties of Tat48-60 is transferred to an antibody via Tat-grafting into a CDR. -- Abstract: The 3D8 single chain variable fragment (3D8 scFv) is an anti-nucleic acid antibody that can hydrolyze nucleic acids and enter the cytosol of cells without reaching the nucleus. The Tat peptide, derived from the basic region of the HIV-1 Tat protein, translocates to cell nuclei and has TAR RNA binding activity. In this study, we generated a Tat-grafted antibody (H3Tat-3D8) by replacing complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) within the VH domain of the 3D8 scFv with a Tat48-60 peptide (GRKKRRQRRRPPQ). H3Tat-3D8 retained the DNA-binding and DNA-hydrolyzing activity of the scFv, and translocated to the nuclei of HeLa cells and preferentially recognized TAR RNA. Thus, the properties associated with the Tat peptide were transferred to the antibody via Tat-grafting without loss of the intrinsic DNA-binding and hydrolyzing activities of the 3D8 scFv antibody.

  3. Synthetic LNA/DNA nano-scaffolds for highly efficient diagnostics of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, Irina Kira

    2014-01-01

    Herein novel fluorescent oligonucleotides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies (autoantibodies) are described. The probes are prepared by highly efficient copper-catalyzed click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA) str...

  4. Anti-lysobisphosphatidic acid antibodies in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, C; Bombardieri, M; Di Prospero, L; Conigliaro, P; Conti, F; Labbadia, G; Misasi, R; Sorice, M; Valesini, G

    2005-04-01

    Lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid (LBPA) is a novel antigenic target in anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) and antibodies directed against LBPA (aLBPA) have been detected in sera from APS patients. In this study we first evaluated aLBPA in comparison with the most widely used methods (i.e. anticardiolipin [(aCL)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)] and antibeta-2-glycoprotein-I antibodies (abeta(2)-GPI-ELISA) utilized to detect antiphospholipid antibodies in patients with primary or secondary APS, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic HCV infection and healthy subjects. We then assessed the relationship between aLBPA, lupus anticoagulant (LAC) and the main clinical manifestations of APS. Finally, we evaluated the presence of 'pure' (i.e. beta(2)-GPI-independent) aLBPA in patients with APS and controls. The results indicate that aLBPA as well as abeta(2)-GPI display higher specificity but lower sensitivity for APS compared to aCL. Moreover, serum aLBPA correlate closely with aCL and abeta(2)-GPI in APS patients and are strictly associated with LAC positivity. We demonstrate that beta(2)-GPI binds to LBPA with affinity similar to CL, and antibodies able to react with phosholipid-protein complex exist; however, 'pure' aLBPA can also be detected in sera of APS patients. Altogether these data confirm that LBPA may be an antigenic target in APS and that aLBPA are serological markers of APS with similar sensitivity and specificity compared to abeta(2)-GPI. However, the clinical utility of aLBPA detection alone or in combination with aCL and/or abeta(2)-GPI remains to be elucidated in larger and longitudinal studies. PMID:15762889

  5. Amino acid consumption in naïve and recombinant CHO cell cultures: producers of a monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Carrillo-Cocom, L. M.; Genel-Rey, T.; Araíz-Hernández, D.; López-Pacheco, F.; López-Meza, J.; Rocha-Pizaña, M. R.; Ramírez-Medrano, A.; Alvarez, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    Most commercial media for mammalian cell culture are designed to satisfy the amino acid requirements for cell growth, but not necessarily those for recombinant protein production. In this study, we analyze the amino acid consumption pattern in naïve and recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures. The recombinant model we chose was a CHO-S cell line engineered to produce a monoclonal antibody. We report the cell concentration, product concentration, and amino acid concentration prof...

  6. Standardization of natural mycolic acid antigen composition and production for use in biomarker antibody detection to diagnose active tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlandla, F L; Ejoh, V; Stoltz, A C; Naicker, B; Cromarty, A D; van Wyngaardt, S; Khati, M; Rotherham, L S; Lemmer, Y; Niebuhr, J; Baumeister, C R; Al Dulayymi, J R; Swai, H; Baird, M S; Verschoor, J A

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is characterized by the abundance of species specific, antigenic cell wall lipids called mycolic acids. These wax-like molecules all share an identical, amphiphilic mycolic motif, but have different functional groups in a long hydrophobic hydrocarbon mero-chain that divide them into three main classes: alpha-, keto- and methoxy-mycolic acids. Whereas alpha-mycolic acids constitutively maintain an abundance of around 50%, the ratio of methoxy- to keto-mycolic acid types may vary depending on, among other things, the growth stage of M. tuberculosis. In human patients, antibodies to mycolic acids have shown potential as diagnostic serum biomarkers for active TB. Variations in mycolic acid composition affect the antigenic properties and can potentially compromise the precision of detection of anti-mycolic acids antibodies in patient sera to natural mixtures. We demonstrate this here with combinations of synthetic mycolic acid antigens, tested against TB patient and control sera. Combinations of methoxy- and α-mycolic acids are more antigenic than combinations of keto- and α-mycolic acids, showing the former to give a more sensitive test for TB biomarker antibodies. Natural mixtures of mycolic acids isolated from mature cultures of M. tuberculosis H37Rv give the same sensitivity as that with synthetic methoxy- and α-mycolic acids in combination, in a surface plasmon resonance inhibition biosensor test. To ensure that the antigenic activity of isolates of natural mycolic acids is reproducible, we cultured M. tuberculosis H37Rv on Middlebrook 7H10 solid agar plates to stationary growth phase in a standardized, optimal way. The proportions of mycolic acid classes in various batches of the isolates prepared from these cultures were compared to a commercially available natural mycolic acid isolate. LC-MS/MS and NMR data for quantitation of mycolic acids class compositions show that the variation in batches

  7. Coeliac disease: characterisation of monoclonal antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide corresponding to amino acid residues 206-217 of A-gliadin.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, H. J.; Doyle, A. P.; Sturgess, R P; Ciclitira, P J

    1992-01-01

    A dodecapeptide of A-gliadin, which shares amino acid homologies with the E1b protein of adenovirus 12, was used to produce murine monoclonal antibodies. Five monoclonal antibodies were produced and were screened by enzyme linked immunosorbant assay, immunodot assay, and immunoblotting. The antibodies were tested against whole wheat gliadin and its alpha, beta, gamma, and omega subfractions, and the prolamins of rye, barley, oats, maize, millet, rice, and sorghum. Four of the five antibodies ...

  8. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian;

    2015-01-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream proces...

  9. [Clinical value of antibodies to lysobisphosphatidic acid in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, S; Ruffatti, A; Bontadi, A; Cavazzana, A; Salvan, E; Cuffaro, S; Giunco, S; Punzi, L

    2010-01-01

    To assess the clinical value of anti-lysobisphosphatidic acid (anti-LBPA) antibodies in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), the sera of 140 primary APS patients were tested and compared with those of 70 control subjects affected with rheumatic systemic diseases (n. 24) or autoimmune thyroiditis (n. 46). Anti-LBPA anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-beta2 Glycoprotein I (anti-beta2GPI) antibodies were determined using a "home made" ELISA method. Lupus anticoagulant (LA) was assessed using a series of clotting tests in accordance with the literature. IgG anti-LBPA was significantly prevalent in primary APS (p=0.000) with a sensitivity of 58.6% and a specificity of 92.9%. IgM anti-LBPA showed a significant frequency in primary APS (p=0.000) with a sensitivity of 28.6% and a specificity of 97.1%. Anti-LBPA's sensitivity and specificity for APS were lower or equal to those of aCL and anti-beta2GPI. The prevalence of anti-LBPA in the different clinical and laboratory subsets of APS was lower than those of aCL and anti-beta2GPI. It is interesting to observe that both IgG and IgM anti-LBPA were never found alone. The comparison between anti-LBPA and LA showed that the former had a higher sensitivity but a lower specificity. In conclusion, in view of our results anti-LBPA cannot at present be considered a further tool to be utilized to diagnose APS and to differentiate the different clinical and laboratory subsets of this disease. PMID:20657887

  10. Clinical value of antibodies to lysobisphosphatidic acid in patients with primary antiphospholipid sindrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Giunco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available To assess the clinical value of anti-lysobisphosphatidic acid (anti-LBPA antibodies in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the sera of 140 primary APS patients were tested and compared with those of 70 control subjects affected with rheumatic systemic diseases (n. 24 or autoimmune thyroiditis (n. 46. Anti-LBPA anticardiolipin (aCL and anti-β2 Glycoprotein I (anti-β2GPI antibodies were determined using a “home made” ELISA method. Lupus anticoagulant (LA was assessed using a series of clotting tests in accordance with the literature. IgG anti-LBPA was significantly prevalent in primary APS (p=0.000 with a sensitivity of 58.6% and a specificity of 92.9%. IgM anti-LBPA showed a significant frequency in primary APS (p=0.000 with a sensitivity of 28.6% and a specificity of 97.1%. Anti-LBPA’s sensitivity and specificity for APS were lower or equal to those of aCL and anti-β2GPI. The prevalence of anti-LBPA in the different clinical and laboratory subsets of APS was lower than those of aCL and anti- β2GPI. It is interesting to observe that both IgG and IgM anti-LBPA were never found alone. The comparison between anti-LBPA and LA showed that the former had a higher sensitivity but a lower specificity. In conclusion, in view of our results anti-LBPA cannot at present be considered a further tool to be utilized to diagnose APS and to differentiate the different clinical and laboratory subsets of this disease.

  11. Anti-IL-17 Antibody Improves Hepatic Steatosis by Suppressing Interleukin-17-Related Fatty Acid Synthesis and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Weidong Shi; Qiang Zhu; Jian Gu; Xiaoshan Liu; Ling Lu; Xiaofeng Qian; Jian Shen; Feng Zhang; Guoqiang Li

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between interleukin-17 and proteins involved in fatty acid metabolism with respect to alcoholic liver disease, male ICR mice were randomized into five groups: control, alcoholic liver disease (ALD) at 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks, and anti-IL-17 antibody treated ALD. A proteomic approach was adopted to investigate changes in liver proteins between control and ALD groups. The proteomic analysis was performed by two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. S...

  12. Refractory status epilepticus and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in adults: presentation, treatment and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Ayaz M; Vines, Brannon L; Miller, David W; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Amara, Amy W

    2016-03-01

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD-Abs) have been implicated in refractory epilepsy. The association with refractory status epilepticus in adults has been rarely described. We discuss our experience in managing three adult patients who presented with refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. Case series with retrospective chart and literature review. Three patients without pre-existing epilepsy who presented to our institution with generalized seizures between 2013 and 2014 were identified. Seizures proved refractory to first and second-line therapies and persisted beyond 24 hours. Patient 1 was a 22-year-old female who had elevated serum GAD-Ab titres at 0.49 mmol/l (normal: partial seizure control. Patient 2 was a 61-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l. EEG showed persistent generalized periodic discharges despite maximized therapy with anticonvulsants but no immunotherapy, resulting in withdrawal of care and discharge to nursing home. Patient 3 was a 50-year-old black female whose serum GAD-Ab titre was 0.08 mmol/l, and was discovered to have pulmonary sarcoidosis. Treatment with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin resulted in seizure resolution. Due to the responsiveness to immunotherapy, there may be an association between GAD-Abs and refractory seizures, including refractory status epilepticus. Causation cannot be established since GAD-Abs may be elevated secondary to concurrent autoimmune diseases or formed de novo in response to GAD antigen exposure by neuronal injury. Based on this report and available literature, there may be a role for immuno- and chemotherapy in the management of refractory status epilepticus associated with GAD-Abs. PMID:26878120

  13. Oriented antibody immobilization to polystyrene macrocarriers for immunoassay modified with hydrazide derivatives of poly(methacrylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinokurova Ludmila G

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrophobic polystyrene is the most common material for solid phase immunoassay. Proteins are immobilized on polystyrene by passive adsorption, which often causes considerable denaturation. Biological macromolecules were found to better retain their functional activity when immobilized on hydrophilic materials. Polyacrylamide is a common material for solid-phase carriers of biological macromolecules, including immunoreagents used in affinity chromatography. New macroformats for immunoassay modified with activated polyacrylamide derivatives seem to be promising. Results New polymeric matrices for immunoassay in the form of 0.63-cm balls which contain hydrazide functional groups on hydrophilic polymer spacer arms at their surface shell are synthesized by modification of aldehyde-containing polystyrene balls with hydrazide derivatives of poly(methacrylic acid. The beads contain up to 0.31 μmol/cm2 active hydrazide groups accessible for covalent reaction with periodate-oxidized antibodies. The matrices obtained allow carrying out the oriented antibody immobilization, which increases the functional activity of immunosorbents. Conclusions An efficient site-directed antibody immobilization on a macrosupport is realized. The polymer hydrophilic spacer arms are the most convenient and effective tools for oriented antibody coupling with molded materials. The suggested scheme can be used for the modification of any other solid supports containing electrophilic groups reacting with hydrazides.

  14. Antibody-targeted horseradish peroxidase associated with indole-3-acetic acid induces apoptosis in vitro in hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmazzo, Leandro F F; Santana-Lemos, Bárbara A; Jácomo, Rafael H; Garcia, Aglair B; Rego, Eduardo M; da Fonseca, Luiz M; Falcão, Roberto P

    2011-05-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), when oxidized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP), is transformed into cytotoxic molecules capable of inducing cell injury. The aim of this study was to test if, by targeting hematopoietic tumors with HRP-conjugated antibodies in association with IAA treatment, there is induction of apoptosis. We used two lineages of hematologic tumors: NB4, derived from acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) and Granta-519 from mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). We also tested cells from 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and from 10 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). HRP targeting was performed with anti-CD33 or anti-CD19 antibodies (depending on the origin of the cell), followed by incubation with goat anti-mouse antibody conjugated with HRP. Eight experimental groups were analyzed: control, HRP targeted, HRP targeted and incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA, and cells not HRP targeted but incubated with 1, 5 and 10mM IAA. Apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry using annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide labeling. Results showed that apoptosis was dependent on the dose of IAA utilized, the duration of exposure to the prodrug and the origin of the neoplasia. Targeting HRP with antibodies was efficient in activating IAA and inducing apoptosis. PMID:21168913

  15. Nucleic Acid, Antibody, and Virus Culture Methods to Detect Xenotropic MLV-Related Virus in Human Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Kearney

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The MLV-related retrovirus, XMRV, was recently identified and reported to be associated with both prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome. At the National Cancer Institute-Frederick, MD (NCI-Frederick, we developed highly sensitive methods to detect XMRV nucleic acids, antibodies, and replication competent virus. Analysis of XMRV-spiked samples and/or specimens from two pigtail macaques experimentally inoculated with 22Rv1 cell-derived XMRV confirmed the ability of the assays used to detect XMRV RNA and DNA, and culture isolatable virus when present, along with XMRV reactive antibody responses. Using these assays, we did not detect evidence of XMRV in blood samples ( or prostate specimens ( from two independent cohorts of patients with prostate cancer. Previous studies detected XMRV in prostate tissues. In the present study, we primarily investigated the levels of XMRV in blood plasma samples collected from patients with prostate cancer. These results demonstrate that while XMRV-related assays developed at the NCI-Frederick can readily measure XMRV nucleic acids, antibodies, and replication competent virus, no evidence of XMRV was found in the blood of patients with prostate cancer.

  16. Limbic Encephalitis Associated with Anti-γ-aminobutyric Acid B Receptor Antibodies: A Case Series from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Zhi Guan; Hai-Tao Ren; Xun-Zhe Yang; Qiang Lu; Bin Peng; Yi-Cheng Zhu; Xiao-Qiu Shao

    2015-01-01

    Background: Autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies against γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor (GABABR) in patients with limbic encephalitis (LE) was first described in 2010.We present a series of Han Chinese patients for further clinical refinement.Methods: Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients referred to the program of encephalitis and paraneoplastic syndrome of Peking Union Medical College Hospital were tested with indirect immunofluorescence.Clinical information of patients with anti-GABABR antibody positivity was retrospectively reviewed, and descriptive statistical analysis was performed.Results: All eighteen anti-GABABR antibody-positive cases had limbic syndromes, and electroencephalogram (EEG) or neuroimaging evidence fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of LE.Four patients had additional antibodies against Hu in serum and one had anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antibody in both sera and CSE Seventeen (17/18) patients presented with new-onset refractory seizure or status epileptics.Twelve (12/18) patients had memory deficits, 11 (11/18) patients had personality change, 7 (7/18) patients had disturbance of consciousness, and 3 (3/18) patients showed cerebellar dysfunction.One patient with LE had progressive motor and sensory polyneuropathy.Lung cancer was detected in 6 (6/18) patients.Ten (10/18) patients showed abnormality in bilateral or unilateral mediotemporal region on magnetic resonance imaging.Ten (10/18) patients had temporal lobe epileptic activity with or without general slowing on EEG.Seventeen patients received immunotherapy and 15 of them showed neurological improvement.Four patients with lung cancer died within 1-12 months due to neoplastic complications.Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that most Han Chinese patients with anti-GABABR antibody-associated LE have prominent refractory epilepsy and show neurological improvement on immunotherapy.Patients with underlying lung tumor have a relatively poor prognosis

  17. Kinetic Characterisation of a Single Chain Antibody against the Hormone Abscisic Acid: Comparison with Its Parental Monoclonal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badescu, George O.; Marsh, Andrew; Smith, Timothy R.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Napier, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    A single-chain Fv fragment antibody (scFv) specific for the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been expressed in the bacterium Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. The kinetics of ABA binding have been measured using surface plasmon resonance spectrometry (BIAcore 2000) using surface and solution assays. Care was taken to calculate the concentration of active protein in each sample using initial rate measurements under conditions of partial mass transport limitation. The fusion product, parental monoclonal antibody and the free scFv all have low nanomolar affinity constants, but there is a lower dissociation rate constant for the parental monoclonal resulting in a three-fold greater affinity. Analogue specificity was tested and structure-activity binding preferences measured. The biologically-active (+)-ABA enantiomer is recognised with an affinity three orders of magnitude higher than the inactive (-)-ABA. Metabolites of ABA including phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid and deoxy-ABA have affinities over 100-fold lower than that for (+)-ABA. These properties of the scFv make it suitable as a sensor domain in bioreporters specific for the naturally occurring form of ABA. PMID:27023768

  18. Cost Savings Associated with Testing of Antibodies, Antigens, and Nucleic Acids for Diagnosis of Acute HIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Karris, Maile Y.; Anderson, Christy M.; Sheldon R. Morris; Smith, Davey M.; Little, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    Efforts to identify all persons infected with HIV in the United States are driven by the hope that early diagnosis will lower risk behaviors and decrease HIV transmission. Identification of HIV-infected people earlier in the course of their infection with HIV antigen/antibody (Ag/Ab) combination assays (4th-generation HIV assays) should help achieve this goal. We compared HIV RNA nucleic acid test (NAT) results to the results of a 4th-generation Ag/Ab assay (Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo [HIV Com...

  19. IGF2BP2 Alternative Variants Associated with Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies Negative Diabetes in Malaysian Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Salem, Sameer D.; Saif-Ali, Riyadh; Ismail, Ikram S.; Al-Hamodi, Zaid; Poh, Rozaida; Muniandy, Sekaran

    2012-01-01

    Background The association of Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2) common variants (rs4402960 and rs1470579) with type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been performed in different populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of alternative variants of IGF2BP2; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) negative diabetes in Malaysian Subjects. Methods/Principal Findings IGF2BP2; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 s...

  20. An antibody to de-N-acetyl sialic acid containing-polysialic acid identifies an intracellular antigen and induces apoptosis in human cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M Steirer

    Full Text Available Polysialic acid (PSA, an α2,8-linked homopolymer of N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac, is developmentally regulated and its expression is thought to be restricted to a few tissues in adults. Recently, we showed that two human pathogens expressed a derivative of PSA containing de-N-acetyl sialic acid residues (NeuPSA. Here we show that an epitope identified by the anti-NeuPSA monoclonal antibody, SEAM 3 (SEAM 3-reactive antigen or S3RA, is expressed in human melanomas, and also intracellularly in a human melanoma cell line (SK-MEL-28, a human T cell leukemia cell line (Jurkat, and two neuroblastoma cell lines (CHP-134 and SH-SY5Y. SEAM 3 binding induced apoptosis in the four cell lines tested. The unusual intracellular distribution of S3RA was similar to that described for the PSA polysialyltransferases, STX and PST, which are also expressed in the four cell lines used here. Interestingly, suppression of PST mRNA expression by transfection of SK-MEL-28 cells with PST-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA resulted in decreased SEAM 3 binding. The results suggest further studies of the utility of antibodies such as SEAM 3 as therapeutic agents for certain malignancies.

  1. Change of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody and protein tyrosine phosphatase antibody in Chinese patients with acute-onset type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAO Chen; HUANG Gan; LI Xia; YANG Lin; LIN Jian; JIN Ping; LUO Shuo-ming

    2013-01-01

    Background Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA) and protein tyrosine phosphatase antibody (IA-2A) are two major autoantibodies,which exert important roles in the process of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D).Our study aimed to investigate the changes in positivity and titers of GADA and IA-2A during the course of Chinese acute-onset T1D patients and their relationships with clinical features.Methods Two hundreds and forty-seven Chinese newly diagnosed acute-onset T1D patients were consecutively recruited.GADA and IA-2A were detected at the time of diagnosis,one year later,3-5 years later after diagnosis during the follow-up; all the clinical data were recorded and analyzed as well.Results During the course of acute-onset T1D,the majority of patients remained stable for GADA or IA-2A,however,a few patients changed from positivity to negativity and fewer patients converted from negativity to positivity.The prevalence of GADA was 56.3% at diagnosis,decreasing to 50.5% one year later,and 43.3% 3-5 years later while the corresponding prevalence of IA-2A were 32.8%,31.0% and 23.3%,respectively.The median GADA titers were 0.0825 at diagnosis,declining to 0.0585 one year later and 0.0383 3-5 years later (P <0.001),while the corresponding median titers were 0.0016,0.0010,0.0014 for IA-2A,respectively.Fasting C-peptide (FCP) and postprandial C-peptide 2 hours (PCP2h)levels of GADA or IA-2A negativity persistence patients were higher than those of positivity persistence and negativity conversion patients (P <0.05) which indicated GADA or IA-2A negativity persistence T1D patients had a less loss of β cell function.Conclusion Our data suggest that repeated detection of GADA and IA-2A are necessary for differential diagnosis of autoimmune diabetes and the indirect prediction of the β cell function in Chinese patients.

  2. Increased humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in growing pigs pre-treated with poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Kang, Ik-Jae; Kim, A-Reum; Noh, You-Sun; Chung, Hee-Chun; Park, Bong-Kyun

    2016-06-30

    This study was conducted to determine if humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine improved in 8-week-old growing pigs born to well-vaccinated sows pre-treated with 60 mg of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) three days before vaccination. Antibody against FMD virus serotype O was measured 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-vaccination, using a PrioCHECK FMDV type O ELISA kit. The results showed that positive antibody reactions against FMDV serotype O antigen among a component of the vaccine significantly increased in response to pre-injection with γ-PGA. PMID:26645341

  3. Increased humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease virus vaccine in growing pigs pre-treated with poly-γ-glutamic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Hoon; Kang, Ik-Jae; Kim, A-Reum; Noh, You-Sun; Chung, Hee-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine if humoral antibody response of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine improved in 8-week-old growing pigs born to well-vaccinated sows pre-treated with 60 mg of poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) three days before vaccination. Antibody against FMD virus serotype O was measured 0, 2, 4 and 6 weeks post-vaccination, using a PrioCHECK FMDV type O ELISA kit. The results showed that positive antibody reactions against FMDV serotype O antigen among a component of the vaccine significantly increased in response to pre-injection with γ-PGA. PMID:26645341

  4. Monoclonal antibodies directed against Leishmania secreted acid phosphatase and lipophosphoglycan. Partial characterization of private and public epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilg, T; Harbecke, D; Wiese, M; Overath, P

    1993-10-15

    Leishmania promastigotes, the stage of the parasite characteristic for the sandfly vector, express an abundant glycoconjugate, called lipophosphoglycan, at their surface. Lipophosphoglycan consists of lysoalkyl-sn-glycerophosphoinositol linked to a phosphosaccharide core conserved in all species, which is connected to PO4-6Gal beta 1,4Man alpha 1 repeats with species-specific substitutions at the Gal residue; the repeats are capped by conserved and species-specific oligosaccharides. Most Leishmania species also secrete an acid phosphatase, which, in Leishmania mexicana, is a filamentous complex composed of a phosphorylated glycoprotein and non-covalently associated proteo-(high-molecular-mass)phosphoglycan. The secreted acid phosphatase complex was used as an antigen to derive a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). A total of 25 mAbs (17 novel and 8 previously described) were tested by different techniques for their specificity against lipophosphoglycan and secreted acid phosphatase from several Leishmania species. This comparison and the modification of the antigens by chemical or enzymic treatments allowed a classification of the mAbs into several groups. First, from 25 mAbs examined, 22 recognize lipophosphoglycan and the enzyme complex of L. mexicana; only three are specific for secreted acid phosphatase. Two of the latter group are also directed against carbohydrate structures, whereas the third mAb recognizes the 100-kDa polypeptide of the complex. The secreted acid-phosphatase-specific class detects antigen in the flagellar pocket of promastigotes while all anti-lipophosphoglycan mAbs bind to the cell surface. Second, all 15 anti-lipophosphoglycan mAbs investigated in detail appear to be directed against the phosphosaccharide repeats or the cap structure rather than the phosphosaccharide core. Two mAbs recognize terminal cap-structures containing Man alpha 1,2Man residues. Four antibodies are specific for L. mexicana and are probably directed against PO4

  5. Production of a soluble single-chain variable fragment antibody against okadaic acid and exploration of its specific binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kuo; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Wang, Lixia; Du, Xinjun; Wei, Dong

    2016-06-15

    Okadaic acid is a lipophilic marine algal toxin commonly responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP). Outbreaks of DSP have been increasing and are of worldwide public health concern; therefore, there is a growing demand for more rapid, reliable, and economical analytical methods for the detection of this toxin. In this study, anti-okadaic acid single-chain variable fragment (scFv) genes were prepared by cloning heavy and light chain genes from hybridoma cells, followed by fusion of the chains via a linker peptide. An scFv-pLIP6/GN recombinant plasmid was constructed and transformed into Escherichia coli for expression, and the target scFv was identified with IC-CLEIA (chemiluminescent enzyme immunoassay). The IC15 was 0.012 ± 0.02 μg/L, and the IC50 was 0.25 ± 0.03 μg/L. The three-dimensional structure of the scFv was simulated with computer modeling, and okadaic acid was docked to the scFv model to obtain a putative structure of the binding complex. Two predicted critical amino acids, Ser32 and Thr187, were then mutated to verify this theoretical model. Both mutants exhibited significant loss of binding activity. These results help us to understand this specific scFv-antigen binding mechanism and provide guidance for affinity maturation of the antibody in vitro. The high-affinity scFv developed here also has potential for okadaic acid toxin detection. PMID:26772159

  6. Vesicle interactions with polyamino acids and antibody: in vitro and in vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial spherules or vesicles of 900 A in diameter formed from phosphatidylcholine and gangliosides and enclosing /sup 99m/TcO4- (standard preparation) survive intact in the circulation of the mouse. Polyamino acids and protein have been incorporated into and onto the vesicles; such vesicles remain intact as determined by diffusion dialysis studies and by electron paramagnetic resonance studies of vesicles enclosing spin label. In studying the distribution of polyamino acid-vesicles and protein vesicles in vivo, it was found that the latter distribute differently from standard vesicles or free protein alone whereas aromatic polyamino acid-vesicles concentrate in the liver and spleen to a greater extent than standard vesicles. The permeability and stability characteristics of vesicles may be preserved when they are modified by the addition of protein or polyamino acids and that such modification of vesicles may be associated with an alteration of their fate in vivo. The potential exists to use vesicles as carriers of radiopharmaceuticals and other drugs and to direct the vesicles preferentially to tissue targets in vivo. (U.S.)

  7. Substituent-specific antibody against glucuronoxylan reveals close association of glucuronic acid and acetyl substituents and distinct labeling patterns in tree species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutaniemi, Sanna; Guillon, Fabienne; Tranquet, Olivier; Bouchet, Brigitte; Tuomainen, Päivi; Virkki, Liisa; Pedersen, Henriette Lodberg; Willats, William George Tycho; Saulnier, Luc; Tenkanen, Maija

    2012-01-01

    antibody binding. The treatment removed acetyl groups from xylan, indicating that the vicinity of glucuronic acid substituents is also acetylated. The novel labeling patterns observed in the xylem of tree species suggested that differences within the cell wall exist both in acetylation degree and in...

  8. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-Mercaptopropionic Acid and CdTe-Mercaptosuccinic Acid Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2016-01-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining. PMID:27398438

  9. Genetically Encoded Azide Containing Amino Acid in Mammalian Cells Enables Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugates Using Click Cycloaddition Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBrunt, Michael P; Shanebeck, Kurt; Caldwell, Zachary; Johnson, Jeffrey; Thompson, Pamela; Martin, Thomas; Dong, Huifang; Li, Gary; Xu, Hengyu; D'Hooge, Francois; Masterson, Luke; Bariola, Pauline; Tiberghien, Arnaud; Ezeadi, Ebele; Williams, David G; Hartley, John A; Howard, Philip W; Grabstein, Kenneth H; Bowen, Michael A; Marelli, Marcello

    2015-11-18

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) have emerged as potent antitumor drugs that provide increased efficacy, specificity, and tolerability over chemotherapy for the treatment of cancer. ADCs generated by targeting cysteines and lysines on the antibody have shown efficacy, but these products are heterogeneous, and instability may limit their dosing. Here, a novel technology is described that enables site-specific conjugation of toxins to antibodies using chemistry to produce homogeneous, potent, and highly stable conjugates. We have developed a cell-based mammalian expression system capable of site-specific integration of a non-natural amino acid containing an azide moiety. The azide group enables click cycloaddition chemistry that generates a stable heterocyclic triazole linkage. Antibodies to Her2/neu were expressed to contain N6-((2-azidoethoxy)carbonyl)-l-lysine at four different positions. Each site allowed over 95% conjugation efficacy with the toxins auristatin F or a pyrrolobenzodiazepine (PBD) dimer to generate ADCs with a drug to antibody ratio of >1.9. The ADCs were potent and specific in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. An anti Her2/neu conjugate demonstrated stability in vivo and a PBD containing ADC showed potent efficacy in a mouse tumor xenograph model. This technology was extended to generate fully functional ADCs with four toxins per antibody. The high stability of the azide-alkyne linkage, combined with the site-specific nature of the expression system, provides a means for the generation of ADCs with optimized pharmacokinetic, biological, and biophysical properties. PMID:26332743

  10. Isolation of a foot-and-mouth disease polyuridylic acid polymerase and its inhibition by antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Polatnick, J

    1980-01-01

    A template-dependent polyuridylic acid [poly(U)] polymerase has been isolated from BHK cells infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Enzyme activity in a 20,000 x g supernatant of a cytoplasmic extract was concentrated by precipitation with 30 to 50% saturated ammonium sulfate. The poly(U) polymerase was freed of membranes by sodium dodecyl sulfate and 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane extraction, and RNA was removed by precipitation with 2 M LiCl. The solubilized poly(U) polymerase r...

  11. Effects of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid-Nogo A antibody delayed-release microspheres on regeneration of injured spinal cord in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Lan; Yueming Song

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nogo A antigen is the major inhibiting factor blocking regeneration of the injured spinal cord. Neutralizing Nogo A antigens using Nogo A antibodies may help promote neurite regeneration and nervous function recovery. For successful regeneration, sustained release of the antibody from a biodegradable material loaded with Nogo A antibodies to the injury site is required. OBJECTIVE: To compare the therapeutic effects of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA)-Nogo A antibody delayed-release microspheres and Nogo A antibody alone on spinal regeneration in Sprague-Dawley rats with complete transverse injury to the spinal cord.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled animal trial was performed at the Pharmacological Laboratory of West China Center of Medical Sciences, Sichuan University, between October 2007 and January 2008.MATERIALS: Goat anti-rat Nogo A monoclonal antibody was purchased from Santa, American; goat anti-rat neurofilament 200 monoclonal antibody was from Zhongshan Goldenbridge, Beijing, China; PLGA-Nogo A antibody delayed-release microspheres were provided by the College of Pharmacy, Sichuan University.METHODS: A total of 36 adult female Sprague Dawley rats were used to establish models of completely transected spinal cord injury, at T10. Animals were randomly divided into three groups (n=12): model, Nogo A antibody alone, and Nogo A antibody delayed-release microsphere groups. After transverse injury of the spinal cord, 50 μL normal saline solution, 50 μL normal saline solution containing 50 μ g Nogo A antibody, and 50 μ L normal saline solution containing 50 μg Nogo A antibody microspheres were administered to the respective groups at the injury site. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The expression of Nogo A and neurofilament 200 in injured spinal cord was tested immunohistochemically, and motor function of rats was assessed by Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale.RESULTS: Four weeks after injury, expression of Nogo A in

  12. Removal kinetics of antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase by various plasmapheresis modalities in the treatment of neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Atsushi; Okado, Tomokazu; Kurashima, Naoki; Maeda, Takuma; Miyamoto, Satoko; Nakamura, Ayako; Seshima, Hiroshi; Iimori, Soichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Uchida, Shinichi; Rai, Tatemitsu

    2014-06-01

    Plasmapheresis is one of the acute treatment modalities for neurological disorders associated with antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD). However, there is little information about the removal kinetics of anti-GAD by various plasmapheresis modalities. Here, we investigated the removal rate of anti-GAD and fibrinogen (Fib) by immunoadsorption (IA), plasma exchange using a conventional plasma separator (OP-PE), and plasma exchange using a high cut-off selective membrane plasma separator (EC-PE) in two cases of anti-GAD-associated neurological diseases. In case 1, IA and OP-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 38.2% and 69.1% and Fib: 67.7% and 68.2%, respectively. In case 2, OP-PE and EC-PE were used, and the percent reductions were as follows: anti-GAD: 65.8% and 48.5% and Fib: 68.5% and 19.8%, respectively. OP-PE could remove anti-GAD more efficiently than IA. Further, EC-PE could maintain coagulation factors such as Fib better than IA and OP-PE. It is important to select the appropriate plasmapheresis modality on the basis of the removal kinetics. PMID:24965288

  13. IGF2BP2 alternative variants associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies negative diabetes in Malaysian subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer D Salem

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association of Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA-binding protein 2 (IGF2BP2 common variants (rs4402960 and rs1470579 with type 2 diabetes (T2D has been performed in different populations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of alternative variants of IGF2BP2; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA negative diabetes in Malaysian Subjects. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IGF2BP2; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were genotyped in 1107 GADA negative diabetic patients and 620 control subjects of Asian from Malaysia. The additive genetic model adjusted for age, race, gender and BMI showed that alternative variants; rs6777038, rs16860234 and rs7651090 of IGF2BP2 associated with GADA negative diabetes (OR = 1.21; 1.36; 1.35, P = 0.03; 0.0004; 0.0002, respectively. In addition, the CCG haplotype and diplotype CCG-TCG increased the risk of diabetes (OR = 1.51, P = 0.01; OR = 2.36, P = 0.009, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: IGF2BP2 alternative variants were associated with GADA negative diabetes. The IGF2BP2 haplotypes and diplotypes increased the risk of diabetes in Malaysian subject.

  14. Sensitive Detection of Capsaicinoids Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Anti-Homovanillic Acid Polyclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Toko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes.

  15. Sensitive detection of capsaicinoids using a surface plasmon resonance sensor with anti-homovanillic Acid polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shingo; Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes. PMID:25586413

  16. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Thyroid Antibodies Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Thyroid Autoantibodies; Antithyroid Antibodies; Antimicrosomal Antibody; Thyroid Microsomal Antibody; ...

  17. [One amino acid mutation in an anti-CD20 antibody fragment that affects the yield bacterial secretion and the affinity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin-Xing; Xiong, Dong-Sheng; Fan, Dong-Mei; Shao, Xiao-Feng; Xu, Yuan-Fu; Zhu, Zhen-Ping; Yang, Chun-Zheng

    2003-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) directed against CD20, either unmodified or in radiolabeled forms, have been successfully exploited in clinic as effective therapeutic agents in the management of non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. The antibody fragment is a potential agent in image and therapy of tumor. To further improve the soluble expression of anti-CD20 antibody Fab' fragment, PCR was used to mutate the anti-CD20 VL and VH genes and its biological activity was identified. The expression vector of chimeric antibody Fab' was constructed and expressed in E. coli. The data of mutant clone DNA sequence showed that the amino acid of light chain gene of the parent anti-CD20 antibody (H47) was successful mutated as Ser (GAG)-Asn (CAG). The soluble expression of mutated anti-CD20 Fab' (CD20-7) was 3.8 mg/g dry cell weight, while the parent (CD20-2) was 1.3 mg/g dry cell weight. The affinity constant Ka of CD20-7 was 2.2 x 10(9) L/mol. The primary results of competitive assays by FACS showed that CD20-7 could partially block the sites through which parent antibody (HI47) bind to Raji cells. There was difference in the Raji cells (CD20+)-binding activity between the mutant CD20-7 and parent CD20-2. The site mutation of anti-CD20 Fab' gene make it possible that the anti-CD20 antibody fragment was succeeded to obtain higher expression. In this thesis, we succeeded in completing mutation and expression of anti-CD20 Fab' genes, distinguishing its biological activity, and obtaining its highly expression. These period results will lay a foundation for development of other kind of anti-CD20 engineering antibody (for instance: Fab' Diabody and miniantibody), and make it possible for anti-CD20 antibody to be applied to tumor therapy in civil in the future. PMID:15969005

  18. An experimental test of stroke recovery by implanting a hyaluronic acid hydrogel carrying a Nogo receptor antibody in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Jun [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tian Weiming [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hou Shaoping [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Xu Qunyuan [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Spector, Myron [Tissue Engineering, VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cui Fuzhai [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a hyaluronic-acid-based (HA-based) hydrogel implant, carrying a polyclonal antibody to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR), on adult rats that underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Behavioral tests of a forelimb-reaching task suggested that the disabled function of the impaired forelimb in this stroke model was ameliorated by the implant to a certain extent. These behavioral findings were correlated with immunohistochemical results of investigating the distribution of NgR antibody, neurofilaments (NF) and neuron-specific class III {beta}-tubulin (TuJ1) in the brain sections. The porous hydrogel functioned as a scaffold to deliver the NgR antibody, support cell migration and development. In addition, it was found NF-positive and TuJ1-positive expressions were distributed in the implanted hydrogel. Collectively, the results demonstrate the promise of the HA hydrogel as a scaffold material and the delivery vehicle of the NgR antibody for the repair of defects and the support of neural regeneration in the brain.

  19. An experimental test of stroke recovery by implanting a hyaluronic acid hydrogel carrying a Nogo receptor antibody in a rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a hyaluronic-acid-based (HA-based) hydrogel implant, carrying a polyclonal antibody to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR), on adult rats that underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Behavioral tests of a forelimb-reaching task suggested that the disabled function of the impaired forelimb in this stroke model was ameliorated by the implant to a certain extent. These behavioral findings were correlated with immunohistochemical results of investigating the distribution of NgR antibody, neurofilaments (NF) and neuron-specific class III β-tubulin (TuJ1) in the brain sections. The porous hydrogel functioned as a scaffold to deliver the NgR antibody, support cell migration and development. In addition, it was found NF-positive and TuJ1-positive expressions were distributed in the implanted hydrogel. Collectively, the results demonstrate the promise of the HA hydrogel as a scaffold material and the delivery vehicle of the NgR antibody for the repair of defects and the support of neural regeneration in the brain

  20. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2015-12-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining. PMID:26682358

  1. Anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies presenting in carcinoma of the uterus with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panegyres Peter K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a rare non-metastatic manifestation of malignancy. In this report, to the best of our knowledge we describe for the first time a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration several months prior to the diagnosis of clear carcinoma of the uterus. Case presentation A 75-year-old Caucasian woman manifested a rapidly progressive cerebellar syndrome with nystagmus, past-pointing, dysdiadochokinesis, dysarthria, truncal ataxia and titubation. The paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration was associated with anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. 14-3-3 protein was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin prior to laparotomy, hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy. Our patient has survived for three years following diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of an association of clear cell carcinoma of the uterus and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with both anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The findings imply that both antibodies contributed to the fulminating paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration observed in our patient, and this was of such severity it resulted in the release of 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, a marker of neuronal death.

  2. Antibody immobilization on poly(L-lactic acid) nanofibers advantageously carried out by means of a non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolci, L. S.; Liguori, A.; Merlettini, A.; Calzà, L.; Castellucci, M.; Gherardi, M.; Colombo, V.; Focarete, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the comparison between a conventional wet-chemical method and a non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma process for the conjugation of biomolecules on the surface of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) electrospun fibers is reported. Physico-chemical and morphological characteristics of chemically and plasma functionalized mats are studied and compared with those of pristine mats. The efficiency in biomolecules immobilization is assessed by the covalent conjugation of an antibody (anti-CD10) on the functionalized PLLA fibers. The achieved results highlight that the proposed plasma process enables antibodies to be successfully immobilized on the surface of PLLA fibers, demonstrating that non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma can be an effective, highly flexible and environmentally friendly alternative to the still widely employed wet-chemical methods for the conjugation of biomolecules onto biomaterials.

  3. Generation of a panel of high affinity antibodies and development of a biosensor-based immunoassay for the detection of okadaic acid in shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre, Marie; Kilcoyne, Michelle; Kane, Marian

    2015-09-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, DTX-1 and DTX-2, are marine biotoxins associated with diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. Routine monitoring of these toxins relies on the mouse bioassay. However, due to the technical unreliability and animal usage of this bioassay, there is always a need for convenient and reliable alternative assay methods. A panel of monoclonal antibodies against OA was generated and the most suitable was selected for biosensor-based assay development using surface plasmon resonance. The cross reactivity of the selected antibody with DTX-1 was found to be 73%, confirming the antibody suitability for both OA and DTX detection. The OA and derivative assay was designed as an inhibition assay covering the concentrations 1-75 ng/ml, with a sensitivity of 22.4 ng/ml. The assay was highly reproducible and preliminary validation showed no matrix interference from mussel extracts and good recovery of added standard in mussel extracts, with %CV of <9.3%. This assay could provide a useful and convenient screening tool for OA and its derivatives with a comprehensive extraction protocol for shellfish monitoring programmes. PMID:26169671

  4. A role for uric acid and the Nalp3 inflammasome in antiphospholipid antibody-induced IL-1β production by human first trimester trophoblast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J Mulla

    Full Text Available Women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS are at risk of recurrent pregnancy loss and obstetrical disorders, such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL directly target the placenta by binding beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI expressed on the trophoblast. We recently demonstrated in human first trimester trophoblast cells that anti-β2GPI antibodies (Abs induce the secretion of IL-1β in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-dependent manner. IL-1β secretion requires processing of pro-IL-1β and this is mediated by the inflammasome, a complex of Nalp3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC and caspase-1. The objective of this study was to determine if aPL induce IL-1β production in trophoblast via the inflammasome. Using a human first trimester trophoblast cell line, we demonstrated that a mouse anti-β2GPI mAb and human polyclonal aPL-IgG induce IL-1β processing and secretion, which was partially blocked upon caspase-1 inhibition. Nalp3 and ASC knockdown also attenuated anti-β2GPI Ab-induced IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, aPL stimulated the production of uric acid in a TLR4-dependent manner; and inhibition of uric acid prevented aPL-induced IL-1β production by the trophoblast. These findings demonstrate that aPL, via TLR4 activation, induce a uric acid response in human trophoblast, which in turn activates the Nalp3/ASC inflammasome leading to IL-1β processing and secretion. This novel mechanism may account for the inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface, which causes placental dysfunction and increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in patients with APS.

  5. A role for uric acid and the Nalp3 inflammasome in antiphospholipid antibody-induced IL-1β production by human first trimester trophoblast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Melissa J; Salmon, Jane E; Chamley, Larry W; Brosens, Jan J; Boeras, Crina M; Kavathas, Paula B; Abrahams, Vikki M

    2013-01-01

    Women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are at risk of recurrent pregnancy loss and obstetrical disorders, such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) directly target the placenta by binding beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) expressed on the trophoblast. We recently demonstrated in human first trimester trophoblast cells that anti-β2GPI antibodies (Abs) induce the secretion of IL-1β in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent manner. IL-1β secretion requires processing of pro-IL-1β and this is mediated by the inflammasome, a complex of Nalp3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) and caspase-1. The objective of this study was to determine if aPL induce IL-1β production in trophoblast via the inflammasome. Using a human first trimester trophoblast cell line, we demonstrated that a mouse anti-β2GPI mAb and human polyclonal aPL-IgG induce IL-1β processing and secretion, which was partially blocked upon caspase-1 inhibition. Nalp3 and ASC knockdown also attenuated anti-β2GPI Ab-induced IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, aPL stimulated the production of uric acid in a TLR4-dependent manner; and inhibition of uric acid prevented aPL-induced IL-1β production by the trophoblast. These findings demonstrate that aPL, via TLR4 activation, induce a uric acid response in human trophoblast, which in turn activates the Nalp3/ASC inflammasome leading to IL-1β processing and secretion. This novel mechanism may account for the inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface, which causes placental dysfunction and increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in patients with APS. PMID:23762324

  6. Effect of Co-Administration of 3',5'-Cyclic Diguanylic Acid with Infectious Bursal Disease Virus Vaccine on Serum Antibody Levels in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francois Malouin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP is an intra-cellular bacterial signalling molecule previously shown to possess immune-stimulatory activities. However, the effects of this molecule on chicken immune responses have not been investigated. This study evaluated the humoral immune response following oral administration or Intra-Muscular injection (IM of saline, 10 or 100 nmol c-di-GMP in conjunction with the Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV vaccine S-706 in 96 broiler chickens. The oral vaccine and the test compounds were administrated at age 14 days and the chickens were then monitored until day 35. Blood samples were collected weekly from 8 birds per treatment to determine the antibody titers. Results showed that oral or IM administration of c-di-GMP did not induce any adverse effect in broiler chickens. Significant increases (p<0.05 in the total Immunoglobulin (Ig A concentrations were observed regardless of the treatments as the birds aged. No significant effect was noted for total IgG and IgM concentrations after any of the sampling days immediately following administration of the compounds. However, on day 35, serum of birds orally administered with 10 and 100 nmol of c-di-GMP showed higher serum IgA antibody concentrations when compared to the serum of birds from the saline control (p<0.05 indicating that c-di-GMP stimulated IgA production in serum and confirming the potential of this molecule as a mucosal adjuvant. No significant effect on serum antivirus antibodies (IBDV infectious bronchitis virus, Newcastle disease virus and avian Reovirus was observed for the 10 or 100 nmol c-di-GMP treatments. The results indicate that studies are warranted on the potential beneficial effects of c-di-GMP on broiler immunity.

  7. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also been linked to an increased risk ...

  8. Prevalence of XMRV Nucleic Acid and Antibody in HIV-1-Infected Men and in Men at Risk for HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Spindler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic MLV-Related Virus (XMRV was recently reported to be associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Infection was also reported in 3.7% of healthy individuals. These highly reported frequencies of infection prompted concerns about the possibility of a new, widespread retroviral epidemic. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS provides an opportunity to assess the prevalence of XMRV infection and its association with HIV-1 infection among men who have sex with men. Reliable detection of XMRV infection requires the application of multiple diagnostic methods, including detection of human antibodies to XMRV and detection of XMRV nucleic acid. We, therefore, tested 332 patient plasma and PBMC samples obtained from recent visits in a subset of patients in the MACS cohort for XMRV antibodies using Abbott prototype ARCHITECT chemiluminescent immunoassays (CMIAs and for XMRV RNA and proviral DNA using a XMRV single-copy qPCR assay (X-SCA. Although 9 of 332 (2.7% samples showed low positive reactivity against a single antigen in the CMIA, none of these samples or matched controls were positive for plasma XMRV RNA or PBMC XMRV DNA by X-SCA. Thus, we found no evidence of XMRV infection among men in the MACS regardless of HIV-1 serostatus.

  9. Monoclonal antibody production and indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay development of 3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid based on novel haptens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guopeng; Zhao, Liang; Zhou, Feng; Li, Jiaying; Xing, Yuan; Wang, Tiangang; Zhou, Xilong; Ji, Baoping; Ren, Wanpeng

    2016-10-15

    Two novel immunizing haptens of 3-methyl-quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (MQCA) were synthesized and conjugated with cationized bovine serum albumin. Female BALB/c mice were immunized with above conjugates, splenocytes were fused with Sp2/0 cells to produce monoclonal antibody. Compared with previous studies, antibodies raised in this work showed higher sensitivity. Meantime, a novel heterologous coating hapten was also prepared. The indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) based on the optimum condition showed an IC50 of 3.1μg/kg (ppb), and the linear range of 0.46-10.5ppb for MQCA. The limit of detect (LOD) of MQCA in swine muscle, swine liver and chicken was 0.32, 0.54, and 0.28ppb, respectively. The LOD of this assay can satisfy the minimum required performance levels (4ppb) for MQCA. These results indicated that the proposed ELISA, with high sensitivity and specificity, as well as good reproducibility and accuracy, is suitable for determination of MQCA residues in food samples. PMID:27173564

  10. Alternative affinity tools: more attractive than antibodies?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, V.J.B.; Levisson, M.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Smidt, H.; Oost, van der J.

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies are the most successful affinity tools used today, in both fundamental and applied research (diagnostics, purification and therapeutics). Nonetheless, antibodies do have their limitations, including high production costs and low stability. Alternative affinity tools based on nucleic acids

  11. Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies are indicators of the course, but not of the onset, of diabetes in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vigo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently examine the association of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA positivity with the onset and progression of diabetes in middle-aged adults, we performed a case-cohort study representing the ~9-year experience of 10,275 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study participants, initially aged 45-64 years. Antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 were measured by radioimmunoassay in 580 incident diabetes cases and 544 non-cases. The overall weighted prevalence of GADA positivity (³1 U/mL was 7.3%. Baseline risk factors, with the exception of smoking and interleukin-6 (P £ 0.02, were generally similar between GADA-positive and -negative individuals. GADA positivity did not predict incident diabetes in multiply adjusted (HR = 1.04; 95%CI = 0.55, 1.96 proportional hazard analyses. However, a small non-significant adjusted risk (HR = 1.29; 95%CI = 0.58, 2.88 was seen for those in the highest tertile (³2.38 U/mL of positivity. GADA-positive and GADA-negative non-diabetic individuals had similar risk profiles for diabetes, with central obesity and elevated inflammation markers, aside from glucose, being the main predictors. Among diabetes cases at study's end, progression to insulin treatment increased monotonically as a function of baseline GADA level. Overall, being GADA positive increased risk of progression to insulin use almost 10 times (HR = 9.9; 95%CI = 3.4, 28.5. In conclusion, in initially non-diabetic middle-aged adults, GADA positivity did not increase diabetes risk, and the overall baseline profile of risk factors was similar for positive and negative individuals. Among middle-aged adults, with the possible exception of those with the highest GADA levels, autoimmune pathophysiology reflected by GADA may become clinically relevant only after diabetes onset.

  12. Monoclonal anti-acid-labile subunit oligopeptide antibodies and their use in a two-site immunoassay for ALS measurement in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, S; Wu, Z; Dressendörfer, R A; Morrison, K M; Khare, A; Lee, P D; Strasburger, C J

    2001-06-01

    Quantification of the acid-labile subunit (ALS) has to date been restricted to immunoassays utilizing polyclonal antibodies. By immunization with N-terminal and C-terminal specific ALS oligopeptides, we generated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target ALS-specific sequences outside the nonspecific leucine-rich repeats in the ALS molecule. For mAb selection, a special screening method was developed. Monoclonal antibody 5C9, which targets the N-terminus of ALS, is immobilized and the anti-ALS mAb 7H3, directed against the C-terminus, is biotinylated and used as tracer Ab. Due to the extreme pH-lability of ALS, changes in immunorecognition of ALS were investigated after acidification for protein unfolding in different pH ranges and in a time-dependent manner. It was determined that acidification of the serum samples to pH 2.7 for 30 min, followed by neutralization and dilution to 1:100 was the optimal acid-neutralization method. For standardization purposes, a serum pool derived from healthy volunteers was assigned the value 1 U/ml ALS. The sandwich assay has a working range with a linear dose-response curve in a log/log system between 0.005 and 10 U/ml. ALS levels in seven acromegalic patients ranged from 2.0 to 4.2 U/ml, and in 12 untreated growth hormone deficient patients from 0.036 to 0.986 U/ml (mean=0.45 U/ml). After 12 months of growth hormone therapy, ALS levels increased significantly to 1.18+/-0.45 U/ml (mean+/-SD; p<0.0006). The increase ranged from 0.48 to 1.4 U/ml. The change in ALS with growth hormone (GH) therapy correlated closer with the change in IGF-I (r=0.798, p=0.0057; Spearman rank correlation) than with the change in insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP3; r=0.549, p=0.057). This specific sandwich assay for the measurement of ALS provides a potentially valuable indicator of growth hormone secretory status. With this mAb-based immunofluorometric assay, the nonspecific detection of other proteins containing leucine-rich repeat

  13. Antiphospholipid Antibody and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴竞生

    2008-01-01

    @@ Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) APA is a big category for all kinds of negative charge phospholipid or lecithin - a protein complex autoantibodies or the same antibody, through its recognition of antigen (target protein) different, and phospholipids or lecithin - protein complex combination of various rely on the interference Phospholipid clotting and anti-coagulation factor, and promote endothelial cells, platelets, complement activation and play a role. APA including lupus anticoagulant(LA) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA), In addition, there are anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI) antibody, anti-prothrombin (a- PT) antibody, anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibody and anti-phosphatidylserine antibody, and so on. APA as the main target of phospholipid-binding protein, including β2-GPI, prothrombin, annexin, protein C (PC) and protein S (PS), plasminogen, and so on.

  14. Retinoic Acid and Polyriboinosinic:Polyribocytidylic Acid Stimulate Robust Anti-Tetanus Antibody Production while Differentially Regulating Type 1/Type 2 Cytokines and Lymphocyte Populations1

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Yifan; Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A. Catharine

    2005-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), a bioactive retinoid, and polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidylic acid (PIC) are known to promote immunity in vitamin A-deficient animals. In this study, we hypothesized that RA, PIC, and the combination can provide significant immunoadjuvant activity even in the vitamin A-adequate state. Six-week-old C57BL/6 mice were immunized with tetanus toxoid (TT) and treated with RA and/or PIC at priming in three independent studies of short and long duration. RA and PIC differentially r...

  15. Positively charged templates for labeling internalizing antibodies: comparison of N-succinimidyl 5-iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate and the D-amino acid peptide KRYRR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, Catherine F.; Welsh, Philip C.; Bigner, Darell D.; Zalutsky, Michael R. E-mail: zalut001@mc.duke.edu

    2001-10-01

    Receptor-mediated internalization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), such as those specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII), can lead to rapid loss of radioactivity from the target cell. In the current study, the anti-EGFRvIII mAb L8A4 was radioiodinated using two methods -N-succinimidyl 5-iodo-3-pyridinecarboxylate (SIPC) and via a D-amino acid peptide LysArgTyrArgArg (D-KRYRR). Paired-label internalization assays performed on EGFRvIII-expressing U87{delta}EGFR cells in vitro demonstrated that labeling L8A4 using D-KRYRR resulted in significantly higher retention of radioiodine in the intracellular compartment. In athymic mice with D256 human glioma xenografts, tumor uptake was similar for both labeling methods through 24 hr. However, an up to fourfold higher tumor retention was observed for mAb labeled with the D-amino acid peptide at later time points. Radiation absorbed dose calculations based on these biodistribution data indicated that L8A4 labeled using D-KRYRR exhibited better tumor-to-normal-organ radiation dose ratios, suggesting that this labeling method may be of particular value for labeling internalizing mAbs.

  16. Evaluation and Comparison of Enzyme Immunoassay (Eia and Acid Fast Staining with Confirmation by Immunofluorescent Antibody Assay for Detection of Cryptosporidium Species in Infants and Young Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Dorostcar Moghaddam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cryptosporidiosis is prevalent world wide, causing a variety of problems ranging from acute, self-limiting diarrhea to fatal cases in immunocompromised persons, particulary those with acquired immunodeficiency (AIDS. Diagnosis of Cryptosporidium is made by identification of oocysts in stool specimens. The detection is most commonly made by the acid-fast staining method followed by microscopic examination which has low specificity and sensitivity. Material and Methods: In the present study, we evaluated diagnostic utility of a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (EIA, which detects Cryptosporidium-Specific antigen (CSA in 204 unprocessed stool specimens obtained from patients less than 3 years of age. Results: When compared with the routine screening procedure applied in this field study (screening by acid-fast staining and microscopy after concentration of positive results by IFA, both sensitivity and specificity were 98%. Of the 139 specimens negative by microscopy, 13 (9.3% were positive by EIA, 11 of which were confirmed by inhibition with antibody to Cryptosporidia-specific antigen. Conclusion: The EIA is an important tool for identifying Cryptosporidium in fecal specimens in field studies since it is sensitive, specific, simple to use and unaffected by the presence of a preservative.

  17. Development of a monoclonal antibody binding okadaic acid and dinophysistoxins-1, -2 in proportion to their toxicity equivalence factors

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Linda; Elliott, Christopher; Walker, Alison; Curran, Rhonda; Connolly, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and structurally related toxins dinophysistoxin-1 (DTX-1), and DTX-2, are lipophilic marine biotoxins. The current reference method for the analysis of these toxins is the mouse bioassay (MBA). This method is under increasing criticism both from an ethical point of view and because of its limited sensitivity and specificity. Alternative replacement methods must be rapid, robust, cost effective, specific and sensitive. Although published immuno-based detection techniques have...

  18. Biodistribution in normal mice of an 111In-labelled prostatic acid phosphatase-specific antibody and its F(ab')2 fragments derivatized site-specifically or via bicyclic diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid anhydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the optimization of derivatization of monoclonal antibodies and their fragments intended for use as radiopharmaceutical in radioimaging and/or radioimmunotherapy of prostatic cancer. Two different principles were used to conjugate (DTPA) to a monoclonal antibody (Mab, subclass IgG1) raised against human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP). In addition, the F(ab')2 fragments of this Mab were also derivatized. The biodistribution of the 111In-labelled derivatives was investigated in normal mice. All the derivatives of IgG1 demonstrated a slower blood clearance than the corresponding derivatives of the F(ab')2 fragments. This property was particularly pronounced in the site-specifically conjugated derivatives of IgG1. All the derivatives studied accumulated in the liver, kidney, and spleen. The CA-DTPA derivatives of F(ab')2 fragments showed the highest kidney-to-blood ratios of radioactivity. The derivatives of IgG1 showed a higher percentage of the injected dose in liver and spleen tissues than the derivatives of the F(ab')2 fragments. The F(ab')2 fragments studied also gave rise to site-specific derivatives, which demonstrated that carbohydrates were also present in this part of the molecule. They behaved similarly to the CA-DTPA F(ab')2 derivative in other respects, but the kidney accumulation was lower at 72 and 120 h. The F(ab')2 fragments studied would be better suited for radioimaging than the derivatives of the IgG1 studied. In contrast, the derivatives of IgG1, especially the p-NH2-Bz-DTPA conjugate, might be more suitable candidates for the development of therapeutic agents. (orig.)

  19. Complement-mediated bactericidal activity of human antibodies to poly alpha 2-->8 N-acetylneuraminic acid, the capsular polysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrell, R E; Azmi, F H; Granoff, D M

    1995-11-01

    Serum antibodies to Neisseria meningitidis group B (MenB) polysaccharide are reported not to elicit bacteriolysis in the presence of human complement. To reexamine this question, we evaluated the ability of two human IgM anti-MenB polysaccharide monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and seven human MenB polysaccharide-reactive human IgM paraproteins to elicit bacteriolysis. In the presence of human complement, both MAbs and five of the seven paraproteins were bactericidal at antibody concentrations of 0.25-9.6 micrograms/mL (50% killing). Activity of the respective antibodies was enhanced 200- to > 10,000-fold when rabbit complement was used instead of human complement. With rabbit complement, the bactericidal activity of human IgM polyclonal antibody or MAb to Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) polysaccharide but not human IgG polyclonal antibody or MAb to Hib polysaccharide was similarly augmented. Thus, for both MenB and Hib, IgM antipolysaccharide antibodies elicit complement-mediated bactericidal activity in the presence of human complement, and the use of rabbit complement yields spuriously high activity. PMID:7594665

  20. Bispecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  1. Antibody sensed protein surface conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott R. Schricker

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available An antibody-modified atomic force microscope (AFM tip was used to detect conformational changes of fibronectin deposited on a poly(methyl methacrylate/poly(acrylic acid block copolymer compared to PMMA and a random poly(methyl methacrylate/poly(acrylic acid copolymer with an identical chemical composition. Based on the antibody-protein adhesive force maps and phase imaging, it was found that the nanomorphology of the triblock copolymer induces the desired conformation of fibronectin. This finding demonstrates that block copolymer nanomorphology can be used to regulate protein conformation and potentially cellular response.

  2. A Role for Uric Acid and the Nalp3 Inflammasome in Antiphospholipid Antibody-Induced IL-1β Production by Human First Trimester Trophoblast

    OpenAIRE

    Mulla, Melissa J.; Salmon, Jane E.; Chamley, Larry W.; Brosens, Jan J.; Boeras, Crina M.; Kavathas, Paula B.; Abrahams, Vikki M.

    2013-01-01

    Women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are at risk of recurrent pregnancy loss and obstetrical disorders, such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) directly target the placenta by binding beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI) expressed on the trophoblast. We recently demonstrated in human first trimester trophoblast cells that anti-β2GPI antibodies (Abs) induce the secretion of IL-1β in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-dependent manner. IL-1β s...

  3. Synthetic Peptide Immunogens Elicit Polyclonal and Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Linear Epitopes in the D Motifs of Staphylococcus aureus Fibronectin-Binding Protein, Which Are Composed of Amino Acids That Are Essential for Fibronectin Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Huesca, Mario; Sun, Qing; Peralta, Robert; Shivji, Gulnar M.; Sauder, Daniel N.; McGavin, Martin J.

    2000-01-01

    A fibronectin (Fn)-binding adhesin of Staphylococcus aureus contains three tandem 37- or 38-amino-acid motifs (D1, D2, and D3), which function to bind Fn. Plasma from patients with S. aureus infections contain antibodies that preferentially recognize ligand induced binding sites in the D motifs and do not inhibit Fn binding (F. Casolini, L. Visai, D. Joh, P. G. Conaldi, A. Toniolo, M. Höök, and P. Speziale, Infect. Immun. 66:5433–5442, 1998). To eliminate the influence of Fn binding on antibo...

  4. Immunogenicity of an engineered internal image antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Billetta, R; Hollingdale, M. R.; Zanetti, M

    1991-01-01

    We engineered an antibody expressing in the third complementarity-determining region of its heavy chain variable region a "foreign" epitope, the repetitive tetrapeptide Asn-Ala-Asn-Pro (NANP) of the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium falciparum parasite, one of the etiologic agents of malaria in humans. A monoclonal antibody to P. falciparum specific for the (NANP)n amino acid sequence bound to the engineered antibody, and a synthetic (NANP)3 peptide blocked this interaction. Immunization...

  5. Imaging tumors with radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a metallic radionuclide, either directly bound to a monoclonal antibody, or to a chelating agent (such as di-ethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)) conjugated to the antibody, a tumor can be traced rapidly and with high specificity. The labelled antibody is injected into the host. In some cases, a localization of distant metastases is possible, giving an indication of tumor spreading. Detection occurs by photoscanning. (Auth.)

  6. Highly sensitive electroluminescence immunoassay for Hg(II) ions based on the use of CdSe quantum dots, the methylmercury-6-mercaptonicotinic acid-ovalbumin conjugate, and a specific monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have designed a rapid and ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) competitive immunoassay for the determination of mercury(II) ion. It is based on the use of CdSe quantum dots (QDs), methylmercury-6-mercaptonicotinic acid-ovalbumin as coating antigen and specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Hg(II). The latter is quite selective for Hg(II). The coating antigen was immobilized on the surface of a gold electrode via reaction between the functional groups of cysteamine and glutaraldehyde. The mercury(II) ions in a sample and the coating antigen compete for binding sites of QD-labeled monoclonal antibody which binds specifically to Hg(II) ions. The ECL of the system decreases with increasing concentration of Hg(II) because less QD-labeled mAbs are present on the surface of the electrode. Under optimal conditions, the decrease of ECL intensity is linearly related to the logarithm of the Hg(II) concentration in the range from 0.02 to 100 ng mL−1, with a detection limit of 6.2 pg mL−1. As far as we know, this is the first report on an ECL immunoassay for Hg(II) based on a specific monoclonal antibody. The favorable results obtained when this method was applied to real samples indicate that this detection scheme can widely enlarge the applicability of detecting heavy metal ions by exploiting the ECL of QDs for immunoassays. (author)

  7. Radioimmunodetection of lymph node invasion in prostatic cancer. The use of iodine-123 (123I)-labeled monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) 227 A F(ab')2 antibody fragments in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The therapeutic indications in prostatic cancer depend on the regional and distant extension of the cancer and are difficult to assess before lymphadenectomy. Radioimmunodetection of lymph node involvement with monoclonal anti-prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antibodies can be proposed as a noninvasive alternative to lymphadenectomy. Fifteen patients with various stages of histologically proven prostatic cancer were examined by immunolymphoscintigraphy (ILS) before treatment to detect lymph node metastases. These patients had Stage A (n = 7), Stage B (n = 3), Stage C (n = 2), and Stage D (n = 3) tumors. They received between 100 and 400 micrograms of monoclonal antibody 227 A in the form of F(ab')2 fragments labeled with iodine-123 (123I). The antibody was injected directly into the periprostatic area. ILS images were obtained after 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours. Three days later, each patient underwent a lymphadenectomy for histologic examination. The results of the histologic examination and ILS were compared. In ten patients, the examination did not show any images capable of being interpreted as lymphadenopathy and histologic examination confirmed the integrity of the nodes examined. In five cases, scintigraphy suggested the presence of lymph node invasion by prostatic cancer and this was confirmed by histologic examination in three of the five cases. Overall, in terms of lymphadenopathy, this examination had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 83%. Therefore, ILS appears to be capable of detecting lymph node metastases in prostatic cancer

  8. Electrochemical immunoassay for subgroup J of avian leukosis viruses using a glassy carbon electrode modified with a film of poly (3-thiophene boronic acid), gold nanoparticles, graphene and immobilized antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have modified a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with a film of poly(3-thiophene boronic acid), gold nanoparticles and graphene, and an antibody (Ab) was immobilized on its surface through the covalent bond formed between the boronic acid group and the glycosyl groups of the Ab. Subgroup J of avian leukosis viruses (ALV-J) were electrochemically determined with the help of this electrode. There is a linear relationship between the electron transfer resistance (Ret) and the concentration of ALV-J in the range from 527 to 3,162 TCID50.mL-1 (where TCID50 is the 50 % tissue culture infective dose). The detection limit is 210 TCID50.mL-1 (at an S/N of 3), and the correlation coefficient (R) is 0.9964. The electrochemical immunoassay showed good selectivity, stability and reproducibility. (author)

  9. Three amino acid residues in the envelope of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF07_BC regulate viral neutralization susceptibility to the human monoclonal neutralizing antibody IgG1b12

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhui; Nie; Juan; Zhao; Qingqing; Chen; Weijin; Huang; Youchun; Wang

    2014-01-01

    The CD4 binding site(CD4bs) of envelope glycoprotein(Env) is an important conserved target for anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies IgG1 b12(b12) could recognize conformational epitopes that overlap the CD4 bs of Env. Different virus strains, even derived from the same individual, showed distinct neutralization susceptibility to b12. We examined the key amino acid residues affecting b12 neutralization susceptibility using single genome amplification and pseudovirus neutralization assay. Eleven amino acid residues were identified that affect the sensitivity of Env to b12. Through site-directed mutagenesis, an amino acid substitution at position 182 in the V2 region of Env was confirmed to play a key role in regulating the b12 neutralization susceptibility. The introduction of V182 L to a resistant strain enhanced its sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. Correspondingly, the introduction of L182 V to a sensitive strain reduced its sensitivity to b12 more than tenfold. Amino acid substitution at positions 267 and 346 could both enhance the sensitivity to b12 more than twofold. However, no additive effect was observed when the three site mutageneses were introduced into the same strain, and the sensitivity was equivalent to the single V182 L mutation. CRF07_BC is a major circulating recombinant form of HIV-1 prevalent in China. Our data may provide important information for understanding the molecular mechanism regulating the neutralization susceptibility of CRF07_BC viruses to b12 and may be helpful for a vaccine design targeting the CD4 bs epitopes.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are antibodies having single specificity for a given antigen site (epitope). The development of hybridoma technology and the relative ease by which MAbs can be prepared has revolutionized many aspects of serological applications in diagnosis and differentiation of disease producing agents. The property of monospecificity offers advantages in diagnostic applications over polyclonal sera in that tests can be defined exactly with regard to the antigen detected and the affinity of reaction between the given antigenic site and the monoclonal reagent. In addition, MAbs offer better possibilities for test standardization, because the same reagent can be used in different laboratories. Such an MAb can be supplied by a central laboratory or 'grown' from hybridoma cells, ensuring that the resultant product is identical from laboratory to laboratory and that the part of the test involving the MAb reaction is the same. The methodologies for inoculation regimes, mice, cloning methods, selection of fusion partners, etc., have been validated extensively in developed country laboratories. The decision to establish a MAb production facility must be examined on a strict cost-benefit basis, since it is still expensive to produce a product. There are many MAbs available that should be sought to allow exploitation in developing tests. If a production facility is envisaged, it should produce reagents for national needs, i.e. there should be a clear problem oriented approach whereby exact needs are defined. In the field of veterinary applications, MAbs are the central reagent in many immunoassays based on the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The development of specific tests for diagnosing diseases is dominated by MAbs and has been fuelled by a strong research base, mainly in developed countries allied to developing countries through the study of related diseases. Thus, there are very many assays dependent on MAbs, some of which form the basis of

  11. Enhanced antibody production associated with altered amino acid metabolism in a hybridoma high-density perfusion culture established by gravity separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, H A; Damgaard, B; Emborg, C

    1993-01-01

    A high density hybridoma perfusion culture was established by separating and recycling cells from the product stream to the reactor using a simple external sedimentation-based separator-an inclined modified Erlenmeyer flask. After 3 weeks, when the optimal perfusion rate of 1.0 day-1 had been reached, viable cell density stabilized at around 10 x 10(6) cells ml-1, a level five times that obtained by simple batch culture. The efficiency of the separator was enhanced by cell flocculation. Specific antibody productivity, which was initially 0.4 micrograms 1 x 10(6) cells-1 h-1, decreased to half that value while cell density was increasing, but recovered to the initial level when the culture finally stabilized at a high cell density. During the final phase, when viable cell density and specific antibody production were high, there was a marked shift in metabolism. Consumption of the two most important substrates for energy generation, glucose and glutamine, caused their broth concentrations to decrease to 1.5 mM and 1 mM, respectively, from input medium concentrations of 25 mM and 10 mM, respectively. At the same time there was an increase in the specific production of glycine and aspartate, their broth concentrations reaching 1.5 mM and 0.02 mM, respectively. We suggest that this shift in metabolism results in enhanced production of ATP from glutamine. The specific glucose consumption and lactate production also indicate that there is a shift to more energy efficient metabolism. The mechanism whereby this leads to enhanced specific antibody production remains to be elucidated. Nevertheless, the combination of high cell density and enhanced productivity obtained with the present perfusion culture resulted in a high monoclonal antibody production-100 mg 1-1 d-1. PMID:7763691

  12. Evaluation of nucleic acid stabilization products for ambient temperature shipping and storage of viral RNA and antibody in a dried whole blood format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauner, Allison L; Gilliland, Theron C; Mitra, Indrani; Pal, Subhamoy; Morrison, Amy C; Hontz, Robert D; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L

    2015-07-01

    Loss of sample integrity during specimen transport can lead to false-negative diagnostic results. In an effort to improve upon the status quo, we used dengue as a model RNA virus to evaluate the stabilization of RNA and antibodies in three commercially available sample stabilization products: Whatman FTA Micro Cards (GE Healthcare Life Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA), DNAstāble Blood tubes (Biomātrica, San Diego, CA), and ViveST tubes (ViveBio, Alpharetta, GA). Both contrived and clinical dengue-positive specimens were stored on these products at ambient temperature or 37°C for up to 1 month. Antibody and viral RNA levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays, respectively, and compared with frozen unloaded controls. We observed reduced RNA and antibody levels between stabilized contrived samples and frozen controls at our earliest time point, and this was particularly pronounced for the FTA cards. However, despite some time and temperature dependent loss, a 94.6-97.3% agreement was observed between stabilized clinical specimens and their frozen controls for all products. Additional considerations such as cost, sample volume, matrix, and ease of use should inform any decision to incorporate sample stabilization products into a diagnostic testing workflow. We conclude that DNAstāble Blood and ViveST tubes are useful alternatives to traditional filter paper for ambient temperature shipment of clinical specimens for downstream molecular and serological testing. PMID:25940193

  13. Monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  14. Identification of Key Amino Acid Residues in a Thyrotropin Receptor Monoclonal Antibody Epitope Provides Insight into Its Inverse Agonist and Antagonist Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chun-Rong; McLachlan, Sandra M.; Rapoport, Basil

    2008-01-01

    CS-17 is a murine monoclonal antibody to the human TSH receptor (TSHR) with both inverse agonist and antagonist properties. Thus, in the absence of ligand, CS-17 reduces constitutive TSHR cAMP generation and also competes for TSH binding to the receptor. The present data indicate that for both of these functions, the monovalent CS-17 Fab (50 kDa) behaves identically to the intact, divalent IgG molecule (150 kDa). The surprising observation that CS-17 competes for TSH binding to the human but ...

  15. Evaluation of Nucleic Acid Stabilization Products for Ambient Temperature Shipping and Storage of Viral RNA and Antibody in a Dried Whole Blood Format

    OpenAIRE

    Dauner, Allison L.; Gilliland, Theron C; Mitra, Indrani; Pal, Subhamoy; Morrison, Amy C; Hontz, Robert D.; Wu, Shuenn-Jue L.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of sample integrity during specimen transport can lead to false-negative diagnostic results. In an effort to improve upon the status quo, we used dengue as a model RNA virus to evaluate the stabilization of RNA and antibodies in three commercially available sample stabilization products: Whatman FTA Micro Cards (GE Healthcare Life Sciences, Pittsburgh, PA), DNAstāble Blood tubes (Biomātrica, San Diego, CA), and ViveST tubes (ViveBio, Alpharetta, GA). Both contrived and clinical dengue-po...

  16. Role of antiviral antibodies in resistance against coxsackievirus B3 infection: interaction between preexisting antibodies and an interferon inducer.

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, C T; Feng, K. K.; McCarthy, V P; Lenahan, M F

    1982-01-01

    An experimental model of coxsackievirus B3 infection in newborn mice was utilized to examine the protective role of antiviral antibodies and an interferon inducer, polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid [poly(I:C)]. Subcutaneous administration to the infected mice of specific antiviral antibodies resulted in significant protection against coxsackievirus B3 infection. Antibody-treated animals had shortened viremia, early clearance of virus from tissues, and a reduced mortality rate. Dose respons...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies as diagnostics; an appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use.

  18. Site-specific antibodies distinguish single amino acid substitutions in position 57 in HLA-DQ beta-chain alleles associated with insulin-dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atar, D; Dyrberg, T; Michelsen, Birgitte;

    1989-01-01

    -chain alleles, we immunized rabbits with 12 to 13 amino acid long peptides representing HLA-DQw7 and -DQw8 allelic sequences, differing only by one amino acid in position 57 being aspartic acid (Asp) and alanine (Ala), respectively. Immunoblot analysis of lymphoblastoid cells showed that several antisera...... recognized a 29-kDa protein, equivalent to the expected molecular size of the HLA-DQ beta-chain to yield two antisera specific for HLA-DQw7 (pos. 57Asp) and three antisera for HLA-DQw8 (pos. 57Ala) positive cells. Analysis of HLA-DR 3/4 positive IDDM patients (n = 24) and controls (n = 19) showed that all...

  19. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  20. 抗大田软海绵酸单克隆抗体的制备及免疫学特性分析%Preparation of monoclonal antibody against okadaic acid and analysis for its immunological traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡乐琴; 柳俊秀; 王权; 何培民

    2011-01-01

    We aim to prepare monoclonal antibodies against okadaic acid (OA) and analyze its immunologi-cal traits. With synthesized OA-bovine serum albumin (OA-BSA) as antigen, Balb/c mice were immunized. Then by hybridoma technique, a hybridoma cell line 3H4 was established, which could stably secret monoclonal antibody against OA. The secreted antibody was analyzed for titer, haplotype, specificity and sensitiveness. The haplo-type of the monoclonal antibody (McAb) was IgG2b; the indirect ELISA showed the titer of ascites was 1:1.28×10 6, and the 50% inhibitory concentration was 2.852 μg/L measured by the competitive inhibition enzyme-linked im-munosorbent assay (ciELJSA). The lowest detectable limit of the McAb was 0.45 ng/ml. SDS-PAGE indicated that the McAb protein was made up of a weight chain and a light chain. Furthermore, the McAb was quite specific as no cross-reactivity with PTX1, GYM, SPT1, YTX. From all the result, we presume that the McAb prepared in this study would be quite useful for the determination of OA.%制备了赤潮毒素大田软海绵酸(okadaic acid,OA)单克隆抗体,并分析其免疫学特性.方法用人工抗原大田软海绵酸-小牛血清蛋白偶联物( OA-BSA)免疫Balb/c小鼠,采用杂交瘤技术经初筛、复筛和亚克隆,筛选到1株可稳定分泌抗OA单克隆抗体的杂交瘤细胞株3H4.对抗体效价、亚型、特异性、敏感性进行免疫学鉴定与分析.结果抗体亚型为IgG2b;腹水效价为1∶1.28×106;50%抑制质量浓度为2.852 ng/ml;最低检测限为0.45 ng/ml;电泳结果显示抗体,由1条重链和1条轻链组成;与OA同系物PTX1、GYM、SPT1、YTX交叉反应率为0.结论制备的OA单抗效价和特异性均较好,可用于OA的免疫学检测.

  1. Exploitation of the size-exclusion effect of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography for the direct analysis of diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid in therapeutic monoclonal antibody formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jason Z; Liao, Karen; Wang, George; Haby, Thomas; Bolgar, Mark S

    2016-07-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) are being widely studied for the treatment of cancers and other diseases. The mAb is typically in a solution formulation and administered as an intravenous infusion. Ready-to-use solutions are favored for their clinical convenience but they can potentially suffer from a shorter shelf life due to accelerated rates of some forms of degradation such as oxidation, relative to lyophilized formulations. To improve stability, the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) is often used at very low concentrations in biologics formulations to prevent oxidation induced by metal ions. Because of its low concentration and susceptibility to changes in concentration during stability study or processing, the measurement of DTPA levels during formulation and process development is critical. In response to this need we developed a platform reversed-phase HPLC method that allows for the rapid and direct determination of DPTA concentrations which does not require the prior removal of mAbs in formulation samples. The method exploits the "size exclusion effect" of C18 columns with narrow pore sizes (90-120Å) to elute large mAb at the void volume, enabling direct injections of mAb samples for quantitation of DTPA. The method was found to be suitable for the analysis of DTPA in the range of 2-20μg/mL across multiple drug formulations containing different therapeutic mAb and antibody drug conjugates. The method was successfully validated for specificity, precision, accuracy, linearity, and robustness. PMID:27295965

  2. Effects of tumour mass and circulating antigen on the biodistribution of 111In-labelled F(ab')2 fragments of human prostatic acid phosphatase monoclonal antibody in nude mice bearing PC-82 human prostatic tumor xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have evaluated the effects of tumour mass and circulating antigen (prostatic acid phosphatase, PAP) on the biodistribution and the incorporation of 111In-labelled F(ab')2 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) fragments directed against human PAP into human prostatic tumours (PC-82; 0.1-8.9 g) growing in nude mice. The radioactivities in the blood, liver, spleen, kidney and tumour were compared at 1, 3, 4 and 6 days after the intravenous administration of the antibody fragments. There was a significant correlation between the tumour size and the serum PAP concentration in the model employed. Even tissue of a small tumour (111In-labelled F(ab')2 fragments. This relationship had levelled off by 72 h and most likely reflected a better vascularisation of the smaller tumours. Our results show that the increase in tumour size and in the concentration of circulating antigen in the blood led to decreased tumour-to-blood ratios, since there was a tendency for higher blood activities in mice with larger tumours and higher serum PAP concentrations. There was no correlation between tumour size and label uptake by the liver during the follow-up over 144 h, although serum PAP concentrations ranged from 3.1 μg/l to 352 μg/l. On the other hand, when compared with our previous data obtained with non-tumour-bearing mice, there was a significant increase in the uptake by the liver and spleen. These results indicate that even a small concentration of circulating antigen was able to trigger an abnormal change in the biodistribution of MoAbs. (orig.)

  3. Studies on Purification of Methamidophos Monoclonal Antibodies and Comoarative Immunoactivity of Purified Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU-QING ZHAO; YUAN-MING SUN; CHUN-YAN ZHANG; XIAO-YU HUANG; HOU-RUI ZHANG; ZHEN-YU ZHU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To purify Methamidophos (Met) monoclonal antibodies with two methods andcompare immune activity of purified antibodies. Method Caprylic acid ammonium sulphateprecipition (CAASP) method and Sepharose protein-A (SPA) affinity chromatography method wereused to purify Met monoclonal antibodies, UV spectrum scanning was used to determine proteincontent and recovery of purified antibodies, sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to analyze the purity of purified antibodies, and enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine immune activity of purified antibodies.Results Antibody protein content and recovery rate with CAASP method were 7.62 mg/mL and8.05% respectively, antibody protein content and recovery rate with SPA method were 6.45 mg/mLand 5.52% respectively. Purity of antibodies purified by SPA method was higher than that by CAASPmethod. The half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) of antibodies purified by SPA to Met was181.26 μg/mL, and the linear working range and the limit of quantification (LOD) were 2.43-3896.01μg/mL and 1.03 μg/mL, respectively. The IC50 of antibodies purified by CAASP to Met was 352.82μg/mL, and the linear working range and LOD were 10.91-11412.29 ug/mL and 3.42 μg/mL,respectively. Conclusion Antibodies purified by SPA method are better than those by CAASPmethod, and Met monoclonal antibodies purified by SPA method can be used to prepare gold-labelledtesting paper for analyzing Met residue in vegetable and drink water.

  4. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  5. The antibody mining toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew RM; Kiss, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput ...

  6. N-Propionyl polysialic acid precursor enhances the susceptibility of multiple myeloma to antitumor effect of anti-NprPSA monoclonal antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong XIONG; Ai-bin LIANG; Bing XIU; Jian-fei FU; Yi DING; Yu-hua CHEN

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To study the antitumor effect of anti-NprPSA monoclonal antibody (mAb) in combination with ManNPr,a precursor of N-propionyl PSA,in multiple myeloma (MM),and to explore the mechanisms of the action.Methods: Human multiple myeloma cell line RPMI-8226 was tested.The cells were pre-treated with ManNPr (1,2,and 4 mg/mL),and then incubated with anti-NprPSA mAb (1 mg/mL).Cell apoptosis in vitro was detected using MTT assay and flow cytometry.BALB/c nude mice were inoculated sc with RPC5.4 cells.On 5 d after the injection,the mice were administered sc with anti-NprPSA mAb (200 μg/d) and ManNPr (5 mg/d) for 8 d.The tumor size and body weight were monitored twice per week.TUNEL assay was used for detecting apoptosis in vivo.The apoptotic pathway involved was examined using Western blot analysis and caspase inhibitor.Results: Treatment of RPMI-8226 cells with anti-NprPSA mAb alone failed to inhibit cell growth in vitro.In RPM1-8226 ceils pretreated with ManNPr,however,the mAb significantly inhibited the cell proliferation,decreased the viability,and induced apoptosis,which was associated with cleavage of caspase-3,caspase-8,caspase-9,and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.In the mouse xenograft model,treatment with the mAb in combination with ManNPr significantly inhibited the tumor growth,and induced significant apoptosis as compared to treatment with the mAb alone.Moreover,apoptosis induced by the mAb in vivo resulted from the activation of the caspases and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.Conclusion: The anti-NprPSA mAb in combination with ManNPr is an effective treatment for in vitro and in vivo induction of apoptosis in multiple myeloma.

  7. Heavy chain only antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Ahmadvand, Davoud;

    2013-01-01

    Unlike conventional antibodies, heavy chain only antibodies derived from camel contain a single variable domain (VHH) and two constant domains (CH2 and CH3). Cloned and isolated VHHs possess unique properties that enable them to excel conventional therapeutic antibodies and their smaller antigen...

  8. Hepatitis A virus antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is presented of a radioimmunoassay designed to prove the presence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus (HA Ab, anti-Ha) using an Abbott HAVAB set. This proof as well as the proof of the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis B virus is based on competition between a normal antibody against hepatitis A virus and a 125I-labelled antibody for the binding sites of a specific antigen spread all over the surface of a tiny ball; this is then indirect proof of the antibody under investigation. The method is described of reading the results from the number of impulses per 60 seconds: the higher the titre of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in the serum examined, the lower the activity of the specimen concerned. The rate is reported of incidence of the antibody against the hepatitis A virus in a total of 68 convalescents after hepatitis A; the antibody was found in 94.1%. The immunoglobulin made from the convalescents' plasma showed the presence of antibodies in dilutions as high as 1:250 000 while the comparable ratio for normal immunoglobulin Norga was only 1:2500. Differences are discussed in the time incidence of the antibodies against the hepatitis A virus, the antibodies against the surface antigen of hepatitis B, and the antibody against the nucleus of the hepatitis V virus. (author)

  9. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 131I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  10. Two types of antibodies are induced by vaccination with A/California/2009 pdm virus: binding near the sialic acid-binding pocket and neutralizing both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Ohshima

    Full Text Available Many people have a history of catching the flu several times during childhood but no additional flu in adulthood, even without vaccination. We analyzed the total repertoire of antibodies (Abs against influenza A group 1 viruses induced in such a flu-resistant person after vaccination with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. They were classified into two types, with no exceptions. The first type, the products of B cells newly induced through vaccination, binds near the sialic acid-binding pocket. The second type, the products of long-lived memory B cells established before vaccination, utilizes the 1-69 VH gene, binds to the stem of HA, and neutralizes both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses with few exceptions. These observations indicate that the sialic acid-binding pocket and its surrounding region are immunogenically very potent and majority of the B cells whose growth is newly induced by vaccination produce Abs that recognize these regions. However, they play a role in protection against influenza virus infection for a short period since variant viruses that have acquired resistance to these Abs become dominant. On the other hand, although the stem of HA is immunogenically not potent, the second type of B cells eventually becomes dominant. Thus, a selection system should function in forming the repertoire of long-lived memory B cells and the stability of the epitope would greatly affect the fate of the memory cells. Acquisition of the ability to produce Abs that bind to the stable epitope could be a major factor of flu resistance.

  11. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  12. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  13. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  14. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  15. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  16. Production Of Human Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  17. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the baby is Rh-positive and the mother's antibody status is negative for anti-D, the mother is given additional RhIG. This test also may be used to help diagnose autoimmune-related hemolytic anemia ... when a person produces antibodies against his or her own RBC antigens. This ...

  18. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    Yeast surface display is an effective tool for antibody affinity maturation because yeast can be used as an all-in-one workhorse to assemble, display and screen diversified antibody libraries. By employing the natural ability of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently recombine multiple DNA...

  19. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Tim D; Carter, Paul J; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G E; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G; Parren, Paul W H I; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J; Clark, Michael R; Lowe, David C; Dahiyat, Bassil I; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A J; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Burton, Dennis R; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Chester, Kerry A; Glennie, Martin J; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a -mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies. PMID:26716992

  20. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  1. Antibody discovery: sourcing of monoclonal antibody variable domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, William R

    2014-03-01

    Historically, antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies have been sourced primarily from the mouse IgG repertoire, and typically either chimerized or humanized. More recently, human antibodies from transgenic mice producing human IgG, phage display libraries, and directly from human B lymphocytes have been used more broadly as sources of antibody variable domains for therapeutic antibodies. Of the total 36 antibodies approved by major maket regulatory agencies, the variable domain sequences of 26 originate from the mouse. Of these, four are marketed as murine antibodies (of which one is a mouse-rat hybrid IgG antibody), six are mouse-human chimeric antibodies, and 16 are humanized. Ten marketed antibodies have originated from human antibody genes, three isolated from phage libraries of human antibody genes and seven from transgenic mice producing human antibodies. Five antibodies currently in clinical trials have been sourced from camelids, as well as two from non-human primates, one from rat, and one from rabbit. Additional sources of antibody variable domains that may soon find their way into the clinic are potential antibodies from sharks and chickens. Finally, the various methods for retrieval of antibodies from humans, mouse and other sources, including various display technologies and amplification directly from B cells, are described. PMID:24168292

  2. [Continuous perfusion culture hybridoma cells for production of monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Li; Li, Ling; Feng, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2002-05-01

    Hybridoma cells were cultured by continuous perfusion in Fibra-Cel of 5L packed-bed bioreactor for 22 days in low serum or serum-free media. The corresponded amino acids were fed and serum concentration was decreased by analyzing glucose concentration, oxygen uptake rate, secretary antibody amount and amino acids concentration in culture supernatant. Comparing with continuous perfusion culture that amino acids were not fed, antibody amount of production was increased about 2-3 times. The inoculated cell density was 2.5 x 10(5) cells/mL, while the final cell density was 8.79 x 10(8) cells/mL. Antibody production was reached 295 mg/L/d at average level, and the highest level was reached 532 mg/L/d. These results provided a primary mode of enlarge culture for monoclonal antibody industralization. PMID:12192875

  3. Radiolabelled antibodies in imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent technological advances make it possible to produce pure (monoclonal) antibodies in unlimited quantities without the need for continuous immunization of animals and to label these antibodies with a variety of radionuclides which can be traced by single-photon computed tomography. An outline review of the state of the art is presented, with particular reference to the imaging of myocardial infarcts and to tumour imaging studies using labelled monoclonal antibodies (sup(99m)Tc and 125I). Lengthy bibliography. (U.K.)

  4. Response of early-weaned pigs to an enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (K88) challenge when fed diets containing spray-dried porcine plasma or pea protein isolate plus egg yolk antibody, zinc oxide, fumaric acid, or antibiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Asiedu, A; Nyachoti, C M; Marquardt, R R

    2003-07-01

    The effect of feeding diets containing either spray-dried porcine plasma (SDPP) or pea protein-isolate (PPI) supplemented with either egg yolk antibodies (EYA) from hens immunized with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) (K88 and F18) antigens, ZnO, fumaric acid (FA), or carbadox (AB) on pig performance, incidence of scours, and gut morphology was studied in a 14-d experiment. Ninety 10-d-old weaned pigs were assigned to six dietary treatments in a completely randomized design to give five pens per treatment with three pigs per pen. The diets were SDPP without EYA (SDPP - EYA), PPI without EYA (PPI - EYA), PPI with EYA (PPI + EYA), PPI with ZnO (PPI + ZnO), PPI with FA (PPI + FA), or PPI with AB (PPI + AB). Diets were formulated to similar nutrient levels, with AB, EYA, FA, and ZnO at 0.25, 0.5, 2.0, and 0.4% of the diet, respectively. Pigs were weighed and bled on d 0, 7, and 14 to determine plasma urea N (PUN). Pigs were orally challenged with a 6-mL dose of 10(10) cfu/mL ETEC (K88) on d 7. On d 14, three pigs per treatment were killed to obtain sections of the small intestine for histological measurements. Weekly feed intake, BW changes, and gain:feed were determined. Incidence of scours and scour scores were monitored and fecal swabs were taken before and after ETEC challenge for PCR test to detect ETEC (K88). Feeding SDPP or supplementing PPI-based diets with EYA, ZnO, FA, or AB did not affect (P > 0.05) ADG, ADFI (as-fed basis), or gain:feed throughout the study. However, pigs fed PPI - EYA tended to have lower (P = 0.08) ADFI during wk 2 (137.9 g/d) and lower (P pigs 8 h after the ETEC challenge, it lasted only 3 to 5 d in pigs fed SDPP or PPI supplemented with EYA, ZnO, FA, or AB. Pigs fed PPI - EYA continued to have severe diarrhea, resulting in 40% mortality vs. 13% or less in the other groups. The PCR results showed that 81% of PPI-fed pigs continued to shed ETEC K88 7 d after ETEC challenge. Pigs fed PPI-EYA had shorter villi (P pigs to efficiently

  5. 大田软海绵酸人工抗原的合成及其多克隆抗体的制备%Synthesis of artificial antigen and preparation of polyclonal antibody against okadaic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽; 桑亚新; 周群标; 王向红

    2011-01-01

    采用活化酯法将大田软海绵酸(OA)与匙孔血蓝蛋白(KLH)偶联制备免疫抗原(OA-KLH),用还原聚丙烯酸胺凝胶电泳法和红外光谱法对人工抗原的偶联效果进行分析,通过免疫兔子制备抗体,所得抗血清经Protein A凝胶层析柱纯化处理后,用紫外全波长扫描和间接竞争ELISA法验证纯化效果.结果表明,免疫抗原偶联成功并获得了高亲和力的多克隆抗血清,抗血清纯化后浓度为2.16mg/mL,间接竞争ELISA测定其滴度为12800、IC15为3.41ng/ML,为建立快速、经济的检测方法打下了基础.%Okadaic acid (OA) is one kind of lipophilic marine biotoxins, and main pathogenic factor of diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP). In this paper, the artificial antigen was made by coupling hapten of OA with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) using active ester method, and the artificial antigen was tested by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and IR spectrum. After being obtained from rabbits, the antiserum was purified by Chromatography on Protein A Sepharose CL^IB gel column, and the purification efficiency was verified by ultraviolet scanning and ciELISA. The results showed the artificial antigen was prepared successfully and lots of interfering substances were removed. After being purified, the concentration of antiserum was 2.16 mg/mL,it had high titer(12 800)and sensitivity (the value of IC15 was 3.41 ng/mL), which was tested by ciELISA. The success of obtaining polyclonal antibody against OA with high titer and affinity provides the solid foundation which is practical and theoretical for developing rapid and economical detections.

  6. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  7. HIV Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: HIV Screening Tests; AIDS Test; AIDS Screen; HIV Serology; ...

  8. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood may be due to: Chronic liver disease Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Myositis (inflammatory muscle disease) ... Saunders; 2011:chap 51. Read More Antibody Arthritis Collagen vascular disease Drug-induced lupus erythematosus Liver disease Scleroderma Systemic ...

  9. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOLKOVA E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the use of monoclonal antibodies in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics of oncological diseases and their production using hybridoma technolody with flow diagram and technological scheme of manufacturing process

  10. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    OpenAIRE

    TOLKOVA E.S.

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the use of monoclonal antibodies in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics of oncological diseases and their production using hybridoma technolody with flow diagram and technological scheme of manufacturing process

  11. Structural Comparison of Different Antibodies Interacting with Parvovirus Capsids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafenstein, Susan; Bowman, Valorie D.; Sun, Tao; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Palermo, Laura M.; Chipman, Paul R.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Cornell; Purdue

    2009-05-13

    The structures of canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline parvovirus (FPV) complexed with antibody fragments from eight different neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstruction to resolutions varying from 8.5 to 18 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of one of the Fab molecules and the sequence of the variable domain for each of the Fab molecules have been determined. The structures of Fab fragments not determined crystallographically were predicted by homology modeling according to the amino acid sequence. Fitting of the Fab and virus structures into the cryoEM densities identified the footprints of each antibody on the viral surface. As anticipated from earlier analyses, the Fab binding sites are directed to two epitopes, A and B. The A site is on an exposed part of the surface near an icosahedral threefold axis, whereas the B site is about equidistant from the surrounding five-, three-, and twofold axes. One antibody directed to the A site binds CPV but not FPV. Two of the antibodies directed to the B site neutralize the virus as Fab fragments. The differences in antibody properties have been linked to the amino acids within the antibody footprints, the position of the binding site relative to the icosahedral symmetry elements, and the orientation of the Fab structure relative to the surface of the virus. Most of the exposed surface area was antigenic, although each of the antibodies had a common area of overlap that coincided with the positions of the previously mapped escape mutations.

  12. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transg...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    reached at least 3/4 confluency, 2 ampules/cell culture. Save the supernatants for further studies. Regarding to separate the interested cells of irrelevant cells, you must been do a limited diluted procedures. Ascitis production. To produce ascitis the number of cells depend of the every particular clone. Usually we inoculated ip between 1 to 2 x106 cells/ml/mice in PBS buffer. The animals must be inoculated intraperitonealy with Pristan (Sigma) or mineral oil using 0.5 ml per mice. The inoculation could be occurred 7 to 10 days before to inoculated the clone. The weight of the animals must be controlled in order to obtain better yield. The bioreactors are an alternative method to produce AcMs without it have not used animals models. IgG purification process on protein A columns. Mouse antibodies of the IgG1 subclass do not have a high affinity for protein A. Every subclass could be eluted at different peaks using a gradient pH. Usually we use 3M NaCl/1.5 M Gly pH 8.9 as a coupling buffer. For eluting IgGs we use 0.1M Citric Acid in a gradient pH (6 to IgG1, 5 to IgG2a or IgG2b, 4 IgG3). 1. Adjust a Sepharose Protein A (Pharmacia) beads using NaCl/1.5 M Gly pH 8.9 (coupling buffer). 2. Diluted the ascitis 1:10 in coupling buffer using a filter paper for remove the aggregations. 3. Pass the solution trough a Protein A bead column at a standarized flow according your equipment. The capacity of the Protein A beads for IgGl is approximately 5 mg/ml of wet beads. Ascitis contain between 1-10 mg/ml. 4. Wash the colums with 10 volumes of coupling buffer. 5. Elute the column with 0.1 M Citric Acid in a gradient pH starting at 6 to 4. Collect the eluate in appropriate tube, and identify the immunoglobulin-containing fractions by absorbance a 280 nm (1 DO = 0.8 mg/ml)

  14. Detection of antitrophoblast antibodies in the sera of patients with anticardiolipin antibodies and fetal loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrae, K R; DeMichele, A M; Pandhi, P; Balsai, M J; Samuels, P; Graham, C; Lala, P K; Cines, D B

    1993-11-01

    Women with anticardiolipin antibodies (ACLA) are at increased risk for fetal loss. One potential explanation for this outcome is that sera from these individuals contain antibodies reactive with trophoblast cells, which are involved in the establishment of the uteroplacental vasculature and maintenance of placental blood fluidity. To examine this hypothesis, we compared the incidence of trophoblast-reactive antibodies in 27 patients with ACLA and a history of fetal loss with that in 29 normal pregnant women. Sera from 20 patients, but only one control, contained trophoblast-reactive antibodies (P trophoblast cells. In most cases, sera from which ACLA were adsorbed by cardiolipin-containing liposomes maintained reactivity against cells. In addition, patient Ig fractions immunoprecipitated an approximately 62-kD protein from the trophoblast cell surface, stimulated the release of arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 by trophoblasts, and inhibited the binding of prourokinase to trophoblast urokinase receptors. These observations show that sera from women with ACLA and a history of fetal loss contain antitrophoblast antibodies. These antibodies may be serologically distinct from ACLA, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of fetal demise. PMID:7693045

  15. Antibody-Catalyzed Degradation of Cocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Donald W.; Zhao, Kang; Yang, Ginger X.-Q.; Glickman, Michael; Georgiadis, Taxiarchis M.

    1993-03-01

    Immunization with a phosphonate monoester transition-state analog of cocaine provided monoclonal antibodies capable of catalyzing the hydrolysis of the cocaine benzoyl ester group. An assay for the degradation of radiolabeled cocaine identified active enzymes. Benzoyl esterolysis yields ecgonine methyl ester and benzoic acid, fragments devoid of cocaine's stimulant activity. Passive immunization with such an artificial enzyme could provide a treatment for dependence by blunting reinforcement.

  16. Monoclonal Antibody Analysis of Keratin Expression in the Central Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franko, Maryellen C.; Gibbs, Clarence J.; Rhoades, Dorothy A.; Carleton Gajdusek, D.

    1987-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody directed against a 65-kDa brain protein demonstrates an epitope found in keratin from human epidermis. By indirect immunofluorescence, the antibody decorates intracytoplasmic filaments in a subclass of astrocytes and Purkinje cells of adult hamster brain. Double-label immunofluorescence study using antibody to glial fibrillary acidic protein and this antibody reveals the 65-kDa protein to be closely associated with glial filaments in astrocytes of fetal mouse brain cultures. Immunoblot analysis of purified human epidermal keratin and hamster brain homogenate confirms the reactivity of this antibody to epidermal keratin polypeptides. All the major epidermal keratins were recognized by this antibody. It did not bind to the remaining major intermediate filament proteins. These findings suggest that monoclonal antibody 34C9 recognizes a cytoskeletal structure connected with intermediate filaments. In addition, the monoclonal antibody demonstrates that epidermal keratins share an epitope not only among themselves but also with a ``neural keratin.''

  17. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for group B streptococcal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Rote, N S; N. L. TAYLOR; Shigeoka, A O; Scott, J R; Hill, H R

    1980-01-01

    We report here on the development of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for antibodies to types II and III group B streptococci. Streptococcal antigens were prepared by trichloroacetic acid extraction and fractional alcohol precipitation. Microtiter wells were coated with antigen in 0.1 M carbonate buffer at pH 9.6. Lyophilization was found to be an essential step for efficient binding of the streptococcal antigens. After incubation with antibody-containing rabbit serum, bound antibo...

  18. Characterization of a Monoclonal Antibody against Syringate Derivatives: Application of Immunochemical Detection of Methyl Syringate in Honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yoji; Fujinaka, Rie; Juri, Maki; Yoshiki, Yui; Ishisaka, Akari; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Nitta, Yoko; Ishikawa, Hirohito

    2016-08-24

    Syringic acid is one of the key skeletal structures of plant-derived chemicals. The derivatives of syringic acid have certain biological functions. In this study, a monoclonal antibody to syringic acid-based phytochemicals was prepared and characterized. The obtained antibody reacted with methyl syringate, syringic acid, and leonurine. Methyl syringate is a characteristic compound found in manuka honey, other honey varieties, and plants. Manuka honey was fractionated using HPLC, and the reactivity of the fractions with the antibody was examined. The antibody reacted with the fraction in which methyl syringate was eluted. The amount of methyl syringate in honeys as estimated by ELISA using the antibody had a good linearity compared with that estimated by HPLC. These results suggest that the antibody is applicable for the immunochemical detection of syringic acid derivatives in plants and foods. PMID:27477590

  19. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn; Sørensen, Per S

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  20. Development of Biodegradable Nanocarriers Loaded with a Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gdowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatments utilizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics against intracellular protein-protein interactions in cancer cells have been hampered by several factors, including poor intracellular uptake and rapid lysosomal degradation. Our current work examines the feasibility of encapsulating monoclonal antibodies within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles using a water/oil/water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. This method can be used to prepare protective polymeric nanoparticles for transporting functional antibodies to the cytoplasmic compartment of cancer cells. Nanoparticles were formulated and then characterized using a number of physical and biological parameters. The average nanoparticle size ranged from 221 to 252 nm with a low polydispersity index. Encapsulation efficiency of 16%–22% and antibody loading of 0.3%–1.12% were observed. The antibody molecules were released from the nanoparticles in a sustained manner and upon release maintained functionality. Our studies achieved successful formulation of antibody loaded polymeric nanoparticles, thus indicating that a PLGA-based antibody nanoformulation is a promising intracellular delivery vehicle for a large number of new intracellular antibody targets in cancer cells.

  1. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  2. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  3. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red ...

  4. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  5. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  6. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  7. The Possible Role of Transplacentally-Acquired Antibodies to Infectious Agents, With Molecular Mimicry to Nervous System Sialic Acid Epitopes, as Causes of Neuromental Disorders: Prevention and Vaccine Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André J. Nahmias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Proof of causality of most neuromental disorders (NMD's is largely unavailable. Lessons from four-decade investigations of the epidemiology, immunology, pathogenesis, prevention and therapy of perinatal infectious agents, which invade directly the nervous system, have led us to propose a new indirect effect hypothesis: maternal transplacentally-acquired antibodies, to agents with epitope molecular mimicry with the developing nervous system, can cross the fetus/infant's blood–nervous system barriers to cause NMD's, clinically manifest years later.

  8. Recombinant antibodies and tumor targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Sheikholvaezin, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Different antibody derived constructs are rapidly advancing as putative tools for treatment of malignant diseases. Antibody engineering has added significant new technologies to modify size, affinities, solubility, stability and biodistribution properties for immunoconjugates. In the present thesis, the aim was to increase our knowledge on how new recombinant antibodies could be tailored to optimize localization to experimental tumors in mice. One hybridoma, producing the monoclonal antibody ...

  9. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M.; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Bi...

  10. Radiolabeled antibodies as imaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author gives a survey of the progress made on radioimmunodetection. Antibodies may now be more readily used in scintigraphy as a result of the development of labeling methods that apply more suitable radionuclides without significant loss of the antigen-binding activity. Antibodies to tumor-specific or tumor-associated antigens can now be produced in large quantities by monoclonal antibody technology

  11. Replacing antibodies with aptamers in lateral flow immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ailiang; Yang, Shuming

    2015-09-15

    Aptamers have been identified against various targets as a type of chemical or nucleic acid ligand by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamers show remarkable advantages over antibodies due to the nucleic acid nature and target-induced structure-switching properties and are widely used to design various fluorescent, electrochemical, or colorimetric biosensors. However, the practical applications of aptamer-based sensing and diagnostics are still lagging behind those of antibody-based tests. Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) represents a well established and appropriate technology among rapid assays because of its low cost and user-friendliness. The antibody-based platform is utilized to detect numerous targets, but it is always hampered by the antibody preparation time, antibody stability, and effect of modification on the antibody. Seeking alternatives to antibodies is an area of active research and is of tremendous importance. Aptamers are receiving increasing attention in lateral flow applications because of a number of important potential performance advantages. We speculate that aptamer-based LFIA may be one of the first platforms for commercial use of aptamer-based diagnosis. This review first gives an introduction to aptamer including the selection process SELEX with its focus on aptamer advantages over antibodies, and then depicts LFIA with its focus on aptamer opportunities in LFIA over antibodies. Furthermore, we summarize the recent advances in the development of aptamer-based lateral flow biosensing assays with the aim to provide a general guide for the design of aptamer-based lateral flow biosensing assays. PMID:25912679

  12. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E. (Vanderbilt); (Scripps); (CDC)

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  13. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B; Swan, J C; Parrillo, J E; Masur, H

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii...... reacted with human P. carinii, and none of four monoclonal antibodies to human P. carinii reacted with rat P. carinii. Two antibodies to human P. carinii reacted by immunofluorescence with only one human P. carinii isolate. Immunoblot studies identified major antigens of rat P. carinii with molecular...

  15. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  16. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps......Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...

  17. Monoclonal antibody as radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purification of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody 4C11 belonging to IgG sub(2a) subclass from mouse ascitis, donated by Ludwig Institute, Brazil was developed. The fragmentation of purified IgG sub(2a) by pepsin digestion and analytical studies by polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) were done as preliminary assessment for their specific application in immunoscintigraphy. (author)

  18. Anticardiolipin antibodies in leptospirosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Rugman, F P; Pinn, G.; Palmer, M. F.; Waite, M.; Hay, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical course and serology of 16 cases of leptospirosis in an area with an unusually high endemic infection rate were studied to gain further insight into the pathology of the secondary immune phase that is typical of the disease. IgG anticardiolipin antibody concentrations were measured by immunoassay and found to be increased in eight serologically confirmed cases with severe complicated disease, compared with eight patients with relatively uncomplicated leptospirosis who had IgG anti...

  19. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin. PMID:23098305

  20. Antibody therapy for Ebola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with fatality rates up to 90%, and are identified as biosafety level 4 pathogens and CDC Category A Agents of Bioterrorism. To date, there are no approved therapies and vaccines available to treat these infections. Antibody therapy was estimated to be an effective and powerful treatment strategy against infectious pathogens in the late 19th, early 20th centuries but has fallen short to meet expectations to widely combat infectious diseases. Passive immunization for Ebola virus was successful in 2012, after over 15 years of failed attempts leading to skepticism that the approach would ever be of potential benefit. Currently, monoclonal antibody (mAbs)-based therapies are the most efficient at reversing the progression of a lethal Ebola virus infection in nonhuman primates, which recapitulate the human disease with the highest similarity. Novel combinations of mAbs can even fully cure lethally infected animals after clinical symptoms and circulating virus have been detected, days into the infection. These new developments have reopened the door for using antibody-based therapies for filovirus infections. Furthermore, they are reigniting hope that these strategies will contribute to better control the spread of other infectious agents and provide new tools against infectious diseases. PMID:24503566

  1. Effects of Supplementation of Various Medium Components on Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Cultures Producing Recombinant Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do Yun; Lee, Joon Chul; Chang, Ho Nam; Oh, Duk Jae

    2005-01-01

    Thirteen vitamins, twenty amino acids, hormones, inorganic salts, and other chemical agents, which constitute typical serum-free media, were evaluated for the development of fortified medium to enhance cell growth and productivity of recombinant antibody in the cultures of the recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (rCHO) cells. Two different rCHO cell lines, rCHO-A producing recombinant antibodies against the human platelet and rCHO-B secreting recombinant antibodies against the S surface antigen...

  2. BAFF Blockade Prevents Anti-Drug Antibody Formation in a Mouse Model of Pompe Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Doerfler, Phillip A.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W; Morel, Laurence; Barry J Byrne

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies formed against the therapeutic protein are a life-threatening complication that arises during enzyme replacement therapy for Pompe disease (acid α-glucosidase deficiency; GAA). To provide an effective alternative to current practices, we investigated the capacity of anti-B-cell activating factor (BAFF) as a novel drug candidate to prevent antibody formation in a Pompe disease mouse model. A BAFF-neutralizing antibody was administered prophylactically and with maintenance doses in a...

  3. Measuring the sequence-affinity landscape of antibodies with massively parallel titration curves

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Rhys M.; Kinney, Justin B.; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the central role that antibodies play in the adaptive immune system and in biotechnology, much remains unknown about the quantitative relationship between an antibody's amino acid sequence and its antigen binding affinity. Here we describe a new experimental approach, called Tite-Seq, that is capable of measuring binding titration curves and corresponding affinities for thousands of variant antibodies in parallel. The measurement of titration curves eliminates the confounding effects ...

  4. Detection of tubercular antibody and antigen in sera of bone and joint tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pramanik, J; Lodam, A. N.; Badole, C.M.; Reddy, M. V. R.; Patond, K. R.; Harinath, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    Trichloroacetic acid (TCA) solubilized and DEAE fractionatedMycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra excretory-secretory (ES) antigen viz., Mtb EST DE1 and affinity purified goat antibodies to the TCA solubilized ES antigen (Mtb EST) were explored in detecting tubercular antibody and antigen respectively in sera of bone and joint tuberculosis by indirect and sandwich ELISA. Out of total 36 bone & joint tuberculosis cases, tubercular antibody was detected by indirect ELISA in 30 patients (sensitivity ...

  5. Tumor targeting of radiolabeled antibodies using HYNIC chelate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an increasing interest in the use of labeled antibodies for diagnosis of cancers as well as for therapy. Various radiolabeling methods have been used in order to obtain better tumor specific targeting for detection and therapy. It was generally used to tumor targeted immunotherapy and immunodetection that lym-1, mouse monoclonal antibody, was specific binding to surface antigen of Raji. The 3E8 antibody was produced from humanized anti-TAG-72 monoclonal antibody (AKA) by amino acid change in 95-99 residues of heavy chain complementary determinant regions (HCDRs) 3 using phage displayed library technology. In this study, we are investigating the usefulness of HYNIC chelate as a bifunctional chelating agent in radioimmunodetecton of tumor. Two types of antibodies, Lym-1 and 3E8, were used for the conjugation with HYNIC chelate. Lym-1 and 3E8 are specific antibodies to surface antigen of Non-Hogkin's lymphoma and TAG-72 antigen of colorectal carcinoma, respectively. We prepare HYNIC-antibody conjugates, determine radiolabeling yield with 99mTc and evaluate tumor targeting in tumor bearing nude mice model

  6. Phospho-Specific Antibody Probes of Intermediate Filament Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hidemasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kasahara, Kousuke; Inagaki, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments (IFs) form one of the major cytoskeletal systems in the cytoplasm or beneath the nuclear membrane. Accumulating data have suggested that IF protein phosphorylation dramatically changes IF structure/dynamics in cells. For the production of an antibody recognizing site-specific protein phosphorylation (a site- and phosphorylation state-specific antibody), we first employed a strategy to immunize animals with an in vitro-phosphorylated polypeptide or a phosphopeptide (corresponding to a phosphorylated residue and its surrounding sequence of amino acids), instead of a phosphorylated protein. Our established methodology not only improves the chance of obtaining a phospho-specific antibody but also has the advantage that one can predesign a targeted phosphorylation site. It is now applied to the production of an antibody recognizing other types of site-specific posttranslational modification, such as acetylation or methylation. The use of such an antibody in immunocytochemistry enables us to analyze spatiotemporal distribution of site-specific IF protein phosphorylation. The antibody is of great use to identify a protein kinase responsible for in vivo IF protein phosphorylation and to monitor intracellular kinase activities through IF protein phosphorylation. Here, we present an overview of our methodology and describe stepwise approaches for the antibody characterization. We also provide some examples of analyses for IF protein phosphorylation involved in mitosis and signal transduction. PMID:26795468

  7. A novel affinity purification method to isolate peptide specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Alan E; Lernmark, A; Kofod, Hans; Dyrberg, T

    1990-01-01

    affinity-purify anti-peptide antibodies. To test our system, rabbits were immunized with model peptides representing sequences of the putative rabbit growth hormone receptor and several HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules. Polystyrene plastic beads were coated with peptides. Immune serum was incubated with the...... beads and after a wash step the bound antibodies were eluted in 1 M acetic acid. The eluted material was composed predominantly of intact immunoglobulin as evidenced by the presence of heavy and light chain bands in SDS-PAGE. The eluted antibodies were peptide specific in ELISA and bound only to intact......, antigenic protein in immunoblot analyses. The sequence-specific nature of the eluted antibodies was confirmed since binding to the antigenic proteins could be displaced by the immunizing but not by unrelated peptides....

  8. Second antibody clearance of radiolabeled antibody in cancer radioimmunodetection.

    OpenAIRE

    Sharkey, R M; Primus, F J; Goldenberg, D. M.

    1984-01-01

    The imaging of tumors using radiolabeled antibodies previously has required the implementation of computer-assisted subtraction techniques to reduce background radioactivity. A decrease in radioactivity in the blood of hamsters bearing human colonic tumor xenografts has been achieved by administering a second antibody directed against a radiolabeled primary antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). This method was found to reduce the level of blood radioactivity by a factor of 4 within 2 hr...

  9. A Novel Scheme for Production of Polyclonal Antibody against Estrogenic Bisphenols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A polyclonal antibody against the currently concerned estrogenic bisphcnol compoundswas produced according to a new scheme. 4,4-Bis (4-hydroxyphenyl) valeric acid was used tosynthesize the complete antigen in which the characteristic bisphenol structure was exposed to thelargest extent. The produced polyclonal antibody showed high specificity and affinity forbisphenol A.

  10. Induction and characterization of multianalyte antibodies against penicillins in egg yolk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuw, de P.; Kapa, G.; Petz, M.; Schreurs, F.J.G.; Kan, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    Antibodies against penicillins were induced in eggs of laying hens after immunization with 6-aminopenicillanic acid (6-APA) coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Development of the antibody titer was monitored by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with 6-APA coupled to oval

  11. Protective effects of L-type fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) in proximal tubular cells against glomerular injury in anti-GBM antibody-mediated glomerulonephritis

    OpenAIRE

    Kanaguchi, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Yusuke; Osaki, Ken; Sugaya, Takeshi; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Background. In glomerulonephritis (GN), an overload of free fatty acids (FFA) bound to albumin in urinary protein may induce oxidative stress in the proximal tubules. Human liver-type fatty acid-binding protein (hL-FABP) expressed in human proximal tubules, but not rodents, participates in intracellular FFA metabolism and exerts anti-oxidative effects on the progression of tubulointerstitial damage. We examined whether tubular enhancement of this anti-oxidative action modulates the progressio...

  12. Antibody Glossary —

    Science.gov (United States)

    The components of the immune system have diverse roles in the initial development of cancers, progression of early-stage malignancies to invasive tumors, establishment of metastatic lesions, tumor dormancy, and response or resistance to therapy. Characterizing the components of the immune system and their functional status in tissues and in tumors requires the use of highly specific reagents. Researchers employ antibodies in a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications to delineate, enrich, or deplete specific immune subsets in order to understand their role(s) in tumorigenesis. This is a glossary of validated reagents and protocols that are useful for functional phenotyping of the immune system in murine cancer models.

  13. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  14. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  15. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (sec...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  17. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approv...

  18. Empowered Antibody Therapies - IBC conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Jens

    2010-10-01

    The Empowered Antibody Therapies conference, held in Burlingame, CA, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of multispecific antibodies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on DVD-Igs from Abbott Laboratories, ImmTACs from Immunocore, 'Dock-and-Lock' technology from Immunomedics, the bispecific BiTE antibody blinatumomab from Micromet, and Triomabs from TRION Pharma and Fresenius Biotech. PMID:20878591

  19. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... (iii) antibody numbering and IMGT. Here, we review “antibody informatics,” which may integrate the above three fields so that bridging the gaps between industrial needs and academic solutions can be accelerated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering...

  20. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab)2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  1. Identification of a linear epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed to the heterogeneous nucleoriboprotein A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tronstrøm, Julie; Dragborg, Anette H.; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar; Trier, Nicole Hartwig

    2014-01-01

    ), where the amino acids Ser, Ile and Asp were found to be essential for antibody reactivity. These amino acids were found to contribute to the antibody-antigen interface through side-chain interactions, possibly in combination with a positively charged amino acid in position 77. Moreover, the amino acids...... in the N-terminal end (Pro and His) were found to contribute to the interface through backbone contributions. No notable reactivity was found with RA-positive patient sera, thus screening of RA33 antibodies does not seem to be a supplementary for the diagnosis of RA....

  2. Creating Ordered Antibody Arrays with Antibody-Polymer Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie; Olsen, Bradley

    Antibodies are a category of functional proteins that play crucial roles in the immune system and have been widely applied in the area of cancer therapeutics, targeting delivery, signal detection, and sensors. Due to the extremely large size and lack of specific functional groups on the surface, it is challenging to functionalize antibodies and manipulate the ordered packing of antibodies in an array with high density and proper orientation, which is critical to achieve outstanding performance in materials. In this work, we demonstrate an efficient and facile approach for preparing antibody-polymer conjugates with two-step sequential ``click'' reaction to form antibody-polymer block copolymers. Highly ordered nanostructures are fabricated based on the principles of block copolymer self-assembly. The nanostructures are studied with both small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lamellae with alternating antibody domain and polymer domain are observed with an overall domain size of ~50 nm. The nanostructure not only increases the packing density and promotes proper orientation of the antibody, but also provides possible channel to facilitate substrate transportation and improves the stability of the antibody.

  3. Antibodies against a preselected peptide recognize and neutralize foot and mouth disease virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Pfaff, E; Mussgay, M.; Böhm, H O; Schulz, G. E.; Schaller, H

    1982-01-01

    A major antibody combining site on foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O1K has been identified in a predicted surface helix of viral protein 1 (VP1) between amino acid residues 144 and 159. A hexadecapeptide covering this sequence elicits high titers of antibodies that specifically recognize and neutralize FMDV. The high quality of the immune response is attributed to a particularly stable conformation of the antigenic amino acid sequence, which is most likely an alpha-helix.

  4. Capture ELISA for IgM antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum glutamate rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Borre, Mette; Petersen, E; Högh, B; Jepsen, S; Vuust, J; Axelsen, N

    1992-01-01

    -galactosidase fusion protein and used as antigen after purification and biotinylation. Specific IgM antibodies were found in 51% (39/77) of sera from adult Liberians immune to malaria. The binding of IgM antibodies was specific for the malaria portion of the fusion protein and no cross-reactivity was found in sera...... from patients with IgM antibodies due to other diseases. Inhibition studies with a fusion protein containing amino acid residues 816-1134 (GLURP816-1134) representing the carboxy-terminal repeat region suggested a different use of epitopes for IgM antibodies in different individuals....

  5. A monoclonal antibody toolkit for C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayla Hadwiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1, a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10, a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1, a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4, which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2, a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5; to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1; to EHD1 (RME-1 a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1, a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1, a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8 that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60 targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1, a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7 of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1 and to the alpha-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2 as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1 and cadherin (HMR-1, both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1, which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413 which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7 which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to

  6. Antiphospholipid antibodies and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chighizola, C B; de Jesus, G R

    2014-10-01

    Since the late 1980s some publications have proposed that antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) may have some relationship with infertility, considering reported deleterious effects that aPL exert on trophoblast proliferation and growth. Although not included in current classification criteria for antiphospholipid syndrome, many physicians investigate for aPL in patients with a history of infertility, including antibodies not listed in classification criteria, and most of those patients will receive anticoagulant therapy if any of those antibodies have a result considered positive. A review of literature was conducted searching for studies that investigated the association of aPL and infertility and if aPL positivity alters in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome. The definition of infertility, routine work-up to exclude other causes of infertility, definition of IVF failure as inclusion criteria and control populations were heterogeneous among studies. Most of them enrolled women over 40 years of age, and exclusion of other confounding factors was also inconsistent. Of 29 studies that assessed aPL positivity rates in infertile women, the majority had small sample sizes, implying a lack of power, and 13 (44.8%) reported higher frequency of aPL in infertile patients compared to controls, but most of them investigated a panel of non-criteria aPL tests, whose clinical significance is highly controversial. Only two studies investigated all three criteria tests, and medium-high titer of anticardiolipin cut-off conforming to international guidelines was used in one study. Considering IVF outcome, there was also disparity in this definition: few studies assessed the live birth rate, others the implantation rate. Of 14 publications that addressed the relationship between aPL and IVF outcome, only two described a detrimental effect of these autoantibodies. In conclusion, available data do not support an association between aPL and infertility, and aPL positivity does not seem to

  7. Fluorescent labeling of antibody fragments using split GFP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortunato Ferrara

    Full Text Available Antibody fragments are easily isolated from in vitro selection systems, such as phage and yeast display. Lacking the Fc portion of the antibody, they are usually labeled using small peptide tags recognized by antibodies. In this paper we present an efficient method to fluorescently label single chain Fvs (scFvs using the split green fluorescent protein (GFP system. A 13 amino acid tag, derived from the last beta strand of GFP (termed GFP11, is fused to the C terminus of the scFv. This tag has been engineered to be non-perturbing, and we were able to show that it exerted no effect on scFv expression or functionality when compared to a scFv without the GFP11 tag. Effective functional fluorescent labeling is demonstrated in a number of different assays, including fluorescence linked immunosorbant assays, flow cytometry and yeast display. Furthermore, we were able to show that this split GFP system can be used to determine the concentration of scFv in crude samples, as well an estimate of antibody affinity, without the need for antibody purification. We anticipate this system will be of widespread interest in antibody engineering and in vitro display systems.

  8. Isolation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for chondroitin sulfate E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ippei; Hikita, Tomoya; Mizuno, Haruka; Sekita, Risa; Minami, Akira; Ishii, Ami; Minamisawa, Yuka; Suzuki, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Hiroshi; Hidari, Kazuya I P J; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Chondroitin sulfate E (CSE) is a polysaccharide containing mainly disaccharide units of D-glucuronic acid (GlcA) and 4,6-O-disulfated N-acetyl-D-galactosamine (GalNAc) residues (E-unit) in the amount of ∼ 60%. CSE is involved in many biological and pathological processes. In this study, we established new monoclonal antibodies, termed E-12C and E-18H, by using CSE that contained more than 70% of E-units as an immunogen. These antibodies recognized CSE but not other CSs isomers or dermatan sulfate (DS). We evaluated the reactivities of the antibodies to 6-O-sulfated CSA (6S-CSA) and DS (6S-DS) that possessed ∼ 60% of GalNAc (4S, 6S) moieties in their structures. Neither of the antibodies reacted with 6S-DS. The antibodies strictly distinguished the structural difference of GlcA and L-iduronic acid in the polysaccharide. Binding affinities of the antibodies were determined by a surface plasmon resonance assay using CSE and 6S-CSA. The binding affinities were strongly associated with the molecular weight of CSE and the E-unit content of 6S-CSA. Moreover, we demonstrated that the antibodies are applicable to histochemical analysis. In conclusion, the new anti-CSE monoclonal antibodies specifically recognize the E-unit of CSE. The antibodies will become useful tools for the investigation of the biological and pathological significance of CSE. PMID:26036195

  9. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    Missailidis, Sotiris

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  10. Refolding Technologies for Antibody Fragments

    OpenAIRE

    Tsutomu Arakawa; Daisuke Ejima

    2014-01-01

    Refolding is one of the production technologies for pharmaceutical grade antibody fragments. Detergents and denaturants are primarily used to solubilize the insoluble proteins. The solubilized and denatured proteins are refolded by reducing the concentration of the denaturants or detergents. Several refolding technologies have been used for antibody fragments, comprising dilution, dialysis, solid phase solvent exchange and size exclusion chromatography, as reviewed here. Aggregation suppresso...

  11. ANTISPERM ANTIBODIES IN VASOVASOSTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Pourmand

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred and forty patients, who had undergone vasectomy from 1977 to 1985 and subsequent vasovasostomy ,were studied for the presence of sperm-specific antibodies by using the Kibrick's gelatin agglutination test. The number of successful pregnancies and the presence of agglutination were also considered in this survey. Sixty-nine pregnancies occurred in total and agglutination was present in 49% out of 51% positive specimens by the Kibrick Test."nThe average sperm motility was slightly higher in the negative Kibrick group than in the positive Kibrick group. The obtained data indicated that there seems to be a relationship between the increased titers and percentage of agglutination in semen samples.

  12. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Rajkannan; E J Padma Malar

    2007-09-01

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the crystal structure of monoclonal antibody specific for the pres1 region of the hepatitis B virus. At the optimized docked conformation, the interactions between the amino acids of antigen and antibody were examined. It is found that the docked complex is stabilized by 59.3 kcal/mol. The stability of the docked antigen-antibody complex is due to hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. The amino acids of the antigen and antibody responsible for the interaction were identified.

  13. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  14. Antibodies Against Annexin V and Prothrombin, Their Correlation with Other Anti-phospholipid Antibodies in Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the findings of serum antibodies against annexin V, prothrombin,ph-inositol, ph-acid, ph-ethanolamine, ph-serine, ph-glycerol, cardiolipin, and beta2-glycoprotein I and analyze the trophoblast annexin V receptorsMethods Sera from 156 patients aged 26-41 years with recurrent pregnancy loss (3-7 times) were investigated. Eighty-four fertile healthy women aged 24-38 years were included in a control group. ELISA methods were used for detecting a panel of sera anti-phospholipid antibodies. Immunolocalization of annexin Vreceptors in 143trophoblast specimens of 156patients was investigated by the immunofluorescence technique using Annexin V-FITC, Apoptosis and Annexin V-CY3 commercial kits.Results Positivity for anti-phospholipid antibodies mainly against ph-serine, phethanolamine, and ph-inositol was found together in 80. 8% (126 out of 156 patients),anti-prothrombin antibodies in 12% (18), and anti-annexin Vantibodies in 13. 5%(21) women. No significant levels of anti-phospholipid antibodies were found in 6controls. Placenta immunohistopathology also exhibited some changes manifested by the presence of apoptotic and necrotic cells in trophoblast, and very few microthrombotization in some intervillous spaces.Conclusion Our detailed study demonstrated the prevalence of majority of antiphospholipid antibodies as a high risk factor for repeated reproductive failure. Very low microthrombosis in placentas could be explained by the changes of haemocoagulation properties out of uterus.

  15. Detection of newly antibody-defined epitopes on HLA class I alleles reacting with antibodies induced during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquesnoy, R J; Hönger, G; Hösli, I; Marrari, M; Schaub, S

    2016-08-01

    The determination of HLA mismatch acceptability at the epitope level can be best performed with epitopes that have been verified experimentally with informative antibodies. The website-based International Registry of HLA Epitopes (http://www.epregistry.com.br) has a list of 81 antibody-verified HLA-ABC epitopes but more epitopes need to be added. Pregnancy offers an attractive model to study antibody responses to mismatched HLA epitopes which can be readily determined from the HLA types of child and mother. This report describes a HLAMatchmaker-based analysis of 16 postpregnancy sera tested in single HLA-ABC allele binding assays. Most sera reacted with alleles carrying epitopes that have been antibody-verified, and this study focused on the reactivity of additional alleles that share other epitopes corresponding to eplets and other amino acid residue configurations. This analysis led in the identification of 16 newly antibody-defined epitopes, seven are equivalent to eplets and nine correspond to combinations of eplets in combination with other nearby residue configurations. These epitopes will be added to the repertoire of antibody-verified epitopes in the HLA Epitope Registry. PMID:27312793

  16. Functional characterization of antibodies against Neisseria gonorrhoeae opacity protein loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica G Cole

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of a gonorrhea vaccine is challenged by the lack of correlates of protection. The antigenically variable neisserial opacity (Opa proteins are expressed during infection and have a semivariable (SV and highly conserved (4L loop that could be targeted in a vaccine. Here we compared antibodies to linear (Ab(linear and cyclic (Ab(cyclic peptides that correspond to the SV and 4L loops and selected hypervariable (HV(2 loops for surface-binding and protective activity in vitro and in vivo. METHODS/FINDINGS: Ab(SV cyclic bound a greater number of different Opa variants than Ab(SV linear, including variants that differed by seven amino acids. Antibodies to the 4L peptide did not bind Opa-expressing bacteria. Ab(SV (cyclic and Ab(HV2 (cyclic, but not Ab(SV (linear or Ab(HV2 linear agglutinated homologous Opa variants, and Ab(HV2BD (cyclic but not Ab(HV2BD (linear blocked the association of OpaB variants with human endocervical cells. Only Ab(HV2BD (linear were bactericidal against the serum resistant parent strain. Consistent with host restrictions in the complement cascade, the bactericidal activity of Ab(HV2BD (linear was increased 8-fold when rabbit complement was used. None of the antibodies was protective when administered vaginally to mice. Antibody duration in the vagina was short-lived, however, with <50% of the antibodies recovered 3 hrs post-administration. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that an SV loop-specific cyclic peptide can be used to induce antibodies that recognize a broad spectrum of antigenically distinct Opa variants and have agglutination abilities. HV(2 loop-specific cyclic peptides elicited antibodies with agglutination and adherence blocking abilities. The use of human complement when testing the bactericidal activity of vaccine-induced antibodies against serum resistant gonococci is also important.

  17. Characterization of Antibodies for Grain-Specific Gluten Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Girdhari M; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Williams, Kristina M; Pahlavan, Autusa

    2016-03-01

    Gluten ingestion causes immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or celiac disease in sensitive individuals, and a strict gluten-free diet greatly limits food choices. Immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are used to quantify gluten to ensure labeling compliance of gluten-free foods. Anti-gluten antibodies may not exhibit equal affinity to gluten from wheat, rye, and barley. Moreover, because wheat gluten is commonly used as a calibrator in ELISA, accurate gluten quantitation from rye and barley contaminated foods may be compromised. Immunoassays utilizing grain-specific antibodies and calibrators may help improve gluten quantitation. In this study, polyclonal antibodies raised against gluten-containing grain-specific peptides were characterized for their immunoreactivity to gluten from different grain sources. Strong immunoreactivity to multiple gluten polypeptides from wheat, rye, and barley was observed in the range 34 to 43 kDa with anti-gliadin, 11 to 15 and 72 to 95 kDa with anti-secalin, and 30 to 43 kDa with anti-hordein peptide antibodies, respectively. Minimal or no cross-reactivity with gluten from other grains was observed among these antibodies. The anti-consensus peptide antibody raised against a repetitive amino acid sequence of proline and glutamine exhibited immunoreactivity to gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and oat. The antibodies exhibited similar immunoreactivity with most of the corresponding grain cultivars by ELISA. The high specificity and minimal cross-reactivity of grain-specific antibodies suggest their potential use in immunoassays for accurate gluten quantitation. PMID:26878584

  18. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    EBV antibody test; EBV serology ... a lab, where a lab specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little antibody may be detected. For this reason, the test ...

  19. Measurement of antibodies to tubulin by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A solid-phase double antibody radioimmunoassay capable of measuring antibody to tubulin, the principal component of microtubules, is described. This assay is simple, combining sensitivity with specificity and also allowing determination of antibody subclasses. (Auth.)

  20. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  1. Serum Vaccine Antibody Concentrations in Children Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P.; Andersen, E. W.; Budtz-Jorgensen, E.;

    2012-01-01

    Context Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) have emerged as important food contaminants. They cause immune suppression in a rodent model at serum concentrations similar to those occurring in the US population, but adverse health effects of PFC exposure are poorly understood. Objective To determine...... perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Among PFCs in maternal pregnancy serum, PFOS showed the strongest negative correlations with antibody concentrations at age 5 years, for which a 2-fold greater concentration of exposure was associated with a difference of -39% (95% CI, -55% to -17%) in the diphtheria antibody...

  2. PRODUCTION OF A HUMAN RECOMBINANT ANTIBODY AGAINST SEROTYPE A CANDIDA ALBICANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A. Jafari

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available After using 3 different generations of antibodies including human and non-human hyperimmune sera, monoclonal antibodies and chimeric antibodies, more recently a newer approach has been developed in which the antibody genes are cloned directly from a patient peripheral B-lymphocytes and expressed in a host like E. coli. In this study the Candida albicans serotype A (NCTC 3153 mannan was purified using a modified Fehling method and used for selection of human recombinant antibody from a C. albicans phage antibody library. After four rounds of affinity selecting (panning, 2 predominant clones were chosen by DNA fingerprinting and ELISA. A 248 amino acid DNA fragment coding for anti-C. albicans mannan scFv was sequenced and cloned in a pBAD-TOPO cloning vector to produce a soluble and phage free antibody. The analysis of antibody sequences by V base Index (DNAPLOT confirmed the human antibody origin with the VH4 family in V segment of heavy variable chain and VL3 (Lambda 3 in J segment of the light variable chain. This antibody fragment was purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and inmmunoblotted as a 31kDa recombinant protein.

  3. Characterization of Tumor-Avid Antibody Fragments Genetically Engineered for Mono-Specific Radionuclide Chelation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The successful clinical application of targeted-radiopharmaceuticals depends on the development of molecules that optimize tumor specific radionuclide deposition and minimize non-specific organ irradiation. To this end, this proposal outlines a research effort to identify and evaluate novel antibodies and antibody fragments that bind breast tumors. The tumor-avid antibodies will be investigated for as imaging and therapeutic agents and to gain a better understanding of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of radiolabeled tumor-avid antibody fragments through the use of site-specifically labeled molecules. Antibodies or antibody fragments, that bind breast carcinoma carbohydrate antigens, will be obtained from hybridoma or bacteriophage library screening. More specifically, antibody fragments that bind the carcinoma-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen will be radiolabeled with 99mTc and 188Re at a natural amino acid chelation site and will be investigated in vivo for their abilities to target human breast tumors. In addition, site-specific radiolabeled antibody fragments will be biosynthesized using misacylated suppressor tRNAs. Homogeneously radiolabeled populations of antibody fragments will be used to investigate the effects of radionuclide location and chelation chemistries on their biodistribution and metabolism. It is hypothesized that site-specifically radiolabeled antibody fragments will possess enhanced tumor imaging and therapeutic properties due to optimal label location and conjugation chemistries. New insights into the factors that govern antibody metabolism in vivo are also expected from this work. Results from these studies should enhance our ability to design and synthesize radiolabeled antibody fragments that have improved pharmacokinetic properties. The studies in this proposal involve basic research into the development of antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals, with the ultimate goal of application in humans. This type of basic nuclear

  4. Characterization of Tumor-Avid Antibody Fragments Genetically Engineered for Mono-Specific Radionuclide Chelation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, T.P.

    2003-12-31

    The successful clinical application of targeted-radiopharmaceuticals depends on the development of molecules that optimize tumor specific radionuclide deposition and minimize non-specific organ irradiation. To this end, this proposal outlines a research effort to identify and evaluate novel antibodies and antibody fragments that bind breast tumors. The tumor-avid antibodies will be investigated for as imaging and therapeutic agents and to gain a better understanding of the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of radiolabeled tumor-avid antibody fragments through the use of site-specifically labeled molecules. Antibodies or antibody fragments, that bind breast carcinoma carbohydrate antigens, will be obtained from hybridoma or bacteriophage library screening. More specifically, antibody fragments that bind the carcinoma-associated Thomsen-Friedenreich (T) antigen will be radiolabeled with {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}Re at a natural amino acid chelation site and will be investigated in vivo for their abilities to target human breast tumors. In addition, site-specific radiolabeled antibody fragments will be biosynthesized using misacylated suppressor tRNAs. Homogeneously radiolabeled populations of antibody fragments will be used to investigate the effects of radionuclide location and chelation chemistries on their biodistribution and metabolism. It is hypothesized that site-specifically radiolabeled antibody fragments will possess enhanced tumor imaging and therapeutic properties due to optimal label location and conjugation chemistries. New insights into the factors that govern antibody metabolism in vivo are also expected from this work. Results from these studies should enhance our ability to design and synthesize radiolabeled antibody fragments that have improved pharmacokinetic properties. The studies in this proposal involve basic research into the development of antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals, with the ultimate goal of application in humans. This type of basic

  5. Antibody fragments: Hope and hype

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, Aaron L

    2010-01-01

    The antibody molecule is modular and separate domains can be extracted through biochemical or genetic means. It is clear from review of the literature that a wave of novel, antigen-specific molecular forms may soon enter clinical evaluation. This report examines the developmental histories of therapeutics derived from antigen-specific fragments of antibodies produced by recombinant processes. Three general types of fragments were observed, antigen-binding fragments (Fab), single chain variabl...

  6. Functional effects of anticardiolipin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, E N; Pierangeli, S S

    1996-10-01

    The 'lupus anticoagulant' phenomenon is the best documented functional effect of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies, occurring either by inhibition of the prothrombinase and/or Factor X activation reactions. Understanding the mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent coagulation reactions may yield important clues about their 'thrombogenic effects' in vivo. We conducted a series of studies to determine the specificity, diversity, and mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent reactions. Results showed that purified immunoglobulins with lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin activities were absorbed by negatively charged phospholipids and both activities were recovered from the phospholipid-antibody precipitate. Purified aPL antibodies inhibited the prothrombinase reaction in a plasma free system in which beta 2-glycoprotein 1 (beta 2-GP1) was absent. Affinity purified aPL antibodies had 25-50 times the inhibitory activity of immunoglobulin preparations. The phospholipid binding proteins, beta 2-GPI and placental anticoagulant protein I (PAP I), independently inhibited the prothrombinase reaction, and when these proteins were combined with aPL, inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction was additive. Antibodies of syphilis had no inhibitory effect, partially accounted for by lack of specificity for phosphotidylserine (PS). Although aPL antibodies inhibited the protein C activation reaction, there was no correlation of these activities with inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction. Together, these results show that aPL exert their effects by interaction with negatively charged phospholipids, in particular phosphotidylserine, but lack of correlation between inhibition of the prothrombinase and protein C activation reactions, suggests that the nature of the coagulation protein is also important. PMID:8902763

  7. The antineutrophil antibody in uveitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Young, D W

    1991-01-01

    Ninety eight patients with uveitis of various types were tested for the presence of the antineutrophil antibody or ANCA by an indirect immunofluorescence method. This antibody is found in patients with diseases associated with small vessel vasculitis, including Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyarteritis. Eleven true positive cases were found. A positive test was not associated with the anatomical site of the uveitis but was related to the time course of the disease. In particular ...

  8. Interfacial metal and antibody recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Tongqing; Hamer, Dean H.; Hendrickson, Wayne A.; Sattentau, Quentin J.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2005-01-01

    The unique ligation properties of metal ions are widely exploited by proteins, with approximately one-third of all proteins estimated to be metalloproteins. Although antibodies use various mechanisms for recognition, to our knowledge, none has ever been characterized that uses an interfacial metal. We previously described a family of CD4-reactive antibodies, the archetype being Q425. CD4:Q425 engagement does not interfere with CD4:HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein binding, but it blocks subse...

  9. Pyoderma gangrenosum and anticardiolipin antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Godoy Jose Maria

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG is a rare ulceronecrotic inflammatory cutaneous disorder and is frequently associated with systemic diseases. The authors report a 22-year-old male patient with pyoderma gangrenosum, thrombosis of both popliteal arteries, ischemic stroke and seropositivity for anticardiolipin antibody. Despite intravenous treatment with antibiotics, corticosteroid and heparin, pyoderma gangrenosum caused necrosis of his right lower limb which resulted in amputation. It was concluded that the anticardiolipin antibody may have contributed to the gravity of this case.

  10. Charge-modified single chain antibody constructs of monoclonal antibody CC49: generation, characterization, pharmacokinetics, and biodistribution analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel strategy was developed in which an antibody scFv fragment of the monoclonal antibody (MAb) CC49 was modified by engineering DNA coding sequences to lower its isoelectric point. Negatively charged amino acids were added to the carboxy terminus of the CC49 VH region by adding nucleotide sequences in a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the coding sequence of CC49 scFv. Two new DNA constructs coding for CC49 scFv with lower isoelectric points of 5.8 and 5.2 were engineered. These novel strategy-generated, charge-modified antibody constructs were compared for their immunological, pharmacokinetic, and biodistribution properties in athymic mice bearing LS-174T human colon carcinoma xenografts

  11. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  12. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  14. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author)

  15. Radioimmunoguided surgery using monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential proficiency of radioimmunoguided surgery in the intraoperative detection of tumors was assessed using labeled monoclonal antibody B72.3 in 66 patients with tissue-proved tumor. Monoclonal antibody B72.3 was injected 5 to 42 days preoperatively, and the hand-held gamma-detecting probe was used intraoperatively to detect the presence of tumor. Intraoperative probe counts of less than 20 every 2 seconds, or tumor-to-adjacent normal tissue ratios less than 2:1 were considered negative (system failure). Positive probe counts were detected in 5 of 6 patients with primary colon cancer (83 percent), in 31 of 39 patients with recurrent colon cancer (79 percent), in 4 of 5 patients with gastric cancer (80 percent), in 3 of 8 patients with breast cancer (37.5 percent), and in 4 of 8 patients with ovarian cancer (50 percent) undergoing second-look procedures. Additional patients in each group were scored as borderline positive. Overall, radioimmunoguided surgery using B72.3 identified tumors in 47 patients (71.2 percent), bordered on positive in 6 patients (9.1 percent), and failed to identify tumor in 13 patients (19.7 percent). Improved selection of patients for antigen-positive tumors, the use of higher affinity second-generation antibodies, alternate routes of antibody administration, alternate radionuclides, and more sophisticatedly bioengineered antibodies and antibody combinations should all lead to improvements in radioimmunoguided surgery

  16. Radiosensitivity of antibody responses and radioresistant secondary tetanus antitoxin responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were increasingly repressed in mice when gamma radiation doses of 100 to 400 rads were delivered by whole-body exposure prior to immunization with fluid tetanus toxoid (FTT). Nearly normal secondary antitoxin responses were obtained in mice exposed to 600 rads of gamma radiation 4 days after secondary antigenic stimulation with FTT. A rapid transition from radiosensitivity of the antibody-forming system on days 1 to 3 was followed by relative radioresistance on day 4 after the booster injection of toxoid. Studies on lymphoid cellular kinetics in popliteal lymph nodes after injection of 3H--thymidine (3H--TdR) and incorporation of 3H--L-histidine into circulating antitoxin were carried out. Analysis of tritium radioactivity in antigen--antibody precipitates of serums 2 hr after injection of the labeled amino acid revealed maximum incorporation into antibody around day 7 after the booster in nonirradiated controls and about day 12, i.e., 8 days after irradiation, in experimental mice. The shift from radiosensitivity to relative radioresistance was attributed to a marked peak of plasma-cell proliferation in the medulla of lymph nodes on day 3. Many medullary plasma cells survived and continued to proliferate after exposure to radiation. Germinal centers were destroyed by radiation within 1 day. Since antibody formation continued after exposure to radiation and after the loss of germinal centers, this supports the view that germinal-center cells were involved more in the generation of memory cells than in antibody synthesis

  17. Antibodies to a recombinant glutamate-rich Plasmodium falciparum protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogh, B; Petersen, E; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; David, K; Hanson, A; Borre, M; Holm, A; Vuust, J; Jepsen, S

    1992-01-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum antigen gene coding for a 220-kD glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) has been cloned, and the 783 C-terminal amino acids of this protein (GLURP489-1271) have been expressed as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The encoded 783 amino acid residues contain two....../RESA) (EENV)6 were examined in 423 individuals (age range 30 days-78 years) living in a malaria holoendemic area of Liberia. In the 5-9-year-old age group, subjects with anti-GLURP489-1271 antibody concentrations greater than the mean value of the group had lower parasite densities than those with low...... antibody concentrations (P = 0.0151). High levels of anti-GLURP899-916 antibodies did not correlate with low parasite densities. However, high levels of anti-(EENV)6 antibodies were associated with significantly lower parasite densities in the 2-4-year-old age group (P = 0.0189). There was no correlation...

  18. Development of a monoclonal antibody against human heart ferritin and its application in an immunoradiometric assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavanna, F.; Chieregatti, G.; Murador, E. (Farmitalia Carlo Erba, Milano (Italy). Ricerche e Sviluppo Diagnostici); Ruggeri, G.; Iacobello, C.; Albertini, A. (Facolta di Medicina, Brescia (Italy). Cattedra di Chimica); Arosio, P. (Milan Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Scienze e Tecnologie Biomediche)

    1983-11-15

    In the present report the authors describe the development of a monoclonal antibody which appears to be strictly monospecific for acidic human isoferritins. Its characteristics of specificity and affinity have been studied, and it is shown that it can be used in an immunoradiometric assay to evaluate the acidic ferritin level in serum.

  19. Production of recombinant antibodies using bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Shukra, A. M.; Sridevi, N. V.; Dev Chandran,; Kapil Maithal,

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant antibody fragments such as Fab, scFv, diabodies, triabodies, single domain antibodies and minibodies have recently emerged as potential alternatives to monoclonal antibodies, which can be engineered using phage display technology. These antibodies match the strengths of conventionally produced monoclonal antibodies and offer advantages for the development of immunodiagnostic kits and assays. These fragments not only retain the specificity of the whole monoclonal ...

  20. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  1. Evaluation of a monoclonal antibody able to detect live Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølve, Marianne; Boel, Jeppe; Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal Listeria antibody, designated B4, was evaluated. The ability of the antibody to bind to viable bacteria belonging to Listeria spp, compared to bacteria of the same species killed by beat treatment, acid or base treatment, sanitizers, and irradiation was examined. The antibody was found...... to react with viable L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, but not with heat-killed (72 degrees C, 5 min) strains of these organisms. When L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were killed by methods other than heat treatment, it was ambiguous whether the antibody detected the organism or not. It was concluded...... that the B4 antibody has potential to be used in an immune capture step to capture live L, monocytogenes and L. innocua from foods prior to identification of L. monocytogenes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)....

  2. Efficient purification of unique antibodies using peptide affinity-matrix columns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Liselotte Brix; Riise, Erik; Nielsen, Leif Kofoed;

    2004-01-01

    fragments and had no affinity for other antibodies. Using this peptide matrix MK16 IgG could be purified from cell culture supernatants thereby separating MK16 IgG from bovine IgG normally present in the enriched growth media used for such cells. Investigations of the fine specificity of the ER6.1 peptide......Phage display technology was used to identify peptide ligands with unique specificity for a monoclonal model antibody, MK16, that recognises the human multiple sclerosis associated MHC class II molecule DR2 in complex with a myelin basic protein (MBP)-derived peptide corresponding to residue 85...... demonstrated that it recognised a unique epitope within the heavy chain CDR3 region of the MK16 antibody. Thus, variants of MK16 antibody, which had retained the specificity and affinity of the original antibody but had slightly different amino acid composition in the CDR3 region, were not recognised by the ER...

  3. Radioimmunoassay for anticollagen-antibodies using 14C-labelled collagen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay for anticollagen antibodies is described. 14C-labelled human acid-soluble collagen of high specific activity (5 x 106 dpm/mg) is used as antigen either in native or denatured state. Experimentally induced anticollagen antibodies or RA synovial fluids containing antibodies to collagen are reacted with the labelled antigen. The immune complexes formed are precipitated with goat antiserum to rabbit globulins ('second antibody'). A systematic investigation of the labelled collagen in regard to cleavage by enzymes, fibril formation and specificity showed that no gross alteration had been caused by the labelling procedure. The assay furnishes information on the avidity, specificity and immunoglobulin class of experimental or pathological anticollagen antibodies. It can also be used as sensitive assay for collagen in biological fluids

  4. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015. PMID:26651519

  5. Effect of chelating agents on the distribution of monoclonal antibodies in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for altering the biodistribution of radiolabel from gallium- and indium-labeled mouse monoclonal antibodies was investigated in mice using metal chelating agents. The chelating agents used were desferrioxamine (DFO), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), ethylenediamine-di (O-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) (EDHPA), and 2,2' dipyridyl (DIPY). The mouse monoclonal antibody LICR-LON-M8 was labeled with 111In after conjugation to DTPA, and with 67Ga after conjugation to DFO. All the chelating agents except DIPY altered the biodistribution of [67Ga]citrate and [111In]citrate but did not affect the 48-hr tissue uptake of label from [111In]DTPA-M8 or [67Ga]DFO-M8, confirming the in vivo stability of the antibody conjugates. Label fixed in the tissues was inaccessible to the chelating agents, indicating that they will not be suitable for reducing the high background liver radioactivity in patients undergoing scanning with indium-labeled antibodies

  6. Are Onconeural Antibodies a Clinical Phenomenology in Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs occur in patients with cancer and can cause clinical symptoms and signs of dysfunction of the nervous system that are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinical syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC, lymphoma, and gynecological tumors. The finding of highly specific antibodies directed against onconeural antigens has revolutionized the diagnosis and promoted the understanding of these syndromes and led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Accumulating data strongly suggested direct pathogenicity of these antibodies. The field of PNS has expanded rapidly in the past few years with the discovery of limbic encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65, the voltage (VGKC-gated potassium channel complex, the methyl (N-NMDA-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA (B receptors, and so forth. Despite this, the clinical spectrum of these diseases has not yet been fully investigated. The clinical importance of these conditions lies in their frequent response to immunotherapies and, less commonly, their association with distinctive tumors. This review provides an overview on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of PNS, with emphasis on the role of antibodies in limbic encephalitis.

  7. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  8. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies. PMID:26210205

  9. Antisperm antibodies and in vitro fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, H J; Bastiaans, B A; Goverde, H J; Hollanders, H M; Wetzels, A A; Schellekens, L A

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of antisperm antibodies in the male, the female, or both partners on the outcome of in vitro fertilization treatment. The results in terms of ongoing pregnancies in the male and female antibody-positive group were the same as in the antibody-negative group. In the double antibody-positive group two of the three patients became pregnant. When high levels of antisperm antibodies were present on the spermatozoa, the fertilization rate was significantly reduced. In the female positive group no clear relationship between the antibody titer and the fertilization percentage could be detected. Abnormal semen quality was responsible for a much lower fertilization rate than the presence of antibodies. The conclusion of this study is that in vitro fertilization provides an equal change of conception in couples with antisperm antibodies in comparison with couples with no antibodies if the other semen parameters are normal. PMID:1472812

  10. Development of an EGFRvIII specific recombinant antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gordon

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EGF receptor variant III (EGFRvIII is the most common variant of the EGF receptor observed in human tumors. It results from the in frame deletion of exons 2-7 and the generation of a novel glycine residue at the junction of exons 1 and 8. This novel juxtaposition of amino acids within the extra-cellular domain of the EGF receptor creates a tumor specific and immunogenic epitope. EGFRvIII expression has been seen in many tumor types including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, breast adenocarcinoma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, ovarian adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, but has been rarely observed in normal tissue. Because this variant is tumor specific and highly immunogenic, it can be used for both a diagnostic marker as well as a target for immunotherapy. Unfortunately many of the monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies directed against EGFRvIII have cross reactivity to wild type EGFR or other non-specific proteins. Furthermore, a monoclonal antibody to EGFRvIII is not readily available to the scientific community. Results In this study, we have developed a recombinant antibody that is specific for EGFRvIII, has little cross reactivity for the wild type receptor, and which can be easily produced. We initially designed a recombinant antibody with two anti-EGFRvIII single chain Fv's linked together and a human IgG1 Fc component. To enhance the specificity of this antibody for EGFRvIII, we mutated tyrosine H59 of the CDRH2 domain and tyrosine H105 of the CDRH3 domain to phenylalanine for both the anti-EGFRvIII sequence inserts. This mutated recombinant antibody, called RAbDMvIII, specifically detects EGFRvIII expression in EGFRvIII expressing cell lines as well as in EGFRvIII expressing GBM primary tissue by western blot, immunohistochemistry (IHC and immunofluorescence (IF and FACS analysis. It does not recognize wild type EGFR in any of these assays. The affinity of this antibody for EGFRvIII peptide is 1.7 × 107 M-1 as

  11. Remembering antibodies coming of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchers, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Norbert Hilschmann discovered that antibodies have variable immunoglobulin domains to bind antigens, and constant domains to carry out effector functions in the immune system. Just as this happened, the author of this perspective entered the field of immunology. Ten years later, the genetic basis of antibody variability was discovered by Susumu Tonegawa and his colleagues at the Basel Institute for Immunology, where the author had become a scientific member. At the same time, Georges Köhler, a former graduate student of the author's at the Basel Institute, invented with Cesar Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, the method to produce monoclonal antibodies. The author describes here his memories connected to these three monumental, paradigm-changing discoveries, which he observed in close proximity. PMID:27144253

  12. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  13. Site-specific antibodies to human erythropoietin directed toward the NH2-terminal region.

    OpenAIRE

    Sue, J M; Sytkowski, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Site-specific antibodies to human erythropoietin have been raised in rabbits immunized with a synthetic polypeptide composed of the putative 26 NH2-terminal amino acids of the hormone. The immunogenic peptide was coupled to bovine serum albumin. Antibodies specific for peptide were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. They immunoprecipitated both highly purified 125I-labeled erythropoietin and biologically active erythropoietin. The immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled erythropoietin...

  14. Functional analysis of neutralizing antibodies against Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Mark S; Cover, Timothy L

    2007-04-01

    The Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin causes a severe, often fatal illness (enterotoxemia) characterized by cardiac, pulmonary, kidney, and brain edema. In this study, we examined the activities of two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against the C. perfringens epsilon-toxin. Both antibodies inhibited epsilon-toxin cytotoxicity towards cultured MDCK cells and inhibited the ability of the toxin to form pores in the plasma membranes of cells, as shown by staining cells with the membrane-impermeant dye 7-aminoactinomycin D. Using an antibody competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), a peptide array, and analysis of mutant toxins, we mapped the epitope recognized by one of the neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to amino acids 134 to 145. The antibody competition ELISA and analysis of mutant toxins suggest that the second neutralizing monoclonal antibody also recognizes an epitope in close proximity to this region. The region comprised of amino acids 134 to 145 overlaps an amphipathic loop corresponding to the putative membrane insertion domain of the toxin. Identifying the epitopes recognized by these neutralizing antibodies constitutes an important first step in the development of therapeutic agents that could be used to counter the effects of the epsilon-toxin. PMID:17261609

  15. Antibody Response to Pneumocystis jirovecii

    OpenAIRE

    Daly, Kieran R.; Huang, Laurence; Morris, Alison; Koch, Judy; Crothers, Kristina; Levin, Linda; Eiser, Shary; Satwah, Supriya; Zucchi, Patrizia; Walzer, Peter D.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prospective pilot study of the serologic responses to overlapping recombinant fragments of the Pneumocystis jirovecii major surface glycoprotein (Msg) in HIV-infected patients with pneumonia due to P. jirovecii and other causes. Similar baseline geometric mean antibody levels to the fragments measured by an ELISA were found in both groups. Serum antibodies to MsgC in P. jirovecii patients rose to a peak level 3–4 weeks (p50 cells/μL and first episode of pneumocystosis were the ...

  16. Radioimmunotherapy with engineered antibody fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have developed and begun evaluating radiometal-chelated (213Bi) engineered antibody fragments as radioimmunotherapy agents that target the HER2/neu (c-erbB-2) antigen. The diabody format was found to have 40-fold greater affinity for HER2/neu and to be associated with significantly greater tumor localization than is achieved with scFv molecule. It is shown that short-lived isotopes like 213Bi would be most effective when used in conjunction with antibodies that targeted diffuse malignancies (leukemia or lymphoma) or when used for very rapid pretargeted radioimmunotherapy application in which the radioisotope is conjugated to a very small ligand

  17. In vivo germinal mutation detection with "monospecific" antibody against lactate dehydrogenase-X.

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, A. A.; Baig, M A; Malling, H. V.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes developments toward a cell specific-locus test for measuring point mutations directly in sperm based upon the use of a monospecific antibody against sperm-specific lactate dehydrogenase-X (LDH-X). The antibody recognizes amino acid differences between mouse and rat LDH-X molecules. In general, mouse sperm do not bind the monospecific antibody against rat LDH-X, but a few exceptional mouse sperm do. Such mouse sperm are believed to contain LDH-X molecules in which an amin...

  18. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  19. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  20. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  1. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  2. Subsetting of acetylcholine receptor-reactive antibodies by preparative isoelectric focusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P A; Krolick, K A

    1991-01-01

    The antibodies produced against most foreign antigens are composed of a family of immunoglobulins, a family composed of members that are of a number that often reflects the size/complexity of the molecule that stimulates their production. In other words, such responses involve the activation of a "polyclonal" B lymphocyte population. The antibody products of the B cells, although all capable of binding the original antigen, bind at various immunogenic sites (epitopes) on that antigen. Such differences in antigen-binding fine specificity is determined by amino acid residues in the antibody variable region domains found associated with the antigen combining site and tend to have a complimentary biochemistry with the molecule for which they are intended to interact. Furthermore, in addition to amino acid differences that dictate the isotypes and allotypes of antibody molecules, differences in the amino acids that compose the variable regions can produce differences in net charge of particular antibody molecules; thus, families of polyclonal antibodies, all reactive with the same antigen but with different fine specificities, can be separated and, as shown below, purified based on their isoelectric points by preparative isoelectric focusing (pIEF). PMID:1780274

  3. Homogeneous plate based antibody internalization assay using pH sensor fluorescent dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Zimprich, Chad; Dwight, Stephen J; Corona, Cesear; McDougall, Mark; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-04-01

    Receptor-mediated antibody internalization is a key mechanism underlying several anti-cancer antibody therapeutics. Delivering highly toxic drugs to cancer cells, as in the case of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), efficient removal of surface receptors from cancer cells and changing the pharmacokinetics profile of the antibody drugs are some of key ways that internalization impacts the therapeutic efficacy of the antibodies. Over the years, several techniques have been used to study antibody internalization including radiolabels, fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry and cellular toxicity assays. While these methods allow analysis of internalization, they have limitations including a multistep process and limited throughput and are generally endpoint assays. Here, we present a new homogeneous method that enables time and concentration dependent measurements of antibody internalization. The method uses a new hydrophilic and bright pH sensor dye (pHAb dye), which is not fluorescent at neutral pH but becomes highly fluorescent at acidic pH. For receptor mediated antibody internalization studies, antibodies against receptors are conjugated with the pHAb dye and incubated with the cells expressing the receptors. Upon binding to the receptor, the dyes conjugated to the antibody are not fluorescent because of the neutral pH of the media, but upon internalization and trafficking into endosomal and lysosomal vesicles the pH drops and dyes become fluorescent. The enabling attributes of the pHAb dyes are the hydrophilic nature to minimize antibody aggregation and bright fluorescence at acidic pH which allows development of simple plate based assays using a fluorescent reader. Using two different therapeutic antibodies--Trastuzumab (anti-HER2) and Cetuximab (anti-EGFR)--we show labeling with pHAb dye using amine and thiol chemistries and impact of chemistry and dye to antibody ration on internalization. We finally present two new approaches using the pHAb dye, which will be

  4. Antibodies against glycolipids enhance antifungal activity of macrophages and reduce fungal burden after infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Amelia eBueno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus.

  5. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    better understand the underlying mechanisms of antibody-antigen interaction here we present a pipeline developed by us to structurally classify immunoglobulin antigen binding sites and to infer key sequence residues and other variables that have a prominent role in each structural class....

  6. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  7. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  8. Linkers Having a Crucial Role in Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Jiang, Feng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) comprised of a desirable monoclonal antibody, an active cytotoxic drug and an appropriate linker are considered to be an innovative therapeutic approach for targeted treatment of various types of tumors and cancers, enhancing the therapeutic parameter of the cytotoxic drug and reducing the possibility of systemic cytotoxicity. An appropriate linker between the antibody and the cytotoxic drug provides a specific bridge, and thus helps the antibody to selectively deliver the cytotoxic drug to tumor cells and accurately releases the cytotoxic drug at tumor sites. In addition to conjugation, the linkers maintain ADCs' stability during the preparation and storage stages of the ADCs and during the systemic circulation period. The design of linkers for ADCs is a challenge in terms of extracellular stability and intracellular release, and intracellular circumstances, such as the acid environment, the reducing environment and cathepsin, are considered as the catalysts to activate the triggers for initiating the cleavage of ADCs. This review discusses the linkers used in the clinical and marketing stages for ADCs and details the fracture modes of the linkers for the further development of ADCs. PMID:27089329

  9. Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibody against liver fatty acid binding protein%肝脏型脂肪酸结合蛋白的重组表达及其单克隆抗体的制备和鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋巍; 杨海波; 陈兰英

    2014-01-01

    目的:制备抗肝脏型脂肪酸结合蛋白(LFABP)的单克隆抗体(mAb)并进行亚型和特异性鉴定。方法:以重组的LFABP蛋白为免疫原,经过原核表达和纯化后,免疫BALB/c小鼠,获得分泌鼠抗人LFABP蛋白mAb的杂交瘤细胞株,通过ELISA和Western blot方法检测其特异性。结果:纯化的LFABP重组蛋白免疫小鼠后经过筛选得到2株稳定分泌抗人LFABP的mAb杂交瘤细胞株,分别命名为3E6和5B7,其亚型分别为IgG1和IgG2a,抗体经纯化后浓度达到2 mg/mL,效价达到1∶10000以上。Western blot分析结果表明可与细胞中表达的内源LFABP发生特异性免疫反应。结论:成功制备了鼠抗人LFABP的mAb,为进一步研究LFABP的生物学特性,并为相关疾病的治疗奠定了基础。%OBJECTIVE:To prepare anti-liver-type fatty acid binding protein (LFABP) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and identified subtype and specificity. METHODS:The LFABP recombinant protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice,spleen cells from immunized mice were fused with myeloma cell Sp2/0. After HAT selective culture and indirect ELISA screening,we obtained hybridoma cell line secreting mouse mAb against human LFABP. The specificity was verified by ELISA and Western blotting. RESULTS:After using purified recombinant protein immunized mice and screening,we obtained two hybridoma cell lines secreting the mAb against human LFABP,named 3E6 and 5B7,both were of the IgG1 subtype. The antibody was purified,reaching a concentration of 2 mg/mL,and titer of 1∶10 000 above. Western blotting showed that mAb had a specific reaction with the LFABP endogenous expression in the cells. CONCLUSION:We successfully prepared mice mAb against human LFABP ,which could not only provide an important foundation to further studies of the biological characteristics of LFABP,mechanism involved in regulation of fatty acid metabolism and drug interaction,but also provide experimental evidence for the treatment

  10. Virus Strain Discrimination Using Recombinant Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Boonham, N.; Barker, I.

    2002-01-01

    Most routine testing for plant viruses is currently carried out using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. Traditional methods of antibody production however can be time consuming and require the use of expensive cell culture facilities. Recombinant antibody technology however is starting to make an impact in this area, enabling the selection of antibody fragments in a few weeks compared with the many months associated with traditional methods and requires only basic microbiological faciliti...

  11. Immunoglobulin G4: an odd antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Aalberse; S.O. Stapel; J. Schuurman; T. Rispens

    2009-01-01

    Despite its well-known association with IgE-mediated allergy, IgG4 antibodies still have several poorly understood characteristics. IgG4 is a very dynamic antibody: the antibody is involved in a continuous process of half-molecules (i.e. a heavy and attached light-chain) exchange. This process, also

  12. Production and characterization of a broad-specificity polyclonal antibody for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides and a quantitative structure-activity relationship study of antibody recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyclonal antibody (PAb) with broad-specificity for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) against a generic hapten, 4-(diethoxyphosphoro thioyloxy) benzoic acid, was produced. The obtained PAb showed high sensitivity to seven commonly used O,O-diethyl OPs in a competitive indirect enzyme-l...

  13. Capture ELISA for IgM antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum glutamate rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Borre, M B; Petersen, E;

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta-galactos......This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta...

  14. Production, isolation, and characterization of rabbit anti-idiotypic antibodies directed against human antithyrotrophin receptor antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, J. R.; Lukes, Y G; Burman, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that anti-idiotypic antibodies can be developed in vivo through animal immunization with idiotype, and that these antibodies can be isolated from other anti-immunoglobulin antibodies by affinity purification. These techniques have relied on large amounts of idiotype, which were produced either by hyperimmunization or by monoclonal antibodies, to serve as the affinity adsorbent. In the present study, we produced anti-idiotypic antibodies to human anti-thyroid-stimul...

  15. Solid phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention is concerned with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for assaying body fluid content of an antigenic substance which may either be an antigen itself or a hapten capable of being converted, such as by means of reaction with a protein, to an antigenic material. The present invention is concerned with a novel and improved modification of a double-antibody RIA technique in which there is a first antibody that is specific to the antigenic substance suspected to be present in a body fluid from which the assay is intended. The second antibody, however, is not specific to the antigenic substance or analyte, but is an antibody against the first antibody

  16. The role of antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, M; Stassen, M H W

    2002-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease associated with antibodies directed to the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. These antibodies reduce the number of receptors. Autoantibodies against AChR and other muscle antigens can be used for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and related disorders. The origin and the role of these antibodies in the disease are discussed. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, an experimental model closely mimicking the disease, has provided answers to many questions about the role of antibodies, complement macrophages and AChR anchor proteins. Genetically modified anti-AChR antibodies may also be used in the future to treat myasthenia. PMID:12220686

  17. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  18. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  19. Mechanistic insights into the neutralization of cytotoxic abrin by the monoclonal antibody D6F10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shradha Bagaria

    Full Text Available Abrin, an A/B toxin obtained from the Abrus precatorius plant is extremely toxic and a potential bio-warfare agent. Till date there is no antidote or vaccine available against this toxin. The only known neutralizing monoclonal antibody against abrin, namely D6F10, has been shown to rescue the toxicity of abrin in cells as well as in mice. The present study focuses on mapping the epitopic region to understand the mechanism of neutralization of abrin by the antibody D6F10. Truncation and mutational analysis of abrin A chain revealed that the amino acids 74-123 of abrin A chain contain the core epitope and the residues Thr112, Gly114 and Arg118 are crucial for binding of the antibody. In silico analysis of the position of the mapped epitope indicated that it is present close to the active site cleft of abrin A chain. Thus, binding of the antibody near the active site blocks the enzymatic activity of abrin A chain, thereby rescuing inhibition of protein synthesis by the toxin in vitro. At 1∶10 molar concentration of abrin:antibody, the antibody D6F10 rescued cells from abrin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis but did not prevent cell attachment of abrin. Further, internalization of the antibody bound to abrin was observed in cells by confocal microscopy. This is a novel finding which suggests that the antibody might function intracellularly and possibly explains the rescue of abrin's toxicity by the antibody in whole cells and animals. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on a neutralizing epitope for abrin and provides mechanistic insights into the poorly understood mode of action of anti-A chain antibodies against several toxins including ricin.

  20. Large-scale sequence and structural comparisons of human naive and antigen-experienced antibody repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeKosky, Brandon J; Lungu, Oana I; Park, Daechan; Johnson, Erik L; Charab, Wissam; Chrysostomou, Constantine; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ellington, Andrew D; Ippolito, Gregory C; Gray, Jeffrey J; Georgiou, George

    2016-05-10

    Elucidating how antigen exposure and selection shape the human antibody repertoire is fundamental to our understanding of B-cell immunity. We sequenced the paired heavy- and light-chain variable regions (VH and VL, respectively) from large populations of single B cells combined with computational modeling of antibody structures to evaluate sequence and structural features of human antibody repertoires at unprecedented depth. Analysis of a dataset comprising 55,000 antibody clusters from CD19(+)CD20(+)CD27(-) IgM-naive B cells, >120,000 antibody clusters from CD19(+)CD20(+)CD27(+) antigen-experienced B cells, and >2,000 RosettaAntibody-predicted structural models across three healthy donors led to a number of key findings: (i) VH and VL gene sequences pair in a combinatorial fashion without detectable pairing restrictions at the population level; (ii) certain VH:VL gene pairs were significantly enriched or depleted in the antigen-experienced repertoire relative to the naive repertoire; (iii) antigen selection increased antibody paratope net charge and solvent-accessible surface area; and (iv) public heavy-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-H3) antibodies in the antigen-experienced repertoire showed signs of convergent paired light-chain genetic signatures, including shared light-chain third complementarity-determining region (CDR-L3) amino acid sequences and/or Vκ,λ-Jκ,λ genes. The data reported here address several longstanding questions regarding antibody repertoire selection and development and provide a benchmark for future repertoire-scale analyses of antibody responses to vaccination and disease. PMID:27114511

  1. OptMAVEn--a new framework for the de novo design of antibody variable region models targeting specific antigen epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn. OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced

  2. Negative tail fusions can improve ruggedness of single domain antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ellen R; Brozozog-Lee, P Audrey; Zabetakis, Dan; Turner, Kendrick B; Walper, Scott A; Liu, Jinny L; Anderson, George P

    2014-03-01

    Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs), the recombinantly expressed binding domains derived from the heavy-chain-only antibodies found in camelids and sharks, are valued for their ability to refold after heat denaturation. However, some sdAbs are prone to aggregation on extended heating at high concentration. Additionally, sdAbs prepared cytoplasmically often lack the conserved disulfide bond found in variable heavy domains, which both decreases their melting point and can decrease their ability to refold. Genetic fusions of sdAbs with the acid tail of α-synuclein (ATS) resulted in constructs that had enhanced ability to resist aggregation. In addition, almost complete refolding was observed even in the absence of the disulfide bond. These sdAb-ATS fusions expand the utility of sdAbs. They provide sdAbs that are resistant to aggregation, and enable the production of re-foldable sdAbs in the reducing environment of the cytoplasm. PMID:24440507

  3. Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibodies against Ractopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prepare the monoclonal antibody against Ractopamine (RCT), RCT-conjugated antigen was produced by methods of mixed acid anhydride. The spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized by RCT-BSA were fused with SP2/0 plasmacytoma cells using PEG4000. A hybridoma cell line of 3E1-C9-E10 was screened for specificity to RCT and cloned by limited dilution method, which secreted stable monoclonal antibodies against RCT with indirect ELISA titers of 1 x 105 in supernatant, 1 x 107 in ascites. The McAb of 3E1-C9-E10 generally had 24% cross-reactivity to Dobutamine, and showed little or no cross-reactivity to Salbutamol and Clenbuterol. (authors)

  4. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  5. Monoclonal Antibody Therapies against Anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaochun Chen; Mahtab Moayeri; Robert Purcell

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax is a highly lethal infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. It not only causes natural infection in humans but also poses a great threat as an emerging bioterror agent. The lethality of anthrax is primarily attributed to the two major virulence factors: toxins and capsule. An extensive effort has been made to generate therapeutically useful monoclonal antibodies to each of the virulence components: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and ede...

  6. Antibody Peptide Based Antifungal Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Giovati, Laura; Zanello, Pier Paolo; Sperindè, Martina; Ciociola, Tecla; Polonelli, Luciano

    2012-01-01

    Fungal infections still represent relevant human illnesses worldwide and some are accompanied by unacceptably high mortality rates. The limited current availability of effective and safe antifungal agents makes the development of new drugs and approaches of antifungal vaccination/immunotherapy every day more needed. Among them, small antibody(Ab)-derived peptides are arousing great expectations as new potential antifungal agents. In this topic, the search path from the study of the yeast kill...

  7. Epigenetics of the antibody response

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications and microRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR) and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and microRNAs modulate t...

  8. Pharmacological selection of antibodies for immunoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent development of hybridoma technology has resulted in the production of monoclonal antibodies that recognize a variety of tumor antigens. Many antibodies have been developed and some of them are used with different success in clinical practice. A list of criteria is proposed for the selection of antibodies suitable for imaging studies illustrated with the example of two monoclonal antibodies anti-CEA and 19.9 used in colorectal carcinoma imaging. Monoclonal antibodies obtained today are not truly tumor-specific, they are tumor-associated; this suggests that some cross-reactions with normal tissues exist. For immunoscintigraphical use it is important to select antibodies which procedure high tumor cell staining with limited reactivity against normal tissues. Antibodies can be separated into F(ab')2 and Fab fragments which diffuse more easily into the tumor with a rapid clearance from the circulation giving higher tumor to normal tissues ratio at an early time. Antibodies with both high affinity and avidity towards tumor cell receptors produce better imaging results. Antibodies can be labelled directly with iodine or technetium and with indium using chelating agents. In vivo kinetics of radiolabelled antibodies are very different considering the nuclide and the labelling method used. Pharmacokinetics on nude mice grated with human tumors are very useful for selecting the most appropriate nuclide antibody fragment and the most efficient labelling technique for a given application. (author)

  9. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Veterinary Parasitology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein in 1975, heralded a new era in antibody research. Mouse hybridomas were the first reliable source of monoclonal antibodies. The generation of monoclonal antibodies from species other than rats and mice, has developed slowly over the last 30 years. The advent of antibody engineering and realization of the advantages of non murine antibodies has increased their relevance recently. However, in the area of veterinary parasitology, monoclonal antibodies are just beginning to fulfill the promises inherent in their great specificity for recognizing and selectively binding to antigens. This review describes the recent advances in the application of monoclonal antibodies for immunodiagnosis / prophylaxis and immunotherapy of parasitic diseases. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 183-188

  10. Development of antibody against sulfamethazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulfamethazine (SMT) is widely used to treat bacterial and protozoan infections in food animals. So its residue has been detected in various food products, and in Europe, the tolerance level for sulfonamides in meat and milk is 100 ng/g. To ensure that residues in animal food products do not exceed this limit, a simple, sensitive, and rapid method to determinate their residues in animal tissues is needed. In this paper the development of polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies against sulfamethazine (SMT) and a simplified method to identify residual sulfamethazine by radio immunoassay (RIA) is presented. Polyclonal antibodies (PcAbs) against sulfamethazine (SMT) were obtained by immunizing rabbits with SMT-conjugated bovine serum albumin (BSA). The association constants (Ka) of the PcAbs were higher than 108 and the cross-reactivities with Sulfadiazine(SD), Sulfaquinoxaline(SQX) which were structurally related compounds were lower than 0.05%(RIA). Simultaneous, six strains of hybridoma cell were prepared which can secrete monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against SMT . The Ka of the McAbs against SMT were higher than 107 and the cross-reactivities with SD, SQX were lower than 0.1%(RIA). (authors)

  11. Monoclonal antibodies in targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Powroźnik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy is a new therapeutic method consisting in the inhibition of specific molecular pathways. In modern therapy, the key role is played by monoclonal antibodies, included in the group of biological agents. The success of molecularly targeted therapy is to define the proper “molecular target”, selecting the right drug active against a specific “target” and selecting a group of patients who benefit from treatment. Introduction of targeted therapy resulted in improved results of the treatment of many serious and chronic diseases. In general, targeted molecular therapies have good toxicity profiles, but some patients are exquisitely sensitive to these drugs and can develop particular and severe toxicities. Patient selection and proper monitoring significantly decrease the risk of life-threatening adverse events. Data concerning late side effects are still unavailable because of the short follow-up of molecularly targeted therapy. Currently in the U.S. and Europe there are approximately 31 registered therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, while 160 are subjected to clinical trials. This paper presents an overview of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies currently used in therapy and the present state of knowledge about them. 

  12. Engineered antibodies for monitoring of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'The long-term goal of this project is to develop antibodies and antibody-based methods for detection and recovery of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH adducts that are potential biomarkers in environmental and biological samples. The inherent cross-reactivity will be exploited by pattern recognition methods. Dr. Karu''s laboratory uses new haptens representing key PAHs to derive recombinant Fab (rFab) and single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies from hybridoma lines and combinatorial phage display libraries. Computational models of the haptens and combining sites made by Dr. Roberts''s group are used to guide antibody engineering by mutagenesis. Dr. Li''s laboratory develops enzyme immunoassays (EIAs), sensors, and immunoaffinity methods that make use of the novel haptens and antibodies for practical analytical applications in support of DOE''s mission. This report summarizes work completed in one and one-half years of a 3-year project, with close collaboration between the three research groups. Dr. Alexander Karu''s laboratory: the authors proceeded with the two strategies described in the original proposal. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to correct differences in the rFab N-terminal amino acids that were introduced by the degenerate PCR primers used for gene amplification. The binding constants of the rFabs with the corrected sequences will be compared with those of the parent MAbs, and should be very similar. The 4D5 and 10C10 heavy and light chain sequences are being moved to the pCOMB3H phagemid vector to facilitate selection of new engineered mutants.'

  13. Study on Antibody Persistence of the Neonatal after Vaccinated the Hepatitis B Vaccine Made by Recombinant Deoxyribonucleic Acid Techniques Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Yeast for 15 Years%重组乙型肝炎疫苗(酿酒酵母)免疫后15年的持久性效果研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王存祯; 邢秀生; 王晓芳; 王海娇; 光明; 李虹; 常少英; 李太生; 安建会

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the antibody persistence of hepatitis B vccine made by recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid techniques in saccharomyces cerevisiae yast (HepB-SCY) among the neonatal.Provide the references for developing HepB-SCY immunization strategies.Method Collected serum samples of the children who were born in 1995 and completed full-course vaccination of HepB-SCY,detected infection indicators of hepatitis B virus (HBV),for observing the effect of HepB-SCY among the children.Results Antibody to HBV surface antigen (HBsAg)(Anti-HBs)positive rate,the effective positive rate and geometric mean concentrations decreased year by year,decreased from 92.08%,84.16%,29.21mIU/ml to 65.66%,40.40%,5.24mIU/ml which were measured respectively in the first year and the 15th year after immunizations.The average annual decline rates were 2.23 %,4.78%,10.82% respectively.Positive rate of Anti-HBs declined slowly and the effective positive rate declined rapidly.The average annual decline rates of various indicators were significantly slow with time.Speculate the state of low positive rate would be long time.All the HBsAg were negative.Conclusions There is no HBsAg infection in the children who immunized with HepB-SCY 15 years ago.The state of low Anti-HBs positive rate after HepB-SCY immunizations would be long time.It need not to conduct the surveillance of the Anti-HBs and reimmunization within 12-15 years after vaccination of HepB.%目的 探讨重组乙型肝炎(乙肝)疫苗(酿酒酵母)[Hepatitis B Vaccine Made by Recombinant Deoxyribonucleic Acid Techniques in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Yeast,HepB-SCY]新生儿免疫的持久性效果,为制订HepB免疫策略提供参考.方法 对1995年出生、HepB-SCY全程免疫的儿童采集血清样本,检测乙肝病毒(Hepatitis B Virus,HBV)感染指标,追踪观察其免疫15年后的持久性效果.结果 抗乙肝病毒表面抗原抗体[Antibody to HBV Surface Antigen (HBsAg),Anti-HBs]阳性[≥2.1毫国际

  14. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  15. Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting of Genetically Modified Primary Human CD4+ T Cells by One-Step Streptavidin Affinity Purification

    OpenAIRE

    Matheson, Nicholas J.; Peden, Andrew A.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Existing methods for phenotypic selection of genetically modified mammalian cells suffer disadvantages of time, cost and scalability and, where antibodies are used to bind exogenous cell surface markers for magnetic selection, typically yield cells coated with antibody-antigen complexes and beads. To overcome these limitations we have developed a method termed Antibody-Free Magnetic Cell Sorting in which the 38 amino acid Streptavidin Binding Peptide (SBP) is displayed at the cell surface by ...

  16. A sequence in subdomain 2 of DBL1α of Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 induces strain transcending antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Blomqvist

    Full Text Available Immunity to severe malaria is the first level of immunity acquired to Plasmodium falciparum. Antibodies to the variant antigen PfEMP1 (P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 present at the surface of the parasitized red blood cell (pRBC confer protection by blocking microvascular sequestration. Here we have generated antibodies to peptide sequences of subdomain 2 of PfEMP1-DBL1α previously identified to be associated with severe or mild malaria. A set of sera generated to the amino acid sequence KLQTLTLHQVREYWWALNRKEVWKA, containing the motif ALNRKE, stained the live pRBC. 50% of parasites tested (7/14 were positive both in flow cytometry and immunofluorescence assays with live pRBCs including both laboratory strains and in vitro adapted clinical isolates. Antibodies that reacted selectively with the sequence REYWWALNRKEVWKA in a 15-mer peptide array of DBL1α-domains were also found to react with the pRBC surface. By utilizing a peptide array to map the binding properties of the elicited anti-DBL1α antibodies, the amino acids WxxNRx were found essential for antibody binding. Complementary experiments using 135 degenerate RDSM peptide sequences obtained from 93 Ugandan patient-isolates showed that antibody binding occurred when the amino acids WxLNRKE/D were present in the peptide. The data suggests that the ALNRKE sequence motif, associated with severe malaria, induces strain-transcending antibodies that react with the pRBC surface.

  17. Efficient, chemoselective synthesis of immunomicelles using single-domain antibodies with a C-terminal thioester

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raats Jos MH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classical bioconjugation strategies for generating antibody-functionalized nanoparticles are non-specific and typically result in heterogeneous compounds that can be compromised in activity. Expression systems based on self-cleavable intein domains allow the generation of recombinant proteins with a C-terminal thioester, providing a unique handle for site-specific conjugation using native chemical ligation (NCL. However, current methods to generate antibody fragments with C-terminal thioesters require cumbersome refolding procedures, effectively preventing application of NCL for antibody-mediated targeting and molecular imaging. Results Targeting to the periplasm of E. coli allowed efficient production of correctly-folded single-domain antibody (sdAb-intein fusions proteins. On column purification and 2-mercapthoethanesulfonic acid (MESNA-induced cleavage yielded single-domain antibodies with a reactive C-terminal MESNA thioester in good yields. These thioester-functionalized single-domain antibodies allowed synthesis of immunomicelles via native chemical ligation in a single step. Conclusion A novel procedure was developed to obtain soluble, well-folded single-domain antibodies with reactive C-terminal thioesters in good yields. These proteins are promising building blocks for the chemoselective functionalization via NCL of a broad range of nanoparticle scaffolds, including micelles, liposomes and dendrimers.

  18. Molecular Evolution of Antibody Cross-Reactivity for Two Subtypes of Type a Botulinum Neurotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rodriguez, C.; Levy, R.; Arndt, J.W.; Forsyth, C.M.; Razai, A.; Lou, J.; Geren, I.; Stevens, R.C.; Marks, J.D.; /UC, San Francisco /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-09

    Broadening antibody specificity without compromising affinity should facilitate detection and neutralization of toxin and viral subtypes. We used yeast display and a co-selection strategy to increase cross-reactivity of a single chain (sc) Fv antibody to botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A). Starting with a scFv that binds the BoNT/A1 subtype with high affinity (136 pM) and the BoNT/A2 subtype with low affinity (109 nM), we increased its affinity for BoNT/A2 1,250-fold, to 87 pM, while maintaining high-affinity binding to BoNT/A1 (115 pM). To find the molecular basis for improved cross-reactivity, we determined the X-ray co-crystal structures of wild-type and cross-reactive antibodies complexed to BoNT/A1 at resolutions up to 2.6 A, and measured the thermodynamic contribution of BoNT/A1 and A2 amino acids to wild-type and cross-reactive antibody binding. The results show how an antibody can be engineered to bind two different antigens despite structural differences in the antigen-antibody interface and may provide a general strategy for tuning antibody specificity and cross-reactivity.

  19. High-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes using ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn; Nilsson, Peter; Uhlen, Mathias; Schafer-Nielsen, Claus

    2012-01-01

    -resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against...... linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several...... cases, multiple distinct epitopes could be identified for the same target protein, suggesting an efficient approach to the generation of paired antibodies. Two alternative epitope mapping approaches identified similar, although not necessarily identical, epitopes. These results show that ultrahigh...

  20. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Are Anti-GAD Antibodies Implicated in Its Pathophysiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannopoulos, Sotirios; Theodoridou, Varvara; Argyropoulou, Ourania; Bostantjopoulou, Sevasti

    2016-01-01

    Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS) is considered as a variant of the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) and its characteristic clinical features are ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Typically, it is associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies; however, a significant percentage (>10%) of these patients are seronegative. Here, we report a 67-year-old female patient who presented with the typical clinical features of MFS. Workup revealed antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in relatively high titers while GQ1b antibodies were negative. Neurological improvement was observed after intravenous gamma globulin and follow-up examinations showed a continuous clinical amelioration with simultaneous decline of anti-GAD levels which finally returned to normal values. This case indicates that anti-GAD antibodies may be associated with a broader clinical spectrum and future studies in GQ1b-seronegative patients could determine ultimately their clinical and pathogenetic significance in this syndrome. PMID:27239355

  1. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Are Anti-GAD Antibodies Implicated in Its Pathophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis E. Dagklis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS is considered as a variant of the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS and its characteristic clinical features are ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Typically, it is associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies; however, a significant percentage (>10% of these patients are seronegative. Here, we report a 67-year-old female patient who presented with the typical clinical features of MFS. Workup revealed antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD in relatively high titers while GQ1b antibodies were negative. Neurological improvement was observed after intravenous gamma globulin and follow-up examinations showed a continuous clinical amelioration with simultaneous decline of anti-GAD levels which finally returned to normal values. This case indicates that anti-GAD antibodies may be associated with a broader clinical spectrum and future studies in GQ1b-seronegative patients could determine ultimately their clinical and pathogenetic significance in this syndrome.

  2. Multiple autoimmune antibody limbic encephalitis: a case in a pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meha Goyal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune limbic encephalitis is most commonly associated with antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, among other neuronal cell surface receptors. Here, a case of a pregnant female with limbic encephalitis in the presence of multiple additional autoimmune antibodies is described. The patient was a 36-year-old female who presented with 4 days of confusion, hallucinations, hypersexuality, disinhibition, and pressured speech. The patient's work-up detected the presence of anti-NMDAR antibodies, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies, and a yet uncharacterized neuronal autoantibody. The patient was also found to be pregnant. No evidence of ovarian or other pelvic malignancy was discovered. Symptomatic control was achieved with plasma exchange.

  3. The properties of monoclonal antibody against sepiapterin reductase from fat body of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iino, T; Sawada, H; Gyure, W L; Tsusué, M

    1992-12-01

    A specific monoclonal antibody prepared for the 29-kDa a subunit of silkworm fat body sepiapterin reductase (SPR) was able to recognize the subunit in crude extract of fat body after SDS treatment. Although SPR from the silkworm fat body has biochemical properties similar to those reported for SPR from mammalian sources, especially rat erythrocytes, the antibody failed to recognize the 28-kDa subunit of rat erythrocyte SPR. This result indicates that SPR from silkworm fat body has a different amino-acid sequence from that of the rat erythrocyte enzyme. Sepiapterin reductase activity has not been found in crude extract of fat body from the silkworm mutant lemon. Although the antibody recognized only 29-kDa protein in the crude extract of silkworm fat body from normal strain after SDS-treatment, the antibody recognized only an approximately 80-kDa protein in the crude extract of the lemon mutant after SDS-treatment. PMID:1292509

  4. Study of the association of an O-specific polysaccharide from Pseudomonas fluorescens with antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The O-specific polysaccharide has been isolated from the lipopolysaccharide-protein complex of Pseudomonas fluorescens by mild acid hydrolysis followed by gel chromatography of the carbohydrate fraction of Sephadex G-50. According to 13C NMR spectroscopy, the polysaccharide is constructed of regularly repeating trisaccharide units including three 6-deoxyhexose residues two of which are amino sugars. An investigation has been performed of the interaction of the polysaccharide with specific antibodies and univalent Fab fragments of the antibodies. For the isolation of the antibodies and Fab fragments and their fractionation with respect to affinity we used an immunosorbent based on the polysaccharide bound to Sepharose 4B. It was established that antibodies to the polysaccharide were heterogeneous to some extent in relation to their affinity, and their interaction with polysaccharide had a cooperative nature

  5. Study of the association of an O-specific polysaccharide from Pseudomonas fluorescens with antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solov' eva, T.F.; Naberezhnykh, G.A.; Mazur, A.K.; Khomenko, V.A.; Ovodoy, Yu.S.

    1986-12-01

    The O-specific polysaccharide has been isolated from the lipopolysaccharide-protein complex of Pseudomonas fluorescens by mild acid hydrolysis followed by gel chromatography of the carbohydrate fraction of Sephadex G-50. According to /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy, the polysaccharide is constructed of regularly repeating trisaccharide units including three 6-deoxyhexose residues two of which are amino sugars. An investigation has been performed of the interaction of the polysaccharide with specific antibodies and univalent Fab fragments of the antibodies. For the isolation of the antibodies and Fab fragments and their fractionation with respect to affinity we used an immunosorbent based on the polysaccharide bound to Sepharose 4B. It was established that antibodies to the polysaccharide were heterogeneous to some extent in relation to their affinity, and their interaction with polysaccharide had a cooperative nature.

  6. Comparison on the Antibody Response and Influenced Factors of Hepatitis B Vacine Made by Recombinant Dexyribonucleic Acid Techniques among Adults%成人接种20微克重组乙型肝炎疫苗免疫应答及其影响因素的比较研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘甲野; 颜丙玉; 张丽; 吕静静; 冯艺; 纪峰; 陈世玉; 徐爱强

    2013-01-01

    目的 比较成人接种20微克(μg)重组乙型肝炎(乙肝)疫苗(中国仓鼠卵巢细胞)[Hepatitis B Vaccine (HepB) Made by Recombinant Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Techniques in Chinese Hamster Ovary(CHO) Cell,HepB-CHO]和20μg重组乙肝疫苗(酿酒酵母)(HepB Made by Recombinant DNA Techniques inSaccharornyces Cerevisiae Yeast,HepB-SCY)的抗体应答及其影响因素.方法 在山东省章丘市选择研究现场,筛选出乙肝病毒表面抗原[Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Surface Antigen,HBsAg]、抗乙肝病毒表面抗原抗体(Antibody to HBsAg,Anti-HBs)和抗乙肝病毒核心抗原抗体全阴性者作为研究对象,随机分为两组,按照0、1、6个月免疫程序分别接种20μgHepB-SCY和20μg HepB-CHO.所有研究对象进行问卷调查并采集静脉血,采用化学发光微粒子免疫分析法(Chemiluminescence Microparticle Imunoassay,C MIA)定量检测Anti-HBs.比较不同HepB初次免疫后的抗体应答率和抗体水平,采用多因素分析方法确定排除其他因素影响后,HepB种类对抗体应答的影响.结果 HepB-SCY和HepB-CHO分别接种2011人和2290人.HepB-SCY无应答[<10毫国际单位/毫升(mIU/m1)]率、低应答[10mIU/ml~99mIU/ml]率、正常应答[100mIU/ml~999mIU/m1]率、高应答[≥1000mIU/ml]率分别为14.22%、15.57%、29.09%和41.12%,HepB-CHO分别为9.35%、19.08%、33.97%和37.60%,两组四项指标间差异均有统计学意义(x2=5.44~23.11,P<0.01).HepB-SCY组和HepB-CHO组Anti-HBs几何平均浓度(Geometric Mean Concentration,GMC)分别为270.39mIU/ml[95%可信区间(Confidence Interval,CI):233.33mIU/ml~313.32 mIU/ml]和3 12.67mIU/ml (95% CI:278.28mIU/ml~351.32mIU/ml),差异无统计学意义(U=1.52,P=0.13).多因素分析显示,排除性别、年龄、体重指数、吸烟史、饮酒史等因素影响后,无应答率与疫苗种类有关.结论 成人接种20pg HepB-SCY和20μg HepB-CHO均可以获得较好的抗体应答,20μg Hep

  7. Surface plasmon resonance biosensing: Approaches for screening and characterising antibodies for food diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakes, B J; Buijs, J; Elliott, C T; Campbell, K

    2016-08-15

    Research in biosensing approaches as alternative techniques for food diagnostics for the detection of chemical contaminants and foodborne pathogens has increased over the last twenty years. The key component of such tests is the biorecognition element whereby polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies still dominate the market. Traditionally the screening of sera or cell culture media for the selection of polyclonal or monoclonal candidate antibodies respectively has been performed by enzyme immunoassays. For niche toxin compounds, enzyme immunoassays can be expensive and/or prohibitive methodologies for antibody production due to limitations in toxin supply for conjugate production. Automated, self-regenerating, chip-based biosensors proven in food diagnostics may be utilised as rapid screening tools for antibody candidate selection. This work describes the use of both single channel and multi-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors for the selection and characterisation of antibodies, and their evaluation in shellfish tissue as standard techniques for the detection of domoic acid, as a model toxin compound. The key advantages in the use of these biosensor techniques for screening hybridomas in monoclonal antibody production were the real time observation of molecular interaction and rapid turnaround time in analysis compared to enzyme immunoassays. The multichannel prototype instrument was superior with 96 analyses completed in 2h compared to 12h for the single channel and over 24h for the ELISA immunoassay. Antibodies of high sensitivity, IC50's ranging from 4.8 to 6.9ng/mL for monoclonal and 2.3-6.0ng/mL for polyclonal, for the detection of domoic acid in a 1min analysis time were selected. Although there is a progression for biosensor technology towards low cost, multiplexed portable diagnostics for the food industry, there remains a place for laboratory-based SPR instrumentation for antibody development for food diagnostics as shown herein. PMID:27260435

  8. Evidence for a novel human-specific xeno-auto-antibody response against vascular endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tho; Gregg, Christopher J; Karp, Felix; Chow, Renee; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Xi; Witztum, Joseph L; Varki, Nissi M; Varki, Ajit

    2009-12-10

    Humans are genetically unable to synthesize the common mammalian sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). However, Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated and covalently expressed on cultured human cell surfaces. Meanwhile, humans express varying and sometimes high titers of polyclonal anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Here, a survey of human tissues by immunohistochemistry with both a monospecific chicken anti-Neu5Gc antibody and with affinity-purified human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies demonstrates endothelial expression of Neu5Gc, likely originating from Neu5Gc-rich foods like red meats. We hypothesized that the combination of Neu5Gc incorporation and anti-Neu5Gc antibodies can induce endothelial activation. Indeed, the incubation of high-titer human sera with Neu5Gc-fed endothelial cells led to Neu5Gc-dependent antibody binding, complement deposition, endothelial activation, selectin expression, increased cytokine secretion, and monocyte binding. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha also selectively enhanced human anti-Neu5Gc antibody reactivity. Anti-Neu5Gc antibodies affinity-purified from human serum also directed Neu5Gc-dependent complement deposition onto cultured endothelial cells. These data indicate a novel human-specific mechanism in which Neu5Gc-rich foods deliver immunogenic Neu5Gc to the endothelium, giving anti-Neu5Gc antibody- and complement-dependent activation, and potentially contributing to human vascular pathologies. In the case of atherosclerosis, Neu5Gc is present both in endothelium overlying plaques and in subendothelial regions, providing multiple pathways for accelerating inflammation in this disease. PMID:19828701

  9. Stability of 188Re Labeled antibody for radioimmunotherapy and the effect of stabilizing agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For clinical application of beta-emitter labeled antibody, high specific activity is important. Carrier-free 188Re from 188W/ 188Re generator is an ideal radionuclide for this purpose. However, low stability of 188Re labeled antibody, especially in high specific activity, due to radiolytic decomposition by high energy (2.1 MeV) beta ray was problem. We studied the stability of 188Re labeled antibody, and stabilizing effect of several stabilizers. Pre-reduced monoclonal antibody (CEA79.4) was labeled with 188Re by incubating with generator-eluted 188Re-perrhenate in the presence of stannous tartrate for 2 hr at room temperature. Radiochemical purity of each preparation was determined by chromatography. Human serum albumin was added to the labeled antibodies (2%). Stability of 188Re-CEA79.4 was investigated in the presence of ascorbic acid, ethanol, or Tween 80 as stabilizing agents. Labeling efficiencies were 88±4% (n=12). Specific activities of 1.25 ∼4.77 MBq/μg were obtained. If stored after purging with N2, all the preparations were stable for 10 hr. However, stability decreased in the presence of air. Perrhenate and 188Re-tartrate was major impurity in declined preparation. Colloid-formation was not a significant problem in all cases. Addition of ascorbic acid stabilized the labeled antibodies either under N2 or under air by reducing the formation of perrhenate. High specific activity 188Re labeled antibody is unstable, especially, in the presence of oxygen. Addition of ascorbic acid increased the stability

  10. Labelling of monoclonal antibodies with 99Tcm, their quality control and evaluation for scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several clinical studies have demonstrated that both the 111In and 99Tcm labelled specific monoclonal antibodies and non specific human immunoglobulins can delineate variety of cancerous infectious and inflammatory lesions. However, due to practical advantages of 99Tcm over 111In, 99Tcm labelled antibodies have exhibited distinct advantages for clinical investigations. Although the most stable and specific method for labelling antibodies with 99Tcm is performed by the bifunctional approach, there has recently been an increased interest in direct labelling methods as a result of significant improvement in the stability of the radiolabel and its potential application in the form of kits which can produce 99Tcm-antibody complex at the time of use. Direct methods based on the use of 2-mercaptoethanol ascorbic acid, borohydride and boric acid buffer appeared most promising. In addition, the method based on the use of iminothiolane to provide 99Tcm attachment site on the lysine has also been claimed a good practical method. We have evaluated these methods for radiolabelling of antibodies with 99Tcm using human immunoglobulin (hIgG) and an anti CEA mouse monoclonal antibody (ior-CEA-1) by studying labelling efficiency, in vitro serum stability, relative radionuclide binding strength, immunoreactivity, blood kinetics, biodistribution, specific target scintigraphy and also for development of lyophilized kits. The study has led to the improvement of the method based on the use o 2-ME and development of a novel method which uses ascorbic acid (ASC) to label the antibodies with 99Tcm and the production of lyophilized kits which give quality 99Tcm-hIgG and 99Tcm-ior-CEA-1 instantly when mixed with 99Tcm-pertechnetate. Both the products prepared from the kits have been found suitable for immunoscintigraphy

  11. Disease progression and search for monogenic diabetes among children with new onset type 1 diabetes negative for ICA, GAD- and IA-2 Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pörksen, Sven; Laborie, Lene; Nielsen, Lotte;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND:To investigate disease progression the first 12 months after diagnosis in children with type 1 diabetes negative (AAB negative) for pancreatic autoantibodies [islet cell autoantibodies(ICA), glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) and insulinoma-associated antigen-2 antibodies (I...

  12. Amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amino acids are organic compounds that combine to form proteins . Amino acids and proteins are the building blocks of life. When proteins are digested or broken down, amino acids are left. The human body uses amino acids ...

  13. Comparative biodistribution of indium- and yttrium-labeled B3 monoclonal antibody conjugated to either 2-(p-SCN-Bz)-6-methyl-DTPA (1B4M-DTPA) or 2-(p-SCN-Bz)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane tetraacetic acid (2B-DOTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodistribution of indium-111/yttrium-88-labeled B3 monoclonal antibody, a murine IgGlk, was evaluated in non-tumor-bearing mice. B3 was conjugated to either 2-(p-SCN-Bz)-6-methyl-DTPA (1B4M) or 2-(p-SCN-Bz)-1,4,7,10 tetraazacyclododecane tetra-acetic acid (2B-DOTA) and labeled with 111In at 1.4-2.4 mCi/mg and 88Y at 0.1-0.3 mCi/mg. Non-tumor-bearing nude mice were co-injected i.v. with 5-10 μCi/4-10 μg of 111In/88Y-labeled B3 conjugates and sacrificed at 6 h and daily up to 168 h post-injection. Mice injected with 111In/88Y-(1B4M)-B3 showed a similar biodistribution of the two radiolabels in all tissues except the bones, where significantly higher accretion of 88Y than 111In was observed, with 2.8% ± 0.2% vs 1.3% ± 0.16% ID/g in the femur at 168 h, respectively (P111In/88Y-(DOTA)-B3 conjugate showed significantly higher accumulation of 111In than 88Y in most tissues, including the bones, with 2.0% ± 0.1% vs 1.2% ± 0.09% ID/g in the femur at 168 h, respectively (P111In/88Y-(1B4M)-B3 and 0.84, 1.23, 1.56, and 1.31 for 111In/88Y-(DOTA)-B3, respectively, ratios ∼ 1 were observed between 111In-(1B4M)-B3 and 88Y-(DOTA)-B3. In summary, while neither 1B4M nor DOTA was equally stable for 111In and 88Y, the fate of 88Y-(DOTA)-B3 could be closely traced by that of 111In-(1B4M)-B3. (orig.)

  14. Preparation and Characterization of Olaquindox Polyclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHE,Huilian; SHI Baoxia; CHEN,Jinlan; ZHU,Xuejia; HE,Jiguo

    2009-01-01

    2-[N-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-carbamoyl]-3-methyl-oxoquinoxaline-l,4-oxides (OLA) was first mono-esterificated by succinic acid anhydride, and was then turned into a derivative with carboxyl. The synthetic product was purified by recrystallization with a yield of 52.47%. Its chemical structure was determined by NMR, IR and MS spectra. The determined structure was used to synthese OLA hapten, which had the molecular structural characteristics of OLA. The OLA hapten and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were conjugated using the activated ester method, while the hapten and ovalbumin (OVA) were coupled by the mixed anhydride method. The UV scanning and infrared spectrum results showed that the hapten and the carrier protein were successfully coupled to BSA and OVA, with the combined ratios of 3.8 : 1 and 5 : 1, respectively. OLA-BSA was used as the immunogen to immunize four New Zealand white rabbits, and the high titer anti-serum produced relatively. The titers were 1 " 6400, 1 : 1600, 1 : 12800 and 1 : 6400, respectively, determined by indirect ELISA OLA-OVA as the coating antigen. The intermediate inhibition concentration (IC50) of OLA in the indirect ELISA test was 743.3 ng/mL. The lowest detection limit (IC20) was 5.71 ng/mL. High-purity OLA polyclonal antibody has been obtained by saturated ammonium sulfate and ion-exchange chromatography.

  15. Affitins as alternative to antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. We have developed the use of Sac7d archaeal polypeptide and its homologues as a non-antibody scaffold from which artificial affinity proteins (Affitins) can be derived with a number of favorable properties. Affitins show affinity (sub-nanomolar) and specificity that compare well with those of antibodies [Ref.1]. They are thermally (up to 90 C. degrees) and chemically stable (pH 0-12+, denaturants), well expressed in E. coli (up to 200 mg/L), lack disulfide bridge and have a size compatible with chemical synthesis (7 kDa). We have demonstrated their use as reagents for intra-cellular inhibition [Ref.1], affinity purification [Ref.2], immuno-localization [Ref.3], protein chip array [Ref.4] and biosensors [Ref.5]. We have also shown that Affitins are plastic enough to tolerate several mutagenesis schemes while their fold and their favorable properties are conserved [Ref.6]. Compared to Affitins, monoclonal antibodies are 20 times larger, less stable and more complex molecules. Furthermore, the remarkable stability properties of Affitins make them suited for demanding labeling protocols that are usually used for peptides. All together, these results show that Affitins should be well suited for biomedical applications where fine tuning of the affinity reagent properties is needed. References: [Ref.1] Mouratou, B. et al., (2007), Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 104, 17983-17988; [Ref.2] Krehenbrink, M. et al. (2008), J Mol Biol 383, 1058-1068; [Ref.3] Buddelmeijer, N. et al. (2009), J Bacteriol 191, 161-168; [Ref.4] Cinier, M. et al. (2009), Bioconjug. Chem. 20, 2270-2277; [Ref.5] Miranda, F. F. et al. (2011), Biosens. Bioelectron. 26, 4184-4190; [Ref.6] Behar G.et al. (2013), Protein Eng Des Sel. 26(4):267-75. (authors)

  16. Development of monoclonal antibodies against parathyroid hormone: Genetic control of the immune response to human PTH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors embarked upon a program to develop monoclonal antibodies to the biologically active amino terminal region of PTH. Using the BALB/c mouse for immunization, fully biologically active synthetic human PTH-(1-34) and bovine PTH-(1-84) as immunogens, monoclonal antibody methods and a solid-phase screening assay in which PTH-(1-34) was adhered to polyvinylchloride plates in a manner that preserved immunoreactivity. They generated 17 monoclonal antibodies against the amino-terminal portion of parathyroid hormone. Isotypic analysis of these monoclonal antibodies was performed using affinity purified goat anti-mouse immunoglobins specific for IgG heavy chains, γ/sub 1/, γ/sub 2a/, γ/sub 2b/, γ/sub 3/; α(IgA); and μ(Igm). All antibodies were IgM as evidenced by 40 times greater than background radioactivity when 25,000 cpm of /sup 125/I-labeled goat anti-mouse IgM was used as second antibody in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay. All incubations with iodinated second antibodies to other heavy chain classes of immunoglobins demonstrated background radioactivity. Extensive synthetic work in the laboratory for multiple biologic studies of structure-activity relationships of PTH, as well as analog design, has led to the synthesis of many peptide analogues and fragments from 7 to 34 amino acids in length. Study of the antibody recognition site (region specificity) by two of these monoclonal antibodies, 10A/sub 7/, and 6B/sub 1/, was undertaken with synthetic peptides

  17. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies are...... powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors such as......, including solid-phase peptide-carrier conjugation and peptide-carrier conjugation in solution. Upon immunization, adjuvants such as Al(OH)(3) are added together with the immunogenic peptide-carrier conjugate, which usually leads to high-titred antisera. Following immunization and peptide antibody...

  18. Assessing analytical methods to monitor isoAsp formation in monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    CatherineEakin

    2014-01-01

    A ubiquitous post-translational modification observed in proteins is isomerization of aspartic acid to isoaspartic acid (isoAsp). This non-enzymatic post-translational modification occurs spontaneously in proteins and plays a role in aging, autoimmune response, cancer, neurodegeneration, and other diseases. Formation of isoAsp is also a significant issue for recombinant monoclonal antibody based protein therapeutics particularly when isomerization occurs in a complementarity-determining regio...

  19. D-amino carboxamide-based recruitment of dinitrophenol antibodies to bacterial surfaces via peptidoglycan remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fura, Jonathan M; Pires, Marcos M

    2015-07-01

    During the past few decades there has been a rapid emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria afflicting human patients. At the same time, reduced output from pharmaceutical industry in this area precipitated a sharp decrease in the approval of new antibiotics. The combination of these factors potentially compromises the ability to effectively combat bacterial infections. While traditional drug discovery efforts continue in the pursuit of small molecule agents that disrupt bacterial growth, non-traditional efforts could serve to complement antimicrobial strategies. We recently demonstrated our ability to remodel the surface of bacterial cells using unnatural D-amino acids displaying the antigenic dinitrophenyl (DNP) handle. These immune stimulant D-amino acids derivatives were metabolically incorporated onto the peptidoglycan of bacteria via a promiscuous surface-anchored transpeptidase. The covalent modification of DNP moieties onto the peptidoglycan led to the anti-DNP antibody opsonization of the bacterial cell surface. Herein, we show that the amidation of the C-terminus to generate DNP-displaying D-amino carboxamide drastically improves antibody recruitment. Antibody opsonization using the D-amino carboxamide agent is observed at lower concentrations than the D-amino acid counterpart. In addition, the recruitment of endogenous antibodies in pooled human serum to the DNP-modified bacterial cell surface is demonstrated for the first time. We envision that the C-terminus amidation of DNP-conjugated D-amino acids could potentially facilitate translation of these results to in vivo animal disease models. PMID:25653048

  20. GAD65 antibodies among Greenland Inuit and its relation to glucose intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Lynge; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2014-01-01

    fasting glycemia, (3) with impaired glucose tolerance and (4) with previously unknown diabetes based on oral glucose tolerance test and were enrolled in the study. Presence of circulating Glutamin-Acid-decarboxylase 65 antibodies were measured in all participants. A total of 484 persons were enrolled in...

  1. A general approach to antibody thermostabilization

    OpenAIRE

    McConnell, Audrey D; Xue ZHANG; Macomber, John L.; Chau, Betty; Sheffer, Joseph C; Rahmanian, Sorena; Hare, Eric; Spasojevic, Vladimir; Horlick, Robert A.; King, David J; Bowers, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody engineering to enhance thermostability may enable further application and ease of use of antibodies across a number of different areas. A modified human IgG framework has been developed through a combination of engineering approaches, which can be used to stabilize antibodies of diverse specificity. This is achieved through a combination of complementarity-determining region (CDR)-grafting onto the stable framework, mammalian cell display and in vitro somatic hypermutation (SHM). Thi...

  2. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    OpenAIRE

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunctio...

  3. Haptens, conjugates and antibodies for pyrimethanil fungicide

    OpenAIRE

    Mercader Badia, Josep Vicent; Abad Fuentes, Antonio; Abad Somovilla, Antonio; Agulló, Consuelo

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to haptens, conjugates and antibodies for pyrimethanil fungicide. In addition, the invention relates to the use of pyrimethanil conjugates as assay antigens or immunogens in order to obtain antibodies of the aforementioned fungicide, and to the use of the labelled derivatives of pyrimethanil as assay antigens. The invention also relates to a pyrimethanil analysis method using the antibodies obtained, at times together with assay antigens which are conjugates or labe...

  4. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-02-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development. PMID:26551147

  5. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Caterina; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies, by cloning hybridoma derived from the fusion of myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes, has allowed to obtain great advances in many fields of biological knowledge. The use of specific antibodies to the estrogen receptor, in fact, has been an invaluable method to bring out its mechanisms of action and its effects, both genomic and extra-genomic. Here we describe, step by step, the production of monoclonal antibodies, starting from protocol for antigen preparation to the selection of antibody-secreting hybridoma. PMID:25182770

  6. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thrombocytopenia Platelet Factor 4 Antibody Related tests: Complete Blood Count , Platelet Count , Serotonin Release Assay, Heparin-induced Platelet Aggregation All content on Lab Tests Online has been ...

  7. Monoclonal antibody against boron carriers of BNCT. Part 1. Preparation and characterization of anti mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate antibody (anti-BSH MAb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monoclonal antibody against mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) was prepared, which recognized specifically the icosahedral boron cluster moiety and named 'anti-BSH MAb'. The dissociation constant of anti-BSH MAb against BSH was determined, and the cross reactivity was also clarified by using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, the amino acid sequences of the antigen-binding site in the variable region of heavy and light chains were partly determined and characterized upon protein database. Furthermore, a highly specific, rapid and practical immunoassay for BSH including quantitative determination of the BSH concentrations in blood by the competitive ELISA system using anti-BSH MAb has been explored. (author)

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9. PMID:27221501

  9. Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Systemic Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awa Oumar Touré

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLs could be associated with an increased risk of vascular pathologies in systemic scleroderma. The aim of our study was to search for APLs in patients affected by systemic scleroderma and to evaluate their involvement in the clinical manifestations of this disease. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study, from January 2009 until August 2010, with patients received at the Department of Dermatology (Dakar, Senegal. Blood samples were taken at the hematology laboratory and were analyzed for the presence of APLs. Results: Forty patients were recruited. Various types of either isolated or associated APLs were found in 23 patients, i.e. 57.5% of the study population. The most frequently encountered antibody was IgG anti-β2 GPI (37.5% of the patients, followed by anticardiolipins (17.5% and lupus anticoagulants (5%. No statistically significant association of positive antiphospholipid-related tests to any of the scleroderma complications could be demonstrated. Conclusion: A high proportion of patients showing association of systemic scleroderma and APLs suggests the presence of a morbid correlation between these 2 pathologies. It would be useful to follow a cohort of patients affected by systemic scleroderma in order to monitor vascular complications following confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  10. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do not...... scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  11. Stratification of Antibody-Positive Subjects by Antibody Level Reveals an Impact of Immunogenicity on Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A.; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J.; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic....

  12. High level transient production of recombinant antibodies and antibody fusion proteins in HEK293 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jäger, Volker; Büssow, Konrad; Wagner, Andreas; Weber, Susanne; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background The demand of monospecific high affinity binding reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies, has been steadily increasing over the last years. Enhanced throughput of antibody generation has been addressed by optimizing in vitro selection using phage display which moved the major bottleneck to the production and purification of recombinant antibodies in an end-user friendly format. Single chain (sc)Fv antibody fragments require additional tags for detection and are not as suitable...

  13. Antibodies to human fetal erythroid cells from a nonimmune phage antibody library

    OpenAIRE

    Huie, Michael A.; Cheung, Mei-Chi; Muench, Marcus O.; Becerril, Baltazar; Kan, Yuet W.; Marks, James D.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to isolate fetal nucleated red blood cells (NRBCs) from the maternal circulation makes possible prenatal genetic analysis without the need for diagnostic procedures that are invasive for the fetus. Such isolation requires antibodies specific to fetal NRBCs. To generate a panel of antibodies to antigens present on fetal NRBCs, a new type of nonimmune phage antibody library was generated in which multiple copies of antibody fragments are displayed on each pha...

  14. Elimination of Fc receptor binding of human immunoglobulin G in immunofluorescence assays for herpes simplex virus antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallo, D

    1986-01-01

    The binding of human immunoglobulin G by Fc receptors in herpes simplex virus (HSV)-infected cells can cause false-positive interpretations in the immunofluorescence test for HSV antibody. When the infected cell smears were treated with 10% glacial acetic acid for 5 min and rinsed in phosphate-buffered saline before the immunofluorescence test was performed, the Fc receptors were completely inactivated, resulting in a reliable method for HSV antibody detection.

  15. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. These maternal antibodies, depending on the pathogen, can provide early protection from some diseases, but it may also interfere with the vaccination re...

  16. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  17. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Haryadi

    Full Text Available Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig heavy chain (HC and kappa light chain (LC was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells.

  18. Optimization of heavy chain and light chain signal peptides for high level expression of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryadi, Ryan; Ho, Steven; Kok, Yee Jiun; Pu, Helen X; Zheng, Lu; Pereira, Natasha A; Li, Bin; Bi, Xuezhi; Goh, Lin-Tang; Yang, Yuansheng; Song, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of a nascent protein from the cytosol into the ER mediated by its signal peptide is a critical step in protein secretion. The aim of this work was to develop a platform technology to optimize the signal peptides for high level production of therapeutic antibodies in CHO cells. A database of signal peptides from a large number of human immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (HC) and kappa light chain (LC) was generated. Most of the HC signal peptides contain 19 amino acids which can be divided into three domains and the LC signal peptides contain 22 amino acids. The signal peptides were then clustered according to sequence similarity. Based on the clustering, 8 HC and 2 LC signal peptides were analyzed for their impacts on the production of 5-top selling antibody therapeutics, namely, Herceptin, Avastin, Remicade, Rituxan, and Humira. The best HC and LC signal peptides for producing these 5 antibodies were identified. The optimized signal peptides for Rituxan is 2-fold better compared to its native signal peptides which are available in the public database. Substitution of a single amino acid in the optimized HC signal peptide for Avastin reduced its production significantly. Mass spectrometry analyses revealed that all optimized signal peptides are accurately removed in the mature antibodies. The results presented in this report are particularly important for the production of these 5 antibodies as biosimilar drugs. They also have the potential to be the best signal peptides for the production of new antibodies in CHO cells. PMID:25706993

  19. Use of antinucleoside antibodies to probe the organization of chromosomes denatured by ultraviolet irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet irradiation of methanol:acetic acid-fixed human and mouse metaphase chromosomes rendered them capable of binding antibodies specific for purine or pyrimidine bases. Since these antibodies react with single-stranded but not with native DNA, our results indicate that UV irradiation generated single-stranded regions in chromosomal DNA. Using an indirect immunofluorescence technique to detect antibody binding, highly characteristic, nonrandom patterns of antibody binding were observed. Antibodies to adenosine (anti-A) and thymidine (anti-T) produced identical patterns of binding which in most respects matched the chromosome banding patterns produced by quinacrine. However, additional foci of intense fluorescence were seen in the paracentromeric regions of constitutive heterochromatin on chromosomes 1, 9 and 16, regions which had been shown by in situ DNA--RNA hybridization to be the locations of AT-rich human satellite DNA. Antibodies to cytidine were also bound to the same region of chromosome 9. In mouse chromosome preparations, both anti-A and anti-T produced bright fluorescence of the region containing centromeric heterochromatin, which had been shown to be the location of the AT-rich satellite DNA of this species. (U.S.)

  20. Comparison of bifunctional chelates for {sup 64}Cu antibody imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Cara L.; Crisp, Sarah; Bensimon, Corinne [MDS Nordion, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Yapp, Donald T.T.; Ng, Sylvia S.W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of British Columba, The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Sutherland, Brent W. [British Columbia Cancer Agency Research Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Gleave, Martin [Prostate Centre at Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Jurek, Paul; Kiefer, Garry E. [Macrocyclics Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Improved bifunctional chelates (BFCs) are needed to facilitate efficient {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under mild conditions and to yield stable, target-specific agents. The utility of two novel BFCs, 1-Oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclododecane-5-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-4,7,10-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-Oxo-DO3A) and 3,6,9,15-tetraazabicyclo[9.3.1]pentadeca-1(15),11,13-triene-4-S-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-3,6,9-triacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-PCTA), for mAb imaging with {sup 64}Cu were compared to the commonly used S-2-(4-isothiocyanatobenzyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-tetraacetic acid (p-SCN-Bn-DOTA). The BFCs were conjugated to trastuzumab, which targets the HER2/neu receptor. {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling of the conjugates was optimized. Receptor binding was analyzed using flow cytometry and radioassays. Finally, PET imaging and biodistribution studies were done in mice bearing either HER2/neu-positive or HER2/neu-negative tumors. {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab were prepared at room temperature in >95% radiochemical yield (RCY) in <30 min, compared to only 88% RCY after 2 h for the preparation of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab under the same conditions. Cell studies confirmed that the immunoreactivity of the mAb was retained for each of the bioconjugates. In vivo studies showed that {sup 64}Cu-Oxo-DO3A- and PCTA-trastuzumab had higher uptake than the {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab at 24 h in HER2/neu-positive tumors, resulting in higher tumor to background ratios and better tumor images. By 40 h all three of the {sup 64}Cu-BFC-trastuzumab conjugates allowed for clear visualization of the HER2/neu-positive tumors but not the negative control tumor. The antibody conjugates of PCTA and Oxo-DO3A were shown to have superior {sup 64}Cu radiolabeling efficiency and stability compared to the analogous DOTA conjugate. In addition, {sup 64}Cu-PCTA and Oxo-DO3A antibody conjugates may facilitate earlier imaging with greater target to background ratios than

  1. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B; Hoiby, P E; Missier, V; Pedersen, L H; Hansen, Theis Peter; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Bang, Ole

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy and...

  2. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  4. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  5. Thyrotropin receptor antibodies and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyrotropin receptor antibodies (TRAb) are not homogeneous, which are composed by four antibodies at least. TRAb plays very important roles in autoimmune thyroid diseases ad off-thyroid symptoms associated, and other thyroiditis in clinical diagnosis, assessment of curative effects, determination of the time to stop medicine, prognostication of recurrence and inspection of high risk population

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona.

    OpenAIRE

    Ainsworth, A J; Lester, T L; Capley, G

    1985-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies produced against Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona have been studied for their diagnostic usefulness. All three monoclonals reacted strongly in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect fluorescent antibody test with serovar pomona and did not react with serovars grippotyphosa, canicola, icterohaemorrhagiae and hardjo.

  7. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  8. Determination of Biotin: Antibody Molar Ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the biotinylation yield (number of biotin molecules per molecule of antibody) is important to ensure that the MAb has maintained its immunoreactivity. If the biotinylation of the MAb is carried out with a molar ratio of biotin:antibody ~10:1, then the number of biotins per MAb usually ranges between 6 and 8

  9. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  10. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  11. Phage displayed peptides and anti-idiotype antibodies recognised by a monoclonal antibody directed against a diagnostic antigen of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengurić, D R; Dungu, B; Thiaucourt, F; du Plessis, D H

    2001-07-26

    A monoclonal antibody (Mab 4.52) raised against Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (Mccp) cell lysate was used as a template to obtain substitute antigens recognised by its paratope. Two approaches were investigated: a 17-mer random peptide library displayed on the surface of a filamentous phage was screened by panning on the immobilised Mab 4.52 and anti-idiotype antibodies were generated by immunising a chicken with the F(ab')(2) fragments of the antibody. Analysis of the peptide sequences displayed by the isolated phages identified two peptides. Both contained two cysteine residues and had identical or similar amino acids in positions 5 (P), 8 (I/L) and 13 (L). The fusion phages were also recognised by Mab 4.52 in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and binding was shown by surface plasmon resonance. One of the peptides was a markedly better inhibitor (67%) of the binding of Mab 4.52 to its original antigen than the other (20%) at 1mg/ml. After absorption, to remove isotypic and allotypic reactivities, the anti-idiotype IgY was specifically recognised by Mab 4.52 in ELISA and was able to inhibit its binding to the original antigen, whereas anti-idiotype antibodies raised against a bluetongue virus-specific antibody had no effect. In spite of unequivocal binding of the anti-idiotype antibodies and the fusion phages to the paratope of Mab 4.52, goat antisera appeared not to react with either of the surrogate antigens. In contrast, the test sera bound to the original antigen suggesting that Mab 4.52 does not recognise exactly the same antigenic site as antibodies in the goat antisera. PMID:11376960

  12. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of our project is to continue the development of new techniques for rapid, automated identification of radionuclides, metals, and chelators that may contaminant sur face and groundwater at DOE sites. One of the four specific aims of the present project is to develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance our immunosensor program. Recombinant antibodies have potential advantages over monoclonal antibodies produced by standard hybridoma technology. The cloned genes represent a stable, recoverable source for antibody production. In addition, the recombinant format offers opportunities for protein engineering that enhances antibody performance and for studies that relate antibody sequence to binding activity. In this study, a hybridoma that synthesized an antibody (12F6) that recognized a 1:1 complex between 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10- phenanthroline (DCP) and UO22+ was used as a source of RNA for the development of a recombinant (Fab)2 fragment. RNA was isolated from the 12F6 hybridoma and the cDNA encoding the entire κ light chain and the linked VH and C1 portions of the heavy chain were amplified from total RNA. cDNA sequences were verified by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of the native 12F6 monoclonal antibody. A leader sequence and appropriate restriction sites were added to each chain, and the fragments were ligated into a commercial dicistronic vector (pBudCE4.1, Invitrogen, Inc.). COS-1 cells were transfected with this vector and the culture supernatant was assayed for activity and the (Fab)2 protein. Cells transfected with vector containing 12F6 cDNA synthesized and secreted recombinant (Fab)2 fragments that bound to the UO22+-DCP complex with an affinity indistinguishable from that of a (Fab)2 fragment prepared from the native antibody. Molecular models of the heavy and light chain variable domains were constructed according to the canonical structures method detailed by Morea et al

  13. Development of a Recombinant Antibody with Specificity for Chelated Uranyl Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Li; A.M. Kriegel; T.C. Bishop; R.C. Blake; E. Figueiredo; H. Yu; D.A. Blake

    2005-04-18

    The goal of our project is to continue the development of new techniques for rapid, automated identification of radionuclides, metals, and chelators that may contaminant sur face and groundwater at DOE sites. One of the four specific aims of the present project is to develop new technologies in antibody engineering that will enhance our immunosensor program. Recombinant antibodies have potential advantages over monoclonal antibodies produced by standard hybridoma technology. The cloned genes represent a stable, recoverable source for antibody production. In addition, the recombinant format offers opportunities for protein engineering that enhances antibody performance and for studies that relate antibody sequence to binding activity. In this study, a hybridoma that synthesized an antibody (12F6) that recognized a 1:1 complex between 2,9-dicarboxyl-1,10- phenanthroline (DCP) and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was used as a source of RNA for the development of a recombinant (Fab){sub 2} fragment. RNA was isolated from the 12F6 hybridoma and the cDNA encoding the entire {kappa} light chain and the linked VH and C1 portions of the heavy chain were amplified from total RNA. cDNA sequences were verified by comparison with the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of the native 12F6 monoclonal antibody. A leader sequence and appropriate restriction sites were added to each chain, and the fragments were ligated into a commercial dicistronic vector (pBudCE4.1, Invitrogen, Inc.). COS-1 cells were transfected with this vector and the culture supernatant was assayed for activity and the (Fab){sub 2} protein. Cells transfected with vector containing 12F6 cDNA synthesized and secreted recombinant (Fab){sub 2} fragments that bound to the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-DCP complex with an affinity indistinguishable from that of a (Fab){sub 2} fragment prepared from the native antibody. Molecular models of the heavy and light chain variable domains were constructed according to the

  14. Nano antibody therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomedicine, an offshoot of nanotechnology, refers to highly specific medical intervention at the molecular scale for curing disease or repairing damaged tissues, such as bone, muscle, or nerve. Nanotechnology can have an early, paradigm-changing impact on how clinicians will detect cancer in its earliest stages. Exquisitely sensitive devices constructed of nanoscale components-such as nanocantilevers, nanowires and nanochannels-offer the potential for detecting even the rarest molecular signals associated with malignancy. One of the most pressing needs in clinical oncology is for imaging agents that can identify tumors that are far smaller than is possible with today's technology, at a scale of 100,000 cells rather than 1,000,000,000 cells. A new approach in nanotechnology for treating cancer incorporates nano iron particles and attaches them to an antibody that has targets only cancer cells and not healthy cells. The treatment works in two steps. This treatment is an ingenious way to make localized tumor ablation a systemic treatment. The advantages are incredible. There are absolutely no side effects from this treatment. It is not painful or even uncomfortable. The iron particles get flushed harmlessly from the body. It is not a drug and so the cancer cannot build up a resistance to the treatment. It is a systematic treatment; even cancer cells and tumors that are not known about get heated up and ablated. This treatment can even be used to enhance imaging of the cancer because once the cancer cells are coated with the iron particles, they are easy to identify. Everything depends on how reliably the antibodies target cancer cells and not healthy cells. When used in conjunction with other systemic treatments, such as vaccine treatments, we could be looking at a time when even advanced cancers can be brought under control. (author)

  15. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana; Clemmentsen, I; Schumacher, H; Høiby, N

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody...... response was studied with serum samples collected in 1992 from 56 CF patients in a cross-sectional study and with serum samples from 18 CF patients in a longitudinal study. Anti-beta-lactamase immunoglobulin G antibodies were present in all of the serum samples from the patients with chronic...... bronchopulmonary P. aeruginosa infection (CF + P) but in none of the CF patients with no or intermittent P. aeruginosa infection. Anti-beta-lactamase antibodies were present in serum from CF + P patients after six antipseudomonal courses (median) and correlated with infection with a beta-lactam-resistant strain of...

  16. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  17. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  18. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  19. Antibody glycosylation and its impact on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the impact of glycosylation and keeping a close control on glycosylation of product candidates are required for both novel and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fc-fusion protein development to ensure proper safety and efficacy profiles. Most therapeutic mAbs are of IgG class and contain a glycosylation site in the Fc region at amino acid position 297 and, in some cases, in the Fab region. For Fc-fusion proteins, glycosylation also frequently occurs in the fusion partners. Depending on the expression host, glycosylation patterns in mAb or Fc-fusions can be significantly different, thus significantly impacting the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of mAbs. Glycans that have a major impact on PK and PD of mAb or Fc-fusion proteins include mannose, sialic acids, fucose (Fuc), and galactose (Gal). Mannosylated glycans can impact the PK of the molecule, leading to reduced exposure and potentially lower efficacy. The level of sialic acid, N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), can also have a significant impact on the PK of Fc-fusion molecules. Core Fuc in the glycan structure reduces IgG antibody binding to IgG Fc receptor IIIa relative to IgG lacking Fuc, resulting in decreased antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activities. Glycoengineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) expression systems can produce afucosylated mAbs that have increased ADCC activities. Terminal Gal in a mAb is important in the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in that lower levels of Gal reduce CDC activity. Glycans can also have impacts on the safety of mAb. mAbs produced in murine myeloma cells such as NS0 and SP2/0 contain glycans such as Galα1-3Galβ1-4N-acetylglucosamine-R and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NGNA) that are not naturally present in humans and can be immunogenic when used as therapeutics. PMID:25872915

  20. Isolation of Balamuthia mandrillaris-specific antibody fragments from a bacteriophage antibody display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Kulsoom, Huma; Lalani, Salima; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a protist pathogen that can cause encephalitis with a mortality rate of more than 95%. Early diagnosis followed by aggressive treatment is a pre-requisite for successful prognosis. Current methods for identifying this organism rely on culture and microscopy, antibody-based methods using animals, or involve the use of molecular tools that are expensive. Here, we describe the isolation of antibody fragments that can be used for the unequivocal identification of B. mandrillaris. B. mandrillaris-specific antibody fragments were isolated from a bacteriophage antibody display library. Individual clones were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunofluorescence. Four antibody clones showed specific binding to B. mandrillaris. The usefulness of phage antibody display technology as a diagnostic tool for isolating antibody fragments against B. mandrillaris antigens and studying their biological role(s) is discussed further. PMID:27055361

  1. Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immobilization of antibodies and enzyme-labeled antibodies by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The antibody activity of antibody was not affected by irradiation at an irradiation dose of below 8 MR and low temperatures. Immobilization of peroxidase-labeled anti-rabbit IgG goat IgG, anti-peroxidase, peroxidase, and anti-alpha-fetoprotein was carried out with hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers. The activity of the immobilized enzyme-labeled antibody membranes varied with the thickness of the membranes and increased with decreasing membrane thickness. The activity of the immobilized antibody particles was varied by particle size. Immobilized anti-alpha-fetoprotein particles and membranes can be used for the assay of alpha-fetoprotein by the antigen-antibody reaction, such as a solid-phase sandwich method with high sensitivity

  2. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. PMID:26104192

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immuno extract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  4. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  5. Importance of Hypervariable Region 2 for Stability and Affinity of a Shark Single-Domain Antibody Specific for Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George P.; Teichler, Daniel D.; Zabetakis, Dan; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Liu, Jinny L.; Lonsdale, Stephen G.; Goodchild, Sarah A.; Goldman, Ellen R.

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies derived from the unique New Antigen Receptor found in sharks have numerous potential applications, ranging from diagnostic reagents to therapeutics. Shark-derived single-domain antibodies possess the same characteristic ability to refold after heat denaturation found in single-domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. Recently, two shark derived single-domain antibodies specific for the nucleoprotein of Ebola virus were described. Our evaluation confirmed their high affinity for the nucleoprotein, but found their melting temperatures to be low relative to most single-domain antibodies. Our first approach towards improving their stability was grafting antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions) of one of these single-domain antibodies onto a high melting temperature shark single-domain antibody. This resulted in two variants: one that displayed excellent affinity with a low melting temperature, while the other had poor affinity but a higher melting temperature. These new proteins, however, differed in only 3 amino acids within the complementarity determining region 2 sequence. In shark single-domain antibodies, the complementarity determining region 2 is often referred to as hypervariable region 2, as this segment of the antibody domain is truncated compared to the sequence in camelid single-domain antibodies and conventional heavy chain variable domains. To elucidate which of the three amino acids or combinations thereof were responsible for the affinity and stability we made the 6 double and single point mutants that covered the intermediates between these two clones. We found a single amino acid change that achieved a 10°C higher melting temperature while maintaining sub nM affinity. This research gives insights into the impact of the shark sdAb hypervariable 2 region on both stability and affinity. PMID:27494523

  6. Importance of Hypervariable Region 2 for Stability and Affinity of a Shark Single-Domain Antibody Specific for Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George P; Teichler, Daniel D; Zabetakis, Dan; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Liu, Jinny L; Lonsdale, Stephen G; Goodchild, Sarah A; Goldman, Ellen R

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies derived from the unique New Antigen Receptor found in sharks have numerous potential applications, ranging from diagnostic reagents to therapeutics. Shark-derived single-domain antibodies possess the same characteristic ability to refold after heat denaturation found in single-domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. Recently, two shark derived single-domain antibodies specific for the nucleoprotein of Ebola virus were described. Our evaluation confirmed their high affinity for the nucleoprotein, but found their melting temperatures to be low relative to most single-domain antibodies. Our first approach towards improving their stability was grafting antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions) of one of these single-domain antibodies onto a high melting temperature shark single-domain antibody. This resulted in two variants: one that displayed excellent affinity with a low melting temperature, while the other had poor affinity but a higher melting temperature. These new proteins, however, differed in only 3 amino acids within the complementarity determining region 2 sequence. In shark single-domain antibodies, the complementarity determining region 2 is often referred to as hypervariable region 2, as this segment of the antibody domain is truncated compared to the sequence in camelid single-domain antibodies and conventional heavy chain variable domains. To elucidate which of the three amino acids or combinations thereof were responsible for the affinity and stability we made the 6 double and single point mutants that covered the intermediates between these two clones. We found a single amino acid change that achieved a 10°C higher melting temperature while maintaining sub nM affinity. This research gives insights into the impact of the shark sdAb hypervariable 2 region on both stability and affinity. PMID:27494523

  7. Enzyme immunoassay for carminic acid in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, A; Takagaki, Y; Nishimune, T

    1995-01-01

    A competitive enzyme immunoassay (EIA) for carminic acid was investigated. Monoclonal anticarminic acid antibody was obtained from A/J mice immunized with carminic acid-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) conjugate. Carminic acid was extracted with distilled water from beverage, jelly, candy, pasta sauce, yogurt, or ice cream samples. Ham or fish paste samples were digested with pronase, then carminic acid was extracted from samples with sodium hydroxide solution. The extract was diluted more than 10-fold with 1% gelatin in borate buffer solution. Microtiter plates were coated with carminic acid-bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate or just BSA. Goat anti-mouse IgG(H+L)-peroxidase complex was used as a second antibody, and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine was used as a substrate for the peroxidase. The working range for quantitative analysis was 0.3-10 ng/mL, and the detection limit was 0.2 micrograms/g original sample. Recoveries of carminic acid by this assay were > 95% for milk beverage and jelly, and > 85% for yogurt and fish paste. Carminic acid was detected in 7 of 26 red-colored commercial food products and ranged from 3.5 to 356 micrograms/g. This EIA system also responded to the structural analogue of carminic acid, laccaic acid. PMID:7756895

  8. Generation and characterization of heavy chain antibodies derived from Camelids

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidthals, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies and antibody fragments are essential tools in basic research, diagnostics and therapy. Conventional antibodies consist of two heavy and two light chains with both chains contributing to the antigen-binding site. In addition to these conventional antibodies, camelids (llamas, alpacas, dromedaries and camels) possess so-called heavy chain antibodies (hcAbs) that lack the light chains. The antigen binding site of these unusual antibodies is formed by one single domain only, the so cal...

  9. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  10. Establishment of 131I, 99mTc Labeling Methods to In-house Anti-CEA Antibodies and Evaluation of the Immunological Characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer cells have several tumor-associated antigens on the cell surfaces, and antibodies against these antigens have been developed by many investigators. Radiolabeled antibodies have been used as new methods to diagnose and treat malignant tumors. Especially anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is the most popular antibody for these purposes. In this investigation, we tried to label 131I and 99mTc to anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies which were developed in the Seoul National University College of Medicine. We found CEA-79 and CEA-92 antibodies had the better immunological characteristics among 8 anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies. And radioiodination of CEA-79 could be performed by chloramine-T method, while radioiodination of CEA-92 by iodogen method. To label these antibodies with 99mTc, we used pretargeting transchelation as direct labeling method. At first, 99mTc was bound to glucaric acid, and monoclonal antibody was reduced by β-mercaptoethanol. When these were incubated together, 99mTc bound to glucarate was switched to monoclonal antibody because of higher affinity. We established conditions of several steps in this method. Anti-CEA monoclonal antibodies labeled with 131I and 99mTc are expected to be used valuably in the detection and treatment of malignant tumors.

  11. In vitro affinity maturation of a natural human antibody overcomes a barrier to in vivo affinity maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Fouts, Ashley E; Stengel, Katharina; Luan, Peng; Dillon, Michael; Liang, Wei-Ching; Feierbach, Becket; Kelley, Robert F; Hötzel, Isidro

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies isolated from human donors are increasingly being developed for anti-infective therapeutics. These antibodies undergo affinity maturation in vivo, minimizing the need for engineering of therapeutic leads for affinity. However, the affinities required for some therapeutic applications may be higher than the affinities of the leads obtained, requiring further affinity maturation in vitro. To improve the neutralization potency of natural human antibody MSL-109 targeting human cytomegalovirus (CMV), we affinity matured the antibody against the gH/gL glycoprotein complex. A phage display library where most of the six complementary-determining regions (CDRs) were allowed to vary in only one amino acid residue at a time was used to scan for mutations that improve binding affinity. A T55R mutation and multiple mutations in position 53 of the heavy chain were identified that, when present individually or in combination, resulted in higher apparent affinities to gH/gL and improved CMV neutralization potency of Fab fragments expressed in bacterial cells. Three of these mutations in position 53 introduced glycosylation sites in heavy chain CDR 2 (CDR H2) that impaired binding of antibodies expressed in mammalian cells. One high affinity (KD < 10 pM) variant was identified that combined the D53N and T55R mutations while avoiding glycosylation of CDR H2. However, all the amino acid substitutions identified by phage display that improved binding affinity without introducing glycosylation sites required between two and four simultaneous nucleotide mutations to avoid glycosylation. These results indicate that the natural human antibody MSL-109 is close to a local affinity optimum. We show that affinity maturation by phage display can be used to identify and bypass barriers to in vivo affinity maturation of antibodies imposed by glycosylation and codon usage. These constraints may be relatively prevalent in human antibodies due to the codon usage and the amino acid

  12. Improved iodine radiolabels for monoclonal antibody therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Rhona; Govindan, Serengulam V; Mattes, M Jules; Chen, Susan; Reed, Linda; Newsome, Guy; McBride, Bill J; Griffiths, Gary L; Hansen, Hans J; Goldenberg, David M

    2003-01-01

    A major disadvantage of (131)iodine (I)-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for radioimmunotherapy has been the rapid diffusion of iodotyrosine from target cells after internalization and catabolism of the radioiodinated MAbs. We recently reported that a radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide, designated immunomedics' residualizing peptide 1 (IMP-R1), was a residualizing iodine label that overcame many of the limitations that had impeded the development of residualizing iodine for clinical use. To determine the factors governing the therapeutic index of the labeled MAb, as well as the factors required for production of radioiodinated MAb in high yield and with high specific activity, variations in the peptide structure of IMP-R1 were evaluated. A series of radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide moieties (IMP-R1 through IMP-R8) that differed in overall hydrophilicity and charge were compared. Radioiodinations of the peptides followed by conjugations to disulfide-reduced RS7 (an anti-epithelial glycoprotein-1 MAb) furnished radioimmunoconjugates in good overall incorporations, with immunoreactivities comparable to that of directly radioiodinated RS7. Specific activities of up to 8 mCi/mg and yields > 80% have been achieved. In vitro processing experiments showed marked increases in radioiodine retention with all of the adducts; radioiodine retention at 45 h was up to 86% greater in cells than with directly iodinated RS7. Each of the (125)I-peptide-RS7 conjugates was compared with (131)I-RS7 (labeled by the chloramine-T method) in paired-label biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing human lung tumor xenografts. All of the residualizing substrates exhibited significantly enhanced retention in tumor in comparison to directly radioiodinated RS7, but the nontarget uptakes differed significantly among the residualizing labels. The best labels were IMP-R4 and IMP-R8, showing superior tumor-to-non-tumor ratios

  13. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    OpenAIRE

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference ...

  14. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodis, Ioannis; Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  15. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Parodis

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204 or without (n = 294 LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous, before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes. Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all, but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are

  16. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  17. Clinical application of a new antimyosin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mouse monoclonal antibody, 3-48 (Rougier Bio-Tech Ltd, Montreal) which recognizes the alpha and beta heavy chains of human atrial and ventricular myosin, and the beta heavy chain of human slow skeletal muscle, has recently been developed. In the rat isoproterenol-induced infarction model and the canine model of selective obstruction of a coronary artery, the antibody was shown to be specifically localized to the necrotic myocardium. A selected group of patients with known infarction was imaged with the 111indium labeled F(ab')2 protion of this antibody in a pre-clinical feasibility study, and the results therefrom are reported in this communication. (orig.)

  18. Antibody catalysis of peptide bond formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobsen, J R; Schultz, P. G.

    1994-01-01

    An antibody generated against a neutral phosphonate diester transition-state (TS not equal to) analog catalyzes the formation of an amide bond between a phenylalanyl amino group and an acyl azide derived from L-alanine. The antibody is selective for L- vs. D-alanine and does not catalyze the hydrolysis of the acyl azide to an appreciable degree. A rate acceleration of 10,000-fold relative to the uncatalyzed reaction is observed. The antibody may achieve its catalytic efficiency both by acting...

  19. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  20. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  1. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  2. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  3. Reshaping Human Antibodies: Grafting an Antilysozyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhoeyen, Martine; Milstein, Cesar; Winter, Greg

    1988-03-01

    The production of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology has proved difficult, and this has prompted the ``humanizing'' of mouse monoclonal antibodies by recombinant DNA techniques. It was shown previously that the binding site for a small hapten could be grafted from the heavy-chain variable domain of a mouse antibody to that of a human myeloma protein by transplanting the hypervariable loops. It is now shown that a large binding site for a protein antigen (lysozyme) can also be transplanted from mouse to human heavy chain. The success of such constructions may be facilitated by an induced-fit mechanism.

  4. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated

  5. Immunotherapy with GD2 specific monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Targeted immunotherapy focuses anti-tumor activity of antibodies and effector cells, which are actively developed by the host or adoptively transferred, onto tumor cells and into tumor sites. Such tumor selective therapy can be more specific and efficient. The value of such an approach is evident in the classical interaction of antibodies. This paper reports that the ganglioside GD2 is an ideal antigen for specific tumor targeting because of its relative lack of heterogeneity among human neuroblastoma, its high density on tumor cells, its lack of antigen modulation upon binding to antibody, and its restricted distribution in normal tissues

  6. Class specific antibody response to gonococcal infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Miettinen, A; Hakkarainen, K; Grönroos, P; Heinonen, P.; Teisala, K; Aine, R; Sillantaka, I; Saarenmaa, K; Lehtinen, M; Punnonen, R

    1989-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay was used to determine IgM, IgG, and IgA antibodies to gonococcal pili in 68 patients with uncomplicated gonorrhoea, 35 women with pelvic inflammatory disease, and in 115 normal controls. A clear difference in response rate in all three antibody classes between patients with gonorrhoea and healthy controls was evident. Among women with gonorrhoea, the magnitude of antibody response was higher than among men with gonorrhoea, especially in the IgM class. No major difference...

  7. Acid Rain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1987-01-01

    Provides some background information on acid deposition. Includes a historical perspective, describes some effects of acid precipitation, and discusses acid rain in the United Kingdom. Contains several experiments that deal with the effects of acid rain on water quality and soil. (TW)

  8. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:23568985

  9. Simple Method To Prepare Oligonucleotide-Conjugated Antibodies and Its Application in Multiplex Protein Detection in Single Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Haibiao; Holcomb, Ilona; Ooi, Aik; Wang, Xiaohui; Majonis, Daniel; Unger, Marc A; Ramakrishnan, Ramesh

    2016-01-20

    The diversity of nucleic acid sequences enables genomics studies in a highly multiplexed format. Since multiplex protein detection is still a challenge, it would be useful to use genomics tools for this purpose. This can be accomplished by conjugating specific oligonucleotides to antibodies. Upon binding of the oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies to their targets, the protein levels can be converted to oligonucleotide levels. In this report we describe a simple method for preparing oligonucleotide-conjugated antibodies and discuss this method's application in oligonucleotide extension reaction (OER) for multiplex protein detection. Conjugation is based on strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition (the Cu-free click reaction), in which the antibody is activated with a dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) moiety and subsequently linked covalently with an azide-modified oligonucleotide. In the functional test, the reaction conditions and purification processes were optimized to achieve maximum yield and best performance. The OER assay employs a pair of antibody binders (two antibodies, each conjugated with its own oligonucleotide) developed for each protein target. The two oligonucleotides contain unique six-base complementary regions at their 3' prime ends to allow annealing and extension by DNA synthesis enzymes to form a DNA template. Following preamplification, the DNA template is detected by qPCR. Distinct oligonucleotide sequences are assigned to different antibody binders to enable multiplex protein detection. When tested using recombinant proteins, some antibody binders, such as those specific to CSTB, MET, EpCAM, and CASP3, had dynamic ranges of 5-6 logs. The antibody binders were also used in a multiplexed format in OER assays, and the binders successfully detected their protein targets in cell lysates, and in single cells in combination with the C1 system. This click reaction-based antibody conjugation procedure is cost-effective, needs minimal hands-on time, and

  10. Antibody immobilization on gold nanoparticles coated layer-by-layer with polyelectrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale materials are used in the biomedical field for magnetic resonance imaging, protein detection and drug/gene delivery. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are particularly investigated in cancer treatment and imaging. In this study, we described a simple and reliable liquid method to coat AuNPs (diameter: 21 nm) layer-by-layer with alternative cationic polyallylamine and anionic polystyrenesulfonate. The C-terminal amino acid of the antibody directed against anti-bovine serum albumin was activated by EDC/NHS, and then condensed with the amino functions of the external polyallylamine layer. An ELISA test confirmed that the antigen recognition of the bioconjugate antibody was conserved. This AuNP coating and the covalently coupling could be used as a generic process for binding other specific antibodies, particularly those overexpressed in cancer cells and angiogenesis.

  11. Radioimmunological proof of thyroglobulin antibodies in humans by the use of a double antibody method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyroid antibodies, especially thyroglobulin antibodies, allow themselves to be proven with the double antibody method, in competitive radio binding assays and with the solid phase technique. These methods offer advantages relative to sensitivity and quantifiability. In this work a sensitive radioimmunoassay as a double antibody method was worked out whereby a 125 I-thyroglobulin/thyroglobulin antibody immune complex was precipitated out using anti-human immunoglobulin. The measured results from the radioimmunoassay show a good correlation with the results of the immune histological findings. A high to very high Tg antibody level occurs with autoimmune thyroiditis (80%), primary hypothyroidism (74%) and hyperthyroidism (70%). The control values with healthy people came to less than 5% specific binding. In correlation with the results of other authors this method is advantageous relative to test start and evaluation procedures. (orig.)

  12. Antibodies against the calcium-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant microsomes contain a protein clearly related to a calcium-binding protein, calsequestrin, originally found in the sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle cells, responsible for the rapid release and uptake of Ca2+ within the cells. The location and role of calsequestrin in plant cells is unknown. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to plant calsequestrin, mice were immunized with a microsomal fraction from cultured cells of Streptanthus tortuosus (Brassicaceae). Two clones cross-reacted with one protein band with a molecular weight equal to that of calsequestrin (57 kilodaltons) by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. This band is able to bind 45Ca2+ and can be recognized by a polyclonal antibody against the canine cardiac muscle calsequestrin. Rabbit skeletal muscle calsequestrin cross-reacted with the plant monoclonal antibodies. The plant monoclonal antibodies generated here are specific to calsequestrin protein

  13. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  14. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  15. Chemical biology: How to minimalize antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    The success of antibodies as pharmaceuticals has triggered interest in crafting much smaller mimics. A crucial step forward has been taken with the chemical synthesis of small molecules that recruit immune cells to attack cancer cells.

  16. Immunoglobulin Classification Using the Colored Antibody Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonissone, Stefano R; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2016-06-01

    The somatic recombination of V, D, and J gene segments in B-cells introduces a great deal of diversity, and divergence from reference segments. Many recent studies of antibodies focus on the population of antibody transcripts that show which V, D, and J gene segments have been favored for a particular antigen, a repertoire. To properly describe the antibody repertoire, each antibody must be labeled by its constituting V, D, and J gene segment, a task made difficult by somatic recombination and hypermutation events. While previous approaches to repertoire analysis were based on sequential alignments, we describe a new de Bruijn graph-based algorithm to perform VDJ labeling and benchmark its performance. PMID:27149636

  17. Deep sequencing and human antibody repertoire analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Scott D; Crowe, James E

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade, high-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) methods and improved approaches for isolating antigen-specific B cells and their antibody genes have been applied in many areas of human immunology. This work has greatly increased our understanding of human antibody repertoires and the specific clones responsible for protective immunity or immune-mediated pathogenesis. Although the principles underlying selection of individual B cell clones in the intact immune system are still under investigation, the combination of more powerful genetic tracking of antibody lineage development and functional testing of the encoded proteins promises to transform therapeutic antibody discovery and optimization. Here, we highlight recent advances in this fast-moving field. PMID:27065089

  18. Monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunoimaging: Current perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to image tumor using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody products has been widely demonstrated. The questions of safety and efficacy remain open and require further experience, but in some clinical situations, radioimmunoimaging has provided clinically useful information. This paper deals with a set of current problems in imaging with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and current perspectives on the possible solutions to these problems. The major areas discussed here are the following: (a) The selection process. How might we choose the ''best'' antibody for imaging from among the multitude now available and what form (i.e., which fragments) may be useful? (b) The imaging procedure: What are the basic optimal imaging parameters and how does the data produced by this modality interface with information obtained by more standard methods of imaging? (c) Quantitative techniques: How can noninvasive quantitative techniques provide information useful to the antibody selection process and to the diagnostic and therapeutic applications

  19. Antibody deficiency in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herriot, R; Miedzybrodzka, Z

    2016-03-01

    The developmental disorder Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is frequently complicated by recurrent respiratory infections. In many cases this is likely to be the result of microaspiration or gastro-oesophageal reflux but, in a proportion, underlying antibody deficiency is a potentially modifiable susceptibility factor for infection. Relatively subtle, specific defects of pneumococcal antibody production have previously been described in the context of RTS. Here, we report a rare association between the syndrome and an overt, major primary antibody deficiency disorder (common variable immune deficiency) which was successfully managed with immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Early recognition and investigation for antibody deficiency associated with RTS allied to effective and optimized treatment are essential to minimize morbidity and mortality and improve quality and duration of life. PMID:26307339

  20. New haptens and antibodies for ractopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liu, Meixuan; Shi, Weimin; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-09-15

    In this work, three unreported immunizing haptens of ractopamine (RAC) were synthesized and used to produce highly sensitive and specific polyclonal antibody. The spacer arms of haptens for coupling to protein carrier were located on different position of RAC with different length. High affinity polyclonal antibodies were obtained and characterized in terms of titer and sensitivity by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The best antibody employed in a heterologous competitive ELISA exhibited an IC50 value as low as 0.12ngmL(-1) and could not recognize other 10 β-agonists including clenbuterol and salbutamol. The heterologous competitive ELISA was preliminary applied to swine urine and the results showed the new antibody was sufficiently sensitive and specific, and potentially used for the detection of RAC at trace level in real samples. PMID:25863617

  1. Localization of tumors by radiolabelled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of utilizing radiolabelled antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigens for determining the site of tumors which produce or are associated with carcinoembryonic antigen is disclosed. 3 claims, no drawings

  2. Lack of in Vivo Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity with Antibody Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Marya; Pan, Dorothy W.; Davis, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a cytolytic mechanism that can elicit in vivo antitumor effects and can play a significant role in the efficacy of antibody treatments for cancer. Here, we prepared cetuximab, panitumumab, and rituximab containing gold nanoparticles and investigated their ability to produce an ADCC effect in vivo. Cetuximab treatment of EGFR-expressing H1975 tumor xenografts showed significant tumor regression due to the ADCC activity of the antibody in vivo,...

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Antibody Internalization with Novel Monoclonal Antibodies against Alexa Fluorophores

    OpenAIRE

    Liao-Chan, Sindy; Daine-Matsuoka, Barbara; Heald, Nathan; Wong, Tiffany; Lin, Tracey; Cai, Allen G.; Lai, Michelle; D’Alessio, Joseph A.; Theunissen, Jan-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies against cell surface antigens may be internalized through their specific interactions with these proteins and in some cases may induce or perturb antigen internalization. The anti-cancer efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates is thought to rely on their uptake by cancer cells expressing the surface antigen. Numerous techniques, including microscopy and flow cytometry, have been used to identify antibodies with desired cellular uptake rates. To enable quantitative measurements of inte...

  4. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies Suitable for Rabies Virus Antibody and Antigen Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Chander, Vishal; Singh, R.P.; Verma, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    The control of an infectious viral disease as rabies is made easier by rapid and accurate diagnosis. Successful rabies prophylaxis is dependent upon the active immunization with vaccine along with passive administration of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies which together clear the virus before widespread infection of central nervous system occurs. The present study aimed at the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection. For the pro...

  5. A monoclonal thyroid-stimulating antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Takao; Latif, Rauf; Pritsker, Alla; Moran, Thomas; Nagayama, Yuji; Davies, Terry F.

    2002-01-01

    The thyrotropin receptor, also known as the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), is the primary antigen of Graves disease. Stimulating TSHR antibodies are the cause of thyroid overstimulation and were originally called long-acting thyroid stimulators due to their prolonged action. Here we report the successful cloning and characterization of a monoclonal antibody (MS-1) with TSHR-stimulating activity. The thyroid-stimulating activity of MS-1 was evident at IgG concentrations as low as...

  6. History and Practice: Antibodies in Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies and passive antibody therapy in the treatment of infectious diseases is the story of a treatment concept which dates back more than 120 years, to the 1890s, when the use of serum from immunized animals provided the first effective treatment options against infections with Clostridium tetani and Corynebacterium diphtheriae. However, after the discovery of penicillin by Fleming in 1928, and the subsequent introduction of the much cheaper and safer antibiotics in the 1930s, serum therapy was largely abandoned. However, the broad and general use of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine has resulted in the development of multi-resistant strains of bacteria with limited to no response to existing treatments and the need for alternative treatment options. The combined specificity and flexibility of antibody-based treatments makes them very valuable tools for designing specific antibody treatments to infectious agents. These attributes have already caused a revolution in new antibody-based treatments in oncology and inflammatory diseases, with many approved products. However, only one monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, for the prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus, is approved for infectious diseases. The high cost of monoclonal antibody therapies, the need for parallel development of diagnostics, and the relatively small markets are major barriers for their development in the presence of cheap antibiotics. It is time to take a new and revised look into the future to find appropriate niches in infectious diseases where new antibody-based treatments or combinations with existing antibiotics, could prove their value and serve as stepping stones for broader acceptance of the potential for and value of these treatments. PMID:26104697

  7. Single-domain antibodies for brain targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Lalatsa, Katerina; Moreira Leite, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Smaller recombinant antibody fragments as single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) are emerging as credible alternatives because of their target specificity, high affinity, and cost-effective recombinant production. sdAbs have been forged into multivalent and multispecif ic therapeutics, or targeting moieties, that are able to shuttle their linked therapeutic cargo (i.e., drugs, nanoparticles, toxins, enzymes, and radionuclides) to the receptor of interest. Their ability to permeate across the blood ...

  8. Influenza-Specific Antibody-Dependent Phagocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Vanderven, Hillary; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Johnston, Angus; Rockman, Steven; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Reading, Patrick; Lichtfuss, Marit; Stephen J Kent

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunity to human influenza A virus (IAV) infection is only partially understood. Broadly non-neutralizing antibodies may assist in reducing disease but have not been well characterized. Methods We measured internalization of opsonized, influenza protein-coated fluorescent beads and live IAV into a monocytic cell line to study antibody-dependent phagocytosis (ADP) against multiple influenza hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes. We analyzed influenza HA-specific ADP in healthy human donors, ...

  9. Clearance of pathological antibodies using biomimetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Copp, Jonathan A.; Fang, Ronnie H.; Luk, Brian T.; Hu, Che-Ming J.; Gao, Weiwei; Zhang, Kang; Zhang, Liangfang

    2014-01-01

    The selective depletion of disease-causing antibodies using nanoparticles offers a new model in the management of type II immune hypersensitivity reactions. The demonstration of pathophysiologically inspired nanoengineering serves as a valuable prototype for additional therapeutic improvements with the goal of minimizing therapy-related adverse effects. Through the use of cell membrane-cloaked nanoparticles, nanoscale decoys with strong affinity to pathological antibodies can be administered ...

  10. Monoclonal antibodies to Bacteroides fragilis lipopolysaccharide.

    OpenAIRE

    Linko-Kettunen, L; Arstila, P; Jalkanen, M; Jousimies-Somer, H; Lassila, O; Lehtonen, O P; Weintraub, A; Viljanen, M K

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Bacteroides fragilis were produced by immunizing mice before hybridization with bacterial outer membranes solubilized with Triton X-100. Nineteen stabile clones were established. They all produced antibodies that reacted more strongly with purified B. fragilis LPS than with crude sonicated antigen in an enzyme immunoassay. Four MoAbs were studied by immunoblotting and enzyme immunoassay inhibition. Immunoblotting confirmed that ...

  11. Anti-synthetic peptide antibody reacting at the fusion junction of deletion-mutant epidermal growth factor receptors in human glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have investigated human gliomas that amplify and rearrange the epidermal growth factor receptor gene, with generation of an in-frame deletion mutation of 802 nucleotides in the external domain. This in-frame deletion mutation generates a local amino acid sequence at the fusion junction of what normally were distant polypeptide sequences in the intact epidermal growth factor receptor. This 14-amino acid peptide was chemically synthesized, coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and used as an immunogen in rabbits. The elicited antibody reacted specifically with the fusion peptide in ELISA. The anti-fusion junction peptide antibody was purified by passage of the antiserum over a peptide affinity column with acidic elution. The purified antibody selectively bound the glioma deletion mutant as compared to the intact epidermal growth factor receptor as assessed by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence, immunoprecipitation with gel electrophoresis, and binding experiments using radioiodinated antibody. These data indicate that it is feasible to generate site-specific anti-peptide antibodies that are highly selective for mutant proteins in human tumors. The anti-peptide antibody described here, and other mutation site-specific antibodies, should be ideal candidates for tumor immunoimaging and immunotherapy

  12. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. → Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. → The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. → The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  13. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, Anwar M. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Van Domselaar, Gary [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi [National Institute for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, Beijing (China); She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Sui, Jianhua [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); He, Runtao [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Marasco, Wayne A. [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Li, Xuguang, E-mail: Sean.Li@hc-sc.gc.ca [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  14. Antibody-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arruebo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way into the fields of Biotechnology and Medicine. Nanoparticles by themselves offer specific physicochemical properties that they do not exhibit in bulk form, where materials show constant physical properties regardless of size. Antibodies are nanosize biological products that are part of the specific immune system. In addition to their own properties as pathogens or toxin neutralizers, as well as in the recruitment of immune elements (complement, improving phagocytosis, cytotoxicity antibody dependent by natural killer cells, etc., they could carry several elements (toxins, drugs, fluorochroms, or even nanoparticles, etc. and be used in several diagnostic procedures, or even in therapy to destroy a specific target. The conjugation of antibodies to nanoparticles can generate a product that combines the properties of both. For example, they can combine the small size of nanoparticles and their special thermal, imaging, drug carrier, or magnetic characteristics with the abilities of antibodies, such as specific and selective recognition. The hybrid product will show versatility and specificity. In this review, we analyse both antibodies and nanoparticles, focusing especially on the recent developments for antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, offering the researcher an overview of the different applications and possibilities of these hybrid carriers.

  15. Decay of maternal antibodies in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Mahmoud, Kamel

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the decay rate of maternal antibodies against major broiler chicken pathogens. A total of 30 one-day-old broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and reared in isolation. These chicks were retrieved from a parent flock that received a routine vaccination program. Chicks were bled at hatch and sequentially thereafter every 5 d through 30 d of age. Maternal antibody titers were measured by ELISA for avian encephalomyelitis (AEV), avian influenza virus (AIV), chicken anemia virus (CAV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), and reovirus (Reo). Maternal antibody titers for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition test. Half-life estimates of maternal antibody titers were 5.3, 4.2, 7, 5.1, 3.9, 3.8, 4.9, 4.1, 6.3, and 4.7 d for AEV, AIV, CAV, IBDV, IBV, ILTV, MG, MS, NDV, and Reo, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences among half-lives of maternal antibody titers against certain pathogens. Furthermore, all maternal antibody titers were depleted by 10 d of age except for IBDV. PMID:23960115

  16. Quality control of antibodies for assay development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Sarah; Seitz, Harald

    2016-09-25

    Antibodies are used as powerful tools in basic research, for example, in biomarker identification, and in various forms for diagnostics, for example, identification of allergies or autoimmune diseases. Due to their robustness and ease of handling, immunoassays are favourite methods for investigation of various biological or medical questions. Nevertheless in many cases, additional analyses such as mass spectrometry are used to validate or confirm the results of immunoassays. To minimize the workload and to increase confidence in immunoassays, there are urgent needs for antibodies which are both highly specific and well validated. Unfortunately many commercially available antibodies are neither well characterized nor fully tested for cross-reactivities. Adequate quality control and validation of an antibody is time-consuming and can be frustrating. Such validation needs to be performed for every assay/application. However, where an antibody validation is successful, a highly specific and stable reagent will be on hand. This article describes the validation processes of antibodies, including some often neglected factors, as well as unspecific binding to other sample compounds in a multiparameter diagnostic assay. The validation consists of different immunological methods, with important assay controls, and is performed in relation to the development of a diagnostic test. PMID:26873787

  17. Comparative Analysis of Immune Repertoires between Bactrian Camel's Conventional and Heavy-Chain Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyang; Duan, Xiaobo; Yang, Kai; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Changjiang; Fu, Longfei; Ren, Zhe; Wang, Changxi; Wu, Jinghua; Lu, Ruxue; Ye, Yanrui; He, Mengying; Nie, Chao; Yang, Naibo; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Liu, Xiao; Tan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Compared to classical antibodies, camel heavy chain antibodies (HCAbs) are smaller in size due to lack of the light chain and the first constant domain of the heavy chain (CH1 region). The variable regions of HCAbs (VHHs) are more soluble and stable than that of conventional antibodies (VHs). Even with such simple structure, they are still functional in antigen binding. Although HCAbs have been extensively investigated over the past two decades, most efforts have been based upon low throughput sequence analysis, and there are only limited reports trying to analyze and describe the complete immune repertoire (IR) of camel HCAbs. Here we leveraged the high-throughput data generated by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) of the variable domains of the antibody heavy chains from three Bactrian camels to conduct in-depth comparative analyses of the immunoglobulin repertoire. These include analyses of the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) length and distribution, mutation rate, antibody characteristic amino acids, the distribution of the cysteine (Cys) codons, and the non-classical VHHs. We found that there is higher diversity in the CDR2 than in the other sub-regions, and there is a higher mutation rate in the VHHs than in the VHs (P Arg AA substitution at the first position of framework 4 for all types of clones. We present, for the first time, a relatively complete picture of the Bactrian camel antibody immune repertoire, including conventional antibody (Ab) and HCAbs, using PCR and in silico analysis based on high-throughput NGS data. PMID:27588755

  18. Improving effector functions of antibodies for cancer treatment: Enhancing ADCC and CDC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akito Natsume

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Akito Natsume, Rinpei Niwa, Mitsuo SatohAntibody Research Laboratories, Research Division, Kyowa Hakko Kirin Co., Ltd.,/Machida-shi, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: As platforms for therapeutic agents, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have already been approved, and several MAbs have demonstrated clinical effectiveness in a variety of malignancies. However, several issues have also been emerging in antibody therapy, such as high cost and insufficient drug action. Recently, to improve MAb activity in humans, effector functions have been subjects of focus, especially antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC. Extensive efforts have been made to enhance these effector functions of MAbs, and successful approaches have been reported by us and others, wherein the binding activity of MAbs to FcγRIIIa or C1q is increased by introducing amino acid mutations into heavy chain constant regions or through glyco-modification of Fc-linked oligosaccharides. In addition, one of the next approaches to optimizing therapeutic antibodies would be to combine multiple enhancing modifications into a single antibody platform to overcome the diverse mechanisms of clinical resistance of tumor cells. For this aim, we have recently developed a successful combination composed of ADCC-enhancing modification by the fucose depletion from Fc-linked oligosaccharides and CDC-enhancing modification by IgG1 and IgG3 isotype shuffling in heavy chains, which could be of great value for the development of third-generation antibody therapeutics.Keywords: ADCC, CDC, effector functions, Fc oligosaccharides, IgG isotypes, nonfucosylated IgG

  19. Antibody specificities of children living in a malaria endemic area to inhibitory and blocking epitopes on MSP-1 19 of Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omosun, Y O; Adoro, S; Anumudu, C I; Odaibo, A B; Uthiapibull, C; Holder, A A; Nwagwu, M; Nwuba, R I

    2009-03-01

    Merozoite surface protein-1(19) (MSP-1(19)) specific antibodies which include processing inhibitory, blocking and neutral antibodies have been identified in individuals exposed to Plasmodium falciparum. Here we intend to look at the effect of single and multiple amino acid substitutions of MSP-1(19) on the recognition by polyclonal antibodies from children living in Igbo-Ora, Nigeria. This would provide us with information on the possibility of eliciting mainly processing inhibitory antibodies with a recombinant MSP-1(19) vaccine. Blood was collected from children in the rainy season and binding of anti-MSP-1(19) antibodies to modified mutants of MSP-1(19) was analysed by ELISA. The MSP-1(19) mutant proteins with single substitutions at positions 22 (Leu-->Arg), 43 (Glu-->Leu) and 53 (Asn-->Arg) and the MSP-1(19) mutant protein with multiple substitutions at positions 27+31+34+43 (Glu-->Tyr, Leu-->Arg, Tyr-->Ser, Glu-->Leu); which had inhibitory epitopes; had the highest recognition. Children recognised both sets of mutants with different age groups having different recognition levels. The percentage of malaria positive individuals (32-80%) with antibodies that bound to the mutants MSP-1(19) containing epitopes that recognise only processing inhibitory and not blocking antibodies, were significantly different from those with antibodies that did not bind to these mutants (21-28%). The amino acid substitutions that abolished the binding of blocking antibodies without affecting the binding of inhibitory antibodies are of particular interest in the design of MSP-1(19) based malaria vaccines. Although these MSP-1(19) mutants have not been found in natural population, their recognition by polyclonal antibodies from humans naturally infected with malaria is very promising for the future use of MSP-1(19) mutants in the design of a malaria vaccine. PMID:19081386

  20. Characterization of two anti-dengue human monoclonal antibodies prepared from PBMCs of patients with dengue illness in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z-Y; Yamashita, A; Kawashita, N; Sasaki, T; Pan, Y; Ono, K-I; Ikuta, K; Li, Y-G

    2016-06-01

    The global spread of the four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (dengue-1 to -4) has made this virus a major and growing public health concern. Generally, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies derived from primary infection play a significant role in protecting against subsequent infection with the same serotype. By contrast, these pre-existing antibodies are believed to mediate a non-protective response to subsequent heterotypic DENV infections, leading to the onset of dengue illness. In this study, two monoclonal antibodies prepared by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with dengue fever were characterized. Epitope mapping revealed that amino acid residues 254-278 in domain II of the viral envelope protein E were the target region of these antibodies. A database search revealed that certain sequences in this epitope region showed high conservation among the four serotypes of DENV. These two human monoclonal antibodies could neutralize DENV-2,-4 more effectively than DENV-1,-3. The amino acid sequences could not explain this difference in neutralizing activity. However, the 3D structure results showed that amino acid 274 could be the critical residue for the difference in neutralization. These results may provide basic information for the development of a dengue vaccine. PMID:27265466

  1. 21 CFR 866.5110 - Antiparietal antibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antiparietal antibody immunological test system....5110 Antiparietal antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antiparietal antibody... the specific antibody for gastric parietal cells in serum and other body fluids. Gastric...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  3. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  4. Antipeptide antibody that specifically inhibits insulin receptor autophosphorylation and protein kinase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two site-specific antibodies that immunoprecipitate the human insulin receptor have been prepared by immunizing rabbits with chemically synthesized peptides derived from the cDNA-predicted amino acid sequence of the β subunit of the proreceptor. Antibodies to the carboxyl terminus (AbP5) and to a domain around tyrosine-960 (AbP4) specifically recognize the β subunit of the receptor on immunoblots. Both antibodies immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin-receptor complexes and the autophosphorylated receptor. Although neither antibody inhibited insulin binding to the receptor, both insulin-dependent autophosphorylation and exogenous substrate phosphorylation were inhibited by AbP4. Inhibition by AbP4 was dependent upon the phosphorylation state of the receptor; it was not detected when the receptor was autophosphorylated prior to addition of AbP4. AbP4 did not inhibit activity of the related epidermal growth factor (EGF)-receptor tyrosine protein kinase nor did it inhibit the activity of cAMP-dependent kinase or protein kinase C. The observation that an antibody directed to residues 952-967 of the proreceptor neutralizes the protein kinase activity of the β subunit suggest that this region may play a critical role in the function of the hormone-dependent, protein tyrosine-specific kinase activity of the insulin receptor

  5. Isolation of active site and antibody-binding fragments of human erythrocyte transglutaminase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytically active human erythrocyte transglutaminase (TGase) was purified using an immunoaffinity column prepared from a monoclonal antibody to guinea pig liver TGase. The enzyme activity was completely inhibited by incorporation of iodo[14C]acetamide to the level of 1 mole per 1 mole of TGase. The 14C-labeled TGase was digested with cyanogen bromide, subjected to HPLC, and four pure peptides were isolated with molecular weights ranging from 3-22 KDa. Only one of the peptides was radiolabeled and characterized as an active site peptide of 10 KDa. Another peptide of 18 KDa was identified as a monoclonal antibody-binding domain of TGase. Although the active site and the antibody-binding domain were present on different cyanogen bromide fragments, the mouse anti-TGase inhibited 100% of TGase activity. The results suggest that the antibody-binding site is not located on the enzyme active site sequence, but that the three dimensional space configuration of the antigen-antibody complex hinders substrate binding to the active site. The radiolabeled active site cysteine residue was not found in the N-terminal 21 amino acids of the 10 KDa peptide. Additional fragments of the active site peptide are currently being analyzed

  6. Fabrication of Calix[4]arene Derivative Monolayers to Control Orientation of Antibody Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three calix[4]arene (Cal-4 derivatives which separately contain ethylester (1, carboxylic acid (2, and crownether (3 at the lower rim with a common reactive thiol at the upper rim were synthesized and constructed to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on Au films. After spectroscopic characterization of the monolayers, surface coverage and orientation of antibody immobilized on the Cal-4 derivative SAMs were studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique. Experimental results revealed that the antibody could be immobilized on the Cal-4 derivatives spontaneously. The orientation of absorbed antibody on the Cal-4 derivative SAMs is related to the SAM’s dipole moment. The possible orientations of the antibody immobilized on the Cal-4 derivative 1 SAM are lying-on or side-on, while on the Cal-4 derivative 2 and Cal-4 derivative 3 head-on and end-on respectively. These experimental results demonstrate the surface dipole moment of Cal-4 derivative appears to be an important factor to antibody orientation. Cal-4 derivatives are useful in developing site direct protein chips.

  7. Epitope Mapping of Anti-Interleukin-13 Neutralizing Antibody CNTO607

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teplyakov, Alexey; Obmolova, Galina; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Luo, Jinquan; Kang, James; O' Neil, Karyn; Gilliland, Gary L.; (Centocor)

    2009-06-24

    CNTO607 is a neutralizing anti-interleukin-13 (IL-13) human monoclonal antibody obtained from a phage display library. To determine how this antibody inhibits the biological effect of IL-13, we determined the binding epitope by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of the complex between CNTO607 Fab and IL-13 reveals the antibody epitope at the surface formed by helices A and D of IL-13. This epitope overlaps with the IL-4Ralpha/IL-13Ralpha1 receptor-binding site, which explains the neutralizing effect of CNTO607. The extensive antibody interface covers an area of 1000 A(2), which is consistent with the high binding affinity. The key features of the interface are the charge and shape complementarity of the molecules that include two hydrophobic pockets on IL-13 that accommodate Phe32 [complementarity-determining region (CDR) L2] and Trp100a (CDR H3) and a number of salt bridges between basic residues of IL-13 and acidic residues of the antibody. Comparison with the structure of the free Fab shows that the CDR residues do not change their conformation upon complex formation, with the exception of two residues in CDR H3, Trp100a and Asp100b, which change rotamer conformations. To evaluate the relative contribution of the epitope residues to CNTO607 binding, we performed alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the A-D region of IL-13. This study confirmed the primary role of electrostatic interactions for antigen recognition.

  8. Optimization of the DTPA mixed-anhydride reaction with antibodies at low concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) was conjugated with antibody to human serum albumin (Ab) at low concentration (300 μg/ml, 2.0 μM/ via the DTPA carboxycarbonyl mixed-anhydride method. To study parameters determining the balance between the degree of conjugation and the antibody-binding activaty of Ab, a known concentration of the anhydride prepared at isobutylchloroformate (IBC)-to-DTPA ratios of 1, 2.1, or 4.2 was reacted with Ab. The percentage yields of the anhydride were determined by spectrophotometric and gravimetric titration. By the former method the percentage yields, based on DTPA concentration, were 18, 24, and 220, respectively, when the IBC-to-DTPA ratios were 1, 2.1, and 4.2. The corresponding percentage yields were 17, 39, and 262 when determined by the latter method. When the anhydride was prepared at an IBC-to-DTPA ratio of 2.1, an optimum conjugation giving three indium atoms per Ab was obtained, wtih 64% retention of antibody-binding activity. For an IBC-to-DTPA ratio of 1, the antibody retained almost 100% binding activity but the number of indium atoms incorporated (0.2) was too small. For an IBC-to-DTPA ratio of 4.2, up to 22 indium atoms were incorporated but antibody-binding activity was completely destroyed

  9. Anti-bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate antibody accumulates acetylated LDL-derived cholesterol in cultured macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delton-Vandenbroucke, Isabelle; Bouvier, Jerome; Makino, Asami; Besson, Nelly; Pageaux, Jean-François; Lagarde, Michel; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2007-03-01

    Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP), also called lysobisphosphatidic acid, is a phospholipid highly enriched in the internal membranes of multivesicular late endosomes, in which it forms specialized lipid domains. It has been suggested that BMP-rich membranes regulate cholesterol transport. Here, we examine the effects of an anti-BMP antibody on cholesterol metabolism and transport in two macrophage cell lines, RAW 264.7 and THP-1, during loading with acetylated low density lipoprotein (AcLDL). Anti-BMP antibody was internalized and accumulated in both macrophage cell types. Cholesterol staining with filipin and mass measurements indicate that AcLDL-stimulated accumulation of free cholesterol (FC) was enhanced in macrophages that had accumulated the antibody. Unlike the hydrophobic amine U18666A (3-beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one), esterification of AcLDL-derived cholesterol by ACAT was not modified after anti-BMP treatment. AcLDL loading led to an increase of FC in the plasma membrane. This increase was further enhanced in anti-BMP-treated macrophages. However, cholesterol efflux to HDL was reduced in antibody-treated cells. These results suggest that the accumulation of anti-BMP antibody alters cholesterol homeostasis in AcLDL-loaded macrophages. PMID:17146116

  10. High-affinity uranyl-specific antibodies suitable for cellular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have proved to be valuable models for the study of protein-metal interactions, and previous reports have described very specific antibodies to chelated metal ions, including uranyl. We raised specific mAbs against UO22+-DCP-BSA (DCP, 1, 10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid) to generate new sets of antibodies that might cross-react with various complexed forms of uranyl in different environments for further application in the field of toxicology. Using counter-screening with UO22+-DCP-casein, we selected two highly specific mAbs against uranyl-DCP (KD = 10-100 pM): U04S and U08S. Competitive assays in the presence of different metal ions (UO22+, Fe3+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Ca2+) showed that uranyl in solution can act as a good competitor, suggesting some antibody ability to cross-react with chelating groups other than DCP in the UO22+ equatorial coordination plane. Interestingly, one of the antibodies could be used for revealing uranyl cations in cell samples. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analyses after immuno-labeling revealed the interaction of uranyl with human kidney cells HK2. The intracellular accumulation of uranyl could be directly visualized by metal-immunostaining using fluorescent-labeled mAb. Our results suggest that U04S mAb epitopes mostly include the uranyl fraction and its para-topes can accommodate a wide variety of chelating groups. (authors)

  11. Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111-hydroxyquinoline labelled platelets, though useful in the detection of thrombus, have not gained widespread use owing to the time and technical skill required for their preparation. A study was therefore conducted evaluating a new method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a 111In labelled monoclonal antibody, P256, directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. When the number of receptors occupied by P256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface platelet function, as assessed by platelet aggregometry, was undisturbed. P256 was radiolabelled with 111In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo - that is, by direct intravenous injection of P256 - in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The 111In kinetics recorded after intravenous P256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P256, three had documented thrombus, tow of whom gave positive results on P256 platelet scintigraphy. The third subject had chromic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative. Imaging thrombus using a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody directed to platelets appears to offer great potential as a simple, non-invasive approach to the diagnosis of thrombosis. 3 refs. (Author)

  12. Engineered Bovine Antibodies in the Development of Novel Therapeutics, Immunomodulators and Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Koti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Some bovine antibodies across all classes are unique, such as the CDR3 of the variable heavy-domain (VH CDR3, which is exceptionally long (up to 66 amino acids, unlike most conventional antibodies where the VH CDR3 loops range from 10 to 25 amino acids. The exceptionally long VH CDR3 is encoded by unusually long germline IGHD genes together with insertion of novel “a” nucleotide rich conserved short nucleotide sequence (CSNS specifically at the IGH V-D junction. Such an exceptionally long VH CDR3 confers unique “knob and stalk” structural architecture where the knob, formed by intra-VH CDR3 disulfide bridges, is separated by 20 Å solvent exposed stalk composed of anti-parallel beta strands. The substitution of the knob with cytokines, such as, erythropoietin and granulocyte colony stimulating factor 3 (granulocyte colony stimulating factor, results in expression of functional fusion proteins with enhanced pharmacokinetics. The beta stranded stalk can be substituted with other rigid structures, for example, repeat alpha helices to form coiled-coil that mimics the beta-stranded stalk and, thus, opens opportunities for insertion of this structure in the CDRs of antibodies across species. Given the versatility of such a structural platform in bovine antibody VH CDR3, it provides the opportunity for the development of new generation of diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccines and immunomodulating drugs.

  13. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis and other glutamate and GABA receptor antibody encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruijn, Marienke A A M; Titulaer, Maarten J

    2016-01-01

    Over the last few year, antibodies to various central nervous system receptors, particularly the glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, have been found to be associated with autoimmune neurologic disorders. The receptors include the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR), the metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and GABA type A and B receptors (respectively GABAAR and GABABR). Compared to the previously described paraneoplastic antibodies directed at intracellular targets, the patients with receptor antibodies are often younger, they less frequently have malignancies, and they respond better to immunotherapy. Many of the patients have limbic encephalitis with amnesia, disorientation, seizures, and psychological or psychiatric symptoms, but those with NMDAR antibodies usually develop a more widespread form of encephalitis, often leading to a decrease in consciousness and requirement for long-term intensive care treatment. The autoantibodies bind directly to the synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors on the membrane surface, and have direct effects on signal transduction in central synapses. These conditions are very important to recognize as the symptoms and complications can be fatal when not treated in time, whereas with immunotherapy many patients recover considerably. PMID:27112679

  14. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  15. Antibody epitopes on the neuraminidase of a recent H3N2 influenza virus (A/Memphis/31/98).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Upma; Hwang, Chi-Ching; Venkatramani, Lalitha; Gulati, Shelly; Stray, Stephen J; Lee, Janis T; Laver, W Graeme; Bochkarev, Alexey; Zlotnick, Adam; Air, Gillian M

    2002-12-01

    We have characterized monoclonal antibodies raised against the neuraminidase (NA) of a Sydney-like influenza virus (A/Memphis/31/98, H3N2) in a reassortant virus A/NWS/33(HA)-A/Mem/31/98(NA) (H1N2) and nine escape mutants selected by these monoclonal antibodies. Five of the antibodies use the same heavy chain VDJ genes and may not be independent. Another antibody, Mem5, uses the same V(H) and J genes with a different D gene and different isotype. Sequence changes in escape mutants selected by these antibodies occur in two loops of the NA, at amino acid 198, 199, 220, or 221. These amino acids are located on the opposite side of the NA monomer to the major epitopes found in N9 and early N2 NAs. Escape mutants with a change at 198 have reduced NA activity compared to the wild-type virus. Asp198 points toward the substrate binding pocket, and we had previously found that a site-directed mutation of this amino acid resulted in a loss of enzyme activity (M. R. Lentz, R. G. Webster, and G. M. Air, Biochemistry 26:5351-5358, 1987). Mutations at residue 199, 220, or 221 did not alter the NA activity significantly compared to that of wild-type NA. A 3.5-A structure of Mem5 Fab complexed with the Mem/98 NA shows that the Mem5 antibody binds at the sites of escape mutation selected by the other antibodies. PMID:12414967

  16. Mapping of epitopes recognized by antibodies induced by immunization of mice with PspA and PspC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadesilho, Cintia F M; Ferreira, Daniela M; Gordon, Stephen B; Briles, David E; Moreno, Adriana T; Oliveira, Maria Leonor S; Ho, Paulo L; Miyaji, Eliane N

    2014-07-01

    Pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) and pneumococcal surface protein C (PspC) are important candidates for an alternative vaccine against pneumococcal infections. Since these antigens show variability, the use of variants that do not afford broad protection may lead to the selection of vaccine escape bacteria. Epitopes capable of inducing antibodies with broad cross-reactivities should thus be the preferred antigens. In this work, experiments using peptide arrays show that most linear epitopes recognized by antibodies induced in mice against different PspAs were located at the initial 44 amino acids of the mature protein and that antibodies against these linear epitopes did not confer protection against a lethal challenge. Conversely, linear epitopes recognized by antibodies to PspC included the consensus sequences involved in the interaction with human factor H and secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA). Since linear epitopes of PspA were not protective, larger overlapping fragments containing 100 amino acids of PspA of strain Rx1 were constructed (fragments 1 to 7, numbered from the N terminus) to permit the mapping of antibodies with conformational epitopes not represented in the peptide arrays. Antibodies from mice immunized with fragments 1, 2, 4, and 5 were capable of binding onto the surface of pneumococci and mediating protection against a lethal challenge. The fact that immunization of mice with 100-amino-acid fragments located at the more conserved N-terminal region of PspA (fragments 1 and 2) induced protection against a pneumococcal challenge indicates that the induction of antibodies against conformational epitopes present at this region may be important in strategies for inducing broad protection against pneumococci. PMID:24807052

  17. A multi-Fc-species system for recombinant antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Nizak Clément; Vielemeyer Ole; El Marjou Ahmed; Moutel Sandrine; Benaroch Philippe; Dübel Stefan; Perez Franck

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic projects often suffer from a lack of functional validation creating a strong demand for specific and versatile antibodies. Antibody phage display represents an attractive approach to select rapidly in vitro the equivalent of monoclonal antibodies, like single chain Fv antibodies, in an inexpensive and animal free way. However, so far, recombinant antibodies have not managed to impose themselves as efficient alternatives to natural anti...

  18. Antigen-Specific Antibody Glycosylation Is Regulated via Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Mahan, Alison E.; Jennewein, Madeleine F.; Suscovich, Todd; Dionne, Kendall; Tedesco, Jacquelynne; Chung, Amy W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Pau, Maria; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Francis, Don; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna; Walker, Bruce D.; Baden, Lindsey; Barouch, Dan H.

    2016-01-01

    Antibody effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, complement deposition, and antibody-dependent phagocytosis, play a critical role in immunity against multiple pathogens, particularly in the absence of neutralizing activity. Two modifications to the IgG constant domain (Fc domain) regulate antibody functionality: changes in antibody subclass and changes in a single N-linked glycan located in the CH2 domain of the IgG Fc. Together, these modifications provide a spe...

  19. 唑来膦酸与γδ TCR单抗体外扩增HIV感染者Vδ2 T细胞的效果比较%The comparison between HIV-infected patients' Vdelta2 T cells expansion efficiencies by zoledronic acid and gammadelta TCR monoclonal antibody in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许文; 武晓丽; 谢杨新; 杨俊连; 聂为民; 赵敏; 陈威巍

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察唑来膦酸和γδ TCR单抗两种诱导方法对HIV感染者的Vδ2 T细胞的扩增效果,探讨效率更高的扩增方法.方法 选择65例HIV感染者和38例健康对照者,应用唑来膦酸法和γδ TCR单抗法分别诱导其外周血单个核细胞(PBMC),分别在培养的0d、7d、14 d应用流式细胞术检测其γδ T细胞及其亚群的百分率及Vδ2 T细胞增殖情况,比较两种方法的诱导效果.结果 外周血中HIV感染者Vδ2 T细胞的数量和比例与健康对照相比显著下降;扩增14 d后,γδ TCR单抗法诱导HIV感染者和健康对照者的Vδ2 T细胞占CD3+细胞的百分比分别为(17.6±19.8)%和(64.3±4.5)%,Vδ2 T细胞扩增倍数分别为54±40和74±29;而采用唑来膦酸法的诱导结果分别为(69.6±21.2)%和(97.3±1.7)%以及538±11和5984±721.结论 唑来膦酸法可诱导HIV感染者及健康对照者Vδ2 T细胞大量增殖,其效率显著高于γδ TCR单抗诱导法.%Objective To find out the more efficient induction method through investigating the expansion efficiencies of HIV-infected patients' Vdelta2 T cells induced by zoledronic acid (Zol) or gammadelta TCR monoclonal antibody (mAb).Methods 38 healthy control subjects (HC group) and 65 HIV infected patients (HIV group) were enrolled in this research.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of individuals were stimulated by Zol or γδ TCR mAb respectively for 14 days at 2.0 × 107 cells/well,and then γδ T cells and Vδ2 subsets frequencies were measured by flow cytometry (FCM) on 0,7 and 14 day.The absolute numbers of Vδ2 T cells were calculated and the Vδ2 T cell expansion efficiencies by these two methods were compared.Results The absolute numbers and frequencies of Vδ2 T cell of HIV groups were lower than those of HC groups significantly on 0 day.After 14 days,the frequencies of Vδ2 T cell of HIV group and HC group were(17.6 ± 19.8)% and(64.3 ± 4.5) % respectively,and the expansion indexes of Vδ2

  20. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... found naturally in some foods, including leafy vegetables, citrus fruits, beans (legumes), and whole grains. Folic acid ... mcg of folic acid every day for good health. But older adults need to be sure they ...

  1. Epitope Mapping of Fc gamma RIIa Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Tan Sardjono

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available FcγRIIa (CD32 is an IgG receptor which has been shown to be important in autoimmune disease pathology. IV.3, 8.7, and 7.30 are anti-FcγRIIa monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, which block the interaction between FcγRIIa and complex IgG. In this study, the three mAbs were demonstrated to inhibit FcγRIIa function. The determination of the precise epitopes of the IV.3, 8.7, and 7.30 mAbs may become a potential approach for designing inhibitors for FcγRIIa. The epitope of IV.3, 8.7, and 7.30 were determined using chimeric receptors based on the extracellular domains of FcγRIIa and the FcεRI a chain. The epitopes for IV.3 was found to be mapped on amino acid residues 132-137, while 8.7 and 7.30 were on amino acid residues 112-119 and 157-162. Based on the crystal 3D model of FcγRIIa molecule, these amino acid sequences are clustered together forming a contiguous region within the ligand binding site of the receptor.

  2. Stability of rhenium-188 labeled antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For clinical application of beta-emitter labeled antibody, high specific activity is important. Carrier-free Re-188 from W-188/Re-188 generator is an ideal radionuclide for this purpose. However, low stability of Re-188 labeled antibody, especially in high specific activity, due to radiolytic decomposition by high energy (2.1 MeV) beta ray was problem. We studied the stability of Re-188 labeled antibody, and stabilizing effect of several nontoxic radical-quenching agents. Pre-reduced monoclonal antibody (CEA79.4) was labeled with Re-188 by incubating with generator-eluted Re-188-perrhenate in the presence of stannous tartrate for 2 hr at room temperature. Radiochemical purity of each preparation was determined by chromatography (ITLC-SG/acetone, ITLC-SG/Umezawa, Whatman No.1/saline). Human serum albumin was added to the labeled antibodies(2%). Stability of Re-188-CEA79.4 was investigated in the presence of vitamin C, ethanol, or Tween 80 as radical-quenching agents. Specific activities of 4.29∼5.11 MBq/μg were obtained. Labeling efficiencies were 88±4%(n=12). Very low stability after removal of stannous tartrate from the preparation was observed. If stored after purging with N2, all the preparations were stable for 10 hr. However, if contacted with air, stability decreased. Perrhenate and Re-188-tartrate was major impurity in declined preparation (12∼47 and 9∼38% each, after 10 hr). Colloid-formation was not a significant problem in all cases. Addition of vitamin C stabilized the labeled antibodies either under N2 or under air by reducing the formation of perrhenate. High specific activity Re-188 labeled antibody is unstable, especially, in the presence of oxygen. Addition of vitamin C increased the stability

  3. Antibody immobilized cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles for aflatoxin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Aditya; Matharu, Zimple; Sumana, G.; Solanki, Pratima R. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, Biomedical Instrumentation Section, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kim, C.G. [Centre for NanoBioEngineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Malhotra, B.D., E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.co [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, Biomedical Instrumentation Section, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Centre for NanoBioEngineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-30

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} antibody (aAFB{sub 1}) covalently attached to cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles (C-AuNP) has been immobilized onto 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) based self assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold electrode (MBA/Au), for the fabrication of BSA/aAFB{sub 1}-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode. This immunoelectrode has been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical characterization techniques. The electrochemical response studies reveal that the BSA/aAFB{sub 1}-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode can be used to detect AFB{sub 1} in the range of 10-100 ng dL{sup -1} and has sensitivity as 0.45 {mu}A ng{sup -1} dL, limit of detection as 17.90 ng dL{sup -1} and a response time of 60 s.

  4. Antibody immobilized cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles for aflatoxin detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aflatoxin B1 antibody (aAFB1) covalently attached to cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles (C-AuNP) has been immobilized onto 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) based self assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold electrode (MBA/Au), for the fabrication of BSA/aAFB1-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode. This immunoelectrode has been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical characterization techniques. The electrochemical response studies reveal that the BSA/aAFB1-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode can be used to detect AFB1 in the range of 10-100 ng dL-1 and has sensitivity as 0.45 μA ng-1 dL, limit of detection as 17.90 ng dL-1 and a response time of 60 s.

  5. The antibody mining toolbox: an open source tool for the rapid analysis of antibody repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Kiss, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput screening methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The high cost and the need for bioinformatics experts and powerful computer clusters, however, have limited the general use of deep sequencing in antibody selections. Here, we describe the AbMining ToolBox, an open source software package for the straightforward analysis of antibody libraries sequenced by the three main next generation sequencing platforms (454, Ion Torrent, MiSeq). The ToolBox is able to identify heavy chain CDR3s as effectively as more computationally intense software, and can be easily adapted to analyze other portions of antibody variable genes, as well as the selection outputs of libraries based on different scaffolds. The software runs on all common operating systems (Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), on standard personal computers, and sequence analysis of 1-2 million reads can be accomplished in 10-15 min, a fraction of the time of competing software. Use of the ToolBox will allow the average researcher to incorporate deep sequence analysis into routine selections from antibody display libraries. PMID:24423623

  6. Antibodies Produced in Response to Cryptococcus neoformans Pulmonary Infection in Mice Have Characteristics of Nonprotective Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Casadevall, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Murine cryptocococcal pulmonary infection elicited serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG to the capsular polysaccharide, but only IgG stained yeast cells in alveoli. Both isotypes produced punctuate immunofluorescence patterns on yeast cells like those of nonprotective antibodies. The difficulties involved in associating humoral immunity with protection in murine cryptocococcal infection could reflect nonprotective antibody responses.

  7. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Olivia B; Estevez, Carlos; Yu, Qingzhong; Suarez, David L

    2013-04-15

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere with vaccine antigen processing that reduces the subsequent immune response. Once MAb titers are depleted, the chick will respond to vaccination, but they are also susceptible to viral infection. This study examines the effect of MAb on seroconversion to different viral-vectored avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccines. Chicks were given passively transferred antibodies (PTA) using AIV hyperimmunized serum, and subsequently vaccinated with a fowlpox-AIV recombinant vaccine (FPr) or a Newcastle disease virus-AIV recombinant vaccine (NDVr). Our results indicate that passively transferred antibodies led to significant reduction of seroconversion and clinical protection from virulent challenge in recombinant virus vaccinated chicks thus demonstrating maternal antibody interference to vaccination. The passive antibody transfer model system provides an important tool to evaluate maternal antibody interference to vaccination. PMID:23398721

  8. Mediation of Staphylococcus saprophyticus adherence to uroepithelial cells by lipoteichoic acid.

    OpenAIRE

    Teti, G; Chiofalo, M S; Tomasello, F.; Fava, C.; Mastroeni, P.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of uroepithelial cells with lipoteichoic acid from Staphylococcus saprophyticus resulted in a decrease in the adherence of this organism. Similar effects were observed when bacteria were pretreated with the lipoteichoic acid ligands albumin and anti-polyglycerophosphate monoclonal antibodies. Lipoteichoic acid might behave as an adhesin of S. saprophyticus.

  9. Immunomodulatory Gene Therapy Prevents Antibody Formation and Lethal Hypersensitivity Reactions in Murine Pompe Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Baodong; Kulis, Michael D; Young, Sarah P.; Hobeika, Amy C; Li, Songtao; Bird, Andrew; Zhang, Haoyue; Li, Yifan; Clay, Timothy M.; Burks, Wesley; Kishnani, Priya S.; Koeberl, Dwight D

    2009-01-01

    Infantile Pompe disease progresses to a lethal cardiomyopathy in absence of effective treatment. Enzyme-replacement therapy (ERT) with recombinant human acid α-glucosidase (rhGAA) has been effective in most patients with Pompe disease, but efficacy was reduced by high-titer antibody responses. Immunomodulatory gene therapy with a low dose adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector (2 × 1010 particles) containing a liver-specific regulatory cassette significantly lowered immunoglobin G (IgG), IgG1, a...

  10. Stacking and energetic contribution of aromatic islands at the binding interface of antibody proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Di; Sun, Jing; Xu, Tianlei; Wang, Shuning; Li, Guoqing; Li, Yixue; Cao, Zhiwei

    2010-01-01

    Background The enrichment and importance of some aromatic residues, such as Tyr and Trp, have been widely noticed at the binding interfaces of antibodies from many experimental and statistical results, some of which were even identified as “hot spots” contributing significantly greater to the binding affinity than other amino acids. However, how these aromatic residues influence the immune binding still deserves further investigation. A large-scale examination was done regarding the local spa...

  11. Anti-bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate antibody accumulates acetylated LDL-derived cholesterol in cultured macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Delton-Vandenbroucke, Isabelle; Bouvier, Jerome; Makino, Asami; Besson, Nelly; Pageaux, Jean-François; Lagarde, Michel; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2007-01-01

    Bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP), also called lysobisphosphatidic acid, is a phospholipid highly enriched in the internal membranes of multivesicular late endosomes, in which it forms specialized lipid domains. It has been suggested that BMP-rich membranes regulate cholesterol transport. Here, we examine the effects of an anti-BMP antibody on cholesterol metabolism and transport in two macrophage cell lines, RAW 264.7 and THP-1, during loading with acetylated low density lipoprotein (AcLDL...

  12. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  13. Platform for high-throughput antibody selection using synthetically-designed antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batonick, Melissa; Holland, Erika G; Busygina, Valeria; Alderman, Dawn; Kay, Brian K; Weiner, Michael P; Kiss, Margaret M

    2016-09-25

    Synthetic humanized antibody libraries are frequently generated by random incorporation of changes at multiple positions in the antibody hypervariable regions. Although these libraries have very large theoretical diversities (>10(20)), the practical diversity that can be achieved by transformation of Escherichia coli is limited to about 10(10). To constrain the practical diversity to sequences that more closely mimic the diversity of natural human antibodies, we generated a scFv phage library using entirely pre-defined complementarity determining regions (CDR). We have used this library to select for novel antibodies against four human protein targets and demonstrate that identification of enriched sequences at each of the six CDRs in early selection rounds can be used to reconstruct a consensus antibody with selectivity for the target. PMID:26607994

  14. Antibody induction versus placebo, no induction, or another type of antibody induction for liver transplant recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penninga, Luit; Wettergren, André; Wilson, Colin H;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver transplantation is an established treatment option for end-stage liver failure. To date, no consensus has been reached on the use of immunosuppressive T-cell antibody induction for preventing rejection after liver transplantation. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of...... immunosuppressive T-cell specific antibody induction compared with placebo, no induction, or another type of T-cell specific antibody induction for prevention of acute rejection in liver transplant recipients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane......-cell specific antibody induction compared with placebo, no induction, or another type of antibody induction in liver transplant recipients. Our inclusion criteria stated that participants within each included trial should have received the same maintenance immunosuppressive therapy. We planned to include trials...

  15. Feasibility of iodine-125 labeled anti-human hemoglobin antibody in the detection of bleeding sites from the large bowel-A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A monoclonal anti-human hemoglobin antibody that cross-reacts with mouse hemoglobin was labeled with Iodine-125 through the Chloramine-T method. The labeled antibody was used in an attempt to recognize bleeding sites from the large bowel in a mouse model, through a non-invasive enema-like study. In vitro experiments after double column chromatography of the labeled antibody and 10% trichloroacetic acid conjugation revealed that about 80% of the radioactivity was incorporated into protein. Inhibition assay containing could (non-radiolabeled) antibody showed that Iodine-125 radiolabeled antibody preserved its immunoreactivity. Autoradiographs exquisitely demonstrated accumulation of isotope in the corresponding intestinal bleeding areas. These findings suggest that this method can be useful for scintigraphic localization of bleeding sites in the large bowel. (author)

  16. Epitope grafting, re-creating a conformational Bet v 1 antibody epitope on the surface of the homologous apple allergen Mal d 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens; Ferreras, Mercedes; Ipsen, Henrik; Würtzen, Peter A; Gajhede, Michael; Larsen, Jørgen N; Lund, Kaare; Spangfort, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    Birch-allergic patients often experience oral allergy syndrome upon ingestion of vegetables and fruits, most prominently apple, that is caused by antibody cross-reactivity of the IgE antibodies in patients to proteins sharing molecular surface structures with the major birch pollen group 1 allergen...... from Betula verrucosa (Bet v 1). Still, to what extent two molecular surfaces need to be similar for clinically relevant antibody cross-reactivity to occur is unknown. Here, we describe the grafting of a defined conformational antibody epitope from Bet v 1 onto the surface of the homologous apple...... allergen Malus domestica group 1 (Mal d 1). Engineering of the epitope was accomplished by genetic engineering substituting amino acid residues in Mal d 1 differing between Bet v 1 and Mal d 1 within the epitope defined by the mAb BV16. The kinetic parameters characterizing the antibody binding interaction...

  17. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  18. Recombinant shark natural antibodies to thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Samuel F; Jensen, Ingvill; Ramsland, Paul A; Marchalonis, John J

    2005-01-01

    As cartilaginous fish are the vertebrates most distal from man to produce antibodies, fundamental information regarding conservation and variation of the antigen binding site should be gained by comparing the properties of antibodies directed against the same antigen from the two species. Since monoclonal cell lines cannot be generated using shark B cells, we isolated antigen binding recombinant single chain Fv antibodies (scFv) comprising of the complete variable regions from shark light and heavy chains. Thyroglobulin was used as the selecting antigen as both sharks and humans express natural antibodies to mammalian thyroglobulin in the absence of purposeful immunization. We report that recombinant sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) scFvs that bind bovine thyroglobulin consist of heavy chain variable regions (VH) homologous to those of the human VHIII subset and light chain variable regions (VL) homologous to those of the human Vlambda6 subgroup. The homology within the frameworks is sufficient to enable the building of three-dimensional models of the shark VH/VL structure using established human structures as templates. In natural antibodies of both species, the major variability lies in the third complementarity determining region (CDR3) of both VH and VL. PMID:15954089

  19. Cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, J; Arita, Y; Bystryn, J C

    1993-06-01

    Patients with vitiligo have been found to have circulating antibodies to pigment cells. To evaluate the functional activity of these antibodies, a highly sensitive europium release assay was used to compare complement-mediated cytolysis of human melanocytes by sera of 56 patients with vitiligo (20 with active disease, 25 with inactive disease, 11 with unidentified disease activity) and 47 control individuals. Significant melanocyte lysis was mediated by 32 (57%) of the patients with vitiligo but by only three (6%) of the control sera (p < 0.001), and by 17 (85%) of 20 patients with active vitiligo versus 11 (44%) of 25 patients with inactive disease (p < 0.025). Mean melanocyte lysis by vitiligo sera was 24% versus 6% by control sera (p < 0.0001). A subset of 12 vitiligo sera with high titers of cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes (34% mean cytolysis) reacted minimally (< 2% mean cytolysis) to a panel of control cells that included human and murine melanomas, human fibroblasts, lung carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. These findings indicate that antibodies present in patients with vitiligo have the functional ability to selectively kill melanocytes and are more common in active disease. These observations support, but do not prove, the hypothesis that vitiligo is an autoimmune disease and that anti-pigment cell antibodies have a role in inducing the disease. PMID:8496621

  20. Radiation safety issues related to radiolabeled antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Techniques related to the use of radiolabeled antibodies in humans are reviewed and evaluated in this report. It is intended as an informational resource for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and NRC licensees. Descriptions of techniques and health and safety issues are provided. Principal methods for labeling antibodies are summarized to help identify related radiation safety problems in the preparation of dosages for administration to patients. The descriptions are derived from an extensive literature review and consultations with experts in the field. A glossary of terms and acronyms is also included. An assessment was made of the extent of the involvement of organizations (other than the NRC) with safety issues related to radiolabeled antibodies, in order to identify regulatory issues which require attention. Federal regulations and guides were also reviewed for their relevance. A few (but significant) differences between the use of common radiopharmaceuticals and radiolabeled antibodies were observed. The clearance rate of whole, radiolabeled immunoglobulin is somewhat slower than common radiopharmaceuticals, and new methods of administration are being used. New nuclides are being used or considered (e.g., Re-186 and At-211) for labeling antibodies. Some of these nuclides present new dosimetry, instrument calibration, and patient management problems. Subjects related to radiation safety that require additional research are identified. 149 refs., 3 figs., 20 tabs

  1. Antibody penetration into living cells. V. Interference between two fc gamma receptor-mediated functions: antibody penetration and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llerena, J M; Ruíz-Argüelles, A; Alarcón-Segovia, D; Llorente, L; Díaz-Jouanen, E

    1981-01-01

    The same Fc gamma receptor appears to be shared for two important phenomena: antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody penetration into living cells. ADCC is inhibited through interaction with the Fc gamma receptor during the antibody penetration process, indicating that both mechanisms may modulate each other in vitro. PMID:6972908

  2. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian-Zhe; Coljee, Vincent W; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2013-11-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  3. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were obtained from hybrid myelomas, following fusion of mouse NSI myeloma cells with mouse spleen cells. Ten different antibodies were obtained from 4 separate fusions. Eight antibodies were of the IgG1 subclass. Affinities of antibodies for TSH were in the range 2 x 108-5 x 1010 M-1. Five of the antibodies were specific for TSH and did not react with LH, FSH or hCG. The remaining antibodies reacted with all these hormones and were assumed to recognise their common (α) subunit. The 5 specific antibodies fell into 3 subgroups recognising distinct antigenic determinants, whereas the 5 non-specific antibodies recognised a single determinant or closely related set of sites. It is concluded that these antibodies should be valuable reagents for use in sensitive and specific two-site immunoradiometric assays. (Auth.)

  4. A bioinformatics pipeline to build a knowledge database for in silico antibody engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanrong; Lu, Jin

    2011-04-01

    A challenge to antibody engineering is the large number of positions and nature of variation and opposing concerns of introducing unfavorable biochemical properties. While large libraries are quite successful in identifying antibodies with improved binding or activity, still only a fraction of possibilities can be explored and that would require considerable effort. The vast array of natural antibody sequences provides a potential wealth of information on (1) selecting hotspots for variation, and (2) designing mutants to mimic natural variations seen in hotspots. The human immune system can generate an enormous diversity of immunoglobulins against an almost unlimited range of antigens by gene rearrangement of a limited number of germline variable, diversity and joining genes followed by somatic hypermutation and antigen selection. All the antibody sequences in NCBI database can be assigned to different germline genes. As a result, a position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene can be constructed by aligning all its member sequences and calculating the amino acid frequencies for each position. The position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene characterizes "hotspots" and the nature of variations, and thus reduces the sequence space of exploration in antibody engineering. We have developed a bioinformatics pipeline to conduct analysis of human antibody sequences, and generated a comprehensive knowledge database for in silico antibody engineering. The pipeline is fully automatic and the knowledge database can be refreshed anytime by re-running the pipeline. The refresh process is fast, typically taking 1min on a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 laptop with 3G memory. Our knowledge database consists of (1) the individual germline gene usage in generation of natural antibodies; (2) the CDR length distributions; and (3) the position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene. The knowledge database provides comprehensive support for antibody engineering

  5. Limited cross-reactivity of mouse monoclonal antibodies against Dengue virus capsid protein among four serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Noda,1 Promsin Masrinoul,1 Chaweewan Punkum,1 Chonlatip Pipattanaboon,2,3 Pongrama Ramasoota,2,4 Chayanee Setthapramote,2,3 Tadahiro Sasaki,6 Mikiko Sasayama,1 Akifumi Yamashita,1,5 Takeshi Kurosu,6 Kazuyoshi Ikuta,6 Tamaki Okabayashi11Mahidol-Osaka Center for Infectious Diseases, 2Center of Excellence for Antibody Research, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 4Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand; 5Graduate School of Life Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 6Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, JapanBackground: Dengue illness is one of the important mosquito-borne viral diseases in tropical and subtropical regions. Four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 are classified in the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. We prepared monoclonal antibodies against DENV capsid protein from mice immunized with DENV-2 and determined the cross-reactivity with each serotype of DENV and Japanese encephalitis virus.Methods and results: To clarify the relationship between the cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies and the diversity of these viruses, we examined the situations of flaviviruses by analyses of phylogenetic trees. Among a total of 60 prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for DENV, five monoclonal antibodies stained the nuclei of infected cells and were found to be specific to the capsid protein. Three were specific to DENV-2, while the other two were cross-reactive with DENV-2 and DENV-4. No monoclonal antibodies were cross-reactive with all four serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV amino acid sequences of the capsid protein revealed that DENV-2 and DENV-4 were clustered in the same branch, while DENV-1 and DENV-3 were clustered in the other branch. However, these classifications of the capsid protein were different from those of the

  6. Inhibition of glucosyltransferase activities of Streptococcus mutans by a monoclonal antibody to a subsequence peptide.

    OpenAIRE

    Chia, J S; Lin, R.H.; S.W. Lin; Chen, J.Y.; C. S. Yang

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary analysis indicated that a 19-amino-acid peptide sequence (435 to 453 of GtfC) within a highly conserved region of the glucosyltransferases of the cariogenic streptococci might be functionally important (J.-S. Chia, S.-W. Lin, T.-Y. Hsu, J.-Y. Chen, H.-W. Kwan, and C.-S. Yang, Infect. Immun. 61:1563-1566, 1993). To obtain antipeptide monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), the 19-amino-acid peptide was conjugated to bovine serum albumin and used as an antigen in BALB/c mice. Six immunoglobul...

  7. Complementary monoclonal antibody-based dot ELISA for universal detection of H5 avian influenza virus

    OpenAIRE

    Goutama Michael; Murtini Sri; Soejoedono Retno D; He Fang; Kwang Jimmy

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Rapid diagnosis and surveillance for H5 subtype viruses are critical for the control of H5N1 infection. Results In this study, H5 Dot ELISA, a rapid test for the detection of avian H5N1 influenza virus, was developed with two complementary H5 monoclonal antibodies. HA sequencing of escape mutants followed by epitope mapping revealed that the two Mabs target the epitope component (189th amino acid) on the HA protein but are specific for different amino acids (189Lys or 189A...

  8. De novo identification of VRC01 class HIV-1–neutralizing antibodies by next-generation sequencing of B-cell transcripts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Wu, Xueling; Zhang, Baoshan; McKee, Krisha; O’Dell, Sijy; Soto, Cinque; Zhou, Tongqing; Casazza, Joseph P.; Mullikin, James C.; Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of antibody transcripts provides a wealth of data, but the ability to identify function-specific antibodies solely on the basis of sequence has remained elusive. We previously characterized the VRC01 class of antibodies, which target the CD4-binding site on gp120, appear in multiple donors, and broadly neutralize HIV-1. Antibodies of this class have developmental commonalities, but typically share only ∼50% amino acid sequence identity among different donors. Here we apply next-generation sequencing to identify VRC01 class antibodies in a new donor, C38, directly from B cell transcript sequences. We first tested a lineage rank approach, but this was unsuccessful, likely because VRC01 class antibody sequences were not highly prevalent in this donor. We next identified VRC01 class heavy chains through a phylogenetic analysis that included thousands of sequences from C38 and a few known VRC01 class sequences from other donors. This “cross-donor analysis” yielded heavy chains with little sequence homology to previously identified VRC01 class heavy chains. Nonetheless, when reconstituted with the light chain from VRC01, half of the heavy chain chimeric antibodies showed substantial neutralization potency and breadth. We then identified VRC01 class light chains through a five-amino-acid sequence motif necessary for VRC01 light chain recognition. From over a million light chain sequences, we identified 13 candidate VRC01 class members. Pairing of these light chains with the phylogenetically identified C38 heavy chains yielded functional antibodies that effectively neutralized HIV-1. Bioinformatics analysis can thus directly identify functional HIV-1–neutralizing antibodies of the VRC01 class from a sequenced antibody repertoire. PMID:24106303

  9. Method for preparation of single chain antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Guo, Hong-fen

    2012-04-03

    This invention provides a method for identifying cells expressing a target single chain antibody (scFv) directed against a target antigen from a collection of cells that includes cells that do not express the target scFv, comprising the step of combining the collection of cells with an anti-idiotype directed to an antibody specific for the target antigen and detecting interaction, if any, of the anti-idiotype with the cells, wherein the occurrence of an interaction identifies the cell as one which expresses the target scFv. This invention also provides a method for making a single chain antibody (scFv) directed against an antigen, wherein the selection of clones is made based upon interaction of those clones with an appropriate anti-idiotype, and heretofore inaccessible scFv so made. This invention provides the above methods or any combination thereof. Finally, this invention provides various uses of these methods.

  10. Engineered antibodies for molecular imaging of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Antibody technology has transformed drug development, providing robust approaches to producing highly targeted and active therapeutics that can routinely be advanced through clinical evaluation and registration. In parallel, there is an emerging need to access similarly targeted agents for diagnostic purposes, including non-invasive imaging in preclinical models and patients. Antibody engineering enables modification of key properties (immunogenicity, valency, biological inertness, pharmacokinetics, clearance route, site-specific conjugation) in order to produce targeting agents optimized for molecular imaging. Expanded availability of positron-emitting radionuclides has led to a resurgence of interest and applications of immunoPET (immuno-positron emission tomography). Molecular imaging using engineered antibodies and fragments provides a general approach for assessing cell surface phenotype in vivo and stands to play an increasingly important role in cancer diagnosis, treatment selection, and monitoring of molecularly targeted therapeutics. PMID:24091005

  11. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs

  12. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs.

  13. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  14. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  15. Antibody of predetermined specificity to a carboxy-terminal region of H-ras gene products inhibits their guanine nucleotide-binding function.

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, S. K.; Lacal, J C; Reynolds, S.H.; Aaronson, S A

    1985-01-01

    The high prevalence of ras oncogenes in human tumors has given increasing impetus to efforts aimed at elucidating the structure and function of their p21 products. To identify functionally important domains of the p21 protein, antibodies were generated against synthetic peptides corresponding to various regions of the protein. Antibodies directed against a synthetic peptide fragment corresponding to amino acid residues 161 to 176 in the carboxy-terminal region of the H-ras-encoded p21 molecul...

  16. Utility of feline coronavirus antibody tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addie, Diane D; le Poder, Sophie; Burr, Paul; Decaro, Nicola; Graham, Elizabeth; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Jarrett, Oswald; McDonald, Michael; Meli, Marina L

    2015-02-01

    Eight different tests for antibodies to feline coronavirus (FCoV) were evaluated for attributes that are important in situations in veterinary practice. We compared four indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT), one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (FCoV Immunocomb; Biogal) and three rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) tests against a panel of samples designated by consensus as positive or negative. Specificity was 100% for all but the two IFATs based on transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), at 83.3% and 97.5%. The IFAT and ELISA tests were best for obtaining an antibody titre and for working in the presence of virus. The RIM tests were the best for obtaining a result quickly (10-15 mins); of these, the Speed F-Corona was the most sensitive, at 92.4%, followed by FASTest feline infectious peritonitis (FIP; 84.6%) and Anigen Rapid FCoV antibody test (64.1%). Sensitivity was 100% for the ELISA, one FCoV IFAT and one TGEV IFAT; and 98.2% for a second TGEV IFA and 96.1% for a second FCoV IFAT. All tests worked with effusions, even when only blood products were stipulated in the instruction manual. The ELISA and Anigen RIM tests were best for small quantities of sample. The most appropriate FCoV antibody test to use depends on the reason for testing: in excluding a diagnosis of FIP, sensitivity, specificity, small sample quantity, rapidity and ability to work in the presence of virus all matter. For FCoV screening, speed and sensitivity are important, and for FCoV elimination antibody titre is essential. PMID:24966245

  17. In vivo modulators of antibody kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study was to summarize the effect of in vivo modulation of antibody kinetics and to present new data on the in vivo effect of the cell membrane active detergent Tween 80 and the cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) on the accumulation and clearance of a radioactive antibody. Mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma xenografts and rats bearing DMBA-induced mammary carcinomas were studied after injecting I-125 labeled IgG1 monoclonal antibody (3c4c7g6) raised against a tyrosine kinase receptor protein Tie. Expression of Tie is known to be abundant in vascular endothelia and possibly related to malignant angiogenesis. Tween 80 was administered intratumorally (0.04% of tumor volume), whereas IL-2 was administered intraperitoneally. In the Lewis lung tumor model, the absolute tumor uptake varied between 2 and 5% ID/g, and maximum uptake was achieved after 24 h with Tween, and after 48 h without Tween. Tween manipulation did not increase the uptake in any normal organ, but it enhanced antibody clearance form the blood. In the DMBA rat model, IL-2 had no effect on blood clearance, but enhanced the uptake of Tie antibody into the tumor from 2.5-0.9 to 4.5-0.4% ID/g at 48 h. These data indicate that antibody biodistribution and pharmacokinetics can be modulated by a surface detergent and a cytokine, giving decreased exposure to critical organs, and increased uptake into the tumor. This type of manipulation provides an opportunity to optimize radioimmunotherapy. (orig.)

  18. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Rong-Hong; Liu, Li-Ke; Chen, Zhen-Shi; Li, Ye-Nan; Bu, Zhi-Gao

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5)AIDITRK(11), (72)RDELNVL(78), (251)KSKHNRREGY(260), (269)DENGIVLD(276), and (341)DETTLVRS(348). Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays. PMID:23825668

  19. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Hong Hua

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5AIDITRK(11, (72RDELNVL(78, (251KSKHNRREGY(260, (269DENGIVLD(276, and (341DETTLVRS(348. Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  20. Dissection of an antibody-catalyzed reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, J D; Krebs, J F; Siuzdak, G; Berdis, A J; Smithrud, D B; Benkovic, S J

    1994-01-01

    Antibody 43C9 accelerates the hydrolysis of a p-nitroanilide by a factor of 2.5 x 10(5) over the background rate in addition to catalyzing the hydrolysis of a series of aromatic esters. Since this represents one of the largest rate accelerations achieved with an antibody, we have undertaken a series of studies aimed at uncovering the catalytic mechanism of 43C9. The immunogen, a phosphonamidate, was designed to mimic the geometric and electronic characteristics of the tetrahedral intermediate...

  1. Antibodies for detecting and quantifying anticoagulant agents

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador, Juan Pablo; Marco, María Pilar

    2012-01-01

    [EN] The present invention relates to the design of haptens that are structurally related to coumarin oral anticoagulant compounds (COAC), to be used for the production of specific antibodies against said type of substances and the subsequent use thereof for the development of diagnosis tools for use in laboratories or in point-of-care (PoC) devices. In particular, the produced antibodies have been used to develop a diagnosis tool that enables the plasma levels of COAC to be quantified in pat...

  2. Immunoglobulin A antibodies to Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaskowski, T D; Martins, T B; Hill, H R; Litwin, C M

    1997-01-01

    Serological testing for immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to Helicobacter pylori has proven useful in supporting the diagnosis of infection with this organism, but the clinical value of IgA antibodies in H. pylori-related gastritis remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to determine the frequency of IgA-positive IgG-negative patients with symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, thus assessing the clinical utility of IgA testing for H. pylori-related gastritis. It was found p...

  3. Basic immunology of antibody targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibody targeted radiotherapy brings an important new treatment modality to Radiation oncology clinic. Radiation dose to tumor and normal tissues are determined by a complex interplay of antibody, antigen, tumor, radionuclide, and host-related factors. A basic understanding of these immunologic and physiologic factors is important to optimally utilize this therapy in the clinic. Preclinical and clinical studies need to be continued to broaden our understanding and to develop new strategies to further improve the efficacy of this promising form of targeted therapy

  4. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy. Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is now playing a great role not only in diagnostic application but also in therapy of cancer patients. Under the concept of targeted radiotherapy, a number of radiopharmaceuticals based on radiolabelled biomolecules had been evaluated for treatment of cancer by many investigators. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and some small specific peptides labelled with beta emitting radiometals such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188 or Y-90, are being introduced into clinical trials. The objective of this project is to develop laboratory procedures to label monoclonal antibodies, peptide or other proteins with beta emitting radionuclides to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purpose

  5. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is now playing a great role not only in diagnostic application but also in therapy of cancer patients. Under the concept of targeted radiotherapy, a number of radiopharmaceuticals based on radiolabelled biomolecules had been evaluated for treatment of cancer by many investigators. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and some small specific peptides labelled with beta emitting radiometals such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188 or Y-90, are being introduced into clinical trials. The objective of this project is to develop laboratory procedures to label monoclonal antibodies, peptide or other proteins with beta emitting radionuclides to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purpose

  6. Measurement of tumour reactive antibody and antibody conjugate by competition, quantitated by flow cytofluorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, R A; Laxton, R R; Garnett, M; Price, M R; Baldwin, R W

    1986-06-24

    Binding of unlabelled monoclonal antibody preparations has been assessed by competition at saturation with fluorochrome labelled homologous antibody for binding to antigen bearing target cells. The extent of competition was measured by quantitative flow cytofluorimetry, and simple mathematical procedures have been developed to allow the interpretation of competition data in terms of antibody binding activity. In the system studied, non-specific (non-competitive) fluorescence was minimal, but an iterative method to calculate its contribution to the measured signal is given. This approach has the advantage that the antibody preparation to be tested does not need to be labelled or modified; this is particularly important when evaluating the binding activity of therapeutic antibody conjugates. Comparison with a well characterized standard antibody preparation provides a rapid, sensitive and accurate quality control procedure. This test is also simple to perform, requiring only the mixing of labelled and unlabelled antibodies with target cells, a single incubation, followed by analysis without washing of the target cells. PMID:2424997

  7. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  8. Interaction of anti-phospholipid antibodies with late endosomes of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve-de Rochemonteix, B; Kobayashi, T; Rosnoblet, C; Lindsay, M; Parton, R G; Reber, G; de Maistre, E; Wahl, D; Kruithof, E K; Gruenberg, J; de Moerloose, P

    2000-02-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APLAs) are associated with thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy loss. APLAs bind to anionic phospholipids directly or indirectly via a cofactor such as beta(2)-glycoprotein 1 (beta(2)GPI). The lipid target of APLA is not yet established. Recently, we observed that APLAs in vitro can bind lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). The internal membranes of late endosomes are enriched in this phospholipid. The current study was undertaken to determine to what extent binding of APLA to LBPA is correlated with binding to cardiolipin and to beta(2)GPI and to determine whether patient antibodies interact with late endosomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and thus modify the intracellular trafficking of proteins. Binding of patient immunoglobulin G (n=37) to LBPA was correlated significantly with binding to cardiolipin. Although LBPA binding was correlated to a lesser extent with beta(2)GPI binding, we observed that beta(2)GPI binds with high affinity to LBPA. Immunofluorescence studies showed that late endosomes of HUVECs contain LBPA. Patient but not control antibodies recognized late endosomes, but not cardiolipin-rich mitochondria, even when we used antibodies that were immunopurified on cardiolipin. Incubation of HUVECs with patient plasma samples immunoreactive toward LBPA resulted in an accumulation of the antibodies in late endosomes and led to a redistribution of the insulinlike growth factor 2/mannose-6-phosphate receptor from the Golgi apparatus to late endosomes. Our results suggest that LBPA is an important lipid target of APLA in HUVECs. These antibodies are internalized by the cells and accumulate in late endosomes. By modifying the intracellular trafficking of proteins, APLA could contribute to several of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms leading to the antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:10669657

  9. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. PMID:27330002

  10. Treatment of leukemia with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgouros, G; Scheinberg, D A

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to radioimmunotherapy of solid disease, wherein the primary obstacle to success is access of radiolabeled antibody to antigen-positive cells, in the treatment of leukemia delivering a lethal absorbed dose to the isolated cell appears to be the primary obstacle. The isolated cell is defined as one that is exposed only to self-irradiation (from internalized or surface-bound radiolabeled antibody) and to irradiation from free antibody in the blood. It is isolated in the sense that the particulate (beta, electron, alpha) emissions from its nearest neighboring antigen-positive cell do not contribute to its absorbed dose. Disease in the bone marrow and other tissues, since it is confined to a smaller volume, is more easily eradicated because the absorbed dose to a given cell nucleus is enhanced by emissions from adjacent cells (a smaller fraction of the emission energy is 'wasted'). The optimization simulations presented above for the M195 antibody suggest that the optimum dose of antibody that should be administered is that required to yield a concentration within the distribution volume of the antibody that is approximately equal to the concentration of antigen sites as determined by the tumor burden. Although not specifically considered in the modeling example presented above, antibody internalization and catabolism may be expected to play an important role in radioimmunotherapy treatment planning of leukemia. Depending upon the kinetics of internalization and catabolism, the absorbed dose to the red marrow and to antigen-positive cells may be reduced considerably, since catabolism, assuming that it is followed by rapid extrusion of the radioactive label, would decrease the cells' exposure time considerably. The recently demonstrated effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in certain cases of B-cell lymphoma and in reducing tumor burden in acute myelogenous leukemia suggests that radioimmunotherapy is beginning to fulfill the promise held when it was initially

  11. Structural basis for diverse N-glycan recognition by HIV-1-neutralizing V1-V2-directed antibody PG16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancera, Marie; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McLellan, Jason S.; Bailer, Robert T.; Dai, Kaifan; Loesgen, Sandra; Louder, Mark K.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Blinn, Julie; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Amin, Mohammed N.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D. [NIH; (Scripps); (Duke); (Maryland-MED); (IAVI)

    2013-08-05

    HIV-1 uses a diverse N-linked-glycan shield to evade recognition by antibody. Select human antibodies, such as the clonally related PG9 and PG16, recognize glycopeptide epitopes in the HIV-1 V1–V2 region and penetrate this shield, but their ability to accommodate diverse glycans is unclear. Here we report the structure of antibody PG16 bound to a scaffolded V1–V2, showing an epitope comprising both high mannose–type and complex-type N-linked glycans. We combined structure, NMR and mutagenesis analyses to characterize glycan recognition by PG9 and PG16. Three PG16-specific residues, arginine, serine and histidine (RSH), were critical for binding sialic acid on complex-type glycans, and introduction of these residues into PG9 produced a chimeric antibody with enhanced HIV-1 neutralization. Although HIV-1–glycan diversity facilitates evasion, antibody somatic diversity can overcome this and can provide clues to guide the design of modified antibodies with enhanced neutralization.

  12. Anti Rh Hemolytic Disease due to Anti C Antibody: Is Testing for Anti D Antibodies Enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Negi, Gita; Singh, Gaur Dushyant

    2011-01-01

    Rh blood group system is a complex blood group system. Rh antibodies are produced in Rh negative individuals following exposure to foreign RBCs after transfusion or pregnancy. Anti C is a rare cause of hemolytic disease of newborn and is very scarcely reported in the literature. The aim of the present case report of Hemolytic disease caused by Anti C antibody is to bring out the fact that antibodies other than anti D should be considered in cases that give a suggestive history but no evidence...

  13. Binding of immunoglobulin G antibodies in Guillain-Barré syndrome sera to a mixture of GM1 and a phospholipid: possible clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunoki, Susumu; Morita, Daiji; Ohminami, Shinya; Hitoshi, Seiji; Kanazawa, Ichiro

    2003-03-01

    Anti-GM1 immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies are frequently present in sera from patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). A previous report on a patient who had a neuropathy with immunoglobulin M (IgM) M-protein binding to a conformational epitope formed by phosphatidic acid (PA) and gangliosides prompted us to investigate the binding of IgG antibodies in GBS sera to a mixture of GM1 and PA (GM1/PA). Of 121 GBS patients, 32 had anti-GM1 IgG antibodies. All 32 also had antibody activity against GM1/PA. Twenty-five (78%) of 32 patients had greater activity against GM1/PA than against GM1 alone. Twelve patients who had no anti-GM1 IgG antibodies had IgG antibody activity against GM1/PA. No GBS patient had IgG antibody against PA alone. In contrast, two rabbit anti-GM1 antisera had greater activity against GM1 alone than against GM1/PA. IgG antibody with greater binding activity against a mixture of GM1 and a phospholipid than against GM1 alone may have an important role in the pathogenesis of GBS and has implications for diagnosis. PMID:12635116

  14. Phase Transitions in Antibody Solutions: from Pharmaceuticals to Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Benedek, George; Dana Farber Cancer Institute Collaboration; Amgen Inc. Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Antibodies are very important proteins. Natural antibodies play essential role in the immune system of human body. Pharmaceutical antibodies are used as drugs. Antibodies are also indispensable tools in biomedical research and diagnostics. Recently, a number of observations of phase transitions of pharmaceutical antibodies have been reported. These phase transitions are undesirable from the perspective of colloid stability of drug solutions in processing and storage, but can be used for protein purification, X-ray crystallography, and improving pharmokinetics of drugs. Phase transitions of antibodies can also take place in human body, particularly in multiple myeloma patients who overproduce monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies, in some cases, crystallize at body temperature and cause severe complications called cryoglobulinemia. I will present the results of our current studies on phase transitions of both pharmaceutical antibodies and cryoglobulinemia-associated antibodies. These studies have shown that different antibodies have different propensity to undergo phase transitions, but their phase behavior has universal features which are remarkably different from those of spherical proteins. I will discuss how studies of phase behavior can be useful in assessing colloid stability of pharmaceutical antibodies and in early diagnostics of cryoglobulinemia, as well as general implications of the fact that some antibodies can precipitate at physiological conditions.

  15. Functional characterization of two scFv-Fc antibodies from an HIV controller selected on soluble HIV-1 Env complexes: a neutralizing V3- and a trimer-specific gp41 antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trott

    Full Text Available HIV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs represent an important tool in view of prophylactic and therapeutic applications for HIV-1 infection. Patients chronically infected by HIV-1 represent a valuable source for nAbs. HIV controllers, including long-term non-progressors (LTNP and elite controllers (EC, represent an interesting subgroup in this regard, as here nAbs can develop over time in a rather healthy immune system and in the absence of any therapeutic selection pressure. In this study, we characterized two particular antibodies that were selected as scFv antibody fragments from a phage immune library generated from an LTNP with HIV neutralizing antibodies in his plasma. The phage library was screened on recombinant soluble gp140 envelope (Env proteins. Sequencing the selected peptide inserts revealed two major classes of antibody sequences. Binding analysis of the corresponding scFv-Fc derivatives to various trimeric and monomeric Env constructs as well as to peptide arrays showed that one class, represented by monoclonal antibody (mAb A2, specifically recognizes an epitope localized in the pocket binding domain of the C heptad repeat (CHR in the ectodomain of gp41, but only in the trimeric context. Thus, this antibody represents an interesting tool for trimer identification. MAb A7, representing the second class, binds to structural elements of the third variable loop V3 and neutralizes tier 1 and tier 2 HIV-1 isolates of different subtypes with matching critical amino acids in the linear epitope sequence. In conclusion, HIV controllers are a valuable source for the selection of functionally interesting antibodies that can be selected on soluble gp140 proteins with properties from the native envelope spike.

  16. The antigenic structure of the influenza B virus hemagglutinin: operational and topological mapping with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, M T; Webster, R G

    1985-06-01

    We have probed the antigenic structure of the influenza B virus hemagglutinin (HA) with monoclonal antibodies specific for the HA of influenza B virus, B/Oregon/5/80. Seventeen laboratory-selected antigenic variants of this virus were analyzed by hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assays or ELISA and an operational antigenic map was constructed. In addition, the monoclonal antibodies were tested in a competitive binding assay to construct a topological map of the antigenic sites. In contrast to the influenza A virus HA, only a single immunodominant antigenic site composed of several overlapping clusters of epitopes was defined by the HI-positive antibodies. Three variants could be distinguished from the parental virus with polyclonal antisera by HI and infectivity reduction assays suggesting that changes in this antigenic site may be sufficient to provide an epidemiological advantage to influenza B viruses in nature. In addition, two nonoverlapping epitopes of unknown biological significance were identified in the competitive binding analysis by two monoclonal antibodies with no HI activity and little or no neutralizing activity. We previously identified single amino acid substitutions in the HAs of the antigenic variants used in this study (M. T. Berton, C. W. Naeve, and R. G. Webster (1984), J. Virol. 52, 919-927). These changes occurred in regions of the molecule which, by amino acid sequence alignment, appeared to correspond to proposed antigenic sites A and B on the H3 HA of influenza A virus. Correlation with the antigenic map established in this report, however, demonstrates that the amino acid residues actually contribute to a single antigenic site on the influenza B virus HA and suggests significant differences in the antigenic structures of the influenza A and B virus HAs. PMID:2414911

  17. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of fusariosis with monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbæk, B.; Jungersen, Gregers; Hartvig, T.; Moser, C.; Rozell, B.L.; Blennow, O.

    establishing an accurate diagnosis. Although molecular techniques (e.g. in situ hybridization and PCR) have been explored for diagnostic use, the development of specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) for immunohistochemical identification of Fusarium spp. will extend the availability of diagnostic options for...

  18. Conjugates of monoclonal antibodies and chelating polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of protein modification with chelating polymers is to prepare monoclonal antibodies labeled with heavy metal isotopes (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-emitting metal and paramagnetic ions for NMR tomography). Conventional binding of metals to proteins via chelating agents directly coupled to proteins does not permit binding of a large number of metal atoms per protein molecule without causing alterations in the specific properties of the protein molecules. On the other hand, metal ion binding to proteins via intermediate chelating polymers should permit binding of several dozens of the metal atoms per protein molecule without affect the specific properties adversely. Moreover, the biodistribution and clearance rates can be regulated by varying the polymer properties. Modified antibodies may be used successfully in nuclear and NMR diagnostic applications and in radiotherapy. Possible applications of this approach shall be demonstrated with monoclonal antibody R11D10 for visualization of acute myocardial infarction. Use of this modification with other monoclonal antibodies is also discussed. The chemistry of protein modification with these polymers is presented

  19. Production of monoclonal antibodies against canine leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Palis; Borges dos Santos, Roberto Robson; Lima, Carla Andrade; Rios de Sousa Gomes, Hilton; Larangeira, Daniela Farias; Santos, Patrícia Meira; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Conrado dos-Santos, Washington Luis; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain

    2004-04-01

    A panel of anti-canine leukocyte monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was produced by immunizing BALB/c mice with canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), either resting or stimulated with concanavalin A (ConA). Three out of 28 clones-IH1, AB6, and HG6-screened by ELISA and producing antibody with the highest specificity for canine cell immunostaining, were subjected to three subsequent subcloning steps by limiting dilution, and selected for further characterization. These MAbs belonged to IgG1 (HG6 and IH1) and IgG2a (AB6) isotypes. The distribution of cell populations expressing the antigen recognized by the antibodies was identified by indirect immunoflorescence on canine PBMC and on tissue sections of lymph node, spleen, liver and skin. The possible crossreactivity with human PBMC was also examined in immunocytochemistry. One of the antibodies specifically recognized macrophages. The MAbs presented here can be foreseen as possible valuable diagnostic and research tools to study immune functions in dogs. PMID:15165486

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against chicken interleukin-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were produced against a recombinant (r) chicken interleukin-6 (IL-6). Eight mAbs that were produced were tested for isotype; ability to inhibit recombinant forms of chicken (ch), human (h) and murine (m) IL-6; and recognition of rchIL-6 by Western immunoblotting. The mA...

  1. Dengue Antibody Prevalence in German Travelers

    OpenAIRE

    Wichmann, Ole; Lauschke, Annekathrin; Frank, Christina; Shu, Pei-Yun; Niedrig, Matthias; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung; Stark, Klaus; Jelinek, Tomas

    2005-01-01

    We studied 2,259 German citizens after they returned from dengue-endemic countries from 1996 to 2004. Serotype-specific dengue antibodies indicated acute infections in 51 (4.7%) travelers with recent fever and 13 (1.1%) travelers with no recent fever, depending largely on destination and epidemic activity in the countries visited.

  2. Conformational Isomerism Can Limit Antibody Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debler, E.W.; Muller, R.; Hilvert, D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-14

    Ligand binding to enzymes and antibodies is often accompanied by protein conformational changes. Although such structural adjustments may be conducive to enzyme catalysis, much less is known about their effect on reactions promoted by engineered catalytic antibodies. Crystallographic and pre-steady state kinetic analyses of antibody 34E4, which efficiently promotes the conversion of benzisoxazoles to salicylonitriles, show that the resting catalyst adopts two interconverting active-site conformations, only one of which is competent to bind substrate. In the predominant isomer, the indole side chain of Trp{sup L91} occupies the binding site and blocks ligand access. Slow conformational isomerization of this residue, on the same time scale as catalytic turnover, creates a deep and narrow binding site that can accommodate substrate and promote proton transfer using Glu{sup H50} as a carboxylate base. Although 34E4 is among the best catalysts for the deprotonation of benzisoxazoles, its efficiency appears to be significantly limited by this conformational plasticity of its active site. Future efforts to improve this antibody might profitably focus on stabilizing the active conformation of the catalyst. Analogous strategies may also be relevant to other engineered proteins that are limited by an unfavorable conformational pre-equilibrium.

  3. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  4. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  5. Ebola Virus Antibodies in Fruit Bats, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Kevin J Olival; Islam, Ariful; YU, Meng; Anthony, Simon J.; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Khan, Shahneaz Ali; Khan, Salah Uddin; Crameri, Gary; Wang, Lin-Fa; Lipkin, W. Ian; Luby, Stephen P.; Daszak, Peter

    2013-01-01

    To determine geographic range for Ebola virus, we tested 276 bats in Bangladesh. Five (3.5%) bats were positive for antibodies against Ebola Zaire and Reston viruses; no virus was detected by PCR. These bats might be a reservoir for Ebola or Ebola-like viruses, and extend the range of filoviruses to mainland Asia.

  6. JDIP Genomics, Antibodies, and Proteomics Core Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    The JDIP Genomics, Proteomics, and Antibodies Core has developed several resources that are available for use by JDIP researchers. Five tasks have been completed or are in progress: Task 1 – Transposon mutants: Nearly 24,000 gene disruption M. paratuberculosis mutants are now available for JDIP re...

  7. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data

  8. Neutralizing antibodies in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirjam B Zeisel; Samira Fafi-Kremer; Isabel Fofana; Heidi Barth; Fran(c)oise Stoll-Keller; Michel Doffo(e)l; Thomas F Baumert

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis world-wide. The majority of infected individuals develop chronic hepatitis which can then progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous viral clearance occurs in about 20%-30% of acutely infected individuals and results in resolution of infection without sequaelae. Both viral and host factors appear to play an important role for resolution of acute infection. A large body of evidence suggests that a strong, multispecific and long-lasting cellular immune response appears to be important for control of viral infection in acute hepatitis C. Due too the lack of convenient neutralization assays,the impact of neutralizing responses for control of viral infection had been less defined. In recent years, the development of robust tissue culture model systems for HCV entry and infection has finally allowed study of antibody-mediated neutralization and to gain further insights into viral targets of host neutralizing responses.In addition, detailed analysis of antibody-mediated neutralization in individual patients as well as cohorts with well defined viral isolates has enabled the study of neutralizing responses in the course of HCV infection and characterization of the impact of neutralizing antibodies for control of viral infection. This review will summarize recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization and its impact for HCV pathogenesis.(C) 2007 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  9. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  10. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Presenting with Hemichorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yezenash Ayalew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old Bangladeshi lady presented to neurology with a three-month history of involuntary movements of her right arm, associated with loss of power. There was progression to the right leg, and she subsequently developed episodes of slurred speech and blurred vision. At the time of presentation, she was 12 weeks pregnant and the symptoms were reported to have started at conception. Past medical history was unremarkable apart from one first trimester miscarriage and there was no significant family history suggestive of a hereditary neurological condition. MRI of the head revealed no abnormalities but serology showed positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs at a titre of 1/400. Further investigations revealed strongly positive anticardiolipin antibodies (>120 and positive lupus anticoagulant antibodies. The patient had a second miscarriage at 19 weeks gestation strengthening the possibility that the chorea was related to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and she was started on a reducing dose of Prednisolone 40 mg daily and aspirin 300 mg daily. Six months later, she had complete resolution of neurological symptoms. There are several reports of chorea as a feature of antiphospholipid syndrome, but no clear consensus on underlying pathophysiology.

  11. Greasing the SCIDs for Universal Flu Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yewdell, Jonathan W.; Ince, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Previews In this issue, Nakamura et al. describe a robust SCID mouse-based method for isolating human monoclonal antibodies of desired specificity from adoptively transferred human B cells. As proof-of principle, they isolate human mAbs that could potentially be used to treat or prevent human infection with any influenza A virus strain. PMID:23870308

  12. Burkholderia pseudomallei Antibodies in Children, Cambodia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Pheaktra, Ngoun; Putchhat, Hor; Sin, Lina; Sen, Bun; Kumar, Varun; Langla, Sayan; Peacock, Sharon J.; Nicholas P. Day

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei were detected in 16% of children in Siem Reap, Cambodia. This organism was isolated from 30% of rice paddies in the surrounding vicinity. Despite the lack of reported indigenous cases, melioidosis is likely to occur in Cambodia.

  13. New Antibody Conjugates in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serengulam V. Govindan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting of radiation, drugs, and protein toxins to cancers selectively with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs has been a topic of considerable interest and an area of continued development. Radioimmunotherapy (RAIT of lymphoma using directly labeled MAbs is of current interest after approval of two radiolabeled anti-CD20 MAbs, as illustrated with the near 100% overall response rate obtained in a recent clinical trial using an investigational radiolabeled anti-CD22 MAb, 90Y-epratuzumab. The advantage of pretargeted RAIT over directly labeled MAbs is continuing to be validated in preclinical models of lymphoma and solid tumors. Importantly, the advantages of combining RAIT with radiation sensitizers, with immunotherapy, or a drug conjugate targeting a different antigen are being studied clinically and preclinically. The area of drug-conjugated antibodies is progressing with encouraging data published for the trastuzumab-DM1 conjugate in a phase I clinical trial in HER2-positive breast cancer. The Dock-and-Lock platform technology has contributed to the design and the evaluation of complex antibody-cytokine and antibody-toxin conjugates. This review describes the advances made in these areas, with illustrations taken from advances made in the authors' institutions.

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals based on antibodies and peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past two decades have seen a great stride in the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals due to the discovery and availability of a number of specific carrier molecules and the application of synthetic organic chemistry to modify these carrier molecules to accommodate the radionuclide of interest. Radiopharmaceuticals based on antibodies and peptides are discussed

  15. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies to the envelope e2 protein of hepatitis C virus and their characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohko K Shimizu

    Full Text Available We isolated and characterized two human monoclonal antibodies to the envelope E2 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV. Lymphoblastoid cell lines stably producing antibodies were obtained by immortalizing peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a patient with chronic hepatitis C using Epstein-Barr virus. Screening for antibody-positive clones was carried out by immunofluorescence with Huh7 cells expressing the E2 protein of HCV strain H (genotype 1a isolated from the same patient. Isotype of resulting antibodies, #37 and #55, was IgG1/kappa and IgG1/lambda, respectively. Epitope mapping revealed that #37 and #55 recognize conformational epitopes spanning amino acids 429 to 652 and 508 to 607, respectively. By immunofluorescence using virus-infected Huh7.5 cells as targets both antibodies were reactive with all of the nine different HCV genotypes/subtypes tested. The antibodies showed a different pattern of immuno-staining; while #37 gave granular reactions mostly located in the periphery of the nucleus, #55 gave diffuse staining throughout the cytoplasm. Both antibodies were shown by immuno-gold electron microscopy to bind to intact viral particles. In a neutralization assay (focus-forming unit reduction using chimeric infectious HCV containing structural proteins derived from genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 3a, 4a, 5a, 6a, and 7a, #55 inhibited the infection of all HCV genotypes tested but genotype 7a to a lesser extent. #37 did not neutralize any of these viruses. As a broadly cross-neutralizing human antibody, #55 may be useful for passive immunotherapy of HCV infection.

  16. Pathological conformations involving the amino terminus of tau occur early in Alzheimer's disease and are differentially detected by monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Benjamin; Hamel, Chelsey; Kanaan, Nicholas M

    2016-10-01

    Conformational changes involving the amino terminus of the tau protein are among the earliest alterations associated with tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. This region of tau contains a phosphatase-activating domain (PAD) that is aberrantly exposed in pathological forms of the protein, an event that is associated with disruptions in anterograde fast axonal transport. We utilized four antibodies that recognize the amino terminus of tau, TNT1, TNT2 (a novel antibody), Tau12, and Tau13, to further study this important region. Using scanning alanine mutations in recombinant tau proteins, we refined the epitopes of each antibody. We examined the antibodies' relative abilities to specifically label pathological tau in non-denaturing and denaturing assays to gain insight into some of the mechanistic details of PAD exposure. We then determined the pattern of tau pathology labeled by each antibody in human hippocampal sections at various disease stages in order to characterize PAD exposure in the context of disease progression. The characteristics of reactivity for the antibodies fell into two groups. TNT1 and TNT2 recognized epitopes within amino acids 7-12 and specifically identified recombinant tau aggregates and pathological tau from Alzheimer's disease brains in a conformation-dependent manner. These antibodies labeled early pre-tangle pathology from neurons in early Braak stages and colocalized with thiazine red, a marker of fibrillar pathology, in classic neurofibrillary tangles. However, late tangles were negative for TNT1 and TNT2 indicating a loss of the epitope in later stages of tangle evolution. In contrast, Tau12 and Tau13 both identified discontinuous epitopes in the amino terminus and were unable to differentiate between normal and pathological tau in biochemical and tissue immunohistological assays. Despite the close proximity of these epitopes, the antibodies demonstrated remarkably different abilities to identify pathological

  17. Antibody Request - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  18. Distribution of Legionella pneumophila Antibody Among Primate Species

    OpenAIRE

    Helmke, R J; Kalter, S. S.; Heberling, R L

    1981-01-01

    Sera representing 16 different primate species were surveyed by indirect immunofluorescence for evidence of antibody to Legionella pneumophila. The presence of antibody in Old and New World monkeys and in apes supports previous observations of the ubiquity of Legionella pneumophila.

  19. Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Antibodies Act Jointly to Promote Inflammation in Rheumatoid Arthritis Two types of antibody molecules act in concert to stimulate inflammation in people with rheumatoid arthritis, according to research funded in part by the ...

  20. Experimental investigations with radiolabeled anti-collagen antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antibodies to collagen were prepared and labelled with indium 111. Kinetic studies were performed using labelled antibody for up to 48 hours following an injury. These results provide a method to detect injury by radioimmunographic techniques. 5 figs., 3 tabs