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Sample records for anti-homocysteic acid antibody

  1. Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease with Anti-Homocysteic acid Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Tohru Hasegawa; Nobuyuki Mikoda; Masashi Kitazawa; Frank M. LaFerla

    2008-01-01

    Homocysteic acid (HA) may play an important role in Alzhiemer disease (AD) as we previously reported that HA induced accumulation of intraneuronal A[beta]42. In this study, we first analyzed HA levels in a mouse model of AD. 4-month old pre-pathologic 3xTg-AD mice exhibited higher levels of HA in the hippocampus as compared to age-matched nontransgenic, suggesting that HA accumulation may precede both A[beta] and tau pathologies. To further determine the pathogenic role of HA in AD, we treate...

  2. Detection of antimycolic acid antibodies by liposomal biosensors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Lemmer, Yolandy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to mycolic acid (MA) antigens can be detected as surrogate markers of active tuberculosis (TB) with evanescent field biosensors where the lipid antigens are encapsulated in liposomes. Standard immunoassay such as ELISA, where the lipid...

  3. Boronic acid-modified magnetic materials for antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar L; Hussain, Abid; Azevedo, Ana M; Aires-Barros, Raquel; Roque, Ana C A

    2014-02-06

    Aminophenyl boronic acids can form reversible covalent ester interactions with cis-diol-containing molecules, serving as a selective tool for binding glycoproteins as antibody molecules that possess oligosaccharides in both the Fv and Fc regions. In this study, amino phenyl boronic acid (APBA) magnetic particles (MPs) were applied for the magnetic separation of antibody molecules. Iron oxide MPs were firstly coated with dextran to avoid non-specific binding and then with 3-glycidyloxypropyl trimethoxysilane to allow further covalent coupling of APBA (APBA_MP). When contacted with pure protein solutions of human IgG (hIgG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), APBA_MP bound 170 ± 10 mg hIgG g(-1) MP and eluted 160 ± 5 mg hIgG g(-1) MP, while binding only 15 ± 5 mg BSA g(-1) MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 × 10(5) M(-1) (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed g(-1) MP (Qmax), whereas control particles bound a negligible amount of hIgG and presented an estimated theoretical maximum capacity of 3.1 mg hIgG adsorbed g(-1) MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely mild conditions.

  4. "Clickable" LNA/DNA probes for fluorescence sensing of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anna S; Gupta, Pankaj; Wengel, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Herein we describe fluorescent oligonucleotides prepared by click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA) strands and a series of fluorescent azides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies.......Herein we describe fluorescent oligonucleotides prepared by click chemistry between novel alkyne-modified locked nucleic acid (LNA) strands and a series of fluorescent azides for homogeneous (all-in-solution) detection of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies....

  5. Prevalence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies amongst young Malaysian diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Nazaimoon, W M; Faridah, I; Singaraveloo, M; Ismail, I S; Wan Mohamad, W B; Letchuman, R; Rasat, R; Pendek, R; Hew, F L; Sheriff, I H; Khalid, B A

    1999-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GAD Ab) in a group of 926 young Malaysian diabetics of three ethnic groups, Malay, Chinese, and Indian. Patients were clinically diagnosed to be Type 1 or Type 2 before the age of 40 years. The overall GAD Ab positivity was 17.4% (161/926), significantly higher in the Type 1 than the Type 2 diabetics (35.5%, 116/329 vs. 7.5%, 45/597, P=0.0001). Compared to GAD Ab negative patients, seropositive diabetics were diagnosed at younger age (21.2+/-0.9 vs. 27.4+/-0.3 y, P=0.0001), had lower fasting (289+/-27.4 vs. 640+/-17.6 pmol/l, P=0.0001) and post-glucagon C-peptide levels (527+/-51.8 vs. 1030+/-28.9 pmol/l, P=0.0001). There were no racial differences in the prevalence of GAD Ab; of the total Type 1, 30.8, 36.4, and 39.4% were Malay, Chinese, and Indian diabetics, respectively and of the total Type 2, 8.8, 8.2, and 4.4% were Malay, Chinese, and Indian diabetics respectively. There was a curvilinear relationship between GAD Ab and the post-glucagon C-peptide levels, suggesting that GAD Ab do play a role in the beta-cells destruction and could be an important immune marker for the LADA group. This study reconfirmed previous reports that the autoimmune mechanisms in the Type 1 Asian diabetics are indeed different from the Caucasians, and further investigations should be carried out to explain the differences.

  6. Lepromatous leprosy patients produce antibodies that recognise non-bilayer lipid arrangements containing mycolic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Baeza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements are three-dimensional structures that form when anionic phospholipids with an intermediate structure of the tubular hexagonal phase II are present in a bilayer of lipids. Antibodies that recognise these arrangements have been described in patients with antiphospholipid syndrome and/or systemic lupus erythematosus and in those with preeclampsia; these antibodies have also been documented in an experimental murine model of lupus, in which they are associated with immunopathology. Here, we demonstrate the presence of antibodies against non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements containing mycolic acids in the sera of lepromatous leprosy (LL patients, but not those of healthy volunteers. The presence of antibodies that recognise these non-bilayer lipid arrangements may contribute to the hypergammaglobulinaemia observed in LL patients. We also found IgM and IgG anti-cardiolipin antibodies in 77% of the patients. This positive correlation between the anti-mycolic-non-bilayer arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies suggests that both types of antibodies are produced by a common mechanism, as was demonstrated in the experimental murine model of lupus, in which there was a correlation between the anti-non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements and anti-cardiolipin antibodies. Antibodies to non-bilayer lipid arrangements may represent a previously unrecognised pathogenic mechanism in LL and the detection of these antibodies may be a tool for the early diagnosis of LL patients.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies Follow Distinct Aggregation Pathways During Production-Relevant Acidic Incubation and Neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Skamris; Tian, Xinsheng; Thorolfsson, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Aggregation aspects of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of common concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Low pH treatment is applied during affinity purification and to inactivate endogenous retroviruses, directing interest to the mechanisms of acid-induced antibody aggregat......PURPOSE: Aggregation aspects of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of common concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Low pH treatment is applied during affinity purification and to inactivate endogenous retroviruses, directing interest to the mechanisms of acid-induced antibody...... identified, which may lead to two distinct pathways of reversible and irreversible aggregation, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that subtle variations in mAb sequence greatly affect responses towards low-pH incubation and subsequent neutralization, and demonstrate how orthogonal biophysical methods...... distinguish between reversible and irreversible mAb aggregation pathways at early stages of acidic treatment....

  8. Interactions between nucleic acids and antibodies to Z-DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leng, M.; Hartmann, B.; Malfoy, B.; Pilet, J.; Ramstein, J.; Sage, E.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper we report some properties of the antibodies to Z-DNA. To determine more precisely the antigenic determinant, the interactions between the antibodies and several polynucleotides have been studied. We found that the antibodies bind very weakly to poly(dI-br 5 dC).(dI-br 5 dC). This polynucleotide can adopt the Z conformation in high salt concentration, as we have demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy. Moreover, from the study of the exchange rate of the protons involved in hydrogen bonds in this polynucleotide and from previous studies on poly(dG-dC).poly(dG-dC) (Ramstein and Leng 1980; Pilet and Leng 1982), we propose a quantitative description of the dynamic structure of the Z form. 34 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  9. Radioimmunodetection of prostate cancer by 111In-labeled monoclonal antibody against prostatic acid phosphatase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahonen, A.; Karnani, P.; Heikkilae, J.; Nurmi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Purified human prostate acid phosphatase (PAP) was used to generate a specific monoclonal antibody (FC 3001) for detection of PAP expressed by some prostatic carcinomas. DTPA derivatives of MoAb-F(ab')2-fragments were labeled with indium-111 chloride. This labeled antibody was tested in 15 prostate cancer patients who underwent staging pelvic lymphadenectomy; 9 of them received labeled antibody alone whereas 6 received simultaneous injections of labeled and unlabeled antibody with two dose levels (40 or 80 mg). Biodistribution data obtained by direct blood measurements and imaging procedures indicated that simultaneous injection of unlabeled antibody reduced both the blood elimination rate and the accumulation in the liver. Accumulation of the radionuclide in pelvic lymph node metastases was observed in some patients but in a couple of patients accumulation was noted also in normal lymph nodes. The method cannot in its present design replace staging pelvic lymphadenectomy and further studies are needed for elaboration of clinically useful radioimmunodetection methods. (orig.)

  10. Limbic encephalitis with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase presenting with brainstem symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Incecik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Limbic encephalitis (LE is a neurological syndrome that may present in association with cancer, infection, or as an isolate clinical condition often accompanying autoimmune disorders. LE associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (anti-GAD is rare in children. Here, we characterized the clinical and laboratory features of a patient presenting with brainstem involvement with non-paraneoplastic LE associated with anti-GAD antibodies. In our patient, after plasma exchange, we determined a dramatic improvement of the neurological deficits.

  11. Discovery of a Chemical Modification by Citric Acid in a Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant therapeutic monoclonal antibodies exhibit a high degree of heterogeneity that can arise from various post-translational modifications. The formulation for a protein product is to maintain a specific pH and to minimize further modifications. Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS), citric acid is commonly used for formulation to maintain a pH at a range between 3 and 6 and is generally considered chemically inert. However, as we reported herein, citric acid covalently modified a recombinant monoclonal antibody (IgG1) in a phosphate/citrate-buffered formulation at pH 5.2 and led to the formation of so-called “acidic species” that showed mass increases of 174 and 156 Da, respectively. Peptide mapping revealed that the modification occurred at the N-terminus of the light chain. Three additional antibodies also showed the same modification but displayed different susceptibilities of the N-termini of the light chain, heavy chain, or both. Thus, ostensibly unreactive excipients under certain conditions may increase heterogeneity and acidic species in formulated recombinant monoclonal antibodies. By analogy, other molecules (e.g., succinic acid) with two or more carboxylic acid groups and capable of forming an anhydride may exhibit similar reactivities. Altogether, our findings again reminded us that it is prudent to consider formulations as a potential source for chemical modifications and product heterogeneity. PMID:25136741

  12. Physicochemical improvement of rabbit derived single-domain antibodies by substitutions with amino acids conserved in camelid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Naoya; Hashimoto, Ryuji; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu

    2018-02-01

    Recently, we showed that immunized rabbit heavy chain variable regions (rVHs) can have strong antigen binding activity comparable to that of the camelid variable domain of the heavy chain of heavy chain antibody (VHH). These rVHs lack the light chain variable regions (rVLs), which exist in the authentic Fab format; thus, molecular surfaces at the interface region of rVHs are exposed to solvent. This physical feature may change physicochemical properties, such as causing reduced stability. By overcoming potential physicochemical issues through engineering the interface region, rVHs could become more useful as single-domain antibodies. In this study, we substituted amino acid residues conserved at the interface region of rVHs with those of VHHs. These substitutions included V37F, involving substitution of a residue in the hydrophobic core with a bulkier hydrophobic amino acid, and G44E/L45R, involving double substitutions of highly exposed residues with more hydrophilic ones. As expected, biophysical and structural characterizations showed that the V37F substitution markedly enhanced the thermal stability through increased hydrophobic packing, while G44E/L45R substitutions greatly reduced hydrophobicity of the interface. The quadruple substitutions of V37F/G44E/L45R/F91Y resulted in not only enhancements of thermal stability and reduction in hydrophobicity, both in an additive manner, but also synergistic improvement of purification yield. This quadruple mutant exhibited greatly reduced non-specific binding with improved colloidal stability owing to the reduced hydrophobicity. The approach used in this study should further enhance the utility of rVHs and promote research and development of single-domain antibodies. Copyright © 2018 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of hapten-protein conjugates: antibody generation and immunoassay development for chlorophenoxyacetic acid pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boro, Robin C; Singh, K Vikas; Suri, C Raman

    2009-01-01

    The generation of specific and sensitive antibodies against small molecules is greatly dependent upon the characteristics of the hapten-protein conjugates. In this study, we report a new fluorescence-based method for the characterization of hapten-protein conjugates. The method is based on an effect promoted by hapten-protein conjugation density upon the fluorescence intensity of the intrinsic tryptophan chromophore molecules of the protein. The proposed methodology is applied to quantify the hapten-protein conjugation density for two different chlorophenoxyacetic acid pesticides, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid (2,4-DB), coupled to carrier protein. Highly sensitive anti-2,4-D and anti-2,4-DB antibodies were obtained using these well-characterized hapten-protein conjugates. The generated antibodies were used in an immunoassay format demonstrating inhibitory concentration (IC50) values equal to 30 and 7 ng/mL for 2,4-D and 2,4-DB, respectively. Linearity was observed in the concentration range between 0.1-500 nglmL with LODs around 4 and 3 ng/mL for 2,4-D and 2,4-DB, respectively, in standard water samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the extent of hapten-protein conjugation to produce specific antibodies for immunoassay development against pesticides.

  14. Amino-Acid Sequences of Light Chains of a Rabbit Anti-p-Azobenzoate Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appella, E.; Chersi, A.; Roholt, O. A.; Pressman, D.

    1971-01-01

    Half-cystine peptic peptides representing the intrachain disulfide bonds of the light chain from an apparently homogeneous rabbit anti-p-azobenzoate antibody were isolated in good yields after reduction and alkylation with [14C]iodoacetate, and their sequences were determined. The sequence of the first 21 amino-terminal residues was also determined. The good yields of these peptides, the fact that no variants of any of them were found, and the cleanness of the amino-terminal sequence determination confirm the high degree of homogeneity of this light-chain preparation. Previous evidence for the homogeneity of the light chain includes the appearance of only a single band upon analysis by disc electrophoresis, a relatively unique amino-acid composition, and a simple tryptic peptide map. The whole antibody shows a homogeneity of the hapten-binding constant. The antigen used in the present work is complex, since the attached hapten groups are in a large variety of environments, particularly since the carrier is a heterogeneous mixture of globulins. The very limited heterogeneity of the antibodies found in this case would appear to depend on the stimulation of only a few of the cells capable of producing antibody against a given hapten, rather than on a structural identity of the environment around each individual hapten group that is located on the antigen molecule. Images PMID:5289890

  15. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torkashvand, Fatemeh; Vaziri, Behrouz; Maleknia, Shayan; Heydari, Amir; Vossoughi, Manouchehr; Davami, Fatemeh; Mahboudi, Fereidoun

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB) multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44) cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM) to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb) titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds. PMID:26480023

  16. Designed Amino Acid Feed in Improvement of Production and Quality Targets of a Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Torkashvand

    Full Text Available Cell culture feeds optimization is a critical step in process development of pharmaceutical recombinant protein production. Amino acids are the basic supplements of mammalian cell culture feeds with known effect on their growth promotion and productivity. In this study, we reported the implementation of the Plackett-Burman (PB multifactorial design to screen the effects of amino acids on the growth promotion and productivity of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44 cell line producing bevacizumab. After this screening, the amino acid combinations were optimized by the response surface methodology (RSM to determine the most effective concentration in feeds. Through this strategy, the final monoclonal antibody (mAb titre was enhanced by 70%, compared to the control group. For this particular cell line, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and glycine had the highest positive effects on the final mAb titre. Simultaneously, the impact of the designed amino acid feed on some critical quality attributes of bevacizumab was examined in the group with highest productivity. The product was analysed for N-glycan profiles, charge variant distribution, and low molecular weight forms. The results showed that the target product quality has been improved using this feeding strategy. It was shown how this strategy could significantly diminish the time and number of experiments in identifying the most effective amino acids and related concentrations in target product enhancement. This model could be successfully applied to other components of culture media and feeds.

  17. Recognition of anti-mycolic acid antibody at self-assembled mycolic acid antigens on a gold electrode: a potential impedimetric immunosensing platform for active tuberculosis

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mathebula, NS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical impedimetric recognition by anti-mycolic acid antibodies, present in tuberculosis (TB)-positive human serum co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), of mycolic acids (MA) integrated into a self-assembled monolayer of N-(2...

  18. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against recombinant fatty acid binding protein of Fasciola gigantica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisriro, A; Grams, R; Vichasri-Grams, S; Ardseungneon, P; Pankao, V; Meepool, A; Chaithirayanon, K; Viyanant, V; Tan-Ariya, P; Upatham, E S; Sobhon, P

    2002-04-30

    In Fasciola parasites fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are the carrier proteins that help in the uptake of fatty acids from the hosts' fluids. Attempts have been made to utilize both native and recombinant FABP (rFABP) for immunodiagnosis and vaccine development for fasciolosis. In this study, we have produced a number of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against rFABP of Fasciola gigantica. These MoAbs were initially screened against rFABP by ELISA and then tested for their specificities by immunoblotting. Five stable clones were selected and characterized further: four of them were of the isotype IgG(1) while one clone was IgG(2a). All the MoAbs reacted with rFABP which has a molecular weight (MW) of 20 kD and with at least two isoforms of native proteins at MW 14.5 kD that were present in the tegumental antigen (TA) and crude worm extracts, and the excretion-secretion materials. Immunoperoxidase staining of frozen sections of adult parasites by using these MoAbs as primary antibodies indicated that FABP were present in high concentration in the parenchymal cells and reproductive tissues, in low concentration in the tegument and caecal epithelium. All MoAbs cross-reacted with a 14.5 kD antigen present in the whole body (WB) extract of Schistosoma mansoni, while no cross-reactivities were detected with antigens from Eurytrema pancreaticum and Paramphistomum spp.

  19. CTLA-4+49 A/G polymorphism and antiglutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated encephalopathy in Taiwanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jainn-Jim; Lin, Kuang-Lin; Wang, Yu; Wang, Huei-Shyong; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Chang, Luan-Yin

    2016-04-01

    Anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies are associated with encephalopathy, an autoimmune central nervous system inflammatory disease. The cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4)+49 A/G polymorphism has been shown to confer genetic susceptibility to positive anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus in Japan. We aimed to investigate the association of the CTLA-4+49 A/G (rs231775) polymorphism in Taiwanese children with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated encephalopathy. This was a case-control study from July 2011 to June 2012 performed at Chang Gung Children's Hospital in Taiwan. Genotyping of the CTLA-4+49 A/G polymorphism was performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Seventeen patients with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated encephalopathy and 97 controls were enrolled. The genotype, allele and carrier frequencies of the CTLA-4+49 A/G polymorphism were equally distributed in the patients and controls, with no significant differences between the two groups. In addition, we found a positive trend between the level of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and the G allele of the CTLA-4+49 A/G polymorphism, although this trend was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that the CTLA-4+49 A/G (rs231775) polymorphism does not confer an increased susceptibility to anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-associated encephalopathy in Taiwanese children. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream process...

  1. SDR-ELISA: Ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection based on antibody-like DNA nanostructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Junlin; Chen, Junhua; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui

    2017-04-15

    An ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection system, termed as strand displacement reaction-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (SDR-ELISA), has been developed on the basis of antibody-like DNA nanostructures. Three digoxigenin or biotin modified hairpin probes are utilized to construct antibody-like DNA nanostructures that feature affinity toward streptavidin and anti-digoxigenin antibody via isothermal target-triggered SDR amplification. These antibody-like nanostructures have been employed to conjugate horseradish-peroxidase-labeled anti-digoxigenin antibody with streptavidin that is immobilized on microliter plate wells for enzyme-linked colorimetric assay. The resulting SDR-ELISA system is ultrasensitive for target DNA with a low detection limit of 5 fM. Moreover, the SDR-ELISA system is capable of discriminating DNA sequences with single base mutations, and do so in a high-throughput manner by detection and quantification of up to 96 or 384 DNA samples in a single shot. This detection system is further applied to detect other DNA targets such as Shewanella oneidensis specific DNA sequence, which indicates the generality of proposed SDR-ELISA system. The integration of SDR amplification and convenient ELISA technique advances an intelligent strategy for ultrasensitive and high-throughput nucleic acid detection, which may be amenable for direct visual detection and quantification using an accompanying quantitative color chart. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The clinical significance of detecting serum glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GAD), C-peptide and insulin in diabetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Tingliang; Zhang Jinchi; Yao Yingfei; Chen Linxing; Huang Hua

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of detecting serum glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody, C-peptide (CP) and insulin (INS) in the classification of diabetic patients. Methods: Serum GAD antibody, CP and INS concentration were determined with RIA in 27 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) and 49 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Sugar-electrode-method was used to detect the concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in these patients. Results: The positive rate of GAD antibody in DM1 patients (66.7%) were significantly higher than that in DM2 group (8.2%) (P<0.01), The levels of CP and INS were lower in DM1 group than those in DM2 group as well (P<0.01). Conclusion: GAD antibody is a valuable marker to predict the impairment of β-cell GAD antibody levels, together with CP /FPG and INS/FPG ratios, might be useful in determining the type of DM and guiding the therapy. (authors)

  3. Definition of essential amino acid residues in the recognition of a peptide by a mouse monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosanó, L; Di Modugno, F; Romagnoli, G; Chersi, A

    1997-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody reacting in ELISA with a synthetic peptide representing a linear amino acid stretch of the protein antigen was tested on all overlapping 5-mer to 9-mer fragments of the peptide, as prepared by multi-pin synthesis. Analysis of the binding data suggests that several residues in the peptide might be relatively unrelevant for recognition, while few others seem to play a critical role as key residues. On the basis of such observations, we attempted to reconstruct an alternative essential epitope by introducing multiple amino acid substitutions in the 9-mer peptide exhibiting the best binding activity, and then tested its ability to be recognized by the monoclonal antibody.

  4. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Simone V; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.

    2016-01-01

    molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best...

  5. Oriented antibody immobilization to polystyrene macrocarriers for immunoassay modified with hydrazide derivatives of poly(methacrylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinokurova Ludmila G

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydrophobic polystyrene is the most common material for solid phase immunoassay. Proteins are immobilized on polystyrene by passive adsorption, which often causes considerable denaturation. Biological macromolecules were found to better retain their functional activity when immobilized on hydrophilic materials. Polyacrylamide is a common material for solid-phase carriers of biological macromolecules, including immunoreagents used in affinity chromatography. New macroformats for immunoassay modified with activated polyacrylamide derivatives seem to be promising. Results New polymeric matrices for immunoassay in the form of 0.63-cm balls which contain hydrazide functional groups on hydrophilic polymer spacer arms at their surface shell are synthesized by modification of aldehyde-containing polystyrene balls with hydrazide derivatives of poly(methacrylic acid. The beads contain up to 0.31 μmol/cm2 active hydrazide groups accessible for covalent reaction with periodate-oxidized antibodies. The matrices obtained allow carrying out the oriented antibody immobilization, which increases the functional activity of immunosorbents. Conclusions An efficient site-directed antibody immobilization on a macrosupport is realized. The polymer hydrophilic spacer arms are the most convenient and effective tools for oriented antibody coupling with molded materials. The suggested scheme can be used for the modification of any other solid supports containing electrophilic groups reacting with hydrazides.

  6. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and islet antigen 2 antibody profiles in people with adult-onset diabetes mellitus: a comparison between mixed ethnic populations in Singapore and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Y H; Koh, W C A; Ng, M L; Tam, Z Y; Lim, S C; Boehm, B O

    2017-08-01

    To gain insight into the presence of islet cell autoimmunity in an ethnic Asian compared with a white European population. For this cross-sectional study we recruited people with adult-onset diabetes (age of diagnosis 20-60 years), at tertiary referral centres in Germany (n=1020) and Singapore (n=1088). Glutamic acid decarboxylase and islet antigen 2 antibodies were measured according to Islet Autoantibody Standardization Program protocols. The prevalence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positivity was 13.9% (95% CI 12.1-16.0; PGlutamic acid decarboxylase antibody positivity was 11.4% (95% CI 7.7-16.6) in Indian, 6.0% (95% CI 3.6-9.9) in Malay and 5.8% (95% CI 4.3-7.7; Pglutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody-positive had a lower BMI than those who were autoantibody-negative, but this trend was absent in the Asian cohort. A marked prevalence of islet cell autoimmunity was observed in people with adult-onset diabetes. While glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies were more frequent in the European cohort, islet antigen 2 antibody positivity was highest in the three ethnic groups in Singapore, suggesting ethnic-specific differences in antibody profiles. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  7. No evidence for XMRV nucleic acids, infectious virus or anti-XMRV antibodies in Canadian patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Steffen

    Full Text Available The gammaretroviruses xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV and MLV have been reported to be more prevalent in plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS patients than in healthy controls. Here, we report the complex analysis of whole blood and plasma samples from 58 CFS patients and 57 controls from Canada for the presence of XMRV/MLV nucleic acids, infectious virus, and XMRV/MLV-specific antibodies. Multiple techniques were employed, including nested and qRT-PCR, cell culture, and immunoblotting. We found no evidence of XMRV or MLV in humans and conclude that CFS is not associated with these gammaretroviruses.

  8. Antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase are associated with HLA-DR genotypes in both Australians and Asians with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serjeantson, S W; Kohonen-Corish, M R; Rowley, M J; Mackay, I R; Knowles, W; Zimmet, P

    1992-10-01

    Antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase, previously known as the 64 kD antigen, appear to be more predictive of Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus in Caucasoids than other autoantibodies to islet cell antigens. However, seropositivity to glutamic acid decarboxylase is not universal at the onset of Type 1 diabetes and the prevalence in Asians is low compared to Caucasoid patients. This suggests the involvement of multiple pancreatic autoantigens in the Type 1 diabetes autoimmune process or, genetic differences within and between ethnic groups that contribute to the heterogeneous autoimmune response to glutamic acid decarboxylase or both. Alternatively some cases of Type 1 diabetes could have an aetiology unrelated to autoimmunity. This study examined the differential response to glutamic acid decarboxylase according to HLA-DR and -DQ genotypes, as determined by RFLP, in 49 white Australian and 44 Asian patients with Type 1 diabetes. Among Australians heterozygous for HLA-DR3, DR4, 85% were positive for antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase, significantly different (p = 0.039) from the prevalence of 48% in patients with at least one HLA-DR antigen other than DR3 or DR4. Also, among Australians, the presence of "low risk" HLA-DQ antigens, namely DQw5, DQw6 or DQw7, reduced the prevalence of antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase by 40% (p = 0.064). Among Asians with Type 1 diabetes and with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase, HLA-DR9 was significantly (p = 0.037) increased in frequency, at 63% compared with 22% in those without glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies, and the presence of a "low risk" HLA-DQ allele reduced the antibody rates by 87% (p = 0.003).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Development of a novel ultrasensitive enzyme immunoassay for human glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Satoshi; Katakami, Hideki; Inoue, Shinobu; Sawada, Hirotake; Hashida, Seiichi

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel, ultrasensitive enzyme immunoassay (immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay) for determination of glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody concentrations in serum samples from patients with type 2 diabetes. We developed an immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and measured glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody from 22 patients with type 1 diabetes, 29 patients with type 2 diabetes, and 32 healthy controls. A conventional ELISA kit identified 10 patients with type 1 diabetes and one patient with type 2 diabetes as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody positive, whereas 15 patients with type 1 diabetes and six patients with type 2 diabetes were identified as glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody positive using immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay. Immune complex transfer enzyme immunoassay is a highly sensitive and specific assay for glutamic acid decarboxylase autoantibody and might be clinically useful for diabetic onset prediction and early diagnosis. © The Author(s) 2016.

  10. Binding diversity of monoclonal antibodies to alpha(2-->8) polysialic acid conjugated to outer membrane vesicle via adipic acid dihydrazide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, S J; Karpas, A B; Frasch, C E

    1996-07-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated using group B Neisseria meningitidis and Escherichia coli K1 polysaccharides (PSs) conjugated to outer membrane vesicle (OMV) via adipic acid dihydrazide, and were used to identify the immunodeterminants expressed on these capsular PSs. Ten mAbs representative of IgM and all subclasses of IgG were obtained which recognized diverse immunodeterminants on alpha(2-->8) polysialic acid (PSA). The specificity of mAbs to different antigenic determinants was assessed by their differential binding to PSA attached to a solid phase by different methods and confirmed by absorption studies. Two mAbs from the E. coli K1 fusion were directed to the O-acetyl epitope and the rest reacted with both the PSs only when attached to a solid phase by certain means. The methods by which PSA was coated on the solid phase had an impact on the epitope expression and binding pattern. At the concentrations used, the O-acetyl-specific mAbs, IgG1 and IgG3 mAbs were not bactericidal against group B N. meningitidis, whereas other mAbs were. The conjugates B and K1 PSs present to the murine immune system different antigenic determinants, some of which elicit bactericidal antibodies.

  11. Elucidating the effects of pH shift on IgG1 monoclonal antibody acidic charge variant levels in Chinese hamster ovary cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Panpan; Niu, Huijie; Chen, Xinning; Zhang, Xintao; Miao, Shiwei; Deng, Xiancun; Liu, Xuping; Tan, Wen-Song; Zhou, Yan; Fan, Li

    2016-12-01

    Charge variants, especially acidic charge variants, in recombinant monoclonal antibodies are critical quality attributes, which can affect antibodies' properties in vitro and in vivo. Meanwhile, charge variants are cumulative effects of various post-translational modifications and chemical degradations on antibody. In this work, to investigate the effect of lowering culture pH in the stationary phase on acidic charge variant contents in fed-batch cultures and its mechanism, cell culture experiments in 2-L bioreactors were firstly performed to explore the changes in the charge distribution under the pH downshift condition using weak cation exchange chromatography. It is found that acidic charge variant contents were significantly decreased by pH downshift. Then, to reveal the mechanism by which the content of acidic charge variants is reduced under pH downshift condition, the variation of post-translational modifications and chemical degradations under the pH downshift condition was explored. Meanwhile, the structure of the acidic charge variants was characterized. Several analysis experiments including size exclusion chromatography, capillary electrophoresis-sodium dodecyl sulfate under non-reducing conditions, tryptic peptide map, and reduced antibody mass were applied in this study. The results show that the mechanism by which the content of acidic charge variants is reduced is that the contents of disulfide bond reduction, galactosylation, and asparagine deamination of the HC-N388 in the Fc domain were reduced by pH downshift.

  12. Radiolabelling of antibodies with indium: Use of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) as chelating agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loetscher, H.

    1986-01-01

    /sup 111/In/sup 3+/ was used to radiolabel the F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment of a monoclonal antibody (b-12) raised against a surface antigen of a mammalian breast tumor cell line (5). The in vivo distribution of the radiolabel was analyzed in mice bearing a transplant of fixed tumor cells in the left thigh. The results demonstrate that DTPA can be efficiently coupled to a tumor specific F(ab')/sub 2/ fragment and loaded with /sup 111/In/sup 3+/ yielding a stable, highly labelled complex

  13. [A case of immune-mediated encephalopathy showing refractory epilepsy and extensive brain MRI lesions associated with anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayakawa, Yuko; Tateishi, Takahisa; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Doi, Hikaru; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2010-02-01

    We reported a patient with immune-mediated encephalopathy showing refractory epilepsy and multiple brain lesions on MRI. The patient had high titers of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody in sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A 36-year-old previously healthy woman was admitted to our hospital with onset of sudden generalized seizure that then persisted for one month. She had repeated epileptic attacks accompanied with loss of consciousness, and was refractory to valproic acid, zonisamide (200 mg/day) and phenobarbital (200 mg/day). Brain MRI showed multiple hyperintense lesions in predominantly bilateral frontal lobes, parietal lobes, occipital lobes and cingulate cortices. EEG showed epileptic activities (frequent sharp waves) in bilateral frontal regions. After admission, attacks disappeared through the administration of clonazepam (1.5 mg/day), though the patient remained slightly disoriented. As titers of anti-GAD antibody in sera and CSF were extremely high, we implemented plasma exchanges. After treatment, titers of anti-GAD antibody in sera and CSF decreased. The patient completely recovered to an alert state and the abnormal MRI lesions almost disappeared. Since GAD catalyzes production of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), it is proposed that anti-GAD antibodies reduce synthesis of GABA or interferes with exocytosis of GABA in the nervous system. Anti-GAD antibodies are detected in some rare neurological disorders such as stiff-person syndrome. Recently, anti-GAD antibodies have been reported as implicated in cerebellar ataxia, palatal myoclonus, refractory epilepsy and limbic encephalitis. Epilepsy associated with the anti-GAD antibody is mostly pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy; with brain MRI showing no abnormality or only hippocampal sclerosis. It is very rare that brain MRI shows extensive abnormal lesions except in the hippocampus. This case suggests that anti-GAD antibodies could contribute to unexplained encephalopathy with

  14. Immunoreactivity of polyclonal antibodies generated against the carboxy terminus of the predicted amino acid sequence of the Huntington disease gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkatib, G.; Graham, R.; Pelmear-Telenius, A. [Univ. of Britisch Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    A cDNA fragment spanning the 3{prime}-end of the Huntington disease gene (from 8052 to 9252) was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector containing the E. Coli lac promoter and a portion of the coding sequence for {beta}-galactosidase. The truncated {beta}-galactosidase gene was cleaved with BamHl and fused in frame to the BamHl fragment of the Huntington disease gene 3{prime}-end. Expression analysis of proteins made in E. Coli revealed that 20-30% of the total cellular proteins was represented by the {beta}-galactosidase-huntingtin fusion protein. The identity of the Huntington disease protein amino acid sequences was confirmed by protein sequence analysis. Affinity chromatography was used to purify large quantities of the fusion protein from bacterial cell lysates. Affinity-purified proteins were used to immunize New Zealand white rabbits for antibody production. The generated polyclonal antibodies were used to immunoprecipitate the Huntington disease gene product expressed in a neuroblastoma cell line. In this cell line the antibodies precipitated two protein bands of apparent gel migrations of 200 and 150 kd which together, correspond to the calculated molecular weight of the Huntington disease gene product (350 kd). Immunoblotting experiments revealed the presence of a large precursor protein in the range of 350-750 kd which is in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of the protein without post-translational modifications. These results indicate that the huntingtin protein is cleaved into two subunits in this neuroblastoma cell line and implicate that cleavage of a large precursor protein may contribute to its biological activity. Experiments are ongoing to determine the precursor-product relationship and to examine the synthesis of the huntingtin protein in freshly isolated rat brains, and to determine cellular and subcellular distribution of the gene product.

  15. Kinetics of Antibody Aggregation at Neutral pH and Ambient Temperatures Triggered by Temporal Exposure to Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Honda, Shinya

    2016-09-15

    The purification process of an antibody in manufacturing involves temporal exposure of the molecules to low pH followed by neutralization-pH-shift stress-which causes aggregation. It remains unclear how aggregation triggered by pH-shift stress grows at neutral pH and how it depends on the temperature in an ambient range. We used static and dynamic light scattering to monitor the time-dependent evolution of the aggregate size of the pH-shift stressed antibody between 4.0 and 40.0 °C. A power-law relationship between the effective molecular weight and the effective hydrodynamic radius was found, indicating that the aggregates were fractal with a dimension of 1.98. We found that the aggregation kinetics in the lower-temperature range, 4.0-25.0 °C, were well described by the Smoluchowski aggregation equation. The temperature dependence of the effective aggregation rate constant gave 13 ± 1 kcal/mol of endothermic activation energy. Temporal acid exposure creates an enriched population of unfolded protein molecules that are competent of aggregating. Therefore, the energetically unfavorable unfolding step is not required and the aggregation proceeds faster. These findings provide a basis for predicting the growth of aggregates during storage under practical, ambient conditions.

  16. An aspartate and a water molecule mediate efficient acid-base catalysis in a tailored antibody pocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debler, Erik W.; Müller, Roger; Hilvert, Donald; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    Design of catalysts featuring multiple functional groups is a desirable, yet formidable goal. Antibody 13G5, which accelerates the cleavage of unactivated benzisoxazoles, is one of few artificial enzymes that harness an acid and a base to achieve efficient proton transfer. X-ray structures of the Fab-hapten complexes of wild-type 13G5 and active-site variants now afford detailed insights into its mechanism. The parent antibody preorganizes AspH35 and GluL34 to abstract a proton from substrate and to orient a water molecule for leaving group stabilization, respectively. Remodeling the environment of the hydrogen bond donor with a compensatory network of ordered waters, as seen in the GluL34 to alanine mutant, leads to an impressive 109-fold rate acceleration over the nonenzymatic reaction with acetate, illustrating the utility of buried water molecules in bifunctional catalysis. Generalization of these design principles may aid in creation of catalysts for other important chemical transformations. PMID:19846764

  17. The ethnic distribution of antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase: presence and levels of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in Europid and Asian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmet, P Z; Rowley, M J; Mackay, I R; Knowles, W J; Chen, Q Y; Chapman, L H; Serjeantson, S W

    1993-01-01

    Our objective was to ascertain the frequency of antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in Europids and four Asian ethnic groups with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) to gain insight into why the prevalence and incidence of IDDM varies so widely among ethnic and/or geographically diverse population groups. The subjects in this study were Europid (n = 49), Japanese (n = 16), Thai (n = 7), Korean (n = 21), and Chinese (n = 13) persons with IDDM with a duration ranging from 5 to 14 years. There were similar numbers of healthy controls matched for each ethnic group. A validated radioimmunoprecipitation assay used GAD from pig brain radiolabeled with 125I using chloramine T. Islet cell cytoplasmic antibodies measured by indirect immunofluorescence were expressed as Juvenile Diabetes Foundation units. The prevalence of antibodies to GAD, compared with Europids (63%), was much lower in all Asian populations with IDDM: Japanese (31%), Thai (29%), Korean (5%), and Chinese (27%). The mean level of antibodies to GAD, however, among diabetics from each population who gave a positive reaction, was similar. For all groups, the prevalence of antibodies to GAD was much higher than that of islet cell cytoplasmic antibodies. Almost all IDDM subjects positive for islet cell antibodies had antibodies to GAD, but the converse did not hold. A radioimmunoprecipitation assay for antibodies to GAD applied to serum from subjects with IDDM in various ethnic groups showed that Europids with IDDM had a much higher prevalence of such antibodies than did Asians. This held for all ethnic groups, and particularly Koreans. Thus, among different populations, there may be etiologic heterogeneity of IDDM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Oral delivery of Acid Alpha Glucosidase epitopes expressed in plant chloroplasts suppresses antibody formation in treatment of Pompe mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Doerfler, Phillip A; Byrne, Barry J; Herzog, Roland W; Daniell, Henry

    2015-10-01

    Deficiency of acid alpha glucosidase (GAA) causes Pompe disease in which the patients systemically accumulate lysosomal glycogen in muscles and nervous systems, often resulting in infant mortality. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is effective in treating patients with Pompe disease, formation of antibodies against rhGAA complicates treatment. In this report, we investigated induction of tolerance by oral administration of GAA expressed in chloroplasts. Because full-length GAA could not be expressed, N-terminal 410-amino acids of GAA (as determined by T-cell epitope mapping) were fused with the transmucosal carrier CTB. Tobacco transplastomic lines expressing CTB-GAA were generated through site-specific integration of transgenes into the chloroplast genome. Homoplasmic lines were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Despite low-level expression of CTB-GAA in chloroplasts, yellow or albino phenotype of transplastomic lines was observed due to binding of GAA to a chloroplast protein that has homology to mannose-6 phosphate receptor. Oral administration of the plant-made CTB-GAA fusion protein even at 330-fold lower dose (1.5 μg) significantly suppressed immunoglobulin formation against GAA in Pompe mice injected with 500 μg rhGAA per dose, with several-fold lower titre of GAA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a. Lyophilization increased CTB-GAA concentration by 30-fold (up to 190 μg per g of freeze-dried leaf material), facilitating long-term storage at room temperature and higher dosage in future investigations. This study provides the first evidence that oral delivery of plant cells is effective in reducing antibody responses in ERT for lysosomal storage disorders facilitating further advances in clinical investigations using plant cell culture system or in vitro propagation. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Amino acid-based advanced liquid formulation development for highly concentrated therapeutic antibodies balances physical and chemical stability and low viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemter, Kristina; Altrichter, Jens; Derwand, Roland; Kriehuber, Thomas; Reinauer, Eva; Scholz, Martin

    2018-04-16

    To develop highly concentrated therapeutic antibodies enabling convenient subcutaneous application, well stabilizing pharmaceutical formulations with low viscosities are considered to be key. The purpose of this study was to select specific amino acid combinations that reduce and balance aggregation, fragmentation and chemical degradation and also lower viscosity of highly concentrated liquid antibodies. As a model, the therapeutically well-established antibody trastuzumab (25 - >200 mg/mL) in liquid formulation was used. Pre-testing of formulations based on a stabilizing and protecting solutions (SPS®) platform was conducted in a thermal unfolding model using Differential Scanning Fluorimetry (DSF) and accelerated aging at 37 °C and 45 °C. Pre-selected amino acid combinations were further iteratively adjusted to obtain stable highly concentrated antibody formulations with low viscosity. Size Exclusion Chromatography (SE-HPLC) revealed significantly lower aggregation and fragmentation at specific amino acid:sugar and protein:excipient ratios. Dynamic viscosities <20 mPa∗s of highly concentrated trastuzumab (≥200 mg/mL) were measured by falling ball viscosimetry. Moreover, less chemical degradation was found by Cationic Exchange Chromatography (CEX -HPLC) even after six months liquid storage at 25 °C. In conclusion, specifically tailored and advanced amino acid-based liquid formulations avoid aggregation and enable the development of stable and low viscous highly concentrated biopharmaceuticals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Stereo-selective binding of monoclonal antibodies to the poly-γ-D-glutamic acid capsular antigen of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Mark A; Thorkildson, Peter; Welch, William H; Kozel, Thomas R

    2013-10-01

    Bacillus anthracis is surrounded by an anti-phagocytic capsule that is entirely composed of γ-linked D-glutamic acid (γDPGA). γDPGA is required for virulence and is produced in large quantities following spore germination. We have previously described the isolation of several γDPGA-reactive mAbs. The reagents are effective in both immunoprotection and diagnostic applications. The current work was done to further investigate the specificity of γDPGA-reactive mAbs. The specificity of each mAb was characterized using surface plasmon resonance. Our results indicate that each mAb is stereoselective for binding to D-glutamic acid oligomers, but to varying degrees. In particular, mAb F26G3 is highly selective for γDPGA; alterations in stereochemistry disrupted recognition. These differences in mAb reactivity suggest that binding of γDPGA by mAb F26G3 is more specific than non-directional ionic interactions between a negatively charged antigen and a positively charged antibody. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-Mercaptopropionic Acid and CdTe-Mercaptosuccinic Acid Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2016-01-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining.

  2. Amino acid and glucose metabolism in fed-batch CHO cell culture affects antibody production and glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian; Wagtberg Sen, Jette; Rasmussen, Søren Kofoed; Kontoravdi, Cleo; Weilguny, Dietmar; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam

    2015-03-01

    Fed-batch Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture is the most commonly used process for IgG production in the biopharmaceutical industry. Amino acid and glucose consumption, cell growth, metabolism, antibody titer, and N-glycosylation patterns are always the major concerns during upstream process optimization, especially media optimization. Gaining knowledge on their interrelations could provide insight for obtaining higher immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer and better controlling glycosylation-related product quality. In this work, different fed-batch processes with two chemically defined proprietary media and feeds were studied using two IgG-producing cell lines. Our results indicate that the balance of glucose and amino acid concentration in the culture is important for cell growth, IgG titer and N-glycosylation. Accordingly, the ideal fate of glucose and amino acids in the culture could be mainly towards energy and recombinant product, respectively. Accumulation of by-products such as NH4(+) and lactate as a consequence of unbalanced nutrient supply to cell activities inhibits cell growth. The levels of Leu and Arg in the culture, which relate to cell growth and IgG productivity, need to be well controlled. Amino acids with the highest consumption rates correlate with the most abundant amino acids present in the produced IgG, and thus require sufficient availability during culture. Case-by-case analysis is necessary for understanding the effect of media and process optimization on glycosylation. We found that in certain cases the presence of Man5 glycan can be linked to limitation of UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis as a result of insufficient extracellular Gln. However, under different culture conditions, high Man5 levels can also result from low α-1,3-mannosyl-glycoprotein 2-β-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnTI) and UDP-GlcNAc transporter activities, which may be attributed to high level of NH4+ in the cell culture. Furthermore, galactosylation of the mAb Fc glycans

  3. Guillain-Barré Syndrome: A Variant Consisting of Facial Diplegia and Paresthesia with Left Facial Hemiplegia Associated with Antibodies to Galactocerebroside and Phosphatidic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, Sho; Branch, Joel; Tsuchiya, Tsubasa; Ito, Ryoji; Kawada, Junya

    2017-10-02

    BACKGROUND A rare variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) consists of facial diplegia and paresthesia, but an even more rare association is with facial hemiplegia, similar to Bell's palsy. This case report is of this rare variant of GBS that was associated with IgG antibodies to galactocerebroside and phosphatidic acid. CASE REPORT A 54-year-old man presented with lower left facial palsy and paresthesia of his extremities, following an upper respiratory tract infection. Physical examination confirmed lower left facial palsy and paresthesia of his extremities with hyporeflexia of his lower limbs and sensory loss of all four extremities. The differential diagnosis was between a variant of GBS and Bell's palsy. Following initial treatment with glucocorticoids followed by intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), his sensory abnormalities resolved. Serum IgG antibodies to galactocerebroside and phosphatidic acid were positive in this patient, but not other antibodies to glycolipids or phospholipids were found. Five months following discharge from hospital, his left facial palsy had improved. CONCLUSIONS A case of a rare variant of GBS is presented with facial diplegia and paresthesia and with unilateral facial palsy. This rare variant of GBS may which may mimic Bell's palsy. In this case, IgG antibodies to galactocerebroside and phosphatidic acid were detected.

  4. Sensitive Detection of Capsaicinoids Using a Surface Plasmon Resonance Sensor with Anti-Homovanillic Acid Polyclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Toko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes.

  5. Sensitive detection of capsaicinoids using a surface plasmon resonance sensor with anti-homovanillic Acid polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shingo; Yatabe, Rui; Onodera, Takeshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2013-11-13

    Recently, highly functional biosensors have been developed in preparation for possible large-scale terrorist attacks using chemical warfare agents. Practically applicable sensors are required to have various abilities, such as high portability and operability, the capability of performing rapid and continuous measurement, as well as high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed the detection method of capsaicinoids, the main component of some lachrymators, using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) immunosensor as an on-site detection sensor. Homovanillic acid, which has a vanillyl group similar to capsaicinoids such as capsaicin and dihydrocapsaicin, was bound to Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH) for use as an immunogen to generate polyclonal antibodies. An indirect competitive assay was carried out to detect capsaicinoids using SPR sensor chips on which different capsaicin analogues were immobilized. For the sensor chip on which 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylamine hydrochloride was immobilized, a detection limit of 150 ppb was achieved. We found that the incubation time was not required and the detection can be completed in five minutes.

  6. Anti-nucleosome antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus patients: Relation to anti-double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid and disease activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayada Ali Abdalla

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Anti-NCS antibodies could play a role in the pathogenesis of SLE and is related to disease activity. Its association with anti-dsDNA antibodies and its presence in those with negative anti-ds DNA may aid in the diagnosis of SLE.

  7. Protein and bacterial fouling characteristics of peptide and antibody decorated surfaces of PEG-poly(acrylic acid) co-polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Victoria E; Koberstein, Jeffrey T; Bryers, James D

    2004-05-01

    The potential for base poly(ethylene glycol) graft poly(acrylic acid) PEG-g-PA copolymers and surface-modified PEG-g-PA materials to inhibit random protein fouling and bacterial adhesion are investigated. PEG-g-PA co-polymers were synthesized that inhibited non-specific protein and cellular adhesion. PEG-g-PA co-polymers were then covalently modified with either cell adhesion peptides (YRGDS, YEILDV) or fragments of antibodies to monocyte/macrophage integrin receptors (Anti-VLA4, Anti-beta1, Anti-beta2, and Anti-CD64) known to enhance macrophage adhesion and, perhaps, modulate their activation. Materials produced in this work were characterized using: hydrophobicity by contact angle; angle-resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to confirm the presence of PEG in the bulk material and the surface; degree of hydration; differential scanning calorimetry; and thermal gravimetric analysis. To evaluate the non-fouling efficacy of the various modified surfaces, three proteins, human serum albumin, human fibronectin (Fraction I) and human immunoglobulin were 125I labeled. Samples of base PEG-g-PA and PEG-g-PA, modified with various peptides, were exposed to solutions containing either 2 or 200 microg/ml of one of the labeled proteins at 37 degrees C for 24 h. PEG-g-PA substrata modified with directly bound peptides exhibited protein adsorption that varied depending upon the surface bounded peptide. PEG-g-PA modified with peptides linked by linear PEG tethers reduced protein adsorption at 24 h by approximately 45% in comparison to PEG-g-PA. Peptides linked by way of StarPEO and StarlikePEO tethers further decreased protein adsorption in comparison to PEG-g-PA. The ability of peptide:PEOtethers to inhibit protein adsorption appeared to be a function of type and surface coverage of the PEO tether and not influenced by the amount or molecular structure the tethered peptide. Peptides directly coupled to the PEG-g-PA increased the amount of protein fouling relative to controls

  8. Combination sclerostin antibody and zoledronic acid treatment outperforms either treatment alone in a mouse model of osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, David G; Peacock, Lauren; Mikulec, Kathy; Kneissel, Michaela; Kramer, Ina; Cheng, Tegan L; Schindeler, Aaron; Munns, Craig

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we examined the therapeutic potential of anti-Sclerostin Antibody (Scl-Ab) and bisphosphonate treatments for the bone fragility disorder Osteogenesis Imperfecta (OI). Mice with the Amish OI mutation (Col1a2 G610C mice) and control wild type littermates (WT) were treated from week 5 to week 9 of life with (1) saline (control), (2) zoledronic acid given 0.025mg/kg s.c. weekly (ZA), (3) Scl-Ab given 50mg/kg IV weekly (Scl-Ab), or (4) a combination of both (Scl-Ab/ZA). Functional outcomes were prioritized and included bone mineral density (BMD), bone microarchitecture, long bone bending strength, and vertebral compression strength. By dual-energy absorptiometry, Scl-Ab treatment alone had no effect on tibial BMD, while ZA and Scl-Ab/ZA significantly enhanced BMD by week 4 (+16% and +27% respectively, P<0.05). Scl-Ab/ZA treatment also led to increases in cortical thickness and tissue mineral density, and restored the tibial 4-point bending strength to that of control WT mice. In the spine, all treatments increased compression strength over controls, but only the combined group reached the strength of WT controls. Scl-Ab showed greater anabolic effects in the trabecular bone than in cortical bone. In summary, the Scl-Ab/ZA intervention was superior to either treatment alone in this OI mouse model, however further studies are required to establish its efficacy in other preclinical and clinical scenarios. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. An experimental test of stroke recovery by implanting a hyaluronic acid hydrogel carrying a Nogo receptor antibody in a rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Jun [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Tian Weiming [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Hou Shaoping [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Xu Qunyuan [Beijing Institute of Neuroscience, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100054 (China); Spector, Myron [Tissue Engineering, VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Cui Fuzhai [Biomaterials Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2007-12-15

    The objective of the study was to determine the effects of a hyaluronic-acid-based (HA-based) hydrogel implant, carrying a polyclonal antibody to the Nogo-66 receptor (NgR), on adult rats that underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Behavioral tests of a forelimb-reaching task suggested that the disabled function of the impaired forelimb in this stroke model was ameliorated by the implant to a certain extent. These behavioral findings were correlated with immunohistochemical results of investigating the distribution of NgR antibody, neurofilaments (NF) and neuron-specific class III {beta}-tubulin (TuJ1) in the brain sections. The porous hydrogel functioned as a scaffold to deliver the NgR antibody, support cell migration and development. In addition, it was found NF-positive and TuJ1-positive expressions were distributed in the implanted hydrogel. Collectively, the results demonstrate the promise of the HA hydrogel as a scaffold material and the delivery vehicle of the NgR antibody for the repair of defects and the support of neural regeneration in the brain.

  10. A case of relapsing encephalitis positive for gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor antibody associated with Type B3 thymoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Takaya; Kinoshita, Makoto; Shimazu, Kohki; Fushimi, Hiroaki; Omori, Kenichi; Hazama, Takanori

    2016-11-29

    A 87-year-old female presented with subacute progression of cognitive decline. Fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images of brain MRI showed multifocal high-intensity lesions. Thoracic CT image revealed the presence of thymoma, and serum autoantibody screening showed positivity for anti-gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) A receptor antibody. Histopathological analysis confirmed type B3 thymoma after thymectomy. The patient received both plasmapheresis and intravenous methylprednisolone therapy, and showed remarkable amelioration of clinical symptoms and MRI abnormal high intensity. However, after 2 month from the clinical recovery, the patient showed recurrence of brain lesions and intravenous methylprednisolone monotherapy was performed. Continuation of oral steroid therapy was required to maintain the quienscent state of inflammation within the central nervous system. Anti-GABA A receptor antibody is a recently discovered novel autoantibody associated with autoimmue encephalitis. Due to the limited number of literature reported, clinical course and therapeutic response of GABA A receptor antibody encephalitis remains elusive. Here we reported a rare case of GABA A receptor antibody encephalitis with type B3 thymoma. Clinical, radiological and therapeutic courses described in our report highlight the importance of immunotherapy for treatment of the disease.

  11. Cancer Cell Targeting Using Folic Acid/Anti-HER2 Antibody Conjugated Fluorescent CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gurpal; Kumar, Manoj; Soni, Udit; Arora, Vikas; Bansal, Vivek; Gupta, Dikshi; Bhat, Madhusudan; Dinda, Amit K; Sapra, Sameer; Singh, Harpal

    2015-12-01

    CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were synthesized by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique and direct aqueous synthesis respectively using thiol stabilizers. Synthesized CdSe/CdS/ZnS and CdTe QDs stabilized with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA) were used as fluorescent labels after conjugation with folic acid (FA) and anti-HER2 antibodies. Photoluminescence quantum yield of folated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA and CdTe-MSA QDs was 59% and 77% than that of non-folated hydrophilic QDs. The folate receptor-mediated delivery of folic acid-conjugated CdTe-MSA and CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs showed higher cellular internalization as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopic studies. Folated and non-folated CdTe-MSA QDs were highly toxic and exhibited only 10% cell viability as compared to > 80% cell viability with CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs over the concentration ranging from 3.38 to 50 pmoles. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) results of human breast cancer tissue samples showed positive results with anti-HER2 antibody conjugated CdSe/CdS/ZnS-MPA QDs with better sensitivity and specificity as compared to conventional IHC analysis using diaminobenzedene staining.

  12. Anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies presenting in carcinoma of the uterus with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panegyres Peter K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is a rare non-metastatic manifestation of malignancy. In this report, to the best of our knowledge we describe for the first time a diagnosis of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration several months prior to the diagnosis of clear carcinoma of the uterus. Case presentation A 75-year-old Caucasian woman manifested a rapidly progressive cerebellar syndrome with nystagmus, past-pointing, dysdiadochokinesis, dysarthria, truncal ataxia and titubation. The paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration was associated with anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. 14-3-3 protein was detected in the cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with intravenous immunoglobulin prior to laparotomy, hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy. Our patient has survived for three years following diagnosis and treatment. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of an association of clear cell carcinoma of the uterus and paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with both anti-Yo and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The findings imply that both antibodies contributed to the fulminating paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration observed in our patient, and this was of such severity it resulted in the release of 14-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid, a marker of neuronal death.

  13. Assessment of the effects of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and trace elements on cognitive performance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghadir AH

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad H Alghadir,1 Sami A Gabr,1,2 Einas Al-Eisa11Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptBackground: Homeostatic imbalance of trace elements such as iron (Fe, copper (Cu, and zinc (Zn demonstrated adverse effects on brain function among older adults.Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the effects of trace elements and the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs in human cognitive abilities among healthy older adults.Methods: A total of 100 healthy subjects (65 males, 35 females; age range; 64–96 years were recruited for this study. Based on Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA score, the participants were classified according to cognitive performance into normal (n=45, moderate (n=30, and severe (n=25. Cognitive functioning, leisure-time physical activity (LTPA, serum trace elements – Fe, Cu, Zn, Zn/Cu, and GADAs were assessed using LOTCA battery, pre-validated physical activity (PA questionnaire, atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques, respectively.Results: Approximately 45% of the study population (n=45 had normal distribution of cognitive function and 55% of the study population (n=55 had abnormal cognitive function; they were classified into moderate (score 62–92 and severe (score 31–62. There was a significant reduction in the level of Zn and Zn/Cu ratio along with an increase in the level of Fe, Cu, and anti-GADAs in subjects of severe (P=0.01 and moderate (P=0.01 cognitive performance. LOTCA-cognitive scores correlated positively with sex, HbA1c, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Zn/Cu ratio, and negatively with age, PA, body mass index, and anti-GADAs. Significant inter-correlation was reported between serum trace element concentrations and anti-GADAs which suggest producing a cognitive decline via oxidative and neural

  14. Antibodies directed to drug epitopes to investigate the structure of drug-protein photoadducts. Recognition of a common photobound substructure in tiaprofenic acid/ketoprofen cross-photoreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz, A; Hernández, D; Miranda, M A; Pérez-Prieto, J; Morera, I M; Castell, J V

    2001-11-01

    Drug-induced photoallergy is an immune adverse reaction to the combined effect of drugs and light. From the mechanistic point of view, it first involves covalent binding of drug to protein resulting in the formation of a photoantigen. Hence, determination of the structures of drug-protein photoadducts is of great relevance to understand the molecular basis of photoallergy and cross-immunoreactivity among drugs. Looking for new strategies to investigate the covalent photobinding of drugs to proteins, we generated highly specific antibodies to drug chemical substructures. The availability of such antibodies has allowed us to discriminate between the different modes by which tiaprofenic acid (TPA), suprofen (SUP), and ketoprofen (KTP) photobind to proteins. The finding that the vast majority of the TPA photoadduct can be accounted for by means of antibody anti-benzoyl strongly supports the view that the drug binds preferentially via the thiophene ring, leaving the benzene ring more accessible. By contrast, selective recognition of SUP-protein photoadducts by antibody anti-thenoyl evidences a preferential coupling via the benzene ring leaving the thiophene moiety more distant from the protein matrix. In the case of KTP, photoadducts are exclusively recognized by antibody anti-benzoyl, indicating that the benzene ring is again more accessible. As a result of this research, we have been able to identify a common substructure that is present in TPA-albumin and KTP-albumin photoadducts. This is remarkable since, at a first sight, the greatest structural similarities can be found between TPA and SUP as they share the same benzoylthiophene chromophore. These findings can explain the previously reported observations of cross-reactivity to KTP (or TPA) in patients photosensitized to TPA (or KTP).

  15. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  16. Diagnostic accuracy of the anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody in type 1 diabetes mellitus: Comparison between radioimmunoassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Takashi; Tsuzaki, Kokoro; Nirengi, Shinsuke; Watanabe, Tomokazu; Mizutani, Yukako; Okada, Hayami; Tsukamoto, Masami; Odori, Shinji; Nakagawachi, Reiko; Kawaguchi, Yaeko; Yoshioka, Fumi; Yamada, Kazunori; Shimatsu, Akira; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Sakane, Naoki

    2017-07-01

    The distributer of the anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody assay kit using radioimmunoassay (RIA) recently announced its discontinuation, and proposed an alternative kit using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The aim of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic values of the anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody by RIA and ELISA among type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and control participants. A total of 79 type 1 diabetes mellitus patients and 79 age-matched controls were enrolled and assessed using RIA and ELISA. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values and negative predictive values were calculated for cut-off values (RIA = 1.5 U/mL and ELISA = 5.0 U/mL, respectively). Kappa coefficients were used to test for agreements between the RIA and ELISA methods regarding the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values for diagnosing type 1 diabetes mellitus were 57.0, 97.5, 95.7, and 69.4% by RIA, and 60.8, 100.0, 100.0 and 71.8% by ELISA, respectively. The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes mellitus using the RIA and ELISA methods showed substantial agreement with the kappa values of 0.74 for all participants, and of 0.64 for the acute type; however, there was moderate agreement with the kappa value of 0.56 for the slowly progressive type. The present study suggests that both anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody by RIA and ELISA was useful for diagnosing type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, in the slowly progressive type, the degree of agreement of these two kits was poorer compared with those in all participants or in the acute type. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Selective modification of NMR relaxation time in human colorectal carcinoma by using gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated with monoclonal antibody 19-9.

    OpenAIRE

    Curtet, C; Tellier, C; Bohy, J; Conti, M L; Saccavini, J C; Thedrez, P; Douillard, J Y; Chatal, J F; Koprowski, H

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 19-9 (mAb 19-9) against human colon adenocarcinoma was conjugated with gadolinium X diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd X DTPA) and used as a contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in an effort to improve tumor target selectivity in nude mice. The data indicate that Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 in solution decreased the T1 relaxation of water protons at 90 MHz in direct proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and this effect was greater than in Gd X DTPA solutions...

  18. Use of a Plackett-Burman statistical design to determine the effect of selected amino acids on monoclonal antibody production in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Leal, I J; Carrillo-Cocom, L M; Ramírez-Medrano, A; López-Pacheco, F; Bulnes-Abundis, D; Webb-Vargas, Y; Alvarez, M M

    2011-01-01

    Culture media design is central to the optimization of monoclonal antibody (mAb) production. Although general strategies do not currently exist for optimization of culture media, the combined use of statistical design and analysis of experiments and strategies based on simple material balances can facilitate culture media design. In this study, we evaluate the effect of selected amino acids on the growth rate and monoclonal antibody production of a Chinese hamster ovary DG-44 (CHO-DG44) cell line. These amino acids were selected based on their relative mass fraction in the specific mAb produced in this study, their consumption rate during bioreactor experiments, and also through a literature review. A Plackett-Burman statistical design was conducted to minimize the number of experiments needed to obtain statistically relevant information. The effect of this set of amino acids was evaluated during exponential cell culture (considering viable cell concentration and the specific growth rate as main output variables) and during the high cell-density stage (considering mAb final concentration and specific productivity as relevant output variables). For this particular cell line, leucine (Leu) and arginine (Arg) had the highest negative and positive effects on cell viability, respectively; Leu and threonine (Thr) had the highest negative effect on growth rate, and valine (Val) and Arg demonstrated the highest positive impact on mAb final concentration. Results suggest the pertinence of a two-stage strategy for amino acid supplementation, with a mixture optimized for cell growth and a different amino acid mixture for mAb production at high density. Copyright © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  19. Loss of autonoetic consciousness of recent autobiographical episodes and accelerated long-term forgetting in a patient with previously unrecognized glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody related limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juri-Alexander eWitt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 35-year old male patient presenting with depressed mood and emotional instability who complained about severe anterograde and retrograde memory deficits characterized by accelerated long-term forgetting and loss of autonoetic consciousness regarding autobiographical memories of the last three years. Months before he had experienced two breakdowns of unknown etiology giving rise to the differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures after various practitioners and clinics had suggested different etiologies such as a psychosomatic condition, burnout, depression or dissociative amnesia. Neuropsychological assessment indicated selectively impaired figural memory performance. Extended diagnostics confirmed accelerated forgetting of previously learned and retrievable verbal material. Structural imaging showed bilateral swelling and signal alterations of temporomesial structures (left > right. Video-EEG monitoring revealed a left temporal epileptic focus and subclincal seizure, but no overt seizures. Antibody tests in serum and liquor were positive for glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. These findings led to the diagnosis of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody related limbic encephalitis. Monthly steroid pulses over six months led to recovery of subjective memory and to intermediate improvement but subsequent worsening of objective memory performance. During the course of treatment the patient reported de novo paroxysmal non-responsive states. Thus, antiepileptic treatment was started and the patient finally became seizure free. At the last visit vocational reintegration was successfully in progress.In conclusion, amygdala swelling, retrograde biographic memory impairment, accelerated long-term forgetting and emotional instability may serve as indicators of limbic encephalitis, even in the absence of overt epileptic seizures. The monitoring of such patients calls for a standardized and concerted multilevel diagnostic approach with

  20. Detection of pantothenic acid-immunoreactive neurons in the rat lateral septal nucleus by a newly developed antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Arturo; Yajeya, Javier; Gonzalez, Noelia; Husson, Marianne; Geffard, Michel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The available immunohistochemical techniques have documented restricted distribution of vitamins in the mammalian brain. The aim of the study was to develop a highly specific antiserum directed against pantothenic acid to explore the presence of this vitamin in the mammalian brain. According to ELISA tests, the anti-pantothenic acid antiserum used showed a good affinity (10-8 M) and specificity. The antiserum was raised in rabbits. Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the mapping of pantothenic acid-immunoreactive structures was carried out in the rat brain. Pantothenic acid-immunoreactive perikarya were exclusively found in the intermediate part of the lateral septal nucleus. These cells were generally small, round, fusiform or pyramidal and showed 2-3 long (50-100 μm) immunoreactive dendrites. Any immunoreactive axons containing pantothenic acid were detected. The very restricted anatomical distribution of the pantothenic acid suggests that this vitamin could be involved in some specific neurophysiological mechanisms.

  1. A role for uric acid and the Nalp3 inflammasome in antiphospholipid antibody-induced IL-1β production by human first trimester trophoblast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa J Mulla

    Full Text Available Women with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS are at risk of recurrent pregnancy loss and obstetrical disorders, such as preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR. Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL directly target the placenta by binding beta2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI expressed on the trophoblast. We recently demonstrated in human first trimester trophoblast cells that anti-β2GPI antibodies (Abs induce the secretion of IL-1β in a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4-dependent manner. IL-1β secretion requires processing of pro-IL-1β and this is mediated by the inflammasome, a complex of Nalp3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC and caspase-1. The objective of this study was to determine if aPL induce IL-1β production in trophoblast via the inflammasome. Using a human first trimester trophoblast cell line, we demonstrated that a mouse anti-β2GPI mAb and human polyclonal aPL-IgG induce IL-1β processing and secretion, which was partially blocked upon caspase-1 inhibition. Nalp3 and ASC knockdown also attenuated anti-β2GPI Ab-induced IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, aPL stimulated the production of uric acid in a TLR4-dependent manner; and inhibition of uric acid prevented aPL-induced IL-1β production by the trophoblast. These findings demonstrate that aPL, via TLR4 activation, induce a uric acid response in human trophoblast, which in turn activates the Nalp3/ASC inflammasome leading to IL-1β processing and secretion. This novel mechanism may account for the inflammation at the maternal-fetal interface, which causes placental dysfunction and increases the risk of adverse pregnancy outcome in patients with APS.

  2. Syntheses of haptens containing dioxaphosphorinan methoxyacetic acid linker arms for the production of antibodies to organophosphate pesticides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    tenHoeve, W; Wynberg, H; Jones, WT; Harvey, D; Ryan, GB; Reynolds, PHS

    1997-01-01

    Four generic heterobifunctional reagents, namely 2-(2-chloro-5-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)methoxyacetic acid methyl ester, p-sulfide, 2-(2-chloro-5-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)methoxyacetic acid methyl ester, p-oxide, 2-(2-mercapto-5-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl)methoxyacetic

  3. Prevalence of XMRV Nucleic Acid and Antibody in HIV-1-Infected Men and in Men at Risk for HIV-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Spindler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Xenotropic MLV-Related Virus (XMRV was recently reported to be associated with prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Infection was also reported in 3.7% of healthy individuals. These highly reported frequencies of infection prompted concerns about the possibility of a new, widespread retroviral epidemic. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS provides an opportunity to assess the prevalence of XMRV infection and its association with HIV-1 infection among men who have sex with men. Reliable detection of XMRV infection requires the application of multiple diagnostic methods, including detection of human antibodies to XMRV and detection of XMRV nucleic acid. We, therefore, tested 332 patient plasma and PBMC samples obtained from recent visits in a subset of patients in the MACS cohort for XMRV antibodies using Abbott prototype ARCHITECT chemiluminescent immunoassays (CMIAs and for XMRV RNA and proviral DNA using a XMRV single-copy qPCR assay (X-SCA. Although 9 of 332 (2.7% samples showed low positive reactivity against a single antigen in the CMIA, none of these samples or matched controls were positive for plasma XMRV RNA or PBMC XMRV DNA by X-SCA. Thus, we found no evidence of XMRV infection among men in the MACS regardless of HIV-1 serostatus.

  4. Construction, expression, and characterization of a single-chain variable fragment antibody against 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in the hemolymph of silkworm larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Pongkitwitoon, Benyakan; Nakamura, Seiko; Sasaki-Tabata, Kaori; Tanizaki, Yusuke; Maenaka, Katsumi; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Satoshi

    2011-07-01

    A single-chain variable fragment antibody against herbicide, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D-scFv) has been successfully expressed in the hemolymph of silkworm larvae using a rapid Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid DNA system. Variable heavy- and light-chain domains were cloned directly from the cDNA of the hybridoma cell line 2C4 and assembled together with flexible peptide linker (Gly(4)Ser)(3) between two domains. The yield of functional 2,4-D-scFv after purification was 640 μg per 30 ml of hemolymph, which is equivalent to 21.3 mg per liter of hemolymph. The characterization of 2,4-D-scFv using an indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) revealed that it has wide cross-reactivities against 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (65.5%), 2,4-dichlorophenol (47.9%), and 2,4-dichlorobenzoic acid (26.0%), making it possible to apply 2,4-D-scFv to icELISA for detecting/determining 2,4-D and its metabolites. Judging from its cost and time requirements and its ease of handling, this BmNPV bacmid DNA expression system is more useful for expressing functional scFv than bacterial systems, which frequently require costly and time-consuming refolding.

  5. Effect of temperature shift on levels of acidic charge variants in IgG monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishishita, Shohei; Nishikawa, Tomoko; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Nagashima, Hiroaki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takuma, Shinya; Aoyagi, Hideki

    2015-06-01

    During the production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), not only enhancement of mAb productivity but also control of quality attributes is critical. Charge variants, which are among the most important quality attributes, can substantially affect the in vitro and in vivo properties of mAbs. During process development for the production of mAbs in a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, we have observed that an improvement in mAb titer is accompanied by an increase in the content of acidic charge variants. Here, to help maintain comparability among mAbs, we aimed to identify the process parameters that controlled the content of acidic charge variants. First, we used a Plackett-Burman design to identify the effect of selected process parameters on the acidic charge variant content. Eight process parameters were selected by using a failure modes and effects analysis. Among these, temperature shift was identified from the Plackett-Burman design as the factor most influencing the acidic charge variant content. We then investigated in more detail the effects of shift temperature and temperature shift timing on this content. The content decreased with a shift to a lower temperature and with earlier timing of this temperature shift. Our observations suggest that Plackett-Burman designs are advantageous for preliminary screening of bioprocess parameters. We report here for the first time that temperature downshift is beneficial for effective control of the acidic peak variant content. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies are indicators of the course, but not of the onset, of diabetes in middle-aged adults: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vigo

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available To efficiently examine the association of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody (GADA positivity with the onset and progression of diabetes in middle-aged adults, we performed a case-cohort study representing the ~9-year experience of 10,275 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study participants, initially aged 45-64 years. Antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65 were measured by radioimmunoassay in 580 incident diabetes cases and 544 non-cases. The overall weighted prevalence of GADA positivity (³1 U/mL was 7.3%. Baseline risk factors, with the exception of smoking and interleukin-6 (P £ 0.02, were generally similar between GADA-positive and -negative individuals. GADA positivity did not predict incident diabetes in multiply adjusted (HR = 1.04; 95%CI = 0.55, 1.96 proportional hazard analyses. However, a small non-significant adjusted risk (HR = 1.29; 95%CI = 0.58, 2.88 was seen for those in the highest tertile (³2.38 U/mL of positivity. GADA-positive and GADA-negative non-diabetic individuals had similar risk profiles for diabetes, with central obesity and elevated inflammation markers, aside from glucose, being the main predictors. Among diabetes cases at study's end, progression to insulin treatment increased monotonically as a function of baseline GADA level. Overall, being GADA positive increased risk of progression to insulin use almost 10 times (HR = 9.9; 95%CI = 3.4, 28.5. In conclusion, in initially non-diabetic middle-aged adults, GADA positivity did not increase diabetes risk, and the overall baseline profile of risk factors was similar for positive and negative individuals. Among middle-aged adults, with the possible exception of those with the highest GADA levels, autoimmune pathophysiology reflected by GADA may become clinically relevant only after diabetes onset.

  7. Synthetic LNA/DNA nano-scaffolds for highly efficient diagnostics of nucleic acids and autoimmune antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, Irina Kira

    2014-01-01

    of the monoclonal human autoantibody is achieved. It makes the novel "clickable" LNA/DNA complexes a very promising tool in molecular diagnostics of both nucleic acids and autoantibodies against DNA. The latter are produced under several autoimmune conditions including antiphospholipide syndrome and systemic lupus...

  8. Evaluation and Comparison of Enzyme Immunoassay (Eia and Acid Fast Staining with Confirmation by Immunofluorescent Antibody Assay for Detection of Cryptosporidium Species in Infants and Young Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Dorostcar Moghaddam

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cryptosporidiosis is prevalent world wide, causing a variety of problems ranging from acute, self-limiting diarrhea to fatal cases in immunocompromised persons, particulary those with acquired immunodeficiency (AIDS. Diagnosis of Cryptosporidium is made by identification of oocysts in stool specimens. The detection is most commonly made by the acid-fast staining method followed by microscopic examination which has low specificity and sensitivity. Material and Methods: In the present study, we evaluated diagnostic utility of a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (EIA, which detects Cryptosporidium-Specific antigen (CSA in 204 unprocessed stool specimens obtained from patients less than 3 years of age. Results: When compared with the routine screening procedure applied in this field study (screening by acid-fast staining and microscopy after concentration of positive results by IFA, both sensitivity and specificity were 98%. Of the 139 specimens negative by microscopy, 13 (9.3% were positive by EIA, 11 of which were confirmed by inhibition with antibody to Cryptosporidia-specific antigen. Conclusion: The EIA is an important tool for identifying Cryptosporidium in fecal specimens in field studies since it is sensitive, specific, simple to use and unaffected by the presence of a preservative.

  9. When Good Intentions Go Awry: Modification of a Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody in Chemically Defined Cell Culture by Xylosone, an Oxidative Product of Ascorbic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumsae, Chris; Hossler, Patrick; Raharimampionona, Haly; Zhou, Yu; McDermott, Sean; Racicot, Chris; Radziejewski, Czeslaw; Zhou, Zhaohui Sunny

    2015-08-04

    With the advent of new initiatives to develop chemically defined media, cell culture scientists screen many additives to improve cell growth and productivity. However, the introduction or increase of supplements, typically considered beneficial or protective on their own, to the basal media or feed stream may cause unexpected detrimental consequences to product quality. For instance, because cultured cells are constantly under oxidative stress, ascorbic acid (vitamin C, a potent natural reducing agent) is a common additive to cell culture media. However, as reported herein, a recombinant monoclonal antibody (adalimumab) in cell culture was covalently modified by xylosone (molecular weight 148), an oxidative product of ascorbate. Containing reactive carbonyl groups, xylosone modifies various amines (e.g., the N-termini of the heavy and light chains and susceptible lysines), forming either hemiaminal (+148 Da) or Schiff base (imine, +130 Da) products. Our findings show, for the first time, that ascorbate-derived xylosone can contribute to an increase in molecular heterogeneity, such as acidic species. Our work serves as a reminder that additives to cell culture and their metabolites may become reactive and negatively impact the overall product quality and should be carefully monitored with any changes in cell culture conditions.

  10. A putative amino acid ABC transporter substrate-binding protein, NMB1612, from Neisseria meningitidis, induces murine bactericidal antibodies against meningococci expressing heterologous NMB1612 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Miao-Chiu; Humbert, María Victoria; Laver, Jay R; Phillips, Renee; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-08-26

    The nmb1612 (NEIS1533) gene encoding the ~27-kDa putative amino acid ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter, periplasmic substrate-binding protein from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B (MenB) strain MC58 was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the purified recombinant (r)NMB1612 was used for animal immunization studies. Immunization of mice with rNMB1612 adsorbed to Al(OH)3 and in liposomes with and without MPLA, induced antiserum with bactericidal activity in an assay using baby rabbit complement, against the homologous strain MC58 (encoding protein representative of Allele 62) and killed heterologous strains encoding proteins of three other alleles (representative of Alleles 1, 64 and 68), with similar SBA titres. However, strain MC58 was not killed (titre bactericidal assay (hSBA) using anti-rNMB1612 sera, although another strain (MC168) expressing the same protein was killed (median titres of 16-64 in the hSBA). Analysis of the NMB1612 amino acid sequences from 4351 meningococcal strains in the pubmlst.org/Neisseria database and a collection of 13 isolates from colonized individuals and from patients, showed that antibodies raised against rNMB1612 could potentially kill at least 72% of the MenB strains in the complete sequence database. For MenB disease occurring specifically in the UK from 2013 to 2015, >91% of the isolates causing disease in this recent period expressed NMB1612 protein encoded by Allele 1 and could be potentially killed by sera raised to the recombinant antigen in the current study. The NMB1612 protein was surface-accessible and expressed by different meningococcal strains. In summary, the properties of (i) NMB1612 protein conservation and expression, (ii) limited amino acid sequence variation between proteins encoded by different alleles, and (iii) the ability of a recombinant protein to induce cross-strain bactericidal antibodies, would all suggest a promising antigen for consideration for inclusion in new meningococcal vaccines

  11. Caprylic acid-induced impurity precipitation from protein A capture column elution pool to enable a two-chromatography-step process for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ji; Wang, Lu; Twarowska, Barbara; Laino, Sarah; Sparks, Colleen; Smith, Timothy; Russell, Reb; Wang, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the use of caprylic acid (CA) to precipitate impurities from the protein A capture column elution pool for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the objective of developing a two chromatography step antibody purification process. A CA-induced impurity precipitation in the protein A column elution pool was evaluated as an alternative method to polishing chromatography techniques for use in the purification of mAbs. Parameters including pH, CA concentrations, mixing time, mAb concentrations, buffer systems, and incubation temperatures were evaluated on their impacts on the impurity removal, high-molecular weight (HMW) formation and precipitation step yield. Both pH and CA concentration, but not mAb concentrations and buffer systems, are key parameters that can affect host-cell proteins (HCPs) clearance, HMW species, and yield. CA precipitation removes HCPs and some HMW species to the acceptable levels under the optimal conditions. The CA precipitation process is robust at 15-25°C. For all five mAbs tested in this study, the optimal CA concentration range is 0.5-1.0%, while the pH range is from 5.0 to 6.0. A purification process using two chromatography steps (protein A capture column and ion exchange polishing column) in combination with CA-based impurity precipitation step can be used as a robust downstream process for mAb molecules with a broad range of isoelectric points. Residual CA can be effectively removed by the subsequent polishing cation exchange chromatography. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  12. Localization of aristolochic acid in mouse kidney tissues by immunohistochemistry using an anti-AA-I and AA-II monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Yokota, Sadaki; Wang, Dan; Wang, Xuan; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Aristolochic acids (AAs) are found in herbal medicines of Aristolochiaceae plants, including Aristolochia and Asarum species. AAs are associated with a rapidly progressive interstitial nephritis, which is called aristolochic acid nephropathy (AAN). However, the in-situ localization of AAs in the target organ, the kidney, has not been investigated yet. In the present study, the accumulation of aristolochic acid I (AA-I) in mouse kidney was revealed by immunoperoxidase light microscopy as well as colloidal gold immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) based on an anti-AA-I and AA-II monoclonal antibody (mAb). Male BALB/c mice were treated with 1.25 or 2.50 mg kg(-1) of AA-I per day for 5 days. Paraffin sections and ultra-thin sections of kidney tissue were respectively prepared. Under light microscopy, the apical surface of proximal tubules was strongly stained for AA-I, whereas no obvious immunostaining was found in the distal tubules and glomerulus, which remained relatively intact. Under electron microscopy, epithelial cells of the proximal tubules, distal tubules and collecting tubules were broken to various degrees. Gold labeling in the proximal and distal tubules was stronger than that in the collecting tubules. In renal tubules, immunogold signals of AA-I tended to accumulate in the mitochondria and peroxisomes, though the signals could be observed all over the cell. Gold signals were also found in the erythrocytes of glomeruli. The MAb against AA-I and AA-II provides a clue for the identification of proteins or factors which might interact with AA-I and thus induce targeted damage of kidney.

  13. Viscosity-Lowering Effect of Amino Acids and Salts on Highly Concentrated Solutions of Two IgG1 Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujing; Zhang, Ning; Hu, Tao; Dai, Weiguo; Feng, Xiuying; Zhang, Xinyi; Qian, Feng

    2015-12-07

    Monoclonal antibodies display complicated solution properties in highly concentrated (>100 mg/mL) formulations, such as high viscosity, high aggregation propensity, and low stability, among others, originating from protein-protein interactions within the colloidal protein solution. These properties severely hinder the successful development of high-concentration mAb solution for subcutaneous injection. We hereby investigated the effects of several small-molecule excipients with diverse biophysical-chemical properties on the viscosity, aggregation propensity, and stability on two model IgG1 (JM1 and JM2) mAb formulations. These excipients include nine amino acids or their salt forms (Ala, Pro, Val, Gly, Ser, HisHCl, LysHCl, ArgHCl, and NaGlu), four representative salts (NaCl, NaAc, Na2SO4, and NH4Cl), and two chaotropic reagents (urea and GdnHCl). With only salts or amino acids in their salt-forms, significant decrease in viscosity was observed for JM1 (by up to 30-40%) and JM2 (by up to 50-80%) formulations, suggesting charge-charge interaction between the mAbs dictates the high viscosity of these mAbs formulations. Most of these viscosity-lowering excipients did not induce substantial protein aggregation or changes in the secondary structure of the mAbs, as evidenced by HPLC-SEC, DSC, and FT-IR analysis, even in the absence of common protein stabilizers such as sugars and surfactants. Therefore, amino acids in their salt-forms and several common salts, such as ArgHCl, HisHCl, LysHCl, NaCl, Na2SO4, and NaAc, could potentially serve as viscosity-lowering excipients during high-concentration mAb formulation development.

  14. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column.

  15. Antiprothrombin Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Žigon

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In patients with the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS, the presence of a group of pathogenic autoantibodies called antiphospholipid antibodies causes thrombosis and pregnancy complications. The most frequent antigenic target of antiphospholipid antibodies are phospholipid bound β2-glycoprotein 1 (β2GPI and prothrombin. The international classification criteria for APS connect the occurrence of thrombosis and/or obstetric complications together with the persistence of lupus anticoagulant, anti-cardiolipin antibodies (aCL and antibodies against β2GPI (anti-β2GPI into APS. Current trends for the diagnostic evaluation of APS patients propose determination of multiple antiphospholipid antibodies, among them also anti-prothrombin antibodies, to gain a common score which estimates the risk for thrombosis in APS patients. Antiprothrombin antibodies are common in APS patients and are sometimes the only antiphospholipid antibodies being elevated. Methods for their determination differ and have not yet been standardized. Many novel studies confirmed method using phosphatidylserine/prothrombin (aPS/PT ELISA as an antigen on solid phase encompass higher diagnostic accuracy compared to method using prothrombin alone (aPT ELISA. Our research group developed an in-house aPS/PT ELISA with increased analytical sensitivity which enables the determination of all clinically relevant antiprothrombin antibodies. aPS/PT exhibited the highest percentage of lupus anticoagulant activity compared to aCL and anti-β2GPI. aPS/PT antibodies measured with the in-house method associated with venous thrombosis and presented the strongest independent risk factor for the presence of obstetric complications among all tested antiphospholipid antibodies

  16. The effect of varied pH on the luminescence characteristics of antibody-mercaptoacetic acid conjugated ZnS nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Madeeha; Rehman, Malik Abdul; Gul, Asghari; Qamar, Raheel; Bhatti, Arshad Saleem

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate here that the effect of varied pH of the media on the photoluminescence (PL) properties of mercaptoacetic acid (MAA) and digoxin antibody (Ab) conjugated zinc sulphide (ZnS) nanowires. The charge-transfer kinetics from MAA to ZnS and vice versa showed a profound effect on the luminescence of ZnS defect states. The PL intensity of the ZnS defect states showed strong dependence on the value of pH with respect to the pKa of MAA. The carboxyl and thiol group of MAA in the protonated (pH pKa) and deprotonated (pH > pKa) states resulted in the quenched PL intensity. While for pH ∼ pKa, the PL intensity was regained as there was equal probability of both protonated and deprotonated carboxyl and thiol groups. These findings indicated that pH of the environment is a key parameter for the use of MAA-Ab conjugated ZnS nanowires as an optical biomarker.

  17. A synthetic peptide derived from the animo acid sequence of canine parvovirus structural proteins which defines a B cell epitope and elicits antiviral antibody in BALB c mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides, recombinant fusion proteins and mouse monoclonal antibodies were used to delineate a B cell epitope of the VP'2 structural protein of canine parvovirus (CPV). Although this epitope is not preferentially recognized in the normal antibody response to CPV, virus-specific

  18. Selective modification of NMR relaxation time in human colorectal carcinoma by using gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated with monoclonal antibody 19-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtet, C; Tellier, C; Bohy, J; Conti, M L; Saccavini, J C; Thedrez, P; Douillard, J Y; Chatal, J F; Koprowski, H

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 19-9 (mAb 19-9) against human colon adenocarcinoma was conjugated with gadolinium X diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd X DTPA) and used as a contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in an effort to improve tumor target selectivity in nude mice. The data indicate that Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 in solution decreased the T1 relaxation of water protons at 90 MHz in direct proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and this effect was greater than in Gd X DTPA solutions. T1 relaxation time at 90 MHz, measured in tumors removed from nude mice 24 hr after injection of Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 (Gd, 20 mumol/kg; 16 DTPA molecules per mAb molecule), was significantly decreased (by 15%) as compared with the control group. Similar results were obtained in tumors from mice injected with Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 solutions in which Gd was used at 2, 6, or 10 mumol/kg (16 DTPA molecules per mAb molecule). These doses are lower than those commonly used for Gd X DTPA (10-100 mumol/kg) as contrast agent. Tumor localization by the Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 complex containing radioactive Gd (0.3 microCi/microgram of 153Gd) to confirm scintigraphy revealed significant concentrations of the complex (5% of the injected dose per gram of tissue) in the tumor. Scan images recorded in planar scintigraphy at day 5 showed good visualization of tumors. Images PMID:3459174

  19. A systematic study of the effect of low pH acid treatment on anti-drug antibodies specific for a domain antibody therapeutic: Impact on drug tolerance, assay sensitivity and post-validation method assessment of ADA in clinical serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavita, Uma; Duo, Jia; Crawford, Sean M; Liu, Rong; Valcin, Joan; Gleason, Carol; Dong, Huijin; Gadkari, Snaehal; Dodge, Robert W; Pillutla, Renuka C; DeSilva, Binodh S

    2017-09-01

    We developed a homogeneous bridging anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay on an electro chemiluminescent immunoassay (ECLIA) platform to support the immunogenicity evaluation of a dimeric domain antibody (dAb) therapeutic in clinical studies. During method development we evaluated the impact of different types of acid at various pH levels on polyclonal and monoclonal ADA controls of differing affinities and on/off rates. The data shows for the first time that acids of different pH can have a differential effect on ADA of various affinities and this in turn impacts assay sensitivity and drug tolerance as defined by these surrogate controls. Acid treatment led to a reduction in signal of intermediate and low affinity ADA, but not high affinity or polyclonal ADA. We also found that acid pretreatment is a requisite for dissociation of drug bound high affinity ADA, but not for low affinity ADA-drug complexes. Although we were unable to identify an acid that would allow a 100% retrieval of ADA signal post-treatment, use of glycine pH3.0 enabled the detection of low, intermediate and high affinity antibodies (Abs) to various extents. Following optimization, the ADA assay method was validated for clinical sample analysis. Consistencies within various parameters of the clinical data such as dose dependent increases in ADA rates and titers were observed, indicating a reliable ADA method. Pre- and post-treatment ADA negative or positive clinical samples without detectable drug were reanalyzed in the absence of acid treatment or presence of added exogenous drug respectively to further assess the effectiveness of the final acid treatment procedure. The overall ADA results indicate that assay conditions developed and validated based on surrogate controls sufficed to provide a reliable clinical data set. The effect of low pH acid treatment on possible pre-existing ADA or soluble multimeric target in normal human serum was also evaluated, and preliminary data indicate that acid type and

  20. Magnetic Purification of Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadge, Vijaykumar Laxman

    This work aimed at the development of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody purification and at the evaluation of their performance in Magnetic fishing and in a newly developed hybrid technology Magnetic Aqueous Two Phase Systems. Magnetic materials were produced by coprecipitation and solvothermal approaches. Natural polymers such as dextran, extracellular polysaccharide and gum Arabic were employed for coating of iron oxide magnetic supports. Polymer coated magnetic supports were then modified with synthetic antibody specific ligands,namely boronic acid, a triazine ligand (named 22/8) and an Ugi ligand (named A2C7I1). To optimize the efficacy of magnetic nanoparticles for antibody magnetic fishing, various solutions of pure and crude antibody solutions along with BSA as a non-specific binding protein were tested. The selectivity of magnetic nanoparticle for antibody, IgG, was found effective with boronic acid and ligand 22/8. Magnetic supports were then studied for their performance in high gradient magnetic separator for effective separation capability as well as higher volume handling capability. The magnetic materials were also supplemented to aqueous two phase systems, devising a new purification technology. For this purpose, magnetic particles modified with boronic acid were more effective. This alternative strategy reduced the time of operation,maximized separation capability (yield and purity), while reducing the amount of salt required. Boronic acid coated magnetic particles bound 170 +/- 10 mg hIgG/g MP and eluted 160 +/- 5 mg hIgG/g MP, while binding only 15 +/- 5 mg BSA/g MP. The affinity constant for the interaction between hIgG and APBA_MP was estimated as 4.9 x 105 M-1 (Ka) with a theoretical maximum capacity of 492 mg hIgG adsorbed/g MP (Qmax). APBA_MPs were also tested for antibody purification directly from CHO cell supernatants. The particles were able to bind 98% of IgG loaded and to recover 95% of pure IgG (purity greater than 98%) at extremely

  1. Antibody biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-07-06

    Jul 6, 2009 ... and automated, the hybrid cells can be stored for many years in liquid nitrogen and antibodies production is homogeneous. The hybridoma method .... they may be modified to vehicle active molecules such as radio-isotopes, toxins, cytokines, enzyme etc. In these cases, the therapeutic effect is due to ...

  2. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ability of the highly evolved machinery of immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex ... to Pauling, if the structure of the antigen binding site of antibodies were to be produced in a random ..... where the immune system of the body is destructive, as in autoimmune disorders or after organ transplant.

  3. Catalytic Antibodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While chemistry provides the framework for understanding the structure and function of biomolecules, the immune sys- tem provides a highly evolved natural process to generate one class of complex biomolecules – the antibodies. A combination of the two could be exploited to generate new classes of molecules with novel ...

  4. Presence of common idiotypes on antibodies induced by glutamic acid-lysine-containing terpolymers in responder and nonresponder mice with the Ig-1b heavy chain allotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipps, T J; Benacerraf, B; Dorf, M E

    1977-12-01

    A B10.A (5R) responder mouse to the random linear terpolymer, poly--(Glu, Lys, Phe), GLphi, can produce immunoglobulins which bind poly-L (Glu, Lys), GL, that share idiotypic determinants with GL-binding antibodies produced by other members of the same strain. Expression of these common idiotypic determinants, termed BGL, is independent of the H-2 halotype and closely linked to the Ig-lb heavy chain allotype. Moreover, nonresponder mice with the Ig-lb heavy chain allotype, when immunized with GLphi that has been chemically coupled to an immunogenic carrier, chicken IgG, can produce GL-binding antibodies that share BGL idiotypic specificities with anti-GLphi antibodies produced by responder animals. Also, the responses to other GL-containing polymers, such as poly-L (Glu, Lys, Ala) and poly-L (Glu, Lys, Pro), which are under the control of distinct Ir genes, can stimulate the production of GL-binding antibodies that share common BGL idiotypic determinants with antibodies induced with GLphi. These findings are discussed with respect to their implications concerning the mechanism(s) of Ir gene control.

  5. Effect of antibodies to glutamate on the content of neurotransmitter amino acids in brain structures of rats with ischemic damage to the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, G A; Kvashennikova, Yu N; Shakova, F M; Davydova, T V

    2012-05-01

    Experiments on the model of bilateral photothrombosis in the prefrontal cortex showed that antibodies to glutamate administered intranasally 1 h after ischemic damage to the brain cortex led to a decrease in glutamate content in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and had no effect on aspartate concentration in these structures of the brain.

  6. Substituent-specific antibody against glucuronoxylan reveals close association of glucuronic acid and acetyl substituents and distinct labeling patterns in tree species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutaniemi, Sanna; Guillon, Fabienne; Tranquet, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Immunolabeling can be used to locate plant cell wall carbohydrates or other components to specific cell types or to specific regions of the wall. Some antibodies against xylans exist; however, many partly react with the xylan backbone and thus provide limited information on the type of substituen...

  7. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Iron-binding Capacity (TIBC, UIBC) Trichomonas Testing Triglycerides Troponin Tryptase Tumor Markers Uric Acid Urinalysis Urine ... the rate at which the body uses energy ( metabolism ). The body uses a feedback system in which ...

  8. Determination of okadaic acid content of dinoflagellate cells: a comparison of the HPLC-fluorescent method and two monoclonal antibody ELISA test kits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, S L; Tindall, D R

    1996-08-01

    Total okadaic acid (okadaic acid plus methylokadaic acid) in acclimated clones of the dinoflagellates Prorocentrum hoffmannianum and P. lima was determined using the HPLC-fluorescent method, UBE ELISA test kit, and Rougier ELISA test kit. The nonokadaic acid-producing species. Amphidinium klebsii, Prorocentrum mexicanum, P. micans, P. cassubicum, and Gambierdiscus toxicus were examined using the same methods of analysis. All three methods yielded consistent results for P. hoffmannianum which produces only okadaic acid. However, results of the three methods were not consistent for P. lima which produces both okadaic acid and methylokadaic acid. The UBE ELISA demonstrated little or no cross-reactivity with methylokadaic acid; whereas, the Rougier ELISA demonstrated varying degrees of cross-reactivity with that analog. Analyses of nonokadaic acid producing-species yielded negative results, with one exception. The Rougier ELISA demonstrated reactivity with extracts of G. toxicus. Since outbreaks of DSP may be caused by okadaic acid, methylokadaic acid, or a combination of these toxins, both ELISA kits may underestimate total toxin present in toxic shellfish.

  9. Site-specific antibodies distinguish single amino acid substitutions in position 57 in HLA-DQ beta-chain alleles associated with insulin-dependent diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atar, D; Dyrberg, T; Michelsen, Birgitte

    1989-01-01

    The HLA-DQ beta-chain gene shows a close association with susceptibility or resistance to autoimmune insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and it has been suggested that the amino acid in position 57 may be of pathogenetic importance. To study the expression of the IDDM associated HLA-DQ beta......-chain alleles, we immunized rabbits with 12 to 13 amino acid long peptides representing HLA-DQw7 and -DQw8 allelic sequences, differing only by one amino acid in position 57 being aspartic acid (Asp) and alanine (Ala), respectively. Immunoblot analysis of lymphoblastoid cells showed that several antisera...... amino acid substitutions in predetermined positions of allelic HLA-DQ beta-chain gene products. Such sera should become useful to detect and investigate HLA associated susceptibility to autoimmune diseases in man....

  10. Photobinding of tiaprofenic acid and suprofen to proteins and cells: a combined study using radiolabeling, antibodies and laser flash photolysis of model bichromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, J V; Hernández, D; Gómez-Lechón, M J; Lahoz, A; Miranda, M A; Morera, I M; Pérez-Prieto, J; Sarabia, Z

    1998-11-01

    Drug photoallergy is a matter of current concern. It involves the formation of drug-protein photoadducts (photoantigens) that may ultimately trigger an immunological response. Tyrosine residues appear to be key binding sites in proteins. The present work has investigated the photobinding of tiaprofenic and (TPA) and the closely related isomer suprofen (SUP) to proteins and cells by means of radioactive labelling and drug-directed antibodies. To ascertain whether preassociation with the protein may play a role in photoreactivity, two model bichromophoric compounds (TPA-Tyr and SUP-Tyr) have been prepared and studied by laser flash photolysis. The results of this work show that (a) TPA and SUP photobind to proteins with similar efficiencies, (b) both drugs form photoadducts that share a basic common structure, as they are recognized by the same antibody and (c) drug-protein preassociation must play a key role in photoreactivity, as indicated by the dramatic decrease in the triplet state lifetimes of the model bichromophores compared to the parent drugs.

  11. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors...... such as structure, accessibility and amino acid composition are crucial. Since small peptides tend not to be immunogenic, it may be necessary to conjugate them to carrier proteins in order to enhance immune presentation. Several strategies for conjugation of peptide-carriers applied for immunization exist...

  13. A 2-4-Amino Acid Deletion in the V5 Region of HIV-1 Env gp120 Confers Viral Resistance to the Broadly Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody, VRC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Shingo; Sasaki, Maho; Tanaka, Takako; Inoue, Mari; Ophinni, Youdiil; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Kameoka, Masanori

    2017-12-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) plays a critical role in viral entry into host cells. The broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody VRC01, which recognizes the CD4 binding site on gp120, neutralizes more than 90% of HIV-1 isolates. However, some of the CRF01_AE viruses prevalent in Southeast Asia are resistant to VRC01-mediated neutralization. We previously reported that 3 amino acid residues at positions 185, 186, and 197 of gp120 played an important role in the VRC01 resistance of CRF01_AE Env (AE-Env) clones isolated from HIV-infected Thai individuals. However, the VRC01 susceptibility of AE-Env clones was not fully explained by mutations at these 3 residues. In the present study, we examined other factors involved in the acquisition of viral VRC01 resistance. Neutralization tests using lentiviral vectors expressing a series of mutant AE-Env clones revealed that the deletion of 2-4 amino acid residues on the loop structure in the V5 region of gp120 conferred VRC01 resistance to several AE-Env clones. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying viral VRC01 resistance.

  14. Electron transfer dynamics across self-assembled N-(2-mercaptoethyl) octadecanamide/mycolic acid layers: impedimetric insights into the structural integrity and interaction with anti-mycolic acid antibodies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, KI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Ozoemena_2010.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 56321 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Ozoemena_2010.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Electron transfer... and potentially be used for impedimetric recognition of anti-MA antibodies present in TB-positive serum. Viable fabrication and application of this SAM-based electrode as an electrochemical immunodiagnostic platform for TB will, however, require thorough...

  15. Isolation of populations of antipeptide antibodies directed against different epitopes of the same fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Greger, C; Houghten, R A

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit antibodies against small peptides may be composed by subpopulations recognizing different epitopes made likely by few amino acids. This explains the frequent crossreactivity of antipeptide antibodies with unrelated peptides. A suitable use of immunoadsorbents is suggested to obtain truly specific antibodies able to react with restricted amino acid sequences.

  16. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  17. Platelet antibodies blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    This blood test shows if you have antibodies against platelets in your blood. Platelets are a part of the blood ... Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Platelet antibody - blood. In: Chernecky ... caused by platelet destruction, hypersplenism, or hemodilution. ...

  18. Radioimmunotherapy of small cell lung carcinoma with the two-step method using a bispecific anti-carcinoembryonic antigen/anti-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) antibody and iodine-131 Di-DTPA hapten: results of a phase I/II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillez, J P; Kraeber-Bodéré, F; Moro, D; Bardiès, M; Douillard, J Y; Gautherot, E; Rouvier, E; Barbet, J; Garban, F; Moreau, P; Chatal, J F

    1999-10-01

    As small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) is frequently a widespread disease at diagnosis, highly radiosensitive and often only partially responsive to chemotherapy, radioimmunotherapy (RIT) would appear to be a promising technique for treatment. We report the preliminary results of a Phase I/II trial of RIT in SCLC using a two-step method and a myeloablative protocol with circulating stem cells transplantation. Fourteen patients with proved SCLC relapse after chemotherapy were treated with RIT. They were first injected i.v. with a bispecific (anti-carcinoembryonic antigen/anti-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid) monoclonal antibody (20-80 mg in 100 ml of saline solution) and then 4 days later with di-(In-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid)-tyrosyl-lysine hapten labeled with 1.48-6.66 GBq (40-180 mCi) of I-131 and diluted in 100 ml of saline solution. In patients receiving 150 mCi or more, circulating stem cells were harvested before treatment and reinfused 10-15 days later. Treatment response was evaluated by CT and biochemical data during the month before and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after treatment. All patients received the scheduled dose without immediate adverse reactions to bispecific antibody or 1-131 hapten. Toxicity was mainly hematological, with two cases of grade 2 leukopenia and three cases of grade 3 or 4 thrombopenia. Body scanning 8 days after injection of the radiolabeled hapten generally showed good uptake at the tumor sites. Estimated tumor dose was 2.6-32.2 cGy/mCi. Among the 12 patients evaluated to date, we have observed 9 progressions, 2 partial responses (one almost complete for 3 months), and 1 stabilization of more than 24 months. Efficiency and toxicity were dose-related. The maximal tolerable dose without hematological rescue was 150 mCi. These preliminary results are encouraging, and dose escalation is currently continuing to reach 300 mCi. RIT should prove to be an interesting therapeutic method for SCLC, although repeated injections and

  19. Dynamics of African horse sickness virus nucleic acid and antibody in horses following immunization with a commercial polyvalent live attenuated vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, C T; Grewar, J D; Burger, P; Joone, C; Lourens, C; MacLachlan, N J; Guthrie, A J

    2017-04-25

    African horse sickness (AHS) is a fatal disease of equids relevant to the global equine industry. Detection of AHS virus (AHSV) during outbreaks has become more rapid and efficient with the advent of group specific reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (GS RT-qPCR) assays to detect AHSV nucleic acid. Use of GS RT-qPCR together with recently described type specific (TS RT-qPCR) assays cannot only expedite diagnosis of AHS but also facilitate further evaluation of the dynamics of AHSV infection in the equine host. A potential limitation to the application of these assays is that they detect viral nucleic acid originating from any AHS live attenuated vaccine (LAV), which is the vaccine type routinely administered to horses in South Africa. The aim of this study was to contrast the dynamics and duration of the RNAaemia to the serological responses of horses following immunization with a commercial polyvalent AHSV-LAV using GS and TS RT-qPCR assays and serum neutralisation tests. The results of the study showed extended RNAemia in vaccinated horses, and that more horses tested positive on GS RT-qPCR with lower Cq values after receiving the AHSV-LAV containing types 1, 3 and 4 prior to the vaccine containing types 2, 6, 7 and 8, rather than when the vaccine combinations were reversed. Furthermore, lower Cq values were obtained when vaccines were administered 4weeks apart as compared with a longer interval or 12weeks apart. These findings are of particular relevance in regions where AHSV-LAVs are used as the use of these vaccines may complicate the accurate interpretation of diagnostic testing results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  1. Radioimmunoassay for Zearalenone and Zearalanol in Human Serum: Production, Properties, and Use of Porcine Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Thouvenot, Daniel; Morfin, Robert F.

    1983-01-01

    To produce antigens susceptible to raise antibodies for resorcylic acid lactones, the 6′-carboxymethyloxime derivatives of zearalenone and zearalanone were bound to bovine serum albumin. Pigs could be immunized by using these antigens, the best titer in antibodies being obtained with the zearalenone antigen. The porcine antibodies were specific for the resorcylic acid lactones of structural resemblance with zearalenone. This specificity made the antibodies usable for a radioimmunoassay of zea...

  2. Radiolabeled antibody imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies, in particular monoclonal antibodies, offer the potential for the specific nuclear imaging of malignant and benign diseases in man. If this imaging potential is realized, they may also have a large role in cancer treatment. This paper reviews: (1) what monoclonal antibodies are and how they differ from polyclonal antibodies, (2) how they are produced and radiolabeled, (3) the results of preclinical and clinical trials in cancer imaging, including the utility of SPECT and antibody fragments, (4) the role of antibodies in the diagnosis of benign diseases, (5) alternate routes of antibody delivery, (6) the role of these agents in therapy, and (7) whether this technology ''revolutionizes'' the practice of nuclear radiology, or has a more limited complementary role in the imaging department

  3. Two types of antibodies are induced by vaccination with A/California/2009 pdm virus: binding near the sialic acid-binding pocket and neutralizing both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuko Ohshima

    Full Text Available Many people have a history of catching the flu several times during childhood but no additional flu in adulthood, even without vaccination. We analyzed the total repertoire of antibodies (Abs against influenza A group 1 viruses induced in such a flu-resistant person after vaccination with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. They were classified into two types, with no exceptions. The first type, the products of B cells newly induced through vaccination, binds near the sialic acid-binding pocket. The second type, the products of long-lived memory B cells established before vaccination, utilizes the 1-69 VH gene, binds to the stem of HA, and neutralizes both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses with few exceptions. These observations indicate that the sialic acid-binding pocket and its surrounding region are immunogenically very potent and majority of the B cells whose growth is newly induced by vaccination produce Abs that recognize these regions. However, they play a role in protection against influenza virus infection for a short period since variant viruses that have acquired resistance to these Abs become dominant. On the other hand, although the stem of HA is immunogenically not potent, the second type of B cells eventually becomes dominant. Thus, a selection system should function in forming the repertoire of long-lived memory B cells and the stability of the epitope would greatly affect the fate of the memory cells. Acquisition of the ability to produce Abs that bind to the stable epitope could be a major factor of flu resistance.

  4. Two types of antibodies are induced by vaccination with A/California/2009 pdm virus: binding near the sialic acid-binding pocket and neutralizing both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Nobuko; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Iba, Yoshitaka; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Kurosawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-01-01

    Many people have a history of catching the flu several times during childhood but no additional flu in adulthood, even without vaccination. We analyzed the total repertoire of antibodies (Abs) against influenza A group 1 viruses induced in such a flu-resistant person after vaccination with 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus. They were classified into two types, with no exceptions. The first type, the products of B cells newly induced through vaccination, binds near the sialic acid-binding pocket. The second type, the products of long-lived memory B cells established before vaccination, utilizes the 1-69 VH gene, binds to the stem of HA, and neutralizes both H1N1 and H5N1 viruses with few exceptions. These observations indicate that the sialic acid-binding pocket and its surrounding region are immunogenically very potent and majority of the B cells whose growth is newly induced by vaccination produce Abs that recognize these regions. However, they play a role in protection against influenza virus infection for a short period since variant viruses that have acquired resistance to these Abs become dominant. On the other hand, although the stem of HA is immunogenically not potent, the second type of B cells eventually becomes dominant. Thus, a selection system should function in forming the repertoire of long-lived memory B cells and the stability of the epitope would greatly affect the fate of the memory cells. Acquisition of the ability to produce Abs that bind to the stable epitope could be a major factor of flu resistance.

  5. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Umana, Pablo; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linkers, stable molecules could be obtained in amounts that were within the same range as or no less than 4-fold lower than those observed with monoclonal antibodies in transient expression assays. In contrast to monospecific CCR5 antibodies, bispecific antibody derivatives block two alternative docking sites of CCR5-tropic HIV strains on the CCR5 coreceptor. Consequently, these molecules showed 18- to 57-fold increased antiviral activities compared to the parent antibodies. Most importantly, one prototypic tetravalent CCR5 antibody had antiviral activity against virus strains resistant to the single parental antibodies. In summary, physical linkage of two CCR5 antibodies targeting different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5 resulted in tetravalent, bispecific antibodies with enhanced antiviral potency against wild-type and CCR5 antibody-resistant HIV-1 strains. PMID:21300827

  6. A novel affinity purification method to isolate peptide specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Alan E; Lernmark, A; Kofod, Hans

    1990-01-01

    with the beads and after a wash step the bound antibodies were eluted in 1 M acetic acid. The eluted material was composed predominantly of intact immunoglobulin as evidenced by the presence of heavy and light chain bands in SDS-PAGE. The eluted antibodies were peptide specific in ELISA and bound only to intact...

  7. Generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Penicillic acid is one of the main mycotoxins in moldy feedstuff and has toxic effect on livestock and poultry and probably humans due to food chain transmission. The objective of this study was to generate and characterize a monoclonal antibody to penicillic acid for the efficient detection of penicillic acid from Penicillium ...

  8. A 10-RESIDUE FRAGMENT OF AN ANTIBODY (MINI-ANTIBODY) DIRECTED AGAINST LYSOZYME AS LIGAND IN IMMUNOAFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WELLING, GW; VANGORKUM, J; DAMHOF, RA; DRIJFHOUT, JW; BLOEMHOFF, W; WELLINGWESTER, S

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between an antibody molecule and a protein antigen is an example of "natural" protein modelling. Amino acids of the antigen-binding site consisting of three hypervariable segments (L1, L2, L3) of the light (L) and three (H1, H2, H3) of the heavy (H) chain of an antibody molecule

  9. Identification of a linear epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed to the heterogeneous nucleoriboprotein A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tronstrøm, Julie; Dragborg, Anette H.; Hansen, Paul Robert

    2014-01-01

    ), where the amino acids Ser, Ile and Asp were found to be essential for antibody reactivity. These amino acids were found to contribute to the antibody-antigen interface through side-chain interactions, possibly in combination with a positively charged amino acid in position 77. Moreover, the amino acids...

  10. Antibodies Against Melanin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1973-01-06

    Jan 6, 1973 ... Departments of Internal Medicine and Anatomical Pathology, University of Stellenbosch and MRC. Pigment Metabolism Research Unit, ... at the production of antibodies against natural melanoprotein. and a consideration of our negative .... the random polymerization of several monomers, antibody formed ...

  11. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  12. Identification of antibody glycosylation structures that predict monoclonal antibody Fc-effector function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Amy W; Crispin, Max; Pritchard, Laura; Robinson, Hannah; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Yu, Xiaojie; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Ackerman, Margaret E; Scanlan, Chris; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Alter, Galit

    2014-11-13

    To determine monoclonal antibody (mAb) features that predict fragment crystalizable (Fc)-mediated effector functions against HIV. Monoclonal antibodies, derived from Chinese hamster ovary cells or Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized mouse heteromyelomas, with specificity to key regions of the HIV envelope including gp120-V2, gp120-V3 loop, gp120-CD4(+) binding site, and gp41-specific antibodies, were functionally profiled to determine the relative contribution of the variable and constant domain features of the antibodies in driving robust Fc-effector functions. Each mAb was assayed for antibody-binding affinity to gp140(SR162), antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and for the ability to bind to FcγRIIa, FcγRIIb and FcγRIIIa receptors. Antibody glycan profiles were determined by HPLC. Neither the specificity nor the affinity of the mAbs determined the potency of Fc-effector function. FcγRIIIa binding strongly predicted ADCC and decreased galactose content inversely correlated with ADCP, whereas N-glycolylneuraminic acid-containing structures exhibited enhanced ADCP. Additionally, the bi-antenary glycan arm onto which galactose was added predicted enhanced binding to FcγRIIIa and ADCC activity, independent of the specificity of the mAb. Our studies point to the specific Fc-glycan structures that can selectively promote Fc-effector functions independently of the antibody specificity. Furthermore, we demonstrated antibody glycan structures associated with enhanced ADCP activity, an emerging Fc-effector function that may aid in the control and clearance of HIV infection.

  13. Antibody engineering: methods and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chames, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    "Antibody Engineering: Methods and Protocols, Second Edition was compiled to give complete and easy access to a variety of antibody engineering techniques, starting from the creation of antibody repertoires and efficient...

  14. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  15. Therapeutic Antibodies against Intracellular Tumor Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Trenevska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are among the most clinically effective drugs used to treat cancer. However, their target repertoire is limited as there are relatively few tumor-specific or tumor-associated cell surface or soluble antigens. Intracellular molecules represent nearly half of the human proteome and provide an untapped reservoir of potential therapeutic targets. Antibodies have been developed to target externalized antigens, have also been engineered to enter into cells or may be expressed intracellularly with the aim of binding intracellular antigens. Furthermore, intracellular proteins can be degraded by the proteasome into short, commonly 8–10 amino acid long, peptides that are presented on the cell surface in the context of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I molecules. These tumor-associated peptide–MHC-I complexes can then be targeted by antibodies known as T-cell receptor mimic (TCRm or T-cell receptor (TCR-like antibodies, which recognize epitopes comprising both the peptide and the MHC-I molecule, similar to the recognition of such complexes by the TCR on T cells. Advances in the production of TCRm antibodies have enabled the generation of multiple TCRm antibodies, which have been tested in vitro and in vivo, expanding our understanding of their mechanisms of action and the importance of target epitope selection and expression. This review will summarize multiple approaches to targeting intracellular antigens with therapeutic antibodies, in particular describing the production and characterization of TCRm antibodies, the factors influencing their target identification, their advantages and disadvantages in the context of TCR therapies, and the potential to advance TCRm-based therapies into the clinic.

  16. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  17. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide......-antibody interface and the antibody intraface.the microenvironment and ecology of Acaryochloris and Prochloron, and in this thesis we attempted to further describe the distribution, growth characteristics and adaptive/regulatory mechanisms of these two cyanobacteria, both in their natural habitat and under defined...

  18. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test is Performed A blood sample ... person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  19. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  20. Bifunctional antibodies for radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Faivre-Chauvet, A; Bardies, M; Peltier, P; Gautherot, E; Barbet, J

    1995-04-01

    In two-step targeting technique using bifunctional antibodies, a nonradiolabeled immunoconjugate with slow uptake kinetics (several days) is initially injected, followed by a small radiolabeled hapten with fast kinetics (several hours) that binds to the bispecific immunoconjugate already taken up by the tumor target. In patients with colorectal or medullary thyroid cancer, clinical studies performed with an anti-CEA/anti-DTPA-indium bifunctional antibody and an indium-111-labeled di-DTPA-TL bivalent hapten showed that tumor uptake was not modified compared to results for F(ab')2 fragments of the same anti-CEA antibody directly labeled with indium-111, whereas the radioactivity of normal tissues was significantly reduced (3- to 6-fold). The fast tumor uptake kinetics (several hours) and high or very high tumor-to-normal tissue ratios obtained with the bifunctional antibody technique are favorable parameters for efficient radioimmunotherapy.

  1. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antibody Blood Tests Researchers have discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of ... do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? ...

  2. Structural Comparison of Different Antibodies Interacting with Parvovirus Capsids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafenstein, Susan; Bowman, Valorie D.; Sun, Tao; Nelson, Christian D.S.; Palermo, Laura M.; Chipman, Paul R.; Battisti, Anthony J.; Parrish, Colin R.; Rossmann, Michael G.; Cornell; Purdue

    2009-05-13

    The structures of canine parvovirus (CPV) and feline parvovirus (FPV) complexed with antibody fragments from eight different neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were determined by cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) reconstruction to resolutions varying from 8.5 to 18 {angstrom}. The crystal structure of one of the Fab molecules and the sequence of the variable domain for each of the Fab molecules have been determined. The structures of Fab fragments not determined crystallographically were predicted by homology modeling according to the amino acid sequence. Fitting of the Fab and virus structures into the cryoEM densities identified the footprints of each antibody on the viral surface. As anticipated from earlier analyses, the Fab binding sites are directed to two epitopes, A and B. The A site is on an exposed part of the surface near an icosahedral threefold axis, whereas the B site is about equidistant from the surrounding five-, three-, and twofold axes. One antibody directed to the A site binds CPV but not FPV. Two of the antibodies directed to the B site neutralize the virus as Fab fragments. The differences in antibody properties have been linked to the amino acids within the antibody footprints, the position of the binding site relative to the icosahedral symmetry elements, and the orientation of the Fab structure relative to the surface of the virus. Most of the exposed surface area was antigenic, although each of the antibodies had a common area of overlap that coincided with the positions of the previously mapped escape mutations.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    reached at least 3/4 confluency, 2 ampules/cell culture. Save the supernatants for further studies. Regarding to separate the interested cells of irrelevant cells, you must been do a limited diluted procedures. Ascitis production. To produce ascitis the number of cells depend of the every particular clone. Usually we inoculated ip between 1 to 2 x10 6 cells/ml/mice in PBS buffer. The animals must be inoculated intraperitonealy with Pristan (Sigma) or mineral oil using 0.5 ml per mice. The inoculation could be occurred 7 to 10 days before to inoculated the clone. The weight of the animals must be controlled in order to obtain better yield. The bioreactors are an alternative method to produce AcMs without it have not used animals models. IgG purification process on protein A columns. Mouse antibodies of the IgG 1 subclass do not have a high affinity for protein A. Every subclass could be eluted at different peaks using a gradient pH. Usually we use 3M NaCl/1.5 M Gly pH 8.9 as a coupling buffer. For eluting IgGs we use 0.1M Citric Acid in a gradient pH (6 to IgG 1 , 5 to IgG 2a or IgG 2b , 4 IgG 3 ). 1. Adjust a Sepharose Protein A (Pharmacia) beads using NaCl/1.5 M Gly pH 8.9 (coupling buffer). 2. Diluted the ascitis 1:10 in coupling buffer using a filter paper for remove the aggregations. 3. Pass the solution trough a Protein A bead column at a standarized flow according your equipment. The capacity of the Protein A beads for IgGl is approximately 5 mg/ml of wet beads. Ascitis contain between 1-10 mg/ml. 4. Wash the colums with 10 volumes of coupling buffer. 5. Elute the column with 0.1 M Citric Acid in a gradient pH starting at 6 to 4. Collect the eluate in appropriate tube, and identify the immunoglobulin-containing fractions by absorbance a 280 nm (1 DO = 0.8 mg/ml)

  4. Antibody-Mediated Catalysis in Infection and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Anthony; Wear, Maggie; Casadevall, Arturo

    2017-09-01

    The existence of catalytic antibodies has been known for decades. Natural antibodies capable of cleaving nucleic acid, protein, and polysaccharide substrates have been described. Although the discovery of catalytic antibodies initially aroused great interest because of their promise for the development of new catalysts, their enzymatic performance has been disappointing due to low reaction rates. However, in the areas of infection and immunity, where processes often occur over much longer times and involve high antibody concentrations, even low catalytic rates have the potential to influence biological outcomes. In this regard, the presence of catalytic antibodies recognizing host antigens has been associated with several autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, naturally occurring catalytic antibodies to microbial determinants have been correlated with resistance to infection. Recently, there has been substantial interest in harnessing the power of antibody-mediated catalysis against microbial antigens for host defense. Additional work is needed, however, to better understand the prevalence, function, and structural basis of catalytic activity in antibodies. Here we review the available information and suggest that antibody-mediated catalysis is a fertile area for study with broad applications in infection and immunity. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Non-random escape pathways from a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody map to a highly conserved region on the hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein encompassing amino acids 412-423.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-yong Keck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A challenge for hepatitis C virus (HCV vaccine development is to define epitopes that are able to elicit protective antibodies against this highly diverse virus. The E2 glycoprotein region located at residues 412-423 is conserved and antibodies to 412-423 have broadly neutralizing activities. However, an adaptive mutation, N417S, is associated with a glycan shift in a variant that cannot be neutralized by a murine but by human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs against 412-423. To determine whether HCV escapes from these antibodies, we analyzed variants that emerged when cell culture infectious HCV virions (HCVcc were passaged under increasing concentrations of a specific HMAb, HC33.1. Multiple nonrandom escape pathways were identified. Two pathways occurred in the context of an N-glycan shift mutation at N417T. At low antibody concentrations, substitutions of two residues outside of the epitope, N434D and K610R, led to variants having improved in vitro viral fitness and reduced sensitivity to HC33.1 binding and neutralization. At moderate concentrations, a S419N mutation occurred within 412-423 in escape variants that have greatly reduced sensitivity to HC33.1 but compromised viral fitness. Importantly, the variants generated from these pathways differed in their stability. N434D and K610R-associated variants were stable and became dominant as the virions were passaged. The S419N mutation reverted back to N419S when immune pressure was reduced by removing HC33.1. At high antibody concentrations, a mutation at L413I was observed in variants that were resistant to HC33.1 neutralization. Collectively, the combination of multiple escape pathways enabled the virus to persist under a wide range of antibody concentrations. Moreover, these findings pose a different challenge to vaccine development beyond the identification of highly conserved epitopes. It will be necessary for a vaccine to induce high potency antibodies that prevent the formation of escape

  6. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  7. Specificity of rabbit antibodies elicited by related synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Houghten, R A; Chillemi, F; Zito, R; Centis, D

    1986-01-01

    Three 17-residue peptides, presenting from 65% to 70% sequence homology, and one endecapeptide, with no apparent homology with the first three, were chemically synthesized and investigated in their ability to elicit rabbit antipeptide antibodies. The complex cross reactivities of the antisera were investigated by testing the binding of the antibodies to the intact peptides, to their enzymatic fragments, and by the use of specific immunoadsorbents. Antipeptide antibodies may or may not crossreact with related "parent" peptides, this depending upon number, distribution, and localization of amino acid differences in low or high antigenicity regions of the immunogen. Related peptides may elicit antibodies that crossreact almost completely, and therefore not specific for one or the other "parent" peptide. Those antibodies may therefore be of little use for the selective recognition of closely related structures.

  8. Serum Vaccine Antibody Concentrations in Children Exposed to Perfluorinated Compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P.; Andersen, E. W.; Budtz-Jorgensen, E.

    2012-01-01

    in follow-up through 2008. Main Outcome Measures Serum antibody concentrations against tetanus and diphtheria toxoids at ages 5 and 7 years. Results Similar to results of prior studies in the United States, the PFCs with the highest serum concentrations were perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS......) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). Among PFCs in maternal pregnancy serum, PFOS showed the strongest negative correlations with antibody concentrations at age 5 years, for which a 2-fold greater concentration of exposure was associated with a difference of -39% (95% CI, -55% to -17%) in the diphtheria antibody.......44) for falling below a clinically protective level of 0.1 IU/mL for tetanus and diphtheria antibodies at age 7 years. Conclusion Elevated exposures to PFCs were associated with reduced humoral immune response to routine childhood immunizations in children aged 5 and 7 years. JAMA. 2012;307(4):391-397...

  9. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  10. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook

    1979-01-01

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  11. A novel affinity purification method to isolate peptide specific antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Alan E; Lernmark, A; Kofod, Hans

    1990-01-01

    affinity-purify anti-peptide antibodies. To test our system, rabbits were immunized with model peptides representing sequences of the putative rabbit growth hormone receptor and several HLA-DQ beta-chain molecules. Polystyrene plastic beads were coated with peptides. Immune serum was incubated...... with the beads and after a wash step the bound antibodies were eluted in 1 M acetic acid. The eluted material was composed predominantly of intact immunoglobulin as evidenced by the presence of heavy and light chain bands in SDS-PAGE. The eluted antibodies were peptide specific in ELISA and bound only to intact...

  12. Fluctuation of zonulin levels in blood vs stability of antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Elroy; Kharrazian, Datis

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the measurement of zonulin level and antibodies of zonulin and other tight junction proteins in the blood of controls and celiac disease patients. METHODS This study was conducted to assess the variability or stability of zonulin levels vs IgA and IgG antibodies against zonulin in blood samples from 18 controls at 0, 6, 24 and 30 h after blood draw. We also measured zonulin level as well as zonulin, occludin, vinculin, aquaporin 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies...

  13. Utilization of Multi-Immunization and Multiple Selection Strategies for Isolation of Hapten-Specific Antibodies from Recombinant Antibody Phage Display Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullila, Antti; Nevanen, Tarja K.

    2017-01-01

    Phage display technology provides a powerful tool for the development of novel recombinant antibodies. In this work, we optimized and streamlined the recombinant antibody discovery process for haptens as an example. A multi-immunization approach was used in order to avoid the need for construction of multiple antibody libraries. Selection methods were developed to utilize the full potential of the recombinant antibody library by applying four different elution conditions simultaneously. High-throughput immunoassays were used to analyse the binding properties of the individual antibody clones. Different carrier proteins were used in the immunization, selection, and screening phases to avoid enrichment of the antibodies for the carrier protein epitopes. Novel recombinant antibodies against mycophenolic acid and ochratoxin A, with affinities up to 39 nM and 34 nM, respectively, were isolated from a multi-immunized fragment antigen-binding (Fab) library. PMID:28561803

  14. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you have a higher chance of developing thyroid disease in the future. Antithyroid microsomal antibodies may be ... PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 11. Weiss RE, Refetoff S. Thyroid function testing. In: Jameson JL, De Groot LJ, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and ... Lupus Read more ...

  15. Antibodies Targeting EMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    determine their targets on the cell. The newly discovered antibodies will then be engineered for utility as new highly specific drugs and diagnostics in...are from the aldo-keto reductase family (AKRs). Remarkably, 3 of the top 10 genes with induction in the mesenchymal TES2b cells Figure 1. Amino

  16. Monoclonal antibodies in haematopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grignani, F.; Martelli, M.F.; Mason, D.Y.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Oncogene (c-myc, c-myb) amplification in acute myelogenous leukaemia; Ultrastructural characterization of leukaemic cells with monoloclonal antibodies; Origin of B-cell malignancies; Immunohistology of gut lymphomas; and Spurious evidence of lineage infidelity in monocytic leukaemia.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  18. Development of Tetravalent, Bispecific CCR5 Antibodies with Antiviral Activity against CCR5 Monoclonal Antibody-Resistant HIV-1 Strains▿

    OpenAIRE

    Schanzer, Jürgen; Jekle, Andreas; Nezu, Junichi; Lochner, Adriane; Croasdale, Rebecca; Dioszegi, Marianna; Zhang, Jun; Hoffmann, Eike; Dormeyer, Wilma; Stracke, Jan; Schäfer, Wolfgang; Ji, Changhua; Heilek, Gabrielle; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we describe novel tetravalent, bispecific antibody derivatives that bind two different epitopes on the HIV coreceptor CCR5. The basic protein formats that we applied were derived from Morrison-type bispecific antibodies: whole IgGs to which we connected single-chain antibodies (scFvs) via (Gly4Ser)n sequences at either the C or N terminus of the light chain or heavy chain. By design optimization, including disulfide stabilization of scFvs or introduction of 30-amino-acid linker...

  19. Contribution of peptide backbone to Anti-citrulline-dependent antibody reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Dam, Catharina; Olsen, Dorthe

    2015-01-01

    . As ACPAs have been suggested to be involved in the development of RA, knowledge about these antibodies may be crucial. In this study, we examined the influence of peptide backbone for ACPA reactivity in immunoassays. The antibodies were found to be reactive with a central Cit-Gly motif being essential...... is essential for antibody reactivity. Based on these findings it was speculated that any amino acid sequence, which brings the peptide into a properly folded structure for antibody recognition is sufficient for antibody reactivity. These findings are in accordance with the current hypothesis that structural...

  20. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  1. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  2. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.D. Zegers (Netty)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps

  3. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the

  4. Replacing antibodies with modified DNA aptamers in vaccine potency assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trausch, Jeremiah J; Shank-Retzlaff, Mary; Verch, Thorsten

    2017-10-04

    Vaccine in vitro potency assays are vital regulatory tests that are used to confirm the presence and concentration of an antigen of interest in a form that directly or indirectly relates to protective activity in patients. Current assays come in many forms, but they almost exclusively use antibody reagents for selective detection of the target antigen. Antibodies provide specific recognition of vaccine antigens but also exhibit drawbacks such as stability limitations, cost, and lot-to-lot variation, which can make it challenging to maintain the reagent throughout the lifetime of the vaccine. We explored replacing antibodies with aptamers. Aptamers are macromolecules, such as nucleic acids, which can bind to their targets with high specificity and affinity, similar to that of antibodies. Some of the advantages of using aptamers over antibodies is that aptamers can be more stable, smaller, less expensive to produce, synthesized in vitro, and logistically easier to supply throughout the multi-decade lifespan of a commercial vaccine. We created modified DNA aptamers against the common vaccine carrier protein, CRM 197 . Several aptamers were discovered and one was chosen for further characterization. The binding kinetics of the aptamer revealed an off-rate 16-fold slower than anti-CRM 197 antibodies used for comparison. The aptamers were more sensitive than available antibodies in some assay formats and comparable in others. The aptamer epitope was mapped to the receptor-binding domain of CRM 197 , a site adjacent to a known antibody binding site. These data address some key aspects for a path forward in replacing antibodies with aptamers for use as critical reagents in vaccine assays. We further highlight the possibility of using nucleic acid reagents to develop next generation potency assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Replacing antibodies with aptamers in lateral flow immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ailiang; Yang, Shuming

    2015-09-15

    Aptamers have been identified against various targets as a type of chemical or nucleic acid ligand by systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamers show remarkable advantages over antibodies due to the nucleic acid nature and target-induced structure-switching properties and are widely used to design various fluorescent, electrochemical, or colorimetric biosensors. However, the practical applications of aptamer-based sensing and diagnostics are still lagging behind those of antibody-based tests. Lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) represents a well established and appropriate technology among rapid assays because of its low cost and user-friendliness. The antibody-based platform is utilized to detect numerous targets, but it is always hampered by the antibody preparation time, antibody stability, and effect of modification on the antibody. Seeking alternatives to antibodies is an area of active research and is of tremendous importance. Aptamers are receiving increasing attention in lateral flow applications because of a number of important potential performance advantages. We speculate that aptamer-based LFIA may be one of the first platforms for commercial use of aptamer-based diagnosis. This review first gives an introduction to aptamer including the selection process SELEX with its focus on aptamer advantages over antibodies, and then depicts LFIA with its focus on aptamer opportunities in LFIA over antibodies. Furthermore, we summarize the recent advances in the development of aptamer-based lateral flow biosensing assays with the aim to provide a general guide for the design of aptamer-based lateral flow biosensing assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An Insertion Mutation That Distorts Antibody Binding Site Architecture Enhances Function of a Human Antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Jens C.; Ekiert, Damian C.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Smith, Patricia B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Crowe, Jr., James E. (Vanderbilt); (Scripps); (CDC)

    2011-09-02

    The structural and functional significance of somatic insertions and deletions in antibody chains is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that a naturally occurring three-amino-acid insertion within the influenza virus-specific human monoclonal antibody 2D1 heavy-chain variable region reconfigures the antibody-combining site and contributes to its high potency against the 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses. The insertion arose through a series of events, including a somatic point mutation in a predicted hot-spot motif, introduction of a new hot-spot motif, a molecular duplication due to polymerase slippage, a deletion due to misalignment, and additional somatic point mutations. Atomic resolution structures of the wild-type antibody and a variant in which the insertion was removed revealed that the three-amino-acid insertion near the base of heavy-chain complementarity-determining region (CDR) H2 resulted in a bulge in that loop. This enlarged CDR H2 loop impinges on adjacent regions, causing distortion of the CDR H1 architecture and its displacement away from the antigen-combining site. Removal of the insertion restores the canonical structure of CDR H1 and CDR H2, but binding, neutralization activity, and in vivo activity were reduced markedly because of steric conflict of CDR H1 with the hemagglutinin antigen.

  7. Clinical use of antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Hoer, Gustav; Cox, P.H.; Buraggi, G.L.

    1991-01-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies as tumour specific carrier molecules for therapeutic agents or as in vivo diagnostic reagents when labelled with radionuclides or NMR signal enhancers is attracting more and more attention. The potential is enormous but the technical problems are also considerable requiring the concerted action of many different scientific disciplines. This volume is based upon a symposium organised in Frankfurt in 1990 under the auspices of the European Association of Nuclear Medicines' Specialist Task Groups on Cardiology and the Utility of Labelled Antibodies. It gives a multidisciplinary review of the state of the art and of problems to be solved as well as recording the not inconsiderable successes which have been booked to date. The book will be of value as a reference to both clinicians and research scientists. refs.; figs.; tabs

  8. Comparison of PRRSV Nucleic Acid and Antibody Detection in Pen-Based Oral Fluid and Individual Serum Samples in Three Different Age Categories of Post-Weaning Pigs from Endemically Infected Farms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick De Regge

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is the causative agent of an economically important disease in swine. Since it has been shown that PRRSV and PRRSV specific antibodies can be detected in oral fluid, many different aspects have been studied to show that oral fluid could be a worthy alternative diagnostic sample to serum for monitoring and surveillance of this disease. Thorough field evaluations are however missing to convincingly show its usefulness under representative field conditions.Pen-based oral fluid samples and serum samples from all individual pigs in the corresponding pens were collected from post-weaning pigs of three different age categories in eight endemically PRRSV infected farms and one PRRSV free farm in Belgium. All samples were tested by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and ELISA to detect PRRSV RNA and PRRSV specific antibodies, respectively.While the relative specificity of PRRSV detection by qRT-PCR in pen-based oral fluid compared to serum collected from individual pigs was high in all age categories (>90%, the relative sensitivity decreased with the age of the pigs (89, 93 and 10% in 8-12w, 16-20w and 24-28w old pigs, respectively. The latter correlated with a lower percentage of PRRSV positive pigs in serum/pen in the different age categories (55, 29 and 6%, respectively. Irrespective of the age category, pen-based oral fluid samples were always found PCR positive when at least 30% of the individual pigs were positive in serum. PRRSV specific antibody detection in oral fluid by ELISA showed a 100% relative sensitivity to detection in serum since oral fluid samples were always positive as soon as one pig in the pen was positive in serum. On the other hand, two false positive oral fluid samples in 11 pens without serum positive pigs were found, resulting in a relative specificity of 82%. Indications are however present that the oral fluid result indicated the

  9. Comparison of PRRSV Nucleic Acid and Antibody Detection in Pen-Based Oral Fluid and Individual Serum Samples in Three Different Age Categories of Post-Weaning Pigs from Endemically Infected Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Regge, Nick; Cay, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Background Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the causative agent of an economically important disease in swine. Since it has been shown that PRRSV and PRRSV specific antibodies can be detected in oral fluid, many different aspects have been studied to show that oral fluid could be a worthy alternative diagnostic sample to serum for monitoring and surveillance of this disease. Thorough field evaluations are however missing to convincingly show its usefulness under representative field conditions. Methodology Pen-based oral fluid samples and serum samples from all individual pigs in the corresponding pens were collected from post-weaning pigs of three different age categories in eight endemically PRRSV infected farms and one PRRSV free farm in Belgium. All samples were tested by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and ELISA to detect PRRSV RNA and PRRSV specific antibodies, respectively. Results While the relative specificity of PRRSV detection by qRT-PCR in pen-based oral fluid compared to serum collected from individual pigs was high in all age categories (>90%), the relative sensitivity decreased with the age of the pigs (89, 93 and 10% in 8-12w, 16-20w and 24-28w old pigs, respectively). The latter correlated with a lower percentage of PRRSV positive pigs in serum/pen in the different age categories (55, 29 and 6%, respectively). Irrespective of the age category, pen-based oral fluid samples were always found PCR positive when at least 30% of the individual pigs were positive in serum. PRRSV specific antibody detection in oral fluid by ELISA showed a 100% relative sensitivity to detection in serum since oral fluid samples were always positive as soon as one pig in the pen was positive in serum. On the other hand, two false positive oral fluid samples in 11 pens without serum positive pigs were found, resulting in a relative specificity of 82%. Indications are however present that the oral fluid

  10. Development of scoring functions for antibody sequence assessment and optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Seeliger

    Full Text Available Antibody development is still associated with substantial risks and difficulties as single mutations can radically change molecule properties like thermodynamic stability, solubility or viscosity. Since antibody generation methodologies cannot select and optimize for molecule properties which are important for biotechnological applications, careful sequence analysis and optimization is necessary to develop antibodies that fulfil the ambitious requirements of future drugs. While efforts to grab the physical principles of undesired molecule properties from the very bottom are becoming increasingly powerful, the wealth of publically available antibody sequences provides an alternative way to develop early assessment strategies for antibodies using a statistical approach which is the objective of this paper. Here, publically available sequences were used to develop heuristic potentials for the framework regions of heavy and light chains of antibodies of human and murine origin. The potentials take into account position dependent probabilities of individual amino acids but also conditional probabilities which are inevitable for sequence assessment and optimization. It is shown that the potentials derived from human sequences clearly distinguish between human sequences and sequences from mice and, hence, can be used as a measure of humaness which compares a given sequence with the phenotypic pool of human sequences instead of comparing sequence identities to germline genes. Following this line, it is demonstrated that, using the developed potentials, humanization of an antibody can be described as a simple mathematical optimization problem and that the in-silico generated framework variants closely resemble native sequences in terms of predicted immunogenicity.

  11. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  12. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  13. Antibodies to skeletal muscle in myasthenia gravis. Part 1. Diagnostic value for the detection of thymoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuks, J B; Limburg, P C; Horst, G; Dijksterhuis, J; Oosterhuis, H J

    1993-01-01

    The role of anti-muscle antibodies (AMA) in the diagnosis of thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) is evaluated. We compared ELISA and Western blot assay for antibodies to citric acid muscle extract (a-CAE) with an immunofluorescence assay (IF). Sera from 234 selected MG patients and 123

  14. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zider, Alexander; Drakeman, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commer...

  15. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  16. Preparation and characterization of the polyclonal antibody against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To prepare the polyclonal antibody against GAR domain, cDNA encoding 466 amino acids protein of GAR domain was amplified from MG-63 cell by RT-PCR. The amplified cDNA, that exhibited 99% identity to the published sequence, was cloned into prokaryotic expression vector pQE-80L for the expression of GAR ...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the organophosphate pesticide azinphos-methyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, WT; Harvey, D; Jones, SD; Ryan, GB; Wynberg, H; TenHoeve, W; Reynolds, PHS

    1995-01-01

    2-(2-Mercapto-5-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl,2-sulphide) methoxyacetic acid has been synthesized and used to prepare an azinphos hapten and protein conjugates. Monoclonal antibodies of high affinity against the pesticide azinphos-methyl were prepared from mice immunized with the

  18. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...... of the humanization experiment protocol....

  19. Assessing the Impact of Charge Variants on Stability and Viscosity of a High Concentration Antibody Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sule, Shantanu V; Fernandez, Jason E; Mecozzi, Vincent J; Kravets, Yana; Yang, William C; Feng, Pamela; Liu, Suli; Zang, Li; Capili, Allan D; Estey, Tia B; Gupta, Kapil

    2017-12-01

    Characterizing molecular charge variants or isoforms is essential for understanding safety, potency, and bioavailability of antibody therapeutics. However, there is little information on how they influence stability and viscosity-properties governing immunogenicity and delivery. To bridge this gap, we studied antibody stability as a function of charge variant content generated via bioreactor process. We were able to systematically vary acidic variant levels as a function of bioreactor harvest time. Importantly, we do not observe any impact on aggregation behavior of a formulated antibody at high protein concentration as a function of acidic variant level. Furthermore, we confirm that acidic variants enriched using fractionation do not influence viscosity, colloidal or conformational stability. Interestingly, variants with the most acidic isoelectric points contribute disproportionately to formulation color. We discuss our findings in context of antibody manufacturing processes that may yield increased charge variant content. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Antibody Heavy Chain Variable Domains of Different Germline Gene Origins Diversify through Different Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Kirik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available B cells produce antibodies, key effector molecules in health and disease. They mature their properties, including their affinity for antigen, through hypermutation events; processes that involve, e.g., base substitution, codon insertion and deletion, often in association with an isotype switch. Investigations of antibody evolution define modes whereby particular antibody responses are able to form, and such studies provide insight important for instance for development of efficient vaccines. Antibody evolution is also used in vitro for the design of antibodies with improved properties. To better understand the basic concepts of antibody evolution, we analyzed the mutational paths, both in terms of amino acid substitution and insertions and deletions, taken by antibodies of the IgG isotype. The analysis focused on the evolution of the heavy chain variable domain of sets of antibodies, each with an origin in 1 of 11 different germline genes representing six human heavy chain germline gene subgroups. Investigated genes were isolated from cells of human bone marrow, a major site of antibody production, and characterized by next-generation sequencing and an in-house bioinformatics pipeline. Apart from substitutions within the complementarity determining regions, multiple framework residues including those in protein cores were targets of extensive diversification. Diversity, both in terms of substitutions, and insertions and deletions, in antibodies is focused to different positions in the sequence in a germline gene-unique manner. Altogether, our findings create a framework for understanding patterns of evolution of antibodies from defined germline genes.

  1. Theranostics Using Antibodies and Antibody-Related Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moek, Kirsten L; Giesen, Danique; Kok, Iris C; de Groot, Derk Jan A; Jalving, Mathilde; Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn N; Brouwers, Adrienne H; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    In theranostics, radiolabeled compounds are used to determine a treatment strategy by combining therapeutics and diagnostics in the same agent. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and antibody-related therapeutics represent a rapidly expanding group of cancer medicines. Theranostic approaches using these

  2. Ascorbic acid in bronchial asthma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-04-23

    Apr 23, 1983 ... by comparing the pre-ascorbic acid results with those obtained 21/2 hours after the intravenous ... (ASO), C-reactive protein and antibodies to certain respiratory viruses. These investigations were ..... vitamin.6 However, other investigators were unable to detect any protective effects of ascorbic acid on the ...

  3. Antibodies and Plasmodium falciparum merozoites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramasamy, R; Ramasamy, M; Yasawardena, S

    There is considerable interest in using merozoite proteins in a vaccine against falciparum malaria. Observations that antibodies to merozoite surface proteins block invasion are a basis for optimism. This article draws attention to important and varied aspects of how antibodies to Plasmodium

  4. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  5. Antiphospholipid antibodies: standardization and testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, R S; Friedline, J; Rogers, J S

    1997-09-01

    A phenomenon originally scorned as a laboratory nuisance has turned out to be an important cause of thromboembolism, fetal death, and other forms of human disease. Investigations of this inaptly named "lupus anticoagulant" has led to the discovery of at least two distinct types of autoimmune antibodies. In spite of recent discoveries regarding the pathophysiology of these antibodies, their clinical significance is still controversial.

  6. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA

  7. Fluorescent labeling of antibody fragments using split GFP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortunato Ferrara

    Full Text Available Antibody fragments are easily isolated from in vitro selection systems, such as phage and yeast display. Lacking the Fc portion of the antibody, they are usually labeled using small peptide tags recognized by antibodies. In this paper we present an efficient method to fluorescently label single chain Fvs (scFvs using the split green fluorescent protein (GFP system. A 13 amino acid tag, derived from the last beta strand of GFP (termed GFP11, is fused to the C terminus of the scFv. This tag has been engineered to be non-perturbing, and we were able to show that it exerted no effect on scFv expression or functionality when compared to a scFv without the GFP11 tag. Effective functional fluorescent labeling is demonstrated in a number of different assays, including fluorescence linked immunosorbant assays, flow cytometry and yeast display. Furthermore, we were able to show that this split GFP system can be used to determine the concentration of scFv in crude samples, as well an estimate of antibody affinity, without the need for antibody purification. We anticipate this system will be of widespread interest in antibody engineering and in vitro display systems.

  8. CNS syndromes associated with antibodies against metabotropic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Autoantibodies to Central nervous system (CNS) metabotropic receptors are associated with a growing family of autoimmune brain diseases, including encephalitis, basal ganglia encephalitis, Ophelia syndrome, and cerebellitis. The purpose of this review is to summarize the state of knowledge regarding the target receptors, the neurological autoimmune disorders, and the pathogenic mechanisms. Antibodies to the γ-aminobutyric acid B receptor are associate with limbic encephalitis and severe seizures, often with small cell lung cancers. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) antibodies associate with Ophelia syndrome, a relatively mild form of encephalitis linked to Hodgkin lymphoma. mGluR1 antibodies associate with a form of cerebellar degeneration, and also Hodgkin lymphoma. Antibodies to Homer 3, a protein associated with mGluR1, have also been reported in two patients with cerebellar syndromes. Dopamine-2 receptor antibodies have been reported by one group in children with basal ganglia encephalitis and other disorders. CNS metabotropic receptor antibodies may exert direct inhibitory effects on their target receptors, but the evidence is more limited than with autoantibodies to ionotropic glutamate receptors. In the future, improved recognition of these patients may lead to better outcomes. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of the diseases may uncover novel treatment strategies.

  9. [Antibody induction after intrauterine interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, J; Giers, G; Bald, R; Hansmann, M; Hanfland, P

    1993-06-01

    Immunohematologic and clinical data, i.e., antibody profile, location of the placenta, mode of cordocentesis, obtained from 48 pregnant patients with irregular erythrocyte antibodies during the last 2 years have been retrospectively evaluated. All fetuses of the patients received intrauterine transfusions for the treatment of fetal erythroblastosis. In 16 (33%) patients (group I) a secondarily induced antibody was detected after the onset of intrauterine transfusion therapy. 32 (67%) patients (group II) did not further develop new antibody specificities. Group I exhibited a significantly different distribution in the location of the placenta (p pregnant women. In group I a 5-fold higher rate of anterior than posterior placenta location was found. The mode of cordocentesis differed significantly (p antibodies by invasive intrauterine interventions in our patients depended indirectly on the location of the placenta and directly on the mode of the puncture (trans- vs. paraplacental access).

  10. Rationalization and Design of the Complementarity Determining Region Sequences in an Antibody-Antigen Recognition Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Lee, Yu-Ching; Chen, Jun-Bo; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Chen, Ching-Tai; Chang, Jeng-Yih; Yang, Ei-Wen; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Jian, Jhih-Wei; Hsu, Hung-Ju; Chang, Hung-Ju; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Huang, Kai-Fa; Ma, Alex Che; Yang, An-Suei

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are critical determinants in biological systems. Engineered proteins binding to specific areas on protein surfaces could lead to therapeutics or diagnostics for treating diseases in humans. But designing epitope-specific protein-protein interactions with computational atomistic interaction free energy remains a difficult challenge. Here we show that, with the antibody-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) interaction as a model system, the experimentally observed amino acid preferences in the antibody-antigen interface can be rationalized with 3-dimensional distributions of interacting atoms derived from the database of protein structures. Machine learning models established on the rationalization can be generalized to design amino acid preferences in antibody-antigen interfaces, for which the experimental validations are tractable with current high throughput synthetic antibody display technologies. Leave-one-out cross validation on the benchmark system yielded the accuracy, precision, recall (sensitivity) and specificity of the overall binary predictions to be 0.69, 0.45, 0.63, and 0.71 respectively, and the overall Matthews correlation coefficient of the 20 amino acid types in the 24 interface CDR positions was 0.312. The structure-based computational antibody design methodology was further tested with other antibodies binding to VEGF. The results indicate that the methodology could provide alternatives to the current antibody technologies based on animal immune systems in engineering therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies against predetermined antigen epitopes. PMID:22457753

  11. The reverse single radial immunodiffusion technique for detecting antibodies to Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, A A

    1980-04-26

    The reverse single radial immunodiffusion technique was used to detect Dermatophilus congolensis antibody in sera collected from animals previously infected to varying levels with D congolensis. Ammonium sulphate and trichloroacetic acid extracts of five different strains of D congolensis obtained from different geographical locations were used as antigens. All the extracts showed variations in their sensitivities in detecting D congolensis antibody in the various serum samples. Multiple antibodies were detected by some extracts while some showed negative antibody reaction to all extracts. Two extracts also showed cross-reactions with the serum from an animal that was infected by Nocardia species. Trichloroacetic acid extracts of all the strains were found to be more active serologically, detecting antibody in more sera and giving sharper and clearer reactions than ammonium sulphate extracts.

  12. Capture ELISA for IgM antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum glutamate rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Borre, M B; Petersen, E

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta......-galactosidase fusion protein and used as antigen after purification and biotinylation. Specific IgM antibodies were found in 51% (39/77) of sera from adult Liberians immune to malaria. The binding of IgM antibodies was specific for the malaria portion of the fusion protein and no cross-reactivity was found in sera...... from patients with IgM antibodies due to other diseases. Inhibition studies with a fusion protein containing amino acid residues 816-1134 (GLURP816-1134) representing the carboxy-terminal repeat region suggested a different use of epitopes for IgM antibodies in different individuals....

  13. Application and Comparative Evaluation of Fluorescent Antibody, Immunohistochemistry and Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction Tests for the Detection of Rabies Virus Antigen or Nucleic Acid in Brain Samples of Animals Suspected of Rabies in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, K Nithin; Isloor, Shrikrishna; Veeresh, B Hanchinal; Rathnamma, Doddamane; Sharada, R; Das, Lekshmi J; Satyanarayana, M L; Hegde, Nagendra R; Rahman, Sira Abdul

    2018-02-28

    Accurate and early diagnosis of animal rabies is critical for undertaking public health measures. Whereas the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) technique is the recommended test, the more convenient, direct rapid immunochemistry test (dRIT), as well as the more sensitive, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), have recently been employed for the laboratory diagnosis of rabies. We compared the three methods on brain samples from domestic (dog, cat, cattle, buffalo, horse, pig and goat) and wild (leopard, wolf and jackal) animals from various parts of India. Of the 257 samples tested, 167 were positive by all the three tests; in addition, 35 of the 36 decomposed samples were positive by RT-PCR. This is the first study in which such large number of animal samples have been subjected to the three tests simultaneously. The results confirm 100% corroboration between DFA and dRIT, buttress the applicability of dRIT in the simple and rapid diagnosis of rabies in animals, and reaffirm the suitability of RT-PCR for samples unfit for testing either by DFA or dRIT.

  14. Functional characterization of antibodies against Neisseria gonorrhoeae opacity protein loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica G Cole

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of a gonorrhea vaccine is challenged by the lack of correlates of protection. The antigenically variable neisserial opacity (Opa proteins are expressed during infection and have a semivariable (SV and highly conserved (4L loop that could be targeted in a vaccine. Here we compared antibodies to linear (Ab(linear and cyclic (Ab(cyclic peptides that correspond to the SV and 4L loops and selected hypervariable (HV(2 loops for surface-binding and protective activity in vitro and in vivo.Ab(SV cyclic bound a greater number of different Opa variants than Ab(SV linear, including variants that differed by seven amino acids. Antibodies to the 4L peptide did not bind Opa-expressing bacteria. Ab(SV (cyclic and Ab(HV2 (cyclic, but not Ab(SV (linear or Ab(HV2 linear agglutinated homologous Opa variants, and Ab(HV2BD (cyclic but not Ab(HV2BD (linear blocked the association of OpaB variants with human endocervical cells. Only Ab(HV2BD (linear were bactericidal against the serum resistant parent strain. Consistent with host restrictions in the complement cascade, the bactericidal activity of Ab(HV2BD (linear was increased 8-fold when rabbit complement was used. None of the antibodies was protective when administered vaginally to mice. Antibody duration in the vagina was short-lived, however, with <50% of the antibodies recovered 3 hrs post-administration.We conclude that an SV loop-specific cyclic peptide can be used to induce antibodies that recognize a broad spectrum of antigenically distinct Opa variants and have agglutination abilities. HV(2 loop-specific cyclic peptides elicited antibodies with agglutination and adherence blocking abilities. The use of human complement when testing the bactericidal activity of vaccine-induced antibodies against serum resistant gonococci is also important.

  15. GABARAPL1 antibodies: target one protein, get one free!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grand, Jaclyn Nicole; Chakrama, Fatima Zahra; Seguin-Py, Stéphanie; Fraichard, Annick; Delage-Mourroux, Régis; Jouvenot, Michèle; Risold, Pierre-Yves; Boyer-Guittaut, Michaël

    2011-11-01

    Atg8 is a yeast protein involved in the autophagic process and in particular in the elongation of autophagosomes. In mammals, several orthologs have been identified and are classed into two subfamilies: the LC3 subfamily and the GABARAP subfamily, referred to simply as the LC3 or GABARAP families. GABARAPL1 (GABARAP-like protein 1), one of the proteins belonging to the GABARAP (GABA(A) receptor-associated protein) family, is highly expressed in the central nervous system and implicated in processes such as receptor and vesicle transport as well as autophagy. The proteins that make up the GABARAP family demonstrate conservation of their amino acid sequences and protein structures. In humans, GABARAPL1 shares 86% identity with GABARAP and 61% with GABARAPL2 (GATE-16). The identification of the individual proteins is thus very limited when working in vivo due to a lack of unique peptide sequences from which specific antibodies can be developed. Actually, and to our knowledge, there are no available antibodies on the market that are entirely specific to GABARAPL1 and the same may be true of the anti-GABARAP antibodies. In this study, we sought to examine the specificity of three antibodies targeted against different peptide sequences within GABARAPL1: CHEM-CENT (an antibody raised against a short peptide sequence within the center of the protein), PTG-NTER (an antibody raised against the N-terminus of the protein) and PTG-FL (an antibody raised against the full-length protein). The results described in this article demonstrate the importance of testing antibody specificity under the conditions for which it will be used experimentally, a caution that should be taken when studying the expression of the GABARAP family proteins.

  16. Characterization of Antibodies for Grain-Specific Gluten Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Girdhari M; Rallabhandi, Prasad; Williams, Kristina M; Pahlavan, Autusa

    2016-03-01

    Gluten ingestion causes immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or celiac disease in sensitive individuals, and a strict gluten-free diet greatly limits food choices. Immunoassays such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) are used to quantify gluten to ensure labeling compliance of gluten-free foods. Anti-gluten antibodies may not exhibit equal affinity to gluten from wheat, rye, and barley. Moreover, because wheat gluten is commonly used as a calibrator in ELISA, accurate gluten quantitation from rye and barley contaminated foods may be compromised. Immunoassays utilizing grain-specific antibodies and calibrators may help improve gluten quantitation. In this study, polyclonal antibodies raised against gluten-containing grain-specific peptides were characterized for their immunoreactivity to gluten from different grain sources. Strong immunoreactivity to multiple gluten polypeptides from wheat, rye, and barley was observed in the range 34 to 43 kDa with anti-gliadin, 11 to 15 and 72 to 95 kDa with anti-secalin, and 30 to 43 kDa with anti-hordein peptide antibodies, respectively. Minimal or no cross-reactivity with gluten from other grains was observed among these antibodies. The anti-consensus peptide antibody raised against a repetitive amino acid sequence of proline and glutamine exhibited immunoreactivity to gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and oat. The antibodies exhibited similar immunoreactivity with most of the corresponding grain cultivars by ELISA. The high specificity and minimal cross-reactivity of grain-specific antibodies suggest their potential use in immunoassays for accurate gluten quantitation. © Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Antibodies to a recombinant glutamate-rich Plasmodium falciparum protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hogh, B; Petersen, E; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld

    1992-01-01

    A Plasmodium falciparum antigen gene coding for a 220-kD glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) has been cloned, and the 783 C-terminal amino acids of this protein (GLURP489-1271) have been expressed as a beta-galactosidase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The encoded 783 amino acid residues contain two...... areas of repeated amino acid sequences. Antibodies against recombinant GLURP489-1271, as well as against a synthetic peptide corresponding to GLURP899-916, and against a synthetic peptide representing the major glutamate rich repeat sequence from the P. falciparum ring erythrocyte surface antigen (Pf155...

  18. PRODUCTION OF A HUMAN RECOMBINANT ANTIBODY AGAINST SEROTYPE A CANDIDA ALBICANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A. Jafari

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available After using 3 different generations of antibodies including human and non-human hyperimmune sera, monoclonal antibodies and chimeric antibodies, more recently a newer approach has been developed in which the antibody genes are cloned directly from a patient peripheral B-lymphocytes and expressed in a host like E. coli. In this study the Candida albicans serotype A (NCTC 3153 mannan was purified using a modified Fehling method and used for selection of human recombinant antibody from a C. albicans phage antibody library. After four rounds of affinity selecting (panning, 2 predominant clones were chosen by DNA fingerprinting and ELISA. A 248 amino acid DNA fragment coding for anti-C. albicans mannan scFv was sequenced and cloned in a pBAD-TOPO cloning vector to produce a soluble and phage free antibody. The analysis of antibody sequences by V base Index (DNAPLOT confirmed the human antibody origin with the VH4 family in V segment of heavy variable chain and VL3 (Lambda 3 in J segment of the light variable chain. This antibody fragment was purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography and inmmunoblotted as a 31kDa recombinant protein.

  19. Single domain antibodies as a powerful tool for high quality surface plasmon resonance studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Antonio Della Pia

    Full Text Available Single domain antibodies are recombinantly expressed functional antibodies devoid of light chains. These binding elements are derived from heavy chain antibodies found in camelids and offer several distinctive properties for applications in biotechnology such as small size, stability, solubility, and expression in high yields. In this study we demonstrated the potential of using single domain antibodies as capturing molecules in biosensing applications. Single domain antibodies raised against green fluorescent protein were anchored onto biosensor surfaces by using several immobilization strategies based on Ni2+:nitrilotriacetic acid-polyhistidine tag, antibody-antigen, biotin-streptavidin interactions and amine-coupling chemistry. The interaction with the specific target of the single domain antibodies was characterized by surface plasmon resonance. The immobilized single domain antibodies show high affinities for their antigens with KD = 3-6 nM and outperform other antibody partners as capturing molecules facilitating also the data analysis. Furthermore they offer high resistance and stability to a wide range of denaturing agents. These unique biophysical properties and the production of novel single domain antibodies against affinity tags make them particularly attractive for use in biosensing and diagnostic assays.

  20. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  1. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  2. Antisperm antibodies and fertility association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, B; Cardona-Maya, W

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the relation between antisperm antibodies (ASA) and human fertility by reviewing the scientific literature of the last 45 years. We carried out a review of scientific literature about antisperm antibodies and infertility published in spanish or english in databases as Pubmed, Medline, Scielo, some books and another gray literature include information related to this review and that is published in the last 45 years. Infertile couples suffer infertility by immunological mechanisms mainly by the presence of antisperm antibodies ASA in blood, semen or cervicovaginal secretions; the formation of ASA in men and women may be associated with disturbance in immunomodulatory mechanisms that result in functional impairment of sperm and thus its inability to fertilize the oocyte. Immunological infertility caused by ASA is the result of interference of these antibodies in various stages of fertilization process, inhibiting the ability of interaction between sperm and oocyte. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Antibody Drug Conjugates: Preclinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Gadi G

    2015-05-01

    The development path for antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) is more complex and challenging than for unmodified antibodies. While many of the preclinical considerations for both unmodified and antibody drug conjugates are shared, special considerations must be taken into account when developing an ADC. Unlike unmodified antibodies, an ADC must preferentially bind to tumor cells, internalize, and traffic to the appropriate intracellular compartment to release the payload. Parameters that can impact the pharmacological properties of this class of therapeutics include the selection of the payload, the type of linker, and the methodology for payload drug conjugation. Despite a plethora of in vitro assays and in vivo models to screen and evaluate ADCs, the challenge remains to develop improved preclinical tools that will be more predictive of clinical outcome. This review will focus on preclinical considerations for clinically validated small molecule ADCs. In addition, the lessons learned from Mylotarg®, the first in class FDA-approved ADC, are highlighted.

  4. Glycine receptor antibodies in PERM and related syndromes: characteristics, clinical features and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-González, Alexander; Leite, M. Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; Coutinho, Ester; Balint, Bettina; Lang, Bethan; Pettingill, Philippa; Carr, Aisling; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Press, Raomand; Lunn, Michael P.; Lim, Ming; Maddison, Paul; Meinck, H.-M.; Vandenberghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    The clinical associations of glycine receptor antibodies have not yet been described fully. We identified prospectively 52 antibody-positive patients and collated their clinical features, investigations and immunotherapy responses. Serum glycine receptor antibody endpoint titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:60 000. In 11 paired samples, serum levels were higher than (n = 10) or equal to (n = 1) cerebrospinal fluid levels; there was intrathecal synthesis of glycine receptor antibodies in each of the six pairs available for detailed study. Four patients also had high glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (>1000 U/ml), and one had high voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibody (2442 pM). Seven patients with very low titres (antibodies activated complement on glycine receptor-transfected human embryonic kidney cells at room temperature, and caused internalization and lysosomal degradation of the glycine receptors at 37°C. Immunoglobulin G antibodies bound to rodent spinal cord and brainstem co-localizing with monoclonal antibodies to glycine receptor-α1. Ten glycine receptor antibody positive samples were also identified in a retrospective cohort of 56 patients with stiff person syndrome and related syndromes. Glycine receptor antibodies are strongly associated with spinal and brainstem disorders, and the majority of patients have progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. The antibodies demonstrate in vitro evidence of pathogenicity and the patients respond well to immunotherapies, contrasting with earlier studies of this syndrome, which indicated a poor prognosis. The presence of glycine receptor antibodies should help to identify a disease that responds to immunotherapies, but these treatments may need to be sustained, relapses can occur and maintenance immunosuppression may be required. PMID:24951641

  5. Effects of altered FcγR binding on antibody pharmacokinetics in cynomolgus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leabman, Maya K; Meng, Y Gloria; Kelley, Robert F; DeForge, Laura E; Cowan, Kyra J; Iyer, Suhasini

    2013-01-01

    Antibody interactions with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs), like FcγRIIIA, play a critical role in mediating antibody effector functions and thereby contribute significantly to the biologic and therapeutic activity of antibodies. Over the past decade, considerable work has been directed towards production of antibodies with altered binding affinity to FcγRs and evaluation of how the alterations modulate their therapeutic activity. This has been achieved by altering glycosylation status at N297 or by engineering modifications in the crystallizable fragment (Fc) region. While the effects of these modifications on biologic activity and efficacy have been examined, few studies have been conducted to understand their effect on antibody pharmacokinetics (PK). We present here a retrospective analysis in which we characterize the PK of three antibody variants with decreased FcγR binding affinity caused by amino acid substitutions in the Fc region (N297A, N297G, and L234A/L235A) and three antibody variants with increased FcγRIIIA binding affinity caused by afucosylation at N297, and compare their PK to corresponding wild type antibody PK in cynomolgus monkeys. For all antibodies, PK was examined at a dose that was known to be in the linear range. Since production of the N297A and N297G variants in Chinese hamster ovary cells results in aglycosylated antibodies that do not bind to FcγRs, we also examined the effect of expression of an aglycosylated antibody, without sequence change(s), in E. coli. All the variants demonstrated similar PK compared with that of the wild type antibodies, suggesting that, for the six antibodies presented here, altered FcγR binding affinity does not affect PK. PMID:24492343

  6. Glycine receptor antibodies are detected in progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM) but not in saccadic oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Takahiro; Leite, Maria I; Lang, Bethan; Waters, Patrick; Urano, Yoshiaki; Miyakawa, Saori; Hamada, Junichi; Sakai, Fumihiko; Mochizuki, Hideki; Vincent, Angela

    2012-08-01

    Glycine receptor (GlyR) antibodies were recently identified in a few patients with progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM); none of these patients had antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). An inhibitory glycinergic transmission defect has also been implicated in the mechanism underlying saccadic oscillations, including ocular flutter or opsoclonus; GlyR antibodies have not been reported in these patients. The purpose was to determine whether GlyR antibodies are found in patients with PERM, ocular flutter syndrome (OFS), and opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS). GlyR antibodies were first measured in archived sera and CSF from five patients, including one patient with GAD antibody-positive PERM, two patients with OFS, and two patients with OMS. GlyR antibodies were also measured in archived sera from nine other adult patients with OMS. GlyR antibodies and GAD antibodies were both found at high titers in the serum and CSF of the patient with PERM, and their levels paralleled disease activity over time. GlyR antibodies were not found at significant levels in 13 patients with saccadic oscillations. GlyR and GAD antibodies can co-exist in PERM and follow the clinical course. Although saccadic oscillations are a feature of this condition, GlyR antibodies are not commonly found in patients with isolated saccadic oscillations.

  7. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  8. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  9. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Antibody side chain conformations are position-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leem, Jinwoo; Georges, Guy; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M

    2018-01-10

    Side chain prediction is an integral component of computational antibody design and structure prediction. Current antibody modelling tools use backbone-dependent rotamer libraries with conformations taken from general proteins. Here we present our antibody-specific rotamer library, where rotamers are binned according to their immunogenetics (IMGT) position, rather than their local backbone geometry. We find that for some amino acid types at certain positions, only a restricted number of side chain conformations are ever observed. Using this information, we are able to reduce the breadth of the rotamer sampling space. Based on our rotamer library, we built a side chain predictor, position-dependent antibody rotamer swapper (PEARS). On a blind test set of 95 antibody model structures, PEARS had the highest average χ 1 and χ1+2 accuracy (78.7% and 64.8%) compared to three leading backbone-dependent side chain predictors. Our use of IMGT position, rather than backbone ϕ/ψ, meant that PEARS was more robust to errors in the backbone of the model structure. PEARS also achieved the lowest number of side chain-side chain clashes. PEARS is freely available as a web application at http://opig.stats.ox.ac.uk/webapps/pears. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Radiosensitivity of antibody responses and radioresistant secondary tetanus antitoxin responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoner, R.; Terres, G.; Cottier, H.; Hess, M.

    1976-01-01

    Primary tetanus antitoxin responses were increasingly repressed in mice when gamma radiation doses of 100 to 400 rads were delivered by whole-body exposure prior to immunization with fluid tetanus toxoid (FTT). Nearly normal secondary antitoxin responses were obtained in mice exposed to 600 rads of gamma radiation 4 days after secondary antigenic stimulation with FTT. A rapid transition from radiosensitivity of the antibody-forming system on days 1 to 3 was followed by relative radioresistance on day 4 after the booster injection of toxoid. Studies on lymphoid cellular kinetics in popliteal lymph nodes after injection of 3 H--thymidine ( 3 H--TdR) and incorporation of 3 H--L-histidine into circulating antitoxin were carried out. Analysis of tritium radioactivity in antigen--antibody precipitates of serums 2 hr after injection of the labeled amino acid revealed maximum incorporation into antibody around day 7 after the booster in nonirradiated controls and about day 12, i.e., 8 days after irradiation, in experimental mice. The shift from radiosensitivity to relative radioresistance was attributed to a marked peak of plasma-cell proliferation in the medulla of lymph nodes on day 3. Many medullary plasma cells survived and continued to proliferate after exposure to radiation. Germinal centers were destroyed by radiation within 1 day. Since antibody formation continued after exposure to radiation and after the loss of germinal centers, this supports the view that germinal-center cells were involved more in the generation of memory cells than in antibody synthesis

  12. Clinical study on antibody-associated limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jia-wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE has attracted attentions of more and more clinicians. The associated antibodies mainly act on neuronal cell surface antigens, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptor, the γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB receptor, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2 and so on. The clinical manifestation is primarily defined by the subacute onset of short-term memory loss, seizures, confusion and psychiatric symptoms suggesting the involvement of the limbic system. These severe and protracted disorders can affect children and young adults, occurring with or without tumor association. Routine detection of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and imaging tests show no specificity, but associated antibodies can be detected in serum and (or CSF. The patients respond well to tumor resection and immunotherapies, including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, plasma exchange or combination of them, but may relapse. This article aims to study the clinical features and treatment of antibody-associated limbic encephalitis and to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of these diseases.

  13. Replacing reprogramming factors with antibodies selected from combinatorial antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Joel W; Xie, Jia; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Gross, Simon; Lee, Sohyon; Lerner, Richard A; Baldwin, Kristin K

    2017-10-01

    The reprogramming of differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is usually achieved by exogenous induction of transcription by factors acting in the nucleus. In contrast, during development, signaling pathways initiated at the membrane induce differentiation. The central idea of this study is to identify antibodies that can catalyze cellular de-differentiation and nuclear reprogramming by acting at the cell surface. We screen a lentiviral library encoding ∼100 million secreted and membrane-bound single-chain antibodies and identify antibodies that can replace either Sox2 and Myc (c-Myc) or Oct4 during reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts into iPSCs. We show that one Sox2-replacing antibody antagonizes the membrane-associated protein Basp1, thereby de-repressing nuclear factors WT1, Esrrb and Lin28a (Lin28) independent of Sox2. By manipulating this pathway, we identify three methods to generate iPSCs. Our results establish unbiased selection from autocrine combinatorial antibody libraries as a robust method to discover new biologics and uncover membrane-to-nucleus signaling pathways that regulate pluripotency and cell fate.

  14. [Commentary on] Serum vaccine antibody concentrations in children exposed to perfluorinated compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P.; Andersen, Elisabeth Wreford; Budtz-Jorgenser

    2012-01-01

    The article presents insights into a study which examined the role of perfluorinated compounds (PFC) in antibody response to childhood vaccinations. The prevalence of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) which were mentioned in the study was reported by the U...

  15. Radioiodination of antibodies for tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    In view of the great potential of radioiodinated antibody for the detection and treatment of cancer, the present article deals with the various techniques of radioiodination of antibody and their uses. Topics include methods of iodination of antibody, advantages and disadvantages of different methods, and effects of radioiodination on the antibody molecules with respect to their physiochemical and immunologic reactivity. In addition, the clinical usefulness of radioiodinated antibodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  16. Antibodies from plants for bionanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgue, Gueven; Twyman, Richard M; Beiss, Veronique; Fischer, Rainer; Sack, Markus

    2017-11-01

    Antibodies are produced as part of the vertebrate adaptive immune response and are not naturally made by plants. However, antibody DNA sequences can be introduced into plants, and together with laboratory technologies that allow the design of antibodies recognizing any conceivable molecular structure, plants can be used as 'green factories' to produce any antibody at all. The advent of plant-based transient expression systems in particular allows the rapid, convenient, and safe production of antibodies, ranging from laboratory-scale expression to industrial-scale manufacturing. The key features of plant-based production include safety, speed, low cost, and convenience, allowing newcomers to rapidly master the technology and use it to its full advantage. Manufacturing in plants has recently achieved significant milestones and offers more than just an alternative to established microbial and mammalian cell platforms. The use of plants for product development in particular offers the power and flexibility to easily coexpress many different genes, allowing the plug-and-play construction of novel bionanomaterials, perfectly complementing existing approaches based on plant virus-like particles. As well as producing single antibodies for applications in medicine, agriculture, and industry, plants can be used to produce antibody-based supramolecular structures and scaffolds as a new generation of green bionanomaterials that promise a bright future based on clean and renewable nanotechnology applications. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1462. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1462 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2017 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Antibody-Directed Phototherapy (ADP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Adil Butt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically-approved but rather under-exploited treatment modality for cancer and pre-cancerous superficial lesions. It utilises a cold laser or LED to activate a photochemical reaction between a light activated drug (photosensitiser-drug and oxygen to generate cytotoxic oxygen species. These free radical species damage cellular components leading to cell death. Despite its benefits, the complexity, limited potency and side effects of PDT have led to poor general usage. However, the research area is very active with an increasing understanding of PDT-related cell biology, photophysics and significant progress in molecular targeting of disease. Monoclonal antibody therapy is maturing and the next wave of antibody therapies includes antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs, which promise to be more potent and curable. These developments could lift antibody-directed phototherapy (ADP to success. ADP promises to increase specificity and potency and improve drug pharmacokinetics, thus delivering better PDT drugs whilst retaining its other benefits. Whole antibody conjugates with first generation ADP-drugs displayed problems with aggregation, poor pharmacokinetics and loss of immuno-reactivity. However, these early ADP-drugs still showed improved selectivity and potency. Improved PS-drug chemistry and a variety of conjugation strategies have led to improved ADP-drugs with retained antibody and PS-drug function. More recently, recombinant antibody fragments have been used to deliver ADP-drugs with superior drug loading, more favourable pharmacokinetics, enhanced potency and target cell selectivity. These improvements offer a promise of better quality PDT drugs.

  18. Antibody Validation by Western Blotting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signore, Michele; Manganelli, Valeria; Hodge, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Validation of antibodies is an integral part of translational research, particularly for biomarker discovery. Assaying the specificity of the reagent (antibody) and confirming the identity of the protein biomarker is of critical importance prior to implementing any biomarker in clinical studies, and the lack of such quality control tests may result in unexpected and/or misleading results.Antibody validation is the procedure in which a single antibody is thoroughly assayed for sensitivity and specificity. Although a plethora of commercial antibodies exist, antibody specificity must be extensively demonstrated using diverse complex biological samples, rather than purified recombinant proteins, prior to use in clinical translational research. In the simplest iteration, antibody specificity is determined by the presence of a single band in a complex biological sample, at the expected molecular weight, on a Western blot.To date, numerous Western blotting procedures are available, based on either manual or automated systems and spanning the spectrum of single blots to multiplex blots. X-ray film is still employed in many research laboratories, but digital imaging has become a gold standard in immunoblotting. The basic principles of Western blotting are (a) separation of protein mixtures by gel electrophoresis, (b) transfer of the proteins to a blot, (c) probing the blot for a protein or proteins of interest, and (d) subsequent detection of the protein by chemiluminescent, fluorescent, or colorimetric methods. This chapter focuses on the chemiluminescent detection of proteins using a manual Western blotting system and a vacuum-enhanced detection system (SNAP i.d.™, Millipore).

  19. ANTIBODIES TO SKELETAL-MUSCLE IN MYASTHENIA-GRAVIS .1. DIAGNOSTIC-VALUE FOR THE DETECTION OF THYMOMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUKS, JBM; LIMBURG, PC; HORST, G; OOSTERHUIS, HJGH

    1993-01-01

    The role of anti-muscle antibodies (AMA) in the diagnosis of thymoma in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) is evaluated. We compared ELISA and Western blot assay for antibodies to citric acid muscle extract (a-CAE) with an immunofluorescence assay (IF). Sera from 234 selected MG patients and 123

  20. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases.

  1. Evaluation of a monoclonal antibody able to detect live Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sølve, Marianne; Boel, Jeppe; Nørrung, Birgit

    2000-01-01

    A monoclonal Listeria antibody, designated B4, was evaluated. The ability of the antibody to bind to viable bacteria belonging to Listeria spp, compared to bacteria of the same species killed by beat treatment, acid or base treatment, sanitizers, and irradiation was examined. The antibody was found...... to react with viable L. monocytogenes and L. innocua, but not with heat-killed (72 degrees C, 5 min) strains of these organisms. When L. monocytogenes and L. innocua were killed by methods other than heat treatment, it was ambiguous whether the antibody detected the organism or not. It was concluded...... that the B4 antibody has potential to be used in an immune capture step to capture live L, monocytogenes and L. innocua from foods prior to identification of L. monocytogenes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)....

  2. Computational analysis of anti-HIV-1 antibody neutralization panel data to identify potential functional epitope residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Anthony P; Scharf, Louise; Horwitz, Joshua; Klein, Florian; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Bjorkman, Pamela J

    2013-06-25

    Advances in single-cell antibody cloning methods have led to the identification of a variety of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 antibodies. We developed a computational tool (Antibody Database) to help identify critical residues on the HIV-1 envelope protein whose natural variation affects antibody activity. Our simplifying assumption was that, for a given antibody, a significant portion of the dispersion of neutralization activity across a panel of HIV-1 strains is due to the amino acid identity or glycosylation state at a small number of specific sites, each acting independently. A model of an antibody's neutralization IC50 was developed in which each site contributes a term to the logarithm of the modeled IC50. The analysis program attempts to determine the set of rules that minimizes the sum of the residuals between observed and modeled IC50 values. The predictive quality of the identified rules may be assessed in part by whether there is support for rules within individual viral clades. As a test case, we analyzed antibody 8ANC195, an anti-glycoprotein gp120 antibody of unknown specificity. The model for this antibody indicated that several glycosylation sites were critical for neutralization. We evaluated this prediction by measuring neutralization potencies of 8ANC195 against HIV-1 in vitro and in an antibody therapy experiment in humanized mice. These experiments confirmed that 8ANC195 represents a distinct class of glycan-dependent anti-HIV-1 antibody and validated the utility of computational analysis of neutralization panel data.

  3. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  4. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vickie S.

    2013-01-01

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  5. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  6. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  7. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  8. Hu and Yo antibodies have heterogeneous avidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, Cecilie; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2007-04-01

    Onconeural antibodies such as anti-Hu and anti-Yo may be important in the pathogenesis of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes. The avidity of these antibodies is not known. In this study, we compared the avidity of Hu and Yo antibodies both at single time points and over a time range of 2 months to 6 years. The avidity of Yo and Hu antibodies differed among the patients, but anti-Yo generally had higher avidity than anti-Hu. Whether Yo antibodies are more pathogenic than Hu antibodies are presently unknown.

  9. A radioimmunoassay for antibodies against surface membrane antigens using adhering cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tax, A.; Manson, L.A.

    1976-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay using cells adhering to plastic is described. In this assay, A-10 mammary carcinoma attached to the surface of plastic in microtiter plates were permitted to bind antibody and the bound antibody was detected with purified rabbit 125 I-antimouse-Fab. The bound radioactive material was eluted with glycine-HCl buffer (pH 2.5), and the acid eluates were counted in a gamma counter. This assay can be used to detect cytolic or noncytolic antibody to cell surface antigens in studies with any tumor or normal cell that will adhere to a solid surface

  10. Fluctuation of zonulin levels in blood vs stability of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdani, Aristo; Vojdani, Elroy; Kharrazian, Datis

    2017-08-21

    To evaluate the measurement of zonulin level and antibodies of zonulin and other tight junction proteins in the blood of controls and celiac disease patients. This study was conducted to assess the variability or stability of zonulin levels vs IgA and IgG antibodies against zonulin in blood samples from 18 controls at 0, 6, 24 and 30 h after blood draw. We also measured zonulin level as well as zonulin, occludin, vinculin, aquaporin 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein antibodies in the sera of 30 patients with celiac disease and 30 controls using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methodology. The serum zonulin level in 6 out of 18 subjects was low or zonulin levels of > 2.8 ng/mL and showed significant fluctuation from sample to sample. Comparatively, zonulin antibody measured in all samples was highly stable and reproducible from sample to sample. Celiac disease patients showed zonulin levels with a mean of 8.5 ng/mL compared to 3.7 ng/mL in controls ( P zonulin level at 2SD above the mean was demonstrated in 37% of celiac disease patients, while antibodies against zonulin, occludin and other tight junction proteins was detected in up to 86% of patients with celiac disease. Due to its fluctuation, a single measurement of zonulin level is not recommended for assessment of intestinal barrier integrity. Measurement of IgG and IgA antibodies against zonulin, occludin, and other tight junction proteins is proposed for the evaluation of the loss of intestinal barrier integrity.

  11. Studies on associations of antinuclear antibodies with antibodies to an uveitogenic peptide of retinal S antigen in children with uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, A M; Hauta, S A; Prokopchuk, P A; Romanchuk, K G

    1996-02-01

    To determine if, in children with uveitis, antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are associated with antibodies to an uveitogenic peptide of a soluble retinal antigen and to the homologous nuclear antigen, histone 3 (H3). ANA occur in most children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and associated uveitis. An uveitogenic segment of retinal soluble antigen (S antigen peptide) is homologous with a similarly uveitogenic peptide of H3. We investigated a possible association between ANA positivity, antibodies to H3, and antibodies to the uveitogenic S antigen peptide. The sera of 31 children with uveitis (20 of whom had associated JRA) were tested for the presence of ANA by indirect immunofluorescence. Antibodies to H3 and to an uveitogenic peptide of S antigen (an 18 mer segment having the amino acid sequence DTNLASSTIIKEGIDKTV) were measured by enzyme immunoassay. 19 of 20 children (95%) with JRA and associated uveitis and none of 11 with uveitis not associated with JRA had positive tests for ANA (X2 = 14.97; p < 0.00001). 16 of 19 ANA positive sera from subjects with JRA (84%) displayed reactivity with the chromosomal regions of metaphase cells. 9 of 20 patients with JRA with uveitis (45%) and 2 of 11 patients (18%) with uveitis not associated with JRA had antibodies to H3. Two uveitic patients with JRA (10%) and 2 non-JRA patients with uveitis (18%) reacted with S antigen peptide. Antibodies to H3 occurred significantly more frequently in children with uveitis than in all adult control subjects (X2 = 12.98; p = 0.003) and in adults with uveitis (X2 = 5.62; p = 0.022). Humoral immune responses to the uveitogenic peptide of S antigen and the homologous H3 antigen appear not to be uniquely important in the immunopathology of uveitis associated with JRA. Antibodies to isolated H3 do not exclusively account for ANA positivity in the uveitic patient with JRA. A unique immunopathogenic mechanism for the development of uveitis associated with JRA is suggested by the

  12. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD... Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic antigens...

  13. Homogeneous plate based antibody internalization assay using pH sensor fluorescent dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Zimprich, Chad; Dwight, Stephen J; Corona, Cesear; McDougall, Mark; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-04-01

    Receptor-mediated antibody internalization is a key mechanism underlying several anti-cancer antibody therapeutics. Delivering highly toxic drugs to cancer cells, as in the case of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), efficient removal of surface receptors from cancer cells and changing the pharmacokinetics profile of the antibody drugs are some of key ways that internalization impacts the therapeutic efficacy of the antibodies. Over the years, several techniques have been used to study antibody internalization including radiolabels, fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry and cellular toxicity assays. While these methods allow analysis of internalization, they have limitations including a multistep process and limited throughput and are generally endpoint assays. Here, we present a new homogeneous method that enables time and concentration dependent measurements of antibody internalization. The method uses a new hydrophilic and bright pH sensor dye (pHAb dye), which is not fluorescent at neutral pH but becomes highly fluorescent at acidic pH. For receptor mediated antibody internalization studies, antibodies against receptors are conjugated with the pHAb dye and incubated with the cells expressing the receptors. Upon binding to the receptor, the dyes conjugated to the antibody are not fluorescent because of the neutral pH of the media, but upon internalization and trafficking into endosomal and lysosomal vesicles the pH drops and dyes become fluorescent. The enabling attributes of the pHAb dyes are the hydrophilic nature to minimize antibody aggregation and bright fluorescence at acidic pH which allows development of simple plate based assays using a fluorescent reader. Using two different therapeutic antibodies--Trastuzumab (anti-HER2) and Cetuximab (anti-EGFR)--we show labeling with pHAb dye using amine and thiol chemistries and impact of chemistry and dye to antibody ration on internalization. We finally present two new approaches using the pHAb dye, which will be

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to Treponema Pallidum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; J.D.A. van Embden; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThree successive fusions of mouse myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes of a mouse immunized with Treponema Pallidum resulted in one hybridoma producing anti T. pallidum antibodies for each fusion. The mice were immunized with live pallidum cells respectively 1, 3 and 5 months before

  15. Auto-antibodies and their association with clinical findings in women diagnosed with microscopic colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Roth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microscopic colitis (MC is a disease manifested by diarrhoea and is divided into collagenous and lymphocytic colitis. The aetiology is unknown, but auto-immunity is suggested. Auto-antibodies have been only rarely examined in this entity. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of auto-antibodies, and to examine associations between the presence of antibodies and clinical findings. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Women with MC verified by biopsy and younger than 73 years, at any Department of Gastroenterology, in the district of Skåne, between 2002 and 2010 were invited to participate in this study. The patients were asked to complete both a questionnaire describing their medical history and the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS. Blood samples were collected. Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA, anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA, and antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (anti-GAD, islet antigens-like insulin 2 (anti-IA2, thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, and thyrotropin receptor (TRAK were analysed. Of 240 women identified, 133 were finally included in the study, median age 63 (59-67 years. Apart from the MC diagnosis, 52% also suffered from irritable bowel syndrome, 31% from hypertension and 31% from allergy. The prevalence of ANA (14%, ASCA IgG (13%, and anti-TPO antibodies (14% for these patients was slightly higher than for the general population, and were found together with other concomitant diseases. Patients had more of all gastrointestinal symptoms compared with norm values, irrespective of antibody expression. CONCLUSIONS: Women with MC have a slightly increased prevalence of some auto-antibodies. These antibodies are not associated with symptoms, but are expressed in patients with concomitant diseases, obscuring the pathophysiology and clinical picture of MC.

  16. Epitope and functional specificity of monoclonal antibodies to mouse gamma interferon: the synthetic peptide approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.K.; Hayes, M.P.; Carter, J.M.; Torres, B.A.; Dunn, B.M.; Johnson, H.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four anti-recombinant mouse gamma interferon (α-IFNγ) monoclonal antibodies were generated using hamster spleen cells. Binding of 125 I-IFNγ by these protein A-bound antibodies was specifically blocked by cold IFNγ. Binding by three of these antibodies was also blocked by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminal 1-39 amino acids of IFNγ, while a corresponding C-terminal (95-133) peptide had no effect on binding. One of the N-terminal specific monoclonal antibodies inhibited both the antiviral and macrophage priming (for tumor cell killing) activities of IFNγ, while the other two had no effect on either biological function. Blocking experiments with cold IFNγ and N-terminal peptide suggest that the epitope specificities of the monoclonal antibodies could be determined by the conformational or topographic structure of IFNγ. Polyclonal antibodies to either the N-terminal or C-terminal peptides also inhibited both the antiviral and macrophage priming activities of IFNγ. All of the antibodies that inhibited IFNγ function also blocked binding of IFNγ to membrane receptor on cells, while antibodies that did not inhibit function also did not block binding. The data suggest that both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of IFNγ play an important role in its antiviral and macrophage priming functions, possibly in a cooperative manner

  17. Immunologic and functional characterization of anti-HLA-DR rabbit antibodies induced by synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Schulz, G; Houghten, R A

    1984-10-01

    Three peptides selected from the amino acid sequence of the alpha- and beta-chains of DR2 histocompatibility antigens were chemically synthesized and coupled to carrier proteins to be used as immunogens in rabbits. This immunization resulted in the production of specific antibodies that readily recognized the antigen. However, only one of the four antibody preparations, antibody 6148, elicited by a short peptide from the beta-chain (residues 61-73), reacts with native membrane glycoproteins as well as intact human lymphoblastoid cells in enzyme-linked immunosorbant assays. This antibody was found to react also with membrane glycoproteins solubilized by nonionic detergents from cells bearing a different HLA-DR specificity: therefore it is likely that the peptide responsible for eliciting antibody 6148 represents a common framework determinant of DR alloantigens that is accessible on the surface of lymphoblastoid cells. The ability of antibody 6148 to bind to intact cells was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence and by fluorescein-activated cell sorter analysis. This antibody is also capable of mediating antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity as determined by a 51Cr-release assay.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall polysaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, M.G.; Bucheli, E.; Darvill, A.; Albersheim, P. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens (USA))

    1989-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) are useful tools to probe the structure of plant cell wall polysaccharides and to localize these polysaccharides in plant cells and tissues. Murine McAbs were generated against the pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I), isolated from suspension-cultured sycamore cells. The McAbs that were obtained were grouped into three classes based upon their reactivities with a variety of plant polysaccharides and membrane glycoproteins. Eleven McAbs (Class I) recognize epitope(s) that appear to be immunodominant and are found in RG-I from sycamore and maize, citrus pectin, polygalacturonic acid, and membrane glycoproteins from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore, maize, tobacco, parsley, and soybean. A second group of five McAbs (Class II) recognize epitope(s) present in sycamore RG-I, but do not bind to any of the other polysaccharides or glycoproteins recognized by Class I. Lastly, one McAb (Class III) reacts with sycamore RG-I, sycamore and tamarind xyloglucan, and sycamore and rice glucuronoarabinoxylan, but does not bind to maize RG-I, polygalacturonic acid or the plant membrane glycoproteins recognized by Class I. McAbs in Classes II and III are likely to be useful in studies of the structure, biosynthesis and localization of plant cell wall polysaccharides.

  19. Antibodies against glycolipids enhance antifungal activity of macrophages and reduce fungal burden after infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Amelia eBueno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Paracoccidioidomycosis is a fungal disease endemic in Latin America. Polyclonal antibodies to acidic glycosphingolipids (GSLs from Paracoccidioides brasiliensis opsonized yeast forms in vitro increasing phagocytosis and reduced the fungal burden of infected animals. Antibodies to GSL were active in both prophylactic and therapeutic protocols using a murine intratracheal infection model. Pathological examination of the lungs of animals treated with antibodies to GSL showed well-organized granulomas and minimally damaged parenchyma compared to the untreated control. Murine peritoneal macrophages activated by IFN-γ and incubated with antibodies against acidic GSLs more effectively phagocytosed and killed P. brasiliensis yeast cells as well as produced more nitric oxide compared to controls. The present work discloses a novel target of protective antibodies against P. brasiliensis adding to other well-studied mediators of the immune response to this fungus.

  20. Preparation and biological evaluation of radiolabelled antibodies with selected carbohydrate modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, P.; Koganty, R.R.; Selvaraj, S.

    1993-01-01

    Two carbohydrates, N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) and galactose-β-1,3-GalNAc have been attached to human IgG (hIgG) by a novel linking reagent, hexafluoroglutaric acid dimethyl ester. Fluorine-19 NMR signals were used for the determination of the conjugation ratio. A third carbohydrate, sialic acid, was conjugated via reductive amination and the conjugation ratio determined by a resorcinol assay. The biological behaviour of these radiodinated antibodies with carbohydrate modification in normal mice indicates an enhanced liver uptake at 15 min post-injection with an associated change in circulating blood levels occurs for the galactose-based hIgG preparations. However, no significant differences in the biodistribution were observed for the sialic acid conjugate. These studies confirm the potential of carbohydrate-antibody conjugation for modifying the behaviour of antibodies in immunoscintigraphy and radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  1. Antibodies with specificity for native and denatured forms of ovalbumin differ in reactivity between enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, B.E.; Bergmann, A.C.; Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    constituting amino acids 130–135 and 136–141, respectively. Moreover, comparison of antibody reactivity to N OVA revealed that in the streptavidin-capture ELISA, antibody reactivity was notably reduced compared to ELISA employing surface-bound OVA. Collectively, immunization with native OVA preferentially...... to native OVA reacted strongly with native and denatured OVA in both assays, but did not react with the overlapping peptides. Polyclonal antibodies to denatured OVA reacted strongly with both OVA forms and with several of the overlapping peptides. Monoclonal antibodies to native OVA reacted preferentially...... with three-dimensional epitopes on native OVA and not with denatured OVA. Monoclonal antibodies to denatured OVA showed reactivity to both OVA forms. Two of these monoclonal antibodies, HYB 94-06 and 94-07, showed reactivity to overlapping peptides and their epitopes were identified as flexible structures...

  2. Radioimmunological determination of growth hormone antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kracmar, P.; Hnikova, O.

    1979-01-01

    The method is based on the assumption of the presence of antibodies in the serum of the patient and the formation of the complex antibody-tracer ( 125 I-STH). For separation the principle is used of two antibodies and subsequent ultrafiltration with membrane ultrafilters. Clinical experience, reproducibility and the procedure recommended for simple monitoring and the determination of the amount of antibodies in the serum of patients are presented. (author)

  3. Antibody therapeutics - the evolving patent landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petering, Jenny; McManamny, Patrick; Honeyman, Jane

    2011-09-01

    The antibody patent landscape has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years, particularly in areas of technology relating to antibody modification to reduce immunogenicity in humans or improve antibody function. In some cases antibody techniques that were developed in the 1980s are still the subject of patent protection in the United States or Canada. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody resp...... against the infection. On the other hand, immune complexes between the beta-lactamase and corresponding antibodies could play a role in the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary injury in CF by mediating hyperimmune reactions....

  5. Radioimmunoassay method for detection of gonorrhea antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A novel radioimmunoassay for the detection of gonorrhea antibodies in serum is described. A radionuclide is bound to gonorrhea antigens produced by a growth culture. In the presence of gonorrhea antibodies in the serum, an antigen-antibody conjugate is formed, the concentration of which can be measured with conventional radiometric methods. The radioimmunoassay is highly specific

  6. Antibodies Against Melanin | Wassermann | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reports on unsuccessful attempts to produce antibodies against melanoprotein in rabbits. Available evidence suggests antibodies against melanocytes in the aetiology of vitiligo, but there is no convincing evidence for antibodies against melanin per se. It is suggested that the demonstration of antibodif's against ...

  7. Targeting Antibodies to Carbon Nano tube Field Effect Transistors by Pyrene Hydrazide Modification of Heavy Chain Carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefansson, S.; Ahn, S.N.; Kwon, H.H.

    2012-01-01

    Many carbon nano tube field-effect transistor (CNT-FET) studies have used immobilized antibodies as the ligand binding moiety. However, antibodies are not optimal for CNT-FET detection due to their large size and charge. Their size can prevent ligands from reaching within the Debye length of the CNTs and a layer of charged antibodies on the circuits can drown out any ligand signal. In an attempt to minimize the antibody footprint on CNT-FETs, we examined whether pyrene hydrazide modification of antibody carbohydrates could reduce the concentration required to functionalized CNT circuits. The carbohydrates are almost exclusively on the antibody Fc region and this site-specific modification could mediate uniform antibody orientation on the CNTs. We compared the hydrazide modification of anti-E. coli O157:H7 polyclonal antibodies to pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester-coated CNTs and carbodiimide-mediated antibody CNT attachment. Our results show that the pyrene hydrazide modification was superior to those methods with respect to bacteria detection and less than 1 nM labeled antibody was required to functionalized the circuits.

  8. Cytosolic antibody delivery by lipid-sensitive endosomolytic peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akishiba, Misao; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa; Sakamoto, Kentarou; Yu, Hao-Hsin; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Madani, Fatemeh; Gräslund, Astrid; Futaki, Shiroh

    2017-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in intracellular targeting using antibodies is their limited release from endosomes into the cytosol. Here we report an approach to deliver proteins, which include antibodies, into cells by using endosomolytic peptides derived from the cationic and membrane-lytic spider venom peptide M-lycotoxin. The delivery peptides were developed by introducing one or two glutamic acid residues into the hydrophobic face. One peptide with the substitution of leucine by glutamic acid (L17E) was shown to enable a marked cytosolic liberation of antibodies (immunoglobulins G (IgGs)) from endosomes. The predominant membrane-perturbation mechanism of this peptide is the preferential disruption of negatively charged membranes (endosomal membranes) over neutral membranes (plasma membranes), and the endosomolytic peptide promotes the uptake by inducing macropinocytosis. The fidelity of this approach was confirmed through the intracellular delivery of a ribosome-inactivation protein (saporin), Cre recombinase and IgG delivery, which resulted in a specific labelling of the cytosolic proteins and subsequent suppression of the glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription. We also demonstrate the L17E-mediated cytosolic delivery of exosome-encapsulated proteins.

  9. [Improved protein-A chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Toh, Phyllicia; Hoi, Aina; Xian, Mo; Peng, Xinying; Yang, Yuansheng; Zhang, Haibo; Nian, Rui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-25

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies become the major product class within the biopharmaceutical market. Protein A as the first capture step is still dominant in current platforms for purification of monoclonal antibodies. In this study, we developed a new antibody harvest process that incorporates acidic treatment of cell harvest, demonstrating high process yield, improved clearance of host cell associated contaminants, like non-histone host cell protein, histone, DNA and heteroaggregates. Host protein contamination was reduced about 10-fold compared to protein A loaded with harvest clarified by centrifugation and microfiltration. Turbidity increase of eluted IgG upon pH neutralization was nearly eliminated. Residual levels of impurities in the protein A eluate were achieved that potentially meet requirements of drug substance and thus alleviate the burden for further impurities removal in subsequent chromatography steps. The mechanism of host cell associated contaminants removal during acidic treatment was also explored. After a polishing step by Capto adhere, host cell protein was reduced to less than 5 ppm, DNA less than 1 ppb, histone to undetectable level, heteroaggregates less than 0.01% with total IgG recovery around 87%. This efficient process can be easily integrated into current IgG purification platforms, and may overcome downstream processing challenges.

  10. Evaluation of oriented lysozyme immobilized with monoclonal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Satoka; Okada, Keigo; Shigyo, Ayako; Man, Naoki; Karen, Akiya

    2008-12-01

    The orientation of a lysozyme immobilized with a monoclonal antibody was evaluated based on determination of the uppermost surface structure using time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS). Specific peaks of the oriented lysozyme immobilized with monoclonal anti-lysozyme antibody were obtained in comparison with reference samples, non-oriented immobilized lysozyme and immobilized anti-lysozyme antibody. All samples were freeze-dried before TOF-SIMS measurement, and then each sample was measured using TOF-SIMS with a bismuth cluster ion source. TOF-SIMS spectra were analyzed to select peaks specific to the oriented immobilized lysozyme as well as to identify their chemical formula and ensemble of amino acids. The possible chemical formulae of the lysozyme fragments were then investigated with an element matching program and a residue matching program. The results from TOF-SIMS spectra analysis were compared to the amino acid sequence of the lysozyme and its three-dimensional structure registered in the protein data bank. Finally, the fragment-ion-generating regions of the oriented immobilized lysozyme were determined based on the suggested residues and the three-dimensional structure.

  11. Detection of antibodies to co-trimoxazole (preservative drug interfering with routine red cell antibody screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Sachan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-dependent antibodies can rarely cause interference in pretransfusion antibody screening. The diluents for commercial reagent red blood cells contain different antibiotics, such as chloramphenicol, neomycin sulfate, and gentamycin as a preservative. The presence of antibodies to a given drug in patient may lead to positive results when performing antibody identification. We present a rare case of detection of anti-co-trimoxazole antibody during routine antibody screening in a female patient undergoing neurosurgery. These antibodies mimicked as antibody against high-frequency red cell antigens reacting in both saline phase as well as antiglobulin phase. Anti-co-trimoxazole antibody was confirmed by repeating antibody screen using reagent red cells of different manufacturers with and without co-trimoxazole drug as preservative as well as using washed red cell panels. There were no associated clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis.

  12. Capture ELISA for IgM antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum glutamate rich protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Borre, M B; Petersen, E

    1992-01-01

    This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta-galactos......This report describes a novel mu chain capture ELISA for the detection of IgM antibodies against a Plasmodium falciparum antigen. A fragment of the 220 kDa P. falciparum glutamate rich protein containing amino acid residues 489-1271 was expressed in E. coli as a recombinant chimeric beta...

  13. Solid phase double-antibody radioimmunoassay procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niswender, G.D.

    1977-01-01

    The present invention is concerned with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) procedure for assaying body fluid content of an antigenic substance which may either be an antigen itself or a hapten capable of being converted, such as by means of reaction with a protein, to an antigenic material. The present invention is concerned with a novel and improved modification of a double-antibody RIA technique in which there is a first antibody that is specific to the antigenic substance suspected to be present in a body fluid from which the assay is intended. The second antibody, however, is not specific to the antigenic substance or analyte, but is an antibody against the first antibody

  14. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140?250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  15. Antibody pretargeting advances cancer radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, David M; Sharkey, Robert M; Paganelli, Giovanni; Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François

    2006-02-10

    This article reviews the methods of pretargeting, which involve separating the targeting antibody from the subsequent delivery of an imaging or therapeutic agent that binds to the tumor-localized antibody. This provides enhanced tumor:background ratios and the delivery of a higher therapeutic dose than when antibodies are directly conjugated with radionuclides, as currently practiced in cancer radioimmunotherapy. We describe initial promising clinical results using streptavidin-antibody constructs with biotin-radionuclide conjugates in the treatment of patients with malignant gliomas, and of bispecific antibodies with hapten-radionuclides in the therapy of tumors expressing carcinoembryonic antigen, such as medullary thyroid and small-cell lung cancers.

  16. Serum Antibody Biomarkers for ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    45-56. Singh VK. (2009) Phenotypic expression of autoimmune autistic disorder (AAD): A major subset of autism. Ann Clin Psychiat. 21:148-160. 5...spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impairments in communication (verbal and nonverbal), social interactions, and... autoimmunity ; in particular, the generation of antibodies reactive against brain and CNS proteins. The goal of this grant is to identify serum

  17. Antibody Repertoire Development in Swine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Butler, J. E.; Wertz, N.; Šinkora, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, FEB 17 (2017), s. 255-279 ISSN 2165-8102 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-02274S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-09296S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : swine * pre-immune antibody repertoire * ileal Peyer's patches Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.708, year: 2016

  18. Mechanistic insights into the neutralization of cytotoxic abrin by the monoclonal antibody D6F10.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shradha Bagaria

    Full Text Available Abrin, an A/B toxin obtained from the Abrus precatorius plant is extremely toxic and a potential bio-warfare agent. Till date there is no antidote or vaccine available against this toxin. The only known neutralizing monoclonal antibody against abrin, namely D6F10, has been shown to rescue the toxicity of abrin in cells as well as in mice. The present study focuses on mapping the epitopic region to understand the mechanism of neutralization of abrin by the antibody D6F10. Truncation and mutational analysis of abrin A chain revealed that the amino acids 74-123 of abrin A chain contain the core epitope and the residues Thr112, Gly114 and Arg118 are crucial for binding of the antibody. In silico analysis of the position of the mapped epitope indicated that it is present close to the active site cleft of abrin A chain. Thus, binding of the antibody near the active site blocks the enzymatic activity of abrin A chain, thereby rescuing inhibition of protein synthesis by the toxin in vitro. At 1∶10 molar concentration of abrin:antibody, the antibody D6F10 rescued cells from abrin-mediated inhibition of protein synthesis but did not prevent cell attachment of abrin. Further, internalization of the antibody bound to abrin was observed in cells by confocal microscopy. This is a novel finding which suggests that the antibody might function intracellularly and possibly explains the rescue of abrin's toxicity by the antibody in whole cells and animals. To our knowledge, this study is the first report on a neutralizing epitope for abrin and provides mechanistic insights into the poorly understood mode of action of anti-A chain antibodies against several toxins including ricin.

  19. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UCSC)

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  20. Enhancing the sensitivity of immunoassay procedures by use of antibodies directed to the product of a reaction between probe labels and assay substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlanger, B.F.; Chen, B.X.

    1997-07-22

    The subject invention provides an antibody which specifically binds to the product of a reaction between a labeling substance and a substrate. The subject invention also provides a method of making an immunogen used to produce the antibody of the subject invention. The invention further provides methods of using the subject antibody for detecting an antigen of interest in a sample, for example detecting a protein comprising an amino acid sequence of interest and detecting a nucleic acid molecule comprising a nucleic acid sequence of interest. 8 figs.

  1. In vitro-engineered non-antibody protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Rudo; Chen, Zhilei

    2018-01-01

    Antibodies have proved to be a valuable mode of therapy for numerous diseases, mainly owing to their high target binding affinity and specificity. Unfortunately, antibodies are also limited in several respects, chief amongst those being the extremely high cost of manufacture. Therefore, non-antibody binding proteins have long been sought after as alternative therapies. New binding protein scaffolds are constantly being designed or discovered with some already approved for human use by the FDA. This review focuses on protein scaffolds that are either already being used in humans or are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. Although not all are expected to be approved, the significant benefits ensure that these molecules will continue to be investigated and developed as therapeutic alternatives to antibodies. Based on the location of the amino acids that mediate ligand binding, we place all the protein scaffolds under clinical development into two general categories: scaffolds with ligand-binding residues located in exposed flexible loops, and those with the binding residues located in protein secondary structures, such as α-helices. Scaffolds that fall under the first category include adnectins, anticalins, avimers, Fynomers, Kunitz domains, and knottins, while those belonging to the second category include affibodies, β-hairpin mimetics, and designed ankyrin repeat proteins (DARPins). Most of these scaffolds are thermostable and can be easily produced in microorganisms or completely synthesized chemically. In addition, many of these scaffolds derive from human proteins and thus possess very low immunogenic potential. Additional advantages and limitations of these protein scaffolds as therapeutics compared to antibodies will be discussed.

  2. Engineered antibodies for monitoring of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karu, A.E.; Li, Q.X.; Roberts, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    'The long-term goal of this project is to develop antibodies and antibody-based methods for detection and recovery of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and PAH adducts that are potential biomarkers in environmental and biological samples. The inherent cross-reactivity will be exploited by pattern recognition methods. Dr. Karu''s laboratory uses new haptens representing key PAHs to derive recombinant Fab (rFab) and single-chain Fv (scFv) antibodies from hybridoma lines and combinatorial phage display libraries. Computational models of the haptens and combining sites made by Dr. Roberts''s group are used to guide antibody engineering by mutagenesis. Dr. Li''s laboratory develops enzyme immunoassays (EIAs), sensors, and immunoaffinity methods that make use of the novel haptens and antibodies for practical analytical applications in support of DOE''s mission. This report summarizes work completed in one and one-half years of a 3-year project, with close collaboration between the three research groups. Dr. Alexander Karu''s laboratory: the authors proceeded with the two strategies described in the original proposal. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to correct differences in the rFab N-terminal amino acids that were introduced by the degenerate PCR primers used for gene amplification. The binding constants of the rFabs with the corrected sequences will be compared with those of the parent MAbs, and should be very similar. The 4D5 and 10C10 heavy and light chain sequences are being moved to the pCOMB3H phagemid vector to facilitate selection of new engineered mutants.'

  3. Thermodynamic Mechanism for the Evasion of Antibody Neutralization in Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the epitopes of antigenic proteins can confer viral resistance to antibody-mediated neutralization. However, the fundamental properties that characterize epitope residues and how mutations affect antibody binding to alter virus susceptibility to neutralization remain largely unknown. To address these questions, we used an ensemble-based algorithm to characterize the effects of mutations on the thermodynamics of protein conformational fluctuations. We applied this method to the envelope protein domain III (ED3) of two medically important flaviviruses: West Nile and dengue 2. We determined an intimate relationship between the susceptibility of a residue to thermodynamic perturbations and epitope location. This relationship allows the successful identification of the primary epitopes in each ED3, despite their high sequence and structural similarity. Mutations that allow the ED3 to evade detection by the antibody either increase or decrease conformational fluctuations of the epitopes through local effects or long-range interactions. Spatially distant interactions originate in the redistribution of conformations of the ED3 ensembles, not through a mechanically connected array of contiguous amino acids. These results reconcile previous observations of evasion of neutralization by mutations at a distance from the epitopes. Finally, we established a quantitative correlation between subtle changes in the conformational fluctuations of the epitope and large defects in antibody binding affinity. This correlation suggests that mutations that allow viral growth, while reducing neutralization, do not generate significant structural changes and underscores the importance of protein fluctuations and long-range interactions in the mechanism of antibody-mediated neutralization resistance. PMID:24950171

  4. Adaptive antibody diversification through N-linked glycosylation of the immunoglobulin variable region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bovenkamp, Fleur S; Derksen, Ninotska I L; Ooijevaar-de Heer, Pleuni; van Schie, Karin A; Kruithof, Simone; Berkowska, Magdalena A; van der Schoot, C Ellen; IJspeert, Hanna; van der Burg, Mirjam; Gils, Ann; Hafkenscheid, Lise; Toes, René E M; Rombouts, Yoann; Plomp, Rosina; Wuhrer, Manfred; van Ham, S Marieke; Vidarsson, Gestur; Rispens, Theo

    2018-02-20

    A hallmark of B-cell immunity is the generation of a diverse repertoire of antibodies from a limited set of germline V(D)J genes. This repertoire is usually defined in terms of amino acid composition. However, variable domains may also acquire N -linked glycans, a process conditional on the introduction of consensus amino acid motifs ( N -glycosylation sites) during somatic hypermutation. High levels of variable domain glycans have been associated with autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis, as well as certain follicular lymphomas. However, the role of these glycans in the humoral immune response remains poorly understood. Interestingly, studies have reported both positive and negative effects on antibody affinity. Our aim was to elucidate the role of variable domain glycans during antigen-specific antibody responses. By analyzing B-cell repertoires by next-generation sequencing, we demonstrate that N -glycosylation sites are introduced at positions in which glycans can affect antigen binding as a result of a specific clustering of progenitor glycosylation sites in the germline sequences of variable domain genes. By analyzing multiple human monoclonal and polyclonal (auto)antibody responses, we subsequently show that this process is subject to selection during antigen-specific antibody responses, skewed toward IgG4, and positively contributes to antigen binding. Together, these results highlight a physiological role for variable domain glycosylation as an additional layer of antibody diversification that modulates antigen binding.

  5. Redefining progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus after the discovery of antibodies to glycine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Sarah J; Balint, Bettina; Vincent, Angela

    2017-06-01

    This review highlights the recent discovery of antibodies to glycine receptor (GlyR-Ab) and discusses the relationship between these antibodies and neurological disorders. Since the initial description in 2008 of antibodies to glycine receptors (GlyR-Abs) in a patient with progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), these antibodies have been found in PERM and in some patients with a variety of stiff person spectrum (SPS) or related disorders. Patients with GlyR-Abs often improve with aggressive immunotherapy, and antibody titres correlate with disease severity. Around 25% of patients have another autoimmune condition and 10-20% have an underlying malignancy. GlyR-Abs bind to extracellular determinants, are mainly Immunoglobulin G1 subclass and induce GlyR internalization in Human embryonic kidney 293 cells, suggesting pathogenicity. The spectrum of neurological disease associated with GlyR-Abs has not been fully characterized, and lower titres may not be syndrome specific, but GlyR-Abs, like antibodies to other neuronal cell-surface antigens, define immunotherapy-responsive disease and are likely to be pathogenic. This distinguishes them from the glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies that can also be found at high titres in patients with classical stiff person syndrome which is more often chronic and relatively resistant to immunological treatments. Irrespective of the clinical features, GlyR-Abs are helpful in the diagnosis of patients who very often have a subacute, progressive and life-threatening disorder which shows a favourable response to immunotherapy.

  6. Carboxybetaine Modified Interface for Electrochemical Glycoprofiling of Antibodies Isolated from Human Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertok, Tomas; Šedivá, Alena; Filip, Jaroslav; Ilcikova, Marketa; Kasak, Peter; Velic, Dusan; Jane, Eduard; Mravcová, Martina; Rovenský, Jozef; Kunzo, Pavol; Lobotka, Peter; Šmatko, Vasilij; Vikartovská, Alica; Tkac, Jan

    2015-06-30

    Impedimetric lectin biosensors capable of recognizing two different carbohydrates (galactose and sialic acid) in glycans attached to antibodies isolated from human serum were prepared. The first step entailed the modification of a gold surface by a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) deposited from a solution containing a carboxybetaine-terminated thiol applied to the subsequent covalent immobilization of lectins and to resist nonspecific protein adsorption. In the next step, Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA) or Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA) was covalently attached to the SAM, and the whole process of building a bioreceptive layer was optimized and characterized using a diverse range of techniques including electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, quartz crystal microbalance, contact angle measurements, zeta-potential assays, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. In addition, the application of the SNA-based lectin biosensor in the glycoprofiling of antibodies isolated from the human sera of healthy individuals and of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was successfully validated using an SNA-based lectin microarray. The results showed that the SNA lectin, in particular, is capable of discriminating between the antibodies isolated from healthy individuals and those from RA patients based on changes in the amount of sialic acid present in the antibodies. In addition, the results obtained by the application of RCA and SNA biosensors indicate that the abundance of galactose and sialic acid in antibodies isolated from healthy individuals is age-related.

  7. Miller-Fisher Syndrome: Are Anti-GAD Antibodies Implicated in Its Pathophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis E. Dagklis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS is considered as a variant of the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS and its characteristic clinical features are ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia. Typically, it is associated with anti-GQ1b antibodies; however, a significant percentage (>10% of these patients are seronegative. Here, we report a 67-year-old female patient who presented with the typical clinical features of MFS. Workup revealed antibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD in relatively high titers while GQ1b antibodies were negative. Neurological improvement was observed after intravenous gamma globulin and follow-up examinations showed a continuous clinical amelioration with simultaneous decline of anti-GAD levels which finally returned to normal values. This case indicates that anti-GAD antibodies may be associated with a broader clinical spectrum and future studies in GQ1b-seronegative patients could determine ultimately their clinical and pathogenetic significance in this syndrome.

  8. Mechanisms of equine infectious anemia virus escape from neutralizing antibody responses define epitope specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponseller, Brett A; Clark, Sandra K; Friedrich, Rachel A

    2012-08-01

    Determining mechanisms of viral escape to particular epitopes recognized by virus-neutralizing antibody can facilitate characterization of host-neutralizing antibody responses as type- versus group-specific, and provides necessary information for vaccine development. Our study reveals that a single N-glycan located in the 5' region of the Wyoming wild-type equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) principal neutralizing domain (PND) accounts for the differences in neutralization phenotype observed between PND variants, while variations in charged amino acids within the PND do not appear to play a key role in viral escape. Site-directed mutagenesis and peptide mapping of a conserved epitope to neutralizing antibody in the 3' region of the PND showed rapid selective pressure for acquisition of a 5' PND N-glycan responsible for defining the specificity of the neutralizing-antibody response.

  9. Quantification and localization of fucoidan in Laminaria japonica using a novel antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Masashi; Nishitani, Yosuke; Tanoue, Takeshi; Matoba, Yoshie; Ojima, Takao; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kanazawa, Kazuki

    2009-02-01

    The establishment of a simple technique to determine the concentration of fucoidan was developed by using a monoclonal antibody against fucoidan. This antibody reacted with fucoidans purified from Laminaria japonica Areschoug (Makombu in Japanese) and Kjellmaniella gyrate Miyabe (Gagome), but not with polysaccharides from Undaria pinnatifida Suringar (Wakame). Neither laminarin nor algenic acid, which are constituents in Laminaria japonica, were recognized by the prepared antibody. Application of the enzymed-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) inhibition assay increased the specificity of fucoidan in measuring the fucoidan contents. On the basis of these results, it was ascertained that the ELISA inhibition assay of using the anti-fucoidan monoclonal antibody was rapid, accurate, and sensitive in measuring the content of fucoidan. In addition, the localization of fucoidan in Laminaria japonica was investigated. This is the first report of fucoidan being restricted to the outer cortical layer.

  10. High-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes using ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Søren; Rockberg, Johan; Forsström, Björn

    2012-01-01

    against unwanted (e.g. autoimmune) reactivities. Antibodies target proteins as either conformational or linear epitopes. The latter are typically probed with peptides, but the cost of peptide screening programs tends to prohibit comprehensive specificity analysis. To perform high-throughput, high......-resolution mapping of linear antibody epitopes, we have used ultrahigh-density peptide microarrays generating several hundred thousand different peptides per array. Using exhaustive length and substitution analysis, we have successfully examined the specificity of a panel of polyclonal antibodies raised against...... linear epitopes of the human proteome and obtained very detailed descriptions of the involved specificities. The epitopes identified ranged from 4 to 12 amino acids in size. In general, the antibodies were of exquisite specificity, frequently disallowing even single conservative substitutions. In several...

  11. Multiple autoimmune antibody limbic encephalitis: a case in a pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meha Goyal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune limbic encephalitis is most commonly associated with antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, among other neuronal cell surface receptors. Here, a case of a pregnant female with limbic encephalitis in the presence of multiple additional autoimmune antibodies is described. The patient was a 36-year-old female who presented with 4 days of confusion, hallucinations, hypersexuality, disinhibition, and pressured speech. The patient's work-up detected the presence of anti-NMDAR antibodies, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies, and a yet uncharacterized neuronal autoantibody. The patient was also found to be pregnant. No evidence of ovarian or other pelvic malignancy was discovered. Symptomatic control was achieved with plasma exchange.

  12. Donor-derived HLA antibody production in patients undergoing SCT from HLA antibody-positive donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, K; Yoshihara, S; Maruya, E; Ikegame, K; Kaida, K; Hayashi, K; Kato, R; Inoue, T; Fujioka, T; Tamaki, H; Okada, M; Onuma, T; Fujii, N; Kusunoki, Y; Soma, T; Saji, H; Ogawa, H

    2012-10-01

    Pre-existing donor-specific HLA antibodies in patients undergoing HLA-mismatched SCT have increasingly been recognized as a risk factor for primary graft failure. However, the clinical implications of the presence of HLA antibodies in donors remain unknown. We prospectively examined 123 related donors for the presence of HLA antibodies by using a Luminex-based single antigen assay. Of these, 1/57 (1.8%) male, 6/27 (22%) parous female and 0/39 (0%) nonparous female donors were HLA antibody-positive. Then, we determined the presence of HLA antibodies in seven patients who received SCT from antibody-positive donors. Of these, four became HLA antibody-positive after SCT. The specificities of the antibodies that emerged in the patients closely resembled those of the antibodies found in the donors, indicating their production by donor-derived plasma cells. Moreover, the kinetics of the HLA antibody levels were similar in all four patients: levels started increasing within 1 week after SCT and peaked at days 10-21, followed by a gradual decrease. These results suggest that donor-derived HLA antibody production frequently occurs in patients undergoing SCT from antibody-positive donors. Further studies are warranted for clarifying the clinical significance of donor-derived HLA antibodies, including the role of these antibodies in post transplant platelet transfusion refractoriness.

  13. Anemia and hematinic deficiencies in gastric parietal cell antibody-positive and antibody-negative erosive oral lichen planus patients with thyroid antibody positivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Julia Y-F; Chen, I-Chang; Wang, Yi-Ping; Wu, Yu-Hsueh; Chen, Hsin-Ming; Sun, Andy

    2016-11-01

    Serum gastric parietal cell antibody (GPCA), thyroglobulin antibody (TGA), and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMA) are found in some erosive oral lichen planus (EOLP) patients. This study assessed whether serum GPCA, TGA and TMA and EOLP itself played significant roles in causing anemia and hematinic deficiencies in TGA/TMA-positive EOLP patients with GPCA positivity (GPCA + /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients) or negativity (GPCA - /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and mean blood hemoglobin (Hb), iron, vitamin B12, and folic acid levels were measured and compared between any two of the four groups of 29 GPCA + /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients, 80 GPCA - /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients, 198 all antibodies-negative EOLP patients (Abs - /EOLP patients), and 218 healthy control individuals. GPCA + /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients had significantly lower mean Hb and vitamin B12 levels as well as significantly greater frequencies of Hb, iron, and vitamin B12 deficiencies than healthy controls. GPCA + /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients had significantly lower serum vitamin B12 level and higher MCV as well as a significantly greater frequency of vitamin B12 deficiency than GPCA - /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients. Furthermore, both GPCA - /TGA/TMA/EOLP and Abs - /EOLP patients did have significantly lower mean Hb, MCV, and iron (for women only) levels, as well as significantly greater frequencies of Hb and iron deficiencies than healthy controls. However, there were no significant differences in measured blood data between GPCA - /TGA/TMA/EOLP and Abs - /EOLP patients. We conclude that serum GPCA is the major factor causing vitamin B12 deficiency, macrocytosis and pernicious anemia in GPCA + /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients. ELOP itself but not TGA/TMA positivity plays a significant role in causing anemia and hematinic deficiencies in GPCA - /TGA/TMA/EOLP patients. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Construction of Rabbit Immune Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha; Lee, Jong Seo; Shim, Hyunbo

    2018-01-01

    Rabbits have distinct advantages over mice as a source of target-specific antibodies. They produce higher affinity antibodies than mice, and may elicit strong immune response against antigens or epitopes that are poorly immunogenic or tolerated in mice. However, a great majority of currently available monoclonal antibodies are of murine origin because of the wider availability of murine fusion partner cell lines and well-established tools and protocols for fusion and cloning of mouse hybridoma. Phage-display selection of antibody libraries is an alternative method to hybridoma technology for the generation of target-specific monoclonal antibodies. High-affinity monoclonal antibodies from nonmurine species can readily be obtained by constructing immune antibody libraries from B cells of the immunized animal and screening the library by phage display. In this article, we describe the construction of a rabbit immune Fab library for the facile isolation of rabbit monoclonal antibodies. After immunization, B-cell cDNA is obtained from the spleen of the animal, from which antibody variable domain repertoires are amplified and assembled into a Fab repertoire by PCR. The Fab genes are then cloned into a phagemid vector and transformed to E. coli, from which a phage-displayed immune Fab library is rescued. Such a library can be biopanned against the immunization antigen for rapid identification of high-affinity, target-specific rabbit monoclonal antibodies.

  15. Guanine quadruplex monoclonal antibody 1H6 cross-reacts with restrained thymidine-rich single stranded DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazemier, Hinke G.; Paeschke, Katrin; Lansdorp, Peter M.

    2017-01-01

    Previously we reported the production and characterization of monoclonal antibody 1H6 raised against (T(4)G(4))(2) intermolecular guanine quadruplex (G4) DNA structures (Henderson A. et al. (2014) Nucleic Acids Res., 42, 860-869; Hoffmann R. F. et al. (2016) Nucleic Acids Res., 44, 152-163). It was

  16. Quantitation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in human brain tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, S; Bock, E; Warecka, K

    1980-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) content of 58 human brain tumours was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using monospecific antibody against GFA. Astrocytomas, glioblastomas, oligodendrogliomas, spongioblastomas, ependymomas and medulloblastomas contained relatively high...

  17. A novel heavy domain antibody library with functionally optimized complementarity determining regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Aalund Mandrup

    Full Text Available Today a number of synthetic antibody libraries of different formats have been created and used for the selection of a large number of recombinant antibodies. One of the determining factors for successful isolation of recombinant antibodies from libraries lies in the quality of the libraries i.e. the number of correctly folded, functional antibodies contained in the library. Here, we describe the construction of a novel, high quality, synthetic single domain antibody library dubbed Predator. The library is based on the HEL4 domain antibody with the addition of recently reported mutations concerning the amino acid composition at positions critical for the folding characteristics and aggregation propensities of domain antibodies. As a unique feature, the CDR3 of the library was designed to mimic the natural human immune response by designating amino acids known to be prevalent in functional antibodies to the diversity in CDR3. CDR randomizations were performed using trinucleotide synthesis to avoid the presence of stop codons. Furthermore a novel cycle free elongation method was used for the conversion of the synthesized single stranded DNA containing the randomized CDRs into double stranded DNA of the library. In addition a modular approach has been adopted for the scaffold in which each CDR region is flanked by unique restrictions sites, allowing easy affinity maturation of selected clones by CDR shuffling. To validate the quality of the library, one round phage display selections were performed on purified antigens and highly complex antigen mixtures such as cultured eukaryotic cells resulting in several specific binders. The further characterization of some of the selected clones, however, indicates a reduction in thermodynamic stability caused by the inclusion the additional mutations to the HEL4 scaffold.

  18. Specificity of anti-MHC class II antibody binding to synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Romano, T F; Ruocco, E

    1989-01-01

    This study indicates that antibodies raised against a DR4,w6; DQw1,3 positive cell line may bind to synthetic peptides selected from the polymorphic amino acid sequences 51-59 and 63-79 on the DQw2 beta chain. This cross-reaction may be explained by the relatively high sequence homology of these sequences in the beta chains of class II histocompatibility antigens, and suggests that antibody binding to small peptides may be scarsely selective. Based on the observations of the reactivity of the antibodies with several cell lines, and comparison of the amino acid sequences of beta chains of DR and DQ molecules, an attempt to identify the cross-reacting epitope is presented.

  19. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Michelle Remião Ugolini; Danowski, Adriana; Funke, Andreas; Rêgo, Jozelia; Levy, Roger; Andrade, Danieli Castro Oliveira de

    2017-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations) add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  20. Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody Binding Sites on CNBr Fragments of the S- Layer Protein Antigens of Rickettsia Typhi and Rickettsia Prowazekii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Security Clasification ) Mapping of monoclonal antibody binding sites on CNBr fragments o; the S-layer protein antigens of Rickettsia Typhi and...homology was found in all the viral polypeptides have long fatty acids attached to fragments which react with type I antibody (Fig. 4). A their N-termini

  1. Enhanced monoclonal antibody production by gradual increase of osmotic pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jianqiang; Takagi, Mutsumi; Qu, Yinbo; Gao, Peiji; Yoshida, Toshiomi

    1999-01-01

    The time length required for the adaptation of AFP-27 hybridoma cells to high osmotic pressure and the effect of a gradual increase of osmotic pressure on monoclonal antibody production were investigated. When the cells were subjected to an increase of osmotic pressure from 300 mOsmol kg-1 to 366 mOsmol kg- 1, the intracellular content of osmoprotective free amino acids reached a maximum level 6 h after the osmotic pressure was increased to 366 mOsmol kg-1. The same time period of 6 h incubat...

  2. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  3. The future of antibodies as cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M; Dhimolea, Eugen

    2012-09-01

    Targeted therapeutics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have proven successful as cancer drugs. To profile products that could be marketed in the future, we examined the current commercial clinical pipeline of mAb candidates for cancer. Our analysis revealed trends toward development of a variety of noncanonical mAbs, including antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), bispecific antibodies, engineered antibodies and antibody fragments and/or domains. We found substantial diversity in the antibody sequence source, isotype, carbohydrate residues, targets and mechanisms of action (MOA). Although well-validated targets, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and CD20, continue to provide opportunities for companies, we found notable trends toward targeting less-well-validated antigens and exploration of innovative MOA such as the generation of anticancer immune responses or recruitment of cytotoxic T cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. GAD65 antibodies among Greenland Inuit and its relation to glucose intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Lynge; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of circulating Glutamin-Acid-decarboxylase 65 antibodies in a sample of Greenlanders (Inuit) with clinically verified diabetes with samples of participants from a population survey. The study population included participants with known diabetes ...

  5. Purification process monitoring in monoclonal antibody preparation: contamination with viruses, DNA and peptide growth factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. ter Avest (Anja); E.J.J. van Zoelen (Everardus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); C.F. van Kreyl; G. van Steenis (Bert); H.E.M. Spijkers (Ine)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractAdministration in vivo of monoclonal antibodies to humans is challenged by considerations regarding their safety. Contamination with viruses, potentially oncogenic nucleic acids and biologically active components like growth factors and hormones forms a serious point of concern in this

  6. ANTIBODIES TO SKELETAL-MUSCLE IN MYASTHENIA-GRAVIS .2. PREVALENCE IN NON-THYMOMA PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUKS, JBM; LIMBURG, PC; HORST, G; OOSTERHUIS, HJGH

    1993-01-01

    Anti-skeletal muscle antibodies (AMA) were measured in 340 non-thymoma patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) by both an ELISA with citric acid muscle extract and by immunofluorescence assay. Three a-AChR negative but AMA-positive patients were found. The occurrence of AMA was related to the age at

  7. Warm antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfa, Theodosia A

    2016-12-02

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a rare and heterogeneous disease that affects 1 to 3/100 000 patients per year. AIHA caused by warm autoantibodies (w-AIHA), ie, antibodies that react with their antigens on the red blood cell optimally at 37°C, is the most common type, comprising ∼70% to 80% of all adult cases and ∼50% of pediatric cases. About half of the w-AIHA cases are called primary because no specific etiology can be found, whereas the rest are secondary to other recognizable underlying disorders. This review will focus on the postulated immunopathogenetic mechanisms in idiopathic and secondary w-AIHA and report on the rare cases of direct antiglobulin test-negative AIHA, which are even more likely to be fatal because of inherent characteristics of the causative antibodies, as well as because of delays in diagnosis and initiation of appropriate treatment. Then, the characteristics of w-AIHA associated with genetically defined immune dysregulation disorders and special considerations on its management will be discussed. Finally, the standard treatment options and newer therapeutic approaches for this chronic autoimmune blood disorder will be reviewed. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  8. An anti vimentin antibody promotes tube formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mathias Lindh; Møller, Carina Kjeldahl; Rasmussen, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    antibody technology, promotes tube formation of endothelial cells in a 2D matrigel assay. By binding vimentin, the antibody increases the tube formation by 21% after 5 hours of incubation. Addition of the antibody directly to cultured endothelial cells does not influence endothelial cell migration...... or proliferation. The enhanced tube formation can be seen for up to 10 hours where after the effect decreases. It is shown that the antibody-binding site is located on the coil 2 domain of vimentin. To our knowledge this is the first study that demonstrates an enhanced tube formation by binding vimentin in a 2D...

  9. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2018-04-10

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  10. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Gearhart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  11. Glycine receptor antibody mediated Progressive Encephalomyelitis with Rigidity and Myoclonus (PERM): a rare but treatable neurological syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, W M; Howard, R; Chalmers, R M; Woodhall, M R; Waters, P; Vincent, A; Wickremaratchi, M M

    2014-04-01

    A 40-year-old man presented with respiratory compromise and was intubated. After tracheostomy, he was found to have ophthalmoplegia, severe limb rigidity, stimulus-sensitive myoclonus and autonomic dysfunction. For 1 week before admission, there had been a prodromal illness with low mood, hallucinations and limb myoclonus. Serum glycine receptor antibodies were strongly positive: we diagnosed progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. Despite a relapse, he has done well following immunotherapies. The clinical syndrome of encephalomyelitis with rigidity, described in 1976, often has a severe progressive course. A minority of patients have glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies. The association with glycine receptor antibody was first reported in 2008, and we briefly review subsequent case reports to illustrate the range of clinical features. The antibody is likely to be disease mediating, although this remains unproven. The spectrum of diagnosable and treatable antibody mediated neurological syndromes is expanding. It is vital to recognise these conditions early to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  12. High throughput discovery of influenza virus neutralizing antibodies from phage-displayed synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ing-Chien; Chiu, Yi-Kai; Yu, Chung-Ming; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Tung, Chao-Ping; Tsou, Yueh-Liang; Huang, Yi-Jen; Lin, Chia-Lung; Chen, Hong-Sen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Yang, An-Suei

    2017-10-31

    Pandemic and epidemic outbreaks of influenza A virus (IAV) infection pose severe challenges to human society. Passive immunotherapy with recombinant neutralizing antibodies can potentially mitigate the threats of IAV infection. With a high throughput neutralizing antibody discovery platform, we produced artificial anti-hemagglutinin (HA) IAV-neutralizing IgGs from phage-displayed synthetic scFv libraries without necessitating prior memory of antibody-antigen interactions or relying on affinity maturation essential for in vivo immune systems to generate highly specific neutralizing antibodies. At least two thirds of the epitope groups of the artificial anti-HA antibodies resemble those of natural protective anti-HA antibodies, providing alternatives to neutralizing antibodies from natural antibody repertoires. With continuing advancement in designing and constructing synthetic scFv libraries, this technological platform is useful in mitigating not only the threats of IAV pandemics but also those from other newly emerging viral infections.

  13. Not All Antibodies Are Created Equal: Factors That Influence Antibody Mediated Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie L. Butler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Consistent with Dr. Paul Terasaki’s “humoral theory of rejection” numerous studies have shown that HLA antibodies can cause acute and chronic antibody mediated rejection (AMR and decreased graft survival. New evidence also supports a role for antibodies to non-HLA antigens in AMR and allograft injury. Despite the remarkable efforts by leaders in the field who pioneered single antigen bead technology for detection of donor specific antibodies, a considerable amount of work is still needed to better define the antibody attributes that are associated with AMR pathology. This review highlights what is currently known about the clinical context of pre and posttransplant antibodies, antibody characteristics that influence AMR, and the paths after donor specific antibody production (no rejection, subclinical rejection, and clinical dysfunction with AMR.

  14. Neutralization of feline immunodeficiency virus by polyclonal cat antibody: Simultaneous involvement of hypervariable regions 4 and 5 of the surface glycoprotein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.J. Siebelink (Kees); W. Huisman (Willem); J.A. Karlas (Jos); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); M.L. Bosch (Marnix); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractSites involved in antibody-mediated neutralization of feline immunodeficiency virus were mapped by reciprocal exchange of envelope fragments or amino acids between molecular clones of feline immunodeficiency virus with different susceptibilities to neutralization by a polyclonal cat

  15. Triacetone triperoxide (TATP): hapten design and development of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Maria Astrid; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Kraus, Werner; Emmerling, Franziska; Schneider, Rudolf J; Panne, Ulrich; Weller, Michael G

    2010-10-05

    Triacetone triperoxide (TATP), an improvised explosive, is a potential security threat because of its cost-efficient synthesis and the difficulty in detecting it. A highly selective antibody could provide the necessary specificity to the detection process. To obtain antibodies, a hapten made from acetone, hydrogen peroxide, and 7-oxooctanoic acid has been designed, synthesized, and confirmed by NMR that displays the utmost similarity to the analyte. The single-crystal X-ray structures of the solvated species TATP·methanol (1:1) and the TATP derivate were determined. In both compounds, the molecules exhibit D(3) symmetry and adopt a twisted boat-chair conformation. The hapten was coupled to bovine serum albumin, and mice were immunized. An immune response against TATP was elicited, and selective antibodies were detected in the mouse serum, which should be very useful for the development of a TATP biosensor system. An ELISA with a limit of detection for TATP of 65 μg L(-1) is shown.

  16. Purification of antibodies to O antigen of Salmonella Typhimurium from human serum by affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Micoli, Francesca; Gavini, Massimiliano; Goodall, Margaret; Cobbold, Mark; Saul, Allan; Maclennan, Calman A

    2013-01-31

    Nontyphoidal Salmonellae (NTS) are a common cause of bacteraemia in children and HIV-infected adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. We have previously shown that antibodies play a key role in both bactericidal and cellular mechanisms of immunity to NTS, but found that high concentrations of antibody to Salmonella Typhimurium O antigen (OAg) in the serum of some HIV-infected African adults is associated with impaired killing of NTS. To further investigate the function of antibodies to the OAg of NTS, we developed a method to purify these antibodies from human serum by affinity chromatography. Purified Salmonella Typhimurium OAg was activated with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) via two different chemistries before linking to N-hydroxysuccinamide-Sepharose resin: one ADH molecule was introduced per OAg chain on its terminal 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid sugar (OAg-ADH), or multiple ADH molecules were attached along the OAg chain after oxidation with sodium periodate (OAgoxADH). Both resulting columns worked well when tested with commercial polyclonal anti-O:4,5 antibodies from rabbit serum. Over 90% of the applied antibodies bound to the resin and 89% of these antibodies were then eluted as detected by ELISA. OAg-ADH was preferred as the method for OAg derivatisation as it does not modify the saccharide chain and can be applied to OAg from different bacteria. Both columns were able to bind OAg-specific antibodies in human serum, but antibody recovery was initially low. Different elution buffers were tested and different amounts of OAg-ADH were linked to the resin to improve the yield. Optimal recovery (51%) was obtained by loading 1mg of activated OAg per ml of resin and eluting with 0.1M glycine, 0.1M NaCl pH2.4. The column matrix could be regenerated following elution with no detectable loss in performance for over ten uses. This method offers the potential to purify antibodies to Salmonella OAg from polyclonal serum following vaccination or natural exposure to Salmonella

  17. Human anti-Dectin-1 antibody, hybridoma producing said antibody and applications thereof

    OpenAIRE

    Kremer, Leonor; Llorente Gómez, María de las Mercedes; Casasnovas, José María; Fernández Ruíz, Elena; Galán Díez, Marta

    2008-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to hybridoma MGD3 and the monoclonal antibody produced thereby (also called MGD3), which specifically recognises the human Dectin-1 membrane receptor. Antibody MGD3 is capable of inhibiting the binding of Dectin-1 to the natural ligand thereof, the ss-glucans that are components of the fungal wall. In addition, the aforementioned antibody specifically blocks binding to Candida albicans and the secretion of cytokines induced thereby. The MGD3 antibody obtained enable...

  18. Stratification of Antibody-Positive Subjects by Antibody Level Reveals an Impact of Immunogenicity on Pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A.; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J.; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2012-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic....

  19. Validation of commercially available sphingosine kinase 2 antibodies for use in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi A. Neubauer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2 is a ubiquitously expressed lipid kinase that has important, albeit complex and poorly understood, roles in regulating cell survival and cell death. In addition to being able to promote cell cycle arrest and apoptosis under certain conditions, it has recently been shown that SK2 can promote neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis in vivo. Therefore, well validated and reliable tools are required to study and better understand the true functions of SK2. Here, we compare two commercially available SK2 antibodies: a rabbit polyclonal antibody from Proteintech that recognizes amino acids 266-618 of human SK2a, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody from ECM Biosciences that recognizes amino acids 36-52 of human SK2a. We examine the performance of these antibodies for use in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining of endogenous SK2, using human HEK293 and HeLa cell lines, as well as mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs. Furthermore, we assess the specificity of these antibodies to the target protein through the use of siRNA-mediated SK2 knockdown and SK2 knockout (Sphk2-/- MEFs. Our results demonstrate that the Proteintech anti-SK2 antibody reproducibly displayed superior sensitivity and selectivity towards SK2 in immunoblot analyses, while the ECM Biosciences anti-SK2 antibody was reproducibly superior for SK2 immunoprecipitation and detection by immunofluorescence staining. Notably, both antibodies produced non-specific bands and staining in the MEFs, which was not observed with the human cell lines. Therefore, we conclude that the Proteintech SK2 antibody is a valuable reagent for use in immunoblot analyses, and the ECM Biosciences SK2 antibody is a useful tool for SK2 immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining, at least in the human cell lines employed in this study.

  20. Anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus antibodies in commercial immunoglubulin preparations, human serum and milk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hahn-Zoric; B. Carlsson; S. Jeansson; H.P. Ekre; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); D. Roberton; L.A. Hanson

    1993-01-01

    textabstractOur previous studies have suggested that fetal antibody production can be induced by maternal antiidiotypic antibodies transferred to the fetus via the placenta. We tested commercial Ig, sera, and milk for the presence of anti-idiotypic antibodies to poliovirus type 1, using affinity

  1. A novel merozoite surface antigen of Plasmodium falciparum (MSP-3 identified by cellular-antibody cooperative mechanism antigenicity and biological activity of antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Oeuvray

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the identification of a 48kDa antigen targeted by antibodies which inhibit Plasmodium falciparum in vitro growth by cooperation with blood monocytes in an ADCI assay correlated to the naturally acquired protection. This protein is located on the surface of the merozoite stage of P. falciparum, and is detectable in all isolates tested. Epidemiological studies demonstrated that peptides derived from the amino acid sequence of MSP-3 contain potent B and T-cell epitopes recognized by a majority of individuals living in endemic areas. Moreover human antibodies either purified on the recombinant protein, or on the synthetic peptide MSP-3b, as well as antibodies raised in mice, were all found to promote parasite killing mediated by monocytes.

  2. Cooperativity in virus neutralization by human monoclonal antibodies to two adjacent regions located at the amino terminus of hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Zhenyong; Wang, Wenyan; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    A challenge for hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine development is defining conserved epitopes that induce protective antibodies against this highly diverse virus. An envelope glycoprotein (E2) segment located at amino acids (aa) 412 to 423 contains highly conserved neutralizing epitopes. While...... polyclonal antibodies to aa 412 to 423 from HCV-infected individuals confirmed broad neutralization, conflicting findings have been reported on polyclonal antibodies to an adjacent region, aa 434 to 446, that may or may not interfere with neutralization by antibodies to aa 412 to 423. To define the interplay...

  3. The antibody response to well-defined malaria antigens after acute malaria in individuals living under continuous malaria transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, E; Høgh, B; Dziegiel, M

    1992-01-01

    The IgG and IgM antibody responses to the C-terminal 783 amino acids of the P. falciparum glutamate-rich protein, GLURP489-1271, expressed as an E. coli fusion protein, the IgG response to a 18-mer synthetic peptide EDKNEKGQHEIVEVEEIL (GLURP899-916) representing the C-terminal repeats of GLURP...... the antigens, the responses were often short-lived. In adults, the antibody responses to the GLURP489-1271 fusion protein and the (EENV)6 peptide peaked after 2 weeks, and not all individuals responded to all antigens. The antibody response, even against large fragments of conserved antigens, is not uniformly...

  4. Partial characterization of anti-HLA class II antibodies isolated by aid of sepharose-peptide immunoadsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chersi, A; Morganti-Kossmann, M C; Evangelista, M; Cenciarelli, C

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic peptides selected from HLA-DQ and HLA-DP glycoproteins were coupled to Sepharose, and used for the isolation of anti-HLA Class II antibodies from the immune sera of rabbits immunized with human lymphoblastoid cells expressing Class II antigens. Antibodies from early and late bleedings displayed remarkable differences in affinity for peptides and for soluable membrane proteins: these differences might be due to an early immune response directed preferentially against surface linear determinants, and to a late response to assembled (discontinuous) sites. The possibility that such antibodies might be used for the identification of amino acid stretches involved in the formation of the same assembled determinant is considered.

  5. LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE INDUCES THE PRODUCTION OF DIAGNOSTIC MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY BY HYBRIDOMA CELLS AGAINST CONGENITAL ADRENAL HYPERPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GEK KEE CHUA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to screen and identify the potential inducers in maximizing the production of monoclonal antibody by hybridoma 192 cell line for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia diagnostic. There are nine inducers used in this research, namely lysozyme, aldolase, sodium butyrate, sodium phosphate, potassium phosphate, dimethyl sulfoxide, lipopolysaccharide, essential amino acids, and nonessential amino acids. Hybridoma 192 cell was cultured in 5% CO2 incubator at 37°C and ˃80% humidity in the medium with different concentrations of inducer agents. The inducers were added at the beginning of the culture and the samples were taken after 72 h of culture. The performance of these inducer agents was assessed based on the maximum monoclonal antibody titer achieved using Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay. Lipopolysaccharide was found to increase the maximum monoclonal antibody titer when supplemented at 8 to 12 µg/mL. After optimization using one-factor central composite design at this range, the optimum point was determined to be 8 µg/mL. Verification experiments shows that lipopolysaccharide enhanced the average specific monoclonal antibody production rate by 56% relative to control. In conclusion, lipopolysaccharide at 8 µg/mL is able to increase the monoclonal antibody specific production of hybridoma 192 cell line.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  7. Update on antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Remião Ugolini Lopes

    Full Text Available Summary Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disease characterized by antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL associated with thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity. Most APS events are directly related to thrombotic events, which may affect small, medium or large vessels. Other clinical features like thrombocytopenia, nephropathy, cardiac valve disease, cognitive dysfunction and skin ulcers (called non-criteria manifestations add significant morbidity to this syndrome and represent clinical situations that are challenging. APS was initially described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE but it can occur in patients without any other autoimmune disease. Despite the autoimmune nature of this syndrome, APS treatment is still based on anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy.

  8. Characterization of Notch1 antibodies that inhibit signaling of both normal and mutated Notch1 receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Aste-Amézaga

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Notch receptors normally play a key role in guiding a variety of cell fate decisions during development and differentiation of metazoan organisms. On the other hand, dysregulation of Notch1 signaling is associated with many different types of cancer as well as tumor angiogenesis, making Notch1 a potential therapeutic target.Here we report the in vitro activities of inhibitory Notch1 monoclonal antibodies derived from cell-based and solid-phase screening of a phage display library. Two classes of antibodies were found, one directed against the EGF-repeat region that encompasses the ligand-binding domain (LBD, and the second directed against the activation switch of the receptor, the Notch negative regulatory region (NRR. The antibodies are selective for Notch1, inhibiting Jag2-dependent signaling by Notch1 but not by Notch 2 and 3 in reporter gene assays, with EC(50 values as low as 5+/-3 nM and 0.13+/-0.09 nM for the LBD and NRR antibodies, respectively, and fail to recognize Notch4. While more potent, NRR antibodies are incomplete antagonists of Notch1 signaling. The antagonistic activity of LBD, but not NRR, antibodies is strongly dependent on the activating ligand. Both LBD and NRR antibodies bind to Notch1 on human tumor cell lines and inhibit the expression of sentinel Notch target genes, including HES1, HES5, and DTX1. NRR antibodies also strongly inhibit ligand-independent signaling in heterologous cells transiently expressing Notch1 receptors with diverse NRR "class I" point mutations, the most common type of mutation found in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL. In contrast, NRR antibodies failed to antagonize Notch1 receptors bearing rare "class II" or "class III" mutations, in which amino acid insertions generate a duplicated or constitutively sensitive metalloprotease cleavage site. Signaling in T-ALL cell lines bearing class I mutations is partially refractory to inhibitory antibodies as compared to cell

  9. Nano antibody therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatachallam, M.; Sivakumar, T.; Nazeema; Venkateswari, P.

    2011-01-01

    Nanomedicine, an offshoot of nanotechnology, refers to highly specific medical intervention at the molecular scale for curing disease or repairing damaged tissues, such as bone, muscle, or nerve. Nanotechnology can have an early, paradigm-changing impact on how clinicians will detect cancer in its earliest stages. Exquisitely sensitive devices constructed of nanoscale components-such as nanocantilevers, nanowires and nanochannels-offer the potential for detecting even the rarest molecular signals associated with malignancy. One of the most pressing needs in clinical oncology is for imaging agents that can identify tumors that are far smaller than is possible with today's technology, at a scale of 100,000 cells rather than 1,000,000,000 cells. A new approach in nanotechnology for treating cancer incorporates nano iron particles and attaches them to an antibody that has targets only cancer cells and not healthy cells. The treatment works in two steps. This treatment is an ingenious way to make localized tumor ablation a systemic treatment. The advantages are incredible. There are absolutely no side effects from this treatment. It is not painful or even uncomfortable. The iron particles get flushed harmlessly from the body. It is not a drug and so the cancer cannot build up a resistance to the treatment. It is a systematic treatment; even cancer cells and tumors that are not known about get heated up and ablated. This treatment can even be used to enhance imaging of the cancer because once the cancer cells are coated with the iron particles, they are easy to identify. Everything depends on how reliably the antibodies target cancer cells and not healthy cells. When used in conjunction with other systemic treatments, such as vaccine treatments, we could be looking at a time when even advanced cancers can be brought under control. (author)

  10. [Radiolabeled antibodies for cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Jacques; Chatal, Jean-François; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2009-12-01

    The first treatment ever by radio-immunotherapy (RIT) was performed by William H. Beierwaltes in 1951 and was a success. Fifty years later, the main question is to find ways of extending the success of radiolabelled anti-CD20 antibodies in indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma to other forms of cancer. Solid tumours are much more radioresistant than lymphomas, but they respond to RIT if the lesions are small. Clinical situations of residual or minimal disease are thus the most likely to benefit from RIT in the adjuvant or consolidation settings. For disseminated disease, like leukemias or myelomas, the problem is different: beta- particles emitted by the radioactive atoms classically used for cancer treatment (iodine-131 or yttrium-90) disperse their energy in large volumes (ranges 1 mm to 1 cm) and are not very effective against isolated cells. Advances in RIT progress in two directions. One is the development of pretargeting strategies in which the antibody is not labelled but used to provide binding sites to small molecular weight radioactivity vectors (biotin, haptens). These techniques have been shown to increase tumour to non-target uptake ratios and anti-tumour efficacy has been demonstrated in the clinic. The other approach is the use of radionuclides adapted to the various clinical situations. Lutetium-177 or copper-67, because of the lower energy of their emission, their relatively long half-life and good gamma emission, may significantly improve RIT efficacy and acceptability. Beyond that, radionuclides emitting particles such as alpha particles or Auger electrons, much more efficient to kill isolated tumour cells, are being tested for RIT in the clinic. Finally, RIT should be integrated with other cancer treatment approaches in multimodality protocols. Thus RIT, now a mature technology, should enter a phase of well designed and focused clinical developments that may be expected to afford significant therapeutic advances.

  11. Applications of recombinant antibodies in plant pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Angelika; Torrance, Lesley

    2002-09-01

    Summary Advances in molecular biology have made it possible to produce antibody fragments comprising the binding domains of antibody molecules in diverse heterologous systems, such as Escherichia coli, insect cells, or plants. Antibody fragments specific for a wide range of antigens, including plant pathogens, have been obtained by cloning V-genes from lymphoid tissue, or by selection from large naive phage display libraries, thus avoiding the need for immunization. The antibody fragments have been expressed as fusion proteins to create different functional molecules, and fully recombinant assays have been devised to detect plant viruses. The defined binding properties and unlimited cheap supply of antibody fusion proteins make them useful components of standardized immunoassays. The expression of antibody fragments in plants was shown to confer resistance to several plant pathogens. However, the antibodies usually only slowed the progress of infection and durable 'plantibody' resistance has yet to be demonstrated. In future, it is anticipated that antibody fragments from large libraries will be essential tools in high-throughput approaches to post-genomics research, such as the assignment of gene function, characterization of spatio-temporal patterns of protein expression, and elucidation of protein-protein interactions.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies against rat leukocyte surface antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Puklavec, M. J.; Barclay, A. N.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be powerful tools for studying the properties of leukocyte surface antigens and the cells that express them. In the past decades many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for identifying the different rat leukocyte surface antigens have been described. A list of mAb is

  13. Quantitative Changes In Antibodies Against Onchocercal Native ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantitative Changes In Antibodies Against Onchocercal Native Antigens Two Months Postivermectin Treatment Of Onchocerciasis Patients. ... Those without onchocercal skin disease, OSD (n=18) had a significant increase of 20.5±29.6%, with pre- and posttreatment values of 0.59±0.15 versus 0.68±0.13 for IgG antibody ...

  14. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  15. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  16. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  17. Serum Antiphospholipid Antibodies Among Healthy Adults In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Antiphospholipid antibodies have been associated with variety of conditions. There is no standard health associated reference values required for the interpretation of antiphospholipid antibodies result available among adults in North- eastern Nigeria and Nigeria in general. The aim of this study is to determine ...

  18. Radiolabeled antibodies for cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Jacques; Bardiès, Manuel; Bourgeois, Mickael; Chatal, Jean-François; Chérel, Michel; Davodeau, François; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Gestin, Jean-François; Kraeber-Bodéré, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Radiolabeled antibodies were studied first for tumor detection by single-photon imaging, but FDG PET stopped these developments. In the meantime, radiolabeled antibodies were shown to be effective in the treatment of lymphoma. Radiolabeling techniques are well established and radiolabeled antibodies are a clinical and commercial reality that deserves further studies to advance their application in earlier phase of the diseases and to test combination and adjuvant therapies including radiolabeled antibodies in hematological diseases. In solid tumors, more resistant to radiations and less accessible to large molecules such as antibodies, clinical efficacy remains limited. However, radiolabeled antibodies used in minimal or small-size metastatic disease have shown promising clinical efficacy. In the adjuvant setting, ongoing clinical trials show impressive increase in survival in otherwise unmanageable tumors. New technologies are being developed over the years: recombinant antibodies and pretargeting approaches have shown potential in increasing the therapeutic index of radiolabeled antibodies. In several cases, clinical trials have confirmed preclinical studies. Finally, new radionuclides, such as lutetium-177, with better physical properties will further improve the safety of radioimmunotherapy. Alpha particle and Auger electron emitters offer the theoretical possibility to kill isolated tumor cells and microscopic clusters of tumor cells, opening the perspective of killing the last tumor cell, which is the ultimate challenge in cancer therapy. Preliminary preclinical and preliminary clinical results confirm the feasibility of this approach.

  19. Determination of antiphospholipid antibodies and Thrombophilia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recurrent miscarriage is a critical problem in which many factors play a crucial role such as antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) and anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA). Recent studies pointed to a potential role of thrombophilias as a possible cause of recurrent miscarriage (RM). Objectives: This study was ...

  20. A novel polyclonal antibody against human cytomegalovirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Future research should be directed to epitope screening of synthetic HMCV peptides, which could help to understand HCMV infection and virus-neutralising antibodies more fully and to prepare HCMV vaccines and antiviral drugs. Key words: Human cytomegalovirus, AD169 strain, Towne strains, polyclonal antibody.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  2. Cloning single-chain antibody fragments (ScFv) from hyrbidoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toleikis, Lars; Frenzel, André

    2012-01-01

    Despite the rising impact of the generation of antibodies by phage display and other technologies, hybridoma technology still provides a valuable tool for the generation of high-affinity binders against different targets. But there exist several limitations of using hybridoma-derived antibodies. The source of the hybridoma clones are mostly rat or mouse B-lymphocytes. Therefore a human-anti-mouse or human-anti-rat antibody response may result in immunogenicity of these antibodies. This leads to the necessity of humanization of these antibodies where the knowledge of the amino acid sequence of the proteins is inalienable. Furthermore, additional in vitro modifications, e.g., affinity maturation or fusion to other proteins, are dependent on cloning of the antigen-binding domains.Here we describe the isolation of RNA from hybridoma cells and the primers that can be used for the amplification of VL and VH as well as the cloning of the antibody in scFv format and its expression in Escherichia coli.

  3. Use of monoclonal antibodies against Hendra and Nipah viruses in an antigen capture ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiropoulou Christina F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreaks of Hendra (HeV and Nipah (NiV viruses have been reported starting in 1994 and 1998, respectively. Both viruses are capable of causing fatal disease in humans and effecting great economical loss in the livestock industry. Results Through screening of hybridomas derived from mice immunized with γ-irradiated Nipah virus, we identified two secreted antibodies; one reactive with the nucleocapsid (N protein and the other, the phosphoprotein (P of henipaviruses. Epitope mapping and protein sequence alignments between NiV and HeV suggest the last 14 amino acids of the carboxyl terminus of the N protein is the target of the anti-N antibody. The anti-P antibody recognizes an epitope in the amino-terminal half of P protein. These monoclonal antibodies were used to develop two antigen capture ELISAs, one for virus detection and the other for differentiation between NiV and HeV. The lower limit of detection of the capture assay with both monoclonal antibodies was 400 pfu. The anti-N antibody was used to successfully detect NiV in a lung tissue suspension from an infected pig. Conclusion The antigen capture ELISA developed is potentially affordable tool to provide rapid detection and differentiation between the henipaviruses.

  4. Use of monoclonal antibodies against Hendra and Nipah viruses in an antigen capture ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Feng; Lo, Michael K; Rota, Paul A; Spiropoulou, Christina F; Rollin, Pierre E

    2010-06-03

    Outbreaks of Hendra (HeV) and Nipah (NiV) viruses have been reported starting in 1994 and 1998, respectively. Both viruses are capable of causing fatal disease in humans and effecting great economical loss in the livestock industry. Through screening of hybridomas derived from mice immunized with gamma-irradiated Nipah virus, we identified two secreted antibodies; one reactive with the nucleocapsid (N) protein and the other, the phosphoprotein (P) of henipaviruses. Epitope mapping and protein sequence alignments between NiV and HeV suggest the last 14 amino acids of the carboxyl terminus of the N protein is the target of the anti-N antibody. The anti-P antibody recognizes an epitope in the amino-terminal half of P protein. These monoclonal antibodies were used to develop two antigen capture ELISAs, one for virus detection and the other for differentiation between NiV and HeV. The lower limit of detection of the capture assay with both monoclonal antibodies was 400 pfu. The anti-N antibody was used to successfully detect NiV in a lung tissue suspension from an infected pig. The antigen capture ELISA developed is potentially affordable tool to provide rapid detection and differentiation between the henipaviruses.

  5. Multimodal charge-induction chromatography for antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hong-Fei; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Chu, Wen-Ning; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Gao, Dong; Wang, Rong-Zhu; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2016-01-15

    Hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography (HCIC) has advantages of high capacity, salt-tolerance and convenient pH-controlled elution. However, the binding specificity might be improved with multimodal molecular interactions. New ligand W-ABI that combining tryptophan and 5-amino-benzimidazole was designed with the concept of mutimodal charge-induction chromatography (MCIC). The indole and benzimidazole groups of the ligand could provide orientated mutimodal binding to target IgG under neutral pH, while the imidazole groups could induce the electrostatic repulsion forces for efficient elution under acidic pH. W-ABI ligand was coupled successfully onto agarose gel, and IgG adsorption behaviors were investigated. High affinity to IgG was found with the saturated adsorption capacity of 70.4 mg/ml at pH 7, and the flow rate of mobile phase showed little impact on the dynamic binding capacity. In addition, efficient elution could be achieved at mild acidic pH with high recovery. Two separation cases (IgG separation from albumin containing feedstock and monoclonal antibody purification from cell culture supernatant) were verified with high purity and recovery. In general, MCIC with the specially-designed ligand is an expanding of HCIC with improved adsorption selectivity, which would be a potential alternative to Protein A-based capture for the cost-effective purification of antibodies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  7. Antibodies against chromosomal beta-lactamase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Rasmussen, J W; Ciofu, Oana

    1994-01-01

    A murine monoclonal anti-chromosomal beta-lactamase antibody was developed and an immunoblotting technique was used to study the presence of serum and sputum antibodies against Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosomal group 1 beta-lactamase in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The serum antibody...... response was studied with serum samples collected in 1992 from 56 CF patients in a cross-sectional study and with serum samples from 18 CF patients in a longitudinal study. Anti-beta-lactamase immunoglobulin G antibodies were present in all of the serum samples from the patients with chronic...... bronchopulmonary P. aeruginosa infection (CF + P) but in none of the CF patients with no or intermittent P. aeruginosa infection. Anti-beta-lactamase antibodies were present in serum from CF + P patients after six antipseudomonal courses (median) and correlated with infection with a beta-lactam-resistant strain...

  8. Onconeural antibodies: improved detection and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storstein, Anette; Monstad, Sissel Evy; Haugen, Mette; Mazengia, Kibret; Veltman, Dana; Lohndal, Emilia; Aarseth, Jan; Vedeler, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Onconeural antibodies are found in many patients with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) and define the disease as paraneoplastic. The study describes the presence of onconeural antibodies and PNS in 555 patients with neurological symptoms and confirmed cancer within five years, and compares the diagnostic accuracy of different antibody assays (immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence and immunoblot). Onconeural antibodies were found in 11.9% of the patients by immunoprecipitation, in 7.0% by immunofluorescence and in 6.3% by immunoblot. PNS were present in 81.8% of the cancer patients that were seropositive by immunoprecipitation. Immunofluorescence and immunoblot failed to detect onconeural antibodies in almost one third of the PNS cases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Antibody glycosylation and its impact on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of monoclonal antibodies and Fc-fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liming

    2015-06-01

    Understanding the impact of glycosylation and keeping a close control on glycosylation of product candidates are required for both novel and biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and Fc-fusion protein development to ensure proper safety and efficacy profiles. Most therapeutic mAbs are of IgG class and contain a glycosylation site in the Fc region at amino acid position 297 and, in some cases, in the Fab region. For Fc-fusion proteins, glycosylation also frequently occurs in the fusion partners. Depending on the expression host, glycosylation patterns in mAb or Fc-fusions can be significantly different, thus significantly impacting the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of mAbs. Glycans that have a major impact on PK and PD of mAb or Fc-fusion proteins include mannose, sialic acids, fucose (Fuc), and galactose (Gal). Mannosylated glycans can impact the PK of the molecule, leading to reduced exposure and potentially lower efficacy. The level of sialic acid, N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), can also have a significant impact on the PK of Fc-fusion molecules. Core Fuc in the glycan structure reduces IgG antibody binding to IgG Fc receptor IIIa relative to IgG lacking Fuc, resulting in decreased antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activities. Glycoengineered Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) expression systems can produce afucosylated mAbs that have increased ADCC activities. Terminal Gal in a mAb is important in the complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) in that lower levels of Gal reduce CDC activity. Glycans can also have impacts on the safety of mAb. mAbs produced in murine myeloma cells such as NS0 and SP2/0 contain glycans such as Galα1-3Galβ1-4N-acetylglucosamine-R and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NGNA) that are not naturally present in humans and can be immunogenic when used as therapeutics. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, Amin I.; Khawli, Leslie A.

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  11. Docking of Antibodies into Cavities in DNA Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quyang, X; Stefano, Mattia De; Krissanaprasit, Abhichart

    2017-01-01

    microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) validated efficient antibody immobilization in the origami structures. The increased ability to control the orientation of antibodies in nanostructures and at surfaces has potential for directing the interactions of antibodies with targets...

  12. Development of a functional antibody by using a green fluorescent protein frame as the template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongzhi; Xiang, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Yonghui; Chen, Qiuyu; Zhong, Yanfang; Wang, Shihua

    2014-07-01

    Single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies are widely used as diagnostic and therapeutic agents or biosensors for a majority of human disease. However, the limitations of the present scFv antibody in terms of stability, solubility, and affinity are challenging to produce by traditional antibody screening and expression formats. We describe here a feasible strategy for creating the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based antibody. Complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3), which retains the antigen binding activity, was introduced into the structural loops of superfolder GFP, and the result showed that CDR3-inserted GFP displayed almost the same fluorescence intensity as wild-type GFP, and the purified proteins of CDR3 insertion showed the similar binding activity to antigen as the corresponding scFv. Among of all of the CDRs, CDR3s are responsible for antigen recognition, and only the CDR3a insertion is the best format for producing GFP-based antibody binding to specific antigen. The wide versatility of this system was further verified by introducing CDR3 from other scFvs into loop 9 of GFP. We developed a feasible method for rapidly and effectively producing a high-affinity GFP-based antibody by inserting CDR3s into GFP loops. Further, the affinity can be enhanced by specific amino acids scanning and site-directed mutagenesis. Notably, this method had better versatility for creating antibodies to various antigens using GFP as the scaffold, suggesting that a GFP-based antibody with high affinity and specificity may be useful for disease diagnosis and therapy. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immunoextract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  14. Development of Immunoassay Based on Monoclonal Antibody Reacted with the Neonicotinoid Insecticides Clothianidin and Dinotefuran

    OpenAIRE

    Uchigashima, Mikiko; Watanabe, Eiki; Ito, Shigekazu; Iwasa, Seiji; Miyake, Shiro

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) was developed for the neonicotinoid insecticide clothianidin. A new clothianidin hapten (3-[5-(3-methyl-2-nitroguanidinomethyl)-1,3-thiazol-2-ylthio] propionic acid) was synthesized and conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, and was used for monoclonal antibody preparation. The resulting MoAb CTN-16A3-13 was characterized by a direct competitive ELISA (dc-ELISA). The 50% of inhibition concentration value with cl...

  15. Importance of Hypervariable Region 2 for Stability and Affinity of a Shark Single-Domain Antibody Specific for Ebola Virus Nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P Anderson

    Full Text Available Single-domain antibodies derived from the unique New Antigen Receptor found in sharks have numerous potential applications, ranging from diagnostic reagents to therapeutics. Shark-derived single-domain antibodies possess the same characteristic ability to refold after heat denaturation found in single-domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy-chain-only antibodies. Recently, two shark derived single-domain antibodies specific for the nucleoprotein of Ebola virus were described. Our evaluation confirmed their high affinity for the nucleoprotein, but found their melting temperatures to be low relative to most single-domain antibodies. Our first approach towards improving their stability was grafting antigen-binding regions (complementarity determining regions of one of these single-domain antibodies onto a high melting temperature shark single-domain antibody. This resulted in two variants: one that displayed excellent affinity with a low melting temperature, while the other had poor affinity but a higher melting temperature. These new proteins, however, differed in only 3 amino acids within the complementarity determining region 2 sequence. In shark single-domain antibodies, the complementarity determining region 2 is often referred to as hypervariable region 2, as this segment of the antibody domain is truncated compared to the sequence in camelid single-domain antibodies and conventional heavy chain variable domains. To elucidate which of the three amino acids or combinations thereof were responsible for the affinity and stability we made the 6 double and single point mutants that covered the intermediates between these two clones. We found a single amino acid change that achieved a 10°C higher melting temperature while maintaining sub nM affinity. This research gives insights into the impact of the shark sdAb hypervariable 2 region on both stability and affinity.

  16. Folic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folic acid is a B vitamin. It helps the body make healthy new cells. Everyone needs folic acid. For women who may get pregnant, it is really important. Getting enough folic acid before and during pregnancy can prevent major birth ...

  17. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Parodis

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204 or without (n = 294 LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous, before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes. Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all, but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are

  18. Structure Based Antibody-Like Peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Greene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb and soluble receptors represent new classes of therapeutic agents for treatment of several diseases. High affinity and high specificity biologics can be utilized for variety of clinical purposes. Monoclonal antibodies have been used as diagnostic agents when coupled with radionuclide, immune modulatory agents or in the treatment of cancers. Among other limitations of using large molecules for therapy the actual cost of biologics has become an issue. There is an effort among chemists and biologists to reduce the size of biologics which includes monoclonal antibodies and receptors without a reduction of biological efficacy. Single chain antibody, camel antibodies, Fv fragments are examples of this type of deconstructive process. Small high-affinity peptides have been identified using phage screening. Our laboratory used a structure-based approach to develop small-size peptidomimetics from the three-dimensional structure of proteins with immunoglobulin folds as exemplified by CD4 and antibodies. Peptides derived either from the receptor or their cognate ligand mimics the functions of the parental macromolecule. These constrained peptides not only provide a platform for developing small molecule drugs, but also provide insight into the atomic features of protein-protein interactions. A general overview of the reduction of monoclonal antibodies to small exocyclic peptide and its prospects as a useful diagnostic and as a drug in the treatment of cancer are discussed.

  19. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  20. Glycosylation profiles of therapeutic antibody pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Christoph; Berger, Christoph N; Girard, Philippe; Meier, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are often used as therapeutics and represent a major class of drug products. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of antibody complexes resulting in the elimination of a target molecule or the modulation of specific signalling pathways. The physiological effects of antibody therapeutics are known to depend on the structural characteristics of the antibody molecule, specifically on the glycosylation which is the result of posttranslational modifications. Hence, production of therapeutic antibodies with a defined and consistent glycoform profile is needed which still remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. To provide an insight into the industries capability to control their manufacturing process and to provide antibodies of highest quality, we conducted a market surveillance study and compared major oligosaccharide profiles of a number of monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals sampled on the Swiss market. Product lot-to-lot variability was found to be generally low, suggesting that a majority of manufacturers have implemented high quality standards in their production processes. However, proportions of G0, G1 and G2 core-fucosylated chains derived from different products varied considerably and showed a bias towards the immature agalactosidated G0 form. Interestingly, differences in glycosylation caused by the production cell type seem to be of less importance compared with process related parameters such as cell growth. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David M; Koup, Richard A; Ferrari, Guido

    2017-01-01

    The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However, antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Furthermore, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small-molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. HIV antibodies for treatment of HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, David M.; Koup, Richard A.; Ferrari, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Summary The bar is high to improve on current combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), now highly effective, safe, and simple. However antibodies that bind the HIV envelope are able to uniquely target the virus as it seeks to enter new target cells, or as it is expressed from previously infected cells. Further, the use of antibodies against HIV as a therapeutic may offer advantages. Antibodies can have long half-lives, and are being considered as partners for long-acting antiretrovirals for use in therapy or prevention of HIV infection. Early studies in animal models and in clinical trials suggest that such antibodies can have antiviral activity but, as with small molecule antiretrovirals, the issues of viral escape and resistance will have to be addressed. Most promising, however, are the unique properties of anti-HIV antibodies: the potential ability to opsonize viral particles, to direct antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) against actively infected cells, and ultimately the ability to direct the clearance of HIV-infected cells by effector cells of the immune system. These distinctive activities suggest that HIV antibodies and their derivatives may play an important role in the next frontier of HIV therapeutics, the effort to develop treatments that could lead to an HIV cure. PMID:28133794

  3. Streptococcal-vimentin cross-reactive antibodies induce microvascular cardiac endothelial proinflammatory phenotype in rheumatic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delunardo, F; Scalzi, V; Capozzi, A; Camerini, S; Misasi, R; Pierdominici, M; Pendolino, M; Crescenzi, M; Sorice, M; Valesini, G; Ortona, E; Alessandri, C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is characterized by the presence of anti-streptococcal group A antibodies and anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA). Molecular mimicry between streptococcal antigens and self proteins is a hallmark of the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever. We aimed to identify, in RHD patients, autoantibodies specific to endothelial autoantigens cross-reactive with streptococcal proteins and to evaluate their role in inducing endothelial damage. We used an immunoproteomic approach with endothelial cell-surface membrane proteins in order to identify autoantigens recognized by AECA of 140 RHD patients. Cross-reactivity of purified antibodies with streptococcal proteins was analysed. Homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies were found through comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal antigens with human antigens. To investigate interleukin (IL)-1R-associated kinase (IRAK1) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, we performed a Western blot analysis of whole extracts proteins from unstimulated or stimulated human microvascular cardiac endothelial cells (HMVEC-C). Adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors were studied by multiplex bead based immunoassay kits. We observed anti-vimentin antibodies in sera from 49% RHD AECA-positive patients. Cross-reactivity of purified anti-vimentin antibodies with heat shock protein (HSP)70 and streptopain streptococcal proteins was shown. Comparing the amino acid sequence of streptococcal HSP70 and streptopain with human vimentin, we found two homologous peptides recognized by serum cross-reactive antibodies. These antibodies were able to stimulate HMVEC-C inducing IRAK and NF-κB activation, adhesion molecule expression and release of proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. In conclusion, streptococcal–vimentin cross-reactive antibodies were able to activate microvascular cardiac endothelium by amplifying the inflammatory

  4. Stratification of antibody-positive subjects by antibody level reveals an impact of immunogenicity on pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Hoofring, Sarah A; Wu, Yu; Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Swanson, Steven J; Chirmule, Narendra; Starcevic, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The availability of highly sensitive immunoassays enables the detection of antidrug antibody (ADA) responses of various concentrations and affinities. The analysis of the impact of antibody status on drug pharmacokinetics (PK) is confounded by the presence of low-affinity or low-concentration antibody responses within the dataset. In a phase 2 clinical trial, a large proportion of subjects (45%) developed ADA following weekly dosing with AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody therapeutic. The antibody responses displayed a wide range of relative concentrations (30 ng/mL to >13 μg/mL) and peaked at various times during the study. To evaluate the impact of immunogenicity on PK, AMG 317 concentration data were analyzed following stratification by dose group, time point, antibody status (positive or negative), and antibody level (relative concentration). With dose group as a stratifying variable, a moderate reduction in AMG 317 levels (AMG 317 levels was revealed when antibody data was stratified by both time point and antibody level. In general, high ADA concentrations (>500 ng/mL) and later time points (week 12) were associated with significantly (up to 97%) lower trough AMG 317 concentrations. The use of quasi-quantitative antibody data and appropriate statistical methods was critical for the most comprehensive evaluation of the impact of immunogenicity on PK.

  5. Physical characteristics of a citrullinated pro-filaggrin epitope recognized by anti-citrullinated protein antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Holm, Bettina Eide; Slot, Ole

    2016-01-01

    whether biotin labelling influence antibody recognition. The full-length cyclic pro-filaggrin peptide and a linear form with a N-terminal biotin, was recognized to the same level, whereas, a notable difference in ACPA reactivity to the linear peptides with a C-terminal biotin was found, probably due...... amino acid in position 4 C-terminal to citrulline. Collectively, peptide structure, length, the presence of charged amino acids and biotin labelling markedly influence antibody reactivity. In relation to the clinical diagnostics of ACPA, these findings may reflect the differences in diagnostic assays...

  6. Design of an Expression System for Rapid Production of Tri-Functional Antibody Substitution of Hybrid Hybridoma Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Dehghani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tri-functional antibodies, as an effective novel tumor targeting agents, are composed of anti-CD3 rat IgG2b and an anti-tumor antigen antibody. We have intended to develop a novel drug system to induce the apoptosis of HER2-expressing tumor cells, activate and engage cytotoxic T lymphocytes, natural killer cells, and macrophages. In addition, the drug can  inhibit programmed death ligand 1 (PDL-1-expressing tumor cells. We have designed a mammalian vector system suitable to express the trifunctional antibody composed of antiHER2×human-CD80: human-IgG1Fc antibody. This antibody contains four chains of anti-HER2/CL, anti-HER2/CH1-3, B7.1/CL, and B7.1/CH1-3 within the human IgG1 framework and so the vector system will simultaneously express the four chains. The amino acid/nucleotide sequences datasets were retrieved from the GenBank, UniProtKB and PDB databases. The heavy and light chains variable domain framework regions and complementarity determining regions of scA21 antibody were determined by IMGT/V-QUEST and Paratome software. The amino acid sequences of tri-functional antibody chains manually were assembled and converted to DNA sequences by sequence manipulation suite software. The adapting codon usage of these DNA sequences was performed by JCAT software. Finally, the secondary structures of obtained RNAs from the DNAs were individually analyzed by RNAfold program. The Prodigy equilibrium dissociation constant, a ratio of koff/kon, between the antibody and its antigen for hantiHER2VHCH-HER2, hantiHER2VLCL-HER2, CD80CH-CD28, and CD80CL-CD28 were equal to 3.60E-10, 3.10E-9, 1.10E-8 and 2.70E-10; respectively. These findings were confirmed the composition and nano-molar affinity of the respective constructs. A single specific no-cloning expression vector, pHuchiTriomAb, was designed in silico with a desirable length of 8.292 Kbps and bidirectional expression potential for the four chimeric antibody chains. This construct was designed, and

  7. Engineering bispecific antibodies with defined chain pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Sellmann, Carolin; Rhiel, Laura; Schröter, Christian; Dickgiesser, Stephan; Beck, Jan; Zielonka, Stefan; Toleikis, Lars; Hock, Björn; Kolmar, Harald; Becker, Stefan

    2017-10-25

    Bispecific IgG-like antibodies can simultaneously interact with two epitopes on the same or on different antigens. Therefore, these molecules facilitate novel modes of action, which cannot be addressed by conventional monospecific IgGs. However, the generation of such antibodies still appears to be demanding due to their specific architecture comprising four different polypeptide chains that need to assemble correctly. This review focusses on different strategies to circumvent this issue or to enforce a correct chain association with a focus on common-chain bispecific antibodies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  9. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  10. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  11. Immunotherapy with GD2 specific monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.K.V.; Medof, E.M.; Munn, D.

    1988-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapy focuses anti-tumor activity of antibodies and effector cells, which are actively developed by the host or adoptively transferred, onto tumor cells and into tumor sites. Such tumor selective therapy can be more specific and efficient. The value of such an approach is evident in the classical interaction of antibodies. This paper reports that the ganglioside G D2 is an ideal antigen for specific tumor targeting because of its relative lack of heterogeneity among human neuroblastoma, its high density on tumor cells, its lack of antigen modulation upon binding to antibody, and its restricted distribution in normal tissues

  12. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated

  13. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated

  14. Production of monoclonal antibodies for sandwich immunoassay detection of ciguatoxin 51-hydroxyCTX3C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumuraya, Takeshi; Fujii, Ikuo; Inoue, Masayuki; Tatami, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Keisuke; Hirama, Masahiro

    2006-09-01

    Every year, more than 50,000 people in subtropical and tropical regions suffer from ciguatera seafood poisoning. The extremely low level of the causative neurotoxins (ciguatoxins) in fish has hampered the preparation of antibodies for detection of the toxins. In this study, we produced a monoclonal antibody (8H4) against the right end of ciguatoxin CTX1B (1) and 51-hydroxyCTX3C (3) by immunizing mice with the keyhole limpet hemocyanin-conjugate of the synthetic HIJKLM ring fragment (10). We used 8H4 and another previously reported monoclonal antibody (10C9) that recognizes the left end of 3 to develop a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect 3. The assay could detect 3 down to the ppb level and lacked cross-reactivity with other related marine toxins, including brevetoxin A, brevetoxin B, okadaic acid, and maitotoxin.

  15. Specific IgE antibodies in workers with occupational asthma due to western red cedar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, K S; Chan, H; Chan-Yeung, M

    1982-05-01

    The presence of specific IgE antibodies in the serum of patients with occupational asthma resulting from exposure to western red cedar (RCA) was studied by a radioallergosorbent test (RAST). The antigen matrix used in the RAST was either a conjugate of Sepharose particles with antigens in a crude cedar extract or with plicatic acid, the major haptenic component of cedar antigens. Of eighteen patients with clinical RCA and positive reaction to antigenic bronchoprovocation, eight were found to have abnormal RAST values. By appropriate absorption experiments, the serum RAST activity was shown to represent cedar antigen-specific IgE antibodies. No significant RAST activity was detected in the serum specimens from sixteen control subjects or from ten patients with negative bronchoprovocation-reaction to antigenic challenge. These results suggest that IgE antibody-mediated allergic reaction may be an important pathogenetic factor in RCA.

  16. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    conjugation strategy. Recently, a site-selective antibody conjugation method called “DNA-templated protein conjugation (DTPC)” was developed by our group. The site-selective covalently attachment of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to proteins was achieved by using a metal-affinity DNA probe and DNA-templated...... state to get a good pharmacological performance. Recombinant antibody engineering with non-natural amino acids, or enzyme-mediated conjugation approaches (transglutaminase, Sortase A or endoglycosidase) have been reported for producing homogeneous antibody conjugates. However, these methods require...... organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting...

  17. Effect of ABO blood group and secretor status on the frequency of Helicobacter pylori antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höök-Nikanne, J; Sistonen, P; Kosunen, T U

    1990-08-01

    Duodenal ulcer is associated with such genetic characteristics as blood group O and secretor status. Since Helicobacter pylori has been proved to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulcer, we wanted to study whether the frequency of H. pylori antibodies would vary in individuals with different blood group antigens. Antibodies against H. pylori were determined in 271 blood donors. Acid glycine extract from an H. pylori strain was used as antigen in enzyme immunoassay. Our results suggested no significant association of increased level of H. pylori antibodies with ABO blood group and secretor status, which implies that H. pylori infection is not associated with the ABO group and secretor status. Thus H. pylori and blood group antigens seem to be independently linked to duodenal ulcer.

  18. In silico selection of therapeutic antibodies for development: Viscosity, clearance, and chemical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas K.; Patapoff, Thomas W.; Kabakoff, Bruce; Pai, Satyan; Hilario, Eric; Zhang, Boyan; Li, Charlene; Borisov, Oleg; Kelley, Robert F.; Chorny, Ilya; Zhou, Joe Z.; Dill, Ken A.; Swartz, Trevor E.

    2014-01-01

    For mAbs to be viable therapeutics, they must be formulated to have low viscosity, be chemically stable, and have normal in vivo clearance rates. We explored these properties by observing correlations of up to 60 different antibodies of the IgG1 isotype. Unexpectedly, we observe significant correlations with simple physical properties obtainable from antibody sequences and by molecular dynamics simulations of individual antibody molecules. mAbs viscosities increase strongly with hydrophobicity and charge dipole distribution and decrease with net charge. Fast clearance correlates with high hydrophobicities of certain complementarity determining regions and with high positive or high negative net charge. Chemical degradation from tryptophan oxidation correlates with the average solvent exposure time of tryptophan residues. Aspartic acid isomerization rates can be predicted from solvent exposure and flexibility as determined by molecular dynamics simulations. These studies should aid in more rapid screening and selection of mAb candidates during early discovery. PMID:25512516

  19. Progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus: a syndrome with diverse clinical features and antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugaiv, Erkingül; Leite, Maria Isabel; Şehitoğlu, Elçin; Woodhall, Mark; Çavuş, Filiz; Waters, Patrick; İçöz, Sema; Birişik, Ömer; Uğurel, Elif; Ulusoy, Canan; Kürtüncü, Murat; Vural, Burçak; Vincent, Angela; Akman-Demir, Gulsen; Tüzün, Erdem

    2013-01-01

    To better characterize progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM) syndrome and identify novel PERM phenotypes. The clinical features and antibody status of PERM patients were investigated using immunoblots, cell-based assays, RIA, protein macroarray and ELISA. Two patients with supratentorial involvement showed abnormal PET or EEG findings. One patient was discovered to have renal cell carcinoma, and protein macroarray revealed Ma3-antibodies. Another patient with leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies showed a good response to immunotherapy. The heterogeneity of the immunological features suggests that PERM is caused by diverse pathogenic mechanisms. Seropositivity to well-characterized neuronal cell surface antigens might indicate a good treatment response. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Isolation of antibodies specific to sickle hemoglobin by affinity chromatography using a synthetic peptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N.S.; Curd, J.G.; Eastlake, A.; Furie, B.; Schechter, A.N.

    1975-01-01

    Antibodies to hemoglobin have been studied with a radioimmunoassay which employs [ 14 C]carbamylated (= carbamoylated) hemoglobin S. An antiserum raised against hemoglobin S, which initially discriminated poorly between hemoglobins S and A, was fractionated by absorption to a column of Sepharose to which a synthetic peptide corresponding to the first 13 amino-acid residues of the β chain of sickle hemoglobin had been covalently bound. A subpopulation of the antiserum was eluted from this column with 4 M guanidine . HCl. These antibodies showed binding to hemoglobin S but not to hemoglobin A and this interaction could be inhibited by the synthetic peptide. These antibodies, of demonstrated fine structural specificity, may be useful in the detection of sickle hemoglobin and in the study of its structure in solution

  1. New haptens and antibodies for ractopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liu, Meixuan; Shi, Weimin; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-09-15

    In this work, three unreported immunizing haptens of ractopamine (RAC) were synthesized and used to produce highly sensitive and specific polyclonal antibody. The spacer arms of haptens for coupling to protein carrier were located on different position of RAC with different length. High affinity polyclonal antibodies were obtained and characterized in terms of titer and sensitivity by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The best antibody employed in a heterologous competitive ELISA exhibited an IC50 value as low as 0.12ngmL(-1) and could not recognize other 10 β-agonists including clenbuterol and salbutamol. The heterologous competitive ELISA was preliminary applied to swine urine and the results showed the new antibody was sufficiently sensitive and specific, and potentially used for the detection of RAC at trace level in real samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Antiphospholipids antibodies and migraine | Nyandaiti | Sahel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thrombotic neurological conditions such as migraine. We set out to estimate the concentration of antiphospholipids antibody among patients with migraine and normal population. Methods: This is prospective case-control study of 158 subjects ...

  3. Characterization of methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate specific polyclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Nadia Muhammad Akram; Schulz, Alexander; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    that it was highly selective for methionine-derived aliphatic glucosinolates with a methyl-sulfinyl group in the side chain. Use of crude plant extracts from Arabidopsis mutants with different glucosinolate profiles showed that the antibodies recognized aliphatic glucosinolates in a plant extract and did not cross......Antibodies towards small molecules, like plant specialized metabolites, are valuable tools for developing quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques. Glucosinolates are the specialized metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order. Here we describe the characterization of polyclonal...... rabbit antibodies raised against the 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate, glucoraphanin that is one of the major glucosinolates in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (hereafter Arabidopsis). Analysis of the cross-reactivity of the antibodies against a number of glucosinolates demonstrated...

  4. Radionuclide therapy of cancer with radiolabeled antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerman, O.C.; Koppe, M.J.; Postema, E.J.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Oyen, W.J.G.

    2007-01-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against tumor-associated antigens has evolved from an appealing concept to one of the standard treatment options for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Inefficient localization of radiolabeled MAbs to

  5. Dissecting the Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2001-01-01

    The potential of mononclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  6. Immunoglobulin Classification Using the Colored Antibody Graph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonissone, Stefano R; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2016-06-01

    The somatic recombination of V, D, and J gene segments in B-cells introduces a great deal of diversity, and divergence from reference segments. Many recent studies of antibodies focus on the population of antibody transcripts that show which V, D, and J gene segments have been favored for a particular antigen, a repertoire. To properly describe the antibody repertoire, each antibody must be labeled by its constituting V, D, and J gene segment, a task made difficult by somatic recombination and hypermutation events. While previous approaches to repertoire analysis were based on sequential alignments, we describe a new de Bruijn graph-based algorithm to perform VDJ labeling and benchmark its performance.

  7. Opposites attract in bispecific antibody engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, Marit J.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies show great promise as intrinsic combination therapies, but often suffer from poor physiochemical properties, many times related to poor heterodimerization. De Nardis et al. identify specific electrostatic interactions that facilitate efficient heterodimerization, resulting in

  8. Antibody conjugate radioimmunotherapy of superficial bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Alan; Hopper, Melanie; Murray, Andrea; Frier, Malcolm; Bishop, Mike

    2002-01-01

    The administration of antibody conjugates for cancer therapy is now proving to be of clinical value. We are currently undertaking a programme of clinical studies using the monoclonal antibody C 595 (gG3) which reacts with the MUC1 glycoprotein antigen that is aberrantly expressed in a high proportion of bladder tumours. Radio immuno conjugates of the C 595 antibody have been produced with high radiolabelling efficiency and immuno reactivity using Tc-99 m and In-111 for diagnostic imaging, and disease staging and the cytotoxic radionuclides Cu-67 and Re-188 for therapy of superficial bladder cancer. A Phase I/II therapeutic trail involving the intravesical administration of antibody directly into the bladder has now begun. (author)

  9. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R [Berkeley, CA; Kehoe, John [Saint Davids, PA; Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  10. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  11. Targeting Malignant Brain Tumors with Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rok Razpotnik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies have been shown to be a potent therapeutic tool. However, their use for targeting brain diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases and brain cancers, has been limited, particularly because the blood–brain barrier (BBB makes brain tissue hard to access by conventional antibody-targeting strategies. In this review, we summarize new antibody therapeutic approaches to target brain tumors, especially malignant gliomas, as well as their potential drawbacks. Many different brain delivery platforms for antibodies have been studied such as liposomes, nanoparticle-based systems, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs, and cell-based approaches. We have already shown the successful delivery of single-chain fragment variable (scFv with CPP as a linker between two variable domains in the brain. Antibodies normally face poor penetration through the BBB, with some variants sufficiently passing the barrier on their own. A “Trojan horse” method allows passage of biomolecules, such as antibodies, through the BBB by receptor-mediated transcytosis (RMT. Such examples of therapeutic antibodies are the bispecific antibodies where one binding specificity recognizes and binds a BBB receptor, enabling RMT and where a second binding specificity recognizes an antigen as a therapeutic target. On the other hand, cell-based systems such as stem cells (SCs are a promising delivery system because of their tumor tropism and ability to cross the BBB. Genetically engineered SCs can be used in gene therapy, where they express anti-tumor drugs, including antibodies. Different types and sources of SCs have been studied for the delivery of therapeutics to the brain; both mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and neural stem cells (NSCs show great potential. Following the success in treatment of leukemias and lymphomas, the adoptive T-cell therapies, especially the chimeric antigen receptor-T cells (CAR-Ts, are making their way into glioma treatment as another type of cell

  12. Generalized Platform for Antibody Detection using the Antibody Catalyzed Water Oxidation Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Welch, M. Elizabeth; Ritzert, Nicole L.; Chen, Hongjun; Smith, Norah L.; Tague, Michele E.; Xu, Youyong; Baird, Barbara A.; Abru?a, H?ctor D.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Infectious diseases, such as influenza, present a prominent global problem including the constant threat of pandemics that initiate in avian or other species and then pass to humans. We report a new sensor that can be specifically functionalized to detect antibodies associated with a wide range of infectious diseases in multiple species. This biosensor is based on electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide generated through the intrinsic catalytic activity of all antibodies: the antibody ...

  13. Radioimmunoassay of measles virus antibodies in SSPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, M.A.; Gut, W.; Kantoch, M.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive radioimmunoassay (RIA) was introduced for detecting measles virus IgG and IgM antibodies. The hyperimmune response to the measles virus could be demonstrated more accurately by RIA than by haemagglutination inhibition (HI). The ratio between RIA and HI antibody titres was decidedly higher in sera and cerebrospinal fluids of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis than in those of other groups tested. (author)

  14. Immunoglobulin variable region sequences of two human monoclonal antibodies directed to an onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen, lactotetraosylceramide (LcOse4Cer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yago, K; Zenita, K; Ohwaki, I; Harada, R; Nozawa, S; Tsukazaki, K; Iwamori, M; Endo, N; Yasuda, N; Okuma, M

    1993-11-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, 11-50, was generated and was shown to recognize an onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen, LcOse4Cer. The isotype of this antibody was IgM, lambda, similar to the previously known human anti-LcOse4 antibodies, such as IgMWOO and HMST-1. We raised a murine anti-idiotypic antibody G3 (IgG1, kappa) against 11-50, and tested its reactivity towards the affinity purified human polyclonal anti-LcOse4 antibodies prepared from pooled human sera using a Gal beta 1-->3GlcNAc beta-immobilized column. The results indicated that at least a part of the human polyclonal anti-LcOse4 antibodies shared the G3 idiotype with 11-50. We further analyzed the sequence of variable regions of the two anti-LcOse4 antibodies, 11-50 and HMST-1. Sequence analysis of the heavy chain variable regions indicated that the VH regions of these two antibodies were highly homologous to each other (93.5% at the nucleic acid level), and these antibodies utilized the germline genes VH1.9III and hv3005f3 as the VH segments, which are closely related germline genes of the VHIII family. It was noted that these germline VH genes are frequently utilized in fetal B cells. The JH region of both antibodies was encoded by the JH4 gene. For the light chain, the V lambda segments of the two antibodies were 96.3% homologous to each other at the nucleic acid level. The V lambda segments of both antibodies showed the highest homology to the rearranged V lambda gene called V lambda II.DS among reported V lambda genes, while the exact germline V lambda genes encoding the two antibodies were not yet registered in available sequence databanks. The amino acid sequences of the J lambda segments of both antibodies were identical. These results indicate that the two human antibodies recognizing the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen Lc4 are encoded by the same or very homologous germline genes.

  15. IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH HLA ANTIBODIES CLASS I AND II, AND MICA ANTIBODIES IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of HLA and MICA antibodies in patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation and their influence on the course of post-transplant period. Determination of HLA antibodies class I and II, and MICA antibodies was performed on a platform of Luminex (xMAP-tech- nology using sets LABScreen ONE LAMBDA (U.S.. A total of 156 patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Revealed the presence of HLA and MICA antibodies in the serum of 31.4% of patients. Regraf- ted patients increased the content of antibodies to the antigens of HLA system was noted in 88.2% of cases, 47% met the combination of antibodies to the I, II classes and MICA. In patients awaiting first kidney transplantation, HLA and MICA antibodies were determined in 23.7% of cases. The presence of pretransplant HLA and MICA antibodies had a significant influence on the course of post-transplant period. Patients with the presence of HLA and MICA in 50% of cases delayed graft function. Sessions of plasmapheresis can reduce the concentration of HLA and MICA antibodies on average by 61.1%. 

  16. Microangiopathic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex IgM antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senda, Yumi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Yokoyama, Tadafumi; Shimizu, Masaki; Furuichi, Kengo; Wada, Takashi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2017-03-01

    Herein we describe a case of microangiopathic antiphospholipid syndrome (MAPS) due to anti-phosphatidylserine/prothrombin complex (aPS/PT) IgM antibody successfully treated with rituximab. A significant correlation was observed between the clinical course and the aPS/PT IgM antibody titer, which can rise earlier before the appearance of clinical symptoms. Rituximab can be safely and effectively used for MAPS. Although detection of only aPS/PT IgM antibody is rare, aPS/PT IgM antibody might be associated with the pathogenesis of MAPS and might be a useful marker of disease activity. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  17. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  18. Principles for computational design of binding antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Dror; Pszolla, M Gabriele; Lapidoth, Gideon D; Norn, Christoffer; Dym, Orly; Unger, Tamar; Albeck, Shira; Tyka, Michael D; Fleishman, Sarel J

    2017-10-10

    Natural proteins must both fold into a stable conformation and exert their molecular function. To date, computational design has successfully produced stable and atomically accurate proteins by using so-called "ideal" folds rich in regular secondary structures and almost devoid of loops and destabilizing elements, such as cavities. Molecular function, such as binding and catalysis, however, often demands nonideal features, including large and irregular loops and buried polar interaction networks, which have remained challenging for fold design. Through five design/experiment cycles, we learned principles for designing stable and functional antibody variable fragments (Fvs). Specifically, we ( i ) used sequence-design constraints derived from antibody multiple-sequence alignments, and ( ii ) during backbone design, maintained stabilizing interactions observed in natural antibodies between the framework and loops of complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 2. Designed Fvs bound their ligands with midnanomolar affinities and were as stable as natural antibodies, despite having >30 mutations from mammalian antibody germlines. Furthermore, crystallographic analysis demonstrated atomic accuracy throughout the framework and in four of six CDRs in one design and atomic accuracy in the entire Fv in another. The principles we learned are general, and can be implemented to design other nonideal folds, generating stable, specific, and precise antibodies and enzymes.

  19. Antibody-Conjugated Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Arruebo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way into the fields of Biotechnology and Medicine. Nanoparticles by themselves offer specific physicochemical properties that they do not exhibit in bulk form, where materials show constant physical properties regardless of size. Antibodies are nanosize biological products that are part of the specific immune system. In addition to their own properties as pathogens or toxin neutralizers, as well as in the recruitment of immune elements (complement, improving phagocytosis, cytotoxicity antibody dependent by natural killer cells, etc., they could carry several elements (toxins, drugs, fluorochroms, or even nanoparticles, etc. and be used in several diagnostic procedures, or even in therapy to destroy a specific target. The conjugation of antibodies to nanoparticles can generate a product that combines the properties of both. For example, they can combine the small size of nanoparticles and their special thermal, imaging, drug carrier, or magnetic characteristics with the abilities of antibodies, such as specific and selective recognition. The hybrid product will show versatility and specificity. In this review, we analyse both antibodies and nanoparticles, focusing especially on the recent developments for antibody-conjugated nanoparticles, offering the researcher an overview of the different applications and possibilities of these hybrid carriers.

  20. Decay of maternal antibodies in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Mahmoud, Kamel

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the decay rate of maternal antibodies against major broiler chicken pathogens. A total of 30 one-day-old broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and reared in isolation. These chicks were retrieved from a parent flock that received a routine vaccination program. Chicks were bled at hatch and sequentially thereafter every 5 d through 30 d of age. Maternal antibody titers were measured by ELISA for avian encephalomyelitis (AEV), avian influenza virus (AIV), chicken anemia virus (CAV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), and reovirus (Reo). Maternal antibody titers for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition test. Half-life estimates of maternal antibody titers were 5.3, 4.2, 7, 5.1, 3.9, 3.8, 4.9, 4.1, 6.3, and 4.7 d for AEV, AIV, CAV, IBDV, IBV, ILTV, MG, MS, NDV, and Reo, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences among half-lives of maternal antibody titers against certain pathogens. Furthermore, all maternal antibody titers were depleted by 10 d of age except for IBDV.

  1. C595 antibody: A potential vector for targeted alpha therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, A.C.; Allen, B.J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Mucins are high molecular-weight heavily glycosylated glycoproteins with many oligosaccharide side-chains, linked to a protein backbone called apomucin. A total of 19 different mucin genes (MUC1-MUC4, MUC5B, MUC5AC, MUC6-MUC18) have been identified to date. Mucins are present on the surface of most epithelial cells and play a role in their protection and lubrication. In cancer cells the mucin molecule becomes altered, thus representing an important target for diagnosis and therapy. Urinary epithelial mucin1 (MUC1) is found to be frequently up-regulated and abnormally glycosylated in a number of common malignancies, including breast, bladder, colon, ovarian and gastric cancer. The monoclonal antibody C595 is an IgG3 murine MAb raised against the protein core of human MUC1. Epitope mapping has shown that C595 recognizes a tetrapeptide motif (RPAP) within the protein core of MUC1 mucin that contains a large domain of multiples of a highly conserved 20-amino-acid-repeat sequence (PDTRPAPGSTAPPAHGVTSA). This antibody has previously been radiolabelled with 99m Tc and 111 In and used for imaging a range of tumour types including ovary, breast and bladder. The antibody has also been radiolabelled with 67 Cu and 188 Re for the therapy of superficial bladder cancer. More recently we have investigated the pre-clinical use of the C595 antibody for targeted alpha therapy using 213 Bi which emits alpha particles with high linear energy transfer (LET), short range (80 m) radiation and has a short physical half-life of 45.6 minutes. Alpha particles are some 7300 times heavier than beta particles and in theory, following binding of an alpha immunocongugates to the target, a large fraction of the alpha particle energy is delivered to cancer cells, with minimal concomitant radiation of normal tissues. 213 Bi was produced from the 225 Ac/ 213 Bi generator. For antibody conjugation the chelator, cyclic diethylenetriaminepentacetic acid anhydride (DTPA) was used. Initial

  2. Chemical design of radiolabeled antibody fragments for low renal radioactivity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arano, Y; Fujioka, Y; Akizawa, H; Ono, M; Uehara, T; Wakisaka, K; Nakayama, M; Sakahara, H; Konishi, J; Saji, H

    1999-01-01

    The renal uptake of radiolabeled antibody fragments presents a problem in targeted imaging and therapy. We hypothesized that the renal radioactivity levels of radiolabeled antibody fragments could be reduced if radiolabeled compounds of urinary excretion were released from glomerularly filtered antibody fragments before they were incorporated into renal cells by the action of brush border enzymes, present on the lumen of renal tubules. 3'-[131I]Iodohippuryl N(epsilon)-maleoyl-L-lysine ([131I]HML) was conjugated with a thiolated Fab fragment because the glycyl-lysine sequence in HML is a substrate for a brush border enzyme and metaiodohippuric acid is released by cleavage of the linkage. Fab fragments were also radiolabeled by direct radioiodination (125I-Fab) or by conjugation with meta-[125I]-iodohippuric acid via an amide bond [N-(5-maleimidopentyl) 3'-iodohippuric acid amide ([125I]MPH-Fab)] or an ester bond [maleimidoethy 3'-iodohippurate ([125I]MIH-Fab)] by procedures similar to those used for [131I]HML-Fab. In biodistribution experiments in mice, [131I]HML-Fab demonstrated markedly low renal radioactivity levels with kidney:blood ratios of radioactivity of 1 from 10 min to 1 h due to rapid release of meta-[131I]iodohippuric acid. [125]MIH-Fab and 1251-Fab reached their peak ratios of 3.8 and 7.3 at 1 h, respectively, and [125I]MPH-Fab showed the maximum ratio of 16.8 at 6 h. In subcellular distribution studies, both [125I]MIH-Fab and 125I-Fab showed migration of radioactivity from the membrane to the lysosomal fraction of the renal cells from 10 to 30 min postinjection, whereas the majority of the radioactivity was detected only in the membrane fraction after administration of [131I]HML-Fab at both time points. In nude mice, [131I]HML-Fab showed one-quarter of the renal radioactivity of simultaneously administered 125I-Fab without impairing the target radioactivity levels 3 h after injection. These findings indicated that HML is a useful reagent for targeted

  3. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashem, Anwar M.; Van Domselaar, Gary; Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D.; Sui, Jianhua; He, Runtao; Marasco, Wayne A.; Li, Xuguang

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. → Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. → The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. → The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  4. Universal antibodies against the highly conserved influenza fusion peptide cross-neutralize several subtypes of influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashem, Anwar M. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Van Domselaar, Gary [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Li, Changgui; Wang, Junzhi [National Institute for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products, Beijing (China); She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry D. [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Sui, Jianhua [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); He, Runtao [National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Marasco, Wayne A. [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Li, Xuguang, E-mail: Sean.Li@hc-sc.gc.ca [Centre for Vaccine Evaluation, Biologics and Genetic Therapies Directorate, HPFB, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-12-10

    Research highlights: {yields} The fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza viral hemagglutinins. {yields} Anti-fusion peptide antibodies are universal antibodies that cross-react with all influenza HA subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies cross-neutralize different influenza A subtypes. {yields} The universal antibodies inhibit the fusion process between the viruses and the target cells. -- Abstract: The fusion peptide of influenza viral hemagglutinin plays a critical role in virus entry by facilitating membrane fusion between the virus and target cells. As the fusion peptide is the only universally conserved epitope in all influenza A and B viruses, it could be an attractive target for vaccine-induced immune responses. We previously reported that antibodies targeting the first 14 amino acids of the N-terminus of the fusion peptide could bind to virtually all influenza virus strains and quantify hemagglutinins in vaccines produced in embryonated eggs. Here we demonstrate that these universal antibodies bind to the viral hemagglutinins in native conformation presented in infected mammalian cell cultures and neutralize multiple subtypes of virus by inhibiting the pH-dependant fusion of viral and cellular membranes. These results suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral hemagglutinin is exposed sufficiently to be attacked by the antibodies during the course of infection and merits further investigation because of potential importance in the protection against diverse strains of influenza viruses.

  5. The role of major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A antibodies in organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yizhou; Stastny, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) antigens are expressed on the endothelium, they are polymorphic and have been shown to be recognized by antibodies produced by transplant recipients. Methods for detection of these antibodies have become available. In the 15th International Histocompatibility Workshop, a study for MICA antibody testing and of MICA genotyping was organized. Antibodies against MICA antigens have been determined either using cells transfected with MICA alleles or recombinant MICA antigens. MICA epitopes were characterized by empirical study of human sera and by correlation with MICA polymorphic amino acids. Sera were absorbed with cells transfected with MICA alleles and site-directed mutagenesis was employed to analyze complex sera. A number of clinical studies have shown associations of antibodies against MICA with decreased survival of kidney transplants and in one investigation with acute rejection in recipients of heart allografts. In addition to the HLA antigens, which elicit a strong immune response against allografted organs, the MICA antigens may be recognized as foreign and induce the production of MICA-specific antibodies. Antibodies against MICA have been associated with a decrease in the survival of organ allografts. The results suggest the MICA antigens are transplantation antigens that can induce an immune response associated with graft failure.

  6. Anti-tau antibody administration increases plasma tau in transgenic mice and patients with tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra, Kiran; Patel, Tirth K; Jiang, Hong; Schindler, Suzanne; Ulrich, Jason D; Boxer, Adam L; Miller, Bruce L; Kerwin, Diana R; Gallardo, Gilbert; Stewart, Floy; Finn, Mary Beth; Cairns, Nigel J; Verghese, Philip B; Fogelman, Ilana; West, Tim; Braunstein, Joel; Robinson, Grace; Keyser, Jennifer; Roh, Joseph; Knapik, Stephanie S; Hu, Yan; Holtzman, David M

    2017-04-19

    Tauopathies are a group of disorders in which the cytosolic protein tau aggregates and accumulates in cells within the brain, resulting in neurodegeneration. A promising treatment being explored for tauopathies is passive immunization with anti-tau antibodies. We previously found that administration of an anti-tau antibody to human tau transgenic mice increased the concentration of plasma tau. We further explored the effects of administering an anti-tau antibody on plasma tau. After peripheral administration of an anti-tau antibody to human patients with tauopathy and to mice expressing human tau in the central nervous system, there was a dose-dependent increase in plasma tau. In mouse plasma, we found that tau had a short half-life of 8 min that increased to more than 3 hours after administration of anti-tau antibody. As tau transgenic mice accumulated insoluble tau in the brain, brain soluble and interstitial fluid tau decreased. Administration of anti-tau antibody to tau transgenic mice that had decreased brain soluble tau and interstitial fluid tau resulted in an increase in plasma tau, but this increase was less than that observed in tau transgenic mice without these brain changes. Tau transgenic mice subjected to acute neuronal injury using 3-nitropropionic acid showed increased interstitial fluid tau and plasma tau. These data suggest that peripheral administration of an anti-tau antibody results in increased plasma tau, which correlates with the concentration of extracellular and soluble tau in the brain. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies against an arabinogalactan-protein from pressed juice of Echinacea purpurea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, B; Csávás, M; Borbás, A; Dingermann, T; Zündorf, I

    2004-09-01

    Pressed juices of the aerial parts of Echinacea purpurea are used as non-specific immunostimulants, and arabinogalactan-proteins (AGPs) have been shown to be part of the active principle. Monoclonal antibodies against an AGP from pressed juice of Echinacea purpurea with complement-stimulating activity have been established by means of hybridoma techniques. To test the specificity of the antibodies, several other arabinogalactan-proteins from suspension cultures of Echinacea purpurea, the roots of Echinacea pallida, the aerial parts of Rudbeckia hirta, the roots of Baptisia tinctoria and gum arabic as well as an arabinogalactan from larch wood were tested in a competitive ELISA for cross reactivities. Chemical modifications at the periphery of the AGP molecules either by reduction of uronic acids or by dearabinosylation had no influence on the reactivity of the molecules towards the antibodies. For further characterization of the epitope, different Ara-Gal-oligosaccharides were used as antigens. A hexasaccharide consisting of a backbone of four molecules of 6-linked beta- D-Gal p, the second and the fourth of them branched at O-2 to an alpha- L-Ara f residue showed weak but reproducible cross reactivity, indicating that the antibodies may be at least in part directed to the carbohydrate moiety of the AGP. Testing of anti-AGP antibodies JIM 8 and LM 2 revealed good reactivity of LM 2 with the Echinacea AGP, whereas Jim 8 showed only very weak interaction.

  9. Fabrication of calix[4]arene derivative monolayers to control orientation of antibody immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongxia; Liu, Feng; Qi, Fangjie; Koh, Kwangnak; Wang, Keming

    2014-03-31

    Three calix[4]arene (Cal-4) derivatives which separately contain ethylester (1), carboxylic acid (2), and crownether (3) at the lower rim with a common reactive thiol at the upper rim were synthesized and constructed to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au films. After spectroscopic characterization of the monolayers, surface coverage and orientation of antibody immobilized on the Cal-4 derivative SAMs were studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. Experimental results revealed that the antibody could be immobilized on the Cal-4 derivatives spontaneously. The orientation of absorbed antibody on the Cal-4 derivative SAMs is related to the SAM's dipole moment. The possible orientations of the antibody immobilized on the Cal-4 derivative 1 SAM are lying-on or side-on, while on the Cal-4 derivative 2 and Cal-4 derivative 3 head-on and end-on respectively. These experimental results demonstrate the surface dipole moment of Cal-4 derivative appears to be an important factor to antibody orientation. Cal-4 derivatives are useful in developing site direct protein chips.

  10. A synthetic peptide derived from domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus induces neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, J Asnet; Jittmittraphap, Akanitt; Chattanadee, Siriporn; Leaungwutiwong, Pornsawan; Shenbagarathai, R

    2018-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an arthropod-borne human pathogen that represents a severe public health threat in both endemic and non-endemic regions. So far, there is no licensed vaccine or specific drugs available for dengue fever. A fifteen-amino-acid-long peptide that includes the NGR motif was chemically synthesized and conjugated with keyhole limpet hemocyanin. A standard immunization protocol was followed for the production of polyclonal antibodies by immunizing rabbits against the synthetic peptide. The immune response elicited high-titer polyclonal antibodies with the reactivity of the anti-peptide antibody against both synthetic peptide and four serotypes of DENV confirmed by DOT-ELISA. Neutralizing activity of anti-peptide antibody was found to be cross-reactive and effective resulting in 60% reduction of infectivity at 1:200 dilution in all four serotypes of DENV. Our findings have the potential to further improve our understanding of virus-host interactions and provide new insights into neutralizing antibodies and could also be used as a drug target.

  11. Fabrication of Calix[4]arene Derivative Monolayers to Control Orientation of Antibody Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Three calix[4]arene (Cal-4 derivatives which separately contain ethylester (1, carboxylic acid (2, and crownether (3 at the lower rim with a common reactive thiol at the upper rim were synthesized and constructed to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on Au films. After spectroscopic characterization of the monolayers, surface coverage and orientation of antibody immobilized on the Cal-4 derivative SAMs were studied by surface plasmon resonance (SPR technique. Experimental results revealed that the antibody could be immobilized on the Cal-4 derivatives spontaneously. The orientation of absorbed antibody on the Cal-4 derivative SAMs is related to the SAM’s dipole moment. The possible orientations of the antibody immobilized on the Cal-4 derivative 1 SAM are lying-on or side-on, while on the Cal-4 derivative 2 and Cal-4 derivative 3 head-on and end-on respectively. These experimental results demonstrate the surface dipole moment of Cal-4 derivative appears to be an important factor to antibody orientation. Cal-4 derivatives are useful in developing site direct protein chips.

  12. Antipeptide antibodies that can distinguish specific subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, X.; Henry, R. L.; Takemoto, L. J.; Guikema, J. A.; Wong, P. P.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    The amino acid sequences of the beta and gamma subunit polypeptides of glutamine synthetase from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) root nodules are very similar. However, there are small regions within the sequences that are significantly different between the two polypeptides. The sequences between amino acids 2 and 9 and between 264 and 274 are examples. Three peptides (gamma 2-9, gamma 264-274, and beta 264-274) corresponding to these sequences were synthesized. Antibodies against these peptides were raised in rabbits and purified with corresponding peptide-Sepharose affinity chromatography. Western blot analysis of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of bean nodule proteins demonstrated that the anti-beta 264-274 antibodies reacted specifically with the beta polypeptide and the anti-gamma 264-274 and anti-gamma 2-9 antibodies reacted specifically with the gamma polypeptide of the native and denatured glutamine synthetase. These results showed the feasibility of using synthetic peptides in developing antibodies that are capable of distinguishing proteins with similar primary structures.

  13. Engineered Bovine Antibodies in the Development of Novel Therapeutics, Immunomodulators and Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Koti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Some bovine antibodies across all classes are unique, such as the CDR3 of the variable heavy-domain (VH CDR3, which is exceptionally long (up to 66 amino acids, unlike most conventional antibodies where the VH CDR3 loops range from 10 to 25 amino acids. The exceptionally long VH CDR3 is encoded by unusually long germline IGHD genes together with insertion of novel “a” nucleotide rich conserved short nucleotide sequence (CSNS specifically at the IGH V-D junction. Such an exceptionally long VH CDR3 confers unique “knob and stalk” structural architecture where the knob, formed by intra-VH CDR3 disulfide bridges, is separated by 20 Å solvent exposed stalk composed of anti-parallel beta strands. The substitution of the knob with cytokines, such as, erythropoietin and granulocyte colony stimulating factor 3 (granulocyte colony stimulating factor, results in expression of functional fusion proteins with enhanced pharmacokinetics. The beta stranded stalk can be substituted with other rigid structures, for example, repeat alpha helices to form coiled-coil that mimics the beta-stranded stalk and, thus, opens opportunities for insertion of this structure in the CDRs of antibodies across species. Given the versatility of such a structural platform in bovine antibody VH CDR3, it provides the opportunity for the development of new generation of diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccines and immunomodulating drugs.

  14. Antibodies to henipavirus or henipa-like viruses in domestic pigs in Ghana, West Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T S Hayman

    Full Text Available Henipaviruses, Hendra virus (HeV and Nipah virus (NiV, have Pteropid bats as their known natural reservoirs. Antibodies against henipaviruses have been found in Eidolon helvum, an old world fruit bat species, and henipavirus-like nucleic acid has been detected in faecal samples from E. helvum in Ghana. The initial outbreak of NiV in Malaysia led to over 265 human encephalitis cases, including 105 deaths, with infected pigs acting as amplifier hosts for NiV during the outbreak. We detected non-neutralizing antibodies against viruses of the genus Henipavirus in approximately 5% of pig sera (N = 97 tested in Ghana, but not in a small sample of other domestic species sampled under a E. helvum roost. Although we did not detect neutralizing antibody, our results suggest prior exposure of the Ghana pig population to henipavirus(es. Because a wide diversity of henipavirus-like nucleic acid sequences have been found in Ghanaian E. helvum, we hypothesise that these pigs might have been infected by henipavirus(es sufficiently divergent enough from HeVor NiV to produce cross-reactive, but not cross-neutralizing antibodies to HeV or NiV.

  15. Antibody Fragments and Their Purification by Protein L Affinity Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies and related proteins comprise one of the largest and fastest-growing classes of protein pharmaceuticals. A majority of such molecules are monoclonal antibodies; however, many new entities are antibody fragments. Due to their structural, physiological, and pharmacological properties, antibody fragments offer new biopharmaceutical opportunities. In the case of recombinant full-length antibodies with suitable Fc regions, two or three column purification processes centered around Protein A affinity chromatography have proven to be fast, efficient, robust, cost-effective, and scalable. Most antibody fragments lack Fc and suitable affinity for Protein A. Adapting proven antibody purification processes to antibody fragments demands different affinity chromatography. Such technology must offer the unit operation advantages noted above, and be suitable for most of the many different types of antibody fragments. Protein L affinity chromatography appears to fulfill these criteria—suggesting its consideration as a key unit operation in antibody fragment processing.

  16. Avidity of onconeural antibodies is of clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totland, Cecilie; Ying, Ming; Haugen, Mette; Mazengia, Kibret; Storstein, Anette; Aarseth, Jan; Martinez, Aurora; Vedeler, Christian

    2013-08-01

    Onconeural antibodies are important in the detection of paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). The avidity of Hu, Yo, and CRMP5 antibodies from 100 patients was determined by immunoprecipitation (IP), and 13 of the Yo positive sera were also tested by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). There was a significant association between the results from IP and SPR. Yo antibodies had higher avidity than Hu and CRMP5 antibodies, and both high- and low-avidity antibodies were associated with tumors and PNS. High-avidity Yo antibodies were mainly associated with ovarian cancer, whereas high-avidity Hu and CRMP5 antibodies were mainly associated with small-cell lung cancer. Low-avidity CRMP5 and Yo antibodies were less often detected by a commercial line blot than high-avidity antibodies. The failure to detect low-avidity onconeural antibodies may result in under diagnosis of PNS.

  17. Tethered-variable CL bispecific IgG: an antibody platform for rapid bispecific antibody screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hok Seon; Dunshee, Diana Ronai; Yee, Angie; Tong, Raymond K; Kim, Ingrid; Farahi, Farzam; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Ernst, James A; Sonoda, Junichiro; Spiess, Christoph

    2017-09-01

    Bispecific antibodies offer a clinically validated platform for drug discovery. In generating functionally active bispecific antibodies, it is necessary to identify a unique parental antibody pair to merge into a single molecule. However, technologies that allow high-throughput production of bispecific immunoglobulin Gs (BsIgGs) for screening purposes are limited. Here, we describe a novel bispecific antibody format termed tethered-variable CLBsIgG (tcBsIgG) that allows robust production of intact BsIgG in a single cell line, concurrently ensuring cognate light chain pairing and preserving key antibody structural and functional properties. This technology is broadly applicable in the generation of BsIgG from a variety of antibody isotypes, including human BsIgG1, BsIgG2 and BsIgG4. The practicality of the tcBsIgG platform is demonstrated by screening BsIgGs generated from FGF21-mimetic anti-Klotho-β agonistic antibodies in a combinatorial manner. This screen identified multiple biepitopic combinations with enhanced agonistic activity relative to the parental monoclonal antibodies, thereby demonstrating that biepitopic antibodies can acquire enhanced functionality compared to monospecific parental antibodies. By design, the tcBsIgG format is amenable to high-throughput production of large panels of bispecific antibodies and thus can facilitate the identification of rare BsIgG combinations to enable the discovery of molecules with improved biological function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Seroprevalence of Brucella antibodies in camels in Katsina State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisu, U S; Kudi, C A; Bale, J O O; Babashani, M; Kaltungo, B Y; Saidu, S N A; Asambe, A; Baba, A Y

    2017-06-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the status of Brucella infection in one-humped (Dromedary) camels in the North and Central senatorial districts of Katsina State, Nigeria. Nine hundred and eighty serum samples from live and slaughtered camels were tested. Modified Rose Bengal plate test (RBPT) and serum agglutination test (SAT) with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, (EDTA) were used as screening and standard tests, respectively. The prevalence of Brucella antibodies were 110 (11.2%) and 103 (10.5%) for RBPT and SAT, respectively. Of the 472 and 508 serum samples tested from the herds and abattoirs, respectively, 63 (13.3%) and 47 (9.3%) were positive by RBPT while 62 (13.1%) and 41 (8.1%) were positive by SAT, respectively. Based on the results, it was concluded that Brucella antibodies were present in camels in the study area. Poor management practices and mixing of camels with other species of livestock as well as unrestricted movement of camels were proposed to be the reasons for the prevalence of the disease in the study area. In view of the public health importance of the disease, it is recommended that there is the need to develop a strategic plan to decrease spread of brucellosis in the study area.

  19. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents. PMID:29120697

  20. 25-hydroxyvitamin D, autoantigenic and total antibody concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Steffen Ullitz; Pipper, Christian B; Johannesen, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    conducted within this field. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to investigate if higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were inversely associated with β-cell autoantigens glutamic acid decarboxylase (isoform 65) (GADA) and insulinoma associated antigen-2A (IA-2A). Further, we also wanted to examine...... concentration of GADA, IA-2A and antibody isotypes by a 10 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D concentration was modeled by a robust log-normal model regression. RESULTS: We found no association between either 25(OH)D and GADA [adjusted RC per 10 nmol/L increase: 1.00; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98-1.02] or IA-2A...... [adjusted RC per 10 nmol/L increase: 0.92; CI: 0.76-1.12]. Further, 25(OH)D was not associated total concentration of antibody isotypes (immunoglobulin (Ig)A, IgE, IgG and IgM). All null findings were unaltered after adjustment for genetic variation in the vitamin D pathway. CONCLUSION: Physiological...

  1. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J

    As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents.

  2. The Occurrence of Antibodies Against Gluten in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Does Not Correlate with Serological Markers of Impaired Intestinal Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józefczuk, Jan; Konopka, Ewa; Bierła, Joanna Beata; Trojanowska, Ilona; Sowińska, Agnieszka; Czarnecki, Rafał; Sobol, Lucjan; Józefczuk, Paweł; Surdy, Weronika; Cukrowska, Bożena

    2018-02-01

    There is evidence that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) display an increased immune reactivity against gluten, which is supposed to be the effect of intestinal barrier abnormalities. The aim of study was to evaluate the relation of antibody induced by gluten to zonulin and intestinal fatty acid binding proteins (I-FABP), that is, serological markers of an impaired gut barrier. The study included 77 patients with ASDs. Zonulin, I-FABP, celiac-specific antibodies, anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), and antibodies against neural transglutaminase 6 (TG6) of immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG classes were detected in sera. Celiac-specific antibodies were negative in all ASD children, four children (5.2%) had positive anti-TG6 antibodies, and increased AGA-IgG production was found in 21 patients (27.3%). Mean levels of zonulin and I-FABP in ASD patients were similar to those found in healthy controls and revealed a negative correlation with age, whereas regression analysis revealed a significant positive relationship between antibody production and the age. Serum concentrations of zonulin and I-FABP showed no statistically significant association with antibody positivity. An increased production of antibodies related to gliadin and neural TG6 in ASD children is not related to serological markers of an impaired intestinal barrier.

  3. Antibody Modeling and Structure Analysis. Application to biomedical problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Chailyan, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Background The usefulness of antibodies and antibody derived artificial constructs in various medical and biochemical applications has made them a prime target for protein engineering, modelling, and structure analysis. The huge number of known antibody sequences, that far outpaces the number of solved structures, raises the need for reliable automatic methods of antibody structure prediction. Antibodies have a very characteristic molecular structure that is reflected in their modelli...

  4. Influencing Antibody-Mediated Attenuation of Methamphetamine CNS Distribution through Vaccine Linker Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooyit, Major; Miranda, Pedro O; Wenthur, Cody J; Ducime, Alex; Janda, Kim D

    2017-03-15

    Active vaccination examining a single hapten engendered with a series of peptidic linkers has resulted in the production of antimethamphetamine antibodies. Given the limited chemical complexity of methamphetamine, the structure of the linker species embedded within the hapten could have a substantial effect on the ultimate efficacy of the resulting vaccines. Herein, we investigate linker effects by generating a series of methamphetamine haptens that harbor a linker with varying amino acid identity, peptide length, and associated carrier protein. Independent changes in each of these parameters were found to result in alterations in both the quantity and quality of the antibodies induced by vaccination. Although it was found that the consequence of the linker design was also dependent on the identity of the carrier protein, we demonstrate overall that the inclusion of a short, structurally simple, amino acid linker benefits the efficacy of a methamphetamine vaccine in limiting brain penetration of the free drug.

  5. Metal-Dependent Amyloid β-Degrading Catalytic Antibody Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Hara, Mariko; Planque, Stephanie A.; Mitsuda, Yukie; Paul, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic antibodies (catabodies) that degrade target antigens rapidly are rare. We describe the metal-dependence of catabody construct 2E6, an engineered heterodimer of immunoglobulin light chain variable domains that hydrolyzes amyloid β peptides (Aβ) specifically. In addition to the electrophilic phosphonate inhibitor of serine proteases, the metal chelators ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 1,10-phenanthroline completely inhibited the hydrolysis of Aβ by catabody 2E6. Formation of catabody-electrophilic phosphonate inhibitor adducts was unaffected by EDTA, suggesting that the metal exerts a favorable effect on a catalytic step after the initial catabody nucleophilic attack on Aβ. The EDTA inactivated catabody failed to disaggregate fibrillar Aβ, indicating the functional importance of the Aβ hydrolytic activity. Treating the EDTA-inactivated catabody with Zn2+ or Co2+ restored the Aβ hydrolytic activity, and Zn2+-induced catabody conformational transitions were evident by fluorescence emission spectroscopy. The studies reveal the absolute catabody dependence on a metal cofactor. PMID:24698848

  6. Antibody immobilized cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles for aflatoxin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Aditya; Matharu, Zimple; Sumana, G.; Solanki, Pratima R. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, Biomedical Instrumentation Section, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kim, C.G. [Centre for NanoBioEngineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Malhotra, B.D., E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.co [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, Biomedical Instrumentation Section, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Centre for NanoBioEngineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-30

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} antibody (aAFB{sub 1}) covalently attached to cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles (C-AuNP) has been immobilized onto 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) based self assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold electrode (MBA/Au), for the fabrication of BSA/aAFB{sub 1}-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode. This immunoelectrode has been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical characterization techniques. The electrochemical response studies reveal that the BSA/aAFB{sub 1}-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode can be used to detect AFB{sub 1} in the range of 10-100 ng dL{sup -1} and has sensitivity as 0.45 {mu}A ng{sup -1} dL, limit of detection as 17.90 ng dL{sup -1} and a response time of 60 s.

  7. Immunogenicity of anti-tumor necrosis factor antibodies - toward improved methods of anti-antibody measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarden, Lucien; Ruuls, Sigrid R.; Wolbink, Gertjan

    2008-01-01

    To date, millions of people have been treated with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (TmAbs) for various indications. It is becoming increasingly clear that TmAbs can be immunogenic, which may reduce efficacy or induce adverse effects. Over the years, the importance of antibody formation has been

  8. Immunogenicity of Therapeutic Antibodies: Monitoring Antidrug Antibodies in a Clinical Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, Karien; Hernández-Breijo, Borja; Martínez-Feito, Ana; Rispens, Theo

    2017-01-01

    One of the factors that may impact drug levels of therapeutic antibodies in patients is immunogenicity, with potential loss of efficacy. Nowadays, many immunogenicity assays are available for testing antidrug antibodies (ADA). In this article, we discuss different types of immunogenicity assays and

  9. Presence of non-maternal antibodies in newborns of mothers with antibody deficiencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hahn-Zoric; B. Carlsson; J. Bjö rkander; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); L. Mellander; L.A. Hanson

    1992-01-01

    textabstractTo explain the mechanism for induction and production of specific antibodies found in the newborn already at birth, without previous known exposure to the antigen, we chose a model that presumably excluded the possibility of specific antibodies being transferred from the mother to the

  10. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do...

  11. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  12. Ascorbic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascorbic acid is used to prevent and treat scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of vitamin C in ... Ascorbic acid comes in extended-release (long-acting) capsules and tablets, lozenges, syrup, chewable tablets, and liquid drops to ...

  13. Obeticholic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeticholic acid is used alone or in combination with ursodiol (Actigall, Urso) to treat primary biliary cholangitis (PBC; a ... were not treated successfully with ursodiol alone. Obeticholic acid is in a class of medications called farnesoid ...

  14. Aminocaproic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminocaproic acid is used to control bleeding that occurs when blood clots are broken down too quickly. This type ... the baby is ready to be born). Aminocaproic acid is also used to control bleeding in the ...

  15. Ethacrynic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethacrynic acid, a 'water pill,' is used to treat swelling and fluid retention caused by various medical problems. It ... Ethacrynic acid comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken once or twice a day ...

  16. Mefenamic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefenamic acid is used to relieve mild to moderate pain, including menstrual pain (pain that happens before or during a menstrual period). Mefenamic acid is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. ...

  17. Natural strain variation and antibody neutralization of dengue serotype 3 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahala M P B Wahala

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENVs are emerging, mosquito-borne flaviviruses which cause dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The DENV complex consists of 4 serotypes designated DENV1-DENV4. Following natural infection with DENV, individuals develop serotype specific, neutralizing antibody responses. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been used to map neutralizing epitopes on dengue and other flaviviruses. Most serotype-specific, neutralizing MAbs bind to the lateral ridge of domain III of E protein (EDIII. It has been widely assumed that the EDIII lateral ridge epitope is conserved within each DENV serotype and a good target for vaccines. Using phylogenetic methods, we compared the amino acid sequence of 175 E proteins representing the different genotypes of DENV3 and identified a panel of surface exposed amino acids, including residues in EDIII, that are highly variant across the four DENV3 genotypes. The variable amino acids include six residues at the lateral ridge of EDIII. We used a panel of DENV3 mouse MAbs to assess the functional significance of naturally occurring amino acid variation. From the panel of antibodies, we identified three neutralizing MAbs that bound to EDIII of DENV3. Recombinant proteins and naturally occurring variant viruses were used to map the binding sites of the three MAbs. The three MAbs bound to overlapping but distinct epitopes on EDIII. Our empirical studies clearly demonstrate that the antibody binding and neutralization capacity of two MAbs was strongly influenced by naturally occurring mutations in DENV3. Our data demonstrate that the lateral ridge "type specific" epitope is not conserved between strains of DENV3. This variability should be considered when designing and evaluating DENV vaccines, especially those targeting EDIII.

  18. Mechanism of Binding to Ebola Virus Glycoprotein by the ZMapp, ZMAb, and MB-003 Cocktail Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Edgar; Bryan, Christopher; Fong, Rachel H.; Barnes, Trevor; Pfaff, Jennifer M.; Mabila, Manu; Rucker, Joseph B.; Doranz, Benjamin J.

    2015-01-01

    Cocktails of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that target the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus (EBOV) are effective in nonhuman primate models and have been used under emergency compassionate-treatment protocols in human patients. However, the amino acids that form the detailed binding epitopes for the MAbs in the ZMapp, ZMAb, and the related MB-003 cocktails have yet to be identified. Other binding properties that define how each MAb functionally interacts with GP—such as affinity, epito...

  19. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  20. Process development of a FGF21 protein-antibody conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, Anouk; Davis, Keith A; Collins, Joe T; Bhattacharya, Keshab; Finneman, Jari I; Pepin, Erin L; Ryczek, Jeffrey S; Brown, Paul W; Wellborn, William B; Mangalathillam, Ratish; Evans, Brad P; Pozzo, Mark J; Finn, Rory F

    2017-09-26

    A scalable, viable process was developed for the Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 (FGF21) protein-antibody conjugate, CVX-343, an extended half-life therapeutic for the treatment of metabolic disease. CVX-343 utilizes the CovX antibody scaffold technology platform that was specifically developed for peptide and protein half-life extension. CVX-343 is representative of a growing number of complex novel peptide- and protein-based bioconjugate molecules currently being explored as therapeutic candidates. The complexity of these bioconjugates, assembled using well-established chemistries, can lead to very difficult production schemes requiring multiple starting materials and a combination of diverse technologies. Key improvements had to be made to the original CVX-343 Phase 1 manufacturing process in preparation for Phase 3 and commercial manufacturing. A strategy of minimizing FGF21 A129C dimerization and stabilizing the FGF21 A129C Drug Substance Intermediate (DSI), linker, and activated FGF21 intermediate was pursued. The use of tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) to prevent FGF21 A129C dimerization through disulfide formation was eliminated. FGF21 A129C dimerization and linker hydrolysis were minimized by formulating and activating FGF21 A129C at acidic instead of neutral pH. An activation use test was utilized to guide FGF21 A129C pooling in order to minimize misfolds, dimers, and misfolded dimers in the FGF21 A129C DSI. After final optimization of reaction conditions, a process was established that reduced the consumption of FGF21 A129C by 36% (from 4.7 to 3.0 equivalents) and the consumption of linker by 55% (from 1.4 to 0.95 equivalents for a smaller required amount of FGF21 A129C ). The overall process time was reduced from ∼5 to ∼3 days. The product distribution improved from containing ∼60% to ∼75% desired bifunctionalized (+2 FGF21) FGF21-antibody conjugate in the crude conjugation mixture and from ∼80% to ∼85% in the final CVX-343 Drug Substance

  1. Antibody Fragments as Probe in Biosensor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Muyldermans

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Today’s proteomic analyses are generating increasing numbers of biomarkers, making it essential to possess highly specific probes able to recognize those targets. Antibodies are considered to be the first choice as molecular recognition units due to their target specificity and affinity, which make them excellent probes in biosensor development. However several problems such as difficult directional immobilization, unstable behavior, loss of specificity and steric hindrance, may arise from using these large molecules. Luckily, protein engineering techniques offer designed antibody formats suitable for biomarker analysis. Minimization strategies of antibodies into Fab fragments, scFv or even single-domain antibody fragments like VH, VL or VHHs are reviewed. Not only the size of the probe but also other issues like choice of immobilization tag, type of solid support and probe stability are of critical importance in assay development for biosensing. In this respect, multiple approaches to specifically orient and couple antibody fragments in a generic one-step procedure directly on a biosensor substrate are discussed.

  2. Ethnic differences in C-peptide levels and anti-GAD antibodies in South African patients with diabetic ketoacidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rheeder, P; Stolk, RP; Grobbee, DE

    To determine differences between Black and White South Africans with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and between Black patients on insulin vs. those on oral agents presenting with DKA, post stabilization fasting C-peptide levels and anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies were measured

  3. Absence of cross-reactivity to myeloperoxidase of anti-thyroid microsomal antibodies in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freire, BA; Paula, ID; Paula, F; Kallenberg, GGM; Limburg, PC; Queluz, TT

    Background: Thyroperoxidase is the major antigen of the thyroid microsomal antibodies (TMA) detected in autoimmune thyroid diseases. Its amino acid sequence has 44% homology with myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme present in the primary granules of neutrophils and one of the major antineutrophil

  4. Antibody reactivities to glutamate-rich peptides of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in humans from areas of different malaria endemicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, P H; Theander, T G; Hviid, L

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic P. falciparum peptides were evaluated as tools in epidemiological investigations of malaria. Plasma IgM and IgG antibody reactivities against synthetic peptides covering sequences of glutamate-rich protein (GLURP) and acidic-basic repeat antigen (ABRA) were measured by ELISA...

  5. [A case of progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus associated with anti-GAD, anti-glycine receptor and anti-GM1 antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Yuka; Suwabe, Tatsuya; Konno, Takuya; Umeda, Yoshitaka; Oyake, Mutsuo; Fujita, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old woman with one-year history of type 1 diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with progressive weakness in the lower extremities and urinary dysfunction following high fever. On admission, she had rigidity and myoclonus in the upper extremities with sensory ataxia. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed mild pleocytosis and oligoclonal band. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies were detected at high titer in serum, but antibodies to glycine receptor (GlyR), thyroid peroxidase, mitochondrial M2, and GM1 were also detected. She was diagnosed with progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), which probably developed on the basis of polyglandular autoimmune syndromes. The clinical symptoms began to improve after initiation of intravenous high-dose methylprednisolone. Muscle weakness might be related to GM1 antibodies. This is the first report of PERM, in which GM1 antibodies were detected with GAD and GlyR antibodies.

  6. Is antenatal antibody screening worthwhile in Chinese?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K F; Tse, K T; Lee, A W; Mak, C S; So, C C

    1997-06-01

    A total of 1997 pregnant women were screened during their first antenatal visit for irregular antibodies for the prevention of haemolytic disease of the newborn. Patient sera were tested against a panel of group O screen cells including one with the expression of Miltenberger determinants GP.Mur. 17 women (0.85%) had irregular antibodies of which four were of potential clinical significance, including one with anti-D, two with anti-E and one with anti-D, anti-E and anti-G. Although antenatal antibody screening is mandatory in Western populations, our results suggest that this may not be necessary in the Chinese population except for those who are Rh D-negative or who have a history of haemolytic disease of the newborn.

  7. Antinuclear antibodies in autoimmune and allergic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna; Rogacka, Natalia; Rogacki, Michał; Puszczewicz, Mariusz

    2017-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) are primarily significant in the diagnosis of systemic connective tissue diseases. The relationship between their occurrence in allergic diseases is poorly documented. However, the mechanism of allergic and autoimmune diseases has a common thread. In both cases, an increased production of IgE antibodies and presence of ANA in selected disease entities is observed. Equally important is the activation of basophils secreting proinflammatory factors and affecting the differentiation of TH17 lymphocytes. Both autoimmune and allergic diseases have complex multi-pathogenesis and often occur in genetically predisposed individuals. The presence of antinuclear antibodies was confirmed in many systemic connective tissue diseases and some allergic diseases. Examples include atopic dermatitis, non-allergic asthma, and pollen allergy. Co-occurring allergic and autoimmune disorders induce further search for mechanisms involved in the aetiopathogenesis of both groups of diseases.

  8. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  9. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho

    1998-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs

  11. Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) (PMMA) and Polyactic Acid Nanoparticles as Adjuvents for Peroral Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kreuter, Jorg

    1999-01-01

    ...) or the employment of polylactic acid did not achieve a significant protection. Protection did not correlate at all with ELISA antibodies against ricin after oral as well as subcutaneous vaccination...

  12. Prenatal toxoplasmosis antibody and childhood autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Marisa N; Sourander, Andre; Surcel, Heljä-Marja; Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki, Susanna; Brown, Alan S

    2017-05-01

    There is evidence that some maternal infections during the prenatal period are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, such as childhood autism. However, the association between autism and Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), an intracellular parasite, remains unclear. The authors examined whether serologically confirmed maternal antibodies to T. gondii are associated with odds of childhood autism in offspring. The study is based on a nested case-control design of a large national birth cohort (N = 1.2 million) and the national psychiatric registries in Finland. There were 874 cases of childhood autism and controls matched 1:1 on date of birth, sex, birthplace and residence in Finland. Maternal sera were prospectively assayed from a national biobank for T. gondii IgM and IgG antibodies; IgG avidity analyses were also performed. High maternal T. gondii IgM antibody was associated with a significantly decreased odds of childhood autism. Low maternal T. gondii IgG antibody was associated with increased offspring odds of autism. In women with high T. gondii IgM antibodies, the IgG avidity was high for both cases and controls, with the exception of three controls. The findings suggest that the relationship between maternal T. gondii antibodies and odds of childhood autism may be related to the immune response to this pathogen or the overall activation of the immune system. Autism Res 2017, 10: 769-777. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Human antibody production in transgenic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Marianne; Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Hayre, Jasvinder; Avis, Suzanne; Lundstrom, Brian; Buelow, Roland

    2015-04-01

    Fully human antibodies from transgenic animals account for an increasing number of new therapeutics. After immunization, diverse human monoclonal antibodies of high affinity can be obtained from transgenic rodents, while large animals, such as transchromosomic cattle, have produced respectable amounts of specific human immunoglobulin (Ig) in serum. Several strategies to derive animals expressing human antibody repertoires have been successful. In rodents, gene loci on bacterial artificial chromosomes or yeast artificial chromosomes were integrated by oocyte microinjection or transfection of embryonic stem (ES) cells, while ruminants were derived from manipulated fibroblasts with integrated human chromosome fragments or human artificial chromosomes. In all strains, the endogenous Ig loci have been silenced by gene targeting, either in ES or fibroblast cells, or by zinc finger technology via DNA microinjection; this was essential for optimal production. However, comparisons showed that fully human antibodies were not as efficiently produced as wild-type Ig. This suboptimal performance, with respect to immune response and antibody yield, was attributed to imperfect interaction of the human constant region with endogenous signaling components such as the Igα/β in mouse, rat or cattle. Significant improvements were obtained when the human V-region genes were linked to the endogenous CH-region, either on large constructs or, separately, by site-specific integration, which could also silence the endogenous Ig locus by gene replacement or inversion. In animals with knocked-out endogenous Ig loci and integrated large IgH loci, containing many human Vs, all D and all J segments linked to endogenous C genes, highly diverse human antibody production similar to normal animals was obtained.

  14. Limited cross-reactivity of mouse monoclonal antibodies against Dengue virus capsid protein among four serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noda M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Megumi Noda,1 Promsin Masrinoul,1 Chaweewan Punkum,1 Chonlatip Pipattanaboon,2,3 Pongrama Ramasoota,2,4 Chayanee Setthapramote,2,3 Tadahiro Sasaki,6 Mikiko Sasayama,1 Akifumi Yamashita,1,5 Takeshi Kurosu,6 Kazuyoshi Ikuta,6 Tamaki Okabayashi11Mahidol-Osaka Center for Infectious Diseases, 2Center of Excellence for Antibody Research, 3Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 4Department of Social and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Ratchathewi, Bangkok, Thailand; 5Graduate School of Life Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi, 6Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, JapanBackground: Dengue illness is one of the important mosquito-borne viral diseases in tropical and subtropical regions. Four serotypes of dengue virus (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3, and DENV-4 are classified in the Flavivirus genus of the family Flaviviridae. We prepared monoclonal antibodies against DENV capsid protein from mice immunized with DENV-2 and determined the cross-reactivity with each serotype of DENV and Japanese encephalitis virus.Methods and results: To clarify the relationship between the cross-reactivity of monoclonal antibodies and the diversity of these viruses, we examined the situations of flaviviruses by analyses of phylogenetic trees. Among a total of 60 prepared monoclonal antibodies specific for DENV, five monoclonal antibodies stained the nuclei of infected cells and were found to be specific to the capsid protein. Three were specific to DENV-2, while the other two were cross-reactive with DENV-2 and DENV-4. No monoclonal antibodies were cross-reactive with all four serotypes. Phylogenetic analysis of DENV amino acid sequences of the capsid protein revealed that DENV-2 and DENV-4 were clustered in the same branch, while DENV-1 and DENV-3 were clustered in the other branch. However, these classifications of the capsid protein were different from those of the

  15. A bioinformatics pipeline to build a knowledge database for in silico antibody engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanrong; Lu, Jin

    2011-04-01

    A challenge to antibody engineering is the large number of positions and nature of variation and opposing concerns of introducing unfavorable biochemical properties. While large libraries are quite successful in identifying antibodies with improved binding or activity, still only a fraction of possibilities can be explored and that would require considerable effort. The vast array of natural antibody sequences provides a potential wealth of information on (1) selecting hotspots for variation, and (2) designing mutants to mimic natural variations seen in hotspots. The human immune system can generate an enormous diversity of immunoglobulins against an almost unlimited range of antigens by gene rearrangement of a limited number of germline variable, diversity and joining genes followed by somatic hypermutation and antigen selection. All the antibody sequences in NCBI database can be assigned to different germline genes. As a result, a position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene can be constructed by aligning all its member sequences and calculating the amino acid frequencies for each position. The position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene characterizes "hotspots" and the nature of variations, and thus reduces the sequence space of exploration in antibody engineering. We have developed a bioinformatics pipeline to conduct analysis of human antibody sequences, and generated a comprehensive knowledge database for in silico antibody engineering. The pipeline is fully automatic and the knowledge database can be refreshed anytime by re-running the pipeline. The refresh process is fast, typically taking 1min on a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 laptop with 3G memory. Our knowledge database consists of (1) the individual germline gene usage in generation of natural antibodies; (2) the CDR length distributions; and (3) the position specific scoring matrix for each germline gene. The knowledge database provides comprehensive support for antibody engineering

  16. Prevalence of coronavirus antibodies in Iowa swine.

    OpenAIRE

    Wesley, R D; Woods, R D; McKean, J D; Senn, M K; Elazhary, Y

    1997-01-01

    Three hundred and forty-seven serum samples from 22 Iowa swine herds were screened for TGEV/PRCV neutralizing antibody. Ninety-one percent of the sera and all 22 herds were positive. These sera were then tested by the blocking ELISA test to distinguish TGEV and PRCV antibody. The ELISA test confirmed the high percentage of TGEV/PRCV positive sera. By the blocking ELISA test, 12 herds were PRCV positive, 6 herds were TGEV positive and 4 herds were mixed with sera either positive for TGEV or PR...

  17. Do monoclonal antibodies recognize linear sequential determinants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, M; Muratti, E; Trinca, M L; Chersi, A

    1988-01-01

    A group of 19 anti-class II monoclonal antibodies produced in different laboratories were tested in ELISA for their ability to bind to a panel of synthetic peptides selected from HLA-DQ alpha and beta chains. No one of the antibodies tested was found to react with the synthetic fragments, thus confirming the common finding that MoAbs generally fail to recognize fragments of the native antigen. The possibility that this result might be partly due to the procedure used for screening hybridoma supernatants is discussed.

  18. Behaviour of non-donor specific antibodies during rapid re-synthesis of donor specific HLA antibodies after antibody incompatible renal transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithya S Krishnan

    Full Text Available HLA directed antibodies play an important role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. During viral infection of a patient with HLA antibodies, the HLA antibody levels may rise even though there is no new immunization with antigen. However it is not known whether the converse occurs, and whether changes on non-donor specific antibodies are associated with any outcomes following HLA antibody incompatible renal transplantation.55 patients, 31 women and 24 men, who underwent HLAi renal transplant in our center from September 2005 to September 2010 were included in the studies. We analysed the data using two different approaches, based on; i DSA levels and ii rejection episode post transplant. HLA antibody levels were measured during the early post transplant period and corresponding CMV, VZV and Anti-HBs IgG antibody levels and blood group IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were quantified.Despite a significant DSA antibody rise no significant non-donor specific HLA antibody, viral or blood group antibody rise was found. In rejection episode analyses, multiple logistic regression modelling showed that change in the DSA was significantly associated with rejection (p = 0.002, even when adjusted for other antibody levels. No other antibody levels were predictive of rejection. Increase in DSA from pre treatment to a post transplant peak of 1000 was equivalent to an increased chance of rejection with an odds ratio of 1.47 (1.08, 2.00.In spite of increases or decreases in the DSA levels, there were no changes in the viral or the blood group antibodies in these patients. Thus the DSA rise is specific in contrast to the viral, blood group or third party antibodies post transplantation. Increases in the DSA post transplant in comparison to pre-treatment are strongly associated with occurrence of rejection.

  19. Therapeutic assessment of SEED: a new engineered antibody platform designed to generate mono- and bispecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muda, Marco; Gross, Alec W; Dawson, Jessica P; He, Chaomei; Kurosawa, Emmi; Schweickhardt, Rene; Dugas, Melanie; Soloviev, Maria; Bernhardt, Anna; Fischer, David; Wesolowski, John S; Kelton, Christie; Neuteboom, Berend; Hock, Bjoern

    2011-05-01

    The strand-exchange engineered domain (SEED) platform was designed to generate asymmetric and bispecific antibody-like molecules, a capability that expands therapeutic applications of natural antibodies. This new protein engineered platform is based on exchanging structurally related sequences of immunoglobulin within the conserved CH3 domains. Alternating sequences from human IgA and IgG in the SEED CH3 domains generate two asymmetric but complementary domains, designated AG and GA. The SEED design allows efficient generation of AG/GA heterodimers, while disfavoring homodimerization of AG and GA SEED CH3 domains. Using a clinically validated antibody (C225), we tested whether Fab derivatives constructed on the SEED platform retain desirable therapeutic antibody features such as in vitro and in vivo stability, favorable pharmacokinetics, ligand binding and effector functions including antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity. In addition, we tested SEED with combinations of binder domains (scFv, VHH, Fab). Mono- and bivalent Fab-SEED fusions retain full binding affinity, have excellent biochemical and biophysical stability, and retain desirable antibody-like characteristics conferred by Fc domains. Furthermore, SEED is compatible with different combinations of Fab, scFv and VHH domains. Our assessment shows that the new SEED platform expands therapeutic applications of natural antibodies by generating heterodimeric Fc-analog proteins.

  20. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friden, P.M.; Walus, L.R.; Musso, G.F.; Taylor, M.A.; Malfroy, B.; Starzyk, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. The authors have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration, labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate ∼ 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26

  1. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Hong Hua

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5AIDITRK(11, (72RDELNVL(78, (251KSKHNRREGY(260, (269DENGIVLD(276, and (341DETTLVRS(348. Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  2. VHH Antibodies: Reagents for Mycotoxin Detection in Food Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycotoxins are the toxic secondary metabolites produced by fungi and they are a worldwide public health concern. A VHH antibody (or nanobody is the smallest antigen binding entity and is produced by heavy chain only antibodies. Compared with conventional antibodies, VHH antibodies overcome many pitfalls typically encountered in clinical therapeutics and immunodiagnostics. Likewise, VHH antibodies are particularly useful for monitoring mycotoxins in food and feedstuffs, as they are easily genetic engineered and have superior stability. In this review, we summarize the efforts to produce anti-mycotoxins VHH antibodies and associated assays, presenting VHH as a potential tool in mycotoxin analysis.

  3. Impact of Uniform Methods on Interlaboratory Antibody Titration Variability: Antibody Titration and Uniform Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachegowda, Lohith S; Cheng, Yan H; Long, Thomas; Shaz, Beth H

    2017-01-01

    -Substantial variability between different antibody titration methods prompted development and introduction of uniform methods in 2008. -To determine whether uniform methods consistently decrease interlaboratory variation in proficiency testing. -Proficiency testing data for antibody titration between 2009 and 2013 were obtained from the College of American Pathologists. Each laboratory was supplied plasma and red cells to determine anti-A and anti-D antibody titers by their standard method: gel or tube by uniform or other methods at different testing phases (immediate spin and/or room temperature [anti-A], and/or anti-human globulin [AHG: anti-A and anti-D]) with different additives. Interlaboratory variations were compared by analyzing the distribution of titer results by method and phase. -A median of 574 and 1100 responses were reported for anti-A and anti-D antibody titers, respectively, during a 5-year period. The 3 most frequent (median) methods performed for anti-A antibody were uniform tube room temperature (147.5; range, 119-159), uniform tube AHG (143.5; range, 134-150), and other tube AHG (97; range, 82-116); for anti-D antibody, the methods were other tube (451; range, 431-465), uniform tube (404; range, 382-462), and uniform gel (137; range, 121-153). Of the larger reported methods, uniform gel AHG phase for anti-A and anti-D antibodies had the most participants with the same result (mode). For anti-A antibody, 0 of 8 (uniform versus other tube room temperature) and 1 of 8 (uniform versus other tube AHG), and for anti-D antibody, 0 of 8 (uniform versus other tube) and 0 of 8 (uniform versus other gel) proficiency tests showed significant titer variability reduction. -Uniform methods harmonize laboratory techniques but rarely reduce interlaboratory titer variance in comparison with other methods.

  4. Clinical significance of serum anti-human papillomavirus 16 and 18 antibodies in cervical neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chay, Doo Byung; Cho, Hanbyoul; Kim, Bo Wook; Kang, Eun Suk; Song, Eunseop; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2013-02-01

    To estimate the clinical significance of serum anti-human papillomavirus (HPV) antibodies and high-risk cervical HPV DNA in cervical neoplasia. The study population comprised patients who were histopathologically diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1 (n=64), CIN 2 and 3 (n=241), cervical cancer (n=170), and normal control participants (n=975). Cervical HPV DNA tests were performed through nucleic acid hybridization assay tests, and serum anti-HPV 16 and 18 antibodies were measured by competitive immunoassay. The associations of HPV DNA and anti-HPV antibodies were evaluated with demographic characteristics and compared according to the levels of disease severity. Anti-HPV antibodies were also investigated with clinicopathologic parameters, including survival data. Among various demographic characteristics, factors involving sexual behavior had a higher tendency of HPV DNA positivity and HPV seropositivity. Human papillomavirus DNA mean titer and positivity were both increased in patients with cervical neoplasia compared with those with normal control participants, but there was no statistical difference among types of cervical neoplasia. Serum anti-HPV 16 antibodies were also able to differentiate cervical neoplasia from a normal control participant and furthermore distinguished CIN 1 from CIN 2 and 3 (odd ratio 2.87 [1.43-5.78], P=.002). In cervical cancer, HPV 16 seropositivity was associated with prolonged disease-free survival according to the univariable analysis (hazard ratio=0.12 [0.01-0.94], P=.044). Serum anti-HPV 16 antibodies can distinguish cervical neoplasia from a normal control and has the advantage of identifying high-grade CIN. Moreover, in cervical cancer, HPV 16 seropositivity may be associated with a more favorable prognosis. II.

  5. Smith-Magenis Syndrome Patients Often Display Antibody Deficiency but Not Other Immune Pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Tiffany; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Le Coz, Carole; Alaimo, Joseph T; Trofa, Melissa; Mullegama, Sureni V; Antaya, Richard J; Jyonouchi, Soma; Elsea, Sarah H; Utz, Paul J; Meffre, Eric; Romberg, Neil

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex neurobehavioral disorder associated with recurrent otitis. Most SMS cases result from heterozygous interstitial chromosome 17p11.2 deletions that encompass not only the intellectual disability gene retinoic acid-induced 1 but also other genes associated with immunodeficiency, autoimmunity, and/or malignancy. The goals of this study were to describe the immunological consequence of 17p11.2 deletions by determining the prevalence of immunological diseases in subjects with SMS and by assessing their immune systems via laboratory methods. We assessed clinical histories of 76 subjects with SMS with heterozygous 17p11.2 deletions and performed in-depth immunological testing on 25 representative cohort members. Laboratory testing included determination of serum antibody concentrations, vaccine titers, and lymphocyte subset frequencies. Detailed reactivity profiles of SMS serum antibodies were performed using custom-made antigen microarrays. Of 76 subjects with SMS, 74 reported recurrent infections including otitis (88%), pneumonia (47%), sinusitis (42%), and gastroenteritis (34%). Infections were associated with worsening SMS-related neurobehavioral symptoms. The prevalence of autoimmune and atopic diseases was not increased. Malignancy was not reported. Laboratory evaluation revealed most subjects with SMS to be deficient of isotype-switched memory B cells and many to lack protective antipneumococcal antibodies. SMS antibodies were not more reactive than control antibodies to self-antigens. Patients with SMS with heterozygous 17p.11.2 deletions display an increased susceptibility to sinopulmonary infections, but not to autoimmune, allergic, or malignant diseases. SMS sera display an antibody reactivity profile favoring neither recognition of pathogen-associated antigens nor self-antigens. Prophylactic strategies to prevent infections may also provide neurobehavioral benefits to selected patients with SMS. Copyright © 2017

  6. Relationship between Cerebral Vein Thrombosis and Non-Anticardiolipin Antiphospholipid Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saadatnia

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anticardiolipin antibody(aCLhas been recognized as a marker for increased risk of Cerebral Vein Thrombosis (CVT. However, there are only rare reports on CVT associated with other antibodies against different phospholipids such as phosphatidyl inositol, phosphatidyl serine, phosphatidic acid and beta 2 glycoprotein I. In this study, we studied the presence of these antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL, demographic and clinical characteristics in 30 patients with CVT. Methods: After diagnosis of CVT in 30 patients with MRI, we measured the titer of aCL and aPL (IgM and IgG in all cases. The titers of IgG and IgM type of aPL and aCL were estimated in the sera. Results: Anticardiolipin antibody was solely detected in 20% (n=6 and aCL and other aPL in 23.3% ( n=7 of patients, indicating one patient positive for other aPL but not for aCL (non-aCL. Although the aPL positive group did not differ from the aPL-negative group from the stand point of clinical and demographic characteristics, yet seizure, infarct, superficial veins and sinus involvement and the use of OCP were seen more frequently in aPL-positive group Conclusion: Our findings suggest that in addition to aCL, other antiphospholipid antibodies may be an associated condition that plays a role in the pathogenesis of CVT. The presence of aPL in CVT patients is probably associated with more superficial sinus or veins involvement and as a result death rate was lower in aPL- positive group. Further investigations are necessary to establish this hypothesis. Keywords: Cerebral Vein Thrombosis, antiphospholipid antibody, anticardiolipin

  7. Rise and fall of an anti-MUC1 specific antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Thie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, human antibodies with good affinity and specificity for MUC1, a transmembrane protein overexpressed on breast cancers and ovarian carcinomas, and thus a promising target for therapy, were very difficult to generate.A human scFv antibody was isolated from an immune library derived from breast cancer patients immunised with MUC1. The anti-MUC1 scFv reacted with tumour cells in more than 80% of 228 tissue sections of mamma carcinoma samples, while showing very low reactivity with a large panel of non-tumour tissues. By mutagenesis and phage display, affinity of scFvs was increased up to 500fold to 5,7×10(-10 M. Half-life in serum was improved from below 1 day to more than 4 weeks and was correlated with the dimerisation tendency of the individual scFvs. The scFv bound to T47D and MCF-7 mammalian cancer cell lines were recloned into the scFv-Fc and IgG format resulting in decrease of affinity of one binder. The IgG variants with the highest affinity were tested in mouse xenograft models using MCF-7 and OVCAR tumour cells. However, the experiments showed no significant decrease in tumour growth or increase in the survival rates. To study the reasons for the failure of the xenograft experiments, ADCC was analysed in vitro using MCF-7 and OVCAR3 target cells, revealing a low ADCC, possibly due to internalisation, as detected for MCF-7 cells.Antibody phage display starting with immune libraries and followed by affinity maturation is a powerful strategy to generate high affinity human antibodies to difficult targets, in this case shown by the creation of a highly specific antibody with subnanomolar affinity to a very small epitope consisting of four amino acids. Despite these "best in class" binding parameters, the therapeutic success of this antibody was prevented by the target biology.

  8. Chromosome dynamics visualized with an anti-centromeric histone H3 antibody in Allium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaki, Kiyotaka; Yamamoto, Maki; Yamaji, Naoki; Mukai, Yasuhiko; Murata, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    Due to the ease with which chromosomes can be observed, the Allium species, and onion in particular, have been familiar materials employed in cytogenetic experiments in biology. In this study, centromeric histone H3 (CENH3)-coding cDNAs were identified in four Allium species (onion, welsh onion, garlic and garlic chives) and cloned. Anti-CENH3 antibody was then raised against a deduced amino acid sequence of CENH3 of welsh onion. The antibody recognized all CENH3 orthologs of the Allium species tested. Immunostaining with the antibody enabled clear visualization of chromosome behavior during mitosis in the species. Furthermore, three-dimensional (3D) observation of mitotic cell division was achieved by subjecting root sections to immunohistochemical techniques. The 3D dynamics of the cells and position of cell-cycle marker proteins (CENH3 and α-tubulin) were clearly revealed by immunohistochemical staining with the antibodies. The immunohistochemical analysis made it possible to establish an overview of the location of dividing cells in the root tissues. This breakthrough in technique, in addition to the two centromeric DNA sequences isolated from welsh onion by chromatin immuno-precipitation using the antibody, should lead to a better understanding of plant cell division. A phylogenetic analysis of Allium CENH3s together with the previously reported plant CENH3s showed two separate clades for monocot species tested. One clade was made from CENH3s of the Allium species with those of Poaceae species, and the other from CENH3s of a holocentric species (Luzula nivea). These data may imply functional differences of CENH3s between holocentric and monocentric species. Centromeric localization of DNA sequences isolated from welsh onion by chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) using the antibody was confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization and ChIP-quantitative PCR.

  9. Antimitochondrial antibodies and other antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis: diagnostic and prognostic value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratori, Luigi; Granito, Alessandro; Muratori, Paolo; Pappas, Georgios; Bianchi, Francesco B

    2008-05-01

    Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are the serologic cornerstone in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), even if they are not detectable in a proportion of patients, notwithstanding the most sensitive and sophisticated technologies used. To fill in the serologic gap in AMA-negative PBC, there is sound evidence to consider antinuclear antibody (ANA) patterns, such as anti-multiple nuclear dots and anti-membranous/rim-like, as PBC-specific surrogate hallmarks of the disease, and their detection can be considered virtually diagnostic. Furthermore, particular ANA specificities, such as anti-gp210, anti-p62, anticentromere antibodies, and anti-dsDNA, may provide additional diagnostic and prognostic information.

  10. Ibotenic acid and thioibotenic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermit, Mette B; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we have determined and compared the pharmacological profiles of ibotenic acid and its isothiazole analogue thioibotenic acid at native rat ionotropic glutamate (iGlu) receptors and at recombinant rat metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors expressed in mammalian cell lines....... Thioibotenic acid has a distinct pharmacological profile at group III mGlu receptors compared with the closely structurally related ibotenic acid; the former is a potent (low microm) agonist, whereas the latter is inactive. By comparing the conformational energy profiles of ibotenic and thioibotenic acid...... with the conformations preferred by the ligands upon docking to mGlu1 and models of the other mGlu subtypes, we propose that unlike other subtypes, group III mGlu receptor binding sites require a ligand conformation at an energy level which is prohibitively expensive for ibotenic acid, but not for thioibotenic acid...

  11. Structural basis for diverse N-glycan recognition by HIV-1-neutralizing V1-V2-directed antibody PG16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancera, Marie; Shahzad-ul-Hussan, Syed; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; McLellan, Jason S.; Bailer, Robert T.; Dai, Kaifan; Loesgen, Sandra; Louder, Mark K.; Staupe, Ryan P.; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Parks, Robert; Eudailey, Joshua; Lloyd, Krissey E.; Blinn, Julie; Alam, S. Munir; Haynes, Barton F.; Amin, Mohammed N.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Burton, Dennis R.; Koff, Wayne C.; Nabel, Gary J.; Mascola, John R.; Bewley, Carole A; Kwong, Peter D. [NIH; (Scripps); (Duke); (Maryland-MED); (IAVI)

    2013-08-05

    HIV-1 uses a diverse N-linked-glycan shield to evade recognition by antibody. Select human antibodies, such as the clonally related PG9 and PG16, recognize glycopeptide epitopes in the HIV-1 V1–V2 region and penetrate this shield, but their ability to accommodate diverse glycans is unclear. Here we report the structure of antibody PG16 bound to a scaffolded V1–V2, showing an epitope comprising both high mannose–type and complex-type N-linked glycans. We combined structure, NMR and mutagenesis analyses to characterize glycan recognition by PG9 and PG16. Three PG16-specific residues, arginine, serine and histidine (RSH), were critical for binding sialic acid on complex-type glycans, and introduction of these residues into PG9 produced a chimeric antibody with enhanced HIV-1 neutralization. Although HIV-1–glycan diversity facilitates evasion, antibody somatic diversity can overcome this and can provide clues to guide the design of modified antibodies with enhanced neutralization.

  12. Improved pretargeted delivery of radiolabelled hapten to human tumour xenograft in mice by avidin chase of circulating bispecific antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirallie, Eric; Sai-Maurel, Catherine; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Chatal, Jean-Francois; Barbet, Jacques; Thedrez, Philippe [Universite de Nantes, Cancer Research Department, Nantes (France); Regenet, Nicolas [Service de Chirurgie, CHU Nantes, Nantes (France); Chang, Chien-Hsing; Goldenberg, David M. [IBC Pharmaceuticals Inc., Morris Plains, NJ (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Pretargeted therapy with radiolabelled bivalent haptens and bispecific antibodies has shown promising results, but blood clearance of the activity-carrying haptens under conditions designed for radioimmunotherapy is relatively slow. Thus, the chase of excess circulating bispecific antibody by biotinylation of the bispecific antibody and injection of avidin before hapten administration was tested with a view to increasing tumour-to-blood activity ratios. The anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) x anti-diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid-indium (di-DTPA-indium) bispecific antibody (hMN-14 x 734) was derivatised with NHS-LC-biotin and injected into LS-174T tumour-bearing nude mice at a dose of 3.5 nmol, followed by avidin and finally by the{sup 125}I-labelled di-DTPA-indium hapten (1 nmol). Blood samples were collected, animals sacrificed and tumours and normal tissues counted. Avidin chased up to 72% of the circulating antibody in the liver and the spleen within 30 min. When the labelled hapten was injected 3 h after avidin, tumour to blood ratios measured 3 and 24 h after hapten injection were significantly improved by the chase (3.5-fold), whereas tumour uptake was not significantly reduced. Uptake in normal tissues was unchanged (liver, kidney) or decreased (muscle), with the exception of spleen, in which uptake of both antibody and hapten was increased by the avidin chase. (orig.)

  13. Antiphospholipids antibodies and migraine | Nyandaiti | Sahel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similarly, antiphospholipid antibodies was significantly elevated in migraine patients with aura compared to those without aura, ( 2=0.037; p<0.05). The frequency of migraine attacks correlated positively with the concentration of lgG anti β2GP1; ( p<0.05). Conclusion: We demonstrated increased serum level of lgG anti ...

  14. The prevalence ofantiphospholipid antibodies in women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patients. PTT, APTT, kaolin clotting time (KCT),. Russell viper venom time CRvvn were measured in all the subjects, who were also assessed for the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies. Blood was taken by venepuncture into a 0,1 volume of 3,8% trisodium citrate. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) was prepared by centrifuging of ...

  15. Research Paper Polyclonal antibodies production against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main aim of this project is to produce polyclonal antibodies directed against the Staphylococcus aureus protein A and their use to appreciate bacteriological analysis of milk quality. In this context, an immunization produce was set up to test and detect in a batch of animals the convenient responder to the injected ...

  16. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Presenting with Hemichorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yezenash Ayalew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old Bangladeshi lady presented to neurology with a three-month history of involuntary movements of her right arm, associated with loss of power. There was progression to the right leg, and she subsequently developed episodes of slurred speech and blurred vision. At the time of presentation, she was 12 weeks pregnant and the symptoms were reported to have started at conception. Past medical history was unremarkable apart from one first trimester miscarriage and there was no significant family history suggestive of a hereditary neurological condition. MRI of the head revealed no abnormalities but serology showed positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs at a titre of 1/400. Further investigations revealed strongly positive anticardiolipin antibodies (>120 and positive lupus anticoagulant antibodies. The patient had a second miscarriage at 19 weeks gestation strengthening the possibility that the chorea was related to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and she was started on a reducing dose of Prednisolone 40 mg daily and aspirin 300 mg daily. Six months later, she had complete resolution of neurological symptoms. There are several reports of chorea as a feature of antiphospholipid syndrome, but no clear consensus on underlying pathophysiology.

  17. The emergence of antibody therapies for Ebola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael; Whaley, Kevin; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary; Zeitlin, Larry

    2015-12-23

    This review describes the history of Ebola monoclonal antibody (mAb) development leading up to the recent severe Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The Ebola virus has presented numerous perplexing challenges in the long effort to develop therapeutic antibody strategies. Since the first report of a neutralizing human anti-Ebola mAb in 1999, the straightforward progression from in vitro neutralization resulting in in vivo protection and therapy has not occurred. A number of mAbs, including the first reported, failed to protect non-human primates (NHPs) in spite of protection in rodents. An appreciation of the role of effector functions to antibody efficacy has contributed significantly to understanding mechanisms of in vivo protection. However a crucial contribution, as measured by post-exposure therapy of NHPs, involved the comprehensive testing of mAb cocktails. This effort was aided by the use of plant production technology where various combinations of mAbs could be rapidly produced and tested. Introduction of appropriate modifications, such as specific glycan profiles, also improved therapeutic efficacy. The resulting cocktail, ZMapp™, consists of three mAbs that were identified from numerous mAb candidates. ZMapp™ \\ is now being evaluated in human clinical trials but has already played a role in bringing awareness to the potential of antibody therapy for Ebola.

  18. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  19. Platelet antibody: review of detection methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, K.A.

    1988-10-01

    The driving force behind development of in vitro methods for platelet antibodies is identification of plasma factors causing platelet destruction. Early methods relied on measurement of platelet activation. Current methods are more specific and use a purified antibody against immunoglobulin or complement, which is usually labeled with /sup 125/I or tagged with an enzyme or fluorescein. Comparisons of quantitation of platelet-associated IgG show wide variability between different methods. The disparate results can be related both to differences in binding of secondary antibodies to immunoglobulin in solution compared to immunoglobulins attached to platelets and to the improper assumption that the binding ratio between the secondary detecting and primary antiplatelet antibody is one. Most assays can 1) identify neonatal isoimmune thrombocytopenia and posttransfusion purpura, 2) help to differentiate between immune and nonimmune thrombocytopenias, 3) help to sort out the offending drug when drug-induced thrombocytopenia is suspected, and 4) identify platelet alloantibodies and potential platelet donors via a cross match assay for refractory patients. However, the advantages of quantitative assays over qualitative methods with respect to predictions of patients clinical course and response to different treatments remain to be investigated. 61 references.

  20. Rubella antibodies in Australian immunoglobulin products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Megan K; Bertolini, Joseph; Kotharu, Pushpa; Maher, Darryl; Cripps, Allan W

    2017-08-03

    Rubella antibodies are not routinely measured in immunoglobulin products and there is a lack of information on the titer in Australian products. To facilitate future studies of the effectiveness of passive immunisation for preventing rubella and congenital rubella syndrome, this study measured the concentration of rubella-specific antibodies in Australian intramuscular (IM) and intravenous (IV) human immunoglobulin products suitable for post-exposure prophylaxis using a chemiluminescent immunoassay. The GMT ± GSD for the IM product was 19 ± 1.2 IU/mg (2980 ± 1.2 IU/mL). The GMT ± GSD for the IV product was 12 ± 1.5 IU/mg (729 ± 1.5 IU/mL). At present, Australian guidelines recommend offering non-immune pregnant women exposed to rubella 20 mL of intramuscular immunoglobulin within 72 hours of exposure. This equates to 42,160 IU of rubella antibodies if the lowest titer obtained for the Australian IM product is considered. The same dose would be delivered by 176 mL of the Australian IV product at the lowest measured rubella-specific antibody titer.

  1. Karakterisasi Antibodi Poliklonal terhadap Aflatoksin M1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angriani Fusvita

    2017-02-01

    antigen AFM1-BSA with AFM1-BSA antibody to rabbit serum in the form of brown dots after addition of DAB substrate. The results of spectrophotometric against rabbit serum fractionation showed the type of IgG heavy chain.

  2. Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibodies against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    HN), BALB/c mice were immunized with the purified pet-44a-HN in adjuvant and their splenic lymphocytes were fused with myeloma SP2/0 cells. The hybridoma cell lines were screened for HN-specific antibodies by indirect enzyme-linked ...

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) specific antibodies among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... Key words: HIV-1/2 antibody prevalence, pregnant women, commercial sex workers, risk factors, Nigeria. INTRODUCTION. There are two .... Africa. However, among Japanese and Chilean female. SWs, Miyazaki et al. .... STIs (P = 0.0001, OR = 6.0), level of education (P = 0.0001, OR = 40.7) and age (P ...

  4. Evaluation of an Antigen-Antibody

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    1. ABSTRACT. BACKGROUND: Development of “combination” assays detecting in parallel, within a single test,. Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) antigens and antibodies, not ... considered above threshold of detection for antigen proteins suggested a lack of sensitivity by this assay ..... Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (sinusoidal.

  5. Development and evaluation of Indirect Hemagglutination Antibody ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was conducted to develop and evaluate an Indirect Hemagglutination Antibody Test (IHAT) for the serological diagnosis of Cysticercus bovis in live animals. IHAT was set-up in-house and used to test serum samples of cattle against sheep red blood cell (SRBC) coated with crude extracts of C. bovis cyst. Serum ...

  6. Inhibition of HIV protease by monoclonal antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Fábry, Milan; Hořejší, Magdalena; Štouračová, Renata; Lescar, J.; Riottot, M. M.; Sedláček, Juraj; Bentley, G. A.

    15(5), č. 15 (2002), s. 272-276 ISSN 0952-3499 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5052502; GA ČR GV203/98/K023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : monoclonal antibodies * HIV protease * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2002

  7. Strain differentiation of polioviruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; A.J.H. Stegmann; J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractPanels of monoclonal antibodies raised against different poliovirus type 1, 2 and 3 strains, were tested in a micro-neutralization test and in a micro-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay against a large number of poliovirus strains. The results were compared with those obtained with the

  8. Epitope focused immunogens and recombinant antibody ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Combining cutting-edge immunology and protein engineering methods, this collaborative research project aims to develop affordable antibody-based therapies for dengue patients and improved vaccines for the control of dengue fever and East Coast fever in both humans and animals. The core technologies that will be ...

  9. Polyclonal antibodies of Ganoderma boninense isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polyclonal antibodies of Ganoderma boninense isolated from Malaysian oil palm for detection of basal stem rot disease. ... ELISA-PAb shows better detection as compared to cultural-based method, Ganoderma selective medium (GSM) with an improvement of 18% at nursery trial. The present study also demonstrates ...

  10. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  11. Comparisons of the effect of naturally acquired maternal pertussis antibodies and antenatal vaccination induced maternal tetanus antibodies on infant's antibody secreting lymphocyte responses and circulating plasma antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to explore the effects of trans-placental tetanus toxoid (TT) and pertussis (PT) antibodies on an infant's response to vaccination in the context of antenatal immunization with tetanus but not with pertussis. 38 mothers received a single dose of TT vaccine during pregnancy...

  12. Radioimmunoimaging of tumors with a pantumor antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.C.P.; Siegel, M.E.; Chen, F.; Taylor, O.R.; Epstein, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The TNT-1 antibody was developed to bind intracellular nuclear antigens that are accessible only in degenerative or necrotic cells. Since about 50% of tumor cells are in various stages of cell degeneration or death, this antibody could serve as a pantumor antibody for tumor detection. After intravenous injection of 10 μg of TNT-1F(ab')2 fragments labeled with 20 μCi of I-131, serial images were obtained at 1 and 4 hours and daily for 6 days in mice bearing various human tumors. Accumulation of TNT-1 was imaged in a necrotic tumor as early as 4 hours after injection and because more intense at 48 hours. The tumor-muscle ratio was as high as 29:1. Intense accumulation was noted in the necrotic tumor, about nine times that of healthy tumor. In conclusion, TNT-1, a pantumor antibody, can detect necrotic tumors in animal models. It may be an ideal imaging agent for cancer detection

  13. Enhanced Phagocytosis and Antibody Production by Tinospora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tinospora cordifolia (guduchi) is a widely used shrub in ayurvedic systems of medicine known to possess immunomodulatory properties. In the present study the aqueous extract of T. cordifolia was found to enhance phagocytosis in vitro. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts also induced an increase in antibody production ...

  14. Seroprevalence of hepatitis C antibody in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyams, K C; Phillips, I A; Moran, A Y; Tejada, A; Wignall, F S; Escamilla, J

    1992-06-01

    The prevalence in Peru of antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) was determined in a survey of populations living in the northern jungle region and in groups at high risk of parenterally and sexually transmitted diseases. All sera were initially screened for anti-HCV using commercial first and second generation ELISAs; repeatedly reactive sera were further verified with a second generation immunoblot assay. Serum samples were also tested by ELISA for HBsAg, anti-HBs, and anti-HBc. None of 2,111 sera obtained in the survey of jungle residents was positive for anti-HCV by immunoblot assay. Twelve of 16 HIV-1 antibody positive hemophiliacs, one of 103 HIV-1 antibody positive homosexuals, and three of 602 HIV-1 negative registered female prostitutes were positive for anti-HCV. A high prevalence of total markers of hepatitis B infection was found in all subjects, especially in older subjects and groups at high risk of parenterally and sexually transmitted diseases. The findings of this study indicate that seropositivity for hepatitis C virus antibody is uncommon in Peru except in high risk groups and suggest that the epidemiology of hepatitis C differs substantially from hepatitis B.

  15. Single Domain Antibodies as New Biomarker Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Katja; Leow, Chiuan Yee; Chuah, Candy; McCarthy, James

    2017-01-01

    Biomarkers are defined as indicators of biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacological responses to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers have been widely used for early detection, prediction of response after treatment, and for monitoring the progression of diseases. Antibodies represent promising tools for recognition of biomarkers, and are widely deployed as analytical tools in clinical settings. For immunodiagnostics, antibodies are now exploited as binders for antigens of interest across a range of platforms. More recently, the discovery of antibody surface display and combinatorial chemistry techniques has allowed the exploration of new binders from a range of animals, for instance variable domains of new antigen receptors (VNAR) from shark and variable heavy chain domains (VHH) or nanobodies from camelids. These single domain antibodies (sdAbs) have some advantages over conventional murine immunoglobulin owing to the lack of a light chain, making them the smallest natural biomarker binders thus far identified. In this review, we will discuss several biomarkers used as a means to validate diseases progress. The potential functionality of modern singe domain antigen binders derived from phylogenetically early animals as new biomarker detectors for current diagnostic and research platforms development will be described. PMID:29039819

  16. Single Domain Antibodies as New Biomarker Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiuan Herng Leow

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are defined as indicators of biological processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacological responses to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers have been widely used for early detection, prediction of response after treatment, and for monitoring the progression of diseases. Antibodies represent promising tools for recognition of biomarkers, and are widely deployed as analytical tools in clinical settings. For immunodiagnostics, antibodies are now exploited as binders for antigens of interest across a range of platforms. More recently, the discovery of antibody surface display and combinatorial chemistry techniques has allowed the exploration of new binders from a range of animals, for instance variable domains of new antigen receptors (VNAR from shark and variable heavy chain domains (VHH or nanobodies from camelids. These single domain antibodies (sdAbs have some advantages over conventional murine immunoglobulin owing to the lack of a light chain, making them the smallest natural biomarker binders thus far identified. In this review, we will discuss several biomarkers used as a means to validate diseases progress. The potential functionality of modern singe domain antigen binders derived from phylogenetically early animals as new biomarker detectors for current diagnostic and research platforms development will be described.

  17. Antibodies to actin in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritzmann Mathias

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In autoimmune haemolytic anaemia (AIHA, autoreactive antibodies directed against red blood cells are up-regulated, leading to erythrocyte death. Mycoplasma suis infections in pigs induce AIHA of both the warm and cold types. The aim of this study was to identify the target autoantigens of warm autoreactive IgG antibodies. Sera from experimentally M. suis-infected pigs were screened for autoreactivity. Results Actin-reactive antibodies were found in the sera of 95% of all animals tested. The reactivity was species-specific, i.e. reactivity with porcine actin was significantly higher than with rabbit actin. Sera of animals previously immunised with the M. suis adhesion protein MSG1 showed reactivity with actin prior to infection with M. suis indicating that molecular mimicry is involved in the specific autoreactive mechanism. A potentially cross-reactive epitope was detected. Conclusions This is the first report of autoreactive anti-actin antibodies involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune haemolytic anaemia.

  18. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Leonard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131 I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  19. The Relationship between Antisperm Antibodies Prevalence and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    mucus and/or through binding to the receptor by which spermatozoa attach to the ovum, thereby blocking sperm–ovuminteraction 10, 11. Women don't generally ..... 18. Bohring C and Krause W (2005): The role of antisperm antibodies during fertilization and for immunological infertility Chem Immunol Allergy.;. 88: 15-26.

  20. Burkholderia pseudomallei Antibodies in Children, Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pheaktra, Ngoun; Putchhat, Hor; Sin, Lina; Sen, Bun; Kumar, Varun; Langla, Sayan; Peacock, Sharon J.; Day, Nicholas P.

    2008-01-01

    Antibodies to Burkholderia pseudomallei were detected in 16% of children in Siem Reap, Cambodia. This organism was isolated from 30% of rice paddies in the surrounding vicinity. Despite the lack of reported indigenous cases, melioidosis is likely to occur in Cambodia. PMID:18258125

  1. Measurements of auto-antibodies to α-synuclein in the serum and cerebral spinal fluids of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Rizwan S; Licata, Joseph P; Luk, Kelvin C; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2018-03-03

    Biomarkers for α-synuclein are needed for diagnosis and prognosis in Parkinson's disease (PD). Endogenous auto-antibodies to α-synuclein could serve as biomarkers for underlying synucleinopathy, but previous assessments of auto-antibodies have shown variability and inconsistent clinical correlations. We hypothesized that auto-antibodies to α-synuclein could be diagnostic for PD and explain its clinical heterogeneity. To test this hypothesis, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measuring α-synuclein auto-antibodies in human samples. We evaluated 69 serum samples (16 healthy controls (HC) and 53 PD patients) and 145 CSF samples (52 HC and 93 PD patients) from our Institution. Both serum and CSF were available for 24 participants. Males had higher auto-antibody levels than females in both fluids. CSF auto-antibody levels were significantly higher in PD patients as compared to HC, whereas serum levels were not significantly different. CSF auto-antibody levels did not associate with amyloid-β 1-42 , total tau, or phosphorylated tau. CSF auto-antibody levels correlated with performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, even when controlled for CSF amyloidβ 1-42 . CSF hemoglobin levels, as a proxy for contamination of CSF by blood during lumbar puncture, did not influence these observations. Using recombinant α-synuclein with N- and C-terminal truncations, we found that CSF auto-antibodies target amino acids 100 through 120 of α-synuclein. We conclude that endogenous CSF auto-antibodies are significantly higher in PD patients as compared to HC, suggesting that they could indicate the presence of underlying synucleinopathy. These auto-antibodies associate with poor cognition, independently of CSF amyloidβ 1-42 ., and target a select C-terminal region of α-synuclein. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Functional characterization of two scFv-Fc antibodies from an HIV controller selected on soluble HIV-1 Env complexes: a neutralizing V3- and a trimer-specific gp41 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Maria; Weiβ, Svenja; Antoni, Sascha; Koch, Joachim; von Briesen, Hagen; Hust, Michael; Dietrich, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    HIV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) represent an important tool in view of prophylactic and therapeutic applications for HIV-1 infection. Patients chronically infected by HIV-1 represent a valuable source for nAbs. HIV controllers, including long-term non-progressors (LTNP) and elite controllers (EC), represent an interesting subgroup in this regard, as here nAbs can develop over time in a rather healthy immune system and in the absence of any therapeutic selection pressure. In this study, we characterized two particular antibodies that were selected as scFv antibody fragments from a phage immune library generated from an LTNP with HIV neutralizing antibodies in his plasma. The phage library was screened on recombinant soluble gp140 envelope (Env) proteins. Sequencing the selected peptide inserts revealed two major classes of antibody sequences. Binding analysis of the corresponding scFv-Fc derivatives to various trimeric and monomeric Env constructs as well as to peptide arrays showed that one class, represented by monoclonal antibody (mAb) A2, specifically recognizes an epitope localized in the pocket binding domain of the C heptad repeat (CHR) in the ectodomain of gp41, but only in the trimeric context. Thus, this antibody represents an interesting tool for trimer identification. MAb A7, representing the second class, binds to structural elements of the third variable loop V3 and neutralizes tier 1 and tier 2 HIV-1 isolates of different subtypes with matching critical amino acids in the linear epitope sequence. In conclusion, HIV controllers are a valuable source for the selection of functionally interesting antibodies that can be selected on soluble gp140 proteins with properties from the native envelope spike.

  3. Functional characterization of two scFv-Fc antibodies from an HIV controller selected on soluble HIV-1 Env complexes: a neutralizing V3- and a trimer-specific gp41 antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Trott

    Full Text Available HIV neutralizing antibodies (nAbs represent an important tool in view of prophylactic and therapeutic applications for HIV-1 infection. Patients chronically infected by HIV-1 represent a valuable source for nAbs. HIV controllers, including long-term non-progressors (LTNP and elite controllers (EC, represent an interesting subgroup in this regard, as here nAbs can develop over time in a rather healthy immune system and in the absence of any therapeutic selection pressure. In this study, we characterized two particular antibodies that were selected as scFv antibody fragments from a phage immune library generated from an LTNP with HIV neutralizing antibodies in his plasma. The phage library was screened on recombinant soluble gp140 envelope (Env proteins. Sequencing the selected peptide inserts revealed two major classes of antibody sequences. Binding analysis of the corresponding scFv-Fc derivatives to various trimeric and monomeric Env constructs as well as to peptide arrays showed that one class, represented by monoclonal antibody (mAb A2, specifically recognizes an epitope localized in the pocket binding domain of the C heptad repeat (CHR in the ectodomain of gp41, but only in the trimeric context. Thus, this antibody represents an interesting tool for trimer identification. MAb A7, representing the second class, binds to structural elements of the third variable loop V3 and neutralizes tier 1 and tier 2 HIV-1 isolates of different subtypes with matching critical amino acids in the linear epitope sequence. In conclusion, HIV controllers are a valuable source for the selection of functionally interesting antibodies that can be selected on soluble gp140 proteins with properties from the native envelope spike.

  4. Okadaic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H; Severinsen, Mai C K

    2014-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a polyether fatty acid produced by marine dinoflagellates and the causative agent of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning. The effect of OA on apical endocytosis in the small intestine was studied in organ cultured porcine mucosal explants. Within 0.5-1 h of culture, the toxin caused...... in acidic organelles, implying a different toxic mechanism of action. We propose that rapid induction of LBs, an indicator of phospholipidosis, should be included in the future toxicity profile of OA....

  5. Sperm antibody production in female sterility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, L; Scheidel, P; Shirwani, D

    1974-01-01

    A review of the immunological implications in reproductive physiology is presented. Although attempts have been made to ascribe the antigenicity of semen to individual components, it has not been possible to isolate the human semen antigen responsible for infertility. In monkeys total ejaculates and seminal plasma have shown higher antigenicity than washed spermatozoa. In bulls some evidence of such antigens have been found in the seminal plasma. They are iron-binding proteins resembling lactoferrin. Most investigators have found no evidence for any participation of the ABO blood group antigens in cases of sterility. On the surface of human spermatozoa histo-incompatibility antigens have been detected. Transplantation antigens may be related to sterility. However, an immulogic tolerance of the maternal organism exists against the genetically foreign fetal tissue. Autoimmune spermagglutinating antibodies have been detected in the sera and in the seminal plasma of males with sterility. An obstruction of the seminal pathways may facilitate the production of such antibodies against retained sperm. Isoimmunity in females against seminal components has been shown in cases of sterility; however, fertile women have also been shown to have such conditions. In a group of infertile women spermagglutination activity was detected in 7.5% of cases. In another series of 46 cases with primary unexplained infertility agglutinating antibodies were found in 17.4%. Other investigators have also reported higher rates than the authors. The sperm immobilization test seems to be more sensitive than the agglutination test. No sera were found positive with both tests. With immunofluorescent techniques humoral sperm antibodies have been found to be the IgM and IgG fractions. Each acts on a different part of the spermatozoa. The only promising therapy against humoral sperm antibodies is avoidance of sperm contact over a long period of time. Reported results have been conflicting. Cortisone

  6. Antibodies to poliovirus detected by immunoradiometric assay with a monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, M.; Fossati, C.A.; Schild, G.C.; Spitz, L.; Brasher, M.

    1982-01-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the assay of antibodies to poliovirus antigens is described. Dilutions of the test sera or whole (finger prick) blood samples were incubated with the poliovirus antigen bound to a solid phase and the specific antibody was detected by the addition of a mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal antibody (McAb), which was itself revealed by iodinated sheep IgG antimouse F(ab). The authors have shown that this technique is suitable for the estimation of IgG anti-poliovirus antibodies induced in children following polio vaccine. The present study shows that SPRIA provides a simple and inexpensive method for serological studies with poliovirus particularly for use in large-scale surveys. (Auth.)

  7. Antibodies to poliovirus detected by immunoradiometric assay with a monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, M.; Fossati, C.A.; Schild, G.C.; Spitz, L.; Brasher, M. (National Inst. for Biological Standards and Control, London (UK))

    1982-10-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the assay of antibodies to poliovirus antigens is described. Dilutions of the test sera or whole (finger prick) blood samples were incubated with the poliovirus antigen bound to a solid phase and the specific antibody was detected by the addition of a mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal antibody (McAb), which was itself revealed by iodinated sheep IgG antimouse F(ab). The authors have shown that this technique is suitable for the estimation of IgG anti-poliovirus antibodies induced in children following polio vaccine. The present study shows that SPRIA provides a simple and inexpensive method for serological studies with poliovirus particularly for use in large-scale surveys.

  8. Detection of Fasciola gigantica antibodies using Pourquier ELISA kit ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ELISA) screening kit for Fasciola antibodies was conducted in breeding herds in two Local Government Areas of Adamawa state. The objectives were to determine the presence of Fasciola gigantica antibodies as a way of demonstrating the use ...

  9. Antibody-IL2 Fusion Protein Delivery by Gene Transfer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nicolet, Charles

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the work described is to assess the feasibility of a gene therapy approach to deliver a specific antibody cytokine fusion protein called CC49-1L2 to a tumor expressing antigen reactive with the antibody...

  10. Biophysical characterization of antibodies with isothermal titration calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verna Frasca

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies play a key role in the immune response. Since antibodies bind antigens with high specificity and tight affinity, antibodies are an important reagent in experimental biology, assay development, biomedical research and diagnostics. Monoclonal antibodies are therapeutic drugs and used for vaccine development. Antibody engineering, biophysical characterization, and structural data have provided a deeper understanding of how antibodies function, and how to make better drugs. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC is a label-free binding assay, which measures affinity, stoichiometry, and binding thermodynamics for biomolecular interactions. When thermodynamic data are used together with structural and kinetic data from other assays, a complete structure-activity-thermodynamics profile can be constructed. This review article describes ITC, and discusses several applications on how data from ITC provides insights into how antibodies function, guide antibody engineering, and aid design of new therapeutic drugs.

  11. Identification of Novel Breast Cancer Antigens Using Phage Antibody Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, James

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to use phage antibody libraries to identify novel breast tumor antigens The antibodies could be used for breast cancer immunotherapy and the antigens could be used as cancer vaccines...

  12. Identification of Novel Breast Cancer Antigens Using Phage Antibody Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, James

    2002-01-01

    .... Multivalent display of phage antibodies led to more efficient selection of cell binding antibodies, as did recovery of phage from within the cell after binding to an internalizing cell surface receptor...

  13. Identification of Novel Breast Cancer Antigens Using Phage Antibody Libraries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marks, James

    2001-01-01

    .... Multivalent display of phage antibodies led to more efficient selection of cell binding antibodies, as did recovery of phage from within the cell after binding to an internalizing cell surface receptor...

  14. Bglbrick strategy for the construction of single domain antibody fusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R. Goldman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Single domain antibodies, recombinantly expressed variable domains derived from camelid heavy chain antibodies, are often expressed as multimers for detection and therapeutic applications. Constructs in which several single domain antibodies are genetically fused serially, as well as those in which single domain antibodies are genetically linked with domains that naturally form multimers, yield improvement in apparent binding affinity due to avidity. Here, using a single domain antibody that binds envelope protein from the Dengue virus, we demonstrated the construction of single domain antibody dimers using the Bglbrick cloning strategy. Constructing single domain antibodies and multimerization domains as Bglbrick parts enables the easy mixing and matching of parts. The dimeric constructs provided enhanced fluorescent signal in assays for detection of Dengue virus like particles over the monomeric single domain antibody.

  15. Significance of prenatal joint detection of ABO antibody titers and irregular antibodies in pregnant women with type O blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W Y; Li, H X; Liang, Y

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effects of blood transfusion and number of pregnancies on ABO antibody titers and irregular antibodies in pregnant women with type O blood. The study included 4,200 pregnant women with type O blood (their husbands were with non-O type blood) that were divided into transfusion group and non-transfusion group, according to whether they had a history of blood transfusion. The both groups were respectively divided into three subgroups (the number of pregnancies was one, two, and > or = three). The ABO antibody titers and irregular antibodies were detected at the same time. The effects ofABO antibody titers and irregular antibodies on hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) were discussed. There was no consistency of ABO antibody titers and existence of irregular antibody. The positive rates of irregular antibody of transfusion group and of the subgroup (number of pregnancies > or = three) were far higher than that of non-transfusion group and of the subgroups (number of pregnancies pregnant women with positive irregular antibody in non-transfusion group were with HDN. For pregnant women with number of pregnancies > or = three or with history of blood transfusion, the prenatal joint detection of ABO antibody titers and irregular antibodies is helpful for accurately reflecting the in vivo antibody type and level.

  16. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  17. Clinical outcome of patients with coexistent antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and antibodies against glomerular basement membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindic, Jelka; Vizjak, Alenka; Ferluga, Dusan; Kovac, Damjan; Ales, Andreja; Kveder, Radoslav; Ponikvar, Rafael; Bren, Andrej

    2009-08-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and antibodies against glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) rarely coexist. Both antibodies may be associated with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage. We describe the clinical, serological and histological features of our patients with dual antibodies. From 1977 to 2008, 48 patients with anti-GBM antibody-associated renal disease were observed. Eight out of the 30 tested patients (26.7%), all females, had positive myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA coexistent with anti-GBM antibodies. The patients' mean age was 63.4 +/- 7.8 years. Five presented with pulmonary-renal syndrome, all but one were dialysis-dependent on admission. They had constitutional symptoms and different organ involvement. The kidney biopsies revealed intense linear staining for immunoglobulin G and C3 along the glomerular and distal tubular basement membrane associated with irregular diffuse or focal extracapillary crescentic glomerulonephritis with necrosis of varying extent. Lesions of varying ages were characteristically expressed. Seven patients were treated with methylprednisolone and plasma exchange, four with cyclophosphamide, and one with intravenous immunoglobulin. After 28-74 months, there were three dialysis-dependent survivors and one patient with stable chronic renal disease. Two clinical relapses with pulmonary involvement and MPO-ANCA positivity without anti-GBM antibodies occurred in two dialysis-dependent patients. In summary, screening for ANCA and anti-GBM antibodies should be undertaken in patients with clinical signs of systemic vasculitis. In dialysis-dependent patients, the goal of treatment is to limit the damage of other involved organs and not to preserve renal function. Careful follow-up is necessary due to the relapsing nature of the ANCA component of the disease.

  18. AL amyloid imaging and therapy with a monoclonal antibody to a cryptic epitope on amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Wall

    Full Text Available The monoclonal antibody 2A4 binds an epitope derived from a cleavage site of serum amyloid protein A (sAA containing a -Glu-Asp- amino acid pairing. In addition to its reactivity with sAA amyloid deposits, the antibody was also found to bind amyloid fibrils composed of immunoglobulin light chains. The antibody binds to synthetic fibrils and human light chain (AL amyloid extracts with high affinity even in the presence of soluble light chain proteins. Immunohistochemistry with biotinylated 2A4 demonstrated positive reaction with ALκ and ALλ human amyloid deposits in various organs. Surface plasmon resonance analyses using synthetic AL fibrils as a substrate revealed that 2A4 bound with a K(D of ∼10 nM. Binding was inhibited in the presence of the -Glu-Asp- containing immunogen peptide. Radiolabeled 2A4 specifically localized with human AL amyloid extracts implanted in mice (amyloidomas as evidenced by single photon emission (SPECT imaging. Furthermore, co-localization of the radiolabeled mAb with amyloid was shown in biodistribution and micro-autoradiography studies. Treatment with 2A4 expedited regression of ALκ amyloidomas in mice, likely mediated by the action of macrophages and neutrophils, relative to animals that received a control antibody. These data indicate that the 2A4 mAb might be of interest for potential imaging and immunotherapy in patients with AL amyloidosis.

  19. Characterization and purification of proteins suitable for the production of antibodies against 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huawei; Atta, Sagheer; Hartung, John S

    2017-11-01

    The citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB), which is caused by 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CaLas), is one of the most devastating pathogens of citrus, and with no effective method of control, poses a serious threat to citrus production throughout the world. In a previous study we described the production of single chain antibodies against several CaLas proteins that provide the basis for efficient and accurate detection of CaLas in citrus tissues. The isolation of a sufficient amount of purified antigen is a key step in the production of functional antibodies. The current report details purification procedures for six protein antigens used to select recombinant and produce polyclonal antibodies. These proteins include a flagellar biosynthesis protein (FlhA), a dinucleoside polyphosphate hydrolase (InvA), a portion of the major outer membrane protein (OmpA), a component of type IV pilus (CapB), the polysialic acid capsule expression protein (KpsA) and the outer membrane efflux protein (TolC). Results of purification under completely native or denatured conditions were not satisfactory. Therefore different hybrid purification conditions were optimized for each of the different proteins. The results of bioinformatic analysis also indicated that the six proteins contained a great diversity of potential antigenic epitopes, which varied in number, and that the antigenic clusters were not uniformly distributed throughout the proteins. The purified proteins are useful for the development of highly specific antibodies capable of differentiating specific strains of Liberibacter. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Purification of human seminal plasma no. 7 antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isojima, S; Koyama, K; Fujiwara, N

    1982-08-01

    Human seminal plasma (HSP) No. 7 antigen was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound 1C4 monoclonal antibody (Moab) (Shigeta et al., 1980b). The pooled HSP protein was applied to a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B column of bound 1C4 Moab gamma globulin and the antibody bound fraction (fr) eluted was further purified by rechromatography in the same way. The purified antigen in the antibody bound fr obtained by rechromatography gave a single band on SDS-PAGE in a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 15,000 daltons. This preparation was 196.2 times more effective than the original HSP protein in neutralizing the sperm immobilizing activity of 1C4 Moab. The purified HSP No. 7 antigen contained iron, but was different from lactoferrin and transferrin. It did not show any enzymatic activities, such as those of acid phosphatase, LDH or trypsin inhibitor, and shared antigenicity with human milk protein. It was present in seminal plasma as a molecule with a higher molecular weight but seemed to be cleaved to a monomer of 15,000 daltons during purification procedures. This antigen is present on spermatozoa as sperm-coating antigen and the corresponding antibody can immobilize spermatozoa with complement.

  1. Quantitation of anti-tetanus and anti-diphtheria antibodies by enzymoimmunoassay: methodology and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virella, G; Hyman, B

    1991-01-01

    We have developed enzymoimmunoassays (EIA) for the quantitation of antibodies (Ab) to tetanus and diphtheria toxoids (TT, DT) using Immulon I plates coated with the appropriate toxoid. A preparation of human tetanus immunoglobulin with a known concentration of anti-TT Ab was used as calibrator of the anti-TT antibody assay. The assay of anti-DT Ab is calibrated with a pool of human sera whose anti-DT Ab concentration was determined by quantitative immunoelectrophoresis, using a horse anti-DT with known Ab concentration as calibrator. A peroxidase-conjugated anti-human IgG was used in both assays. ABTS was used as substrate, and the reaction was stopped after 1 min incubation with citric acid and the OD measured at 414 nm on a Vmax reader. The assays have been applied to a variety of clinical situations. In patients suspected of having tetanus, the quantitation of antibodies has been helpful in establishing a diagnosis. In patients with a history of hypersensitivity to tetanus toxoid, verification of the levels of anti-TT antibody may prevent unnecessary and potentially harmful immunizations. The assays have also been used for the diagnostic evaluation of the humoral immune response to TT and DT, both in pediatric patients and in immunosuppressed patients. Several non-responders have been detected, and we have recently used the assay to monitor the effects of fish oil administration on the humoral immune response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A computer program for quantification of SH groups generated after reduction of monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Normando Iznaga; Morales, Alejo; Nunez, Gilda

    1996-07-01

    Reduction of disulfide bonds to sulfhydryl (SH) groups for direct radiolabeling of antibodies for immunoscintigraphic studies of colorectal and other cancers continues to be of considerable research interest. We have developed a general strategy and a versatile computer program for the quantification of the number of SH per molecule of antibody (Ab) generated after the treatment of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) with reducing agents such as 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME), stannous chloride (SnCl{sub 2}), dithiothreitol (DTT), dithioerythritol (DTE), ascorbic acid (AA), and the like. The program we describe here performs an unweighted least-squares regression analysis of the cysteine standard curve and interpolates the cysteine concentration of the samples. The number of SH groups per molecule of antibody in the 2-mercaptoethanol and in the other reducing agents was calculated from the cysteine standard curve using Ellman's reagent to develop the yellow color. The linear least-squares method fit the standard data with a high degree of accuracy and with the correlation coefficient r of 0.999. A program has been written for the IBM PC compatible computer utilizing a friendly menu to interact with the users. The package allows the user to change parameters of the assay, to calculate regression coefficients slope, intercept and its standard errors, to perform statistical analysis, together with detailed analysis of variance, and to produce an output of the results in a printed format.

  3. Ultrasensitive detection of clenbuterol by a covalent imprinted polymer as a biomimetic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yiwei; Gao, Jingwen; Liu, Xiuying; Gao, Xue; Ma, Tao; Lu, Xiaonan; Li, Jianrong

    2017-08-01

    As an ideal biomimetic antibody, molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) has shown great promise in immunoassays. Here, we developed a covalent imprinting method to prepare MIP artificial antibody towards clenbuterol on the well surface of a microtiter plate. Template molecule (clenbuterol) was splited by hydrolysis with functional monomer and removed by methanol/acetic acid solution, and then three-dimensional cavities were fabricated in the MIP, which can rebind template molecule via hydrogen bond interaction. Using this artificial antibody, we developed a novel biomimetic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with excellent sensitivity and specificity. The linear range for clenbuterol was 10 -5 to 1000μgL -1 , with a detection limit of 10 -7 μgL -1 . Cross reactivity of this MIP artificial antibody to other four structural analogs was less than 0.93%. This method was applied to determine clenbuterol in real samples with satisfactory result, suggesting a promising application of the biomimetic ELISA in food and environmental analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Specific recognition of the C-terminal end of A beta 42 by a high affinity monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, T.V.; Holm, A.; Birkelund, S.

    2009-01-01

    ) with high specificity. By this is meant that the paratope of the antibody must enclose the C-terminal end of A beta(42) including the carboxy-group of amino acid 42, and not just recognize a linear epitope in the C-terminal part of A beta. This has been accomplished by using a unique antigen construct made...... in human AD tissue and stains plaques with high specificity. Therefore the monoclonal antibody can thus be useful in the histological investigations of the AD pathology Udgivelsesdato: 2009/7...

  5. A novel monoclonal antibody of human stem cell factor inhibits umbilical cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell factor (SCF activates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal and is being used to stimulate the ex vivo expansion of HSCs. The mechanism by which SCF supports expansion of HSCs remains poorly understood. In cord blood ex vivo expansion assays, a newly produced anti-SCF monoclonal antibody (clone 23C8 was found to significantly inhibit the expansion of CD34+ cells. This antibody appears to bind directly to a part of SCF that is critical for biological activity toward expansion of CD34+ cells, which is located in the first 104 amino acids from the NH2-terminus.

  6. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in antimyelin antibody-induced oligodendrocyte damage in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griot-Wenk, M; Griot, C; Pfister, H; Vandevelde, M

    1991-08-01

    Treatment of dissociated murine brain cell cultures with an antibody recognizing galactocerebroside (GalC) led to degeneration of oligodendrocytes with loss of their cell processes. F(ab')2 fragments prepared from this antibody showed no effect. The anti-GalC antibody--but not its F(ab')2 fragments b2 was able to stimulate macrophages in these cultures as seen in a chemiluminescence assay. Therefore, antibodies bound to oligodendrocytes stimulated nearby macrophages by interacting with their Fc receptors. The oligodendroglial damage coincided with the release of toxic compounds by the stimulated macrophages, since treatment of the cultures with the anti-GalC antibody and a variety of other macrophage stimulating agents led to secretion of reactive oxygen species and--in some experiments--tumor necrosis factor, both known to be toxic for oligodendrocytes. These in vitro experiments show evidence that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity may be an important mechanism of tissue destruction in inflammatory demyelinating diseases.

  7. A comparative study of tissue transglutaminase antibodies and endomysium antibody immunofluorescence in routine clinical laboratory practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, David; Pearce, Callum B; Saas, Michael S L; Poller, David

    2003-07-01

    The demand for screening for coeliac disease has grown rapidly over the last few years. Laboratories depending on immunofluorescence assays are faced with an increasing workload using a labour-intensive test, and an alternative to this test has been sought. This study compares tissue transglutaminase (TTG) and endomysium antibodies (EMA) in a routine clinical laboratory situation. An immunofluorescence IgA EMA test was compared with a guinea pig TTG antibody ELISA for 816 unselected requests for gut antibody screening. Discrepant results were investigated more fully using a variety of human source TTG antigen kits. Guinea pig TTG ELISA and EMA assays showed agreement for 93.6% of samples. Four samples were misclassified and 48 samples gave false positive TTG results. Study of 46 EMA samples (this group included 39 of the 'discrepant' negative EMA/positive guinea pig TTG group) using three different human purified and/or recombinant TTG sources showed that 42 patients had no TTG antibodies using human sources, three were misclassified and one patient had negative EMA and positive TTG results that could not be readily explained. Further study of 32 EMA positive samples showed almost complete agreement between the human source TTG kits. We can recommend the replacement of EMA with ELISA for TTG antibodies for the routine screening for coeliac disease, but all positive TTG antibodies should still be followed up with IgA EMA and samples should be screened for IgA deficiency.

  8. Properties of surface functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (ferrofluid) conjugated antibody for lateral flow immunoassay application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nor, Noorhashimah Mohamad [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Abdul Razak, Khairunisak, E-mail: khairunisak@eng.usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); NanoBiotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Tan, Soo Choon; Noordin, Rahmah [NanoBiotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), Institute for Research in Molecular Medicine (INFORMM), 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of acid functionalization and biocompatible polymer on iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) ferrofluid were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The IONPs functionalized using citric acid (IONPs-CA) is the most stable ferrofluid with zeta potential value of -49 mV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IONPs-CA can be directly conjugated with antibody without biocompatible polymer coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IONPs-CA had optimum detection efficiency of 15 min assay time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IONPs-CA showed the highest colour intensity in labelling lateral flow immunoassay. - Abstract: In this study, colloidal stability of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) with several acid functionalizations and biocompatible polymer coating were compared for use as labelling agent in lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA). IONPs were synthesized using the precipitation method and peptized using perchloric acid (PA), nitric acid (NA) and citric acid (CA) to form a stable IONPs ferrofluid. Steric stabilization of IONPs using silane polyethelene glycol (SiPEG) was developed to improve biocompatibility and provide spaces for subsequent conjugation process. From the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, the sizes of IONPs obtained with different acids peptization were in range of 11-17 nm. The IONPs peptized using citric acid showed the most stable ferrofluid condition at physiological condition with zeta potential value of -49 mV. The LFIA was also developed to examine the conjugation properties of IONPs to mouse anti-human IgG{sub 4} antibody (M{alpha}HIgG{sub 4}). IONPs functionalized with citric acid can be directly conjugated with the M{alpha}HIgG{sub 4} without the need of SiPEG addition. This is due to the presence of the carboxylic group that acted as a ligand to the extended bond formation with the antibody. Moreover, the conjugation of IONPs with M{alpha}HIgG{sub 4} was also tested in a LFIA to detect brugian

  9. Structural Basis for Escape of Human Astrovirus from Antibody Neutralization: Broad Implications for Rational Vaccine Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Perez, Edmundo I.; López, Tomás; Arias, Carlos F.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UNAM-Mexico); (UCSC)

    2017-10-25

    a single amino acid mutation induces a structural change in a loop that is responsible for antibody binding. Our findings reveal how viruses can escape antibody neutralization and provide insight for the rational design of vaccines to elicit diverse antibodies that provide broader protection from infection.

  10. Stacking and energetic contribution of aromatic islands at the binding interface of antibody proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background The enrichment and importance of some aromatic residues, such as Tyr and Trp, have been widely noticed at the binding interfaces of antibodies from many experimental and statistical results, some of which were even identified as “hot spots” contributing significantly greater to the binding affinity than other amino acids. However, how these aromatic residues influence the immune binding still deserves further investigation. A large-scale examination was done regarding the local spatial environment around the interfacial Tyr or Trp residues. Energetic contribution of these Tyr and Trp residues to the binding affinity was then studied regarding 82 representative antibody interfaces covering 509 immune complexes from the PDB database and IMGT/3Dstructure-DB. Results The connectivity analysis of interfacial residues showed that Tyr and Trp tended to cluster into the spatial Aromatic Islands (AI) rather than being distributed randomly at the antibody interfaces. Out of 82 antibody-antigen complexes, 72% (59) interfaces were found to contain AI with more than 3 aromatic residues. The statistical test against an empirical distribution indicated that the existence of AI was significant in about 60% representative antibody interfaces. Secondly, the loss of solvent accessible surface area (SASA) for side chains of aromatic residues between actually crowded state and independent state was nicely correlated with the AI size increasing in a linearly positive way which indicated that the aromatic side chains in AI tended to take a compact and ordered stacking conformation at the interfaces. Interestingly, the SASA loss of AI was also correlated roughly with the averaged gap of binding free energy between the theoretical and experimental data for immune complexes. Conclusions The results of our study revealed the wide existence and statistical significance of “Aromatic Island” (AI) composed of the spatially clustered Tyr and Trp residues at the antibody

  11. Antibodies to some enteropathogenic bacteria in serum of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antigens were prepared from bacteria isolates and were used for tile/passive haemagglutination. Results showed that 74, 66, 60 and 50% of the study subjects had antibodies to E. coli, Proteus, Ktebsiella and Shigella spp. respectively. Antibody to E. coli was highest. The highest antibody titre recorded was 1 in 8 for E. coli.

  12. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against mink leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W.S.; Pedersen, Mikael; Gram-Nielsen, S.

    1997-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated against mink leukocytes. One antibody reacted with all T lymphocytes, one with all monocytes and one had platelet reactivity. Under reducing conditions, the T lymphocyte reactive antibody immunoprecipitated 18 kDa, 23 kDa, 25 kDa and 32-40 kDa pol...

  13. Immunobiology of Primary Antibody Deficiencies: Towards a new classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies. The hallmark of PADs is a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen specific antibodies. These antibodies or immunoglobulins are indispensible for the adaptive immune response against a wide

  14. Immunity to rhabdoviruses in rainbow trout: the antibody response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Niels; Lapatra, S.E.

    1999-01-01

    in detail so far. Analysis of the specificity of anti-virus trout antibodies has been complicated by a generally insufficient ability of the antibodies to bind the viral proteins in assays such as immunoblotting. However, other assays, specifically designed for detection of fish anti IHNV/VHSV antibodies...

  15. Detection of avian influenza antibodies and antigens in poultry and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using HI test, the wild birds were negative for AI (H5) antibodies but ELISA detected AI (NP) antibodies in Black Stork (Ciconia nigra) with an overall seroprevalence of 4.5% and mean titre of 24.50±2.400 EU. Cloacal swabs from the same species of wild birds that were tested for antibodies and 710 oropharyngeal swabs ...

  16. Association of ribosomal anti-P antibodies with different parameters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    antibodies with neuropsychiatric lupus manifestations and to find out the relationship of ribosomal anti-P antibodies with other autoimmune parameters of lupus. Ribosomal anti-P antibodies were evaluated in the serum of 41 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients as well as ANA, dsDNA, anti- Sm, anti-SSA, anti-SSB, ...

  17. Stability of llama heavy chain antibody fragments under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Camelids have next to their normal antibodies, a unique subset of antibodies lacking light chains. The resulting single binding domain, VHH, of these heavy chain antibodies consequently have unique properties. A high stability is one of these properties, which was investigated in this thesis. The

  18. Pathogenesis and mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Willy A

    2015-07-01

    The clinical consequences of antibodies to red blood cells (RBCs) have been studied for a century. Most clinically relevant antibodies can be detected by sensitive in vitro assays. Several mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis are well understood. Such hemolysis after transfusion is reliably avoided in a donor-recipient pair, if one individual is negative for the cognate antigen to which the other has the antibody. Mechanisms of antibody-mediated hemolysis were reviewed based on a presentation at the Strategies to Address Hemolytic Complications of Immune Globulin Infusions Workshop addressing intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and ABO antibodies. The presented topics included the rates of intravascular and extravascular hemolysis; immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG isoagglutinins; auto- and alloantibodies; antibody specificity; A, B, A,B, and A1 antigens; A1 versus A2 phenotypes; monocytes-macrophages, other immune cells, and complement; monocyte monolayer assay; antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity; and transfusion reactions due to ABO and other antibodies. Several clinically relevant questions remained unresolved, and diagnostic tools were lacking to routinely and reliably predict the clinical consequences of RBC antibodies. Most hemolytic transfusion reactions associated with IVIG were due to ABO antibodies. Reducing the titers of such antibodies in IVIG may lower the frequency of this kind of adverse event. The only way to stop these events is to have no anti-A or anti-B in the IVIG products. © 2015 AABB.

  19. Use of microbial transglutaminase for the enzymatic biotinylation of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josten, A; Haalck, L; Spener, F; Meusel, M

    2000-06-23

    Nowadays many reagents are available for the biotinylation of proteins. As most of them bind to amino groups of the protein the degree of labelling differs from batch to batch and the possibility exists that the biological activity of the target protein may be affected by the labelling procedure. In the present study we have investigated an enzymatic approach to biotinylation using microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) from Streptoverticillium mobaraense. The proposed method is particularly suitable when only a few biotin molecules need to be attached to the target proteins. The enzyme catalyses the acyl transfer reaction between gamma-carboxyamide groups and various primary amines. This was exploited for biotinylation using two amino-modified biotin derivatives, biotinamido-5-pentylamin (BIAPA) and biotinoyl-1,8-diamino-3, 6-dioxaoctane (BIDADOO) as acyl acceptors and a monoclonal IgG against the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) as the acyl donor. Kinetic studies revealed that the MTGase-mediated reaction proceeds with low velocity and is almost complete after 34 h. Conjugation ratios ranging from 1.1 to 1.9 biotins per IgG were found by mass spectrometry. To investigate the influence of antibody conjugation on antigen binding a competitive ELISA for the determination of 2,4-D employing MTGase-biotinoylated IgGs was developed. In this assay lower limits of detection of 0.3 and 1.0 microg/l of 2,4-D were achieved with BIDADOO- and BIAPA-modified antibodies, respectively.

  20. Histone H1(0) mapping using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dousson, S; Gorka, C; Gilly, C; Lawrence, J J

    1989-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to ox liver histone H1 degree were produced and characterized. Two sets of mice were immunized either with pure H1(0) or with an H1(0)-yeast tRNA complex. Eleven hybridomas of various clonal origin were selected. Typing of the antibodies indicated that all but three IgM belonged to the IgG1 class and contained kappa light chains. Immunoblotting experiments using peptides derived from H1(0) or H5 treated by various proteolytic agents (trypsin, N-bromosuccinimide, cyanogen bromide, acetic acid), revealed that nine of the mAb reacted with the globular part of H1(0). More advanced characterization of the antigenic determinants allowed us to determine distinct regions within this globular part which are involved in the antigenic recognition. The peptopes could be subdivided into two groups. Three mAb bound to residues 24-27 and were specific for H1(0). Six mAb bound to residues 27-30 and were specific for H1(0) except one of them which strongly cross-reacted with H5 and GH5. Two mAb reacted with the entire histone H1(0) but failed to react with any of the peptides, suggesting that the corresponding epitope is a conformational antigenic determinant. In order to confirm the localization of the two distinct regions which are involved in the antigenic recognition, a synthetic decapeptide corresponding to the beginning of human H1(0) globular part (from residue 19 to residue 28) was synthesized. Inhibition experiments of the reaction between H1(0) and the various IgG1 mAb by increasing amounts of peptide-bovine serum albumin conjugates were then performed.