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Sample records for anti-helicobacter pylori activity

  1. Flavonoids with anti-Helicobacter pylori activity from Cistus laurifolius leaves.

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    Ustün, Osman; Ozçelik, Berrin; Akyön, Yakut; Abbasoglu, Ufuk; Yesilada, Erdem

    2006-12-01

    Cistus laurifolius flower buds are used traditionally in folk medicine against gastric ailments. In a prior study we showed that the chloroform extract of Cistus laurifolius had a potent anti-ulcer activity. It has been known that there is a causal relationship between peptic ulcer and Helicobacter pylori infection. Then in a previous study, we demonstrated that chloroform extract of Cistus laurifolius possessed a significant anti-Helicobacter pylori activity. We designed this study to isolate and define the active component(s) involved in the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity of the extract through activity-guided fractionation procedures. The chloroform extract was fractionated by using various chromatography techniques, i.e., Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and preparative thin layer chromatography and six compounds were isolated (1-6). Each of these six compounds' anti-Helicobacter pylori activity was tested in vitro and was measured as minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values by using agar dilution method. The compound 2 had the highest activity against Helicobacter pylori (MIC 3.9 microg/mL). Its chemical structure was elucidated as quercetin 3-methyl ether (isorhamnetin) by various spectroscopic techniques. We believe that the therapeutic effect of Cistus laurifolius in ulcer is at least partially related to its effect on Helicobacter pylori. We hope that the isolated flavonoid having anti-Helicobacter pylori activity ultimately can be utilized as an alternative or additive agent to the current therapy. PMID:16870372

  2. Anti-Helicobacter pylori and Urease Inhibition Activities of Some Traditional Medicinal Plants

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    Tahir Mehmood

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Different parts of Acacia nilotica (L. Delile, Calotropis procera (Aiton W.T. Aiton, Adhatoda vasica Nees, Fagoniaar abica L. and Casuarina equisetifolia L. are traditionally used in folk medicine for the treatment of a variety of common ailments like nausea, cold, cough, asthma, fevers, diarrhea, sore throat, swelling, etc. The present study was aimed to evaluate the anti-Helicobacter pylori and urease inhibition activities of extracts produced from the above selected medicinal plants native to Soon Valley (home to an old civilization in the Punjab province of Pakistan. Methanol, acetone and water extracts of the plants were evaluated for anti-bacterial activity against thirty four clinical isolates and two reference strains of H. pylori. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of the extracts were determined using the agar dilution method and compared with some standard antibiotics like amoxicillin (AMX, clarithromycin (CLA, tetracycline (TET and metronidazole (MNZ, used in the triple therapy for H. pylori eradication. H. pylori urease inhibition activity of the extracts was assessed by the phenol red method, wherein, Lineweaver-Burk plots were used to determine Michaelis-Menten constants for elucidating the mechanism of inhibition. Methanol and acetone extracts from Acacia nilotica and Calotropis procera exhibited stronger anti-H. pylori activity than MNZ, almost comparable activity with TET, but were found to be less potent than AMX and CLT. The rest of the extracts exhibited lower activity than the standard antibiotics used in this study. In the H. pylori urease inhibitory assay, methanol and acetone extracts of Acacia nilotica and Calotropis procera showed significant inhibition. Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated a competitive mechanism for extract of Acacia nilotica, whereas extract of Calotropis procera exhibited a mixed type of inhibition.

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and immunostimulatory effect of extracts from Byrsonima crassa Nied. (Malpighiaceae

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    Vilegas Wagner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several in vitro studies have looked at the effect of medicinal plant extracts against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Regardless of the popular use of Byrsonima crassa (B. crassa as antiemetic, diuretic, febrifuge, to treat diarrhea, gastritis and ulcers, there is no data on its effects against H. pylori. In this study, we evaluated the anti-H. pylori of B. crassa leaves extracts and its effects on reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates induction by murine peritoneal macrophages. Methods The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by broth microdilution method and the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO by the horseradish peroxidase-dependent oxidation of phenol red and Griess reaction, respectively. Results The methanolic (MeOH and chloroformic (CHCl3 extracts inhibit, in vitro, the growth of H. pylori with MIC value of 1024 μg/ml. The MeOH extract induced the production H2O2 and NO, but CHCl3 extract only NO. Conclusion Based in our results, B. crassa can be considered a source of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity, but its use should be done with caution in treatment of the gastritis and peptic ulcers, since the reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by ulcerogenic agents and H. pylori infections.

  4. Evidence of the gastroprotective and anti-Helicobacter pylori activities of β-mangostin isolated from Cratoxylum arborescens (vahl blume

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    Sidahmed HMA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heyam Mohamed Ali Sidahmed,1 Najihah Mohd Hashim,1 Syam Mohan,2 Siddig Ibrahim Abdelwahab,2 Manal Mohamed Elhassan Taha,2 Firouzeh Dehghan,3 Maizatulakmal Yahayu,4 Gwendoline Cheng Lian Ee,5 Mun Fai Loke,6 Jamuna Vadivelu6 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 2Medical Research Center, Jazan University, Jazan, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Exercise Science, Sports Centre, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 4Department of Bioproduct Research and Innovation, Institute of Bioproduct Development (IBD, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM, Johor Bahru, 5Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM, Serdang, 6Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Purpose: β-Mangostin (BM from Cratoxylum arborescens demonstrated various pharmacological activities such as anticancer and anti-inflammatory. In this study, we aimed to investigate its antiulcer activity against ethanol ulcer model in rats. Materials and methods: BM was isolated from C. arborescens. Gastric acid output, ulcer index, gross evaluation, mucus production, histological evaluation using hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid–Schiff staining and immunohistochemical localization for heat shock protein 70 (HSP70 and Bax proteins were investigated. Possible involvement of reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, prostaglandin E2, antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymes, radical scavenging, nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds, and anti-Helicobacter pylori were investigated. Results: BM showed antisecretory activity against the pylorus ligature model. The pretreatment with BM protect gastric mucosa from ethanol damaging effect as seen by the improved gross and histological appearance. BM significantly reduced the ulcer area formation, the submucosal edema, and the leukocytes infiltration compared to the ulcer control. The compound

  5. Anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy significantly reduces Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric mucosal damage in Mongolian gerbils

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    Chun-Chao Chang; Sheng-Hsuan Chen; Gi-Shih Lien; Yuarn-Jang Lee; Horng-Yuan Lou; Ching-Ruey Hsieh; Chia-Lang Fang; Shiann Pan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effectiveness of 4 d' anti-Helicobacter pyloritherapy on the H pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils based on physiological and pathological changes.METHODS: We used 6-wk-old male gerbils orally inoculated with H pylori (ATCC43504, 2x108 CFU/mL).Seven weeks after H pylori inoculation, the animals of study group received 4 d' anti-H pylori triple therapy (H pylorieradicated group). Seven days later, all animals of the H pylori-eradicated and control groups (H pylori-infected& H pylori-uninfected groups) were sacrificed. We examined gastric mucosal lesions macroscopically, studied gastritis microscopically and determined the stomach weight ratio, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin (PG) E2 level.RESULTS: The results showed that both macroscopic and histological gastric damages were significantly less in H pylori-eradicated group than H pylori-infected group.Stomach weight ratio, MPO activity and PGE2 levels were significantly higher in H pylori-infected group than those in the other two groups.CONCLUSION: Four days' anti-H pylori therapy was effective in the improvement of H pylori-induced gastric lesions in Mongolian gerbils.

  6. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity in vitro of chamomile flowers, coneflower herbs, peppermint leaves and thyme herbs – a preliminary report

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    Malm Anna; Glowniak-Lipa Anna; Korona-Glowniak Izabela; Baj Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Recently, several studies have been undertaken so as to develop more effective therapeutic approaches towards eradicating Helicobacter pylori. Among these is phytotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity in vitro of the plant extracts obtained from common herbs cultivated in the Lubelszczyzna region against the reference strain H. pylori ATCC 43504. Among these are thyme herbs, chamomile flowers, peppermint leaves and coneflower herbs. Herein, it was found that the MIC v...

  7. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and oxidative burst inhibition by the naphthoquinone 5-methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin from Paepalanthus latipes

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    Rodrigo Rezende Kitagawa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium recognized as the major cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers. Infection by H. pylori induces inflammatory responses and pathological changes in the gastric microenvironment. The host Keywords: immune cells (especially neutrophils release inflammatory mediators and large 5-methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are associated with an increased Helicobacter pyloririsk of developing gastric cancer. In this study, we evaluated the anti-H. pylori and oxidative burst antioxidantactivitiesofa1,4-naphthoquinone-5-methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin. Paepalanthus latipes The antimicrobial activity was assessed using a spectrophotometric microdilution technique, and antioxidant activity was assessed by noting the effect of 5-methoxy3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin on the neutrophil oxidative burst using luminol-and lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence. The results showed that 5-methoxy-3,4dehydroxanthomegnin is a potent anti-H. pylori compound (MIC 64 µg/mL and MBC 128 µg/mL and a strong antioxidant. 5-Methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin decreased luminol- and lucigenin-amplified chemiluminescence, with ED50 values of 1.58±0.09 µg/mL and 5.4±0.15 µg/mL, respectively, reflecting an inhibitory effect on the oxidative burst. These results indicate that 5-methoxy-3,4-dehydroxanthomegnin is a promising compound for the prevention and treatment of diseases caused by H. pylori infection, such as gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric cancer, because reactive oxygen intermediates are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal injury induced by H. pylori infections.

  8. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity in vitro of chamomile flowers, coneflower herbs, peppermint leaves and thyme herbs – a preliminary report

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    Malm Anna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several studies have been undertaken so as to develop more effective therapeutic approaches towards eradicating Helicobacter pylori. Among these is phytotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the activity in vitro of the plant extracts obtained from common herbs cultivated in the Lubelszczyzna region against the reference strain H. pylori ATCC 43504. Among these are thyme herbs, chamomile flowers, peppermint leaves and coneflower herbs. Herein, it was found that the MIC values of the assayed extracts were as follows: the extracts from coneflower herbs showed anti-H. pylori activity with MIC = 31.3-125 μg/ml; the extracts from chamomile flowers demonstrated MIC = 31.3-62.5 μg/ ml; the extracts from peppermint leaves had MIC = 15.6-250 μg/ml; and the extracts from thyme herbs revealed MIC = 15.6-62.5 μg/ml, depending on the solvent used. The most active were the extracts obtained with ethyl acetate or ethanol alcohol absolute 99.8%. These showing MIC within the range of 15.6-62.5 μg/ml, while the lowest activity was observed in case of the extract obtained with 70% aqueous ethanol. This last showing MIC within the range of 62.5-250 μg/ml. The MIC values of essential oil components were 15.6 μg/ml for bisabolol and menthol or 31.3 μg/ml for thymol. The obtained data indicate that the assayed herbs possessed promising anti-H. pylori bioactivity.

  9. A new look at anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy

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    Seng-Kee Chuah; Feng-Woei Tsay; Ping-I Hsu; Deng-Chyang Wu

    2011-01-01

    With the rising prevalence of antimicrobial resistance, the treatment success of standard triple therapy has recently declined to unacceptable levels (i.e., 80% or less) in most countries. Therefore, several treatment regimens have emerged to cure Helicobacter pylori (H .pylori)infection. Novel first-line anti-H. pylorii therapies in 2011 include sequential therapy, concomitant quadruple therapy, hybrid (dual-concomitant) therapy and bismuth-containing quadruple therapy. After the failure of standard triple therapy, a bismuth-containing quadruple therapy comprising a proton pump inhibitor (PPI), bismuth, tetracycline and metronidazole can be employed as rescue treatment. Recently, triple therapy combining a PPI, levofloxacin and amoxicillin has been proposed as an alternative to the standard rescue therapy. This salvage regimen can achieve a higher eradication rate than bismuth-containing quadruple therapy in some regions and has less adverse effects. The best second-line therapy for patients who fail to eradicate H. pylori with first-line therapies containing clarithromycin, amoxicillin and metronidazole is unclear. However, a levofloxacin-based triple therapy is an accepted rescue treatment. Most guidelines suggest that patients requiring third-line therapy should be referred to a medical center and treated according to the antibiotic susceptibility test. Nonetheless, an empirical therapy (such as levofloxacin-based or furazolidone-based therapies) can be employed to terminate H. pylorii infection if antimicrobial sensitivity data are unavailable.

  10. Does the antibody production ability affect the serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG titer?

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    Chung, Hyun Ah; Lee, Sun-Young; Moon, Hee Won; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Han, Hye Seung

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between serum titers of anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) immunoglobulin G (IgG) and hepatitis B virus surface antibody (HBsAb). METHODS Korean adults were included whose samples had positive Giemsa staining on endoscopic biopsy and were studied in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg)/HBsAb serologic assay, pepsinogen (PG) assay, and H. pylori serologic test on the same day. Subjects were excluded if they were positive for HBsAg, had a recent history of medication, or had other medical condition(s). We analyzed the effects of the following factors on serum titers of HBsAb and the anti-H. pylori IgG: Age, density of H. pylori infiltration in biopsy samples, serum concentrations of PG I and PG II, PG I/II ratio, and white blood cell count. RESULTS Of 111 included subjects, 74 (66.7%) exhibited a positive HBsAb finding. The serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer did not correlate with the serum HBsAb titer (P = 0.185); however, it correlated with the degree of H. pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy (P < 0.001) and serum PG II concentration (P = 0.042). According to the density of H. pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy, subjects could be subdivided into those with a marked (median: 3.95, range 0.82-4.00) (P = 0.458), moderate (median: 3.37, range 1.86-4.00), and mild H. pylori infiltrations (median: 2.39, range 0.36-4.00) (P < 0.001). Subjects with a marked H. pylori infiltration on gastric biopsy had the highest serological titer, whereas in subjects with moderate and mild H. pylori infiltrations titers were correspondingly lower (P < 0.001). After the successful eradication, significant decreases of the degree of H. pylori infiltration (P < 0.001), serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer (P < 0.001), and serum concentrations of PG I (P = 0.028) and PG II (P = 0.028) were observed. CONCLUSION The anti-H. pylori IgG assay can be used to estimate the burden of bacteria in immunocompetent hosts with H. pylori infection, regardless

  11. Comparison of Salivary Anti Helicobacter pylori IgG with Serum IgG and Bacteriological Tests in Detecting Helicobacter pylori Infections

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    H Ghasemian safaei; Fazeli, A.; H Tamizifar; Rashidi, N.(Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, P.O. Box 47416-1467, Babolsar, Iran)

    2005-01-01

    Background: This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) specific IgG antibodies in specimens of oral fluid and serum with bacteriological tests. Methods: Antral biopsy specimens, as well as serum and oral fluid samples were collected from 97 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The presence or absence of current H. pylori infection was determined by culture, ...

  12. Correlations between the CagA Antigen and Serum Levels of Anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG and IgA in Children.

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    Seo, Ji-Hyun; Lim, Chun Woo; Park, Ji Sook; Yeom, Jung Sook; Lim, Jae-Young; Jun, Jin-Su; Woo, Hyang-Ok; Youn, Hee-Shang; Baik, Seung-Chul; Lee, Woo-Kon; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho

    2016-03-01

    We tested correlations between anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG and IgA levels and the urease test, anti-CagA protein antibody, degree of gastritis, and age. In total, 509 children (0-15 years) were enrolled. Subjects were stratified as 0-4 years (n = 132), 5-9 years (n = 274), and 10-15 years (n = 103) and subjected to the urease test, histopathology, ELISA, and western blot using whole-cell lysates of H. pylori strain 51. The positivity rate in the urease test (P = 0.003), the degree of chronic gastritis (P = 0.021), and H. pylori infiltration (P pylori IgG was 732.5 IU/mL at 0-4 years, 689.0 IU/mL at 5-9 years, and 966.0 IU/mL at 10-15 years (P pylori IgA was 61.0 IU/mL at 0-4 years, 63.5 IU/mL at 5-9 years, and 75.0 IU/mL at 10-15 years (P pylori IgG and IgA titers increased with the urease test grade, chronic gastritis degree, active gastritis, and H. pylori infiltration. Presence of CagA-positivity is well correlated with a high urease test grade and high anti-H. pylori IgG/IgA levels. PMID:26955243

  13. Pterocarpus santalinus: an In Vitro study on its anti-Helicobacter pylori effect.

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    Narayan, Shoba; Veeraraghavan, Mani; Devi, C S Shyamala

    2007-02-01

    The anti-H. pylori activity of Pterocarpus santalinus (PS), a traditional herb, has been assessed and compared with that of bismuth subcitrate, through in vitro studies employing rat gastric epithelial cell cultures and H. pylori isolates from gastric mucosal biopsy patients. The MIC of PS was found to be 20 microg/mL. H. pylori was co-cultivated with rat gastric epithelial cells in the presence/absence of PS at its MIC. A reduction in the activity of urease, a normal appearance of the epithelial cells on electron microscopic examination, a decrease in lipid peroxidation and lactate dehydrogenase suggests the possible anti-H. pylori activity of PS. PMID:17128431

  14. Anti- Helicobacter pylori therapy followed by celecoxib on progression of gastric precancerous lesions

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    Li-Jing Zhang; Shi-Yan Wang; Xiao-Hui Huo; Zhen-Long Zhu; Jian-Kun Chu; Jin-Cheng Ma; Dong-Sheng Cui; Ping Gu; Zeng-Ren Zhao; Ming-Wei Wang; Jun Yu

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate whether celecoxib,a selective cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor,could reduce the severity of gastric precancerous lesions following Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) eradication.METHODS:H pylori-eradicated patients with gastric precancerous lesions randomly received either celecoxib (n=30) or placebo (n=30) for up to 3 mo.COX-2 expression and activity was determined by immunostaining and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) assay,cell proliferation by Ki-67 immunostaining,apoptosis by TUNEL staining and angiogenesis by microvascular density (MVD) assay using CD31 staining.RESULTS:COX-2 protein expression was significantly increased in gastric precancerous lesions (atrophy,intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia,respectively) compared with chronic gastritis,and was concomitant with an increase in cell proliferation and angiogenesis.A significant improvement in precancerous lesions was observed in patients who received celecoxib compared with those who received placebo (P<0.001).Of these three changes,84.6% of sites with dysplasia regressed in patients treated with celecoxib (P=0.002) compared with 60% in the placebo group,suggesting that celecoxib was effective on the regression of dysplasia.COX-2 protein expression (P<0.001) and COX-2 activity (P<0.001) in the gastric tissues were consistently lower in celecoxib-treated patients compared with the placebo-treated subjects.Moreover,it was also shown that celecoxib suppressed cell proliferation (P<0.01),induced cell apoptosis (P<0.01) and inhibited angiogenesis with decreased MVD (P<0.001).However,all of these effects were not seen in placebo-treated subjects.Furthermore,COX-2 inhibition resulted in the up-regulation of PPARg expression,a protective molecule with anti-neoplastic effects.CONCLUSION:H pylori eradication therapy followed by celecoxib treatment improves gastric precancerous lesions by inhibiting COX-2 activity,inducing apoptosis,and suppressing cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  15. Comparison of Salivary Anti Helicobacter pylori IgG with Serum IgG and Bacteriological Tests in Detecting Helicobacter pylori Infections

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    H Ghasemian safaei

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to compare the efficacy of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for detecting anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori specific IgG antibodies in specimens of oral fluid and serum with bacteriological tests. Methods: Antral biopsy specimens, as well as serum and oral fluid samples were collected from 97 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The presence or absence of current H. pylori infection was determined by culture, histology and urease detection. Anti-H. pylori specific IgG was detected in serum and oral fluid, using an established lab-made, and a commercial ELISA kit. The obtained data were compared with results of bacteriological tests. Results: In all, 62 (64% of 97 patients were positive for H. pylori by one or more of the gold standard tests (culture, histology and urease detection. Lab-made enzyme-linked immunoassay of oral fluid had a sensitivity and specificity of 92% and 83% respectively. A sensitivity and specificity of 87% and 83%, respectively, was obtained with the commercial kit. Lab-made enzyme-linked immunoassay of serum samples had a sensitivity and specificity of 90% and 88%, respectively. A sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 86% was obtained with the commercial kit. Conclusion: Detection of anti-H. pylori specific IgG in oral fluid by ELISA is comparable in sensitivity and specificity with serum based methods. Oral fluid based ELISA could provide a reliable, non-invasive method for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Saliva testing may have a role in epidemiological studies. Keywords: Helicobacter pylori, ELISA, Oral fluid

  16. Vitamin-C as anti-Helicobacter pylori agent: More prophylactic than curative- Critical review

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    Jagannath Pal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential of nonantibiotic therapies for treatment of Helicobacter pylori-related acid peptic disease remains underexplored. Several clinical studies have shown that higher prevalence of H. pylori infection is associated with low Vitamin C (Vit C level in serum and gastric juice. However, there is no consensus regarding the usefulness of Vit C supplementation in the management of H. pylori infection. Surveying the existing literature we conclude that high concentration of Vit C in gastric juice might inactivate H. pylori urease, the key enzyme for the pathogen′s survival and colonization into acidic stomach. Once infection established, urease is not very important for its survival. The role of Vit-C as anti-H. pylori agent in peptic ulcer diseases appears to be preventive rather than curative. Rather than supplementing high dose of Vit C along with conventional triple therapy, it is preferable to complete the conventional therapy and thereafter start Vit C supplementation for extended period which would prevent reinfection in susceptible individuals, provided the patients are not achlorhydric. Further studies are required to prove the role of Vit C in susceptible population.

  17. Design and evaluation of controlled release mucoadhesive microspheres of amoxicillin for anti Helicobacter pylori therapy

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    N Venkateswaramurthy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop controlled release mucoadhesive microspheres of amoxicillin trihydrate for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori. Microspheres were prepared by solvent evaporation technique using carbopol 974P, hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose K4M (HPMC K4M and Eudragit RS 100. The prepared microspheres were subjected to evaluation for particle size, incorporation efficiency, in vitro mucoadhesion and in vitro drug release characteristics. Absence of drug-polymer interaction was confirmed using differential scanning calorimetry analysis and fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry. The prepared microspheres showed a strong mucoadhesive property. The polymer concentration influenced the in vitro drug release significantly in 0.1N HCl. The particle sizes of systems ranged between 123±8.35 μm and 524±11.54 μm. Percent drug entrapment and release profiles of amoxicillin trihydrate in 0.1 N HCl were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. The percentage drug entrapment and percentage yield of formulations were about 56.71±1.66% to 88.32±0.65% and 39.20±1.62% to 92.40±1.32%, respectively. The stability of the drugs was assessed in 0.1 N HCl. The results further substantiated that mucoadhesive microspheres improved the gastric stability of amoxicillin trihydrate (due to entrapment within the microsphere. From the above results, it was concluded that the mucoadhesive microspheres of amoxicillin trihydrate has feasibility for eradicating H. pylori from the stomach more effectively because of the prolonged gastrointestinal residence time and controlled release of drug from the formulation.

  18. Evaluation of salivary and serum anti-Helicobacter pylori in Egyptian patients with H. pylori related gastric disorders.

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    El-Fakhfakh, Effat Abd El-Monem; Montasser, Iman Fawzy; Khalifa, Reham Ali Ahmed

    2014-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common and important transmissible bacterial human pathogen. Although several diagnostic tests are available for the detection of H. pylori infection, all of them have both advantages and disadvantages, and none can be considered as a single gold standard. Serological methods analyzing (serum and saliva) by using enzyme immunoassays, which are simple, reproducible and inexpensive, can detect either antigen or antibody. This study evaluated the frequency of anti- H. pylori serum and salivary antibodies positivity among Egyptian patients with gastric disorders and the validity of salivary, serum serological tests for diagnosis of H. pylori, comparing this with gold standard tests performed on endoscopy biopsy. This prospective, case-controlled study included 45 Egyptian patients who attended Ain Shams University Hospitals Cairo, Egypt between January 2013 and June 2013. There were 29 males &16 females their mean age was 51.78 +/- 7 (range 18-60). Among the ulcerogenic drugs, Aspirin was the most common drug (46.7%). The evidence revealed the sensitivity of Rapid Urease Test (RUT) was 100%, specificity was 71.4%, Positive Predictive value (PPV) was 88.6% and Negative Predictive value (NPV) was 100%. The sensitivity of serum IgG was 68.97% and specificity was 42.86%; while the sensitivity of serum IgA was 89.6% and the specificity was 50%. Correlating the salivary IgG results with H. pylori status diagnosed by culture, salivary IgG succeeded to diagnose 19 cases from the 31 positive H. pylori patients with a sensitivity of 63.33% & specificity of 92.86% whereas the results of salivary IgA showed a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 92.86%. PMID:24961032

  19. ASSESSMENT OF RELATED ANAMNESTIC AND CLINICAL FACTORS ON EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF ANTI-HELICOBACTER PYLORI THERAPY

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    D. N. Andreev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a prospective clinical study in which 100 patients with H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease of stomach/duodenum were examined. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of concomitant anamnestic and clinical factors on the efficacy and safety of eradication therapy (ET. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a factor that significantly reduces the efficiency of ET with OR 0.21 (95% CI 0,06-0,69, p = 0,0102. Using a macrolide antibiotics prior to ET during the previous 12 months is associated with a reduction in the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication with OR 0.27 (95% CI 0,08-0,90, p = 0,0342. Despite the lack of statistical significance observed negative effect on the efficiency of ET factors such as smoking and increased BMI. Smoking, female gender, age over 50 years and the presence of type 2 diabetes mellitus had no significant impact on the safety profile of ET. 

  20. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori effects of medicinal mushroom extracts, with special emphasis on the Lion's Mane mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (higher Basidiomycetes).

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    Shang, Xiaodong; Tan, Qi; Liu, Ruina; Yu, Kangying; Li, Pingzuo; Zhao, Guo-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Although the medicinal mushroom Hericium erinaceus is used extensively in traditional Chinese medicine to treat chronic superficial gastritis, the underlining pharmaceutical mechanism is yet to be fully understood. In this study, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of extracts prepared from the fruiting bodies of 14 mushroom species (H. erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, Cordyceps militaris, Pleurotus eryngii, P. ostreatus, Agrocybe aegerita, Lentinus edodes, Agaricus brasiliensis, A. bisporus, Coprinus comatus, Grifola frondosa, Phellinus igniarius, Flammulina velutipes, and Hypsizygus marmoreus) were determined against Helicobacter pylori using laboratory strains of ATCC 43504 and SS1 as well as 9 clinical isolates via an in vitro microplate agar diffusion assay. Ethanol extracts (EEs) of 12 mushrooms inhibited the growth of H. pylori in vitro, with MIC values 10 mg/mL). MIC values of ethyl acetate fractions (EAFs) of H. erinaceus against 9 clinical isolates of H. pylori ranged between 62.5 and 250 µg/mL. The bacteriostatic activity of EAFs was found to be concentration-dependant, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration values for H. pylori ATCC 43504 were 73.0 and 200 µg/mL, respectively. The direct inhibitory effect of EEs and EAFs of H. erinaceus against H. pylori could be another pharmaceutical mechanism of medicinal mushrooms-besides the immunomodulating effect of polysaccharides, suggested previously-in the treatment of H. pylori-associated gastrointestinal disorders. Further research to identify the active component(s) is currently undertaking in our laboratory. PMID:23557368

  1. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

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    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies.

  2. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

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    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-05-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  3. POTENTIAL IN VITRO ANTI-HELICOBACTER ACTIVITY OF BACTERIOCIN AND BACTERIOCIN-LIKE COMPOUNDS PRODUCED BY LACTOBACILLI

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    Mohammed A. Ramadan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed for screening of the potential activity of lactic acid bacteria against Helicobacter pylori and other enteropathogenic organisms. A total of 40 samples including natural cow milk and fresh infant stools were tested for the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Of these samples, 73 lactic acid bacterial isolates were recovered on MRS agar medium using the streak-plate method. Isolates inducing probiotic effect were tested under microaerophilic conditions against standard cultures of H. pylori, Esherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis. The data obtained showed that five isolates of lactic acid bacteria were able to produce bacteriocin or bacteriocin-like compounds. Sequencing of 16S rRNA gene revealed that five isolates belonged to Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus plantarum in addition to other lactic acid bacteria. The most effective isolate (LAB1 showed a marked large inhibition zone against H. pylori. The bacteriocin or bacteriocin like compound(s produced by lactobacilli were further analyzed and characterized. We can conclude that probiotics might be useful in the prophylaxis or as co-therapy for treatment of H. pylori infections.

  4. N-acetyl cysteine as an adjunct to standard anti-Helicobacter pylori eradication regimen in patients with dyspepsia: A prospective randomized, open-label trial

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    Mohammad Hassan Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing antibiotic resistance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori which is associated with diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract, has made alternative treatments necessary. This study compares the efficacy of adding N-acetyl cysteine (NAC to standard regimen for H. pylori eradication. Materials and Methods: We conducted a randomized, open-label trial, comparing the efficacy of 14 days of quadruple therapy with Amoxicillin, Bismuth citrate, Omeprazole, Clarithromycin (group A versus 14 days of above regimen plus NAC (group B in adult patients with dyspepsia. Primary objective was H. pylori eradication.Compliance and side effects were determined by questionnaires. Our analysis was by intention-to-treat (ITT and per-protocol. This study is registered with www.IRCT.ir, number: IRCT201201078634N1. Result: A total of 121 participants aged 21-76 years with a mean age of 44.5 ± 14.1, and 52.9% female, were randomly allocated a treatment: 60 with 14-day standard therapy and 61 with 14-day standard therapy with NAC. The eradication rate in groups A and B with ITT analyses was 49/60 (81.7%; 95% [confidence intervals] CI = 71.6-91.8% and 50/61 (82%; 95% CI = 72-91.9%, respectively ( P = 0.96. In per-protocol analysis, the rate of H. pylori eradication in groups A and B was 45/54 (83.3%; 95% CI = 73.1-93.6% and 45/53 (84.9%; 95% CI = 74.9-94.9%, respectively ( P = 0.82. Minor well tolerated side effects were reported in 15 (34.9% and 21 (35.6% patients of groups A and B, respectively, and only one therapy cessation in group A was created. Conclusion: Standard 14-day triple-drug therapy with NAC is not preferable to standard drug regimens for H. pylori infection.

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Twenty Iranian Plant Extracts Against Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

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    Farahnaz Nariman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sDue to increasing emergence of drug-resistance in Helicobacter pylori isolates, traditional plants arepotentially valuable sources of novel anti-H. pylori agents. In this research, anti-H. pylori activity of theorganic extracts of twenty native Iranian plants was determined against ten clinical isolates of H. pylori.Materials and MethodsDisc diffusion was used to determine the biological activity of 20 plant extracts as well as 8 antibioticscommonly used to treat H. pylori infections. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were also measured by tubeand agar dilution methods for the biologically active plant extracts.ResultsOf the twenty plant extracts analyzed, sixteen exhibited good anti-H. pylori activity, using disc diffusion.The ten most active extracts were Carum bulbocastanum, Carum carvi, Mentha longifolia, Saliva limbata,Saliva sclarea, Ziziphora clinopodioides, Thymus caramanicus, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Xanthium brasilicumand Trachyspermum copticum. Minimum inhibitory concentrations measured for the 10 biologically activeplant extracts were within the range of 31.25 to 500 μg/ml.ConclusionAmong the ten plant extracts effective against H. pylori clinical isolates, Carum carvi, Xanthium brasilicumand Trachyspermum copticum showed the highest activity.Keywords: Anti-Helicobacter pylori, Iranian plants, Organic extracts

  6. Effects of Anti-Helicobacter pylori Treatment as Part of Antiemetic Cancer Chemotherapy%抗幽门螺杆菌治疗在肿瘤化疗止吐中的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朴瑛; 刘兆喆; 丁震宇; 徐龙; 郭放; 孙庆庆; 谢晓冬

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This work aims to assess the effects of anti-Helicobacter pylori (anti-H. pylori) therapy combined with antiemetic drugs on chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity. Methods: Out of the 176 patients who were enrolled in the research from January 2010 to January 2011, 86 were infected by H. pylori. Infected patients were randomly divided into Groups A and B. Patients in Group A (n= 43) received anti-H. pylori therapy combined with antiemetic drugs (20 mg omeprazole, 500 mg clarithromycin, and 500 mg tinidazole, twice a day, plus 5 mg tropisetron, for four weeks) Patients in Group B (n=43) only received antiemetic drugs (5 mg tropisetron for four weeks). No statistical significance was observed between Groups A and B for gender, age, and clinical manifestations. Clinical symptoms were observed and evaluated based on the gastrointestinal reaction indexing standards of the World Health Organization. The H. pylori eradication rate was assessed by 4C-urea breath test. Results: The vomiting severity was higher in the patients who were infected by H. pylori and subsequently underwent chemotherapy compared with the non-infected patients. Significant differences were observed between grades Ⅲ and Ⅳ vomiting (x2=21.92, P<0.001), as well as between grades I and Ⅱvomiting (x2=9.73, PO.01). The degree of nausea and vomiting was reduced in the patients who underwent anti-H. pylori therapy combined with antiemetic drugs, compared with those who only received antiemetic drugs. The total efficiency of the treatment was significantly higher in group A than in group B (x2=4.46, P<0.05). Conclusion: Anti-H. pylori treatment combined with antiemetic drugs may effectively reduce and relieve chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal toxicity for patients infected with H. pylori.%目的:评估抗幽门螺杆菌(Helicobacter pylori,HP)治疗及联合常规止吐药物对肿瘤患者化疗所致胃肠道不良反应的疗效.方法:2010年1月至2011年1

  7. 丁香对幽门螺杆菌的体外抑菌作用%Anti-Helicobacter Pylori Action of Eugenol and Essential Oil from Eugenia Caryophyllata in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩艳; 王庆伟; 张琰; 刘新友; 覃华; 杜小燕

    2011-01-01

    目的 考察丁香挥发油及丁香酚体外抑制幽门螺杆菌的活性.方法 水蒸气蒸馏法提取丁香挥发油,采用高效液相色谱法测定挥发油丁香酚的含量.以氨苄西林为对照,体外法测定丁香挥发油、丁香提取挥发油后的水提取物及丁香酚对8种幽门螺杆菌菌株的最小抑菌浓度(MIC).结果 氨苄西林对8种幽门螺杆菌菌株的MIC范围为1.25~2.50 μg·mL-1,丁香挥发油的MIC范围为5.00~10.00 μg·mL-1,丁香酚的MIC范围为2.50~5.00 μg·mL-1,丁香提取挥发油后的水提取物无抑菌作用.结论 丁香抑制幽门螺杆菌的活性成分是其挥发油中的主要成分丁香酚.%Objective To study the antibacterial effects of eugenol and essential oil from Euggenia Cairyphyllata against helicobacter pylori in vitro. Methods The essential oil was obtained by steam distillation. The concentration of eugenol was determined by HPLC. MIC against helicobacter pylori of eugenol, essential oil from Eugenia Caryophyllata and aqueous extract of Eugenia Caryophyllata except essential oil were determined in vitro with ampieillin as a control drug. Results The range of MIC against 8 helicobacter pylori was 1.25-2.50 μg· mL-1 for ampicillin, 5.00-10. 00 μg· mL-1 for the essential oil, 2.50-5.00 μg· mL-1 for eugenol. The aqueous extract showed no effect against helicobacter pylori. Conclusion The main active component from Eugenia Caryophyllata against H. pylori is eugenol of essential oil.

  8. Identification of novel scaffolds for potential anti-Helicobacter pylori agents based on the crystal structure of H. pylori 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonate 8-phosphate synthase (HpKDO8PS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sujin; Im, Hookang; Lee, Ki-Young; Chen, Jie; Kang, Hae Ju; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Min, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Kang Ro; Park, Hyun-Ju; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2016-01-27

    The crystal structure of 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonate-8-phosphate synthase (KDO8PS) from Helicobacter pylori (HpKDO8PS) was determined alone and within various complexes, revealing an extra helix (HE) that is absent in the structures of KDO8PS from other organisms. In contrast to the metal coordination of the KDO8PS enzyme from Aquifex aeolicus, HpKDO8PS is specifically coordinated with Cd(2+) or Zn(2+) ions, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) revealed that Cd(2+) thermally stabilizes the protein structure more efficiently than Zn(2+). In the substrate-bound structure, water molecules play a key role in fixing residues in the proper configuration to achieve a compact structure. Using the structures of HpKDO8PS and API [arabinose 5-phosphate (A5P) and phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) bisubstrate inhibitor], we generated 21 compounds showing potential HpKDO8PS-binding properties via in silico virtual screening. The capacity of three, avicularin, hyperin, and MC181, to bind to HpKDO8PS was confirmed through saturation transfer difference (STD) experiments, and we identified their specific ligand binding modes by combining competition experiments and docking simulation analysis. Hyperin was confirmed to bind to the A5P binding site, primarily via hydrophilic interaction, whereas MC181 bound to both the PEP and A5P binding sites through hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions. These results were consistent with the epitope mapping by STD. Our results are expected to provide clues for the development of HpKDO8PS inhibitors. PMID:26649906

  9. Inmunoglobulina G Anti Helicobacter Pylori por Elisa y Western-blot en pacientes del Servicio de Gastroenterología del Hospital San Vicente de Paúl, Heredia

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    Eugenia Ma Quintana Guzmán

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Justificación y Objetivo: En Costa Rica el cáncer gástrico es una de las malignidades más frecuentes y de la mayor mortalidad y otros estudios han encontrado asociación entre este y el Helicobacter pylori. Esta bacteria es capaz de producir sustancias que alteran la mucosa gástrica, antígenos que han sido reconocidos por medio del Western-blot. El propósito de este trabajo fue realizar, por primera vez en nuestro país, un estudio de anticuerpos IgG-anti H. pylori por medio de Western-blot y lograr identificar los tipos de antígenos contra los cuales se desarrolla la respuesta inmunológica. Para ello se utilizaron sueros y cepas de H. pylori aisladas de pacientes costarricenses. Asimismo, se compararon los resultados obtenidos del Western-blot con una prueba de ELISA para determinar la sensibilidad y especificidad diagnóstica, utilizando como referencia el estudio histológico de biopsia gástrica. Métodos: Se obtuvieron muestras de biopsia gástrica y suero de 83 pacientes referidos al Servicio de Gastroscopía del Hospital San Vicente de Paúl, Heredia. A cada uno se le realizó estudio histológico de biopsia gástrica y de anticuerpos IgG-anti H. pylori, por los métodos de ELISA y Western-blot. Resultados y Conclusiones: Por Western-blot se observaron bandas de proteínas de diferentes pesos moleculares, con un predominio de antígenos de H. pylori de bajo peso molecular. El Western-blot y el ELISA presentaron sensibilidades diagnósticas del 89% y el 88% y especificades diagnósticas del 73% y el 71%, respectivamente, comparados con el estudio histológico.Background and aim: In Costa Rica the gastric cancer is the malignancy that produces more deaths. In other studies their pathology it has been associated with Helicobacter pylori. This bacteria is able to produce substances that alter the gastric mucosa, antigens that have been caracterized by Western-blot. The purpose of this study was to performed for the first time in our

  10. Investigations into the antibacterial activities of phytotherapeutics against Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikla, C; Schmidt, K; Matthias, A; Bone, K M; Lehmann, R; Tiralongo, E

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of gastric diseases is increasing with H. pylori, the causative agent of acute and chronic gastritis, being a major predisposing factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. C. jejuni is the most common cause of enteric infections, particularly among children, resulting in severe diarrhoea. Increasing drug resistance of these bacteria against standard antibiotics, and the more widespread use of herbal medicines, favours investigations into additional anti-Helicobacter and anti-Campylobacter effects of phytotherapeutics that are already used for their beneficial effects on bowel and digestive functions. Twenty-one hydroethanol herbal extracts and four essential oils were screened for antibacterial activity using a modification of a previously described micro-dilution assay and compared with the inhibitory effects of antibiotics. The herbal extracts showing the highest growth inhibition of C. jejuni were Calendula officinalis, Matricaria recutita, Zingiber officinale, Salvia officinalis, Foeniculum vulgare and Silybum marianum. Agrimonia eupatoria, Hydrastis canadensis, Filipendula ulmaria and Salvia officinalis were the most active herbal extracts in inhibiting the growth of H. pylori. This study provides evidence for additional beneficial effects of phytotherapeutics marketed for their gastrointestinal effects and identifies new beneficial antibacterial effects for some herbal medicines not currently recommended for gastrointestinal problems. PMID:19653313

  11. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil activating protein as target for new drugs against H. pylori inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choli-Papadopoulou, Theodora; Kottakis, Filippos; Papadopoulos, Georgios; Pendas, Stefanos

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most common human infections and the major risk factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Within this work we present the implication of C-terminal region of H. pylori neutrophil activating protein in the stimulation of neutrophil activation as well as the evidence that the C-terminal region of H. pylori activating protein is indispensable for neutrophil adhesion to endothelial cells, a step necessary to H. pylori inflammation. In addition we show that arabino galactan proteins derived from chios mastic gum, the natural resin of the plant Pistacia lentiscus var. Chia inhibit neutrophil activation in vitro. PMID:21677824

  12. Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori and Its Associate Urease by Labdane Diterpenoids Isolated from Andrographis paniculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Rafik U; Dawane, Ashwini A; Pawar, Rajendra P; Gond, Dhananjay S; Meshram, Rohan J; Gacche, Rajesh N

    2016-03-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate anti-Helicobacter pylori and its associated urease activity of labdane diterpenoids isolated from Andrographis paniculata. A molecular docking analysis was performed by using ArgusLab 4.0.1 software. The results obtained indicate that compound A possesses strong inhibition to H. pylori, 28 ± 2.98 (minimum inhibitory concentration, 9 µg/mL), and its urease, 85.54 ± 2.62% (IC50 , 20.2 µg/mL). Compounds B, C, and D also showed moderate inhibition to H. pylori and its urease. The obtained results were in agreement with the molecular docking analysis of compounds. The phytochemicals under investigation were found to be promising antibacterial agents. Moreover, the isolated compounds can be considered as a resource for searching novel anti-H. pylori agents possessing urease inhibition. PMID:26648323

  13. Detection of serum anti- Helicobacter pyloriimmunoglobulin G in patients with different digestive malignant tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Xue-Feng Wang; Jiang-Long Peng; Yu-Bao Cui; Jian Wang; Chao-Pin Li

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with different digestive malignant tumors.METHODS: Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG antibody in 374 patients with different digestive malignant tumors and 310 healthy subjects (normal control group).RESULTS: The seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was 61.50 %(230/374) and 46.77 % (145/310),respectively, in patients with digestive tumors and normal controls (P<0.05). The seroprevalence was 52.38 % (33/63),86.60 % (84/97), 83.14 % (84/101), 45.24 (19/42),51.13 % (18/35) and 44.44 % (16/36), respectively in patients with carcinomas of esophagus, stomach, duodenum,rectum, colon and liver (P<0.01). In patients with intestinal and diffuse type gastric cancers, the seroprevalence was 93.75 % (60/64) and 72.73 % (24/33), respectively (P<0.05).In patients with gastric antral and cardiac cancers, the seroprevalence was 96.43 % (54/56) and 73.17 % (30/41),respectively (P<0.05). In patients with ulcerous and proliferous type duodenal cancers, the seroprevalence of H pylori infection was 91.04 % (61/67) and 52.27 % (23/44),respectively (P<0.05). In patients with duodenal bulb and descending cancers, the seroprevalence was 94.20 % (65/69) and 45.20 % (19/42), respectively (P<0.05).CONCLUSION:Hpyloriinfection is associated with occurrence and development of gastric and duodenal carcinomas.Furthermore, it is also associated with histological type and locations of gastric and duodenal carcinomas.

  14. The antimicrobial activities of phenylbutyrates against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung-Yi; Cheng, Hsueh-Ling; Hsu, Jue-Liang; Liao, Ming-Hui; Yen, Rong-Lang; Chen, Yo-Chia

    2013-01-01

    Three phenyl derivatives of butyrate, 2-phenylbutyrate (2-PB), 3-phenylbutyrate (3-PB) and 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB), were evaluated in terms of their antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Our results indicated that PBs demonstrated specific inhibitory activity against Helicobacter pylori and Escherichia coli but did not influence the growth of Bifidobacterium bifidium and Lactobacillus reuteri. PBs also exhibited synergistic effects on H. pylori ATCC 43504 especially at pH 5.5. In the protein expression profiles in H. pylori treated by phenylbutyrates, we also found that three protein spots identified as oxidative stress-related proteins were significantly up-regulated, confirming the response of H. pylori when exposed to PBs. Due to their antibacterial activities and low or slight cytotoxicities, PBs are potential candidates for the treatment of H. pylori infection. This is the first study to discover the antibiotic effects of 2-PB, 3-PB and 4-PB (Buphenyl). PMID:23727774

  15. Comparative study of Nigella Sativa and triple therapy in eradication of Helicobacter Pylori in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Eyad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: A large number of diseases are ascribed to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, particularly chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Successful treatment of H. pylori infection with antimicrobial agents can lead to regression of H. pylori-associated disorders. Antibiotic resistance against H. pylori is increasing, and it is necessary to find new effective agents. Nigella sativa seed (NS, a commonly used herb, possesses in vitro anti-helicobacter activity. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy of NS in eradication of H. pylori infection in non-ulcer dyspeptic patients. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 88 adult patients attending King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, from 2007 to 2008, with dyspeptic symptoms and found positive for H. pylori infection by histopathology and urease test. Patients were randomly assigned to four groups, receiving i triple therapy (TT comprising of clarithromycin, amoxicillin, omeprazole [n= 23], ii 1 g NS + 40 mg omeprazole (OM [n= 21], iii 2 g NS + OM [n= 21] or iv 3 g NS + OM [n= 23]. Negative H. pylori stool antigen test four weeks after end of treatment was considered as eradication. Results: H. pylori eradication was 82.6, 47.6, 66.7 and 47.8% with TT, 1 g NS, 2 g NS and 3 g NS, respectively. Eradication rates with 2 g NS and TT were statistically not different from each other, whereas H. pylori eradication with other doses was significantly less than that with TT (P < 0.05. Dyspepsia symptoms improved in all groups to a similar extent. Conclusions: N. sativa seeds possess clinically useful anti-H. pylori activity, comparable to triple therapy. Further clinical studies combining N. sativa with antibiotics are suggested.

  16. Antibacterial Activity of Twenty Iranian Plant Extracts Against Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Farahnaz Nariman; Fereshteh Eftekhar; Zohreh Habibi; Sadegh Massarrat; Reza Malekzadeh

    2009-01-01

    Objective(s)Due to increasing emergence of drug-resistance in Helicobacter pylori isolates, traditional plants arepotentially valuable sources of novel anti-H. pylori agents. In this research, anti-H. pylori activity of theorganic extracts of twenty native Iranian plants was determined against ten clinical isolates of H. pylori.Materials and MethodsDisc diffusion was used to determine the biological activity of 20 plant extracts as well as 8 antibioticscommonly used to treat H. pylori infecti...

  17. B cells pulsed with Helicobacter pylori antigen efficiently activate memory CD8+ T cells from H. pylori-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azem, Josef; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis that may progress to peptic ulcers or gastric adenocarcinoma and thereby cause major world-wide health problems. Previous studies have shown that CD4+ T cells are important in the immune response to H. pylori in humans, but the role of CD8+ T cells is less clear. In order to study the CD8+ T cell response to H. pylori in greater detail, we have evaluated efficient conditions for activation of CD8+ T cells in vitro. We show that H. pylori-reactive CD8+ T cells can be activated most efficiently by B cells or dendritic cells pulsed with H. pylori antigens. We further show that the majority of CD8+ T cells in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa are memory cells, and that memory CD8+ T cells sorted from peripheral blood of H. pylori-infected individuals respond 15-fold more to H. pylori urease compared to memory cells from uninfected subjects. We conclude that CD8+ T cells do participate in the immune response to H. pylori, and this may have implications for the development of more severe disease outcomes in H. pylori-infected subjects. PMID:16324887

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Northwestern Mexican plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos A; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan C; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiologic agent of such gastric disorders as chronic active gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Over the past few years, the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to the development of better treatments, such as the use of natural products. This study evaluated the anti-H. pylori activity of 17 Mexican plants used mainly in the northwestern part of Mexico (Sonora) for the empirical treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The anti-H. pylori activity of methanolic extracts of the plants was determined by using the broth microdilution method. The 50% minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from less than 200 to 400 μg/mL for Castella tortuosa, Amphipterygium adstringens, Ibervillea sonorae, Pscalium decompositum, Krameria erecta, Selaginella lepidophylla, Pimpinella anisum, Marrubium vulgare, Ambrosia confertiflora, and Couterea latiflora and were greater than 800 μg/mL for Byophyllum pinnatum, Tecoma stans linnaeus, Kohleria deppena, Jatropha cuneata, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Taxodium macronatum. Only Equisetum gigantum showed no activity against H. pylori. This study suggests the important role that these plants may have in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori. The findings set the groundwork for further characterization and elucidation of the active compounds responsible for such activity. PMID:21663492

  19. Catechin-based procyanidins from Peumus boldus Mol. aqueous extract inhibit Helicobacter pylori urease and adherence to adenocarcinoma gastric cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastene, Edgar; Parada, Víctor; Avello, Marcia; Ruiz, Antonieta; García, Apolinaria

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the anti-Helicobacter pylori effect of an aqueous extract from dried leaves of Peumus boldus Mol. (Monimiaceae) was evaluated. This extract displayed high inhibitory activity against H. pylori urease. Therefore, in order to clarify the type of substances responsible for such effect, a bioassay-guided fractionation strategy was carried out. The active compounds in the fractions were characterized through different chromatographic methods (RP-HPLC; HILIC-HPLC). The fraction named F5 (mDP = 7.8) from aqueous extract was the most active against H. pylori urease with an IC50  = 15.9 µg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/mL. HPLC analysis evidenced that F5 was composed mainly by catechin-derived proanthocyanidins (LC-MS and phloroglucinolysis). The anti-adherent effect of boldo was assessed by co-culture of H. pylori and AGS cells. Both the aqueous extract and F5 showed an anti-adherent effect in a concentration-dependent manner. An 89.3% of inhibition was reached at 2.0 mg GAE/mL of boldo extract. In conjunction, our results suggest that boldo extract has a potent anti-urease activity and anti-adherent effect against H. pylori, properties directly linked with the presence of catechin-derived proanthocyanidins. PMID:24853276

  20. Helicobacter pylori associated phospholipase A2 activity: a factor in peptic ulcer production?

    OpenAIRE

    Langton, S. R.; Cesareo, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To examine the potential role of the lipolytic enzyme phospholipase A2, produced by Helicobacter pylori in ulcer formation. METHODS: Phospholipase A2 activity in H pylori was compared with that in 10 commonly occurring pathogenic bacteria. Phospholipase A2 activity and its cytotoxic metabolite, lysolecithin, in the basal gastric aspirates of 12 patients infected with H pylori were compared with those in 12 subjects not infected with H pylori. RESULTS: The phospholipase A2 activity in H ...

  1. Activity calibration in breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some technical and measurement problems of the breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori are briefly discussed. Calibrated results obtained for population of 108 cases indicate difference between HP+ (infected with Helicobacter pylori) and HP- (non infected with Helicobacter pylori) in exhaled 14C activity not less than 3.9 kBq while the lower limit for HP+ cases was set at 6.8 kBq at the detection limit: 0.9 Bq/mmol of CO2. It was estimated that in exhalation way up to 29% of the taken activity was removed in HP+ cases during first 35 minutes. Radiation hazard for the patient system is negligibly small - dose equipment not exceeds 0.29% of the natural (environmental) yearly exposure. (author)

  2. Apoptotic Signaling Pathway Activated by Helicobacter pylori Infection and Increase of Apoptosis-Inducing Activity under Serum-Starved Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Shibayama, Keigo; Doi, Yohei; Shibata, Naohiro; Yagi, Tetsuya; Nada, Toshi; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2001-01-01

    The enhanced gastric epithelial cell apoptosis observed during infection with Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to be of significance in the etiology of gastritis, peptic ulcers, and neoplasia. To investigate the cell death signaling induced by H. pylori infection, human gastric epithelial cells were incubated with H. pylori for up to 72 h. H. pylori infection induced the activation of caspase -8, -9, and -3 and the expression of the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bad and Bid. The pe...

  3. Effect of Cold Starvation, Acid Stress, and Nutrients on Metabolic Activity of Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Blom, Jens; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Ljungh, Åsa; Andersen, Leif P.; Wadström, Torkel

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori can transform, in vivo as well as in vitro, from dividing spiral-shaped forms into nonculturable coccoids, with intermediate forms called U forms. The importance of nonculturable coccoid forms of H. pylori in disease transmission and antibiotic treatment failures is unclear. Metabolic activities of actively growing as well as nonculturable H. pylori were investigated by comparing the concentrations of cellular ATP and total RNA, gene expression, presence of cytoplasmic pol...

  4. Sampling efficiency in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic active gastritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Nedenskov-Sørensen, P; Aase, S; Bjørneklett, A; O. Fausa; Bukholm, G

    1991-01-01

    The methods and sampling procedures used in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic active gastritis were evaluated. Five biopsy specimens for bacteriological cultivation and three specimens for histological examination were obtained endoscopically from a defined area of the gastric antral mucosae of 83 patients. An increase in the number of biopsy specimens for cultivation from one to five revealed only one more H. pylori-infected patient. H. pylori was isolated from 31 of...

  5. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide: Biological activities in vitro and in vivo, pathological correlation to human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Yi-Hui; Yan, Jie; Mao, Ya-Fei

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the biological activity of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) lipopolysaccharide (H-LPS) and understand pathological correlation between H-LPS and human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer.

  6. H pylori stimulates proliferation of gastric cancer cells through activating mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Chang Chen; Ying Wang; Jing-Yan Li; Wen-Rong Xu; You-Li Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To explore the mechanism by which H pylori causes activation of gastric epithelial cells.METHODS: A VacA (+) and CagA (+) standard Hpyloriline NCTC 11637 and a human gastric adenocarcinoma derived gastric epithelial cell line BGC-823 were applied in the study. MTT assay and 3H-TdR incorporation test were used to detect the proliferation of BGC-823 cells and Western blotting was used to detect the activity and existence of related proteins.RESULTS: Incubation with Hpylori extract increased the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, reflected by both live cell number and DNA synthesis rate. The activity of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) signal transduction cascade increased within 20 min after incubation with Hpylori extract and appeared to be a sustained event. MAPK/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059abolished the action of H pylori extract on both ERK activity and cell proliferation. Incubation with H pyloriextract increased c-Fos expression and SRE-dependentgene expression. H pylori extract caused phosphorylation of several proteins including a protein with molecular size of 97.4 kDa and tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibited the activation of ERK and the proliferation of cells caused by H pylori extract.CONCLUSION: Biologically active elements in H pylori extract cause proliferation of gastric epithelial cells through activating tyrosine kinase and ERK signal transduction cascade.

  7. Direct measurement of gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities in patients with or without Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Thong-Ngam, Duangporn; Tangkijvanich, Pisit; Sampatanukul, Pichet; Prichakas, Paungpayom; Mahachai, Varocha; Tosukowong, Piyaratana

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) infection in gastric acid secretion of patients with chronic gastritis remains controversial. This study was designed to elucidate the effect of H pylori on H+/K+-ATPase activities in gastric biopsy specimens.

  8. Helicobacter pylori γ-Glutamyltranspeptidase Induces Tolerogenic Human Dendritic Cells by Activation of Glutamate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käbisch, Romy; Semper, Raphaela P; Wüstner, Stefanie; Gerhard, Markus; Mejías-Luque, Raquel

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection is characterized by chronic persistence of the bacterium. Different virulence factors, including H. pylori γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (gGT), have been reported to induce tolerogenicity by reprogramming dendritic cells (DCs). gGT is present in all bacterial isolates, indicating an important role for gGT in the course of infection. In the current study, we have analyzed the effect of H. pylori gGT on human DCs and the subsequent adaptive immune response. We show that glutamate produced due to H. pylori gGT enzymatic activity tolerizes DCs by inhibiting cAMP signaling and dampening IL-6 secretion in response to the infection. Together, our results provide a novel molecular mechanism by which H. pylori manipulates the host's immune response to persist within its host. PMID:27183641

  9. In vitro activity of olive oil polyphenols against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Concepción; Medina, Eduardo; Vargas, Julio; Brenes, Manuel; De Castro, Antonio

    2007-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is linked to a majority of peptic ulcers and to some types of gastric cancer, and resistance of the microorganism to antibiotic treatment is now found worldwide. Virgin olive oil is an unrefined vegetable oil that contains a significant amount of phenolic compounds. Under simulated conditions, we have demonstrated that these substances can diffuse from the oil into the gastric juice and be stable for hours in this acidic environment. In vitro, they exerted a strong bactericidal activity against eight strains of H. pylori, three of them resistant to some antibiotics. Among the phenolic compounds, the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycon showed the strongest bactericidal effect at a concentration as low as 1.3 microg/mL. Although the experimental conditions are different from other reported works, this bactericidal concentration is much lower than those found for phenolic compounds from tea, wine, and plant extracts. These results open the possibility of considering virgin olive oil a chemopreventive agent for peptic ulcer or gastric cancer, but this bioactivity should be confirmed in vivo in the future. PMID:17263460

  10. Efficacy and safety of probiotics as adjuvant agents for Helicobacter pylori infection: A meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Zhifa; Wang, Ben; ZHOU, XIAOJIANG; WANG, FUCAI; Xie, Yong; ZHENG, HUILIE; Lv, Nonghua

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether probiotics could help to improve the eradication rates and reduce the side effects associated with anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment, and to investigate the optimal time and duration of probiotic administration during the treatment, thus providing clinical practice guidelines for eradication success worldwide. By searching Pubmed, Embase, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and the Science Citation Index, all the randomized...

  11. Ornithine decarboxylase activity is a marker of premalignancy in longstanding Helicobacter pylori infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Patchett, S E; Katelaris, P H; Zhang, Z. W.; Alstead, E M; Domizio, P; Farthing, M J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Longstanding Helicobacter pylori infection may increase the risk of developing gastric adenocarcinoma. The sequence of chronic active gastritis leading to gastritis with atrophy and subsequent intestinal metaplasia is thought to be a key step in gastric carcinogenesis. Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity is increased in some pre-malignant gastrointestinal conditions and is essential for malignant transformation in vitro. AIMS: To measure ODC activity in the antrum of H pylori i...

  12. Construction of an oral recombinant DNA vaccine from H pylori neutrophil activating protein and its immunogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Bo; Li, Zhao-Shen; Tu, Zhen-Xing; Xu, Guo-Ming; Du, Yi-qi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct a live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) strain harboring the H pylori neutrophil activating protein (HP-NAP) gene as an oral recombinant DNA vaccine, and to evaluate its immunogenicity.

  13. Potent inhibitory action of the gastric proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole against urease activity of Helicobacter pylori: unique action selective for H. pylori cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata, K; Satoh, H.; Iwahi, T; Shimoyama, T.; TAMURA, T

    1993-01-01

    The gastric proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole, its active analog AG-2000, and omeprazole dose dependently inhibited urease activity extracted with distilled water from Helicobacter pylori cells; the 50% inhibitory concentrations were between 3.6 and 9.5 microM, which were more potent than those of urease inhibitors, such as acetohydroxamic acid, hydroxyurea, and thiourea. These compounds also inhibited urease activity in intact cells of H. pylori and Helicobacter mustelae but did not inhibit...

  14. Antibacterial activity of Boesenbergia rotunda (L. Mansf. and Myristica fragrans Houtt. against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gail Mahady

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative bacterium, is recognized as the primary etiological agent for the development of gastritis, dyspepsia, peptic ulcer as well as gastric and colon cancer. In developing countries the incidence of H. pylori infection ranges from 50-100%. Two Thai plants, namely Boesenbergia rotunda (L.Mansf. and Myristica fragrans Houtt., have been used to treat dyspepsia and peptic ulcer in Thai Traditional Medicine. Their crude extracts were previously reported to possess anti- H. pylori activity. This investigation proposed to test previously isolated bioactive compounds from B. rotunda and M. fragrans if they possessed anti- H. pylori activity. Primary cultures of H. pylori from local hospital patients in Thailand were used in the investigation. In vitro anti- H. pylori testing had been performed with pinostrobin and red oil from roots of B. rotunda, and dihydroguaiaretic acid from arils of M. fragrans. Clarithromycin (MIC 120 µg/mL was used as a positive control. All three compounds showed positive clear zone in agar diffusion test at p<0.05 in all 10 clinical cultures. Pinostrobin, red oil and dihydroguaiaretic acid autoclaved in blood agar medium had MIC of 125, 150, 100 µg/mL and MBC of 150, 175, 125 µg/mL, respectively. All three compounds have their activities against H. pylori in the same range of that of drug currently used in the treatment of peptic ulcer. Thus, all three compounds from B. rotunda and M. fragrans show good potential for further drug development. This investigation demonstrates that food and spice plants used in Thai Traditional Medicine for treatment of dyspepsia and peptic ulcer contain compounds which inhibit the growth of H. pylori in vitro. The result suggests that ingredients of some Thai food in regular diet may contribute to the low incidence of gastric cancer in the Thai population by affecting the growth of H. pylori.

  15. Increased activity of Pgp multidrug transporter in patients with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zarko Babic; Ivna Svoboda-Beusan; Nastja Kucisec-Tepes; Dragan Dekaris; Rosana Troskot

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether local antibiotic resistance involves P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated active drug outpumping during Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection treatment with classic antibiotic therapy. METHODS: Pgp activity was determined in gastric mucosa biopsy specimens obtained from 53 patients with pathohistologically verified gastritis and microbiologically confirmed H pylori infection, and compared with the Pgp activity in 12 control subjects with normal endoscopic findings. TheH pylori positive patients were treated with short-term 7-d therapy consisting of two antibiotics (amoxicillin and azithromycin/metronidazole and clarithromycin) and a proton pump inhibitor. Pgp activity was determined by flow cytometry in the test of rhodamine dye efflux and quantified as mean fluorescence ratio (RMF).RESULTS: Upon the first cycle,H pylori was successfully eradicated in 20 patients, whereas therapy was continued in 33 patients. In the course of antibiotic therapy, RMF increased (P<0.05) and gastric cells showed higher rhodamine dye efflux. The mean pre-treatment RMF values were also higher (P<0.0001) in patients with multiple therapeutic failure than in those with successful H pylorieradication and control subjects.CONCLUSION: Pgp might be one of the causes of therapy failure in patients with H pylori and antibiotic therapy could be chosen and followed up on the basis of the Pgp transporter local activity.

  16. In vitro bactericidal activities of Japanese rice-fluid against Helicobacter pylori strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Kawakami, Kozue Oana, Masayoshi Hayama, Hiroyoshi Ota, Masahiko Takeuchi, Kazuhiro Miyashita, Tsunetomo Matsuzawa, Kiyomi Kanaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori has now been widely recognized as a causative agent of gastroduodenal diseases. The development of safer anti- H. pylori compounds is desirable due to the antibiotic-resistant strains emerged to date. Methods: We successfully developed the compounds of Rice-fluid derived from unpolished, polished, and usually cooked Japanese rice, and investigated their in vitro antibacterial activities by means of the Time-Kill-Curve methods against various species of bacteria including H. pylori strains. Results: All of the compounds revealed keen bactericidal activities against H. pylori, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Campylobacter jejuni strains, but failed to affect the viability of other bacterial species investigated including staphylococci, enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and other gram-negative rods belonging to the family Enterobacteraceae. The bactericidal activities were demonstrated to be time- and concentration-dependent. Conclusions: The compounds of Rice-fluid are considered to be potentially new and safe therapeutic regimens against H. pylori infections. The mechanism of their bactericidal activities against H. pylori strains remains to be elucidated.

  17. In vitro and In vivo Activity of Lactococci Strains against Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassina Guetarni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Search for lactic acid bacteria that have in vitro, a significant inhibitory effect against the strains of H. pylori and to determine the inhibitory activity in vivo. Approach: The in vitro inhibitory activity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from milk against strains of H. pylori was determined by the agar diffusion method. Two groups of mice were inoculated for a week with TN2GF4. After three weeks, the infected group is treated for seven days with E. faecium (B13. H pylori was detected by a count after culture of gastric biopsy. The probiotic was determined by a count from fresh feces of mice treated. Results: Thirty strains of lactic acid bacteria were isolated and identified. E. faecium (B13 strain showed a highly significant inhibition. H. pylori was successfully detected in the gastric mucosa. E. faecium (B13 reduced the colonization in the stomach of H. pylori with a rate of 43% in a week. Conclusion: E. faecium (B13 has in vitro and in vivo an inhibitory effect against H. pylori.

  18. Oral Fluid Antibody Detection in the Diagnosis of Gastric Helicobacter pylori Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Behzad Hooshm; Alireza Monsef; Mohammad Amirmadglesi; Mani Kashani

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate an enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of anti - helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) specific IgG antibodies in specimens of oral fluid.All subjects over the age 18 years undergoing endoscopy for any reason were asked to participate in the study. Two groups of 44 patients in each were selected as HP+ and HP-. At the same time, 5 milliliters of unstimulated saliva was collected from these patients, and the antibody titration against H...

  19. Komplet remission af højmalignt lymfom i ventriklen efter eradikation af Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Rasmus Tetens; Skau, Anne-Marie; Nørgaard, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    A 91 year-old man was found to have diffuse large cell B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), localized to the stomach. Because of his age, his only treatment was anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy. He achieved a complete remission, and six months after the initial presentation, there were no signs of recurrence....... The recommended treatment of DLBCL is chemotherapy followed by involved-field irradiation. However, small prospective trials have shown high rates of complete remission after eradication of H. pylori alone and this treatment is an option in patients of advanced age or with severe co-morbidities....

  20. BET Inhibition Attenuates Helicobacter pylori-Induced Inflammatory Response by Suppressing Inflammatory Gene Transcription and Enhancer Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinjing; Wang, Zhen; Hu, Xiangming; Chen, Ruichuan; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Peek, Richard M; Chen, Lin-Feng

    2016-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration. H. pylori-initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by enhanced expression of many NF-κB-regulated inflammatory cytokines. Brd4 has emerged as an important NF-κB regulator and regulates the expression of many NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. In this study, we demonstrated that Brd4 was not only actively involved in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene mRNA transcription but also H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene enhancer RNA (eRNA) synthesis. Suppression of H. pylori-induced eRNA synthesis impaired H. pylori-induced mRNA synthesis. Furthermore, H. pylori stimulated NF-κB-dependent recruitment of Brd4 to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes to facilitate the RNA polymerase II-mediated eRNA and mRNA synthesis. Inhibition of Brd4 by JQ1 attenuated H. pylori-induced eRNA and mRNA synthesis for a subset of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory genes. JQ1 also inhibited H. pylori-induced interaction between Brd4 and RelA and the recruitment of Brd4 and RNA polymerase II to the promoters and enhancers of inflammatory genes. Finally, we demonstrated that JQ1 suppressed inflammatory gene expression, inflammation, and cell proliferation in H. pylori-infected mice. These studies highlight the importance of Brd4 in H. pylori-induced inflammatory gene expression and suggest that Brd4 could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of H. pylori-triggered inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:27084101

  1. Helicobacter pylori Inhibits Dendritic Cell Maturation via Interleukin-10-Mediated Activation of the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Pathway.

    OpenAIRE

    Rizzuti, David; Ang, Michelle; Sokollik, Christiane; Wu, Ted; Abdullah, Majd; Greenfield, Laura; Fattouh, Ramzi; Reardon, Colin; Tang, Michael; Diao, Jun; Schindler, Christian; Cattral, Mark; Jones, Nicola L

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human gastric mucosa causing a chronic infection that is the primary risk factor for gastric cancer development. Recent studies demonstrate that H. pylori promotes tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) development indicating that this bacterium evades the host immune response. However, the signaling pathways involved in modulating DC activation during infection remain unclear. Here, we report that H. pylori infection activated the signal transducer and activator of t...

  2. Helicobacter pylori Activates Matrix Metalloproteinase 10 in Gastric Epithelial Cells via EGFR and ERK-mediated Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Angela M; Ferreira, Rui M; Pinto-Ribeiro, Ines; Sougleri, Ioanna S; Oliveira, Maria J; Carreto, Laura; Santos, Manuel A; Sgouras, Dionyssios N; Carneiro, Fatima; Leite, Marina; Figueiredo, Ceu

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and increases the risk for peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. H. pylori upregulates the expression and activity of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in cell lines and in the gastric mucosa. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms leading to upregulation of MMP10 in gastric epithelial cells induced by H. pylori Infection of gastric cells with H. pylori led to an increase in levels of MMP-10 messenger RNA, protein secretion, and activity. cagA knockout mutants or CagA phosphorylation-defective mutants failed to increase MMP10 expression. These results were confirmed in infection experiments with clinical isolates with known cagA status and in human gastric biopsy specimens. Treatment of cells with chemical inhibitors of the receptor tyrosine kinase EGFR and the kinase Src abrogated H. pylori-induced MMP10 expression. Inhibitors of ERK1/2 and JNK kinases abolished and significantly decreased H. pylori-induced MMP10 expression, respectively, whereas inhibition of the kinase p38 had no effect. Finally, inhibition of MMP10 expression by small interfering RNA led to a decrease in the gastric cell-invasive phenotype mediated by the infection. In conclusion, CagA-positive H. pylori strains stimulate MMP10 expression. MMP-10 modulation occurs via EGFR activation in a process that involves Src, ERK, and JNK pathways. MMP-10 may be implicated in H. pylori-mediated extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:26802142

  3. Direct measurement of gastric H + / K +-ATPase activities in patients with or without Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duangporn Thong-Ngam; Pisit Tangkijvanich; Pichet Sampatanukul; Paungpayom Prichakas; Varocha Mahachai; Piyaratana Tosukowong

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The role of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection in gastric acid secretion of patients with chronic gastritisremains controversial. This study was designed to elucidate the effect of H pylori on H+/K+-ATPase activities in gastric biopsy specimens.METHODS: Eighty-two patients with chronic gastritis who had undergone upper endoscopy were included in this study. H pylori infection was confirmed by rapid urease test and histology. Gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities and serum gastrin concentrations were measured by an enzymatic method and radioimmunoassay, respectively. For those patients who received triple therapy for eradicating H pylori, changes in the activity of gastric H+/K+-ATPase and serum gastrin levels were also measured. RESULTS: The mean gastric H+/K+-ATPase activity in H pyloripositive group (42 patients) was slightly higher than thatin H pylori-negative group (29 patients) (169.65±52.9 and eradication of H pylori, the gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities slightly decreased compared to prior therapy (165.03±59.50 The mean basal gastrin concentration was slightly higher in H pylori-positive patients than in H pylori-negative patients (87.92±39.65 pg/mL vs75.04± 42.57 pg/mL, P= 0.228). The gastrin levels fell significantly after the eradication of Hpylori. (Before treatment 87.00±30.78 pg/mL, aftertreatment 64.73±18.96 pg/mL, P = 0.015).CONCLUSION: Gastric H+/K+-ATPase activities are not associated with H pylori status in patients with chronicgastritis.

  4. (-)-Patchouli alcohol protects against Helicobacter pylori urease-induced apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammatory response in human gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianhui; Lin, Zhixiu; Xian, Yanfang; Kong, Songzhi; Lai, Zhengquan; Ip, Siupo; Chen, Haiming; Guo, Huizhen; Su, Zuqing; Yang, Xiaobo; Xu, Yang; Su, Ziren

    2016-06-01

    (-)-Patchouli alcohol (PA), the major active principle of Pogostemonis Herba, has been reported to have anti-Helicobacter pylori and gastroprotective effects. In the present work, we aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of PA on H. pylori urease (HPU)-injured human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1) and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of action. Results showed that pre-treatment with PA (5.0, 10.0, 20.0μM) was able to remarkably ameliorate the cytotoxicity induced by 17.0U/mg HPU in GES-1 cells. Flow cytometric analysis on cellular apoptosis showed that pre-treatment with PA effectively attenuated GES-1 cells from the HPU-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the cytoprotective effect of PA was found to be associated with amelioration of the HPU-induced disruption of MMP, attenuating oxidative stress by decreasing contents of intracellular ROS and MDA, and increasing superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzymatic activities. In addition, pre-treatment with PA markedly attenuated the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-4 (IL-4) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), whereas elevated the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-13 (IL-13) in the HPU-stimulated GES-1 cells. Molecular docking assay suggested that PA engaged in the active site of urease bearing nickel ions and interacted with important residues via covalent binding, thereby restricting the active urease catalysis conformation. Our experimental findings suggest that PA could inhibit the cellular processes critically involved in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection, and its protective effects against the HPU-induced cytotoxicity in GES-1 cells are believed to be associated with its anti-apoptotic, antioxidative, anti-inflammatory and HPU inhibitory actions. PMID:27017292

  5. Antibacterial activity of grape extracts on cagA-positive and -negative Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, S; D'Addario, C; Braconi, D; Bernardini, G; Salvini, L; Bonechi, C; Figura, N; Santucci, A; Rossi, C

    2009-11-01

    There is considerable interest in alternative/adjuvant approaches for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori using biologically active compounds, especially antioxidants from plants. In the present work, we tested the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of hydro-alcoholic extracts from Colorino, Sangiovese and Cabernet Sauvignon grape cultivars against H. pylori G21 (cagA-negative, cagA-) and 10K, (cagApositive, cagA+) clinical isolates. We determined the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) by incubating strain suspensions in Brucella broth with fetal bovine serum and samples at different concentrations in a final volume of 100 microl in a microaerobic atmosphere. After incubation, subcultures were carried out on Brucella agar plates which were incubated for 3-5 days in a microaerobic environment. The lowest concentration in broth, where the subculture on agar showed complete absence of growth, was considered the MBC.The Colorino extract showed the highest antibacterial activity against G21 strain (MBC=1.35 mg/ml), while Sangiovese and Carbernet MBCs were 4.0 mg/ml ca. H. pylori 10K was only susceptible to Colorino after 48 hours (MBC = 3.57 mg/ml). Resveratrol exhibited the highest antibacterial activity. interestingly, the most pathogenic strain (10K) was less susceptible to both the grape extracts and the isolated compounds. These results suggest that the administration of grape extracts and wine constituents, in addition to antibiotics, might be useful in the treatment of H. pylori infection. Should the reduced susceptibility of 10K strain be extended to all the cagA+ H. pylori isolates, which are endowed with cancer promoter activity, this observation may help explain why the organisms expressing CagA are more closely associated with atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinoma development. PMID:19933041

  6. The Effect of Licopid and Bifid and Lactic Acid Bacteria Complex on Lysozyme Activity as the Factor of Nonspecific Immune Protection in Chronic Gastric and Duodenal Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugina V.V.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the effect of Licopid and bifid and lactic acid bacteria complex on Helicobacter pylori eradication and lysozyme activity as the factor of nonspecific immune protection in gastric and duodenal ulcer. Materials and Methods. There were studied 30 patients suffering from Helicobacter associated gastric and duodenal ulcer, lysozyme activity was determined in 8 conditionally healthy individuals. There were used endoscopic, cytomorphological, and immunological (polymerase chain reaction, photonephelometric techniques. To study the effect of immunomodulator and probiotic on eradication and nonspecific immune protection, there were determined H. pylori contamination and lysozyme activity of oropharyngeal secretion and gastric juice before and after the treatment. Results. The analysis of biopsy specimens and lysozyme biological tests revealed the use of immunomodulator (Licopid and bifid and lactic acid bacteria complex combined with anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy increases H. pylori eradication and enhances lysozyme activity of saliva and gastric juice compared to data on quadroscheme. Conclusion. The administration of Licopid and bifid and lactic acid bacteria complex can be recommended in complex therapy of patients suffering from Helicobacter associated gastric and duodenal ulcers.

  7. The role of active efflux in antibiotic - resistance of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falsafi T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In gram-negative bacteria, active efflux pumps that excrete drugs can confer resistance to antibiotics however, in Helicobacter pylori this role is not well established. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of active efflux in resistance of H. pylori isolates to antibiotics. Materials and Methods: Twelve multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR isolates resistant to at least four antibiotics, including β-lactams, metronidazole, tetracycline, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin; three resistant to only β-lactams, and two hyper-susceptible isolates, were obtained from screening of 96 clinical isolates of H. pylori . Their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs for antibiotics and ethidium-bromide (EtBr were compared in the presence- and absence of a proton-conductor, carbonyl cyanide-m chlorophenyl-hydrazone (CCCP using agar-dilution and disc diffusion. Drug accumulation studies for EtBr and antibiotics were assessed in the presence and absence of CCCP using spectrofluorometry. Results: MIC of EtBr for eight MAR-isolates was decreased two- to four-folds in the presence of CCCP, of which five showed reduced MICs for β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin with CCCP. Accumulation of EtBr by the MAR-isolates was rapid and not dependant on the pattern of multiple resistance. Antibiotic accumulation assay confirmed the presence of energy-dependant efflux of β-lactam, metronidazole, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin, but no erythromycin in five MAR isolates. Energy-dependant efflux of EtBr or antibiotics was not observed for four MAR-isolates, and three isolates were resistant only to β-lactams. Conclusion: Energy-dependant efflux plays a role in the resistance of H. pylori clinical isolates to structurally unrelated antibiotics in a broadly specific multidrug efflux manner. Difference in the efflux potential of MAR isolates may be related to the presence or absence of functional efflux-pumps in diverse H. pylori

  8. Comparative in vitro activities of six new fluoroquinolones and other oral antimicrobial agents against Campylobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Simor, A E; Ferro, S.; Low, D E

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 56 clinical isolates of Campylobacter pylori to six new fluoroquinolones and other oral antimicrobial agents were determined by an agar dilution technique. Ciprofloxacin was the most active of the fluoroquinolones (MIC for 90% of strains tested [MIC90], 0.05 microgram/ml). Other fluoroquinolones had variable activities, although most isolates were moderately susceptible to fleroxacin (MIC90, 4 micrograms/ml) and lomefloxacin (MIC90, 4 micrograms/ml).

  9. Construction of an oral recombinant DNA vaccine from H pylori neutrophil activating protein and its immunogenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Sun; Zhao-Shen Li; Zhen-Xing Tu; Guo-Ming Xu; Yi-Qi Du

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To construct a live attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (S.typhimurium) strain harboring the H pylori neutrophil activating protein (HP-NAP) gene as an oral recombinant DNA vaccine, and to evaluate its immunogenicity.METHODS: By genetic engineering methods, the genomic DNA of H pylori was extracted as a template. The total length of the HP-NAP gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cloned into pBT vector for sequencing and BLAST analysis, then subcloned into a eukaryotic expression vector pIRES followed by PCR identification and restriction enzyme digestion. The identified recombinant plasmid pIRES-NAP was transfected into COS-7 cells for target fusion protein expression, and its antigenicity was detected by Western blotting. Then the recombinant plasmid was transformed into a live attenuated S. typhimurium strain SL7207 as an oral vaccine strain, and its immunogenicity was evaluated with animal experiments.RESULTS: A 435 bp product was cloned using high homology with HP-NAP gene in GenBank (more than 98%). With identification by PCR and restriction enzyme digestion, a recompinant eukaryotic expression plasmid pIRES-NAP containing the HP-NAP gene of H pylori was successfully constructed. The expressed target protein had a specific reaction with H pylor(i) whole cell antibody and showed a single strip result detected by Western blotting. Oral immunization of mice with recombinant DNA vaccine strain SL7207 (pIRES-NAP) also induced a specific immune response.CONCLUSION: The successful construction of HP-NAP oral DNA vaccine with good immunogenicity may help to further investigate its immunoprotection effects and develop vaccine against H pylori infection.

  10. Coordinate increase of telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Xin Zhang; Yan-Hong Gu; Zhi-Quan Zhao; Shun-Fu Xu; Hong-Ji Zhang; Hong-Di Wang; Bo Hao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To detect the telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in gastric diseases and to examine the relation between these values and Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) as a risk factor for gastric cancer.METHODS: One hundred and seventy-one gastric samples were studied to detect telomerase activity using a telomerase polymerase chain reaction enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELTSA), and c-Myc expression using immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: The telomerase activity and c-Myc expression were higher in cancers (87.69% and 61.54%) than in noncancerous tissues. They were higher in chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia (52.38% and 47.62%) than in chronic atrophic gastritis with mild intestinal metaplasia (13.33% and 16.67%). Tn chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia, the telomerase activity and c-Myc expression were higher in cases with -H pylori infection (67.86% and 67.86%) than in those without infection (21.43%and 7.14%). c-Myc expression was higher in gastric cancer with H pylori infection (77.27%) than in that without infection (28.57%). The telomerase activity and c-Nyc expression were coordinately up-regulated in H pylori infected gastric cancer and chronic atrophic gastritis with severe intestinal metaplasia.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection may influence both telomerase activity and c-Myc expression in gastric diseases,especially in chronic atrophic gastritis.

  11. DNA-binding activity of TNF-α inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inducing protein (Tipα) is a carcinogenic factor secreted from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), mediated through both enhanced expression of TNF-α and chemokine genes and activation of nuclear factor-κB. Since Tipα enters gastric cancer cells, the Tipα binding molecules in the cells should be investigated. The direct DNA-binding activity of Tipα was observed by pull down assay using single- and double-stranded genomic DNA cellulose. The surface plasmon resonance assay, indicating an association between Tipα and DNA, revealed that the affinity of Tipα for (dGdC)10 is 2400 times stronger than that of del-Tipα, an inactive Tipα. This suggests a strong correlation between DNA-binding activity and carcinogenic activity of Tipα. And the DNA-binding activity of Tipα was first demonstrated with a molecule secreted from H. pylori

  12. Antimicrobial activity against Helicobacter pylori strains and antioxidant properties of blackberry leaves (Rubus ulmifolius) and isolated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Silvia; D'Addario, Claudia; Colacevich, Andrea; Focardi, Silvia; Borghini, Francesca; Santucci, Annalisa; Figura, Natale; Rossi, Claudio

    2009-07-01

    Rubus spp. (Rosaceae) provide extracts used in traditional medicine as antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant and radical scavenging agents. Resistance to antibiotics used to treat Helicobacter pylori infection as well as their poor availability in developing countries prompted us to test the antimicrobial activity of Rubus ulmifolius leaves and isolated polyphenols against two H. pylori strains with different virulence (CagA+ strain 10K and CagA(-) strain G21). The antioxidant activity (TEAC values) of the tested compounds ranged from 4.88 (gallic acid) to 1.60 (kaempferol), whilst the leaf extract gave a value of 0.12. All the isolated polyphenols as well as the leaf extract showed antibacterial activity against both of the H. pylori strains. The minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) of the extract for H. pylori strains G21 and 10K, respectively, were 1200 microg/mL and 1500 microg/mL after 24h of exposure and 134 microg/mL and 270 microg/mL after 48 h exposure. Ellagic acid showed very low MBC values towards both of the H. pylori strains after 48 h (2 microg/mL and 10 microg/mL for strains G21 and 10K, respectively) and kaempferol toward G21 strain (MBC=6 microg/mL). A relationship between antimicrobial activity and antioxidant capacity was found only for H. pylori strain G21 CagA(-) strain. PMID:19386474

  13. Antimicrobial activity against Helicobacter pylori strains and antioxidant properties of blackberry leaves (Rubus ulmifolius) and isolated compounds

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Rubus spp. (Rosaceae) provide extracts used in traditional medicine as antimicrobial, anticonvulsant, muscle relaxant and radical scavenging agents. Resistance to antibiotics used to treat Helicobacter pylori infection as well as their poor availability in developing countries prompted us to test the antimicrobial activity of Rubus ulmifolius leaves and isolated polyphenols against two H. pylori strains with different virulence (CagA+ strain 10K and CagA? strain G21). The ...

  14. A new crystal lattice structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new crystal lattice structure of H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein has been determined. Iron loading causes a series of conformational changes at the ferroxidase centre. A new crystal lattice structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) has been determined in two forms: the native state (Apo) at 2.20 Å resolution and an iron-loaded form (Fe-load) at 2.50 Å resolution. The highly solvated packing of the dodecameric shell is suitable for crystallographic study of the metal ion-uptake pathway. Like other bacterioferritins, HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of channels. Iron loading causes a series of conformational changes of amino-acid residues (Trp26, Asp52 and Glu56) at the ferroxidase centre

  15. Oral Fluid Antibody Detection in the Diagnosis of Gastric Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Hooshm

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate an enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the detection of anti - helicobacter pylori (H. pylori specific IgG antibodies in specimens of oral fluid.All subjects over the age 18 years undergoing endoscopy for any reason were asked to participate in the study. Two groups of 44 patients in each were selected as HP+ and HP-. At the same time, 5 milliliters of unstimulated saliva was collected from these patients, and the antibody titration against H.P. was evaluated by “ELISA” method.In overall, the level of salivary antibody in H.P+ group was significantly more than those in H.P- group (POral fluid ELISA is relatively a comfortable, fast and noninvasive test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection.

  16. In vitro synergistic activity between bismuth subcitrate and various antimicrobial agents against Campylobacter pyloridis (C. pylori).

    OpenAIRE

    Van Caekenberghe, D L; Breyssens, J

    1987-01-01

    The in vitro interactions between bismuth subcitrate and a variety of antimicrobial agents against 12 Campylobacter pyloridis (C. pylori) isolates were studied by the agar dilution checkerboard technique. The combination of bismuth subcitrate with the older quinolone, oxolinic acid, produced synergistic activity against all strains. This observation, however, could not be extended to the (aryl) fluoroquinolones, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, and difloxacin, since synergy was rare or absent when bis...

  17. Helicobacter pylori in colorectal neoplasms: is there an aetiological relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharakan Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This pilot study was carried out to determine whether Helicobacter pylori can be detected in normal colon or in association with colorectal neoplasia. Methods Paraffin processed colonic tissue blocks of normal colonic mucosa (n = 60, and patients diagnosed as adenoma (n = 60, and adenocarcinoma (n = 60 were retrieved from our archive; the adenoma group included tubular (n = 20, tubulovillous (n = 20 and villous adenomas (n = 20. 4 μm sections were stained by immunohistochemical methods using anti-Helicobacter pylori antibodies (polyclonal NCL-HPp and monoclonal NCL-C-jejuni. Results Significant numbers of Helicobacter pylori were identified in tubular adenomas (OR = 11.13; 95%CI = 1.62–76.70, tubulovillous adenomas (OR = 10.45; 95%CI = 1.52–71.52 and adenocarcinomas (OR = 8.13; 95%CI = 1.40–46.99 compared to controls: there was no association in numbers of Helicobacter pylori and villous adenomas (OR = 2.95; 95%CI = 0.29–9.96. Conclusion We conclude that although, in this pilot study, there appears to be an association in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori with some, but not all, colorectal neoplasms, we can not infer causality from these results. These findings need to be further substantiated with a prospective study and the use of molecular biological techniques to determine a causal association.

  18. Soluble surface proteins from Helicobacter pylori activate monocytes/macrophages by lipopolysaccharide-independent mechanism.

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, U E; Perez-Perez, G I; Wahl, L. M.; Wahl, S M; Blaser, M J; Smith, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    The inflammatory lesions associated with Helicobacter pylori gastritis and duodenitis contain large numbers of mononuclear cells. The close proximity of H. pylori to gastric mucosa suggests that the organism interacts with mononuclear cells, thereby modulating the inflammatory response. To investigate the role of monocytes/macrophages in this response, we examined the effect of whole H. pylori bacteria, H. pylori surface proteins, and H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on purified human monoc...

  19. Helicobacter pylori inhibits dendritic cell maturation via interleukin-10-mediated activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzuti, David; Ang, Michelle; Sokollik, Christiane; Wu, Ted; Abdullah, Majd; Greenfield, Laura; Fattouh, Ramzi; Reardon, Colin; Tang, Michael; Diao, Jun; Schindler, Christian; Cattral, Mark; Jones, Nicola L

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects the human gastric mucosa causing a chronic infection that is the primary risk factor for gastric cancer development. Recent studies demonstrate that H. pylori promotes tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) development indicating that this bacterium evades the host immune response. However, the signaling pathways involved in modulating DC activation during infection remain unclear. Here, we report that H. pylori infection activated the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway in murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) and splenic DCs isolated ex vivo. Isogenic cagA-, cagE-, vacA- and urease-mutants exhibited levels of phosphoSTAT3 that were comparable to in the wild-type (WT) parent strain. H. pylori-infected BMDCs produced increased immunosuppressive IL-10, which activated STAT3 in an autocrine/paracrine fashion. Neutralization of IL-10 prevented H. pylori-mediated STAT3 activation in both BMDCs and splenic DCs. In addition, anti-IL-10 treatment of infected H. pylori-BMDCs was associated with increased CD86 and MHC II expression and enhanced proinflammatory IL-1β cytokine secretion. Finally, increased CD86 and MHC II expression was detected in H. pylori-infected STAT3 knockout DCs when compared to WT controls. Together, these results demonstrate that H. pylori infection induces IL-10 secretion in DCs, which activates STAT3, thereby modulating DC maturation and reducing IL-1β secretion. These findings identify a host molecular mechanism by which H. pylori can manipulate the innate immune response to potentially favor chronic infection and promote carcinogenesis. PMID:25412627

  20. Antimicrobial activity, cytotoxicity and intracellular growth inhibition of Portuguese Thymus essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana A. Dandlen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Thyme essential oils are well recognized by their excellent biological activities and the antimicrobial activity of Portuguese thyme essential oils has been investigated with promising results, particularly against food borne pathogens. In this study the potential antimicrobial activity of the essential oils of five species of Thymus (Lamiaceae, namely Th. caespititius Brot., Th. camphoratus Hoffmanns. & Link, Th. capitellatus Hoffmanns. & Link., Th. carnosus Boiss. and Th. zygis L. was evaluated against Candida albicans, Haemophilus influenza, Helicobacter pylori, Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica and Streptococcus pneumoniae. H. pylori strains were the most susceptible bacteria, particularly to the essential oils of Th. caespititius (Planalto Central, Th. zygis (Rebordãos and Th. caespititius (Pico which minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values ranged from 0.05 to 0.08 mg.mL-1. Th. caespititius essential oil from Planalto Central or its main component, carvacrol significantly (p<0.05 inhibited the intracellular growth of H. pylori, and showed no citotoxicity to the gastric cell line. Our results suggest the potential of this essential oil and its main component as a promising tool as anti-Helicobacter agent potentiating the eradication of this important gastroduodenal pathogen.

  1. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang

    2015-08-01

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK-HO-1 signaling. PMID:26022128

  2. IRAK-M expression limits dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine production in response to Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Shiu

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infects the gastric mucosa and persists for the life of the host. Bacterial persistence may be due to the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs whichmay have protective effects against other diseases such as asthma. It has been shown that H. pylori modulates the T cell response through dendritic cell reprogramming but the molecular pathways involved are relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to identify critical elements of dendritic cell (DC activation and evaluate potential influence on immune activation. Microarray analysis was used to demonstrate limited gene expression changes in H. pylori stimulated bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs compared to the BMDCs stimulated with E. coli. IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, was upregulated and we selectedit for investigation of its role in modulating the DC and T cell responses. IRAK-M(-/- and wild type BMDC were compared for their response to H. pylori. Cells lacking IRAK-M produced significantly greater amounts of proinflammatory MIP-2 and reduced amounts of immunomodulatory IL-10 than wild type BMDC. IRAK-M(-/- cells also demonstrated increased MHC II expression upon activation. However, IRAK-M(-/- BMDCs were comparable to wild type BMDCs in inducing T-helper 17 (TH17 and Treg responses as demonstrated in vitro using BMDC CD4+ T cells co-culture assays,and in vivo though the adoptive transfer of CD4(+ FoxP3-GFP T cells into H. pylori infected IRAK-M(-/- mice. These results suggest that H. pylori infection leads to the upregulation of anti-inflammatory molecules like IRAK-M and that IRAK-M has a direct impact on innate functions in DCs such as cytokine and costimulation molecule upregulation but may not affect T cell skewing.

  3. IRAK-M expression limits dendritic cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine production in response to Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiu, Jessica; Czinn, Steven J; Kobayashi, Koichi S; Sun, Yezhou; Blanchard, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects the gastric mucosa and persists for the life of the host. Bacterial persistence may be due to the induction of regulatory T cells (Tregs) whichmay have protective effects against other diseases such as asthma. It has been shown that H. pylori modulates the T cell response through dendritic cell reprogramming but the molecular pathways involved are relatively unknown. The goal of this study was to identify critical elements of dendritic cell (DC) activation and evaluate potential influence on immune activation. Microarray analysis was used to demonstrate limited gene expression changes in H. pylori stimulated bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) compared to the BMDCs stimulated with E. coli. IRAK-M, a negative regulator of TLR signaling, was upregulated and we selectedit for investigation of its role in modulating the DC and T cell responses. IRAK-M(-/-) and wild type BMDC were compared for their response to H. pylori. Cells lacking IRAK-M produced significantly greater amounts of proinflammatory MIP-2 and reduced amounts of immunomodulatory IL-10 than wild type BMDC. IRAK-M(-/-) cells also demonstrated increased MHC II expression upon activation. However, IRAK-M(-/-) BMDCs were comparable to wild type BMDCs in inducing T-helper 17 (TH17) and Treg responses as demonstrated in vitro using BMDC CD4+ T cells co-culture assays,and in vivo though the adoptive transfer of CD4(+) FoxP3-GFP T cells into H. pylori infected IRAK-M(-/-) mice. These results suggest that H. pylori infection leads to the upregulation of anti-inflammatory molecules like IRAK-M and that IRAK-M has a direct impact on innate functions in DCs such as cytokine and costimulation molecule upregulation but may not affect T cell skewing. PMID:23776703

  4. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity

  5. Compound 13, an α1-selective small molecule activator of AMPK, inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced oxidative stresses and gastric epithelial cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Hangyong; Zhu, Huanghuang; Lin, Zhou; Lin, Gang; Lv, Guoqiang, E-mail: lvguoqiangwuxivip@163.com

    2015-08-07

    Half of the world's population experiences Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, which is a main cause of gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, and gastric cancers. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of compound 13 (C13), a novel α1-selective small molecule activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), against H. pylori-induced cytotoxicity in cultured gastric epithelial cells (GECs). We found that C13 induced significant AMPK activation, evidenced by phosphorylation of AMPKα1 and ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase), in both primary and transformed GECs. Treatment of C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced GEC apoptosis. AMPK activation was required for C13-mediated GEC protection. Inhibition of AMPK kinase activity by the AMPK inhibitor Compound C, or silencing AMPKα1 expression by targeted-shRNAs, alleviated C13-induced GEC protective activities against H. pylori. Significantly, C13 inhibited H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. C13 induced AMPK-dependent expression of anti-oxidant gene heme oxygenase (HO-1) in GECs. Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP), two HO-1 inhibitors, not only suppressed C13-mediated ROS scavenging activity, but also alleviated its activity in GECs against H. pylori. Together, these results indicate that C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced ROS production and GEC apoptosis through activating AMPK–HO–1 signaling. - Highlights: • We synthesized compound 13 (C13), a α1-selective small molecule AMPK activator. • C13-induced AMPK activation requires α1 subunit in gastric epithelial cells (GECs). • C13 enhances Helicobacter pylori-induced pro-survival AMPK activation to inhibit GEC apoptosis. • C13 inhibits H. pylori-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in GECs. • AMPK-heme oxygenase (HO-1) activation is required for C13-mediated anti-oxidant activity.

  6. Response of blood endothelin-1 and nitric oxide activity in duodenal ulcer patients undergoing Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Full-Young Chang; Chih-Yen Chen; Ching-Liang Lu; Jiing-Chyuan Luo; Rei-Hwa Lu; Shou-Dong Lee

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Helicobacter pylori eradication on endothelin-1 (ET-1) and nitric oxide (NO)in duodenal ulcer (DU) patients.METHODS: Sixty-six H pylori-infected active DU patients were consecutively enrolled to receive one-week triple therapy (rabeprazole, amoxicillin and metronidazole) and then one-month rabeprazole therapy. They were asked back to determine ulcer and H pylori status using endoscopy one month later. Thirty-seven healthy controls (H pylori+/-: 17/20) were enrolled for comparison. Blood samples were collected in each visit to measure plasma ET-1 and nitrate/nitrite levels using an enzyme immunoassay kit.RESULTS: Sixty DU patients finished trial per protocol.The ulcer healing and H pylori-eradication rates were 86.7%and 83.3%, respectively. Plasma ET-1 level in DU patients was higher than that of H pylori-negative and positive controls(3.59±0.96 vs0.89±0.54 vs0.3±0.2 pg/mL, P<0.01), while nitrate/nitrite levels among them were also significantly different (8.55±0.71 vs 5.27±0.68 vs 6.39±0.92 μmol/L,P<0.05). Hpylorieradication diminished ET-1 levels(3.64±0.55 vs2.64±0.55 pg/mL, P<0.01) but elevated nitrate/nitrite level (8.16±0.84 vs 11.41±1.42 μmol/L, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: Both plasma ET-1 and nitrate/nitrite levels increase in active DU patients. After an effective H pylori eradication, DU healing is associated with diminished blood ET-1 level and elevated nitrate/nitrite level.

  7. Impact of Helicobacter pylori eradication on refractory thrombocytopenia in patients with chronic HCV awaiting antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafy, A S; El Hawary, A T; Hamed, E F; Hassaneen, A M

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of delaying treatment of HCV due to severe thrombocytopenia is challenging. This study aimed to detect the prevalence of active helicobacter infection as a claimed cause of thrombocytopenia in a cohort of Egyptian patients with chronic active HCV awaiting combined anti-viral therapy. The study included 400 chronic HCV patients with thrombocytopenia. Laboratory investigations included liver function tests, real time quantitative PCR, reticulocytic count, ESR, ANA, bone marrow aspiration, measurement of anti-helicobacter antibodies, and helicobacter stool antigen. Positive cases for active H. pylori were given the standard triple therapy for 2 weeks. Helicobacter stool antigen was detected 4 weeks after termination of therapy and the change in platelet count was detected 1 month after eradication. A total of 248 out of 281 seropositive patients for H. pylori (88.3 %) showed positive stool antigen (p = 0.01). Eradication was achieved in 169 (68.1 %) patients with platelet mean count 114.9 ± 18.8 × 10(3)/μl with highly significant statistical difference from pretreatment value (49.7 ± 9.2 × 10(3)/μl, p = 0.000). Seventy-nine patients were resistant to conventional triple therapy and given a 7-day course of moxifloxacin-based therapy; 61 patients responded (77.1 %) with mean platelet improvement from 76.4 ± 17.4 × 10(3)/μl to 104.2 ± 15.2 × 10(3)/μl (p = 0.000). The non-responders showed no improvement in their platelet count (74.6 ± 20.5 vs. 73.6 ± 15.3 × 10(3)/ul, P = 0.5). Eradication of active H. pylori in HCV augments platelet count and enhances the early start of antiviral therapy. PMID:27180243

  8. Can Helicobacter pylori be eradicated with high-dose proton pump inhibitor in extensive metabolizers with the CYP2C19 genotypic polymorphism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeci, A; Emrence, Z; Baran, B; Soyer, O M; Gokturk, S; Evirgen, S; Akyuz, F; Karaca, C; Besisik, F; Kaymakoglu, S; Ustek, D; Demir, K

    2016-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) metabolism and pharmacokinetics are regulated by cytochrome P450 enzymes in the liver. Cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) polymorphism plays an import role in the metabolism of PPIs. The three possible genotypes for CYP2C19 each has a distinct effect on the pharmacodynamics of PPIs. Homozygote extensive metabolizers (HomEM) are the most frequent genotype and have two wild-types (non-mutant) (*1/*1) alleles. HomEM is associated with increased enzyme activity, which increases the rate of PPI metabolism. Intragastric pH, which is required for eradication, is lowest in HomEM. In HomEMs, an insufficient increase in intragastric pH results in decreased anti-Helicobacter pylori (HP) efficacy of the antibiotics and, therefore, lower eradication rates. We determined whether the HP eradication rate would increase after high-dose PPI treatment of extensive PPI metabolizers who had been treated unsuccessfully with a standard PPI dose. In our report, increasing the PPI dosage in patients with genotype polymorphisms may be effective on eradication rates. Eradication rates are directly affected by CYP2C19 polymorphisms, and eradication treatments should be planned considering such genotypic polymorphisms. Hence, CYP2C19 genotyping prior to treatment may facilitate determination of the optimum PPI dose to improve the therapeutic outcome. However, further researches are required to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:27212172

  9. Potential implications of Helicobacter pylori-related neutrophil-activating protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jannis Kountouras; Ioannis Venizelos; Christos Zavos; Georgia Deretzi; Emmanuel Gavalas; Dimitrios Chatzopoulos; Panagiotis Katsinelos; Elena Tsiaousi; Stergios Gagalis; Stergios A Polyzos

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) virulence factors promote the release of various chemoattractants/inflammatory mediators, including mainly the neutrophilattractant chemokine interleukin-8 and neutrophilactivating protein (NAP), involved in H. pylori-induced gastric pathologies. Co-administration of Chios mastic gum (CMG), which inhibits H. pylori NAP, with an H. pylori eradication regimen might add clinical benefits against H. pylori-related gastric pathologies, but possibly not CMG as main therapy. Although H. pylori NAP and other H. pylori-related cytotoxins [i.e., vaculating cytotoxin (VacA)] appear to play a major role in generating and maintaining the H. pylori-associated gastric inflammatory response and H. pylori NAP is a promising vaccine candidate against H. pylori infection (H. pylori-I), concerns regarding its potential drawbacks, particularly neurogenic ones, due to possible crossmimicry, should be considered. Possible cross-mimicry between H. pylori NAP and/or bacterial aquaporin (AQP) and neural tissues may be associated with the anti-AQP-4 antibody-related neural damage in multiple sclerosis (MS)/neuromyelitis optica patients. Moreover, the sequence homology found between H. pylori VacA and human Na+/K+-ATPase A subunit suggests that antibodies to VacA involve ion channels in abaxonal Schwann cell plasmalemma resulting in demyelination in some patients. A series of factors have been implicated in inducing blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption, including inflammatory mediators (e.g., cytokines and chemokines induced by H. pylori-I) and oxidative stress. BBB disruption permits access of AQP4-specific antibodies and T lymphocytes to the central nervous system, thereby playing a major role in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. Relative studies show a strong association between H. pylori-I and MS. H. pylori-I induces humoral and cellular immune responses that, owing to the sharing of homologous epitopes (molecular mimicry), cross-react with components of

  10. STUDY OF DIAGNOSTIC TESTS FOR HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent of most cases of gastritis and peptic ulcer. The diagnosis of H. pylori is an essential element in the management of many common gastrointestinal pathologies. AIMS 1. Comparison of invasive and non-invasive tests to choose the appropriate test for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection. 2. Validation of the comparison of the different diagnostic tests. METHOD Blood and antral biopsy specimens from 100 acid peptic disease patients and blood samples from 10 control subjects were collected. Biopsies were used for Rapid Urease Test (RUT, culture and Gram’s stain by conventional method. Serology using Euroimmun Anti Helicobacter pylori IgG ELISA was done. The efficacy of these tests was determined by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy using culture as gold standard. RESULTS Of the 100 cases 14% were culture positive, 18% Gram stain positive, 36% Rapid urease test positive and 42% were positive for Serology IgG antibodies for H. pylori. Maximum percentage of positivity was in peptic ulcer cases (52.9% followed by Gastritis cases (23.6% and Dyspepsia cases (14.2%. Among the 100 cases of study group, 42(42% were positive by serological test IgG ELISA for H. pylori, whereas 3(30% were positive out of 10 in control group. RUT, IgG Serology showed 100% sensitivity and negative predictive value and Gram stain showed highest specificity (90.1%. CONCLUSION RUT+Gram’s stain+IgG Serology showed highest Sensitivity, Specificity, Positive predictive value, Negative predictive value and Accuracy. IgG Serology indicates a marker for infection. It can be used as a primary diagnostic procedure.

  11. Lactobacilli inhibit interleukin-8 production induced by Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide-activated Toll-like receptor 4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Zhou; Feng-Zhen Ma; Xue-Jie Deng; Hong Yuan; Hong-Sheng Ma

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Lactobacillus bulgaricus (LBG) on the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) pathway and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in SGC-7901 cells treated with Helicobacter pyloriSydney strain 1 lipopolysaccharide (H pyloriSS1-LPS).METHODS: SGC-7901 cells were treated with H pyIoriSS1-LPS in the presence or absence of pretreatment for 1 h with viable LBG or supematant recovered from LBG culture MRS broth (LBG-s). Cellular lysates were prepared for Western blot with anti-TLR4,anti-transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), anti-phospho-TAK1, anti-nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), anti-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK), and anti-phospho-p38MAPK antibodies.The amount of IL-8 in cell culture medium was measured by ELISA.RESULTS: H pyloriSS1-LPS up-regulated the expression of TLR4, stimulated the phosphorylation of TAK1, subsequently enhanced the activation of NFκB and the phosphorylation of p38MAPK in a timedependent manner, leading to augmentation of IL-8 production in SGC-7901 cells. Viable LBG or LBG-s pretreatment attenuated the expression of TLR4,inhibited the phosphorylation of TAK1 and p38MAPK,prevented the activation of NF-κB, and consequently blocked IL-8 production.CONCLUSION: H pyloriSS1-LPS induces IL-8production through activating TLR4 signaling in SGC-7901 cells and viable LBG or LBG-s prevents H pyloriSS1-LPS-mediated IL-8 production via inhibition of the TLR4 pathway.

  12. Helicobacter pylori-induced activation of β-catenin involves low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 and Dishevelled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendeckel Uwe

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human microbial pathogen Helicobacter pylori resides in the stomach of about fifty percent of the world's population and represents a risk factor for chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers and, in rare cases, gastric cancer. Alterations of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway have been described in almost every human cancer disease, due to the regulation of target genes being involved in cell cycle control, differentiation, cell migration or stem cell control. Our study aimed to elucidate the role of proximal Wnt signaling components low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6 and Dishevelled (Dvl in the activation of β-catenin early after infection of gastric epithelial cells with H. pylori. Results Infection of gastric epithelial NCI-N87 cells with H. pylori induces rapid phosphorylation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway co-receptor LRP6 independent of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA or vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA. However, bacteria lacking a functional type 4 secretion system (T4SS failed to induce LRP6 phosphorylation. Further, we identified proteins of the Dvl family, namely Dvl2 and Dvl3, which are involved in LRP6 phosphorylation. H. pylori-induced nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and its transcriptional activation, and expression of Wnt target genes are strongly reduced in stable knockdown cell lines deficient for LRP6, Dvl2 or Dvl3. Conclusion We analysed the H. pylori-induced activation of Wnt-signaling factors and demonstrate for the first time that the canonical Wnt-signaling proteins LRP6 and Dvl2 and Dvl3 are involved in the regulation of β-catenin.

  13. Biological activity of the virulence factor cagA of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱永良; 郑树; 钱可大; 方平楚

    2004-01-01

    Background China is one of the countries with the highest incidence of H. Pylori and more than 9090 isolates possessed the cagA gene. This study was to evaluate the biological activity of the H.pylori virulence factor cagA isolated from Chinese patients. Methods cagA DNA fragments were amplified from the genomic DNA and subsequently cloned into the mammalian expression vector for cell transfection and DNA sequencing. cagA protein, phosphorylated-tyrosine cagA and the complex of cagA precipitated with SHP-2 were identified respectively by western blot in the crude cell lysate from conditionally immortalized gastric epithelial cells at 48 hours after transfection with cagA DNA. In addition, the ability of induction of scattering phenotype was examined after transient expression of cagA in AGS cells. Results The C-terminal half of cagA contained only one repeated sequence and three tandem five-amino-acid motifs glutamic acid-proline-isoleucine-tyrosine-alanine (EPIYA). Moreover, the amino acid sequence of D2 region in repeated sequence was aspartic acid-phenylanaline-aspartic acid (D-F-D) which was significantly distinguished from the three repeated sequences and aspartic acid-aspartic adid-leucine (D-D-L) in the western standard strain NCTC11637. Western blot revealed that cagA became phosphorylated in tyrosine site and bound with SHP-2 after transient expression of cagA DNA in gastric epithelial cells. Transient expression of cagA in AGS cells showed that cagA was able to induce the elongation phenotype although to a lesser extent than western strains. Conclusions cagA perturbs cell signaling pathways by binding with SHP-2. However, significant difference exists in amino acid sequence and biological function of cagA in Chinese compared with those of western countries.

  14. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: a potential Treg modulator suppressing allergic asthma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehrawat, Anjna; Sinha, Siddharth; Saxena, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate aim of the immune system is to eliminate pathogens without being harmful to the host. But what if eliminating the pathogen in itself is discomforting for the host? One such emerging case is of Helicobacter pylori. Modern medicine, infantile vaccination, and ultra-hygienic conditions have led to progressive disappearance of H. pylori in different parts of the world. However, the adversities caused by H. pylori's absence are much larger than those caused by its presence. Asthma is rising as an epidemic in last few decades and several reports suggest an inverse-relationship between H. pylori's persistence and early-life onset asthma. Regulatory T cells play an important role in both the cases. This is further supported by experiments on mouse-models. Hence, need of the hour is to discern the relationship between H. pylori and its host and eliminating its negative impacts without disturbing our indigenous microbiota. To resolve whether H. pylori is a pathogen or an amphibiont is another important side. This review explores the biological basis of H. pylori-induced priming of immune system offering resistance to childhood-onset asthma. HP-NAP-Tregs interaction has been predicted using molecular docking and dynamic simulation. PMID:26082756

  15. Linked color imaging improves endoscopic diagnosis of active Helicobacter pylori infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Osamu; Yagi, Nobuaki; Onozawa, Yuriko; Kimura-Tsuchiya, Reiko; Majima, Atsushi; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Horii, Yusuke; Suzuki, Kentaro; Tomie, Akira; Okayama, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Naohisa; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Katada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Takagi, Tomohisa; Handa, Osamu; Konishi, Hideyuki; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Linked color imaging (LCI) is a new image-enhanced endoscopy technique using a laser light source to enhance slight differences in mucosal color. The aim of this study was to compare the usefulness of LCI and conventional white light imaging (WLI) endoscopy for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Patients and methods: We retrospectively analyzed images from 60 patients examined with WLI and LCI endoscopy between October 2013 and May 2014. Thirty patients had H. pylori infections, and other thirty patients tested negative for H. pylori after eradication therapy. Four endoscopists evaluated the 2 types of images to determine which was better at facilitating a diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Results: H. pylori infection was identified with LCI by enhancing the red appearance of the fundic gland mucosa. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity for diagnosing H. pylori infection using WLI were 74.2 %, 81.7 %, and 66.7 %, respectively, while those for LCI were 85.8 %, 93.3 %, and 78.3 %, respectively. Thus, the accuracy and sensitivity for LCI were significantly higher than those for WLI (P = 0.002 and P = 0.011, respectively). The kappa values for the inter- and intraobserver variability among the 4 endoscopists were higher for LCI than for WLI. Conclusions: H. pylori infection can be identified by enhancing endoscopic images of the diffuse redness of the fundic gland using LCI. LCI is a novel image-enhanced endoscopy and is more useful for diagnosing H. pylori infection than is WLI.

  16. Parenteral Adjuvant Activities of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Toxin and Its B Subunit for Immunization of Mice against Gastric Helicobacter pylori Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Weltzin, Richard; Guy, Bruno; Thomas, William D.; Giannasca, Paul J.; Monath, Thomas P.

    2000-01-01

    The heat-labile toxin (LT) of Escherichia coli is a potent mucosal adjuvant that has been used to induce protective immunity against Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter pylori infection in mice. We studied whether recombinant LT or its B subunit (LTB) has adjuvant activity in mice when delivered with H. pylori urease antigen via the parenteral route. Mice were immunized subcutaneously or intradermally with urease plus LT, recombinant LTB, or a combination of LT and LTB prior to intragastric c...

  17. Molecular dynamics study of the effect of active site protonation on Helicobacter pylori 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekpinar, Mustafa; Yildirim, Ahmet; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A

    2015-12-01

    The protein 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) is involved in the quorum sensing of several bacterial species, including Helicobacter pylori. In particular, these bacteria depend on MTAN for synthesis of vitamin K2 homologs. The residue D198 in the active site of MTAN seems to be of crucial importance, by acting as a hydrogen-bond acceptor for the ligand. In this study, we investigated the conformation and dynamics of apo and holo H. pylori MTAN (HpMTAN), and assessed the effect of protonation of D198 by use of molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that protonation of the active site of HpMTAN can cause a conformational transition from a closed state to an open state even in the absence of substrate, via inter-chain mechanical coupling. PMID:26254213

  18. Withaferin A Inhibits Helicobacter pylori-induced Production of IL-1β in Dendritic Cells by Regulating NF-κB and NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Eun; Lee, Jun-Young; Kang, Min-Jung; Jeong, Yu-Jin; Choi, Jin-A; Oh, Sang-Muk; Lee, Kyung-Bok; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. There is evidence that IL-1β is associated with the development of gastric cancer. Therefore, downregulation of H. pylori-mediated IL-1β production may be a way to prevent gastric cancer. Withaferin A (WA), a withanolide purified from Withania somnifera, is known to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects. In the present study, we explored the inhibitory activity of WA on H. pylori-induced production of IL-1β in murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) and the underlying cellular mechanism. Co-treatment with WA decreased IL-1β production by H. pylori in BMDCs in a dose-dependent manner. H. pylori-induced gene expression of IL-1β and NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3) were also suppressed by WA treatment. Moreover, IκB-α phosphorylation by H. pylori infection was suppressed by WA in BMDCs. Western blot analysis revealed that H. pylori induced cleavage of caspase-1 and IL-1β, as well as increased procaspase-1 and pro IL-1β protein levels, and that both were suppressed by co-treatment with WA. Finally, we determined whether WA can directly inhibit ac tivation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. NLRP3 activators induced IL-1β secretion in LPS-primed macrophages, which was inhibited by WA in a dose-dependent manner, whereas IL-6 production was not affected by WA. Moreover, cleavage of IL-1β and caspase-1 by NLRP3 activators was also dose-dependently inhibited by WA. These findings suggest that WA can inhibit IL-1β production by H. pylori in dendritic cells and can be used as a new preventive and therapeutic agent for gastric cancer. PMID:26770181

  19. Helicobacter pylori induces IL-1β and IL-18 production in human monocytic cell line through activation of NLRP3 inflammasome via ROS signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Sheng; Luo, Jingjing; Liu, Anyuan; Tang, Shuangyang; Liu, Shuo; Yu, Minjun; Zhang, Yan

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated whether Helicobacter pylori could activate the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome in human macrophages and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in inflammasome activation. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-differentiated human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1 was infected with H. pylori. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 in supernatant were measured by ELISA. Intracellular ROS level was analyzed by flow cytometry. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis were employed to determine the mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 and caspase-1 in THP-1 cells, respectively. Our results showed that H. pylori infection could induce IL-1β and IL-18 production in PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in THP-1 cells following H. pylori infection was remarkably reduced by NLRP3-specific small interfering RNA treatment. In addition, the intracellular ROS level was elevated by H. pylori infection, which could be eliminated by the ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Furthermore, NAC treatment could inhibit NLRP3 inflammasome formation and caspase-1 activation and suppress the release of IL-1β and IL-18 from H. pylori-infected THP-1 cells. These findings provide novel insights into the innate immune response against H. pylori infection, which could potentially be used for the prevention and treatment of H. pylori-related diseases. PMID:25834143

  20. Pre-formed urease activity of Helicobacter pylori as determined by a viable cell count technique--clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, H X; Keane, C T; O'Morain, C A

    1994-06-01

    The pre-formed urease activity of three NCTC reference strains and five clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori was determined at room temperature (21 degrees C) and 37 degrees C by a viable cell count technique with a conventional urea slope test (Christensen's agar) as well as the commercial CLO-test. The urease activity of two gastroduodenal commensals, Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae, was also tested. H. pylori strains produced positive reactions with viable cell counts of 10(6)-10(8) cfu within 30 min and with counts of 10(3)-10(6) cfu within 2 h. For some strains, smaller numbers of organisms were needed with the CLO-test than with the conventional test, and incubation of the CLO-test strips at 37 degrees C slightly decreased the number of organisms required for positive results. P. mirabilis produced a positive result on urea slopes with an initial inoculum of 10(7)-10(8) cfu at 2 h, but no positive reaction occurred for K. pneumoniae at 12 h, even with an initial inoculum of 10(11) cfu. However, both P. mirabilis and K. pneumoniae gave a positive result after incubation for 24 h with initial inocula of urease activity than P. mirabilis and K. pneumoniae. False negative results for clinical detection of H. pylori in gastroduodenal biopsies may be due to small numbers of organisms, especially after treatment with antimicrobial agents, and false positive results may arise from gastroduodenal commensals or contaminants. PMID:8006937

  1. Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Bateson, M

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a major cause of peptic ulcer disease, and its detection and eradication are now an important part of gastroenterology. Effective regimes are available which will eliminate the organism in about 90% of cases in developed countries.


Keywords: Helicobacter pylori

  2. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: A potential Treg modulator suppressing allergic asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Anjna eSehrawat; Siddharth eSinha; Abhishek eSaxena

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate aim of immunology is to kill the pathogen without being harmful to the host. But what if eliminating the pathogen in itself is discomforting for the host? One such emerging case is of Helicobacter pylori. Modern medicine, infantile vaccination and ultra-hygienic conditions have led to progressive disappearance of H. pylori in different parts of the world. However, the adversities caused by H. pylori’s absence are much larger than those caused by its presence. Asthma is rising as ...

  3. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: a potential Treg modulator suppressing allergic asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Sehrawat, Anjna; Sinha, Siddharth; Saxena, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate aim of the immune system is to eliminate pathogens without being harmful to the host. But what if eliminating the pathogen in itself is discomforting for the host? One such emerging case is of Helicobacter pylori. Modern medicine, infantile vaccination, and ultra-hygienic conditions have led to progressive disappearance of H. pylori in different parts of the world. However, the adversities caused by H. pylori’s absence are much larger than those caused by its presence. Asthma is ...

  4. Antibacterial activity of Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf. and Myristica fragrans Houtt. against Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Gail Mahady; Warocha Mahachai; Siriyaporn Juthapruth; Sutatip Bhamarapravati

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative bacterium, is recognized as the primary etiological agent for the development of gastritis, dyspepsia, peptic ulcer as well as gastric and colon cancer. In developing countries the incidence of H. pylori infection ranges from 50-100%. Two Thai plants, namely Boesenbergia rotunda (L.)Mansf. and Myristica fragrans Houtt., have been used to treat dyspepsia and peptic ulcer in Thai Traditional Medicine. Their crude extracts were previously reported to possess ...

  5. Detection and evaluation of antibodies against neutrophil-activating protein of Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Long; Jun Luo; Yan Li; Fang-Yin Zeng; Ming Li

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To detect and evaluate the antibodies against Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) in patients with gastric cancer and other gastroduodenal diseases.METHODS: Recombinant HP-NAP was prepared from a prokaryotic expression system in Escherichia coli. Serum positivity and level of HP-NAP-specific antibodies in sera from 43 patients with gastric cancer, 28 with chronic gastritis, 28 with peptic ulcer, and 89 healthy controls were measured by rHP-NAP-based ELISA. rHP-NAP-stimulated production of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and growth-related oncogene (GROα) cytokines in the culture supernatant of SGC7901 gastric epithelial cells was also detected. RESULTS: The serum positivity and mean absorbance value of HP-NAP-specific antibodies in the gastric cancer group (97.7% and 1.01 ± 0.24) were significantly higher than those in the chronic gastritis group (85.7% and 0.89 ± 0.14, P < 0.005) and healthy control group (27.7% and 0.65 ± 0.18, P < 0.001). The sensitivity and specificity of ELISA for the detection of HP-NAP-specific antibodies were 95.5% and 91.5%, respectively. HP-NAP could slightly upregulate IL-8 production in gastric epithelial cell lines but had no effect on GROα production. CONCLUSION: Infection with virulent H pylori strains secreting HP-NAP is associated with severe gastroduodenal diseases, and HP-NAP may play a role in the development of gastric carcinoma. rHP-NAPbased ELISA can be used as a new method to detect H pylori infection. The direct effect of HP-NAP on gastric epithelial cells may be limited, but HP-NAP may contribute to inflammatory response or carcinogenesis by activating neutrophils.

  6. Curcumin suppresses gastric NF-κB activation and macromolecular leakage in Helicobacter pylori-infected rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kawiya; Sintara; Duangporn; Thong-Ngam; Suthiluk; Patumraj; Naruemon; Klaikeaw; Tanittha; Chatsuwan

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether curcumin could attenuate nuclear factor(NF)-κB p65 expression and macromolecular leakage in the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)-infected rats.METHODS:Twenty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were equally divided into five groups:control rats(Control),control rats supplemented with 600 mg/kg curcumin,H.pylori-infected rats(Hp),H.pylori-infected rats supplemented with 200 mg/kg curcumin(Hp + curIn H.pylori-infected groups,rats were inoculated with H.pylori suspension twi...

  7. Aqueous and Organic Solvent-Extracts of Selected South African Medicinal Plants Possess Antimicrobial Activity against Drug-Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori: Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collise Njume

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638 using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC50 values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05 as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05. These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity.

  8. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: A potential Treg modulator suppressing allergic asthma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjna eSehrawat

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate aim of immunology is to kill the pathogen without being harmful to the host. But what if eliminating the pathogen in itself is discomforting for the host? One such emerging case is of Helicobacter pylori. Modern medicine, infantile vaccination and ultra-hygienic conditions have led to progressive disappearance of H. pylori in different parts of the world. However, the adversities caused by H. pylori’s absence are much larger than those caused by its presence. Asthma is rising as an epidemic in last few decades and several reports suggest an inverse-relationship between H. pylori’s persistence and early-life onset asthma. Regulatory T cells play an important role in both the cases. This is further supported by experiments on mouse-models. Hence, need of the hour is to discern the relationship between H. pylori and its host and eliminating its negative impacts without disturbing our indigenous microbiota. To resolve whether H. pylori is a pathogen or an amphibiont is another important side. This review explores the biological basis of H. pylori-induced priming of immune system offering resistance to childhood-onset asthma. HP-NAP-Tregs interaction has been predicted using molecular docking and dynamic simulation.

  9. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  10. 唾液抗幽门螺杆菌抗体检测的价值%The Value of Test anti-Helicobacter Pylori Antibodies in Saliva

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁智慧; 陈萍

    2010-01-01

    目的:探讨研究酶联免疫吸附法检测唾液中抗幽门螺杆菌抗体的价值. 方法: 在上消化疾病患者中随机选择240例已接受胃镜检查的患者,并对每位患者在内镜下距幽门3cm处胃窦大、小弯侧取活检4块,分别做快速脲酶试验、Hp选择分离培养和病理组织切片.在胃镜检查1周内留取唾液和抽取静脉血标本.标本采用酶联免疫吸附的方法检测抗幽门螺杆菌抗体、唾液和血液标本,检测的结果通过与上述3种方法检测的结果进行方法学评价,并计算出各自的敏感度、特异性、阳性预测值、阴性预测值等评价指标,然后对敏感度进行卡方检验. 结果: 做为初筛试验,唾液检测抗幽门螺杆菌抗体具有较高的敏感度,与血液检测幽门螺杆菌抗体的敏感度间的差异无显著性统计学意义,并具有取样方便简单的优点,因而具有较大的临床意义.

  11. Disinfectant activity against different morphological forms of Helicobacter pylori: first results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gebel, J.; Vacata, V.; Sigler, Karel; Pietsch, H.; Rechenburg, A.; Exner, M.; Kistemann, T.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 48, Suppl A (2001), s. 58-63. ISSN 0195-6701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : desinfection * disinfectant efficacy * Helicobacter pylori Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.983, year: 2001

  12. Is a 7-day Helicobater pylori treatment enough for eradication and inactivation of gastric inflammatory activity?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlos Robles-lara; Carlos Robles-Medranda; Manuel Moncayo; Byron Landivar; Johnny Parrales

    2008-01-01

    AIM- To compare the efficacy of a 7-d vs 10-d triple therapy regarding H pylori eradication, endoscopic findings and histological gastric inflammatory inactivation in the Ecuadorian population. METHODS: 136 patients with dyspepsia and H pylori infection were randomized in 2 groups (68 per group): group 1, 7-d therapy; group 2, t0-d therapy. Both groups received the same medication and daily dosage: omeprazole 20 mg bid, clarithromycin 500 mg bid and amoxicillin I g bid. Endoscopy was performed for histological assessment and H pylori infection status before and 8 wk after treatment. RESULTS: H pylori was eradicated in 68% of group 1 vs 83. 8% of group 2 for the intention-to-treat analysis (ITT) (P = 0. 03; OR = 2. 48; 95% CI, 1. 1-5. 8), and 68% in group 1 vs 88% in group 2 for the per-protocol analysis (PP) (P = 0. 008; OR = 3. 66; 95% CI, 1. 4-10). Endoscopic gastric mucosa normalization was observed in 56. 9% in group 1 vs 61. 2% in group 2 for ITT, with similar results for the PP, the difference being statistically not significant. The rate of inflammatory inactivation was 69% in group 1 vs 88. 7% in group 2 for ITT (P = 0. 007;OR = 3. 00; 95% CI, 1. 2-7. 5), and 69% in group 1 vs96% in group 2 for PP (P = 0. 0002; OR = 7. 25; 95% CI, 2-26). CONCLUSION: In this Ecuadorian population, the 10-d therapy was more effective than the 7-d therapy for H pylori eradication as well as for gastric mucosa inflammatory inactivation.

  13. Utility of immunohistochemistry in demonstrating Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Patnayak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available 4 Oncology, Gastroenterology and Hepatology Reports| Jan-Jun 2015 | Vol 4 | Issue 1 Utility of immunohistochemistry in demonstrating Helicobacter pylori Background: Helicobacter pylori is the causative organism for chronic active gastritis, duodenal ulcer and also for malignancies like gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. It is essential to mention the presence of H. pylori in gastric biopsies as it has an important role in patient care. Though there are several special stains to detect H. pylori in histological sections, their specificity and sensitivity vary greatly. Immunohistochemically H. pylori can be detected by using anti H. pylori antibody, which reacts with somatic antigens of the whole bacteria. The aim of this study was to compare the reliability of routine hematoxylin and eosin (H and E, Giemsa, Warthin–Starry (WS silver stain and immunohistochemical technique in diagnosing H. pylori . Materials and Methods: In this retrospective 1 - year (2009 study, endoscopic gastric biopsies taken from patients during gastrointestinal - endoscopy with histopathological diagnosis of gastritis were studied. Standard H and E staining was performed on 5 - μ m‑sections from paraffin block of each specimen. Microscopic sections of biopsy specimens of patients showing features of gastritis histopathologically in routine H and E stain and where the presence of H. pylori was suspected were also stained with Giemsa, WS, and immunohistochemistry (IHC using purified polyclonal H. pylori antiserum (BioGenex. We have not included gastric resection specimens in our study. Results: Of the 29 cases, 26 (32.9% showed presence of H. pylori on H and E, Giemsa and WS stains, whereas 49 (62.0% cases demonstrated H. pylori on IHC stain. Conclusion: We conclude that H. pylori detection by IHC has advantage over routine H and E staining. However, in the developing countries with financial constraints, routine H and E staining in

  14. Pathophysiology and clinical relevance of Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Halter, F.; Hurlimann, S.; Inauen, W

    1992-01-01

    Considerable knowledge has recently accumulated on the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces chronic gastritis. Although H. pylori is not an invasive bacterium, soluble surface constituents can provoke pepsinogen release from gastric chief cells or trigger local inflammation in the underlying tissue. Urease appears to be one of the prime chemoattractants for recruitment and activation of inflammatory cells. Release of cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, interl...

  15. Neutrophil degranulation by Helicobacter pylori proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Nøorgaard, A; Andersen, L P; Nielsen, H

    1995-01-01

    Mucosal biopsy specimens from patients with Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric antrum contain an increased amount of myeloperoxidase. This study was performed to elucidate the interaction of H pylori sonicate protein(s) and neutrophils concerning myeloperoxidase release. Neutrophil degranulation with myeloperoxidase release was examined in a direct stimulating assay. Priming activity of H pylori was examined after preincubating neutrophils in sonicate, either crude or modified by heat t...

  16. Helicobacter pylori: a sexually transmitted bacterium?

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitriadi, Dimitra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Oral sex (fellatio) is a very common sexual activity. H. pylori is mainly a gastric organism, but studies have reported that infected individuals may permanently or transiently carry H. pylori in their mouth and saliva. Material and methods A Pubmed search was conducted using the words infection, oral sex and urethritis. Results The existing studies support the hypothesis that H. pylori could be a causative agent of non–gonococcal urethritis. Conclusions It is possible that H. py...

  17. Structures and Metal-Binding Properties of Helicobacter pylori Neutrophil-Activating Protein with a Di-Nuclear Ferroxidase Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideshi Yokoyama

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes severe diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and stomach cancers. H. pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP is an iron storage protein that forms a dodecameric shell, promotes the adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells, and induces the production of reactive oxygen radicals. HP-NAP belongs to the DNA-protecting proteins under starved conditions (Dps family, which has significant structural similarities to the dodecameric ferritin family. The crystal structures of the apo form and metal-ion bound forms, such as iron, zinc, and cadmium, of HP-NAP have been determined. This review focused on the structures and metal-binding properties of HP-NAP. These metal ions bind at the di-nuclear ferroxidase center (FOC by different coordinating patterns. In comparison with the apo structure, metal loading causes a series of conformational changes in conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins (Trp26, Asp52, and Glu56 at the FOC. HP-NAP forms a spherical dodecamer with 23 symmetry including two kinds of pores. Metal ions have been identified around one of the pores; therefore, the negatively-charged pore is suitable for the passage of metal ions.

  18. Enzyme-ligand interactions that drive active site rearrangements in the Helicobacter pylori 5´-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronning, Donald R; Iacopelli, Natalie M; Mishra, Vidhi [Toledo

    2012-03-15

    The bacterial enzyme 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) plays a central role in three essential metabolic pathways in bacteria: methionine salvage, purine salvage, and polyamine biosynthesis. Recently, its role in the pathway that leads to the production of autoinducer II, an important component in quorum-sensing, has garnered much interest. Because of this variety of roles, MTAN is an attractive target for developing new classes of inhibitors that influence bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. To gain insight toward the development of new classes of MTAN inhibitors, the interactions between the Helicobacter pylori-encoded MTAN and its substrates and substrate analogs were probed using X-ray crystallography. The structures of MTAN, an MTAN-Formycin A complex, and an adenine bound form were solved by molecular replacement and refined to 1.7, 1.8, and 1.6 Å, respectively. The ribose-binding site in the MTAN and MTAN-adenine cocrystal structures contain a tris[hydroxymethyl]aminomethane molecule that stabilizes the closed form of the enzyme and displaces a nucleophilic water molecule necessary for catalysis. This research gives insight to the interactions between MTAN and bound ligands that promote closing of the enzyme active site and highlights the potential for designing new classes of MTAN inhibitors using a link/grow or ligand assembly development strategy based on the described H. pylori MTAN crystal structures.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection and respiratory diseases: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Roussos, Anastasios; Philippou, Nikiforos; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2003-01-01

    In the past few years, a variety of extradigestive disorders, including cardiovascular, skin, rheumatic and liver diseases, have been associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The activation of inflammatory mediators by H. pylori seems to be the pathogenetic mechanism underlying the observed associations. The present review summarizes the current literature, including our own studies, concerning the association between H. pylori infection and respiratory diseases.

  20. Structure, function and localization of Helicobacter pylori urease.

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, B E; Phadnis, S H

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent of most cases of gastritis. Once acquired, H. pylori establishes chronic persistent infection; it is this long-term infection that, is a subset of patients, leads to gastric or duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer or gastric MALT lymphoma. All fresh isolates of H. pylori express significant urease activity, which is essential to survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium. A significant fraction of urease is associated with the surface of H. pylori both in ...

  1. Antibacterial Effects of Grape Extracts on Helicobacter pylori▿

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Joseph C.; Huang, Guohui; Haley-Zitlin, Vivian; Jiang, Xiuping

    2008-01-01

    Anti-Helicobacter pylori activities were determined by agar dilution, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and cell proliferation assays following treatment with various grape extracts. Muscadine grape skin possessed the strongest activity, followed by grape synergy (skin and seed) and seed, suggesting that higher phenolic levels do not necessarily determine overall anti-H. pylori efficacy.

  2. Active infection with Helicobacter pylori in an asymptomatic population of middle aged to elderly people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G; Peschke, F;

    1998-01-01

    -85 years. Prevalence of infection as determined by means of the [13C]urea breath test was 34.8% (95% CI 29.6-40.3%); overall, 33.8% (95% CI 23.0-46.0) in the age group 50-59 years, 32.4% (95% CI 25.4-39.9) in the age group 60-69 years and 41.0% (95% CI 30.0-52.7) in the age group 70-85 years. Duration of...... school education of the father, sharing a bed with parents or siblings during childhood, and the area in which participants had grown up were independent determinants of current infection status in a multivariable analysis. We conclude that the prevalence of current H. pylori infection in healthy elderly......The study objective was to investigate prevalence and determinants of current Helicobacter pylori infection in an asymptomatic population of middle-aged to elderly people. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 337 participants of a general education programme of the University of Ulm aged 50...

  3. Helicobacter pylori Couples Motility and Diffusion to Actively Create a Heterogeneous Complex Medium in Gastric Mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Fu, Henry Chien

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori swims through mucus gel by generating ammonia that locally neutralizes the acidic gastric environment, turning nearby gel into a fluid pocket. The size of the fluid zone is important for determining the physics of the motility: in a large zone swimming occurs as in a fluid through hydrodynamic principles, while in a very small zone the motility could be strongly influenced by nonhydrodynamic cell-mucus interactions including chemistry and adhesion. Here, we calculate the size of the fluid pocket. We model how swimming depends on the de-gelation range using a Taylor sheet swimming through a layer of Newtonian fluid bounded by a Brinkman fluid. Then, we model how the de-gelation range depends on the swimming speed by considering the advection-diffusion of ammonia exuded from a translating sphere. Self-consistency between both models determines the values of the swimming speed and the de-gelation range. We find that H. pylori swims through mucus as if unconfined, in a large pocket of Newtonian fluid.

  4. The Effect of Immunomodulating Therapy on a Lysozyme Activity and the Expression of Helicobacter Pylori Contamination in Chronic Gastric and Duodenal Peptic Ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Dugina V.V.; Kuzin V.B.; Lebedeva N.V.

    2011-01-01

    There has been investigated a lysozyme activity level and the expression of Helicobacter pylori contamination in eradication therapy of gastric and duodenal peptic ulcer using immunomodulators of different pharmacological groups. The use of immunomodulators such as lycopid and immunal against a background of the anti-H.bacter “quadroscheme” has been stated to lead to the increase of eradication, with a lysozyme activity in saliva significantly increasing. The tendency to lysozyme normalizatio...

  5. Breath test to diagnose the presence of Helicobacter pylori, the causative agent of active chronic gastritis and ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Brazil almost 80% of the population presents the bacterium Helicobacter pylori, considered to be the causative agent of active chronic gastritis and ulcers. This does not mean that all of these people will suffer gastritis or ulcers, but it is highly probable. The usual diagnostic procedure used a microbiological culture in mucus biopsy specimens collected during gastroscopy, an invasive method. The problem was to find a non-invasive, easy, fast and efficient procedure to diagnose this bacterium. The nuclear technique applied was liquid scintillation, a suitable technique to measure the low energy β emission of 14C. This was the best method available at the time to develop and establish the test. In order to develop a non-invasive test to diagnose H. pylori, research was carried out with doctors from the Department of Gastroenterology at the School of Medicine of the Federal University of Minas Gerais. This research applied a radiochemical method using 14C, a radioisotope of carbon. The patient's control breath sample was obtained after a 12 hour fast. Then a standard meal was offered to delay gastric emptying, after which the patient drank a determined amount of urea labelled with 14C in water. Breath samples were collected at 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes in a hyaline-ethanol solution with a pH (acid) indicator. If the bacteria were present, the labelled urea would be metabolized and the 14C would be eliminated as 14CO2 by exhalation; otherwise the 14C would be eliminated through the faeces. This 14C urea breath test was applied in around 5000 participants and the results were compared with results obtained through culture

  6. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hiroyuki Osawa

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primar-ily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lym-phoid tissue lymphorna. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in Hpylori injected sub-jects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in associa-tion with atrophic gastritis induced by Hpylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentra-tion. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may re-sult from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations be-fore and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels.

  7. Curcumin alleviates matrix metalloproteinase-3 and -9 activities during eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in cultured cells and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parag Kundu

    Full Text Available Current therapy-regimens against Helicobacter pylori (Hp infections have considerable failure rates and adverse side effects that urge the quest for an effective alternative therapy. We have shown that curcumin is capable of eradicating Hp-infection in mice. Here we examine the mechanism by which curcumin protects Hp infection in cultured cells and mice. Since, MMP-3 and -9 are inflammatory molecules associated to the pathogenesis of Hp-infection, we investigated the role of curcumin on inflammatory MMPs as well as proinflammatory molecules. Curcumin dose dependently suppressed MMP-3 and -9 expression in Hp infected human gastric epithelial (AGS cells. Consistently, Hp-eradication by curcumin-therapy involved significant downregulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities and expression in both cytotoxic associated gene (cag(+ve and cag(-ve Hp-infected mouse gastric tissues. Moreover, we demonstrate that the conventional triple therapy (TT alleviated MMP-3 and -9 activities less efficiently than curcumin and curcumin's action on MMPs was linked to decreased pro-inflammatory molecules and activator protein-1 activation in Hp-infected gastric tissues. Although both curcumin and TT were associated with MMP-3 and -9 downregulation during Hp-eradication, but unlike TT, curcumin enhanced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and inhibitor of kappa B-α. These data indicate that curcumin-mediated healing of Hp-infection involves regulation of MMP-3 and -9 activities.

  8. Helicobacter pylori therapy:Present and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo; De; Francesco; Enzo; Ierardi; Cesare; Hassan; Angelo; Zullo

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis,peptic ulcer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-lymphoma,and is also involved in carcinogenesis of the stomach.H.pylori treatment still remains a challenge for physicians,since no current first-line therapy is able to cure the infection in all treated patients.Several factors may help in the eradication of therapy failure.We reviewed both bacterial and host factors involved in therapeutic management of the H.pylori infection.In addition,we evaluated data on the most successful therapy regimens-sequential and concomitant therapies-currently available for H.pylori eradication.

  9. Regulation of RKIP function by Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika L Moen

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a gram-negative, spiral-shaped bacterium that infects more than half of the world's population and is a major cause of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mechanisms that link H. pylori infection to gastric carcinogenesis are not well understood. In the present study, we report that the Raf-kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP has a role in the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells. Western blot and luciferase transcription reporter assays demonstrate that the pathogenicity island of H. pylori rapidly phosphorylates RKIP, which then localizes to the nucleus where it activates its own transcription and induces apoptosis. Forced overexpression of RKIP enhances apoptosis in H. pylori-infected cells, whereas RKIP RNA inhibition suppresses the induction of apoptosis by H. pylori infection. While inducing the phosphorylation of RKIP, H. pylori simultaneously targets non-phosphorylated RKIP for proteasome-mediated degradation. The increase in RKIP transcription and phosphorylation is abrogated by mutating RKIP serine 153 to valine, demonstrating that regulation of RKIP activity by H. pylori is dependent upon RKIP's S153 residue. In addition, H. pylori infection increases the expression of Snail, a transcriptional repressor of RKIP. Our results suggest that H. pylori utilizes a tumor suppressor protein, RKIP, to promote apoptosis in gastric cancer cells.

  10. Novel nuclear targeting coiled-coil protein of Helicobacter pylori showing Ca(2+)-independent, Mg(2+)-dependent DNase I activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young Chul; Kim, Sinil; Lee, Yong Seok; Lee, Je Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Lee, Woo-Kon; Kang, Hyung-Lyun; Song, Jae-Young; Baik, Seung Chul; Ro, Hyeon Su

    2016-05-01

    HP0059, an uncharacterized gene of Helicobacter pylori, encodes a 284-aa-long protein containing a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and multiple leucine-rich heptad repeats. Effects of HP0059 proteins in human stomach cells were assessed by incubation of recombinant HP0059 proteins with the AGS human gastric carcinoma cell line. Wild-type HP0059 proteins showed cytotoxicity in AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas NLS mutant protein showed no effect, suggesting that the cytotoxicity is attributed to host nuclear localization. AGS cells transfected with pEGFP-HP0059 plasmid showed strong GFP signal merged to the chromosomal DNA region. The chromosome was fragmented into multiple distinct dots merged with the GFP signal after 12 h of incubation. The chromosome fragmentation was further explored by incubation of AGS chromosomal DNA with recombinant HP0059 proteins, which leaded to complete degradation of the chromosomal DNA. HP0059 protein also degraded circular plasmid DNA without consensus, being an indication of DNase I activity. The DNase was activated by MgCl2, but not by CaCl2. The activity was completely blocked by EDTA. The optimal pH and temperature for DNase activity were 7.0-8.0 and 55°C, respectively. These results indicate that HP0059 possesses a novel DNase I activity along with a role in the genomic instability of human gastric cells, which may result in the transformation of gastric cells. PMID:27095458

  11. Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Peter Mygind

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) are Gram-negative spiral bacteria which occur in the human stomach. The bacteria were cultured in vitro for the first time in 1983. It is suspected that the bacteria may cause chronic gastritis of type B and may also be a contributory cause of chronic ulceration and cancer...... of the stomach. The bacteria are accompanied by characteristic inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. The significance for gastritis, chronic ulceration, non-ulcer dyspepsia and carcinoma of the stomach is discussed. HP occurs in a great proportion of the population of the world and the...

  12. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in United States Navy submarine crews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, R P; Schlichting, C; Carr, W; Dubois, A

    2006-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori prevalence is elevated in German submarine crews and in United States Navy (USN) surface fleet personnel, but H. pylori prevalence in USN submariners was unknown. The goal of the study was to determine the prevalence of H. pylori in the crews of USN nuclear submarines compared to other military personnel and to the general US population. The presence of H. pylori IgG antibodies was determined in serum samples using a commercial ELISA. Only 47 out of 451 submariners (9.4%) were H. pylori positive, which is similar to that of the US general population with a similar level of education. In contrast, H. pylori prevalence is significantly higher in US Army recruits (26%), USN surface fleet personnel (25%), and German diesel submariners (38%). These data demonstrate that submarine service (and by inference activity requiring isolation and close contact, per se) is not a risk factor for H. pylori infection. PMID:16194289

  13. Campylobacter pylori gastritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Mahony, M. J.; Wyatt, J I; Littlewood, J M

    1988-01-01

    Campylobacter pylori colonisation of the stomach is strongly associated with type B non-autoimmune gastritis in adults. In a retrospective study of 38 gastric biopsy specimens taken during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in children attending this hospital we found C pylori in nine (24%). Ten biopsy specimens showed histological evidence of gastritis and C pylori was found in eight.

  14. The Effect of Immunomodulating Therapy on a Lysozyme Activity and the Expression of Helicobacter Pylori Contamination in Chronic Gastric and Duodenal Peptic Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dugina V.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been investigated a lysozyme activity level and the expression of Helicobacter pylori contamination in eradication therapy of gastric and duodenal peptic ulcer using immunomodulators of different pharmacological groups. The use of immunomodulators such as lycopid and immunal against a background of the anti-H.bacter “quadroscheme” has been stated to lead to the increase of eradication, with a lysozyme activity in saliva significantly increasing. The tendency to lysozyme normalization in gastric juice has also been observed. A synthetic bacterial immunomodulator lycopid in a greater degree effects a lysozyme activity in comparison with the effect of immunal — an immunomodulator of plants.

  15. Hubungan kadar IL-8 dan IL-10 pada pasien Gastritis H.Pylori dan Non H.Pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Ginting, Ananda Wibawanta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is the commonest cause of chronic active gastritis all over the world which is around 80% in addition to other causes such as autoimmune diseases, drugs, idiopathic and others. In gastritis, there are acute and chronic inflammatory response occurs activation cytokines-cytokines that cause inflammation of the mucosa where the levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha mucosa increased in dyspepsia patients infected with H. pylori. On the one hand ...

  16. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin 1β Up-Regulate Gastric Mucosal Fas Antigen Expression in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, JeanMarie; Macera-Bloch, Lisa S.; Harrison, Lawrence; Kim, Kyung H.; Korah, Reju M.

    2000-01-01

    Fas-mediated gastric mucosal apoptosis is gaining attention as a cause of tissue damage due to Helicobacter pylori infection. We explored the effects of H. pylori directly, and the effects of the inflammatory environment established subsequent to H. pylori infection, on Fas-mediated apoptosis in a nontransformed gastric mucosal cell line (RGM-1). Exposure to H. pylori-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), but not H. pylori itself, induced Fas antigen (Fas Ag) expression, indic...

  17. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.;

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen in major gastroduodenal diseases, including inflammation with ulceration and gastric malignancies. Alterations in H. pylori associated cell turnover in gastric epithelial cells are examined in relation to inflammatory activity, bacteria load and cytoki...

  18. Downregulation of CXCR1 and CXCR2 Expression on Human Neutrophils by Helicobacter pylori: a New Pathomechanism in H. pylori Infection?

    OpenAIRE

    Schmausser, Bernd; Josenhans, Christine; Endrich, Simon; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Sitaru, Cassian; Andrulis, Mindaugas; Brändlein, Stephanie; Rieckmann, Peter; Müller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Eck, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    In Helicobacter pylori gastritis, neutrophil activation and migration, which play central roles in the pathogenesis of the disease, are regulated by the neutrophil attractant chemokines interleukin 8 (IL-8) and Groα, whose secretion is induced by H. pylori. However, the modulation of the corresponding chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2 on human neutrophils under the influence of H. pylori has not been investigated. Incubation of neutrophils with cag+ and cag deletion H. pylori strains result...

  19. Synthesis, structures and Helicobacter pylori urease inhibitory activity of copper(II) complexes with tridentate aroylhydrazone ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lin; Wang, Cunfang; Yan, Kai; Zhao, Kedong; Sheng, Guihua; Zhu, Hailiang; Zhao, Xinlu; Qu, Dan; Niu, Fang; You, Zhonglu

    2016-06-01

    A series of new copper(II) complexes were prepared. They are [CuL(1)(NCS)] (1), [CuClL(1)]·CH3OH (2), [CuClL(2)]·CH3OH (3), [CuL(3)(NCS)]·CH3OH (4), [CuL(4)(NCS)]·0.4H2O (5), and [CuL(5)(bipy)] (6), where L(1), L(2), L(3) and L(4) are the deprotonated form of N'-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide, 4-bromo-N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide, N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide and 2-chloro-N'-(2-hydroxy-5-methoxybenzylidene)benzohydrazide, respectively, L(5) is the dianionic form of N'-(2-hydroxybenzylidene)-3-methylbenzohydrazide, and bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine. The complexes were characterized by infrared and UV-Vis spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Cu atoms in complexes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 are coordinated by the NOO donor set of the aroylhydrazone ligands, and one Cl or thiocyanate N atom, forming square planar coordination. The Cu atom in complex 6 is in a square pyramidal coordination, with the NOO donor set of L(1), and one N atom of bipy defining the basal plane, and with the other N atom of bipy occupying the apical position. Complexes 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 show effective urease inhibitory activities, with IC50 values of 5.14, 0.20, 4.06, 5.52 and 0.26μM, respectively. Complex 6 has very weak activity against urease, with IC50 value over 100μM. Molecular docking study of the complexes with the Helicobacter pylori urease was performed. The relationship between structures and urease inhibitory activities indicated that copper complexes with square planar coordination are better models for urease inhibition. PMID:26908284

  20. Helicobacter pylori-related iron deficiency anemia in children

    OpenAIRE

    Smaragdi Fessatou, Maria Kostaki, T. Karpathios

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY In this report we described two cases of children with chronic active Helicobacter pylori gastritis without evidence of esophagogastrointestinal bleeding associated with irondeficiency anemia. In these cases, long-standing iron supplementation had been necessary, but replacement therapy, without considering the role of Helicobacter pylori, was ineffective. The anemia returned after the discontinuation of the iron therapy. Only the eradication therapy of helicobacter pylori led to a co...

  1. Transgenic Expression of the Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factor CagA Promotes Apoptosis or Tumorigenesis through JNK Activation in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Wandler, Anica M.; Guillemin, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori infects an estimated 50% of the world's population and is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Strains of H. pylori that can inject the CagA effector protein into host cells are known to be more virulent, but the potential contributions of host genetics to pathogenesis are not well-understood. Using transgenic Drosophila melanogaster, we show that the genetic context of both the host cells in which CagA is expressed...

  2. Helicobacter pylori Eradication Prevents Metachronous Gastric Neoplasms after Endoscopic Resection of Gastric Dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Shin

    Full Text Available There is insufficient data about the role of eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection (ER for gastric dysplasia. The aim was to investigate the benefit of H. pylori eradication after ER in patients with gastric dysplasia to prevent metachronous gastric neoplasms.We retrospectively reviewed 1872 patients who underwent ER of gastric dysplasia. We excluded patients with a follow-up period of <2 years or who had not undergone tests for active H. pylori infection. A total of 282 patients were enrolled. The patients were categorized into those without active H. pylori infection (H. pylori-negative group, n = 124, those who successfully underwent H. pylori eradication (eradicated group, n = 122, and those who failed or did not undergo H. pylori eradication (persistent group, n = 36.Metachronous recurrence was diagnosed in 36 patients, including 19 in the H. pylori-negative group, 10 in the eradicated group, and 7 in the persistent group. The cumulative incidence of metachronous recurrence was significantly lower in the H. pylori-eradicated group in comparison with either of the H. pylori-persistent (non-eradicated or failed groups (p = 0.039. Similarly, the incidence of metachronous recurrence was significantly lower in the H. pylori-eradicated group compared with the H. pylori-negative group (p = 0.041.Successful H. pylori eradication may reduce the development of metachronous gastric neoplasms after ER in patients with gastric dysplasia.

  3. Anti-Helicobacter pylori activity and immunostimulatory effect of extracts from Byrsonima crassa Nied. (Malpighiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Vilegas Wagner; Sannomiya Miriam; Carlos Iracilda Z; Raddi Maria; Bonacorsi Cibele

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Several in vitro studies have looked at the effect of medicinal plant extracts against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Regardless of the popular use of Byrsonima crassa (B. crassa) as antiemetic, diuretic, febrifuge, to treat diarrhea, gastritis and ulcers, there is no data on its effects against H. pylori. In this study, we evaluated the anti-H. pylori of B. crassa leaves extracts and its effects on reactive oxygen/nitrogen intermediates induction by murine peritoneal ma...

  4. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion. PMID:26557697

  5. Vector-encoded Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein promotes maturation of dendritic cells with Th1 polarization and improved migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Jin, Chuan; Yu, Di; Eriksson, Fredrik; Essand, Magnus

    2014-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a major virulence factor involved in H. pylori infection. Both HP-NAP protein and oncolytic viruses encoding HP-NAP have been suggested as immunotherapeutic anticancer agents and adjuvants for vaccination but with little known about its mode of action to activate adaptive immunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key players in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses, and in this study we aim to evaluate the effect of HP-NAP on DC maturation, migration, and induction of adaptive immune response. Maturation markers CD83, CD80, CD86, HLA-DR, CD40, and CCR7 were upregulated on human DCs after treatment with supernatants from HP-NAP adenovirus-infected cells. HP-NAP-activated DCs had a Th1 cytokine secretion profile, with high IL-12 and relatively low IL-10 secretion, and migrated toward CCL19. Ag-specific T cells were efficiently expanded by Ag-presenting HP-NAP-activated DCs, which is an important property of functionally mature DCs. Furthermore, intradermal injections of HP-NAP-encoding adenovirus in C57BL/6 mice enhanced resident DC migration to draining lymph nodes, which was verified by imaging lymph nodes by two-photon microscopy and by phenotyping migrating cells by flow cytometry. In conclusion, therapeutic effects of HP-NAP are mediated by maturation of DCs and subsequent activation of Ag-specific T cells in addition to provoking innate immunity. PMID:25049358

  6. Helicobacter pylori-Induced Signaling Pathways Contribute to Intestinal Metaplasia and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Soichiro Sue; Wataru Shibata; Shin Maeda

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induces chronic gastric inflammation, atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and cancer. Although the risk of gastric cancer increases exponentially with the extent of atrophic gastritis, the precise mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis have not been fully elucidated. H. pylori induces genetic and epigenetic changes in gastric epithelial cells through activating intracellular signaling pathways in a cagPAI-dependent manner. H. pylori eventually induces gast...

  7. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders;

    1998-01-01

    in 46/66 by culture and histology. The presence of H. pylori was significantly associated with active or inactive chronic gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was associated with both parents being born in a country with a high prevalence and a low social class. Helicobacter pylori-positive children...

  8. Alcohol consumption and Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Berg, Gabriele; Lappus, N;

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18-88 i...... an indication of a recent change of alcohol consumption were excluded from the analysis. These findings support the hypothesis that moderate alcohol consumption may facilitate spontaneous elimination of H. pylori infection among adults.......Alcohol has strong antimicrobial activity and stimulates gastric acid secretion. Alcohol consumption may therefore compromise the living conditions of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach. We assessed the relation of alcohol consumption with H. pylori infection among 1,785 participants ages 18-88 in...... the German National Health and Nutrition Survey. Detailed information on dietary and lifestyle habits was obtained in personal interviews using a standardized food frequency questionnaire. Serum samples were analyzed for H. pylori immunoglobulin G antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...

  9. Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the CT scans of patients with Helicobacter pylori (formerly Campylobacter pylori) infection and histologic gastritis reviewed to determine if the inflammatory changes can mimic the CT appearance of gastric neoplasm. Records were obtained of 288 consecutive cases of biopsy-confirmed. Helicobacter pylori gastritis, spanning a 21-month period from July 1988 to March 1990. Abdominal CT scans had been performed in 70 of these cases and were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Seven of the 70 cases of confirmed Helicobacter pylori gastritis were suggestive of malignancy on CT

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance in Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gerrits (Monique)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAn estimated 4 to 5 million individuals in the Netherlands are actively infected with Helicobacter pylori. Eradication of this bacterium becomes more difficult as the prevalence of antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide. Most H. pylori infections are now diagnosed by non-invasi

  11. Immune response to H pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes; Ellen J Beswick

    2006-01-01

    The gastric mucosa separates the underlying tissue from the vast array of antigens that traffic through the stomach lumen. While the extreme pH of this environment is essential in aiding the activation of enzymes and food digestion, it also renders the gastric epithelium free from bacterial colonization, with the exception of one important human pathogen, H pylori. This bacterium has developed mechanisms to survive the harsh environment of the stomach, actively move through the mucosal layer,attach to the epithelium, evade immune responses, and achieve persistent colonization. While a hallmark of this infection is a marked inflammatory response with the infiltration of various immune cells into the infected gastric mucosa, the host immune response is unable to clear the infection and may actually contribute to the associated pathogenesis. Here, we review the host responses involved during infection with H pylori and how they are influenced by this bacterium.

  12. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Hideshi, E-mail: h-yokoya@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Tsuruta, Osamu; Akao, Naoya; Fujii, Satoshi [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and octahedral manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn{sup 2+}- or Cd{sup 2+}-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal-bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  13. Crystal structure of Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein with a di-nuclear ferroxidase center in a zinc or cadmium-bound form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Structures of a metal-bound Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein were determined. ► Two zinc ions were tetrahedrally coordinated by ferroxidase center (FOC) residues. ► Two cadmium ions were coordinated in a trigonal–bipyramidal and octahedral manner. ► The second metal ion was more weakly coordinated than the first at the FOC. ► A zinc ion was found in one negatively-charged pore suitable as an ion path. -- Abstract: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein (HP-NAP) is a Dps-like iron storage protein forming a dodecameric shell, and promotes adhesion of neutrophils to endothelial cells. The crystal structure of HP-NAP in a Zn2+- or Cd2+-bound form reveals the binding of two zinc or two cadmium ions and their bridged water molecule at the ferroxidase center (FOC). The two zinc ions are coordinated in a tetrahedral manner to the conserved residues among HP-NAP and Dps proteins. The two cadmium ions are coordinated in a trigonal–bipyramidal and distorted octahedral manner. In both structures, the second ion is more weakly coordinated than the first. Another zinc ion is found inside of the negatively-charged threefold-related pore, which is suitable for metal ions to pass through.

  14. Pre-treatment urea breath test results predict the efficacy of Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy in patients with active duodenal ulcers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung-Chih Lai; Jyh-Chin Yang; Shih-Hung Huang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the association of pre-treatment 13C-urea breath test (UBT) results with H pyloridensity and efficacy of eradication therapy in patients with active duodenal ulcers.METHODS: One hundred and seventeen consecutive outpatients with active duodenal ulcer and H pyloriinfection were recruited. H pylori density was histologically graded according to the Sydney system. Each patient received lansoprazole (30 mg b.i.d.), clarithromycin (500 mg b.i.d.) and amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d.) for 1 week. According to pre-treatment UBT values, patients were allocated into low (<16%o),intermediate (16-35%o), and high (>35%o) UBT groups.RESULTS: A significant correlation was found between pre-treatment UBT results andHpyloridensity (P<0.001).H pylorieradication rates were 94.9%, 94.4% and 81.6%in the low, intermediate and high UBT groups, respectively (per protocol analysis, P=0.11). When patients were assigned into two groups (UBT results ≤35%o and >35%o),the eradication rates were 94.7% and 81.6%, respectively (P=0.04).CONCLUSION: The intragastric bacterial load of H pylori can be evaluated by UBT, and high pre-treatment UBT results can predict an adverse outcome of eradication therapy.

  15. Muc5ac gastric mucin glycosylation is shaped by FUT2 activity and functionally impacts Helicobacter pylori binding

    OpenAIRE

    Magalhães, Ana; Rossez, Yannick; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Maes, Emmanuel; Gomes, Joana; Shevtsova, Anna; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Celso A Reis

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a thick and complex layer of mucus that protects the mucosal epithelium from biochemical and mechanical aggressions. This mucus barrier confers protection against pathogens but also serves as a binding site that supports a sheltered niche of microbial adherence. The carcinogenic bacteria Helicobacter pylori colonize the stomach through binding to host glycans present in the glycocalyx of epithelial cells and extracellular mucus. The secreted MUC5AC mucin...

  16. Muc5ac gastric mucin glycosylation is shaped by FUT2 activity and functionally impacts Helicobacter pylori binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Ana; Rossez, Yannick; Robbe-Masselot, Catherine; Maes, Emmanuel; Gomes, Joana; Shevtsova, Anna; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Borén, Thomas; Reis, Celso A

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is lined by a thick and complex layer of mucus that protects the mucosal epithelium from biochemical and mechanical aggressions. This mucus barrier confers protection against pathogens but also serves as a binding site that supports a sheltered niche of microbial adherence. The carcinogenic bacteria Helicobacter pylori colonize the stomach through binding to host glycans present in the glycocalyx of epithelial cells and extracellular mucus. The secreted MUC5AC mucin is the main component of the gastric mucus layer, and BabA-mediated binding of H. pylori to MUC5AC confers increased risk for overt disease. In this study we unraveled the O-glycosylation profile of Muc5ac from glycoengineered mice models lacking the FUT2 enzyme and therefore mimicking a non-secretor human phenotype. Our results demonstrated that the FUT2 determines the O-glycosylation pattern of Muc5ac, with Fut2 knock-out leading to a marked decrease in α1,2-fucosylated structures and increased expression of the terminal type 1 glycan structure Lewis-a. Importantly, for the first time, we structurally validated the expression of Lewis-a in murine gastric mucosa. Finally, we demonstrated that loss of mucin FUT2-mediated fucosylation impairs gastric mucosal binding of H. pylori BabA adhesin, which is a recognized feature of pathogenicity. PMID:27161092

  17. Helicobacter pylori-elicited induction in gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) release involves ERK-dependent cPLA2 activation and its recruitment to the membrane-localized Rac1/p38 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2016-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of endopeptidases implicated in a wide rage of degenerative and inflammatory diseases, including Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, and gastric and duodenal ulcer. As gastric mucosal inflammatory responses to H. pylori are characterized by the rise in MMP-9 production, as well as the induction in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Rac1 activation, we investigated the role of Rac1/MAPK in the processes associated with the release of MMP-9. We show that H. pylori LPS-elicited induction in gastric mucosal MMP-9 release is associated with MAPK, ERK and p38 activation, and occurs with the involvement of Rac1 and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). Further, we demonstrate that the LPS-induced MMP-9 release requires ERK-mediated phosphorylation of cPLA2 on Ser(505) that is essential for its membrane localization with Rac1, and that this process necessitates p38 participation. Moreover, we reveal that the activation and membrane translocation of p38 to the Rac1-GTP complex plays a pivotal role in cPLA2-dependent enhancement in MMP-9 release. Hence, our findings provide a strong evidence for the role of ERK/cPLA2 and Rac1/p38/cPLA2 cascade in H. pylori LPS-induced up-regulation in gastric mucosal MMP-9 release. PMID:26886372

  18. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or bloody vomit or vomit that looks like coffee grounds. H. pylori testing may also be ordered when a person has completed a regimen of prescribed antibiotics to confirm that the H. pylori bacteria have been eliminated. A follow-up test is ...

  19. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adam Harris

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Using an evidence-based approach this review discusses the current treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcer disease, functional (non-ulcer)dyspepsia or gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD).It also briefly addresses the potential role of eradication of H . pylori in preventing gastric cancer .

  20. Helicobacter pylori and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucukazman, M; Yeniova, O; Dal, K; Yavuz, B

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common infections in human. The association between H. pylori and gastrointestinal diseases including peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis, mucosa associated tissue lymphoma (MALT) and gastric cancer is well known. However it was also suggested that H. pylori was linked to various extra-gastrointestinal disorders such as diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. In this review we summarized the association between H. pylori and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26502864

  1. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on 24 hour intragastric acidity in patients with gastritis and duodenal ulcer.

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, S.; Gladziwa, U; Haruma, K; Varrentrapp, M; Gebel, M

    1992-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori status, gastric histology, and 24 hour acidity were studied in 35 gastritis patients, 21 duodenal ulcer patients, and 14 subjects with normal gastric mucosa. H pylori was identified in 21 of 35 patients with chronic active gastritis and in 19 of 21 duodenal ulcer patients, but in none of those with normal gastric mucosa. Mean scores of activity of gastritis were similar in H pylori positive gastritis and duodenal ulcer patients, but were significantly lower in H pylori neg...

  2. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide:Biological activities in vitro and in vivo, pathological correlation to human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Hui Luo; Jie Yan; Ya-Fei Mao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To determine the biological activity of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) lipopolysaccharide (H-LPS) and understand pathological correlation between H-LPS and human chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer.METHODS: H-LPS of a clinical Hpylori strain and LPS of Escherichia coli strain O55:B5 (E-LPS) were extracted by phenol-water method. Biological activities of H-LPS and E-LPS were detected by limulus lysate assay, pyrogen assay,blood pressure test and PBMC induction test in rabbits,cytotoxicity test in NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells and lethality test in NIH mice. By using self-prepared rabbit anti-H-LPS serum as the first antibody and commercial HRP-labeled sheep anti-rabbit sera as the second antibody, H-LPS in biopsy specimens from 126 patients with chronic gastritis (68 cases) or gastric ulcer (58 cases) were examined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Fibroblast cytotoxicity and mouse lethality of H-LPS were weaker than those of E-LPS. But the ability of coagulating limulus lysate of the two LPSs was similar (+/0.5 ng/mL). At 0.5 h after H-LPS injection, the blood pressures of the 3 rabbits rapidly declined. At 1.0 h after H-LPS injection, the blood pressures in 2 of the 3 rabbits fell to zero causing death of the 2 animals. For the other one rabbit in the same group, its blood pressure gradually elevated. At 0.5 h after E-LPS injection, the blood pressures of the three rabbits also quickly declined and then maintained at low level for approximately 1.0 h. At 0.5 h after injection with H-LPS or E-LPS, PBMC numbers of the rabbits showed a remarkable increase. The total positivity rate of H-LPS from 126 biopsy specimens was 60.3%(76/126). H-LPS positivity rate in the biopsy specimens from chronic gastritis (50/68, 73.5%) was significantly higher than that from gastric ulcer (26/58, 44.8%) (X2=10.77,P<0.01). H-LPS positivity rates in biopsy specimens from chronic superficial gastritis (38/48, 79.2%) and chronic active gastritis (9/10, 90.0%) were significantly higher than

  3. The Impacts of Helicobacter Pylori Antigen Positivity on Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Erkol Ižnal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: We aimed to clarify the impacts of H. pylori infection on disease activity and clinical findings of AS. Material and Method: Forty-eight patients with AS were included in this study. The demographic data including age, sex, durations of the disease and medication of the patients were recorded. The laboratory analysis comprised Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP and H. pylori antigen determination in gaita. The disease activity, functional disability and clinical status were assessed using the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI, The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional index (BASFI and The Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI respectively. We divided patients according to H. pylori antigen positivity in gaita as H. pylori positive and negative patients.Results: The mean age of patients was 41.9 11.8. CRP levels were slightly but not significantly higher in patients with positive H. pylori antigen compared to those in patients without H. pylori antigen in gaita (p=0.08. There was no significant difference in terms of ESR levels, BASDAI, BASFI and BASMI scores in patients with positive H. pylori antigen compared to those in patients with negative H. pylori antigen in gaita (p-values were >0.05 for all. In regression model BASDAI score was found to have no relationship with H. pylori antigen positivity, ESR and CRP levels (p-values were >0.05 for all. Discussion: H. pylori seemed to have probable impacts on the disease activity of AS. Studies with greater patient population and longer follow-up periods are warranted to enlighten this issue.

  4. Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, DFT calculation and biological activities of Fe(III) and Co(II)-omeprazole complexes. Potential application in the Helicobacter pylori eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Marcos G.; Vega Hissi, Esteban G.; Rizzi, Alberto C.; Brondino, Carlos D.; Salinas Ibañez, Ángel G.; Vega, Alba E.; Silva, Humberto J.; Mercader, Roberto; Narda, Griselda E.

    2014-03-01

    The reaction between the antiulcer agent omeprazole (OMZ) with Fe(III) and Co(II) ions was studied, observing a high ability to form metal complexes. The isolated microcrystalline solid complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), magnetic measurements, thermal study, FTIR, UV-Visible, Mössbauer, electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and DFT calculations. The metal-ligand ratio for both complexes was 1:2 determined by elemental and thermal analysis. FTIR spectroscopy showed that OMZ acts as a neutral bidentate ligand through the pyridinic nitrogen of the benzimidazole ring and the oxygen atom of the sulfoxide group, forming a five-membered ring chelate. Electronic, Mössbauer, and EPR spectra together with magnetic measurements indicate a distorted octahedral geometry around the metal ions, where the coordination sphere is completed by two water molecules. SEM and XRPD were used to characterize the morphology and the crystal nature of the complexes. The most favorable conformation for the Fe(III)-OMZ and Co(II)-OMZ complexes was obtained by DFT calculations by using B3LYP/6-31G(d)&LanL2DZ//B3LYP/3-21G(d)&LanL2DZ basis set. Studies of solubility along with the antibacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori for OMZ and its Co(II) and Fe(III) complexes are also reported. Free OMZ and both metal complexes showed antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Co(II)-OMZ presented a minimal inhibitory concentration ˜32 times lower than that of OMZ and ˜65 lower than Fe(III)-OMZ, revealing its promising potential use for the treatment of gastric pathologies associated with the Gram negative bacteria. The morphological changes observed in the cell membrane of the bacteria after the incubation with the metal-complexes were also analyzed by SEM microscopy. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes was proved by the viability test.

  5. The Expression of VacA in BCF of Helicobacter Pylori and Its Relationship to Vacuolated Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施理; 侯晓华; 易粹琼; 张锦坤

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The vacuolated effect of Helicobacter (H. Pylori) and its relationship to vacuolated cyto toxin antigen (VacA) were investigated by the method of cytotoxic test and SDS-pobyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Of the 62 clinical isolates, the broth culture filter (BCF) of 43 strains causecl the Vero cell intracytoplasmically vacuolated. H. Pylori strains were divided into H. Pylori (Toxin+) group with vacuolated effect and H. Pylori (Toxin-) group without vacuolated effect. The analysis of the BCF of H. Pylori (Toxin+) and that of H. Pylori (Toxin-) was studied by SDS-PAGE and Scan reader. A kind of protein with 87 ku molecular weight was recognized in the BCF of 30.23 % (13/43) H. Pylori (Toxin+) strains but in none of that of H. Pylori (Toxin-) strains, the difference was statistically significant (P<0. 05). There was a significant and concordant relation ship between OD of the protein band with 87 ku molecular weight and titer of vacuolated activity of H. Pylori(Toxin+) (r=0. 67 and P<0. 05 by linear regression analysis). H. Pylori strains were di-vided into H. Pylori (Toxin+) group with vacuolated effect and H. Pylori (Toxin-) group without vacuolated effect. The vacuolated effect of H. Pylori (Toxin+) was caused by the protein with 87 ku molecular weight (VacA).

  6. Trans-anethole kills Helicobacter pylori in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhong Li; Gang Guo; Xuhu Mao

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of trans-anethole to kill Helicobacter pylori(H, pylori) in vitro and the ability to eradicate H. pylori from infected mice. Materials and methods The suscepti bility of H. pyloriATCC11637 to trans-anethole was assessed by broth dilution determination. BALB/c mice were inoculated intragastrically with either a suspension of H. pylori B3 or special broth alone after pretreatment with ethanol and antibiotics. The infection status of H. pylori was confirmed before treatment. Then, mice were administered with either 10mg trans-anethole, 5rag trans-anethole,3mg metronidazole or 200μl salad oil every day for 14 days .Mice were sacrificed either in the 7th day ,15th day or 30 days after the completion of treatment, and the presence of H. pylori in their stomachs were detected via culture or PCR method. Results The MIC and MBC of trans-anethole against H.pylori ATCC 11637 were 39 μg/ml and 78 μg/ml, respectively. On condition of treatment of 10mg trans-anethole, 5mg trans-anethole or 3rag metronidazole, there was a significant reduction in H. pylori infection. Conclusion trans-anethole has good in vitro activity against H. pylori. It can eradicate H. pylori infection from mice.

  7. Helicobacter pylori and Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pylori-induced gastro-duodenal diseases. Annual Review of Pathology 2006; 1:63–96. [PubMed Abstract] Kusters JG, ... pattern of the disease and an overview of environmental risk factors. Best Practice & Research Clinical Gastroenterology 2006; ...

  8. Screening for helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, Jaime Correia; Thomas, Roger

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review is to assess whether a screening programme for Helicobacter pylori will be both successful and cost-effective. Method: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and the NHS Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness; MEDLINE; EMBASE; SilverPlatter, Biological Abstracts and Science Citation Index-Expanded. We used the search terms Helicobacter pylori and (diagnos$ or identif$ or find$) and (syst...

  9. Management of Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Shiota, Seiji; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    Meta-analysis has shown that successful Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy improved atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Moreover, successful eradication therapy against atrophic gastritis has led to the suppression of the incidence of metachronous gastric cancer. Thus, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research concluded that all ‘H. pylori-infected persons’ should be considered for eradication therapy, irrespective of any background diseases. Successful eradication can pre...

  10. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Alakkari, Alaa

    2012-02-01

    Research published over the past year has documented the continued decline of Helicobacter pylori-related peptic ulcer disease and increased recognition of non-H. pylori, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ulcer disease--idiopathic ulcers. Despite reduced prevalence of uncomplicated PUD, rates of ulcer complications and associated mortality remain stubbornly high. The role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia is unclear, with some authors considering H. pylori-associated nonulcer dyspepsia a distinct organic entity. There is increasing acceptance of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), but little understanding of how GERD might be more common\\/severe in H. pylori-negative subjects. Research has focused on factors such as different H. pylori phenotypes, weight gain after H. pylori eradication, and effects on hormones such as ghrelin that control appetite.

  11. Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All About Food Allergies Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen KidsHealth > For Parents > Stool Test: H. Pylori Antigen Print A A A Text Size What's in ... sample is used to determine if H. pylori antigens are present in your child's gastrointestinal (GI) system. ...

  12. Halitosis and Helicobacter pylori infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E. G.; de Laat, L.; van Oijen, A. H.; de Boer, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    There is disagreement about a possible relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and objective halitosis, as established by volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) in the breath. Many studies related to H. pylori used self-reported halitosis, a subjective and unreliable method to detec

  13. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  14. H pylori infection among 1000 southern Iranian dyspeptic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahmood Reza Hashemi; Mohammad Rahnavardi; Bavand Bikdeli; Mohsen Dehghani Zahedani

    2006-01-01

    AIS: To describe the frequency of H pylori infection among 1000 southern Iranian dyspeptic patients.METHODS: A prospective study was performed in a referral hospital in south of Iran from 1999 to 2005. One thousand dyspeptic patients (518 males, mean ± SD age of 49.12 ± 12.82 years) consecutively underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Multiple gastric antral biopsy samples were taken from all patients for rapid ureasetest and histopathologic examination (96.9% satisfactory samples). Patients were considered H pylori-infected if one or both tests were positive.RESULTS: Six hundred and seventy-one patients (67.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 64.2%-70.0%) were H pylori-infected.H pylori positivity was significantly more frequent in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD)than in those with non-ulcer dyspepsia (P < 0.001).Male-to-female ratio for duodenal and gastric ulcers was 2.7:1 and 1.5:1, respectively. Moreover, the duodenalto-gastric ulcer ratio was 1.95:1. The frequency of H pylori infection among those with endoscopic diagnosis of gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and normal mucosa was 70.1% (398/568), 86.2% (150/174),71.9% (64/89), and 33.5% (54/161), respectively. H pylori infection, male sex, and older age were independently associated with PUD in multivariate analysis.H pylori positivity was associated with chronic gastritis, and chronic active gastritis with odds ratios of 34.21 (95% CI: 12.19%-96.03%) and 81.21 (95% CI:28.85%-228.55%), respectively.CONCLUSION: H pylori and PUD are highly frequent in dyspeptic patients from south of Iran. H pylori is a cardinal risk factor for chronic active or inactive gastritis.

  15. Prominent role of γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase on the growth of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Gong; Bow Ho

    2004-01-01

    AIM: γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) has been reported as a virulence and colonizing factor of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori). This study examined the effect of GGT on the growth of H pylori.METHODS: Standard H pylori strain NCTC 11637 and 4clinical isolates with different levels of GGT activity as measured by an enzymatic assay were used in this study. Growth inhibition and stimulation studies were carried out by culturing H pylori in brain heart infusion broth supplemented with specific GGT inhibitor (L-serine sodium borate complex, SBC)or enhancer (glutathione together with glycyl-glycine),respectively. The growth profiles of H pyloriwere determined based on viable bacterial count at time interval.RESULTS: Growth was more profuse for H pylori isolates with higher GGT activity than those present with lower GGT activity. However, in the presence of SBC, growth of H pylori was retarded in a dose dependent manner (P = 0.034). In contrast, higher growth rate was observed when GGT activity was enhanced in the presence of glutathione and glycyl-glycine.CONCLUSION: Higher GGT activity provides an advantage to the growth of H pylori in vitro. Inhibition of GGT activity by SBC resulted in growth retardation. The study shows that GGT plays an important role on the growth of H pylori.

  16. Eradication of H pylori for the prevention of gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Karolin Trautmann; Manfred Stolte; Stephan Miehlke

    2006-01-01

    Tnfection with H pylori is the most important known etiological factor associated with gastric cancer. While colonization of the gastric mucosa with H pylori results in active and chronic gastritis in virtually all individuals infected, the likelihood of developing gastric cancer depends on environmental, bacterial virulence and host specific factors. The majority of all gastric cancer cases are attributable to H pylori infection and therefore theoretically preventable. There is evidence from animal models that eradication of H pylori at an early time point can prevent gastric cancer development. However, randomized clinical trials exploring the prophylactic effect of H pylori eradication on the incidence of gastric cancer in humans remain sparse and have yielded conflicting results. Better markers for the identification of patientsat risk for H pylori induced gastric malignancy are needed to allow the development of a more efficient public eradication strategy. Meanwhile, screening and treatment of H pylori in first-degree relatives of gastric cancer patients as well as certain high-risk populations might be beneficial.

  17. Nitric oxide synthetase and Helicobacter pylori in patients undergoing appendicectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kell, M R

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to determine whether Helicobacter pylori forms part of the normal microenvironment of the appendix, whether it plays a role in the pathogenesis of acute appendicitis, and whether it is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) in appendicular macrophages. METHODS: Serology for H. pylori was performed on 51 consecutive patients undergoing emergency appendicectomy. Appendix samples were tested for urease activity, cultured and stained for H. pylori, graded according to the degree of inflammatory infiltrate, and probed immunohistochemically for iNOS expression. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 21 (range 7-51) years. Seventeen patients (33 per cent) were seropositive for H. pylori but no evidence of H. pylori was found in any appendix specimen. However, an enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration was observed in seropositive patients (P < 0.04) and the expression of macrophage iNOS in the mucosa of normal and inflamed appendix specimens was increased (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: H. pylori does not colonize the appendix and is unlikely to be a pathogenic stimulus for appendicitis. Priming effects on mucosal immunology downstream from the foregut may occur after infection with H. pylori.

  18. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world's population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class I definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  19. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world’s population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class I definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  20. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with nodular antritis and follicular gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Tomašević Ratko; Golubović Gradimir; Kiurski Miroslav; Stanković Dragana; Doder Radoje; Pavlović Aleksandar

    2006-01-01

    Introduction. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is known to be the must common cause of chronic gastritis having some endoscopic and pathologic characteristies as determinated by the Sydney System for Gastritis Classification. The aim of our case report was to point out the relationship between an endoscopic finding of nodular antritis and the presence of H. pylori infection and active chronic gastritis. Case report. Our patient underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for dyspeptic...

  1. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection Decreases with Older Age in Atrophic Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Shaohua Chen; Lixiong Ying; Mei Kong; Yu Zhang; Youming Li

    2013-01-01

    The clinical pathological characteristics of 3969 adult patients with chronic atrophic gastritis were retrospectively studied. The positivity of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia in atrophic gastric specimens increased with age; however, H. pylori positivity and inflammatory activity decreased significantly with increased age. H. pylori infection was present in 21.01% of chronic atrophic gastritis patients, and 92.33% of the subjects with H. pylori infection were found to have simultaneous ...

  2. Regression of gastric T cell lymphoma with eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Bariol, C; Field, A.; Vickers, C; Ward, R

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is thought to be important in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric B cell lymphoma of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue. The mechanism of evolution from chronic gastritis to monoclonal B cell proliferation is not known but is thought to be dependent on antigen specific T cells to H pylori and its products. Here, we report a case of gastric T cell lymphoma associated with chronic H pylori gastritis which regres...

  3. Helicobacter pylori Stimulates Dendritic Cells To Induce Interleukin-17 Expression from CD4+ T Lymphocytes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Khamri, Wafa; Walker, Marjorie M; Clark, Peter; Atherton, John C.; Thursz, Mark R.; Bamford, Kathleen B.; Lechler, Robert I.; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastroduodenal pathogen that leads to active chronic inflammation characterized by T-cell responses biased toward a Th1 phenotype. It has been accepted that H. pylori infection induces a Th17 response. At mucosal sites, dendritic cells (DCs) have the capacity to induce effector T cells. Here, we evaluate the role of DCs in the H. pylori-induced interleukin-17 (IL-17) response. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were performed on human gastric mucosal bi...

  4. Macrolide and fluoro quinolone resistance in helicobacter pylori isolates: an experience at a tertiary care centre in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To assess fluoro quinolone and clarithromycin susceptibility pattern along with the types of genomic mutations involved in the resistance of Helicobacter pylori isolates. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from June 2009 to July 2010, and comprised 162 gastric biopsy samples which were tested with Genotype at the rate HelicoDR (Hain Life science GmbH, Germany), a reverse hybridisation multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) line probe assay (LiPA). Also, 23S rRNA (ribosomal ribonucleic acid) gene was analysed with three-point mutations at A2146G, A2146C and A2147G for clarithromycin, and gyrA gene was analyzed at two codon positions 87 and 91 for fluoro quinolone susceptibility testing. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analyses. Results: Clarithromycin resistance was seen in 60 (37.0%) of the isolates mainly involving mutation at A2147G (85%) followed by A2146G (n=35; 21.6%) and A2146C (n=19; 11.6%). Fluoro quinolone resistance was noted in 101(62.3%) isolates, while gyrA mutations at codon 87 was seen in 64 (39.6%) and at codon 91 in 66 (40.6%). Isolates showing combined resistance to both antibiotics were 44 (26.9%). Conclusion: High rate of resistance to fluoroquinolones was seen despite the fact that the drug was not part of the first-line anti-helicobacter therapy. There was moderate increase of clarithromycin resistance beyond the cutoff rates where empirical use of this antibiotic is abandoned. The findings warrant the need for pre-treatment susceptibility testing in Helicobacter pylori infections, especially in Pakistan where burden of disease is high and very limited data is available, to improve patient care by providing targeted therapy. (author)

  5. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia; Pacifico; Caterina; Anania; John; F; Osborn; Flavia; Ferraro; Claudio; Chiesa

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the hu-man stomach for many decades without adverse con-sequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent a...

  6. The association of Helicobacter pylori infection with coronary artery disease: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed Zakaria

    2004-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and other gastrointestinal disorders. Since its discovery, a number of extra-gastrointestinal diseases have been reported to be associated with H. pylori infection. Recently, several epidemiological and clinical studies suggested that H. pylori infection has been associated with an increased risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD). Evidence from animal studies showed that H. pylori plays an important role in the acute phase of myocardial infarction by causing platelet aggregation and inducing pro-coagulant activity in experimentally infected mice. However, results from human studies are conflicting in providing clear evidence for an association between H. pylori and CAD. Therefore, the aim of this article is to critically analyze the available evidence to prove or refute such an association. PMID:19861836

  7. The association of helicobacter pylori infection with coronary artery disease: Fact or fiction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Mohamed

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and other gastrointestinal disorders. Since its discovery, a number of extra-gastrointestinal diseases have been reported to be associated with H. pylori infection. Recently, several epidemiological and clinical studies suggested that H. pylori infection has been associated with an increased risk of developing coronary artery disease (CAD. Evidence from animal studies showed that H. pylori plays an important role in the acute phase of myocardial infarction by causing platelet aggregation and inducing pro-coagulant activity in experimentally infected mice. However, results from human studies are conflicting in providing clear evidence for an association between H. pylori and CAD. Therefore, the aim of this article is to critically analyze the available evidence to prove or refute such an association

  8. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with nodular antritis and follicular gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević Ratko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection is known to be the must common cause of chronic gastritis having some endoscopic and pathologic characteristies as determinated by the Sydney System for Gastritis Classification. The aim of our case report was to point out the relationship between an endoscopic finding of nodular antritis and the presence of H. pylori infection and active chronic gastritis. Case report. Our patient underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for dyspeptic complaints and was diagnosed as having nodular antritis, but also underwent urease test and hystopathologic examination of antral mucosa, to determine the presence and density of H. pylori infection and the presence and severity of gastritis. After a course of anti H. pylori treatment, dyspepsia improved and new biopsy specimens obtained two months and six months afterwards revealed no pathological findings. Conclusion. The case report supported the association of H. pylori infection of lymphoid follicles with nodular gastric mucosis.

  9. The prevalence and related symptomatology of Helicobacter pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Andersen, L P; Pærregaard, Anders; Gernow, A B; Hart Hansen, J P; Matzen, Peter; Krasilnikoff, P A

    1998-01-01

    in 46/66 by culture and histology. The presence of H. pylori was significantly associated with active or inactive chronic gastritis. The presence of H. pylori was associated with both parents being born in a country with a high prevalence and a low social class. Helicobacter pylori-positive children......The aim of the study was to assess and compare the IgG seroprevalence of H. pylori in children with recurrent abdominal pain with healthy children and to investigate the related symptoms. IgG antibodies against low-molecular weight H. pylori antigens were assessed in 438 children with recurrent...... abdominal pain, presence of pyrosis, nocturnal pain, relation of pain to meals and bowel irregularities. The seroprevalence was 21% (95% CI: 17-25%) in the children with recurrent abdominal pain and 10% (95% CI: 5-18%) in the healthy controls (p = 0.30). In seropositive children with RAP H. pylori was found...

  10. Local Immune Response in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivrak Salim, Derya; Sahin, Mehmet; Köksoy, Sadi; Adanir, Haydar; Süleymanlar, Inci

    2016-05-01

    There have been few studies concerning the cytokine profiles in gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with normal mucosa, chronic gastritis, and gastric carcinoma (GAC).In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the genomic expression levels and immune pathological roles of cytokines-interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, IL-17A, IL-32-in H pylori-infected patients with normal gastric mucosa (NGM; control), chronic active gastritis (CAG), and GAC. Genomic expression levels of these cytokines were assayed by real-time PCR analysis in gastric biopsy specimens obtained from 93 patients.We found that the genomic expression levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A mRNA were increased in the CAG group and those of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, TGF-β mRNA were increased in the GAC group with reference to H pylori-infected NGM group.This study is on the interest of cytokine profiles in gastric mucosa among individuals with normal, gastritis, or GAC. Our findings suggest that the immune response of gastric mucosa to infection of H pylori differs from patient to patient. For individual therapy, levels of genomic expression of IL-6 or other cytokines may be tracked in patients. PMID:27196487

  11. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:26372825

  12. The antimicrobial effects and metabolomic footprinting of carboxyl-capped bismuth nanoparticles against Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, P; Dowlatabadi-Bazaz, R; Mofid, M R; Pourmand, M R; Daryani, N E; Faramarzi, M A; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Shahverdi, A R

    2014-01-01

    Organic salts of bismuth are currently used as antimicrobial agents against Helicobacter pylori. This study evaluated the antibacterial effect of elemental bismuth nanoparticles (Bi NPs) using a serial agar dilution method for the first time against different clinical isolates and a standard strain of H. pylori. The Bi NPs were biologically prepared and purified by a recently described method and subjected to further characterization by infrared spectroscopy and anti-H. pylori evaluation. Infrared spectroscopy results showed the presence of carboxyl functional groups on the surface of biogenic Bi NPs. These biogenic nanoparticles showed good antibacterial activity against all tested H. pylori strains. The resulting MICs varied between 60 and 100 μg/ml for clinical isolates of H. pylori and H. pylori (ATCC 26695). The antibacterial effect of bismuth ions was also tested against all test strains. The antimicrobial effect of Bi ions was lower than antimicrobial effect of bismuth in the form of elemental NPs. The effect of Bi NPs on metabolomic footprinting of H. pylori was further evaluated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Exposure of H. pylori to an inhibitory concentration of Bi NPs (100 μg/ml) led to release of some metabolites such as acetate, formic acid, glutamate, valine, glycine, and uracil from bacteria into their supernatant. These findings confirm that these nanoparticles interfere with Krebs cycle, nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism and shows anti-H. pylori activity. PMID:24104691

  13. Bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of culinary and medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachel O'Mahony; Huda Al-Khtheeri; Deepeka Weerasekera; Neluka Fernando; Dino Vaira; John Holton; Christelle Basset

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of 25 plants against Helicobacter pylori (H pylori).METHODS: Twenty-five plants were boiled in water to produce aqueous extracts that simulate the effect of cooking. The bactericidal activity of the extracts was assessed by a standard kill-curve with seven strains of H pylori. The anti-adhesive property was assessed by the inhibition of binding of four strains of FITC-labeled H pylori to stomach sections. RESULTS: Of all the plants tested, eight plants, including Bengal quince, nightshade, garlic, dill, black pepper, coriander, fenugreek and black tea, were found to have no bactericidal effect on any of the isolates. Columbo weed, long pepper, parsley, tarragon, nutmeg, yellow-berried nightshade, threadstem carpetweed, sage and cinnamon had bactericidal activities against H pylori, but total inhibition of growth was not achieved in this study. Among the plants that killed H pylori, turmeric was the most efficient, followed by cumin, ginger, chilli, borage, black caraway, oregano and liquorice. Moreover, extracts of turmeric; borage and parsley were able to inhibit the adhesion of H pylori strains to the stomach sections.CONCLUSION: Several plants that were tested in our study had bactericidal and/or anti-adhesive effects on H pylori. Ingestion of the plants with anti-adhesive properties could therefore provide a potent alternative therapy for H pylori infection, which overcomes the problem of resistance associated with current antibiotic treatment.

  14. The effect of Helicobacter pylori on asthma and allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Amedei

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Amedeo Amedei1, Gaia Codolo2, Gianfranco Del Prete1, Marina de Bernard2, Mario M D’Elios11Policlinico AOU Careggi, Department Internal Medicine, University of Florence, Italy; 2Venetian Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Padua, ItalyAbstract: Current evidence indicates an inverse association between Helicobacter pylori and asthma and allergy. H. pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium which represents the major cause of peptic ulcer and gastric cancer, and preferentially elicits a T helper (Th-1 response. Many H. pylori factors, such as the neutrophil-activating factor of H. pylori (HP-NAP, are able to drive Th-1 polarization and to display a powerful inhibition of allergic Th-2 response. This article proposes an overview of the actual knowledge about the effects of H. pylori on asthma and allergy. Special attention has been drawn to HP-NAP as a potential novel strategy for the prevention and treatment of asthma and atopy.Keywords: Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating factor, protein, Th-1/Th-2, Treg, asthma

  15. Infection with Helicobacter pylori is associated with protection against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Perry

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a lifelong and typically asymptomatic infection of the stomach, profoundly alters gastric immune responses, and may benefit the host in protection against other pathogens. We explored the hypothesis that H. pylori contributes to the control of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first examined M. tuberculosis-specific IFN-gamma and H. pylori antibody responses in 339 healthy Northern Californians undergoing routine tuberculin skin testing. Of 97 subjects (29% meeting criteria for latent tuberculosis (TB infection (LTBI, 45 (46% were H. pylori seropositive. Subjects with LTBI who were H. pylori-seropositive had 1.5-fold higher TB antigen-induced IFN-gamma responses (p = 0.04, ANOVA, and a more Th-1 like cytokine profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared to those who were H. pylori seronegative. To explore an association between H. pylori infection and clinical outcome of TB exposure, we evaluated H. pylori seroprevalence in baseline samples from two high risk TB case-contact cohorts, and from cynomolgus macaques experimentally challenged with M. tuberculosis. Compared to 513 household contacts who did not progress to active disease during a median 24 months follow-up, 120 prevalent TB cases were significantly less likely to be H. pylori infected (AOR: 0.55, 95% CI 0.0.36-0.83, p = 0.005, though seroprevalence was not significantly different from non-progressors in 37 incident TB cases (AOR: 1.35 [95% CI 0.63-2.9] p = 0.44. Cynomolgus macaques with natural H. pylori infection were significantly less likely to progress to TB 6 to 8 months after M. tuberculosis challenge (RR: 0.31 [95% CI 0.12-0.80], p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori infection may induce bystander effects that modify the risk of active TB in humans and non-human primates. That immunity to TB may be enhanced by exposure to other microbial agents may have important implications for

  16. Helicobacter pylori and Hepatitis C virus coinfection in Egyptian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Masry Samir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease worldwide. It has been shown that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori plays an important role in chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies, and its eradication has been advocated. The association between H. pylori infection and liver cirrhosis in patients with hepatitis C virus has been documented in different parts of the world; nevertheless, no conclusive data is available in Egypt. Materials and Methods: In the present study, the status of H. pylori infection was sought in 90 patients with chronic HCV infection and in 66 HCV-free healthy controls. Results: The study showed that the H. pylori positivity was increased significantly (P = 0.03 in the HCV-infected patients when compared to that in healthy controls, where H. pylori infection was found in 50 (55.6% out of 90 of the HCV-infected patients versus 26 (39.4% out of 66 of the healthy controls. In HCV-infected patients, the prevalence of H. pylori infection was increased significantly (P = 0.04 from chronic active hepatitis to cirrhosis. H. pylori infection was present in 6/18 (33.3%, 10/21 (47.6%, 16/27 (59.3%, 18/24 (75.0% patients with chronic active hepatitis, Child-Pugh score A, Child-Pugh score B and Child-Pugh score C, respectively. More importantly, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in HCV-infected patients was increased very significantly (P = 0.003 with increasing Meld (model for end-stage liver disease score. The prevalence of H. pylori was documented in 9/28 (32.1% patients with Meld score ≤10 and in 41/62 (66.1% patients with Meld score> 10. Conclusion: It may be stated that our results collectively reflect a remarkable increase in H. pylori prevalence with advancing hepatic lesions, and the eradication treatment may prove beneficial in those patients with chronic hepatitis C.

  17. Helicobacter pylori eradication using tetracycline and furazolidone versus amoxicillin and azithromycin in lansoprazole based triple therapy: an open randomized clinical trial Erradicação de Helicobacter pylori com o uso de tetraciclina e furazolidona versus amoxicilina e azitromicina em terapia tríplice com lansoprazol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cidrão Frota

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Optimal anti-Helicobacter pylori treatment has not yet been established. AIM: To evaluate H. pylori eradication using tetracycline and furazolidone versus amoxicillin and azithromycin in lansoprazole based triple therapy in northeastern of Brazil. PATIENTS AND METHODS: One hundred and four patients with H. pylori infection, as determined by rapid urease testing and histology, were randomly assigned to receive either: lansoprazole (30 mg q.d., tetracycline (500 mg q.i.d., and furazolidone (200 mg t.i.d. for 7 days (LTF; n = 52; or lansoprazole (30 mg b.i.d. and amoxicillin (1 g b.i.d. for 1 week, plus azithromycin (500 mg q.d. for the first 3 days (LAAz; n = 52. H. pylori eradication was assessed 3 months following completion of therapy by means of rapid urease testing, histology and a 14C-urea breath test. RESULTS: H. pylori eradication was achieved in 46 of 52 (88.4%, 95% CI: 77.5%-95.1% patients in LTF group and in 14 of 52 (26.9%, 95% CI: 16.2%-40,1% patients in LAAz group. On a per-protocol analysis, eradication rates were 91.8% (95% CI: 81.4%-97.3% and 28.5% (95% CI: 17.2%-42.3%, respectively in LTF and LAAz groups. CONCLUSION: The LAAz regimen yielded unacceptably low eradication rates. On the other hand, the LTF scheme represents a suitable alternative for H. pylori eradication.RACIONAL: Ainda não está estabelecida a melhor terapêutica anti-H. pylori. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a erradicação de H.pylori usando tetraciclina e furazolidona versus amoxicilina e azitromicina em terapia tríplice com lansoprazol no nordeste do Brasil. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: Cento e quatro pacientes infectados por H. pylori, diagnosticado através do teste rápido da urease e histologia, foram selecionados aleatoriamente para receber: lansoprazol (30 mg q.d., tetraciclina (500 mg q.i.d., furazolidona (200 mg t.i.d. por 7 dias (LTF; n = 52; ou lansoprazol (30 mg b.i.d. e amoxicilina (1 g b.i.d. por 1 semana, mais azitromicina (500 mg q.d. nos primeiros 3

  18. Infecciones por helicobacter pylori Helicobacter pylori infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliam Alvarez Gil

    1994-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se revisan los conocimientos sobre el papel de Helicobacter pylori en varias enfermedades gastroduodenales como la gastritis crónica (GC, úlcera gástrica (UG, úlcera duodenal (UD y dispepsia no ulcerosa (DNU. La revisión abarca aspectos históricos, microbiológicos, clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos de laboratorio, terapéuticos y de patogénesis.

    The current knowledge of the role of Helicobacter Pylori in several gastroduodenal  diseases is reviewed. It includes chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcers and nonulcerous dyspepsia. The following aspects are treated in this paper: history, microbiology. Clinical presentation, epidemiology, laboratory diagnosis, therapy and pathogenesis.

  19. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bulajic, Milutin; Panic, Nikola; Löhr, Johannes Matthias

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and inducing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smoking habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsiste...

  20. [Transmission route of H. pylori].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Masumi; Tachikawa, Tomohiro; Maekawa, Kohei; Fukuda, Yoshihiro

    2013-08-01

    The incidence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is rapidly decreased in Japan. H. pylori infection is mainly acquired in the first 2 years life and the risk of infection declines rapidly after 5 years of age. Person-to-person transmission in the family appears to be the predominant and in the population with low prevalence, several studies showed the infected mother is likely to be the main source of the infection. H. pylori can be detected from vomitus, saliva and cathartic stools and the possibility of source of infection. Waterborne infection is unlikely in the developed countries. PMID:23967662

  1. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  2. Critical Role of Antimicrobial Peptide Cathelicidin for Controlling Helicobacter pylori Survival and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Wu, William K K; Gallo, Richard L; Fang, Evandro F; Hu, Wei; Ling, Thomas K W; Shen, Jing; Chan, Ruby L Y; Lu, Lan; Luo, Xiao M; Li, Ming X; Chan, Kam M; Yu, Jun; Wong, Vincent W S; Ng, Siew C; Wong, Sunny H; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y; Chan, Matthew T V; Cho, Chi H

    2016-02-15

    The antimicrobial peptide cathelicidin is critical for protection against different kinds of microbial infection. This study sought to elucidate the protective action of cathelicidin against Helicobacter pylori infection and its associated gastritis. Exogenous cathelicidin was found to inhibit H. pylori growth, destroy the bacteria biofilm, and induce morphological alterations in H. pylori membrane. Additionally, knockdown of endogenous cathelicidin in human gastric epithelial HFE-145 cells markedly increased the intracellular survival of H. pylori. Consistently, cathelicidin knockout mice exhibited stronger H. pylori colonization, higher expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-1β, and ICAM1, and lower expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in the gastric mucosa upon H. pylori infection. In wild-type mice, H. pylori infection also stimulated gastric epithelium-derived cathelicidin production. Importantly, pretreatment with bioengineered Lactococcus lactis that actively secretes cathelicidin significantly increased mucosal cathelicidin levels and reduced H. pylori infection and the associated inflammation. Moreover, cathelicidin strengthened the barrier function of gastric mucosa by stimulating mucus synthesis. Collectively, these findings indicate that cathelicidin plays a significant role as a potential natural antibiotic for H. pylori clearance and a therapeutic agent for chronic gastritis. PMID:26800870

  3. New Diagnostic Strategies for Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatric Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Benjamin D; Gilger, Mark A; Czinn, Steven J

    2014-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) is a common chronic bacterial infection that is an important cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastroduodenal disease in children. H pylori is also associated with extragastric manifestations, including growth reduction, iron-deficiency anemia, and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Current guidelines recommend endoscopy with biopsy for the definitive demonstration of H pylori infection. In contrast to serology, the fecal antigen test and the urea breath test provide reliable, sensitive, and specific results for detecting active H pylori infection in children before and after treatment. The first-line treatment option for pediatric patients is triple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor and 2 antibiotics, which include amoxicillin and clarithromycin or metronidazole. Decreasing eradication rates and the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of H pylori have led to the use of other treatments, such as sequential therapy or triple therapy with newer antibiotics, particularly in geographic areas with high rates of antibiotic resistance. Patients should be tested after treatment to confirm eradication, as the absence of symptoms does not necessarily mean that H pylori is no longer present. This clinical roundtable monograph provides an overview of H pylori infection, as well as expert insight into the diagnosis and management of H pylori infection in children. PMID:26491414

  4. Analysis of the urinary peptidome associated with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Xiao; Fan-Liang Meng; Li-Hua He; Yi-Xin Gu; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between urinary peptide changes and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection using urinary peptidome profiling.METHODS: The study was performed in volunteers (n= 137) who gave informed consent. Urinary peptides were enriched by magnetic beads based weak cation exchange chromatography and spectrums acquired by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). ClinProTools bioinformatics software was used for statistical analysis and the recognition of peptide patterns. The marker peptides were identified by LTQ Obitrap XL tandem MS.RESULTS: Approximately 50 proteins or peptides which loaded onto the magnetic beads were detected by MALDI-TOF MS. By optimizing the parameters of the model,the Genetic Algorithm model had good recognition capability (97%) and positive predictive value (94%).Based on the model, 2 markers with molecular masses of 6788 and 1912 Da were found that differentiated between H. pylori positive and negative volunteers.The m/z 1912 sequence was parsed as SKQFTSSTSYNRGDSTF.The peptide was identified as isoform 1 of the fibrinogen α chain precursor, whose concentration in urine was markedly higher in H. pylori infected volunteers than in H. pylori non-infected ones.CONCLUSION: The appearance of urinary fibrinogen degradation products is caused by an active H. pylori -induced process.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Antibody Titer and Gastric Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kishikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The “ABC method” is a serum gastric cancer screening method, and the subjects were divided based on H. pylori serology and atrophic gastritis as detected by serum pepsinogen (PG: Group A [H. pylori (− PG (−], Group B [H. pylori (+ PG (−], Group C [H. pylori (+ PG (+], and Group D [H. pylori (− PG (+]. The risk of gastric cancer is highest in Group D, followed by Groups C, B, and A. Groups B, C, and D are advised to undergo endoscopy, and the recommended surveillance is every three years, every two years, and annually, respectively. In this report, the reported results with respect to further risk stratification by anti-H. pylori antibody titer in each subgroup are reviewed: (1 high-negative antibody titer subjects in Group A, representing posteradicated individuals with high risk for intestinal-type cancer; (2 high-positive antibody titer subjects in Group B, representing active inflammation with high risk for diffuse-type cancer; and (3 low-positive antibody titer subjects in Group C, representing advanced atrophy with increased risk for intestinal-type cancer. In these subjects, careful follow-up with intervals of surveillance of every three years in (1, every two years in (2, and annually in (3 should be considered.

  6. Effect of Helicobacter Pylori Eradication on Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahamd Shavakhi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Ammonia has still essential role in pathogenesis of encephalopathy. It is probable that helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection leads to hyperammonemia and aggravates the hepatic encephalopathy via urease activity or its effect on zinc level. This study was aimed to assess the effect of H pylori eradication on hepatic encephalopathy. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 42 cirrhotic patients with encephalopathy were enrolled the study. For evaluation the encephalopathy, flapping tremor, number connection test (NCT and grade of encephalopathy was determined for all of the patients. The prevalence of H pylori infection was evaluated based on positive serology by ELAISA method (Genesis Kit, UK, and/or rapid urease test (RUT during endoscopic evaluation. One month later, after treatment, grading of encephalopathy, NCT and flapping tremor was evaluated again and data were analyzed by software SPSS.Results: Serologic evaluation or RUT showed that 30 patients of 42 (71.42% were positive for H pylori. In comparison between pre and post treatment, grade of encephalopathy and NCT were reduced significantly but alteration in flapping tremor was not statistically significant.Conclusions: Our results indicate that eradication of H pylori may lead to improve the grade of hepatic encephalopathy and NCT.

  7. Peptide Extracts from Cultures of Certain Lactobacilli Inhibit Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, Luc; Vincent, Pascal; Makras, Eleftherios; Leroy, Frédéric; Pot, Bruno

    2010-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori inhibition by probiotic lactobacilli has been observed in vitro and in vivo. Carefully selected probiotic Lactobacillus strains could therefore play an important role in the treatment of H. pylori infection and eradication. However, the underlying mechanism for this inhibition is not clear. The aim of this study was to examine if peptide extracts, containing bacteriocins or other antibacterial peptides, from six Lactobacillus cultures (Lactobacillus acidophilus La1, Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471, Lactobacillus casei YIT 9029, Lactobacillus gasseri K7, Lactobacillus johnsonii La1, and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG) contribute to the inhibition of H. pylori. Peptide extracts from cultures of Lact. amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were most active, reducing the viability of H. pylori ATCC 43504 with more than 2 log units within 4 h of incubation (P amylovorus DCE 471 and Lact. johnsonii La1 were the most inhibitory, while the three other extracts resulted in a much lower inhibition of H. pylori. Protease-treated extracts were inactive towards H. pylori, confirming the proteinaceous nature of the inhibitory substance. PMID:26780898

  8. γ-Glutamyltransferase Is a Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factor but Is Not Essential for Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    McGovern, K. J.; Blanchard, T G; Gutierrez, J. A.; Czinn, S. J.; Krakowka, S; Youngman, P

    2001-01-01

    The contribution of glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) (γ-glutamyltransferase [EC 2. 3. 2. 2]) to Helicobacter pylori virulence was investigated in piglets and mice using GGT-deficient isogenic strains. All animals became colonized. However, the bacterial load was significantly lower for mutant bacteria than for parent strains. These results suggest that GGT activity provides an advantage to H. pylori in colonization.

  9. Management of Helicobacter pylori infection--the Maastricht IV/ Florence Consensus Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malfertheiner, Peter; Megraud, Francis; O'Morain, Colm A;

    2012-01-01

    Management of Helicobacter pylori infection is evolving and in this 4th edition of the Maastricht consensus report aspects related to the clinical role of H pylori were looked at again in 2010. In the 4th Maastricht/Florence Consensus Conference 44 experts from 24 countries took active part and e...

  10. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  11. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Association with Cell Proliferation,Apoptosis and Prostaglandin E2 Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Kai-feng; ZHANG Yang; ZHANG Lian; MA Jun-ling; FENG Guo-shuang; ZHOU Tong; YOU Wei-cheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between H. pylori infection with cell proliferation, apoptosis and PGE2 levels. Methods: A population-based study was conducted in Linqu, a high-risk area of gastric cancer in China. A total of 1523 subjects, aged 35-64, participating in a gastric cancer screening survey were investigated. H. pylori status were determined by 13C-urea breath test, expressions of Ki-67 were assessed by immunohistochemistry, apoptotic cells were detected by terminal deoxynucleotide transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method, and PGE2 levels were measured by enzyme immunoassay. Results: H. pylori infection was positively associated with cell proliferation activity. The mean and median percentage of Ki-67 labeling index (LI) in subjects with H. pylori positive were 14.1±10.3 and 12.0, significantly higher than those with H. pylori negative (-x±s: 8.4±7.0;median: 5.8;P<0.0001). Moreover, the prevalence rates of H. pylori infection showed a tendency to increase according to severity score of cell apoptosis (Ptrend <0.0001), from score 0 to 3, the percentage of H. pylori positivity increased from 67.5% to 96.7%. Furthermore, The mean and median of PGE2 concentration were 628.84±726.40 pg/mL and 411.33 pg/mL among subjects with H. pylori positive compared with 658.19±575.91pg/mL and 455.97 pg/mL among those with H. pylori negative (P=0.209). Conclusion: H. pylori infection was positively associated with increased cell proliferation and apoptosis activity, suggesting that H. pylori infection plays an important role in the gastric epithelial cell malignant transformation.

  12. Soluble adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1, P-selectin in children with Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elzbieta Maciorkowska; Maciej Kaczmarski; Anatol Panasiuk; Katarzyna Kondej-Muszynska; Andrzej Kemonai

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, and sP-selectin levels in children withHelicobacter pylori(H pylori)infection and to evaluate their significance for the morphological changes found in gastric mucosa.METHODS: The study included 106 children: 59children (55.7%) with chronic gastritis and positive IgG against H pylori, 29 children (27.3%) after previous H pylori infection without the bacterium colonization but with positive IgG against H pylori, and 18 children (17%) with functional disorders of the gastrointestinal system but with normal IgG against H pylori. Endoscopic and histopathological evaluation of gastric mucosa was performed based on the Sydney System classification.The evaluation of sP-selectin, sIC AM-1, sVCAM-1 levels in the sera of children was carried out using ELISA test.RESULTS: The assessment of gastritis activity degrees indicated statistically significant values in the antrum and corpus (P<0.001) of children examined. Serum sVCAM-1 levels were higher in group with gastritis due to H pylori infection than in group without infection and differed statistically (P<0.05). Serum sVCAM-1 levels proved to be the highest among other adhesive molecules in infected children and decreased after eradication of H pylori. Serum sICAM-1 levels were similar in all examined groups. Serum sP-selectin levels were similar in children with and without H pylori infection.CONCLUSION: Assessment of adhesive molecules (sPselectin, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1) in the sera of children with active H pylori infection can show the participation of sVCAM-1 in the pathogenesis of gastric mucosal inflammation, sP-selectin and sICAM-1 concentrations in the sera of children with H pylori infection after eradication cannot reveal any significant differences as compared to healthy children.

  13. Helicobacter pylori and food products: a public health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major human pathogen causing gastritis and chronic superficial infection (CSG). It colonizes the stomach of more than 50% of humans and causes disease. This microorganism is associated with the gastric antral epithelium in patients with active chronic gastritis, peptic (gastric) or duodenal ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma H. pylori is present in feces, sewage, and water but is killed by routine chlorination. Therefore, in developing countries, consumption of sewage-contaminated drinking water and vegetables may pose a risk; properly cooking foods and chlorinating water reduces the risk of transmitting H. pylori to humans. In South America the consumption of raw vegetables fertilized with human feces has been found to be a risk factor for infection, and consumption of water from a municipal supply has been suggested as a risk factor for children. Epidemiological studies have found that H. pylori organisms colonize the stomach and duodenum of humans and many animal species and family clusters; it is believed to be orally transmitted person to person. This transmission is the major, if not exclusive, source of infection.H. pylori has been detected in the mouth from dental plaque. Recent observations in persons infected with H. pylori caused to vomit or have diarrhea showed that an actively unwell person with these symptoms could spread H. pylori in the immediate vicinity by aerosol, splashing of vomitus, infected vomitus, and infected diarrhea. In summary, H. pylori is usually spread by the fecal-oral route but possibly also by the oral-oral route and the spread of contaminated secretions. Thus, in developing countries, individuals catch H. pylori at a very young age from other persons (children) in their environment. In developed countries, H. pylori is more difficult to acquire and is usually transmitted from one family member to another, possibly by the fecal-oral route, or by the oral-oral route, e.g., kissing, vomitus. On occasion

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yvan Vandenplas

    2000-01-01

    @@ IS THERE ANYTHING NEW? Helicobacter pylori has been for many years a forgotten bacterium, since the first report on this spiral organism dated from the 19th century[1]. As early as in 1906, an association between a spiral organism and gastric carcinoma was suggested[2].Doenges reported in 1938 that on autopsy not less than 40% of human stomachs were found to be invaded by spiral organisms[3].

  15. Helicobacter pylori Pathogenic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Salamina, M

    2014-01-01

    From 1994, Helicobacter pylori was classified by WHO (World Health Organization) as a class I carcinogen and its infection has been associated to gastroduodenal disease. It colonizes more than half of worldwide population, with a prevalent infection rate in developed countries. In spite of the majority of infected people are asymptomatic, around 20% develop severe pathologies like peptic ulcers and the 1% lymphoma of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and stomach cancer. This signif...

  16. Helicobacter pylori y gastritis crónica: relación entre infección y actividad inflamatoria en población de alto riesgo de cáncer gástrico Helicobacter pylori and chronic gastritis: Relationship between infection and inflammatory activity in a high risk population for gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Carlos Araya O; Miguel Angel Villaseca H; Iván Roa E; Juan Carlos Roa S

    2000-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori has been involved in gastric epithelial cell damage and gastric gland loss or atrophy. Aims: to evaluate role of Helicobacter pylori infection in acute and chronic changes of chronic gastritis in a high gastric cancer-risk population. Material and methods: 200 patients with chronic gastritis were selected from pathological files of Temuco Hospital. A complete histopathological protocol was fulfilled considering the presence of infection by Helicobacter pylori-l...

  17. Helicobacter pylori in Dental Plaque and Saliva

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Nayoung; Lim, Seon Hee; Lee, Kye Heui; You, Jun Young; Kim, Jung Mogg; Lee, Na Rae; Jung, Hyun Chae; Song, In Sung; Kim, Chung Yong

    2000-01-01

    Background About half of the world population is infected with H. pylori, but the transmission and the source of this infection are still unclear. Recently, dental plaque (DP) and saliva have been implicated as possible sources of H. pylori infection. This study was done to investigate the detection rates of H. pylori in the DP and saliva by use of PCR depending on H. pylori infection state of gastric mucosa. Methods In 46 subjects, gastric H. pylori colonization was evaluated with CLO test, ...

  18. Helicobacter pylori urease inhibition by rabeprazole, a proton pump inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, M; Imamura, L; Park, J B; Kobashi, K

    1995-08-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of four gastric proton pump inhibitors (PPIs): rabeprazole, a novel benzimidazole PPI, omeprazole, lansoprazole and AG-2000, on the urease activity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Their 50% inhibitory concentrations (I50s) were found to be 0.29, 5.4, 9.3 and 0.3 microM respectively. Rabeprazole and omeprazole were also potent inhibitors of Jack bean and Proteus mirabilis cellular ureases. The thioether derivative of rabeprazole, one of its metabolites, had no inhibitory effect on H. pylori urease, despite being reported as a more potent inhibitor of H. pylori growth than rabeprazole. The inhibitory effect of rabeprazole was prevented completely and reversed considerably by the addition of sulfhydryl compounds, such as beta-mercaptoethanol, glutathione and dithiothreitol. Moreover, the addition of beta-mercaptoethanol recovered the urease activity inhibited by rabeprazole. From these results, we expected that rabeprazole inhibited H. pylori urease activity by forming disulfide bonds between it and the active site of the enzyme. PMID:8535394

  19. Bismuth(III) benzohydroxamates: powerful anti-bacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori and hydrolysis to a unique Bi34 oxido-cluster [Bi34O22(BHA)22(H-BHA)14(DMSO)6

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, Amita; Blair, Victoria L.; Ferrero, Richard L.; Mehring, Michael; Andrews, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    Reaction of BiPh3 or Bi(OtBu)3 with benzohydroxamic acid (H2-BHA) results in formation of novel mono- and di-anionic hydroxamato complexes; [Bi2(BHA)3]∞1, [Bi(H-BHA)3] 2, [Bi(BHA)(H-BHA)] 3, all of which display nM activity against Helicobacter pylori. Subsequent dissolution of [Bi2(BHA)3]∞ in DMSO/toluene results in hydrolysis to the first structurally authenticated {Bi34} oxido-cluster [Bi34O22(BHA)22(H-BHA)14(DMSO)6] 4.

  20. Bismuth(III) benzohydroxamates: powerful anti-bacterial activity against Helicobacter pylori and hydrolysis to a unique Bi34 oxido-cluster [Bi34O22(BHA)22(H-BHA)14(DMSO)6].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Amita; Blair, Victoria L; Ferrero, Richard L; Mehring, Michael; Andrews, Philip C

    2014-12-14

    Reaction of BiPh3 or Bi(O(t)Bu)3 with benzohydroxamic acid (H2-BHA) results in formation of novel mono- and di-anionic hydroxamato complexes; [Bi2(BHA)3]∞ 1, [Bi(H-BHA)3] 2, [Bi(BHA)(H-BHA)] 3, all of which display nM activity against Helicobacter pylori. Subsequent dissolution of [Bi2(BHA)3]∞ in DMSO/toluene results in hydrolysis to the first structurally authenticated {Bi34} oxido-cluster [Bi34O22(BHA)22(H-BHA)14(DMSO)6] 4. PMID:25341969

  1. On the importance of developing a new generation of breath tests for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Korenev, Nikolai; Kamarchuk, Lyudmila; Pospelov, Alexander; Kravchenko, Andrey; Bajenov, Leonid; Kabulov, Mels; Amann, Anton; Kamarchuk, Gennadii

    2015-12-01

    State-of-the-art methods for non-invasive detection of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been considered. A reported global tendency towards a non-decreasing prevalence of H. pylori worldwide could be co-influenced by the functional limitations of urea breath tests (UBTs), currently preferred for the non-invasive recognition of H. pylori in a clinical setting. Namely, the UBTs can demonstrate false-positive or false-negative results. Within this context, limitations of conventional clinically exploited H. pylori tests have been discussed to justify the existing need for the development of a new generation of breath tests for the detection of H. pylori and the differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of the bacterium. This paper presents the results of a pilot clinical study aimed at evaluating the development and diagnostic potential of a new method based on the detection of the non-urease products of H. pylori vital activity in exhaled gas. The characteristics of breath of adolescents with H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative functional dyspepsia, together with a consideration of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) status of H. pylori-positive subjects, have been determined for the first time using innovative point-contact nanosensor devices based on salts of the organic conductor tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The clinical and diagnostic relevance of the response curves of the point-contact sensors was assessed. It was found that the recovery time of the point-contact sensors has a diagnostic value for differentiation of the H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease. The diagnostically significant elongation of the recovery time was even more pronounced in patients infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to the CagA-negative patients. Taking into account the operation of the point-contact sensors in the real-time mode, the obtained results are essential prerequisites for the development of a fast and

  2. Characterization of the respiratory chain of Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, M; Andersen, L P; Zhai, L; Kharazmi, A

    1999-01-01

    The respiratory chain of Helicobacter pylori has been investigated. The total insensitivity of activities of NADH dehydrogenase to rotenone and of NADH-cytochrome c reductase to antimycin is indicative of the absence of the classical complex I of the electron transfer chain in this bacterium. NADPH......-dependent respiration was significantly stronger than NADH-dependent respiration, indicating that this is a major respiratory electron donor in H. pylori. Fumarate and malonate exhibited a concentration-dependent inhibitory effect on the activity of succinate dehydrogenase. The activity of succinate-cytochrome c...... reductase was inhibited by antimycin, implying the presence of a classical pathway from complex II to complex III in this bacterium. The presence of NADH-fumarate reductase (FRD) was demonstrated in H. pylori and fumarate could reduce H2O2 production from NADH, indicating fumarate to be an endogenous...

  3. Molecular characterization of Helicobacter pylori VacA induction of IL-8 in U937 cells reveals a prominent role for p38MAPK in activating transcription factor-2, cAMP response element binding protein, and NF-kappaB activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisatsune, Junzo; Nakayama, Masaaki; Isomoto, Hajime;

    2008-01-01

    intracellular Ca(2+) channels (dantrolene) blocked VacA-induced IL-8 production. Furthermore, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator (BAPTA-AM), which inhibited VacA-activated p38 MAPK, caused a dose-dependent reduction in VacA-induced IL-8 secretion by U937 cells, implying a role for intracellular Ca(2+) in......Helicobacter pylori VacA induces multiple effects on susceptible cells, including vacuolation, mitochondrial damage, inhibition of cell growth, and enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression. To assess the ability of H. pylori to modulate the production of inflammatory mediators, we examined the...... mediating activation of MAPK and the canonical NF-kappaB pathway. VacA stimulated translocation of NF-kappaBp65 to the nucleus, consistent with enhancement of IL-8 expression by activation of the NF-kappaB pathway. In addition, small interfering RNA of activating transcription factor (ATF)-2 or CREB, which...

  4. Comparison of Oxidative Stress of Gastric Juice in Helicobacter Pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rahbani- Nobar

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Helicobacter Pylori is the major cause of acute and chronic gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer and increased incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma and elevated gastric mucosa lymphoproliferation. Reactive oxygen species have been suggested as one of the main causes of cell injury in H. Pylori associated gastritis. Methods: In this study to evaluate oxidative stress in H. Pylori infection the activities of Superoxide Dismutase (SOD and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPX were measured in gastric juice of sex and age matched H. Pylori positive (n= 43 and negative (n= 43 individuals. This was determined through endoscopic and urease rapid test examinations. Results: The mean activities of SOD and GPX in the gastric juice of the patients (H. Pylori positive were significantly higher than those of control group (H. Pylori negative (P= 0.0001 in both cases. Correlation test between the mean activities of the both enzyme in gastric juice of control group revealed a direct and significant relationship was noticed (r= 0.702, P= 0.0001 while in the patient group a reverse but non-significant correlation was found (r= -0.028, P= 0.859. Conclusion: Since the activity of GPX is considered as being complementary to the activity of SOD, direct correlation between the activities of the two enzymes in gastric juice in uninfected group, and indirect correlation between these in that of infected group may suggest the presence of oxidative stress in H. Pylori infection.

  5. [The role of CagA in H. pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) chronically colonizes human gastric epithelium and induces various diseases. But the mechanism of carcinogenesis in H. pylori infection remains to be assessed. We described that after attachment of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells, CagA is injected directly from the bacteria into the cells and undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylated CagA can bind to SHP-2. Deregulation of SHP -2 by CagA may induce abnormal proliferation and movement of gastric epithelial cells. There are two patterns of CagA motifs between East Asian strains and Western strains. East Asian-type CagA confers stronger SHP-2 binding and transforming activities than Western-type CagA. We assessed the association between CagA diversity and clinical outcome in Asian countries, where mortalities from gastric cancer is different. As results, H. pylori infection with East Asian-type CagA was associated with gastric atrophy and cancer. Therefore, persistent active inflammation induced by the East Asian CagA-positive strain may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:19999107

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection studies using 14C UBT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon 14 (14C) is a naturally occurring radioactive isotope of carbon. The half-life of 14C is about 5,730 years, and it decays by emitting a low energy beta (â) particle of mean energy 49 KeV. The biological half life of 14C is 10 to 12 days. 14C is present in the environment and in all organic materials and behaves in the environment in the same manner as other carbon isotopes. In medicine, 14C can be injected to study abnormalities of metabolism that underlie diabetes, gout, anaemia and acromegaly (adult 'gigantism'), and for diagnosis of Helicobacterpylori (H pylori), The discovery H Pylori by Warren and Marshall in 1982 changed the approach to treat peptic ulcer disease (PUD), Since then H pylori has been the focus of clinical research and debate. The causal relationship between H pylori infection and chronic gastritis is well established, H pylori infection is one of the most common human infections worldwide. This organism has been shown to infect over half of the world's population. By the application of radiation much progress has been made worldwide in the field of medicine. This article presents the application of 14C Urea Breath Test (14C UBT) for the diagnosis of the H pylori bacteria which present in the stomach and duodenum, 14C UBT relies on the urease activity of H pylori to detect the presence of active infection. Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT), Mumbai has developed 14C UBT method and already in regular practice in many hospitals across the country. Orally administered 14C urea will be hydrolyzed into ammonia (NH4) and 14C labelled carbon dioxide (14CO2). The presence of a significant amount of (14CO2) in the exhaled breath indicates active H pylori infection. 14C UBT is relatively inexpensive, is easy to perform, and does not require endoscopy. 14C UBT has proved to be one of the most accurate methods for assessing H pylori status. The ionizing radiation dose involved in this test is extremely low, much lower than the

  7. Role of Toll-like receptors in Helicobacter pylori infection and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sinéad M

    2014-08-15

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects the stomachs of approximately half of the world's population. Although infection induces an immune response that contributes to chronic gastric inflammation, the response is not sufficient to eliminate the bacterium. H. pylori infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is linked to the severity of the host inflammatory response. Gastric epithelial cells represent the first line of innate immune defence against H. pylori, and respond to infection by initiating numerous cell signalling cascades, resulting in cytokine induction and the subsequent recruitment of inflammatory cells to the gastric mucosa. Pathogen recognition receptors of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family mediate many of these cell signalling events. This review discusses recent findings on the role of various TLRs in the recognition of H. pylori in distinct cell types, describes the TLRs responsible for the recognition of individual H. pylori components and outlines the influence of innate immune activation on the subsequent development of the adaptive immune response. The mechanistic identification of host mediators of H. pylori-induced pathogenesis has the potential to reveal drug targets and opportunities for therapeutic intervention or prevention of H. pylori-associated disease by means of vaccines or immunomodulatory therapy. PMID:25133016

  8. Role of Toll-like receptors in Helicobacter pylori infection and immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sinéad; M; Smith

    2014-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infects the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. Although infection induces an immune response that contributes to chronic gastric inflammation, the response is not sufficient to eliminate the bacterium. H. pylori infection causes peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is linked to the severity of the host inflammatory response. Gastric epithelial cells represent the first line of innate immune defence against H. pylori, and respond to infection by initiating numerous cell signalling cascades, resulting in cytokine induction and the subsequent recruitment of inflamma-tory cells to the gastric mucosa. Pathogen recognition receptors of the toll-like receptor(TLR) family mediate many of these cell signalling events. This review dis-cusses recent findings on the role of various TLRs in the recognition of H. pylori in distinct cell types, describes the TLRs responsible for the recognition of individual H. pylori components and outlines the influence of innate immune activation on the subsequent development of the adaptive immune response. The mechanistic iden-tification of host mediators of H. pylori-induced patho-genesis has the potential to reveal drug targets and opportunities for therapeutic intervention or prevention of H. pylori-associated disease by means of vaccines or immunomodulatory therapy.

  9. Susceptibility of helicobacter pylori to metronidazole and its bioactive derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bannatyne Robert

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydroxy derivative of metronidazole can exhibit equal or greater activity to the parent drug against several bacteria. The susceptibility status of 22 H. pylori strains to these breakdown compounds was determined in order to determine their possible role in the therapy of H. pylori associated peptic ulcer disease. The susceptibility was determined using the agar dilution method and substantial activity (MIC90 = 0.33 .tg/ml for the hydroxy metabolite of metronidazole versus H. pylori was observed. The findings define a role for the hydroxy derivative of metronidazole in peptic ulcer disease and support the limited data on the possibility of cooperative interactions between the parent compound, its main derivatives and related companion drugs in this condition.

  10. Caveolin-1 Protects B6129 Mice against Helicobacter pylori Gastritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitkova, Ivana; Yuan, Gang; Anderl, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Claus; Schmid, Roland M.; Vogelmann, Roger; Ebert, Matthias P. A.; Burgermeister, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC) where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES) but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS), infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies (“humming bird”) compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1). Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1) to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87) and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1) to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs) in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells. PMID:23592983

  11. Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A activates tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in gastric epithelial cells through P300/CBP-associated factor-mediated nuclear factor-κB p65 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qiong; Xu, Hui; Chen, Xintao; Tang, Guorong; Gu, Lan; Wang, Yehong

    2015-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori‑initiated chronic gastritis is characterized by the cytotoxin‑associated gene (Cag) pathogenicity island‑dependent upregulation of pro‑inflammatory cytokines in gastric epithelial cells, which is largely mediated by the activation of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB as a transcription factor. However, the precise regulation of NF‑κB activation, particularly post‑translational modifications in the CagA‑induced inflammatory response, has remained elusive. The present study showed that Helicobacter pylori CagA, an important virulence factor, induced the expression of P300/CBP‑associated factor (PCAF) in gastric epithelial cells. Further study revealed that PCAF was able to physically associate with the NF‑κB p65 sub‑unit and enhance its acetylation. More importantly, PCAF‑induced p65 acetylation was shown to contribute to p65 phosphorylation and further upregulation of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α and interleukin (IL)‑6 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that Helicobacter pylori CagA enhanced TNF‑α and IL‑6 in gastric adenocarcinoma cells through PCAF‑mediated NF‑κB p65 sub‑unit acetylation. PMID:26238217

  12. Eosinophil infiltration, gastric juice and serum eosinophil cationic protein levels in Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yucel Ustundag

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Helicobacter pylori is one of the main causes of gastroduodenal diseases, such as chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer. It has been shown that eosinophils increase in the stomach in H. pylori infection. Eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP is a cytotoxic molecule secreted by the activated eosinophils. However, there are no sufficient data about the role of ECP in H. pylori infection and its effect on ulcer development. In this study we investigated the gastric eosinophilic infiltration, gastric juice and serum ECP levels in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer associated with H. pylori.

  13. Antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation as a marker of immune response in guinea pigs with sustained Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszczyk, Eliza; Walencka, Maria; Rudnicka, Karolina; Matusiak, Agnieszka; Rudnicka, Wiesława; Chmiela, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) bacteria are human pathogens causing symptomatic gastritis, peptic ulcer or gastric cancer. Little is known about the kinetics of immune responses in H. pylori infected patients because the initial moment of infection has not been identified. Various animal models are used to investigate the immune processes related to H. pylori infection. In this study we checked whether H. pylori infection in guinea pigs, mimicking natural H. pylori infection in humans, resulted in the development of specific immune responses to H. pylori antigens by measuring the proliferation of lymphocytes localized in mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and peripheral blood. The maturity of macrophages and cytokines, delivered by monocyte-macrophage lineage or lymphocytes, were considered as mediators, which might influence the lymphocyte blastogenic response. The obtained results showed the activation of T cells localized in mesenteric lymph nodes by H. pylori antigens in H. pylori infected guinea pigs four weeks postinfection. The blastogenic activity of lymphocytes was shaped by their interaction with antigen presenting cells, which were present in the cell cultures during the whole culture period. Moreover, the balance between cytokines derived from adherent leukocytes including interleukin 8--IL-8 as well as interferon gamma--IFN-γ, and transforming growth factor beta--TGF-β delivered by lymphocytes, was probably important for the successful proliferation of lymphocytes. The H. pylori specific lymphocytes were not propagated in peripheral blood and spleen of H. pylori infected animals. The modulation of immunocompetent cells by H. pylori antigens or their different distribution cannot be excluded. PMID:24918491

  14. Tnterobserver variation in histopathological assessment of Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ozlem Aydin; Reyhan Egilmez; Tuba Karabacak; Arzu Kanik

    2003-01-01

    Because the presence or absence of H pylori infection has important implications for therapeutic decisions based on histological assessment, the reproducibility of Sydney system is important. The study was designed to test the reproducibility of features of Helicobacter pylori gastritis,using the updated Sydney classification.METHODS: Gastric biopsies of 40 randomly selected cases of Hpylori gastritis were scored semiquantitatively by three pathologists. Variables analysed included chronic inflammation,inflammatory activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, H pylori,surface epithelial damage. Κ values below 0.5 represented poor, those between 0.5 and 0.75 good and values over 0.75excellent interobserver agreement.RESULTS: The best interobserver agreement (κ=0.62) was present for intestinal metaplasia. The agreement was the poorest for evaluating atrophy (κ=0.31).CONCLUSION: Although the results of this study were in accordance with some previous studies, an excellent agreement could not be reached for any features of H pylori gastritis. This low degree of concordance is assumed to be due to the personal evaluation differences in grading the features, the lack of standardized diagnostic criteria, and the ignorance to reach a consensus about the methods to be used in grading the features of H pylori gastritis before initiating the study.

  15. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase: a candidate Helicobacter pylori vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Riordan, Avril A; Morales, Veronica Athie; Mulligan, Linda; Faheem, Nazia; Windle, Henry J; Kelleher, Dermot P

    2012-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important etiological agent of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) and mannosylated AhpC (mAhpC) as candidate vaccines in the C57BL/6J mouse model of H. pylori infection. Recombinant AhpC was cloned, over-expressed and purified in an unmodified form and was also engineered to incorporate N and C-terminal mannose residues when expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mice were immunized systemically and mucosally with AhpC and systemically with mAhpC prior to challenge with H. pylori. Serum IgG responses to AhpC were determined and quantitative culture was used to determine the efficacy of vaccination strategies. Systemic prophylactic immunization with AhpC/alum and mAhpC/alum conferred protection against infection in 55% and 77.3% of mice, respectively. Mucosal immunization with AhpC/cholera toxin did not protect against infection and elicited low levels of serum IgG in comparison with systemic immunization. These data support the use of AhpC as a potential vaccine candidate against H. pylori infection. PMID:22512976

  16. [Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Masumi; Fukuda, Yoshihiro

    2009-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is mainly acquired in the first 2 or 3 years and the risk of infection declines rapidly after 5 years of age. In developing countries, acquisition age of the infection is probably lower than in developed countries. In Japan, main transmission route is intrafamilial and mother to children infection is most important. But in developing countries, some reports suggest that extrafamilial infection is more important. The famous paper revealed that H. pylori can be cultivated from vomitus, saliva and cathartic stools and the possibility of source of H. pylori infection. Bed sharing, large number of family members, delayed weaning from a feeding bottle, regurgitated gastric juice in the mother's mouth are reported as risk factors of the infection. PMID:19999106

  17. Evidence of helicobacter pylori infection in dental plaque and gastric mucosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque of individuals suffering from H. pylori associated gastric disease. Patients and Methods: Patients presenting with symptoms/signs of chronic gastritis were included in the study. Specimens of dental plaque and gastric biopsy were collected from all the patients. The dental plaque specimen was processed for helicourease test and the gastric biopsy specimens were processed both for the helicourease test and histopathology. Results: Out of all patients studied (n=52), 32 (61.53%) were positive for helicourease test with gastric biopsy while 48 (92.30%) were positive with dental plaque. The histopathology of gastric biopsy showed H. pylori associated chronic active gastritis in 42 (80.76%) patients. Eight (15.38%) patients showed chronic active gastritis which was not associated with H. pylori while in 2 (3.84%) patients the gastric biopsy specimen was unremarkable. Conclusion: Majority of the patients have possible H. pylori colonization in dental plaque while about two-thirds have H. pylori associated chronic active gastritis. Oral cavity may be the first place for colonization and then the infection involves the gastric mucosa. (author)

  18. Canadian Helicobacter pylori Consensus Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Richard; Thomson, Alan BR

    1998-01-01

    These guidelines were created to dispel confusion and provide guidance about how the isolation of Helicobacter pylori infection has led to new opportunities and initiatives to improve patient care. The guidelines are designed for practical application in management decisions, but must remain flexible and amenable to change with new information. Updated versions of the recommendations are anticipated. Although it is now clear that H pylori is a major gastrointestinal pathogen, the extent of th...

  19. Primary resistance of Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Tepeš, Bojan; Jeverica, Samo; Ihan, Alojz; Skvarč, Miha

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial resistance, particularly against metronidazole and clarithromycin, is the leading cause for treatment failure of Helicobacter pylori infection. Eradication rates of primary therapy have fallen below 80% in the majority of states including Slovenia. Th e aim of the study was to assess primary resistance to key antibiotics used for eradication treatment. Patients and methods: Between 2007 and 2009 we isolated 97 strains of Helicobacter pylori from the treatment naive p...

  20. Helicobacter pylori in Barrett's esophagus

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreres, Joan-Carles; Fernández, Fidel; Rodríguez Vives, Agustín; González-Rodilla, Irene; Ursúa, Inmaculada; Ramos, Rafael; Val-Bernal, José Fernando

    1991-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is an anatomicoclinical state in which, due to the prolonged action of gastroesophageal reflux, the squamous epithelium is replaced by columnar epithelium. Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various gastrointestinal disorders and has occasionally been observed in Barrett's esophagus. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of H. pylori in Barrett's esophagus and try to establish its role in the pathoge...

  1. Efficacy of the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with chronic urticaria. A placebo-controlled double blind study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaig, P; García-Ortega, P; Enrique, E; Papo, M; Quer, J C; Richard, C

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been involved in the pathogenesis of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) in patients suffering both CIU and H. pylori infection. We selected 49 patients with 13C urea breath test positive, long-lasting CIU and H. pylori infection; 20 remained symptomatic, had positive urease test or H. pylori histologic identification in gastric biopsy material and accepted to participate in a pacebo-controlled treatment trial. They were randomized for a 7-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled H. pylori eradication treatment with amoxicillin, clarithromycin and omeprazol or placebo. H. pylori eradication was assessed by a second 13C urea breath test six weeks after the end of treatment. We observed a significant improvement of more than 70 % of CIU; baseline clinical score was seen in 4 of the 9 (44 %) patients who eradicated H. pylori after active treatment and in 1 of the 7 (12,3 %) of those who did not (p = 0.19). No clinical differences in CIU characteristics were found between patients with and without improvement. No serious adverse effects were observed in either treatment group. We conclude that the eradication of H. pylori may be useful for patients suffering long-lasting CIU and H. pylori infection, although theses results did not reach statistical significance probably owing to the strict conditions of the recruitment. PMID:12396958

  2. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyo; Jun; Ahn; Dong; Soo; Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to theoccurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cag A and vac A are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis.

  3. Comparative genomics of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quan-Jiang Dong; Qing Wang; Ying-Nin Xin; Ni Li; Shi-Ying Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Genomic sequences have been determined for a number of strains of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and related bacteria.With the development of microarray analysis and the wide use of subtractive hybridization techniques,comparative studies have been carried out with respect to the interstrain differences between H pylori and inter-species differences in the genome of related bacteria.It was found that the core genome of H pylori constitutes 1111 genes that are determinants of the species properties.A great pool of auxillary genes are mainly from the categories of cag pathogenicity islands,outer membrane proteins,restriction-modification system and hypothetical proteins of unknown function.Persistence of H pylori in the human stomach leads to the diversification of the genome.Comparative genomics suggest that a host jump has occurs from humans to felines.Candidate genes specific for the development of the gastric diseases were identified.With the aid of proteomics,population genetics and other molecular methods,future comparative genomic studies would dramatically promote our understanding of the evolution,pathogenesis and microbiology of H pylori.

  4. Does Helicobacter pylori affect portal hypertensive gastropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a major etiological factor of peptic ulcer disease (PUD. It is supposed to be a risk factor for the more frequently encountered PUD in patients with liver cirrhosis. Several investigators have evaluated the effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis, portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG and encephalopathy with controversial results. Some reports have shown a higher seroprevalence and suggested a synergistic effect of H. pylori on liver cirrhosis and PHG. However, this increased prevalence is associated with a negative histology and is not influenced by the cause of cirrhosis, PHG, Child class or gender. Most studies have not found any correlation between H. pylori and PHG. In contrast, other studies have reported a markedly lower prevalence of H. pylori in cirrhotics with duodenal ulcer compared to controls. The aim of this article is to review the relationship between H. pylori infection and portal hypertensive gastropathy and the role of H. pylori eradication in cirrhotic patients.

  5. Relation between periodontitis and helicobacter pylori infection

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Pei; Zhou, Weiying

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The correlation between periodontitis and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the mouth was analyzed. Method: 70 elderly patients with periodontitis treated at our hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were recruited. Dental plaques and gargle were collected for H. pylori detection using PCR technique. Periodontal health status of the patients was recorded. 70 control cases with healthy periodontium were also included. The symptoms of H. pylori infection in the mouth...

  6. [Helicobacter pylori - 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2012-09-01

    The author overviews some aspects of literature data of the past 2 years. Genetic research has identified polymorphisms of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and the host which could play a role in the clinical outcome of the infection (peptic ulcer or gastric cancer). So far they have been performed in research centers but with a decrease of costs, they will take their place in diagnosing the diseases and tailoring the treatment. Antibiotic resistance is still growing in Southern European countries and is decreasing in Belgium and Scandinavia. Currently, the clarithromycin resistance rate is of 17-33% in Budapest and levofloxacin resistance achieved 27%. With careful assessment of former antibiotic use the resistance to certain antibiotics can be avoided and the rates of eradication improved. Immigration is a growing problem worldwide: according to Australian, Canadian and Texan studies, the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori is much higher in the immigrant groups than in the local population. An Italian study showed that the eradication rate of triple therapy is significantly lower in the Eastern European immigrants than in the Italians. A recent research has suggested a link between female/male infertility, habitual abortion and Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there are no published data or personal experience to show whether successful eradication of the virus in these cases is followed by successful pregnancies or not. The author overviews the Maastricht process and analyzes the provisions of the Maastricht IV/Florence consensus, in which the new diagnostic algorithms and indications of eradication therapy are reformulated according to the latest levels of evidence and recommendation grading. According to the "test and treat" strategy, either the urea breath test or the stool monoclonal antigen test are recommended as a non-invasive diagnostic method in primary care. Endoscopy is still recommended in case of alarm symptoms, complicated ulcer, or if

  7. EXAMINATION OF THE PROTEIN PROFILE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI UNDER DIFFERENT GROWTH CONDITIONS USING MATRIX-ASSISTED LASER DESORPTION MASS SPECTROMETRY

    Science.gov (United States)

    US EPA currently has H. pylori on its Contaminant Candidate List 2 (CCL 2), methods are needed to detect the occurrence of viable H. pylori in drinking water. H. pyloi is an interesting microorganism because it can change from a cultural and metabolically active state with a heli...

  8. Induction of CD69 expression by cagPAI-positive Helicobacter pylori infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naoki Mori; Chie Ishikawa; Masachika Senba

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and elucidate the molecular mech-anism that regulates inducible expression of CD69 by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection.METHODS: The expression levels of CD69 in a T-cell line, Jurkat, primary human peripheral blood mononu-clear cells (PBMCs), and CD4+T cells, were assessed by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry. Activation of CD69 promoter was detected by reporter gene. Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation in Jurkat cells infected with H. pylori was evaluated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The role of NF-κB signaling in H. pylori -induced CD69 expression was analyzed using inhibitors of NF-κB and dominant-negative mutants. The isogenic mutants with disrupted cag pathogenicity island ( cagPAI) and virD4 were used to elucidate the role of cagPAI-encoding type Ⅳ secretion system and CagA in CD69 expression.RESULTS: CD69 staining was detected in mucosal lymphocytes and macrophages in specimens of pa-tients with H. pylori -positive gastritis. Although cagPAI-positive H. pylori and an isogenic mutant of virD4 induced CD69 expression, an isogenic mutant of cag-PAI failed to induce this in Jurkat cells. H. pylori also induced CD69 expression in PBMCs and CD4+T cells. The activation of the CD69 promoter by H. pylori was mediated through NF-κB. Transfection of dominant-negative mutants of IκBs, IκB kinases, and NF-κB-inducing kinase inhibited H. pylori -induced CD69 activation. Inhibitors of NF-κB suppressed H. pylori -induced CD69 mRNA expression.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that H. pylori in-duces CD69 expression through the activation of NF-κB. cagPAI might be relevant in the induction of CD69 expression in T cells. CD69 in T cells may play a role in H. pylori -induced gastritis.

  9. Metabolic consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is still the most prevalent infection of the world. Colonization of the stomach by this agent will invariably induce chronic gastritis which is a low-grade inflammatory state leading to local complications (peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, lymphoma) and remote manifestations. While H. pylori does not enter circulation, these extragastric manifestations are probably mediated by the cytokines and acute phase proteins produced by the inflammed mucosa. The epidemiologic link between the H. pylori infection and metabolic changes is inconstant and controversial. Growth delay was described mainly in low-income regions with high prevalence of the infection, where probably other nutritional and social factors contribute to it. The timely eradication of the infection will lead to a more healthy development of the young population, along with preventing peptic ulcers and gastric cancer An increase of total, low density lipoprotein and high density liporotein cholesterol levels in some infected people creates an atherogenic lipid profile which could promote atherosclerosis with its complications, myocardial infarction, stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Well designed and adequately powered long-term studies are required to see whether eradication of the infection will prevent these conditions. In case of glucose metabolism, the most consistent association was found between H. pylori and insulin resistance: again, proof that eradication prevents this common metabolic disturbance is expected. The results of eradication with standard regimens in diabetics are significantly worse than in non-diabetic patients, thus, more active regimens must be found to obtain better results. Successful eradication itself led to an increase of body mass index and cholesterol levels in some populations, while in others no such changes were encountered. Uncertainities of the metabolic consequences of H. pylori infection must be clarified in the future. PMID:24833852

  10. The Helicobacter pylori flbA flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene is required for motility and virulence and modulates urease of H. pylori and Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, David J; Coker, Christopher; Testerman, Traci L; Harro, Janette M; Gibson, Susan V; Mobley, Harry L T

    2002-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori and Proteus mirabilis ureases are nickel-requiring metallo-enzymes that hydrolyse urea to NH3 and CO2. In both H. pylori and in an Escherichia coli model of H. pylori urease activity, a high affinity nickel transporter, NixA, is required for optimal urease activity, whereas the urea-dependent UreR positive transcriptional activator governs optimal urease expression in P. mirabilis. The H. pylori flbA gene is a flagellar biosynthesis and regulatory gene that modulates urease activity in the E. coli model of H. pylori urease activity. All flbA mutants of eight strains of H. pylori were non-motile and five had a strain-dependent alteration in urease activity. The flbA gene decreased urease activity 15-fold when expressed in E. coli containing the H. pylori urease locus and the nixA gene; this was reversed by disruption of flbA. The flbA gene decreased nixA transcription. flbA also decreased urease activity three-fold in E. coli containing the P. mirabilis urease locus in a urea- and UreR-dependent fashion. Here the flbA gene repressed the P. mirabilis urease promoter. Thus, FlbA decreased urease activity of both H. pylori and P. mirabilis, but through distinct mechanisms. H. pylori wild-type strain SS1 colonised gerbils at a mean of 5.4 x 10(6) cfu/g of antrum and caused chronic gastritis and lesions in the antrum. In contrast, the flbA mutant did not colonise five of six gerbils and caused no lesions, indicating that motility mediated by flbA was required for colonisation. Because FlbA regulates flagellar biosynthesis and secretion, as well as forming a structural component of the flagellar secretion apparatus, two seemingly unrelated virulence attributes, motility and urease, may be coupled in H. pylori and P. mirabilis and possibly also in other motile, ureolytic bacteria. PMID:12448680

  11. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases in Vietnam: a cross-sectional, hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okimoto Tadayoshi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of H. pylori infection in Vietnam is reportedly high, but the spectrum of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases has not been systematically investigated. Moreover, despite the similarities of ethnicity and diet, the age-standardized incidence rate of gastric cancer in the northern city of Hanoi is higher than that in the southern city of Ho Chi Minh, but the reason for this phenomenon is unknown. The virulence of Vietnamese H. pylori has also not been investigated in detail. Methods Individuals undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy were randomly recruited. H. pylori infection status was determined based on the combined results of culture, histology, immunohistochemistry, rapid urine test and serum ELISA. Peptic ulcer (PU and gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed by endoscopy, and chronic gastritis was determined histologically. H. pylori virulence factors were investigated by PCR and sequencing. Results Among the examined patients, 65.6% were infected with H. pylori. The prevalence of infection was significantly higher in those over 40 years of age than in those aged ≤40. Chronic gastritis was present in all H. pylori-infected individuals, 83.1% of whom had active gastritis, and 85.3% and 14.7% had atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, respectively. PU was present in 21% of infected patients, whereas its incidence was very low in non-infected individuals. The prevalence of PU was significantly higher in Hanoi than in Ho Chi Minh. The prevalence of vacA m1, which has been identified as an independent risk factor for PU in Vietnam, was significantly higher among H. pylori isolates from Hanoi than among those from Ho Chi Minh. Conclusions H. pylori infection is common in Vietnam and is strongly associated with PU, active gastritis, atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. vacA m1 is associated with an increased risk for PU and might contribute to the difference in the prevalence of PU and gastric cancer between

  12. Application of Stool-PCR test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tahereh Falsafi; Raha Favaedi; Fatemeh Mahjoub; Mehri Najafi

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of stool-PCR test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection in pediatric populations.METHODS: Based on endoscopic features (including nodular gastritis, erosive duodenitis and ulcer) and/or a positive rapid urease test (RUT) obtained during endoscopy, 28 children from a group of children admitted to the Children's Medical Center of Tehran for persistent upper gastrointestinal problems were selected to compare biopsy-based tests with stool-PCR. Their gastric activity and bacterial density were graded by the updated Sydney system, and their first stool after endoscopy was stored at -70℃. Biopsies were cultured on modified campy-blood agar plates and identified by gram-staining, biochemical tests, and PCR. Two methods of phenol-chloroform and boiling were used for DNA extraction from H pylori isolates.Isolation of DNA from stool was performed using a stool DNA extraction kit (Bioneer Inc, Korea). PCR was performed using primers for detection of vacA, cagA,and 16srRNA genes in both isolates and stool.RESULTS: Sixteen out of 28 child patients (57%) were classified as H pylori positive by biopsy-based tests, of which 11 (39%) were also positive by stool-PCR. Sensitivity and specificity of stool-PCR was 62.5% and 92.3% respectively. H pylori was observed in histological sections for 10 out of 11 stool-positive patients. Association was observed between higher score of H pylori in histology and positivity of stool-PCR. Also association was observed between the more severe form of gastritis and a positive stool-PCR.CONCLUSION: Association between higher score of H pylori in histology and a positive stool-PCR make it a very useful test for detection of H pylori active infection in children. We also suggest that a simple stool-PCR method can be a useful test for detection of H pylori virulence genes in stool.

  13. The Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori Infection Decreases with Older Age in Atrophic Gastritis

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    Shaohua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical pathological characteristics of 3969 adult patients with chronic atrophic gastritis were retrospectively studied. The positivity of intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia in atrophic gastric specimens increased with age; however, H. pylori positivity and inflammatory activity decreased significantly with increased age. H. pylori infection was present in 21.01% of chronic atrophic gastritis patients, and 92.33% of the subjects with H. pylori infection were found to have simultaneous inflammatory activity. The intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia positivity markedly increased as the degree of gastric atrophy increased. In conclusion, the incidence of H. pylori infection decreased with age and correlated significantly with inflammatory activity in atrophic gastritis patients. The intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia positivity notably increased as the degree of gastric atrophy increased. Large population-based prospective studies are needed to better understand the progression of CAG.

  14. Helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal pathology: New threats of the old friend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sechi Leonardo A

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. It infects over 50% of the worlds' population, however, only a small subset of infected people experience H. pylori-associated illnesses. Associations with disease-specific factors remain enigmatic years after the genome sequences were deciphered. Infection with strains of Helicobacter pylori that carry the cytotoxin-associated antigen A (cagA gene is associated with gastric carcinoma. Recent studies revealed mechanisms through which the cagA protein triggers oncopathogenic activities. Other candidate genes such as some members of the so-called plasticity region cluster are also implicated to be associated with carcinoma of stomach. Study of the evolution of polymorphisms and sequence variation in H. pylori populations on a global basis has provided a window into the history of human population migration and co-evolution of this pathogen with its host. Possible symbiotic relationships were debated since the discovery of this pathogen. The debate has been further intensified as some studies have posed the possibility that H. pylori infection may be beneficial in some humans. This assumption is based on increased incidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GERD, Barrett's oesophagus and adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus following H. pylori eradication in some countries. The contribution of comparative genomics to our understanding of the genome organisation and diversity of H. pylori and its pathophysiological importance to human healthcare is exemplified in this review.

  15. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Seropositivity in Insulin Sensitivity, Beta Cell Function, and Abnormal Glucose Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lou Rose Malamug

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection, for example, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, has been thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Our aim was to determine the role of H. pylori infection in glucose metabolism in an American cohort. We examined data from 4,136 non-Hispanic white (NHW, non-Hispanic black (NHB, and Mexican Americans (MA aged 18 and over from the NHANES 1999-2000 cohort. We calculated the odds ratios for states of glucose tolerance based on the H. pylori status. We calculated and compared homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and beta cell function (HOMA-B in subjects without diabetes based on the H. pylori status. The results were adjusted for age, body mass index (BMI, poverty index, education, alcohol consumption, tobacco use, and physical activity. The H. pylori status was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance. After adjustment for age and BMI and also adjustment for all covariates, no difference was found in either HOMA-IR or HOMA-B in all ethnic and gender groups except for a marginally significant difference in HOMA-IR in NHB females. H. pylori infection was not a risk factor for abnormal glucose tolerance, nor plays a major role in insulin resistance or beta cell dysfunction.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection and serum ferritin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Gabriele; Bode, G; Blettner, M;

    2001-01-01

    serum ferritin concentration as dependent variable and H. pylori infection and several potential confounding factors as independent variable was fitted. In this model, H. pylori infection was associated with a 17.0% decrease of the serum ferritin concentration (95% CI = 9.8-23.6). The association...... study were H. pylori positive, of whom 57.6% had an infection with a CagA-positive H. pylori strain. Age- and sex-adjusted geometric mean of ferritin was 54.5 microg/dl among H. pylori-infected compared with 63.8 microg/dl among uninfected persons. A multiple linear regression model with log-transformed...

  17. Resveratrol Protects against Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastritis by Combating Oxidative Stress

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    Xiaolin Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a very important role in the inflammation of the gastric mucosa and increases the risk of developing gastric cancer. Resveratrol has many biological functions and activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect. The purpose of this study was to probe whether resveratrol inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of any effect in mice. A mouse model of H. pylori infection was established via oral inoculation with H. pylori. After one week, mice were administered resveratrol (100 mg/kg body weight/day orally for six weeks. The mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and IL-8 were assessed using RT-PCR, Western blot and ELISA. The expression levels of IκBα and phosphorylated IκBα (which embodies the level and activation of NF-κB, Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1; a potent antioxidant enzyme and nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2 were determined using Western blot, and lipid peroxide (LPO level and myeloperoxidase (MPO activity were examined using an MPO colorimetric activity assay, thiobarbituric acid reaction, and histological-grade using HE staining of the gastric mucosa. The results showed that resveratrol improved the histological infiltration score and decreased LPO level and MPO activity in the gastric mucosa. Resveratrol down-regulated the H. pylori-induced mRNA transcription and protein expression levels of IL-8 and iNOS, suppressed H. pylori-induced phosphorylation of IκBα, and increased the levels of HO-1 and Nrf2. In conclusion, resveratrol treatment exerted significant effects against oxidative stress and inflammation in H. pylori-infected mucosa through the suppression of IL-8, iNOS, and NF-κB, and moreover through the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

  18. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitory peptide attenuates Helicobacter pylori-mediated hyper-proliferation in AGS enteric epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himaya, S.W.A. [Marine Bio-Process Research Center, Pukyong National University, Nam-Gu, Busan, 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Dewapriya, Pradeep [Department of Chemistry, Pukyong National University, Nam-Gu, Busan, 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Kwon, E-mail: sknkim@pknu.ac.kr [Marine Bio-Process Research Center, Pukyong National University, Nam-Gu, Busan, 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Pukyong National University, Nam-Gu, Busan, 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most critical causes of stomach cancer. The current study was conducted to explore the protective effects of an isolated active peptide H-P-6 (Pro-Gln-Pro-Lys-Val-Leu-Asp-Ser) from microbial hydrolysates of Chlamydomonas sp. against H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. The peptide H-P-6 has effectively suppressed H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of gastric epithelial cells (AGS). However, the peptide did not inhibit the viability of the bacteria or invasion into AGS cells. Therefore, the effect of the peptide on regulating H. pylori-induced molecular signaling was investigated. The results indicated that H. pylori activates the EGFR tyrosine kinase signaling and nuclear translocation of the β-catenin. The EGFR activation has led to the up-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Moreover, the nuclear translocation levels of β-catenin were significantly increased as a result of Akt mediated down-regulation of GSK3/β protein levels in the cytoplasm. Both of these consequences have resulted in increased expression of cell survival and migration related genes such as c-Myc, cyclin-D, MMP-2 and matrilysin. Interestingly, the isolated peptide potently inhibited H. pylori-mediated EGFR activation and thereby down-regulated the subsequent P13K/Akt signaling leading to β-catenin nuclear translocation. The effect of the peptide was confirmed with the use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1487 and molecular docking studies. Collectively this study identifies a potent peptide which regulates the H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells at molecular level. - Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. derived peptide H-P-6 inhibits H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. • H-P-6 suppresses H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells. • The peptide inhibits H. pylori-induced EGFR activation.

  19. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitory peptide attenuates Helicobacter pylori-mediated hyper-proliferation in AGS enteric epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most critical causes of stomach cancer. The current study was conducted to explore the protective effects of an isolated active peptide H-P-6 (Pro-Gln-Pro-Lys-Val-Leu-Asp-Ser) from microbial hydrolysates of Chlamydomonas sp. against H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis. The peptide H-P-6 has effectively suppressed H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of gastric epithelial cells (AGS). However, the peptide did not inhibit the viability of the bacteria or invasion into AGS cells. Therefore, the effect of the peptide on regulating H. pylori-induced molecular signaling was investigated. The results indicated that H. pylori activates the EGFR tyrosine kinase signaling and nuclear translocation of the β-catenin. The EGFR activation has led to the up-regulation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Moreover, the nuclear translocation levels of β-catenin were significantly increased as a result of Akt mediated down-regulation of GSK3/β protein levels in the cytoplasm. Both of these consequences have resulted in increased expression of cell survival and migration related genes such as c-Myc, cyclin-D, MMP-2 and matrilysin. Interestingly, the isolated peptide potently inhibited H. pylori-mediated EGFR activation and thereby down-regulated the subsequent P13K/Akt signaling leading to β-catenin nuclear translocation. The effect of the peptide was confirmed with the use of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1487 and molecular docking studies. Collectively this study identifies a potent peptide which regulates the H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells at molecular level. - Highlights: • Chlamydomonas sp. derived peptide H-P-6 inhibits H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. • H-P-6 suppresses H. pylori-induced hyper-proliferation and migration of AGS cells. • The peptide inhibits H. pylori-induced EGFR activation

  20. Mir-30d increases intracellular survival of Helicobacter pylori through inhibition of autophagy pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Jun; Si, Ruo-Huang; Liang, Yu-He; Ma, Bing-Qiang; Jiang, Ze-Bin; Wang, Bin; Gao, Peng

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine if mir-30d inhibits the autophagy response to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) invasion and increases H. pylori intracellular survival. METHODS: The expression of mir-30d was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and autophagy level was examined by transmission electron microscopy, western blot, and GFP-LC3 puncta assay in human AGS cells and GES-1 cells. Luciferase reporter assay was applied to confirm the specificity of mir-30d regulation on the expression of several core molecules involved in autophagy pathway. The expression of multiple core proteins were analyzed at both the mRNA and protein level, and the intracellular survival of H. pylori after different treatments was detected by gentamicin protection assay. RESULTS: Autophagy level was increased in AGS and GES-1 cells in response to H. pylori infection, which was accompanied by upregulation of mir-30d expression (P pylori infection). In the two gastric epithelial cell lines, mimic mir-30d was found to repress the autophagy process, whereas mir-30d inhibitor increased autophagy response to H. pylori invasion. mir-30d mimic decreased the luciferase activity of wild type reporter plasmids carrying the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of all five tested genes (ATG2B, ATG5, ATG12, BECN1, and BNIP3L), whereas it had no effect on the mutant reporter plasmids. These five genes are core genes of autophagy pathway, and their expression was reduced significantly after mir-30d mimic transfection (P pylori in AGS cells. CONCLUSION: Mir-30d increases intracellular survival of H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells through inhibition of multiple core proteins in the autophagy pathway. PMID:27099441

  1. Pre-endoscopic screening for Helicobacter pylori and celiac disease in young anemic women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucy Vannella; Debora Gianni; Edith Lahner; Antonio Amato; Enzo Grossi; Gianfranco Delle Fave; Bruno Annibale

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the usefulness of pre-endoscopic serological screening for Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and celiac disease in women aged<50 years affected by iron-deficiency anemia (IDA).METHODS:One hundred and fifteen women aged<50 years with IDA were tested by human recombinant tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies (tTG) and anti- H pylori IgG antibodies.tTG and H pylori IgG antibody were assessed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).All women were invited to undergo upper GI endoscopy.During gastroscopy,biopsies were collected from antrum (n=3),gastric body (n=3) and duodenum (n=4) in all patients,irrespective of test results.The assessment of gastritis was performed according to the Sydney system and celiac disease was classified by Marsh's System.RESULTS:45.2% women were test-positive:41 patients positive for H pylori antibodies,9 patients for tTG and 2 patients for both.The gastroscopy compl iance rate of test-posi t ive women was significantly increased with respect to those testnegative (65.4% vs 42.8%;Fisher test P=0.0239).The serological results were confirmed by gastroscopy in 100% of those with positive H pylori antibodies,in 50% of those with positive tTG and in 81.5% of testnegative patient.Sensitivity and specificity were 84.8% and 100%,respectively for H pylori infection and,80% and 92.8% for tTG.Twenty-eight patients had positive H pylori antibodies and in all the patients,an active H pylori infection was found.In particular,in 23 out of 28 (82%) patients with positive H pylori antibodies,a likely cause of IDA was found because of the active inflammation involving the gastric body.CONCLUSION:Anti- H pylori IgG antibody and tTG IgA antibody testing is able to select women with IDA to submit for gastroscopy to identify H pylori pangastritis and/or celiac disease,likely causes of IDA.2009 The WJG Press and Baishideng.All rights reserved.

  2. A low prevalence of H pylori and endoscopic findings in HTV-positive Chinese patients with gastrointestinal symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the prevalence of H pylori infection,peptic ulcer, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and Candida esophagitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative patients, and evaluate the impact of CD4 lymphocyte on H pylori and opportunistic infections.METHODS: A total of 151 patients (122 HIV-positive and 29 HIV-negative) with gastrointestinal symptoms were examined by upper endoscopy and biopsy. Samples were assessed to determine the prevalence of H pylori infection,CMV, candida esophagitis and histologic chronic gastritis.RESULTS: The prevalence of H pylori was less common in HIV-positive patients (22.1%) than in HIV-negative controls (44.8%; P < 0.05), and the prevalence of H pylori displayed a direct correlation with CD4 count stratification in HIV-positive patients. In comparison with HIV-negative group, HIV-positive patients had a lower incidence of peptic ulcer (20.7% vs 4.1%; P < 0.01), but a higher prevalence of chronic atrophy gastritis (6.9% vs 24.6%; P < 0.05), Candida esophagitis and CMV infection. Unlike HIV-negative group, H pylori infection had a close relationship to chronic active gastritis (P<0.05). In HIV-positive patients, chronic active gastritis was not significantly different between those with H pylori infection and those without.CONCLUSION: The lower prevalence of H pylori infection and peptic ulcer in HTV-positive patients with gastrointestinal symptoms suggests a different mechanism of peptic ulcerogenesis and a different role of H pylori infection in chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcer.The pathogen of chronic active gastritis in HIV-positive patients may be different from the general population that is closely related to H pylori infection.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...... gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take...... place only after susceptibility testing. The association of a proton pump inhibitor and two antibiotics for 1 or 2 weeks gives the best eradication rates. The crucial question to elucidate is whether asymptomatic children should be treated to prevent cancer in the future....

  4. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, Anne Vibeke; Kalach, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    . Also noninvasive tests have been studied in children, including serology, 13C-urea breath test and stool antigen test, showing good results in the different age groups as compared to the gold standard. However, the infection often remains asymptomatic in children and the role of this bacterium in...... gastric manifestations is the subject of conflicting reports. Extra-digestive manifestations are also reported in the course of this infection. The treatment of H. pylori infection is influenced by resistance of the bacteria to the antibiotics used. We suggest that eradication of H. pylori should take......A high prevalence and early colonization of Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood was described again this year in developing countries in contrast to developed ones. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy including gastric biopsies remains the diagnostic gold standard method for this infection...

  5. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancy. A diagnosis of infection is thus an important part of a treatment strategy of many gastrointestinal tract diseases. Many diagnostic tests are available but all have some limitations in different clinical situations and laboratory settings. A single gold standard cannot available, but be used for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection in daily clinical practice in all areas, so several techniques have been developed to give reliable results, especially focusing on real time endoscopic features. The narrow band imaging system (NBI) and high resolution endoscopy are imaging techniques for enhanced visualization of infected mucosa and premalignant gastric lesions. The aim of this article is to review the current diagnostic options and possible future developments detection of Helicobacter pylori infection. PMID:27221831

  6. Marked Improvement in Refractory TTP Directly after H. pylori Eradication Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Irina Gringauz; Narin Nard Carmel-Neiderman; Tobin Mangel; Orith Portnoy; Gad Segal; Idan Goren

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disorder involving thrombotic microangiopathy and is characterized by increased platelet aggregation throughout the body. Acquired TTP can be triggered by a variety of conditions including infections. We hereby describe a case report of an 81-year-old female presenting to the internal medicine department with TTP and active chronic gastritis, positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) on biopsy. The TTP was highly resistant to ...

  7. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylori eradication by triple therapy plus Lactobacillus acidophilus compared to triple therapy alone

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of adding Lactobacillus acidophilus to a triple regimen for Helicobacter pylori eradication in untreated patients with peptic ulcers or ulcer-scars. This was a pre-randomized, single-blind, interventional, treatment-efficacy study with active controls and parallel-assignment, set in Coimbra, Portugal, on 62 consecutive H. pylori-positive untreated adults with peptic ulcers or ulcer-scars, diagnosed by gastroduodenosco...

  8. Tight binding of clarithromycin, its 14-(R)-hydroxy metabolite, and erythromycin to Helicobacter pylori ribosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldman, R.C. (Robert C.); Zakula, D; Flamm, R; Beyer, J; Capobianco, J.

    1994-01-01

    Clarithromycin is a recently approved macrolide with improved pharmacokinetics, antibacterial activity, and efficacy in treating bacterial infections including those caused by Helicobacter pylori, an agent implicated in various forms of gastric disease. We successfully isolated ribosomes from H. pylori and present the results of a study of their interaction with macrolides. Kinetic data were obtained by using 14C-labeled macrolides to probe the ribosomal binding site. Clarithromycin, its pare...

  9. Gastric metaplasia and Campylobacter pylori infection of duodenum in patients with chronic renal failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Shousha, S; Keen, C; Parkins, R A

    1989-01-01

    Duodenal biopsy specimens from 80 patients with chronic renal failure, who were undergoing haemodialysis, were examined by light microscopy for evidence of inflammation, gastric metaplasia, and Campylobacter pylori infection. Chronic duodenitis was present in 47 (59%) of patients, of whom only seven (9%) showed evidence of active inflammation. Gastric metaplasia was present in 50 (62.5%) of patients, yet Campylobacter pylori was identified in only two patients (2.5%). It is suggested that the...

  10. Lactobacillus acidophilus ameliorates H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inactivating the Smad7 and NFκB pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yao-Jong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background H. pylori infection may trigger Smad7 and NFκB expression in the stomach, whereas probiotics promote gastrointestinal health and improve intestinal inflammation caused by pathogens. This study examines if probiotics can improve H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inactivating the Smad7 and NFκB pathways. Results Challenge with H. pylori increased IL-8 and TNF-α expressions but not TGF-β1 in MKN45 cells. The RNA levels of Smad7 in AGS cells increased after H. pylori infection in a dose-dependent manner. A higher dose (MOI 100 of L. acidophilus pre-treatment attenuated the H. pylori-induced IL-8 expressions, but not TGF-β1. Such anti-inflammatory effect was mediated via increased cytoplasmic IκBα and depletion of nuclear NFκB. L. acidophilus also inhibited H. pylori-induced Smad7 transcription by inactivating the Jak1 and Stat1 pathways, which might activate the TGF-β1/Smad pathway. L. acidophilus pre-treatment ameliorated IFN-γ-induced Smad7 translation level and subsequently reduced nuclear NF-κB production, as detected by western blotting. Conclusions H. pylori infection induces Smad7, NFκB, IL-8, and TNF-α production in vitro. Higher doses of L. acidophilus pre-treatment reduce H. pylori-induced inflammation through the inactivation of the Smad7 and NFκB pathways.

  11. Structural Insights into Polymorphic ABO Glycan Binding by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonens, Kristof; Gideonsson, Pär; Subedi, Suresh; Bugaytsova, Jeanna; Romaõ, Ema; Mendez, Melissa; Nordén, Jenny; Fallah, Mahsa; Rakhimova, Lena; Shevtsova, Anna; Lahmann, Martina; Castaldo, Gaetano; Brännström, Kristoffer; Coppens, Fanny; Lo, Alvin W; Ny, Tor; Solnick, Jay V; Vandenbussche, Guy; Oscarson, Stefan; Hammarström, Lennart; Arnqvist, Anna; Berg, Douglas E; Muyldermans, Serge; Borén, Thomas; Remaut, Han

    2016-01-13

    The Helicobacter pylori adhesin BabA binds mucosal ABO/Le(b) blood group (bg) carbohydrates. BabA facilitates bacterial attachment to gastric surfaces, increasing strain virulence and forming a recognized risk factor for peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. High sequence variation causes BabA functional diversity, but the underlying structural-molecular determinants are unknown. We generated X-ray structures of representative BabA isoforms that reveal a polymorphic, three-pronged Le(b) binding site. Two diversity loops, DL1 and DL2, provide adaptive control to binding affinity, notably ABO versus O bg preference. H. pylori strains can switch bg preference with single DL1 amino acid substitutions, and can coexpress functionally divergent BabA isoforms. The anchor point for receptor binding is the embrace of an ABO fucose residue by a disulfide-clasped loop, which is inactivated by reduction. Treatment with the redox-active pharmaceutic N-acetylcysteine lowers gastric mucosal neutrophil infiltration in H. pylori-infected Le(b)-expressing mice, providing perspectives on possible H. pylori eradication therapies. PMID:26764597

  12. Helicobacter pylori γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and vacuolating cytotoxin promote gastric persistence and immune tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertli, Mathias; Noben, Manuel; Engler, Daniela B; Semper, Raphaela P; Reuter, Sebastian; Maxeiner, Joachim; Gerhard, Markus; Taube, Christian; Müller, Anne

    2013-02-19

    Infection with the gastric bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is typically contracted in early childhood and often persists for decades. The immunomodulatory properties of H. pylori that allow it to colonize humans persistently are believed to also account for H. pylori's protective effects against allergic and chronic inflammatory diseases. H. pylori infection efficiently reprograms dendritic cells (DCs) toward a tolerogenic phenotype and induces regulatory T cells (Tregs) with highly suppressive activity in models of allergen-induced asthma. We show here that two H. pylori virulence determinants, the γ-glutamyl transpeptidase GGT and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, contribute critically and nonredundantly to H. pylori's tolerizing effects on murine DCs in vitro and in vivo. The tolerance-promoting effects of both factors are independent of their described suppressive activity on T cells. Isogenic H. pylori mutants lacking either GGT or VacA are incapable of preventing LPS-induced DC maturation and fail to drive DC tolerization as assessed by induction of Treg properties in cocultured naive T cells. The Δggt and ΔvacA mutants colonize mice at significantly reduced levels, induce stronger T-helper 1 (Th1) and T-helper 17 (Th17) responses, and/or trigger more severe gastric pathology. Both factors promote the efficient induction of Tregs in vivo, and VacA is required to prevent allergen-induced asthma. The defects of the Δggt mutant in vitro and in vivo are phenocopied by pharmacological inhibition of the transpeptidase activity of GGT in all readouts. In conclusion, our results reveal the molecular players and mechanistic basis for H. pylori-induced immunomodulation, promoting persistent infection and conferring protection against allergic asthma. PMID:23382221

  13. 三种抗幽门螺杆菌法治疗复发性口腔溃疡的疗效观察%Effects of three anti-Helicobacter pyloritreatments to recurrent oral ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐金菊; 杨永进; 李广

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨三种抗幽门螺杆菌法治疗复发性口腔溃疡(ROU)的疗效。方法选择幽门螺杆菌唾液测试板(HPS)检测阳性的ROU患者159例,分为A、B、C三组,各组处理措施为:A组:复方氯己定含漱液含漱;B组:A组处理方法+牙周洁治;C组:B组处理方法+三联药物(枸橼酸泌钾颗粒、克拉霉素片、替硝唑片);观察三组患者的治疗期疗效和治疗后3个月疗效。结果三组患者平均溃疡期、疼痛指数和间歇期均有统计学差异(P<0.05),其中C组改善最明显;总溃疡数组间无统计学差异(P>0.05)。结论联合使用含漱液、牙周洁治和三联药物治疗HPS阳性ROU有明显疗效,提示ROU和幽门螺杆菌可能有关。%ObjectiveTo investigate the effects of three anti-H.pylori treatments to recurrent oral ulcer(ROU).Methods159 ROU patients tested positive using H.pylori Saliva Test Cassette (HPS) were collected and divided into group A, B, C. Treatment measures were as follows: group A: compound chlorhexidine gargle; group B: A+periodontal scaling; group C: B+triple-drug (potassium citrate secretion granules, clarithromycin tablets, tinidazole tablets).Results The duration, pain and interval of ulcers of three groups' patients were different (P0.05).Conclusion The combined treatment effect of gargle, periodontal scaling and triple drug therapy for HPS positive ROU patients is significant effect, suggesting ROU and H. pylori may have a relationship.

  14. Dolor abdominal, dispepsia y gastritis en pediatría: Rol del Helicobacter pylori Abdominal pain, dyspepsia and gastritis in Paedriatrics: the role of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Harris D.

    2001-03-01

    reports makes it necessary to review the concepts of gastritis, recurrent abdominal pain and dyspepsia in children. Therefore the aim of this study was to update the concepts and to clarify their relationship with H. pylori and to discuss their validity in order to promote good clinical practice. Causative associations between H. pylori infection and other conditions are tenuous and speculative, these conditions include recurrent abdominal pain and non-ulcer dyspepsia. H. pylori is firmly established as a human pathogen because it fulfills each of Koch´s postulates as an infective agent causing chronic-active gastritis. Indeed H. pylori plays a critical and necessary role in the pathogenesis of chronic -active gastritis in adults. Whether H. pylori is a cause of peptic ulcer disease is less well established in children, nevertheless, the evidence for its causation is compelling. There is a strong epidemiological association between H. pylori and peptic ulceration in the absence of drug ingestion in adults. Although many people are infected, only a samll proportion will have clinical manifestations of disease. Approximately 10% of those infected will develop peptic ulcer disease during their lifetime. Infected persons have a 2-6 fold increased risk of developing cancer or MALT lymphoma compared to their uninfected counterparts

  15. Marked Improvement in Refractory TTP Directly after H. pylori Eradication Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gringauz, Irina; Carmel-Neiderman, Narin Nard; Mangel, Tobin; Portnoy, Orith; Segal, Gad; Goren, Idan

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disorder involving thrombotic microangiopathy and is characterized by increased platelet aggregation throughout the body. Acquired TTP can be triggered by a variety of conditions including infections. We hereby describe a case report of an 81-year-old female presenting to the internal medicine department with TTP and active chronic gastritis, positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) on biopsy. The TTP was highly resistant to medical therapy; however the patient underwent complete resolution of her TTP following H. pylori eradication. We conclude that acquired TTP may be triggered by H. pylori infection and that treating the underlying infection may play a role in improving TTP's outcome in some patients, especially when disease is refractory to medical therapy. PMID:27127663

  16. Molecular cross-talk between Helicobacter pylori and human gastric mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vittorio Ricci; Marco Romano; Patrice Boquet

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) has co-evolved with humans to be transmitted from person to person and to colonize the stomach persistently. A well-choreographed equilibrium between the bacterial effectors and host responses permits microbial persistence and health of the host, but confers a risk for serious diseases including gastric cancer. During its long coexistence with humans, H. pylori has developed complex strategies to limit the degree and extent of gastric mucosal damage and inflammation, as well as immune effector activity. The present editorial thus aims to introduce and comment on major advances in the rapidly developing area of H. pylori /human gastric mucosa interaction (and its pathological sequelae), which is the result of millennia of co-evolution of, and thus of reciprocal knowledge between, the pathogen and its human host.

  17. Effects of fucosylated milk of goat and mouse on Helicobacter pylori binding to Lewis b antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Tao Xu; Ning Li; Lennart Hammarstr(o)m; Thomas Borén; Rolf Sj(o)str(o)m; Yao-Feng Zhao; Zheng-Xing Lian; Bao-Liang Fan; Zhi-Hui Zhao; Shu-Yang Yu; Yun-Ping Dai; Li-Li Wang; Hui-Ling Niu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effects of animal milk containing fucosylated antigens on Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) binding to Lewis b antigen.METHODS: A mammary gland expression vector containing human α1-3/4-fucosyltransferase cDNA sequences was constructed. Transient expression of human α1-3/4-fucosyltransferase cDNA in goat mammary cell and establishment of transgenic mice were performed. The adhesion inhibitory properties of milk samples were analyzed by using H pylori RESULTS: Goat milk samples were found to inhibit bacterial binding to Lewis b antigen. The highest inhibition was observed 42 h after injection of the plasmid. The binding activity of Hpylori to Lewis b antigen reduced mostly, by 83%, however milk samples from transgenic mice did not inhibit H pylori binding to Lewis b antigen.CONCLUSION: The use of "humanized" animal milk produced by the transgenic introduction of fucosylated antigen can perhaps provide an alternative therapy and preventive measure for H pylori infection.

  18. Marked Improvement in Refractory TTP Directly after H. pylori Eradication Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gringauz, Irina; Carmel-Neiderman, Narin Nard; Mangel, Tobin; Portnoy, Orith; Segal, Gad; Goren, Idan

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disorder involving thrombotic microangiopathy and is characterized by increased platelet aggregation throughout the body. Acquired TTP can be triggered by a variety of conditions including infections. We hereby describe a case report of an 81-year-old female presenting to the internal medicine department with TTP and active chronic gastritis, positive for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) on biopsy. The TTP was highly resistant to medical therapy; however the patient underwent complete resolution of her TTP following H. pylori eradication. We conclude that acquired TTP may be triggered by H. pylori infection and that treating the underlying infection may play a role in improving TTP's outcome in some patients, especially when disease is refractory to medical therapy. PMID:27127663

  19. Parental smoking and infection with Helicobacter pylori among preschool children in southern Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenner, H; Rothenbacher, D; Bode, G;

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to parental smoking is known to increase children's susceptibility to a variety of infections. We investigated the relation of parental smoking to infection with Helicobacter pylori in a population-based study among preschool children who were screened for school fitness in the city of Ulm......, Germany, in 1996. Current infection with H. pylori was measured by a 13C-labeled urea breath test. Information on factors potentially related to H. pylori infection, including parental smoking in the household, was obtained from children's parents through a self-administered standardized questionnaire....... Among 1,201 eligible children, 945 participated in the study (response rate = 79%). Overall prevalence of active infection was 13.7%. After adjustment for confounding factors, we found a strong positive relation between smoking by the father in the household and H. pylori infection (odds ratio = 3.7; 95...

  20. Protein interaction network related to Helicobacter pylori infection response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyu Kwang Kim; Han Bok Kim

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To understand the complex reaction of gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori (H pylori ) in a systematic manner using a protein interaction network. METHODS: The expression of genes significantly changed on microarray during H pylori infection was scanned from the web literary database and translated into proteins. A network of protein interactions was constructed by searching the primary interactions of selected proteins. The constructed network was mathematically analyzed and its biological function was examined. In addition, the nodes on the network were checked to determine if they had any further functional importance or relation to other proteins by extending them.RESULTS: The scale-free network showing the relationship between inflammation and carcinogenesis was constructed. Mathematical analysis showed hub and bottleneck proteins, and these proteins were mostly related to immune response. The network contained pathways and proteins related to H pylori infection, such as the JAK-STAT pathway triggered by interleukins. Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-kB, TLR4, and other proteins known to function as core proteins of immune response were also found.These immune-related proteins interacted on the network with pathways and proteins related to the cell cycle, cell maintenance and proliferation, and transcription regulators such as BRCA1, FOS, REL, and zinc finger proteins. The extension of nodes showed interactions of the immune proteins with cancerrelated proteins. One extended network, the core network, a summarized form of the extended network, and cell pathway model were constructed. CONCLUSION: Immune-related proteins activated by H pylori infection interact with proto-oncogene proteins. The hub and bottleneck proteins are potential drug targets for gastric inflammation and cancer.

  1. Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide is synthesized via a novel pathway with an evolutionary connection to protein N-glycosylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Hug

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a major component on the surface of Gram negative bacteria and is composed of lipid A-core and the O antigen polysaccharide. O polysaccharides of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori contain Lewis antigens, mimicking glycan structures produced by human cells. The interaction of Lewis antigens with human dendritic cells induces a modulation of the immune response, contributing to the H. pylori virulence. The amount and position of Lewis antigens in the LPS varies among H. pylori isolates, indicating an adaptation to the host. In contrast to most bacteria, the genes for H. pylori O antigen biosynthesis are spread throughout the chromosome, which likely contributed to the fact that the LPS assembly pathway remained uncharacterized. In this study, two enzymes typically involved in LPS biosynthesis were found encoded in the H. pylori genome; the initiating glycosyltransferase WecA, and the O antigen ligase WaaL. Fluorescence microscopy and analysis of LPS from H. pylori mutants revealed that WecA and WaaL are involved in LPS production. Activity of WecA was additionally demonstrated with complementation experiments in Escherichia coli. WaaL ligase activity was shown in vitro. Analysis of the H. pylori genome failed to detect a flippase typically involved in O antigen synthesis. Instead, we identified a homolog of a flippase involved in protein N-glycosylation in other bacteria, although this pathway is not present in H. pylori. This flippase named Wzk was essential for O antigen display in H. pylori and was able to transport various glycans in E. coli. Whereas the O antigen mutants showed normal swimming motility and injection of the toxin CagA into host cells, the uptake of DNA seemed to be affected. We conclude that H. pylori uses a novel LPS biosynthetic pathway, evolutionarily connected to bacterial protein N-glycosylation.

  2. Relationship Between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) Infection and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in Southeast of Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamreza Motalleb; Nima Sanadgol; Ebrahim Shahraki; Jasem Estakhr

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are one of the most common, well-known pathogenic agents in the development of peptic ulcers. Some investigators have shown a relationship between H. pylori and Multiple Sclerosis (MS). However, this relationship is controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the association between H. pylori infection and MS. In a prospective case-control study, we studied 78 patients with MS and 123 Healthy Blood Donors (HBDs) for bacterial DNA detection and antibod...

  3. Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Patients with Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura: A Review and the Role of Biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydman, Galit H; Davis, Nick; Beck, Paul L; Fox, James G

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is typically a diagnosis of exclusion, assigned by clinicians after ruling out other identifiable etiologies. Since a report by Gasbarrini et al. in 1998, an accumulating body of evidence has proposed a pathophysiological link between ITP and chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Clinical reports have described a spontaneous resolution of ITP symptoms in about 50% of chronic ITP patients following empirical treatment of H. pylori infection, but response appears to be geography dependent. Studies have also documented that ITP patients in East Asian countries are more likely to express positive antibody titers against H. pylori-specific cytotoxic-associated gene A (CagA), a virulence factor that is associated with an increased risk for gastric diseases including carcinoma. While a definitive mechanism by which H. pylori may induce thrombocytopenia remains elusive, proposed pathways include molecular mimicry of CagA by host autoantibodies against platelet surface glycoproteins, as well as perturbations in the phagocytic activity of monocytes. Traditional treatments of ITP have been largely empirical, involving the use of immunosuppressive agents and immunoglobulin therapy. However, based on the findings of clinical reports emerging over the past 20 years, health organizations around the world increasingly suggest the detection and eradication of H. pylori as a treatment for ITP. Elucidating the exact molecular mechanisms of platelet activation in H. pylori-positive ITP patients, while considering biogeographical differences in response rates, could offer insight into how best to use clinical H. pylori eradication to treat ITP, but will require well-designed studies to confirm the suggested causative relationship between bacterial infection and an autoimmune disease state. PMID:25728540

  4. Advanced trends in controlling Helicobacter pylori infections using functional and therapeutically supplements in baby milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Gamal M; Taha, Tarek H; El-Deeb, Nehal M; Alshehri, Ali M A

    2015-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen infecting about 30 % of children and 60 % of adults worldwide. It is responsible for diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. H. pylori treatment based on antibiotics with proton pump inhibitor, but therapy failure is shown to be higher than 20 % and is essentially due to an increasing in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which has led to the search for alternative therapies. In this study, we discuss the usage of natural extracts mixture as alternative or complementary agents in controlling H. pylori infection so here, we focused on the plant extracts of (Cloves, Pepper, Cumin, Sage, Pomegranate peel, Ginger, Myrrh and Licorice). To that end, Phytochemical constituents detection like Tannins, Glycosides, Alkaloids, Flavonoids, Terpenoids, Saponins, Phenolic compounds, Reducing sugars, Volatile oils, Amino acids and Proteins was demonstrated. Each plant extract was examined individually or in combination for its antimicrobial activity against H. pylori. Out of the used extracts, four mixes were prepared and tested against H. pylori. The antibacterial activities of the four mixes, represented by the diameter of inhibition clear zone, recorded 21, 39, 23 and 28 mm. The most potent mix (mix2) was chosen and mixed with baby milk as a new combination for H. pylori infections treatment in babies. PMID:26604389

  5. Experimentally validated novel inhibitors of Helicobacter pylori phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase discovered by virtual high-throughput screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Sheng Cheng

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a major etiologic agent associated with the development and maintenance of human gastritis. The goal of this study was to develop novel antibiotics against H. pylori, and we thus targeted H. pylori phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (HpPPAT. PPAT catalyzes the penultimate step in coenzyme A biosynthesis. Its inactivation effectively prevents bacterial viability, making it an attractive target for antibacterial drug discovery. We employed virtual high-throughput screening and the HpPPAT crystal structure to identify compounds in the PubChem database that might act as inhibitors of HpPPAT. d-amethopterin is a potential inhibitor for blocking HpPPAT activity and suppressing H. pylori viability. Following treatment with d-amethopterin, H. pylori exhibited morphological characteristics associated with cell death. d-amethopterin is a mixed inhibitor of HpPPAT activity; it simultaneously occupies the HpPPAT 4'-phosphopantetheine- and ATP-binding sites. Its binding affinity is in the micromolar range, implying that it is sufficiently potent to serve as a lead compound in subsequent drug development. Characterization of the d-amethopterin and HpPPAT interaction network in a docked model will allow us to initiate rational drug optimization to improve the inhibitory efficacy of d-amethopterin. We anticipate that novel, potent, and selective HpPPAT inhibitors will emerge for the treatment of H. pylori infection.

  6. Accuracy of Helicobacter pylori serology in two peptic ulcer populations and in healthy controls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rolv-Ole Lindsetmo; Roar Johnsen; Tor Jac Eide; Tore Gutteberg; Hanne Haukland Husum; Arthur Revhaug

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the test characteristics of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) serology and of C14-urea breath test (C14-UBT) in two different peptic ulcer populations and in community controls. Second, the aim was to explore the association between the level of Hpylori IgG antibodies and severity of inflammation as to active peptic ulceration in the same populations.METHODS: Vagotomized (n = 83), medically treated peptic ulcer patients (n = 73) and one reference group of community controls (n = 88) were gastroscoped.H pylori status was determined by histology, bacterial growth, C14-UBT and serology. Based on the updated Sydney System, cumulative scores from biopsies from the prepyloruos, incisura angularis, corpus and fundus were calculated.RESULTS: The prevalence of Hpylori infection varied from 70% to 79%. The C14-UBT had high accuracy compared to the serology test. The sensitivity of the serology test was good, but the specificity was low (41%-71%). The association between H pylori IgG antibodies and scores of gastric mucosal inflammation and current or previous peptic ulcer were weak.CONCLUSION: The accuracy of C14-UBT to diagnose Hpylori infection was good, and the clinical utility of a negative H pylori serology test was substantial, while the gain in clinical information of a positive test was meagre. Positive H pylori titres could not distinguish between subjects with or those without active peptic ulceration.

  7. Natural Killer Cells and Helicobacter pylori Infection: Bacterial Antigens and Interleukin-12 Act Synergistically To Induce Gamma Interferon Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Cheol H.; Lundgren, Anna; Azem, Josef; Sjöling, Åsa; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B. Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is known to induce a local immune response, which is characterized by activation of lymphocytes and the production of IFN-γ in the stomach mucosa. Since not only T cells, but also natural killer (NK) cells, are potent producers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), we investigated whether NK cells play a role in the immune response to H. pylori infection. Our results showed that NK cells were present in both the gastric and duodenal mucosae but that H. pylori infection did not affect the infiltration of NK cells into the gastrointestinal area. Furthermore, we could show that NK cells could be activated directly by H. pylori antigens, as H. pylori bacteria, as well as lysate from H. pylori, induced the secretion of IFN-γ by NK cells. NK cells were also activated without direct contact when separated from the bacteria by an epithelial cell layer, indicating that the activation of NK cells by H. pylori can also occur in vivo, in the infected stomach mucosa. Moreover, the production of IFN-γ by NK cells was greatly enhanced when a small amount of interleukin-12 (IL-12) was added, and this synergistic effect was associated with increased expression of the IL-12 receptor β2. It was further evident that bacterial lysate alone was sufficient to induce the activation of cytotoxicity-related molecules. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NK cells are present in the gastroduodenal mucosa of humans and that NK cells produce high levels of IFN-γ when stimulated with a combination of H. pylori antigen and IL-12. We propose that NK cells play an active role in the local immune response to H. pylori infection. PMID:15731046

  8. Helicobacter pylori and Peptic Ulcers

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-17

    In this podcast, CDC's Dr. David Swerdlow discusses the relationship between Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease and trends in hospitalization rates for peptic ulcer disease in the United States between 1998 and 2005.  Created: 8/17/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 8/17/2010.

  9. Differentiation of Helicobacter pylori isolates by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Li; SUN Yong; ZHANG Ya-li; ZHANG Zhen-shu; ZHOU Dian-yuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association between the diversity of urease gene and urease activity of clinical isolates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Methods: Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of urease gene and rapid urease activity test were used to study the urease activity of different clinical isolates of H. pylori. Results: H. pylori clinical isolates were divided into 4types according to their PCR-RFLP results of urease gene and urease activity. Type I , possessing strong urease activity (0. 11) and presented 1 fragment of 1.7 kb by PCR-RFLP, had close relations with gastric ulcer; type Ⅱ , with the weakest urease activity (0. 07) and 2 fragments (1.3 and 0. 4 kb respectively), was associated with duodenal bulb ulcer; type Ⅱ , with the strongest urease activity (0. 12) and 2 fragments (0. 4and 0. 17 kb) with or without 1 fragment (0. 23 or 0. 37 kb) , was responsible for gastritis; type Ⅳ, with weak urease activity (0. 09) and 2 fragments (1.5 and 0. 2 kb), was shown to be related to both gastric and duodenal bulb ulcers. Conclusion: The diversity of urease gene decides different urease activities of different clinical isolates of H. pylori, hence the different possibilities of pathogenesis due to this bacteria.

  10. [Helicobacter pylori: a new cardiovascular risk factor?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Torres, Alejandra; Martínez Gaensly, Miguel

    2002-06-01

    There is increasing evidence that certain microbial agents may have an etiopathogenic role in the development of atherothrombosis. Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium that causes peptic ulcer disease, has been suggested as one of the microbes involved in the development of atherothrombosis. This hypothesis is based on the following observations: a) a higher prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, or cerebrovascular disease; b) the coincidence of Helicobacter pylori infection and cardiovascular risk factors, such as serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and plasma fibrinogen; c) Helicobacter pylori seropositivity correlates with acute-phase proteins associated with higher risk of coronary disease, such as C-reactive protein, and d) controversial PCR studies indicating the presence of Helicobacter pylori in atheromas. Analysis of the scientific evidence suggests that Helicobacter pylori infection could indirectly contribute to the development and severity of atherothrombosis and cardiovascular disease. PMID:12113724

  11. H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2007-01-01

    AIM:To study whether H pylori are associated with chronic cholecystitis.METHODS:The subjects were divided into three groups:H pylori-infected cholecystitis group,H pylorinegative cholecystitis group and control group.Pathologic changes of the gallbladder were observed by optic and electronic microscopes and the levels of interleukin-1,6 and 8(IL-1,6 and 8)were detected by radioimmunoassay.RESULTS:Histological evidence of chronic cholecystitis including degeneration,necrosis,inflammatory cell infiltration,were found in the region where H pylori-colonized.Levels of IL-1,6 and 8 in gallbladder mucosa homogenates were significantly higher in H pylori-infected cholecystitis group than those in H pylori-negative cholecystitis group and control group.CONCLUSION:H pylori infection may be related to cholecystitis.

  12. Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Nakić, Dario; Včev, Aleksandar; Jović, Albino; Patrka, Jogen; Zekanović, Dražen; Klarin, Ivo; Ivanac, Krešimir; Mrđen, Anamarija; Balen, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether H. pylori infection is an independent risk factor for acutemyocardial infarction (AMI), determine is there a link between H. pylori infection and severity of disease. In this prospective, single centre study, were enrolled 100 patients with AMI and control group was consisted 93 healthy individuals. The results of this study showed no difference between H. pylori seropositivity distribution in the investigate and control group ...

  13. Paf-acether synthesis by Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Denizot, Y.; Sobhani, I; Rambaud, J C; M. Lewin; Thomas, Y.; Benveniste, J

    1990-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that Helicobacter pylori may play a role in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal ulcers in man but direct evidence of mucosal injury by this microorganism is still lacking. Paf-acether (paf) causes a number of disorders including ischaemic bowel necrosis and gastroduodenal ulceration. Since paf is produced by Escherichia coli, we investigated whether it could be synthesised by H pylori. Five H pylori isolates were collected from antral biopsy specimens from patients wit...

  14. Helicobacter pylori: Beginning the Second Decade

    OpenAIRE

    Matisko, Ann; Thomson, ABR

    1995-01-01

    ‘Beginning the Second Decade’ - a recent international meeting on Helicobacter pylori - was held in conjunction with the VIIth International Workshop on Gastroduodenal Pathology and H pylori and with the meeting of the European Helicobacter pylori Study Group in Houston, Texas from September 30 to October 1, 1994. A menu of 476 abstracts, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology (1994;89:8), highlighted the explosion of advances in this area. The Houston meeting was followed by t...

  15. Dietary prevention of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric cancer with kimchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young-Min; Park, Kun Young; Lee, Don Haeng; Yoo, Joon-Hwan; Cho, Joo Young; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2015-10-01

    To prove whether dietary intervention can prevent Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer, we developed cancer preventive kimchi (cpKimchi) through special recipe and administered to chronic H. pylori-initiated, high salt diet-promoted, gastric tumorigenesis mice model. H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice were administered with cpKimchi mixed in drinking water up to 36 weeks. Gross and pathological gastric lesions were evaluated after 24 and 36 weeks, respectively and explored underlying molecular changes to explain efficacies. Cancer preventive actions of anti-inflammation and anti-mutagenesis were compared between standard recipe kimchi (sKimchi) and special recipe cpKimchi in in vitro H. pylori-infected cell model. The erythematous and nodular changes, mucosal ulcerative and erosive lesions in the stomach were noted at 24th weeks, but cpKimchi administration significantly ameliorated. After 36th weeks, scattered nodular masses, some ulcers, and thin nodular gastric mucosa were noted in H. pylori-infected mice, whereas these gross lesions were significantly attenuated in cpKimchi group. On molecular analysis, significant expressions of COX-2 and IL-6, activated NF-κB and STAT3, increased apoptosis, and marked oxidative stresses were noted in H. pylori-infected group relevant to tumorigenesis, but these were all significantly attenuated in cpKimchi group. cpKimchi extracts imparted significant selective induction of apoptosis only in cancer cells, led to inhibition of H. pylori-induced proliferation, while no cytotoxicity through significant HO-1 induction in non-transformed gastric cells. In conclusion, daily dietary intake of cpKimchi can be an effective way either to rejuvenate H. pylori-atrophic gastritis or to prevent tumorigenesis supported with the concerted actions of anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-mutagenic mechanisms. PMID:26317548

  16. HELICOBACTER PYLORI-RELATED GASTRITIS AND LYMPHOID TISSUE HYPERPLASIA IN THE AGED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高天; 陈晓宇; 胡梅洁

    2003-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between Helicobacter pylori-related gastritis and the development of lymphoid tissue hyperplasia in the antral mucosa and to pursue its evolution after eradication of H.pylori in the aged. Methods Gastric antral mucosa biopsy specimens for microscopic study were obtained from 101 chronic gastritis patients over 60 years old with H.pylori-positive in the period from 2000 to 2001, and meanwhile those from 124 H.pylori-positive chronic gastritis patients under the age of 60 served as controls. Four to six weeks after a course of anti-H.pylori therapy, biopsy specimens were again obtained. Lym-phoid follicles and aggregates were counted and other pathologic features were scored according to the updated Sydney System for classification of chronic gastritis. Results The prevalence and density of lymphoid follicles and aggregates were significantly lower in the aged as compared with those in the control group, being 36. 6%(37/101) and 0. 41 vs. 72. 5%(90/124) and 0. 81, respectively(P<0.0001). The prevalence and density of lymphoid follicles and aggregates correlated strongly with the activity and severity of gastric antral mucosal inflammation in both groups. Eradication of H.pylori resulted in a decrease in the prevalence and density of lymphoid follicles and aggregates in both groups, especially in the aged group. Conclusion The prevalence and density of lymphoid follicles and aggregates in gastric antral mucosal biopsies correlated closely with H.phlori infection in the aged, therefore, anti-H.pylori treatment would be of importance to the aged patients infected with H.pylori.

  17. Evaluation on antibiotic resistance of helicobacter pylori isolated from patients admitted to tooba medical center, Sari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Talebi BezminAbadi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 17 March, 2009; Accepted 8 July, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Helicobacter pylori, which infect approximately one half of the world’s population, are an important risk factor in chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication is now widely recommended as the most effective treatment of peptic ulcer disease. One of the most important reasons for treatment failure is H. pylori resistance to the antimicrobials usage in therapy. The aim of this study was to determine susceptibility patterns of H. pylori isolates in 6 routine anti-microbial agents in Northern Iran.Materials and methods: 125 patients from Tooba Medical Center in Sari with endoscopic evidence of dyspepsia complaints were used for obtaining gastric biopsies specimens. Biopsies were sent to the laboratory in thioglycolate broth (transport medium. Bacteria were primarily cultured on Columbia agar supplemented with 7% horse blood, 7% fetal calf serum. Urease, Catalase and Oxidase activities were used for H. pylori identification. Bacterial suspensions equivalent to 3 Mc. Farlands were spread on plates, along with antibiotic disks and placed in the diameter zone. Inhibition was measured after 3 days of incubation in micro-aerophilic condition.Results: H. pylori were isolated from 116(92.8% subjects, a total of 125 biopsy specimens. Resistance to metronidazole, amoxicillin, clarithromycin, tetracycline, furazolidone and ciprofloxacin were 71%, 35%, 25%, 9%, 24% and 25%, respectively. Multiple resistance (amoxicillin-clarithromycin-metronidazole were found in (65% of the isolates.Conclusion: Comparison of our data with previous results showed that prevalence of H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, furazolidone and metronidazole has increased in Iran considerably. Resistance to amoxicillin in our study was too high in comparison with foreign studies. The present study demonstrates the need for continuous monitoring of the antimicrobial

  18. 3rd BRAZILIAN CONSENSUS ON Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.

  19. Genotyping analysis of Helicobacter pylori using multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeats analysis in five regions of China and Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jinyong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori is the major causative agent of chronic active gastritis. The population of H. pylori shows a high genomic variability among isolates. And the polymorphism of repeat-units of genomics had participated the important process of evolution. Its long term colonization of the stomach caused different clinical outcomes, which may relate to the high degree of genetic variation of H. pylori. A variety of molecular typing tools have been developed to access genetic relatedness in H. pylori isolates. However, there is still no standard genotyping system of this bacterium. The MLVA (Multi-locus of variable number of tandem repeat analysis method is useful for performing phylogenetic analysis and is widely used in bacteria genotyping; however, there's little application in H. pylori analysis. This article is the first application of the MLVA method to investigate H. pylori from different districts and ethnic groups of China. Results MLVA of 12 VNTR loci with high discrimination power based on 30 candidates were performed on a collection of 202 strains of H. pylori which originated from five regions of China and Japan. Phylogenetic tree was constructed using MLVA profiles. 12 VNTR loci presented with high various polymorphisms, and the results demonstrated very close relationships between genotypes and ethnic groups. Conclusions This study used MLVA methodology providing a new perspective on the ethnic groups and distribution characteristics of H. pylori.

  20. Helicobacter pylori filtrate impairs spatial learning and memory in rats and increases β-amyloid by enhancing expression of presenilin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Lian eWang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection is related with a high risk of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD, but the intrinsic link between H.pylori infection and AD development is still missing. In the present study, we explored the effect of H.pylori infection on cognitive function and β-amyloid production in rats. We found that intraperitoneal injection of H.pylori filtrate induced spatial learning and memory deficit in rats with a simultaneous retarded dendritic spine maturation in hippocampus. Injection of H.pylori filtrate significantly increased Aβ42 both in the hippocampus and cortex, together with an increased level of presenilin-2 (PS-2, one key component of γ-secretase involved in Aβ production. Incubation of H.pylori filtrate with N2a cells which over-express APP also resulted in increased PS-2 expression and Aβ42 overproduction. Injection of Escherichia coli (E.coli filtrate, another common intestinal bacterium, had no effect on cognitive function in rats and Aβ production in rats and cells. These data suggest a specific effect of H.pylori on cognition and Aβ production. We conclude that soluble surface fractions of H.pylori may promote Aβ42 formation by enhancing the activity of γ-secretase, thus induce cognitive impairment through interrupting the synaptic function.

  1. Polyelectrolyte coated multilayered liposomes (nanocapsules) for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Parul; Jain, Sanyog; Prasad, K N; Jain, S K; Vyas, Suresh P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the major causes of gastric cancers. A number of systems have already been reported, but 100% eradication has never been achieved. The present invention designs a gastro-retentive drug delivery system incorporated with amoxicillin and metronidazole, specifically suited for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infections due to its mucoadhesiveness in the presence of polyelectrolyte polymers. The system possesses the advantages of both vesicular and particulate carriers, and it was prepared by alternative coating of polyanion (poly(acrylic acid), PAA) and polycation (poly(allylamine hydrochloride), PAH) using liposomes as the core. Compared with the conventional liposomes, the polyelectrolyte based multilayered system (nanocapsules) gave prolonged drug release in simulated gastric fluid, which is well suited for drug delivery against H. pylori infection in the stomach. In vitro growth inhibition study, agglutination assay, and in situ adherence assay in cultured H. pylori suggested the successful in vitro activity and binding propensity of the system. In vivo bacterial clearance study carried out in a H. pylori infected mouse model finally confirmed the success of the developed novel nanocapsule system. Thus, the newly developed composite nanocapsules along with the use of combination therapy proved to have commendable potential in Helicobacter pylori eradication as compared to already existing conventional and novel drug delivery systems. PMID:19718807

  2. Involvement of Toll-like receptors on Helicobacter pylori-induced immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romy Käbisch

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a major role in the innate immune response since they recognize a broad repertoire of PAMPs mainly via Toll-like receptors (TLRs. During Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, TLRs have been shown to be important to control cytokine response particularly in murine DCs. In the present study we analyzed the effect of blocking TLRs on human DCs. Co-incubation of human DCs with H. pylori resulted in the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12p70, IL-6 and IL-10. Release of IL-12p70 and IL-10 was predominantly influenced when TLR4 signaling was blocked by adding specific antibodies, suggesting a strong influence on subsequent T cell responses through TLR4 activation on DCs. Co-incubation of H. pylori-primed DC with allogeneic CD4+ T cells resulted in the production of IFN-γ and IL-17A as well as the expression of Foxp3, validating a mixed Th1/Th17 and Treg response in vitro. Neutralization of TLR4 during H. pylori infection resulted in significantly decreased amounts of IL-17A and IFN-γ and reduced levels of Foxp3-expressing and IL-10-secreting T cells. Our findings suggest that DC cytokine secretion induced upon TLR4-mediated recognition of H. pylori influences inflammatory and regulatory T cell responses, which might facilitate the chronic bacterial persistence.

  3. Helicobacter pylori and T Helper Cells: Mechanisms of Immune Escape and Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Larussa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of at least half of the human population, causing a worldwide infection that appears in early childhood and if not treated, it can persist for life. The presence of symptoms and their severity depend on bacterial components, host susceptibility, and environmental factors, which allow H. pylori to switch between commensalism and pathogenicity. H. pylori-driven interactions with the host immune system underlie the persistence of the infection in humans, since the bacterium is able to interfere with the activity of innate and adaptive immune cells, reducing the inflammatory response in its favour. Gastritis due to H. pylori results from a complex interaction between several T cell subsets. In particular, H. pylori is known to induce a T helper (Th1/Th17 cell response-driven gastritis, whose impaired modulation caused by the bacterium is thought to sustain the ongoing inflammatory condition and the unsuccessful clearing of the infection. In this review we discuss the current findings underlying the mechanisms implemented by H. pylori to alter the T helper lymphocyte proliferation, thus facilitating the development of chronic infections and allowing the survival of the bacterium in the human host.

  4. Tnfluence of various proton pump inhibitors on intestinal metaplasia in noneradicated Helicobacter pylori patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marinko Marusic; Zarko Babic; Mirjana Nesanovic; Mira Lucijanic-Mlinac,; Vesna Stajcar

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Intestinal metaplasia (IM) is more often found in patients with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection, while eradication of H pylori results in significant reduction in the severity and activity of chronic gastritis. We aimed to determine in patients with unsuccessful eradication of H pylori the role of various proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)having different mechanisms in the resolution of IM.METHODS: We confirmed endoscopically and pathohistologically (Sydney classification) the IM in 335 patients with gastritis before and after medication for eradication of H pylori(Maastricht Protocol 2002). H pylori infection was determined by using histology, urease test and culture. Control endoscopy and histology were done after 30 d and thereafter (within 1 year). Unsuccessful eradication was considered if only one of the three tests (histology, urease and culture) was negative after therapy protocol. We used omeprazole, pantoprazole,lansoprazole in therapy protocols (in combination with two antibiotics).RESULTS: We found no significant difference in resolution of IM by using different PPI between the groups of eradicated and noneradicated patients (P<0.4821 and P<0.4388,respectively).CONCLUSION: There is no significant difference in resolution of intestinal metaplasia by different proton pump inhibitors.

  5. Review: Pharmacological ins and outs of medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal; Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Usmanghani, Khan; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2015-05-01

    Since Helicobacter pylori was discovered in 1980, it has been considered as a major cause in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphomas, and gastric cancer. Eventually antibiotics were designed to eradicate this bacterium, which not only prevent peptic ulcer recurrence but also decrease the chances of developing gastric cancer. Propitious consequences of these antibiotic regimens and better hygienic conditions, particularly in developed countries, resulted in significant decline in the prevalence of H. pylori infection. However, persistent high H. pylori infection in developing countries, decreased patience compliance and emerging antibiotic resistance forced researchers to quest for novel candidates. Herbal medicines have always served as a leading source in drug discovery. Since time immemorial, herbs have been used to treat various disorders covering from minor illnesses as pain to life threatening conditions like cancer. Ample amount of studies from different parts of the world have shown promising activities of medicinal herbs not only against H. pylori but also associated disorders while employing in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies. In this review, these multiple pharmacological effects of medicinal plants and their chemical constituents will be discussed in relation to H. pylori not only to scientifically evaluate the beneficial effects of these medicinal plants but to also critically analyze their plausible role as chemo preventive agents against H. pylori-associated disorders. PMID:26051742

  6. Helicobacter pylori Disrupts Host Cell Membranes, Initiating a Repair Response and Cell Proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Fen Juan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori, the human stomach pathogen, lives on the inner surface of the stomach and causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Plasma membrane repair response is a matter of life and death for human cells against physical and biological damage. We here test the hypothesis that H. pylori also causes plasma membrane disruption injury, and that not only a membrane repair response but also a cell proliferation response are thereby activated. Vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA have been considered to be major H. pylori virulence factors. Gastric cancer cells were infected with H. pylori wild type (vacA+/cagA+, single mutant (ΔvacA or ΔcagA or double mutant (ΔvacA/ΔcagA strains and plasma membrane disruption events and consequent activation of membrane repair components monitored. H. pylori disrupts the host cell plasma membrane, allowing localized dye and extracellular Ca2+ influx. Ca2+-triggered members of the annexin family, A1 and A4, translocate, in response to injury, to the plasma membrane, and cell surface expression of an exocytotic maker of repair, LAMP-2, increases. Additional forms of plasma membrane disruption, unrelated to H. pylori exposure, also promote host cell proliferation. We propose that H. pylori activation of a plasma membrane repair is pro-proliferative. This study might therefore provide new insight into potential mechanisms of H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

  7. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection. PMID:26733497

  8. 配偶及家庭亲密接触者共同治疗幽门螺杆菌对根除率的影响%Influence of coordinated therapy with close family members on the eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向谦

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate whether the eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori can be improved by coordinated therapy with spouse and close family members. Methods: 98 patients infected by Helicobacter pylori were divied into two groups according to whether the coordinated therapy were accomplished. Compared the eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori 3 monthes later after the therapy. Results: The eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori were significantly improved in people who received the coordinated therapy with spouse and close family members (80.5%vs61.4%,p=0.035). Conclusion: Coordinated anti-Helicobacter pylori therapy with spouse and close family members wil increase the eradication rate. The result has realistic significance to the treatment of digestive disease.%探索能否通过对患者配偶及家庭亲密接触者共同抗幽门螺杆菌治疗提高根除率。方法:98例符合治疗H P感染适应症患者按是否进行了者配偶及家庭亲密接触者共同抗HP进行分组,治疗结束3月后比较两组患者HP感染存在情况。结果:同时对患者配偶或亲密接触者进行抗HP治疗,较患者独自进行HP感染的治疗,可以显著降低治疗3月后患者HP的感染率(80.5%vs61.4%,p=0.035)。结论:通过对HP感染者配偶及其他家庭亲密接触者进行抗HP治疗,可以有效提高患者HP的根除率,对消化系统疾病诊治具有现实意义。

  9. Relationship Between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori Infection and Multiple Sclerosis (MS in Southeast of Iran

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    Gholamreza Motalleb

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori are one of the most common, well-known pathogenic agents in the development of peptic ulcers. Some investigators have shown a relationship between H. pylori and Multiple Sclerosis (MS. However, this relationship is controversial. The aim of this study was to determine the association between H. pylori infection and MS. In a prospective case-control study, we studied 78 patients with MS and 123 Healthy Blood Donors (HBDs for bacterial DNA detection and antibody assay. DNA extracted from samples (serum and saliva and Real-time PCR was employed to detection of H. pylori genome. The present of anti H. pylori CagA and VacA Immunoglobulin G (IgG were measured in serum by Western blot technique. We found H. pylori DNA in both samples of the 32.05% (25/78 and 32.52% (40/123 of patients and HBDs respectively (p = NS. Furthermore, anti H. pylori IgG for both antigens were detected in 21.95% (27/123 of HBDs in contrast with 25.64% (20/78 of patients (p = NS. Moreover, genome copy number of H. pylori was not significantly change in patients (140 copies/mL and HBDs (147 copies/mL. We didn’t see significant correlation between H. pylori infection in both groups, But H. pylori CagA/VacA-IgG was found in patient quite more than HBDs (p<0.05 and this patients showed more positively for serum H. pylori genome. Although, these results indicate a lack of connection between the Helicobacter pylori infection and multiple sclerosis, the role of immune response against H. pylori in the modulation of MS requires further study.

  10. Oral Helicobacter pylori, its relationship to successful eradication of gastric H. pylori and saliva culture confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X M; Yee, K C; Hazeki-Taylor, N; Li, J; Fu, H Y; Huang, M L; Zhang, G Y

    2014-08-01

    The present study was designed to explore the existence of oral Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), its relationship in the oral cavity to the success rate of eradication of the gastric H. pylori infection, and to determine if the mouthwash solution contained lysine (0.4%) and glycerol monolaurate (0.2%) (LGM) could eliminate oral H. pylori, as well as using the saliva H. pylori culture to confirm the existence of oral H. pylori. A total of 159 symptomatic individuals with stomach pain and 118 asymptomatic individuals with no stomach complaints, were recruited and tested using the saliva H. pylori antigen test (HPS), the H. pylori flagellin test (HPF), the urea breath test (UBT C(13)) and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, which tests were also confirmed by saliva culture. The test subjects also received various treatments. It was found that the H. pylori antigen exists in the oral cavity in UBT C(13) negative individuals. Traditional treatment for gastric eradication had only a 10.67 percent (10.67%) effectiveness rate on the oral H. pylori infection. In groups of patients with the oral H. pylori infection, but with negative UBT C(13), a mouthwash solution provided a 72.58% effectiveness rate in the 95% of the confidence interval (CI) ranges on the oral H. pylori infection. Traditional drug gastric eradication and teeth cleaning (TC) had less than a 10% effectiveness rate. Treatment of the oral infection increased the success rate of eradication of the stomach infection from 61.33% to 82.26% in the 95% CI ranges. We concluded that the successful rate of eradication of gastric H. pylori bears a significant relationship to the oral infection from H. pylori. PMID:25179088

  11. Longitudinal study of influence of Helicobacter pylori on current risk of duodenal ulcer relapse. The Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M R; Franzmann, M B; Holst, C;

    1992-01-01

    Seventy-four patients with duodenal ulcer were followed up longitudinally for 2 years after initial ulcer healing. Endoscopy including biopsy of the antral mucosa was performed every 3rd month and whenever clinical symptoms of relapse occurred. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in the biopsy...... acid output, time of healing of the preceding ulcer, treatment of the present ulcer (cimetidine, antacids, or no treatment), or type and degree of gastritis. Thus, although H. pylori is prevalent in patients with duodenal ulcer disease, the present study indicates that H. pylori does not have a...... substantial note in the precipitation of active duodenal ulcer....

  12. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Elizabeth A; Sachs, George; Scott, David R

    2016-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects about 50 % of the world's population, causing at a minimum chronic gastritis. A subset of infected patients will ultimately develop gastric or duodenal ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, or MALT (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue) lymphoma. Eradication of H. pylori requires complex regimens that include acid suppression and multiple antibiotics. The efficacy of treatment using what were once considered standard regimens have declined in recent years, mainly due to widespread development of antibiotic resistance. Addition of bismuth to standard triple therapy regimens, use of alternate antibiotics, or development of alternative regimens using known therapies in novel combinations have improved treatment efficacy in specific populations, but overall success of eradication remains less than ideal. Novel regimens under investigation either in vivo or in vitro, involving increased acid suppression ideally with fewer antibiotics or development of non-antibiotic treatment targets, show promise for future therapy. PMID:27177639

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajindrajith Shaman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is a common problem in pediatric practice, and its acquisition is related with poor socioeconomic conditions. Although the organism is thought to be responsible for many diseases, only a handful of them have a direct causal relationship. At present, only a small number of children with well-defined clinical syndromes are benefited from testing and treatment. The treatment should include at least two antibiotics with a proton pump inhibitor.

  14. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elios, Mario M; Andersen, Leif P

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects almost half of the population worldwide and represents the major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, such as duodenal and gastric ulcer, gastric adenocarcinoma, autoimmune gastritis, and B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue. Helicobacter pylori induces the...

  15. Helicobacter pylori and oral pathology: Relationship with the gastric infection

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, Isabel; Muiño, Andrea; Aguas, Silvia; Harada, Laura; Diaz, Mariana; Lence, Adriana; Labbrozzi, Mario; Muiño, Juan Manuel; Elsner, Boris; Avagnina, Alejandra; Denninghoff, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been found in the oral cavity and stomach, and its infection is one of the most frequent worldwide. We reviewed the literature and conducted a Topic Highlight, which identified studies reporting an association between H. pylori-infection in the oral cavity and H. pylori-positive stomach bacterium. This work was designed to determine whether H. pylori is the etiologic agent in periodontal disease, recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS), squamous cell carcinoma,...

  16. Advances in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    OpenAIRE

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Cadranel, Samy

    2015-01-01

    In this review we elaborate on two main questions concerning the management of Helicobacter pylori infection in children. First, we focus on who should be treated. In the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-associated peptic ulcer disease, eradication of the micro-organism is recommended. When H. pylori infection is detected by biopsy-based methods in the absence of peptic ulcer disease in a child with dyspeptic symptoms, treatment of H. pylori infection may be considered. In infected...

  17. Role of Helicobacter pylori in functional dyspepsia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Colm O'Morain

    2006-01-01

    The aetiology of dyspepsia is unknown in the majority of patients. Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) is the cause in a subset of patients. A non invasive test to assess the presence of H pylori is recommended in the management of patients under the age of 50 presenting to a family practitioner with dyspepsia. A urea breath test or a stool antigen test are the most reliable non invasive tests. Eradication of H pylori will reduce the risk to the patient with dyspepsia of developing a peptic ulcer, reduce the complication rate if prescribed nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs and later reduce the risk of gastric cancer. The recommended treatment for non ulcer dyspepsia associated with a H pylori infection should be a 10-d course of treatment with a PPI and two antibiotics. Treatment efficacy should be assessed four weeks after completing treatment with a urea breath test or a stool antigen test.

  18. Innate Immunity Components and Cytokines in Gastric Mucosa in Children with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Michalkiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the expression of innate immunity components and cytokines in the gastric mucosa among H. pylori infected and uninfected children. Materials and Methods. Biopsies of the antral gastric mucosa from children with dyspeptic symptoms were evaluated. Gene expressions of innate immunity receptors and cytokines were measured by quantitative real-time PCR. The protein expression of selected molecules was tested by immunohistochemistry. Results. H. pylori infection did not lead to a significant upregulation of MyD88, TLR2, TLR4, CD14, TREM1, and TREM2 mRNA expression but instead resulted in high mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-10, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CD163. H. pylori cagA(+ infection was associated with higher IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA expression, as compared to cagA(− strains. H. pylori infected children showed increased IFN-γ and TNF-α protein levels. IFN-γ mRNA expression correlated with both H. pylori density of colonization and lymphocytic infiltration in the gastric mucosa, whereas TNF-α protein expression correlated with bacterial density. Conclusion. H. pylori infection in children was characterized by (a Th1 expression profile, (b lack of mRNA overexpression of natural immunity receptors, and (c strong anti-inflammatory activities in the gastric mucosa, possibly resulting from increased activity of anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. This may explain the mildly inflammatory gastric inflammation often observed among H. pylori infected children.

  19. EGFR and Bcl-2 in gastric mucosa of children infected with Helicobacter pylori

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    Ewa Ryszczuk

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the expression of EGFR and Bcl-2 proteins as inhibitory markers of apoptosis in surface epithelial cells and gland cells of antral gastric mucosa in children infected with Helicobacter pylori according to the severity and activity of antral gastritis and to assess the correlation between the number of cells expressing EGFR and the number of cells expressing Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children. Materials and methods: The study included 44 children: 68.2% with chronic gastritis and positive IgG against H. pylori, and 31.8% with functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and with normal IgG against H. pylori. The evaluation of EGFR expression in gastric mucosa was performed immunohistochemically using monoclonal mouse anti-EGFR antibody. The polyclonal antibody was used to determine the expression of anti-Bcl-2. Results: A significant increase in the number of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 protein was found in the epithelial cells in severe as well as mild and moderate gastritis in the group of children infected with H. pylori. An increase in the number of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 protein was also found in the epithelial cells in group I according to the activity of gastritis. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the numbers of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children. Conclusion: Increased expression of EGFR and Bcl-2 proteins in the epithelial cells and a statistically significant positive correlation between the numbers of cells expressing EGFR and Bcl-2 in H. pylori infected children could suggest increased regeneration abilities of gastric mucosa.

  20. Isocitrate dehydrogenase of Helicobacter pylori potentially induces humoral immune response in subjects with peptic ulcer disease and gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Abid Hussain

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: H. pylori causes gastritis and peptic ulcers and is a risk factor for the development of gastric carcinoma. Many of the proteins such as urease, porins, flagellins and toxins such as lipo-polysaccharides have been identified as potential virulence factors which induce proinflammatory reaction. We report immunogenic potentials of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICD, an important house keeping protein of H. pylori. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Amino acid sequences of H. pylori ICD were subjected to in silico analysis for regions with predictably high antigenic indexes. Also, computational modelling of the H. pylori ICD as juxtaposed to the E. coli ICD was carried out to determine levels of structure similarity and the availability of surface exposed motifs, if any. The icd gene was cloned, expressed and purified to a very high homogeneity. Humoral response directed against H. pylori ICD was detected through an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA in 82 human subjects comprising of 58 patients with H. pylori associated gastritis or ulcer disease and 24 asymptomatic healthy controls. The H. pylori ICD elicited potentially high humoral immune response and revealed high antibody titers in sera corresponding to endoscopically-confirmed gastritis and ulcer disease subjects. However, urea-breath-test negative healthy control samples and asymptomatic control samples did not reveal any detectable immune responses. The ELISA for proinflammatory cytokine IL-8 did not exhibit any significant proinflammatory activity of ICD. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: ICD of H. pylori is an immunogen which interacts with the host immune system subsequent to a possible autolytic-release and thereby significantly elicits humoral responses in individuals with invasive H. pylori infection. However, ICD could not significantly stimulate IL8 induction in a cultured macrophage cell line (THP1 and therefore, may not be a notable proinflammatory agent.

  1. Five-day bismuth-free triple therapy for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and reduction of duodenal ulcer relapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, L.G.; Passos, M.C.; Chausson, Y.; Castro L de, P. (Gastroenterology, Nutrition and Digestive Surgery Unit, University Hospital, Federal University of Minas Gerais (Brazil))

    1991-08-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a significant reduction of the rate of duodenal ulcer (DU) relapse. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of a bismuth-free triple therapy on the eradication of H. pylori and reduction of DU relapse. After informed consent, 61 patients with endoscopically proven DU and H. pylori infection detected on 14C-urea breath test (BT) were included in the study. All patients received a combination of furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole, three times a day, for 5 days, in addition to eventual classical antiulcer agents prescribed by their attending physicians. BT was repeated after an interval of at least 60 days to evaluate H. pylori eradication. Endoscopy and another BT were performed again at 6.5 months after therapy to detect possible recurrences. Forty-eight patients completed the trial: 26 (54%) patients were negative for H. pylori at 6.5 months after the end of treatment, and 22 (46%) persisted H. pylori positive. Ninety-two percent of the patients in whom the bacteria were eradicated showed endoscopically healed ulcers and were asymptomatic, and two that were symptomatic presented only occasional pain not requiring therapy. Among the 22 patients who persisted H. pylori positive, six (27%) showed endoscopically active ulcers (p = 0.012) and eight (36%) patients continued to be symptomatic (p less than 0.01), and were still using antiulcer drugs (p = 0.002) 6.5 months after treatment. It is concluded that combined treatment with furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole for 5 days represents a well-tolerated, inexpensive, and effective therapeutic regime for the eradication of H. pylori and abolition of DU relapse in more than 50% of the patients during a follow-up period of 6.5 months.

  2. Five-day bismuth-free triple therapy for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and reduction of duodenal ulcer relapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is associated with a significant reduction of the rate of duodenal ulcer (DU) relapse. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term effect of a bismuth-free triple therapy on the eradication of H. pylori and reduction of DU relapse. After informed consent, 61 patients with endoscopically proven DU and H. pylori infection detected on 14C-urea breath test (BT) were included in the study. All patients received a combination of furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole, three times a day, for 5 days, in addition to eventual classical antiulcer agents prescribed by their attending physicians. BT was repeated after an interval of at least 60 days to evaluate H. pylori eradication. Endoscopy and another BT were performed again at 6.5 months after therapy to detect possible recurrences. Forty-eight patients completed the trial: 26 (54%) patients were negative for H. pylori at 6.5 months after the end of treatment, and 22 (46%) persisted H. pylori positive. Ninety-two percent of the patients in whom the bacteria were eradicated showed endoscopically healed ulcers and were asymptomatic, and two that were symptomatic presented only occasional pain not requiring therapy. Among the 22 patients who persisted H. pylori positive, six (27%) showed endoscopically active ulcers (p = 0.012) and eight (36%) patients continued to be symptomatic (p less than 0.01), and were still using antiulcer drugs (p = 0.002) 6.5 months after treatment. It is concluded that combined treatment with furazolidone, amoxicillin, and metronidazole for 5 days represents a well-tolerated, inexpensive, and effective therapeutic regime for the eradication of H. pylori and abolition of DU relapse in more than 50% of the patients during a follow-up period of 6.5 months

  3. CagA-mediated pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidpour, Abolghasem

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been described as the main etiologic agent of gastric cancer, causing a considerable rate of mortality and morbidity in human population across the world. Although the infection mainly begins asymptomatically, but simply develops to peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis, lymphoma of the gastric mucosa and eventually adenocarcinoma. The major pathological feature of H. pylori infection is due to the activity of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA), a 125-140 kDa protein encoded by the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI). CagA is also known as the first bacterial onco-protein, ranking the H. pylori-mediated adenocarcinoma as the second most deadly cancer type worldwide. Upon cytoplasmic translocation CagA undergoes interacting with numerous proteins in phosphorylation dependant and independent manners within the gastric epithelial cells. The profound effect of CagA on multiple intracellular pathways causes major consequences such as perturbation of intracellular actin trafficking, stimulation of inflammatory responses and disruption of cellular tight junctions. Such activities of CagA further participate in development of the hummingbird phenotype and gastric cancer. This review is sought to provide a structural and functional analysis of the CagA protein with focus on demonstrating the molecular basis of the mechanism of CagA intracellular translocation and its interaction with intracellular targets. PMID:26796299

  4. Evaluation of Helicobacter pylory colonization by serologic test (IgG and dyspepsia in volunteers from the countryside of Monte Negro, in the Brazilian western Amazon region Avaliação da colonização por Helicobacter pylori através de teste sorológico (IgG e de dispepsia em voluntários da população rural de Monte Negro (RO, região da Amazônia ocidental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Bernardon Ribeiro

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study intended to analyze the seroprevalence of Helicobacter pylori, IgG, and its relation to dyspepsia in a population from the western Amazon region. During the "Projeto Bandeira Científica", a University of São Paulo Medical School program, in Monte Negro's rural areas, state of Rondônia, 266 blood samples were collected from volunteers. The material was tested for IgG antibodies anti-Helicobacter pylori by ELISA method and the participants were also interviewed on dyspepsia, hygiene and social aspects. Participants aged between five and 81 years old (34 years on average, 149 (56% were female and 117 (44% male. We found 210 (78.9% positive, 50 (18.8% negative and six (2.3% undetermined samples. Dyspeptic complaints were found in 226 cases (85.2%. There was no statistical association between dyspepsia and positive serology for H. pylori. We concluded that the seroprevalence in all age categories is similar to results found in other studies conducted in developing countries, including those from Brazil. On the other hand, the seroprevalence found in Monte Negro was higher than that reported in developed countries. As expected, there was a progressive increase in the positivity for H. pylori in older age groups.Este trabalho tem por objetivo analisar a soroprevalência do Helicobacter pylori, IgG, em população rural da Amazônia, e sua correlação com queixa dispéptica. No Projeto Bandeira Científica da FMUSP, em Monte Negro - RO, foram coletadas 266 amostras sangüíneas nos assentamentos rurais do município. Foram pesquisados anticorpos da classe IgG dirigidos contra Helicobacter pylori pelo método ELISA e aplicados questionários sobre dispepsia, aspectos sociais e epidemiológicos. Os pacientes tinham idades entre cinco e 81 anos (média de 34 anos; 149 (56% do sexo feminino e 117 (44% do sexo masculino. Foram encontradas 210 (78.9% amostras positivas, 50 negativas (18.8% e seis indeterminadas (2.3%. A queixa de

  5. Virulence of water-induced coccoid Helicobacter pylori and its experimental infection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei-Fei She; Jian-Yin Lin; Jun-Yan Liu; Cheng Huang; Dong-Hui Su

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the virulence and the infectivity of coccoid Helicobacter ppylori(H.pylori) transformed from spiral form by exposure to sterile tap water.METHODS: Three strains of H.pylori, isolated from gastric biopsy specimens of confirmed peptic ulcer, were converted from spiral into coccoid form by exposure to sterile tap water.Both spiral and coccoid forms of H.pylori were tested for the urease activity, and the adherence to Hep-2 cells. The presence of flagella was examined under electron microscopy. In the experimental animal infection, the spiral and coccoid forms of H.pylori originated from the same strain F49 were inoculated intragastrically into BALB/c mice respectively four times at a 3-day interval. Half of the mice from each group were sacrificed at Day 21 and Day 28 after the last inoculation. Histology and H.pylori colonization were detected by urease test of gastric mucosa, cultures of H. pylori,and electron microscopy and so on.RESULTS: The urease activity and the ability of adherence to Hep-2 cells were found to be lower in coccoid H.pylori than that in its spiral form. For example, the transformation in strain F44 led to a significant decrease of the adherence rate and adherence index from 70.0±5.3 % to 30.2±3.5 %(P<0.01), and from 2.6±0.4 to 0.86±0.3 (P<0.01),respectively. The flagella of coccoid H.pylori were observed under electron microscope. In the experimental infection in mice, the positive rate of gastric mucosa urease test was 93.8 % (15/16) in the group infected by spiral H.pylori and 50 % (8/16) in the group infected by coccoid H. pylori,and the estimated coccoid H.pylori colony number was 1.75 vs0,56. The positive rates of H. pyloriculture were 87.5 %(14/16) in spiral H. pylori group and 68.8 % (11/16) in coccoid H.pylorigroup. There was no significant difference in either urease test or bacterial culture rate between the groups examined at Day 21 and Day 28 after inoculation. Electron microscopic examination of the samples

  6. Association of Helicobacter pylori and iNOS Production by Macrophages and Lymphocytes in the Gastric Mucosa in Chronic Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Cherdantseva, Lilia A.; Potapova, Oksana V.; Tatyana V. Sharkova; Belyaeva, Yana Yu.; Shkurupiy, Vyacheslav A.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common causes of chronic gastritis. With the development of the disease cellular inflammatory infiltrates composed of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages are formed in epithelium and lamina propria of the stomach. These cells are capable of secreting a number of active substances, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We examined the relationship between H. pylori and secretion of iNOS by cells of inflammatory infiltrates in chronic ga...

  7. Helicobacter pylori cholesteryl α-glucosides contribute to its pathogenicity and immune response by natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Approximately 10-15% of individuals infected with Helicobacter pylori will develop ulcer disease (gastric or duodenal ulcer, while most people infected with H. pylori will be asymptomatic. The majority of infected individuals remain asymptomatic partly due to the inhibition of synthesis of cholesteryl α-glucosides in H. pylori cell wall by α1,4-GlcNAc-capped mucin O-glycans, which are expressed in the deeper portion of gastric mucosa. However, it has not been determined how cholesteryl α-glucosyltransferase (αCgT, which forms cholesteryl α-glucosides, functions in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. Here, we show that the activity of αCgT from H. pylori clinical isolates is highly correlated with the degree of gastric atrophy. We investigated the role of cholesteryl α-glucosides in various aspects of the immune response. Phagocytosis and activation of dendritic cells were observed at similar degrees in the presence of wild-type H. pylori or variants harboring mutant forms of αCgT showing a range of enzymatic activity. However, cholesteryl α-glucosides were recognized by invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells, eliciting an immune response in vitro and in vivo. Following inoculation of H. pylori harboring highly active αCgT into iNKT cell-deficient (Jα18(-/- or wild-type mice, bacterial recovery significantly increased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, cytokine production characteristic of Th1 and Th2 cells dramatically decreased in Jα18(-/- compared to wild-type mice. These findings demonstrate that cholesteryl α-glucosides play critical roles in H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation and precancerous atrophic gastritis.

  8. Curcumin as a potential therapeutic candidate for Helicobacter pylori associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Avijit; De, Ronita; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2016-03-01

    Curcumin, a yellow pigment and principal polyphenolic Curcuminoid obtained from the turmeric rhizome Curcuma longa, is commonly used as a food-coloring agent. Studies suggest that curcumin has a wide range of beneficial properties e.g., anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-cancer, anti-proliferative, anti-fungal and anti-microbial. These pleiotropic activities prompted several research groups to elucidate the role of curcumin in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This is the first review with this heading where we discussed regarding the role of curcumin as an anti-H. pylori agent along with its potential in other gastrointestinal diseases. Based on several in vitro, early cell culture, animal research and few pre-clinical trials, curcumin projected as a potential therapeutic candidate against H. pylori mediated gastric pathogenesis. This review sheds light on the anti-H. pylori effects of curcumin in different models with meticulous emphasis on its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects as well as some critical signaling and effecter molecules. Remarkably, non-toxic molecule curcumin fulfills the characteristics for an ideal chemopreventive agent against H. pylori mediated gastric carcinogenesis but the foremost challenge is to obtain the optimum therapeutic levels of curcumin, due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Further, we have discussed about the possibilities for improving its efficacy and bioavailability. Lastly, we concluded with the anticipation that in near future curcumin may be used to develop a therapeutic drug against H. pylori mediated gastric ailments through improved formulation or delivery systems, facilitating its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. PMID:26973412

  9. Antiadhesive properties of Abelmoschus esculentus (Okra immature fruit extract against Helicobacter pylori adhesion.

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    Jutta Messing

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Traditional Asian and African medicine use immature okra fruits (Abelmoschus esculentus as mucilaginous food to combat gastritis. Its effectiveness is due to polysaccharides that inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates the antiadhesive effect in mechanistic detail. METHODOLOGY: A standardized aqueous fresh extract (Okra FE from immature okra fruits was used for a quantitative in vitro adhesion assay with FITC-labled H. pylori J99, 2 clinical isolates, AGS cells, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Bacterial adhesins affected by FE were pinpointed using a dot-blot overlay assay with immobilized Lewis(b, sialyl-Lewis(a, H-1, laminin, and fibronectin. (125I-radiolabeled Okra FE polymer served for binding studies to different H. pylori strains and interaction experiments with BabA and SabA. Iron nanoparticles with different coatings were used to investigate the influence of the charge-dependence of an interaction on the H. pylori surface. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Okra FE dose-dependently (0.2 to 2 mg/mL inhibited H. pylori binding to AGS cells. FE inhibited the adhesive binding of membrane proteins BabA, SabA, and HpA to its specific ligands. Radiolabeled compounds from FE bound non-specifically to different strains of H. pylori, as well as to BabA/SabA deficient mutants, indicating an interaction with a still-unknown membrane structure in the vicinity of the adhesins. The binding depended on the charge of the inhibitors. Okra FE did not lead to subsequent feedback regulation or increased expression of adhesins or virulence factors. CONCLUSION: Non-specific interactions between high molecular compounds from okra fruits and the H. pylori surface lead to strong antiadhesive effects.

  10. H pylori infection and reflux oesophagitis: A case-control study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rahim Masjedizadeh; Eskandar Hajiani; Koorosh MoezArdalan; Saeed Samie; Mohammad-Javad Ehsani-Ardakani; Ali Daneshmand; Mohammad-Reza Zali

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the relationship between H pylori and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in Iran.METHODS: In this study 51 GORD patients (referred to endoscopy at Taleghani hospital) were compared with 49 age-sex matched controls. Diagnosis of H pylori was made by gastric mucosal biopsy and rapid urease test (positive if the result of one or both diagnostic methods was positive). Updated Sydney system was used to report histopathological changes.RESULTS: The frequency of H pylori infection based on rapid urease test and histology was 88.2% (45) in patients and 77.6% (38) in controls, which showed no significant difference. The frequency of H pylori infection was significantly higher in the antrum than in the corpus and cardia. The mean activity, inflammation,and gastritis scores were also higher in the antrum of patients than in the antrum of controls. The mean scores were significantly higher in the corpus of controls than in the corpus of patients. Diffuse active gastritis was observed in a significantly larger number of controls,while the frequency of diffuse chronic gastritis was higher in patients. There was no significant difference in the frequency of other histological findings between patients and controls.CONCLUSION: H pylori infection cannot prevent GORD in this region.

  11. Helicobacter pylori in z njim povezane bolezni: Helicobacter pylori and associated diseases:

    OpenAIRE

    Jeruc, Jera

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a spiral shaped pathogenic bacterium, was first isolated by Barry Warren and Robin Marshall about 20 years ago, earning them aNobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2005. More than 50 % of the world population harbour Helicobacter pylori in their upper gastrointestinal tract and Helicobacter pylori infection is now accepted as the cause of the most common form of chronic gastritis. The prevalence of infection inversely correlates with socioeconomic status. When not trea...

  12. Association Between Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2 Virulence Factors and Gastric Mucosal Interleukin-33 mRNA Expression and Clinical Outcomes in Dyspeptic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Bahreini, Rasol; Bagheri, Nader; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been reported in more than half of the world human population. It is associated with gastric inflammation and noticeable infiltration of the immune cells to the stomach mucosa by several cytokines secretion. IL-1β, IL-18 have been shown to contribute to H. pylori induced gastritis, but the details of inflammation and association of virulence factors remain unclear. IL-1 cytokine family has a new additional cytokine, Interleukin-33 (IL-33), which is contemplated to have an important role for host defense against microorganisms. H. pylori virulence factors important in gastritis risk are the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) and babA. This study evaluated IL-33 mucosal mRNA expression levels in infected and uninfected patients and its relationship with bacterial virulence factors cagA, babA2 and type of gastritis. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 79 H. pylori-infected patients and 51 H. pylori-negative patients. Mucosal IL-33 mRNA expression levels in gastric biopsies were assessed using real-time PCR. Existence of virulence factors were detected by PCR. IL-33 mRNA expression was significantly higher in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients (Pchronic gastritis patients compared with patients with active gastritis (Pchronic gastritis and severity of inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. PMID:27014647

  13. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective:to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infection.Methods:Serum soluble antigen of H.pylori was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H.pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test(RUT).histologic examination and serology,Results:The sensitivity,specificity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46% ,91.07%,91.67% and 76.12%,respectively.The prevalence rate of werum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergong endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT methods(P>0.05).Conclusions:The detection of serum H.pylori soluble antigen(HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate,and convenient,not affected by the memorizing raction of serum antibody;is more sensitive,more specific and suitable for dinical diagriosis,and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H.pylori as well as for detection in children and pregnant women.

  14. H pylori and host interactions that influence pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ellen J Beswick; Giovanni Suarez; Victor E Reyes

    2006-01-01

    H pylori is probably the most prevalent human pathogen worldwide. Since it was initially suggested in 1983 by Marshall and Warren to be implicated in gastritis and pepticulcer disease,H pylori has also been implicated in gastric carcinoma and was classified as a class I carcinogen. In the last two decades, a noteworthy body of research has revealed the multiple processes that this gram negative bacterium activates to cause gastroduodenal disease in humans. Most infections are acquired early in life and may persist for the life of the individual.While infected individuals mount an inflammatory response that becomes chronic, along with a detectable adaptive immune response, these responses are ineffective in clearing the infection. H pylori has unique features that allow it to reside within the harsh conditions of the gastric environment, and also to evade the host immune response. In this review, we discuss the various virulence factors expressed by this bacterium and how they interact with the host epithelium to influence pathogenesis.

  15. Susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to bactericidal properties of medium-chain monoglycerides and free fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petschow, B W; Batema, R P; Ford, L L

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that various short- and medium-chain free fatty acids (FFAs) and their corresponding monoacylglycerol esters (MGs) have antibacterial activity in vitro against primarily gram-positive bacteria. More recent studies have also shown that the growth of Helicobacter spp. is inhibited by linoleic acid and arachidonic acid. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to the in vitro bactericidal properties of medium-chain MGs and FFAs. Incubation of H. pylori with saturated MGs, ranging in carbon chain length from C10:0 to C14:0, at 1 mM caused a 4-log-unit or greater reduction in the number of viable bacteria after exposure for 1 h. Lower levels of bactericidal activity were observed with C9:0, C15:0, and C16:0 MGs. In contrast, lauric acid (C12:0) was the only medium-chain saturated FFA with bactericidal activity against H. pylori. The MGs and FFAs were bactericidal after incubation for as little as 15 min at neutral or acidic pHs. Higher levels of MGs and FFAs were required for bactericidal activity in the presence of higher amounts of protein in liquid diets. We also found that the frequency of spontaneous development of resistance by H. pylori was higher for metronidazole and tetracycline (10(-5) to 10(-6)) than for C10:0 MG, C12:0 MG, and C12:0 FFA (< 10(-8)). Collectively, our data demonstrate that H. pylori is rapidly inactivated by medium-chain MGs and lauric acid and exhibits a relatively low frequency of spontaneous development of resistance to the bactericidal activity of MGs. Further studies are needed to establish whether MGs may be useful either alone or with other known therapeutic agents in the management of H. pylori infections in humans. PMID:8834870

  16. Epithelial cell kinetics of the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Susanne; Holm, I.L.; Holck, P.P.; Pedersen, M.; Norn, S.; Permin, H.; Nørgaard, A.; Andersen, L.P.

    2007-01-01

    the proliferative marker Ki-67. H. pylori infection, bacteria load and inflammatory activity were associated with increased cell turnover as judged by enhanced activities of TUNEL, p53 and Ki-67. Only p53 was significantly correlated to IFN-gamma, IL-8 and IL-10. The H. pylori-positive state was...... furthermore accompanied by varying degrees of altered distribution pattern of the markers studied, with occasional presence of apoptosis in the deeper pit zones, upward extension of Ki-67 and to a lesser degree of p53. Given a similar pattern of change in proliferation and apoptosis in some neoplastic lesions...

  17. Exposure to Helicobacter pylori-positive Siblings and Persistence of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Diana; Fischbach, Lori A.; Goodman, Karen J.; Phillips, Carl; Chen, Shande; Broussard, Cheryl

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Cross-sectional studies suggest that Helicobacter pylori may be transmitted between siblings. The present study aimed to estimate the effect of a Helicobacter pylori infected sibling on the establishment of a persistent Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods The authors used data collected from a Texas-Mexico border population from 1998–2005 (the “Pasitos Cohort Study”). Starting at age 6-months, Helicobacter pylori and factors thought to be associated with Helicobacter pylori were ascertained every six month for participants and their younger siblings. Hazard ratios were estimated from proportional hazards regression models with household dependent modeling. Results Persistent Helicobacter pylori infection in older siblings always preceded persistent infection in younger siblings. After controlling for mother’s Helicobacter pylori status, breastfeeding, antibiotic use and socioeconomic factors, a strong effect was estimated for persistent Helicobacter pylori infection in an older sibling on persistent infection in a younger sibling [Hazard Ratio (HR): 7.6, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.6, 37], especially when the difference in the age of the siblings was less than or equal to 3 years (HR: 16, 95% CI: 2.5, 112). Conclusions These results suggest that when siblings are close in age, the older sibling may be an important source of Helicobacter pylori transmission for younger siblings. PMID:20639704

  18. Structural Characteristics of Gastric Cell Populations in Chronic Gastritis and Chronic Hepatitis under Conditions of Helicobacter pylori Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapii, G A; Bakarev, M A; Nepomnyashchikh, G I; Kapustina, V I; Nepomnyashchikh, D L; Vinogradova, E V; Postnikova, O A

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistence in patients with chronic gastritis is associated with a complex of nonspecific structural reactions, the type of these reactions correlates with the severity of infection: catarrhal fibrotic changes in the gastric mucosa predominate in cases with manifest colonization, while the absence of H. pylori is associated with predominance of fibrotic process. Analysis of the incidence of some pathomorphological phenomena (degeneration, atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia of the surface epithelium) shows no relationship between the presence of H. pylori and colonization intensity. In all patients with chronic hepatitis, the gastric mucosa is involved in the pathological process; fibrosis (gastropathy) was the most common process. No appreciable correlations between the structural changes and hepatitis activity and the presence of H. pylori were detected. PMID:26899845

  19. Virulence and potential pathogenicity of coccoid Helicobacter pylori induced by antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Fei She; Dong Hui Su; Jian Yin Lin; Lin Ying Zhou

    2001-01-01

    AIM To explore the virulence and the potential pathogenicity of coccoid Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) transformed from spiral form by exposure to antibiotic.METHODS Three strains of H. pylori, isolated from gastric biopsy specimens of confirmed peptic ulcer, were converted from spiral into coccoid from by exposure to metronidazole.Both spiral and coccoid form of H. pylori were tested for the urease activity, the adherence to Hep-2 cells and the vacuolating cytotoxicity to Hela cells, and the differences of the protein were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot,The mutation of the genes including ureA, ureB,hpaA; vacA and cagA, related with virulence,was detected by means of PCR and PCR-SSCP.RESULTS In the coccoid H. pylori, the urease activity, the adherence to Hep-2 cells and the vacuolating cytotoxicity to Hela cells alldecreased. In strain F44, the rate and index of adherence reduced from 70.0% ± 5.3% to 33% ±5.1% and from 2.6 ±0.4 to 0.96 ±0.3 (P<0.01),respectively. The invasion of coccoid H. pylori into Hep-2 cell could be seen under electronmicroscope. SDS-PAGE showed that the content of the protein with the molecular weight over Mr74 000 decreased, and the hybriditional signal in band Mr 125 000 weakened, while the band Mr 110000 and Mr63000 strengthened in coccoid H. pylori as shown in Western blot. The results of PCR were all positive, and PCR-SSCP indicated that there may exist the point mutation in gene hpaA or vacA.CONCLUSION The virulence and the proteins with molecular weight over Mr74 000 in coccoid H. pylori decrease, but no deletion exists in amplification fragments from ureA, ureB, hpaA,vacA and cagA genes, suggesting that coccoid H. pylori may have potential pathogenicity.

  20. Immunoglobulin A antibodies to Helicobacter pylori.

    OpenAIRE

    Jaskowski, T D; Martins, T B; Hill, H R; Litwin, C M

    1997-01-01

    Serological testing for immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to Helicobacter pylori has proven useful in supporting the diagnosis of infection with this organism, but the clinical value of IgA antibodies in H. pylori-related gastritis remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to determine the frequency of IgA-positive IgG-negative patients with symptoms of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders, thus assessing the clinical utility of IgA testing for H. pylori-related gastritis. It was found p...

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastropathy: A comparison between Indonesian and Japanese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murdani Abdullah; Hiroyuki Ohtsuka; Abdul Aziz Rani; Tadashi Sato; Ari F Syam; Masayuki A Fujino

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effects of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection on gastropathy between Indonesian and Japanese patients.METHODS: Biopsy specimens were obtained during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy from 167 subjects (125 Indonesians and 42 Japanese) with uninvestigated symptoms of dyspepsia. The specimens were analyzed for the presence of H pylori using urease analysis, histopathology, and cell culture. The grade and activity of gastritis was assessed using the updated Sydney system.RESULTS: The percentages of Indonesian and Japanese patients who were H pylori-positive at the antrum or body of the stomach were similar (68% and 59.5%, respectively; P = 0.316). Of those who were H pylori-positive, more Japanese patients than Indonesian patients had high levels of polymorphonuclear cells ( P = 0.001), mononuclear cells ( P = 0.013), glandular atrophy ( P = 0.000), and intestinal metaplasia ( P = 0.011) in both the antrum and body of the stomach.CONCLUSION: The grade of gastritis and prevalence of mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were higher in Japanese patients. The difference between Indonesian and Japanese patients was significant.

  2. In vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis and Eucalyptus torelliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Christiana Bola A; Lawal, Temitope Olufunmilayo; Mahady, Gail B

    2009-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to extracts of Eucalyptus camaldulensis Dehnh. and Eucalyptus torelliana F. Muell. (Myrtaceae), Nigerian medicinal plants, was investigated in six strains of H. pylori, namely, ATCC 4504, ATCC 47619, A2, TI8984, 019A, and A6. The susceptibility of these strains was determined using a standardized agar dilution method (National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards guidelines) with Mueller-Hinton agar, supplemented with defibrinated horse blood. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of the crude extracts against all the tested strains ranged from 12.5 to 400 mug/mL. Phytochemical screening of the plant extracts revealed the presence of tannins, saponins, and cardenolides. The anti-H. pylori activities demonstrated by these plants may be attributed to their chemical constituents, and explain their reported traditional uses, as well as their gastroprotective properties as demonstrated previously in experimental animals. The results of this work suggest that, in accordance with their traditional medical use in Nigeria, E. camaldalensis and E. torelliana have some therapeutic potential against H. pylori, and thus are of interest for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:20396588

  3. Bacterial flora concurrent with Helicobacter pylori in the stomach of patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan Hu; Li-Hua He; Di Xiao; Guo-Dong Liu; Yi-Xin Gu; Xiao-Xia Tao; Jian-Zhong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the non-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylorl) bacterial flora concurrent with H.py/ori infection.METHODS:A total of 103 gastric biopsy specimens from H.py/ori positive patients were selected for bacterial culture.All the non-H.py/ori bacterial isolates were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS).RESULTS:A total of 201 non-H.py/ori bacterial isolates were cultivated from 67 (65.0%) of the 103 gastric samples,including 153 isolates identified successfully at species level and 48 at genus level by MALDI-TOF MS.The dominant species were Streptococcus,Neisseria,Rothia and Staphylococcus,which differed from the predominantly acid resistant species reported previously in healthy volunteers.The prevalence of non-H.pylori bacteria was higher in non-ulcer dyspepsia group than in gastric ulcer group (100% vs 42.9%,P < 0.001).Six bacterial species with urease activity (Staphylococcus epidermidis,Staphylococcus warneri,Staphylococcus capitis,Staphylococcus aureus,Brevibacterium spp.and Klebsiella pneumoniae) were also isolated.CONCLUSION:There is a high prevalence of the non-H.pylori bacteria concurrent with H.pylori infection,and the non-H.pylori bacteria may also play important as-yet-undiscovered roles in the pathogenesis of stomach disorders.

  4. Multiple repeats of Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites predict risk of gastric ulcer in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand-Jahromy, Sahar; Siavoshi, Farideh; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sattari, Taher Nejad; Latifi-Navid, Saeid

    2015-12-01

    Biological activity of Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA is determined by a diversity in the tyrosine phosphorylation motif sites. In the present study, the diversity and the type of the H. pylori CagA EPIYA motifs and their association with gastric ulcer (GU) and duodenal ulcer (DU) in Iranian dyspeptic patients were assessed. PCR amplification, sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis were performed to determine the pattern of CagA EPIYA motifs. Of 168 H. pylori cagA(+) strains, the frequency of ABC was 93.50%, ABCCC 5.40%, ABC + ABCCC 0.6% and ABCC 0.6%. There was no EPIYA-D segment. The ABCCC pattern of EPIYA motif was more frequent in the H. pylori isolates from GU (8/50, 16%) than in those from chronic gastritis (CG) (0/81, 0%) (P = 0). In contrast, The ABC pattern of EPIYA motif was less frequent in the H. pylori isolates from GU (41/50, 82%) than in those from CG (80/81, 98.80%) (Age-sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.020, 95% CI = 0.002-0.259; P = 0.003). The distribution of the ABC motif was almost the same in H. pylori isolates from CG (98.80%) and DU diseases (97.30%). There was no significant association between the number of CagA EPIYA-C segment and DU (P > 0.05). We have proposed that CagA from Iranian H. pylori strains were Western type and all strains had active phosphorylation sites. The three EPIYA-C motifs of CagA were more frequently observed in the H. pylori strains from GU; thus it might be an important biomarker for predicting the GU risk in Iran. PMID:26408373

  5. Proteomics-Based Identification and Analysis of Proteins Associated with Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjiang Zhou

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium that causes the most common chronic infection in the human stomach. Approximately 1%-3% of infected individuals develop gastric cancer. However, the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces gastric cancer are not completely understood. The available evidence indicates a strong link between the virulence factor of H. pylori, cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA, and gastric cancer. To further characterize H. pylori virulence, we established three cell lines by infecting the gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and AGS with cagA+ H. pylori and transfecting SGC-7901 with a vector carrying the full-length cagA gene. We detected 135 differently expressed proteins from the three cell lines using proteome technology, and 10 differential proteins common to the three cell lines were selected and identified by LC-MS/MS as well as verified by western blot: β-actin, L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD, pre-mRNA-processing factor 19 homolog (PRPF19, ATP synthase, calmodulin (CaM, p64 CLCP, Ran-specific GTPase-activating protein (RanGAP, P43 and calreticulin. Detection of the expression of these proteins and genes encoding these proteins in human gastric cancer tissues by real-time PCR (RT-qPCR and western blot revealed that the expression of β-ACTIN, LDH, DLD, PRPF19 and CaM genes were up-regulated and RanGAP was down-regulated in gastric cancer tissues and/or metastatic lymph nodes compared to peri-cancerous tissues. High gene expression was observed for H. pylori infection in gastric cancer tissues. Furthermore, the LDH, DLD and CaM genes were demethylated at the promoter -2325, -1885 and -276 sites, respectively, and the RanGAP gene was highly methylated at the promoter -570 and -170 sites in H. pylori-infected and cagA-overexpressing cells. These results provide new insights into the molecular pathogenesis and treatment targets for gastric cancer with H

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erdal Kurtoglu; Ertugrul Kayacetin; Aysegul Ugur

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To compare the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) infection in autoimmune thrombocytopenic purpura (AITP) patients with that of nonthrombocytopenic controls,and to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment in H pylori(+)and H pylori(-) AITP patients.METHODS: The prevalence of gastric H pylori infection in 38 adult AITP patients (29 female and 9 male; median age 27 years; range 18-39 years) who consecutively admitted to our clinic was investagated.RESULTS: H pylori infection was found in 26 of 38 AITP patients (68.5%). H pylori infection was found in 15 of 23control subjects (65.2%). The difference in H pylori infection between the 2 groups was not significant. Thrombocyte count of H pylori-positive AITP patients was significantly lower than that of H pylori-negative AITP patients (P<0.05).Thrombocyte recovery of H pylori-positive group was less than that of H pylori-negative group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: H pylori infection should be considerecd in the treatment of AITP patients with H pylori infection.

  7. Diagnostic of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mégraud, Francis; Floch, Pauline; Labenz, Joachim; Lehours, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    There is progress in endoscopy techniques. While it is not yet possible to detect Helicobacter pylori directly in the stomach, it becomes easier to detect the mucosal changes induced by the bacteria. Some small changes can also increase the sensitivity of the invasive tests, for example culture or histology, but the wide use of proton-pump inhibitors has a negative impact on these tests. Only molecular methods are able to detect a limited load of bacteria, especially by using real-time PCR but also with new methods, for example dual-priming oligonucleotide-based PCR, loop-medicated isothermal amplification, droplet-digital PCR or a multiple genetic analysis system. Among the noninvasive tests, urea breath test remains a test of major interest, while there are attempts to develop an ammonia breath test and other nanosensor devices. A new antigen stool test, a chemoluminescence immunoassay using the LIAISON apparatus has also been tested for the first time with success. Despite its limitations, serology remains the most popular test to detect H. pylori antibodies. It also allows pepsinogen dosage which is of interest for detecting atrophy. PMID:27531532

  8. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article aims to examine current best practice in the field reference to first-line, second-line, rescue and emerging treatment regimens for Helicobacter pylori eradication. The recommended first-line treatment in published guidelines in Europe and North American is proton pump inhibitor combined with amoxicillin and clarithromycin being the favoured regimen. Rates of eradication with this regimen however are falling alarmingly due to a combination of antibiotic resistance and poor compliance with therapy. Bismuth based quadruple therapies and levofloxacin based regimes have been shown to be effective second line regimens. Third-line options include regimes based on rifabutin or furazolidone, but susceptibility testing is the most rational option here, but is currently not used widely enough. Sequential therapy is promising but needs further study and validation outside of Italy. Although the success of first line treatments is falling, if compliance is good and a clear treatment paradigm adhered to, almost universal eradication rates can still be achieved. If compliance is not achievable, the problem of antibiotic resistance will continue to beset any combination of drugs used for H. pylori eradication.

  9. Helicobacter pylori therapy: a paradigm shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, David Y; Dore, Maria Pina

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) is a leading cause of gastroduodenal disease, including gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication therapies and their efficacy are summarized. A number of current treatment regimens will reliably yield >90% or 95% cure rates with susceptible strains. None has proven to be superior. We show how to predict the efficacy of a regimen in any population provided one knows the prevalence of antibiotic resistance. As with other infectious diseases, therapy should always be susceptibility-based. Susceptibility testing should be demanded. We provide recommendations for empiric therapies when that is the only option and describe how to distinguish studies providing misinformation from those providing reliable and interpretable data. When treated as an infectious disease, high H. pylori cure rates are relatively simple to reliably achieve. PMID:27077447

  10. Morphological and Cellular Features of Innate Immune Reaction in Helicobacter pylori Gastritis: A Brief Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieni, Antonio; Barresi, Valeria; Rigoli, Luciana; Fedele, Francesco; Tuccari, Giovanni; Caruso, Rosario Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity are both involved in acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The main cellular players in the innate immune system are macrophages, mast cells, dendritic cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and natural killer (NK), which offer antigen-independent defense against infection. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection presents peculiar characteristics in gastric mucosa infrequently occurring in other organs; its gastric colonization determines a causal role in both gastric carcinomas and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In contrast, an active role for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been identified only in 9% of gastric carcinomas. The aim of the present review is to discuss the role of cellular morphological effectors in innate immunity during H. pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26784180

  11. Morphological and Cellular Features of Innate Immune Reaction in Helicobacter pylori Gastritis: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Ieni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Innate and adaptive immunity are both involved in acute and chronic inflammatory processes. The main cellular players in the innate immune system are macrophages, mast cells, dendritic cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and natural killer (NK, which offer antigen-independent defense against infection. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection presents peculiar characteristics in gastric mucosa infrequently occurring in other organs; its gastric colonization determines a causal role in both gastric carcinomas and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In contrast, an active role for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV has been identified only in 9% of gastric carcinomas. The aim of the present review is to discuss the role of cellular morphological effectors in innate immunity during H. pylori infection and gastric carcinogenesis.

  12. Helicobacter pylori:Does it add to risk of coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vishal; Sharma; Amitesh; Aggarwal

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) is a known pathogen implicated in genesis of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma and gastric lymphoma. Beyond the stomach, the organism has also been implicated in the causation of immune thrombocytopenia and iron deficiency anemia. Although an area of active clinical research, the role of this gram negative organism in causation of atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease(CAD) remains enigmatic. CAD is a multifactorial disease which results from the atherosclerosis involving coronaryarteries. The major risk factors include age, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hypertension and dyslipidemia. The risk of coronary artery disease is believed to increase with chronic inflammation. Various organisms like Chlamydia and Helicobacter have been suspected to have a role in genesis of atherosclerosis via causation of chronic inflammation. This paper focuses on available evidence to ascertain if the role of H. pylori in CAD causation has been proven beyond doubt and if eradication may reduce the risk of CAD or improve outcomes in these patients.

  13. 14C-urea breath test for the detection of Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high urease activity of Helicobacter pylori can be used to detect this bacterium by noninvasive breath tests. We have developed a 14C-urea breath test which uses 5 microCi 14C with 50 mg nonradioactive urea. Breath samples are collected at baseline and every 30 min for 2 h. Our study compared the outcome of the breath test to the results of histology and culture of endoscopically obtained gastric biopsies in 84 patients. The breath test discriminated well between the 50 positive patients and the 34 patients negative for Helicobacter pylori: the calculated sensitivity was 100%, specificity 88%, positive predictive value 93%, and negative predictive value 100%. Treatment with bismuth subsalicylate and/or ampicillin resulted in lower counts of exhaled 14CO2 which correlated with histological improvement in gastritis. The 14C-urea breath test is a better gold standard for the detection of Helicobacter pylori than histology and/or culture

  14. Stool microbiome reveals diverse bacterial ureases as confounders of oral urea breath testing for Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiga, Mamoudou; Cohen, Keira; Baya, Bocar; Srikrishna, Geetha; Siddiqui, Sophia; Sanogo, Moumine; Somboro, Anou M; Diarra, Bassirou; Diallo, Mariam H; Mazumdar, Varun; Yoder, Christian; Orsega, Susan; Belson, Michael; Kassambara, Hamadoun; Goita, Drissa; Murphy, Robert L; Dao, Sounkalo; Polis, Michael; Diallo, Souleymane; Timmins, Graham S; Dodd, Lori; Earl, Ashlee M; Bishai, William R

    2016-01-01

    Detection of bacterial urease activity has been utilized successfully to diagnose Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). While Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) also possesses an active urease, it is unknown whether detection of mycobacterial urease activity by oral urease breath test (UBT) can be exploited as a rapid point of care biomarker for tuberculosis (TB) in humans. We enrolled 34 individuals newly diagnosed with pulmonary TB and 46 healthy subjects in Bamako, Mali and performed oral UBT, mycobacterial sputum culture and H. pylori testing. Oral UBT had a sensitivity and specificity (95% CI) of 70% (46-88%) and 11% (3-26%), respectively, to diagnose culture-confirmed M. tuberculosis disease among patients without H. pylori, and 100% sensitivity (69-100%) and 11% specificity (3-26%) to diagnose H. pylori among patients without pulmonary TB. Stool microbiome analysis of controls without TB or H. pylori but with positive oral UBT detected high levels of non-H. pylori urease producing organisms, which likely explains the low specificity of oral UBT in this setting and in other reports of oral UBT studies in Africa. PMID:27532494

  15. Preparation of epigallocatechin gallate-loaded nanoparticles and characterization of their inhibitory effects on Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of approaches have been proposed for overcoming the unpleasant side effects associated with antibiotics treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections. Research has shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major ingredient in green tea, has antibacterial activity for antiurease activity against H. pylori. Oral EGCG is not good because of its digestive instability and the fact that it often cannot reach the targeted site of antibacterial activity. To localize EGCG to H. pylori infection site, this study developed a fucose–chitosan/gelatin nanoparticle to encapsulate EGCG at the target and make direct contact with the region of microorganisms on the gastric epithelium. Analysis of a simulated gastrointestinal medium indicated that the proposed in vitro nanocarrier system effectively controls the release of EGCG, which interacts directly with the intercellular space at the site of H. pylori infection. Meanwhile, results of in vivo clearance assays indicated that our prepared fucose–chitosan/gelatin/EGCG nanoparticles had a significantly greater H. pylori clearance effect and more effectively reduced H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation in the gastric-infected mouse model than the EGCG solution alone. (paper)

  16. Preparation of epigallocatechin gallate-loaded nanoparticles and characterization of their inhibitory effects on Helicobacter pylori growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Feng, Chun-Lung; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Jui-Hsiang; Chen, Hao-Yun

    2014-08-01

    A variety of approaches have been proposed for overcoming the unpleasant side effects associated with antibiotics treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections. Research has shown that epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a major ingredient in green tea, has antibacterial activity for antiurease activity against H. pylori. Oral EGCG is not good because of its digestive instability and the fact that it often cannot reach the targeted site of antibacterial activity. To localize EGCG to H. pylori infection site, this study developed a fucose-chitosan/gelatin nanoparticle to encapsulate EGCG at the target and make direct contact with the region of microorganisms on the gastric epithelium. Analysis of a simulated gastrointestinal medium indicated that the proposed in vitro nanocarrier system effectively controls the release of EGCG, which interacts directly with the intercellular space at the site of H. pylori infection. Meanwhile, results of in vivo clearance assays indicated that our prepared fucose-chitosan/gelatin/EGCG nanoparticles had a significantly greater H. pylori clearance effect and more effectively reduced H. pylori-associated gastric inflammation in the gastric-infected mouse model than the EGCG solution alone.

  17. Helicobacter pylori and peptic ulcer disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, M; Peterson, W. L.

    1993-01-01

    Medical therapy for duodenal or gastric ulcer disease has traditionally involved gastric acid antisecretory therapy for 4 to 8 weeks to promote initial healing and indefinitely to prevent recurrences of ulcer. The discovery of Helicobacter pylori in most patients with peptic ulcer disease has led to a change in this approach. Therapy designed to eradicate H pylori may facilitate ulcer healing with acid antisecretory agents and, more important, may greatly reduce the incidence of ulcer recurre...

  18. Helicobacter pylori infection and dental care.

    OpenAIRE

    Hardo, P G; Tugnait, A; Hassan, F.; Lynch, D A; West, A P; Mapstone, N P; Quirke, P.; Chalmers, D M; Kowolik, M J; Axon, A T

    1995-01-01

    Sixty two patients (mean age 45.6 years) were assessed for oral hygiene and periodontal disease by dental examination before endoscopy. Information about oral care, smoking, and dentures was obtained and samples of dental plaque collected. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in plaque as sought by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and gastric antral biopsy specimens were taken for histological examination. Although H pylori was detected in the antral specimens of 34 patients (54%) ...

  19. Accuracy and economics of Helicobacter pylori diagnosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Cutler, A. F.

    1998-01-01

    Many diagnostic tests are available to establish Helicobacter pylori infection status. Most of the tests are accurate though none works perfectly, and no gold standard for diagnosis exists. Newly developed serum immunoassay kits can substitute for laboratory-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, but whole blood immunoassays do not yet demonstrate adequate performance characteristics. Serologic diagnosis of H. pylori remains the most cost-effective option and should be utilized to establis...

  20. Isolation of Helicobacter pylori from saliva.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, D A; C. Li; Patel, N. R.; Mayberry, W R; Chi, D S; Thomas, E.

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori was grown in low numbers from the saliva of one of nine patients who were positive for gastric H. pylori. The saliva-derived isolate from this patient was identical to the antral biopsy-derived isolate from the same patient and differed from isolates cultured from the antral biopsies of all other patients by soluble-protein electrophoresis, restriction endonuclease DNA analysis, and Southern blot hybridization. This is the first observation, to our knowledge, of the recove...

  1. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Carolina-Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Zina, Lívia-Guimarães; Amaral, Fabrício-Rezende

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a recurrent painful ulcerative disorder that commonly affects the oral mucosa. Local and systemic factors such as trauma, food sensitivity, nutritional deficiencies, systemic conditions, immunological disorders and genetic polymorphisms are associated with the development of the disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophile bacteria, that colonizes the gastric mucosa and it was previously suggested to be involved ...

  2. Supplementation with Angelica keiskei inhibits expression of inflammatory mediators in the gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori-infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aryoung; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hoguen; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-05-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric ulceration and carcinogenesis. The oxidant-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB), regulates expression of inflammatory mediators such as interferon γ (IFN-γ), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These inflammatory mediators increased in gastric mucosal tissues from patients infected with H pylori. Angelica keiskei (AK), a green leafy vegetable, is rich in carotenoids and flavonoids and shows antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Therefore, we hypothesized that AK may protect the gastric mucosa of H pylori-infected mice against inflammation. We determined lipid peroxide abundance, myeloperoxidase activity, expression levels of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, COX-2, and iNOS), NF-κB-DNA binding activity, and histologic changes in gastric mucosal tissues. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine served as the positive control treatment. Supplementation with AK suppressed increases in lipid peroxide abundance, myeloperoxidase activity, induction of inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, COX-2, and iNOS), activation of NF-κB, and degradation of nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor α in gastric mucosal tissue from H pylori-infected mice. Inhibition of H pylori-induced alterations by AK was similar to that by N-acetylcysteine. Taken together, these results suggest that supplementation with AK may prevent H pylori-induced gastric inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB-mediated induction of inflammatory mediators in the gastric mucosa of patients infected with H pylori. PMID:27101766

  3. [Helicobacter pylori in the development of dental caries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseeva, M V; Belova, E V; Vakhrushev, Ia M

    2010-01-01

    It is shown, that in patients with erosive and ulcer defects of gastroduodenal zone at settling Helicobacter pylori (Hp) in an oral cavity in 100% of cases caries develops at intensity 13.6 +/- 1.4 teeth. Produced Hp protease and ammonia cause disintegration connected to protein silica acids and reduce activity lysocim, worsening, thus, fluid and protective properties of a saliva. In the subsequent infringement of autopurification of a teeth results in accumulation of a dental strike where protease activity conditionally pathogenic microflora conducts to depolymerization and demineralization enamels of a teeth. PMID:20496804

  4. Role of ASC in the Mouse Model of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Benoit, Bekale N.; Kobayashi, Motohiro; Kawakubo, Masatomo; Takeoka, Michiko; Sano, Kenji; Zou, Jian; Itano, Naoki; Tsutsui, Hiroko; Noda, Tetsuo; Fukuda, Minoru; Nakayama, Jun; Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC) is an adaptor molecule activating caspase-1 that stimulates pro-interleukin-1β (pro-IL-1β) and pro-IL-18, two pro-inflammatory cytokines with critical functions in host defense against a variety of pathogens. In this study, we investigated the role of ASC in the host defense against Helicobacter pylori utilizing ASC-deficient mice. Mice were orally inoculated with H. pylori; bacterial load, degree...

  5. Gastric angiogenesis and Helicobacter pylori infection Angiogénesis gástrica e infección por Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Pousa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of new blood vessels seen in conditions commonly associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection, including gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma, prompts consideration of a potential relationship between mucosal colonization by this organism and the angiogenic process. H. pylori directly or indirectly damages endothelial cells, which induces a number of changes in the microvasculature of the gastric mucosa. In H. pylori-associated conditions, that is, in gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric carcinoma, there is an increased concentration of angiogenic factors, and subsequently a formation of new blood vessels. However, this early angiogenesis -which is activated to repair the gastric mucosa- is subsequently inhibited in patients with peptic ulcer, and ulcer healing is thus delayed. This may be due to the antiproliferative action of this organism on endothelial cells. While the angiogenic process becomes inhibited in infected patients with peptic ulcer, it remains seemingly active in those with gastritis or gastric cancer. This fact is in support of the notion suggested by various studies that peptic ulcer and gastric cancer are mutually excluding conditions. In the case of gastric cancer, neoangiogenesis would enhance nutrient and oxygen supply to cancer cells, and thus tumor growth and metastatic spread.

  6. Study of Biofilm Formation in C57Bl/6J Mice by Clinical Isolates of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaran, Bahareh; Falsafi, Tahereh; Moghaddam, Ali N.

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aim: Despite the significant number of studies on H. pylori pathogenesis, not much data has been published concerning its ability to form biofilm in the host stomach. This study aims to evaluate the potential of clinical isolates of H. pylori to form biofilm in C57BL/6J mice model. Materials and Methods: Two strains of H. pylori were selected from a collection of clinical isolates; one (19B), an efficient biofilm producer and the other (4B), with weak biofilm-forming ability. Mice infected through gastric avages were examined after one and two weeks. Colonization was determined by CFU and urease activity; the anti-H. pylori IgA was measured by ELISA, and chronic infections were evaluated by histopathology. Bacterial communities within mucosal sections were studied by immunofluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Successful infection was obtained by both test strains. Strain 19B with higher ability to form biofilm in vitro also showed a higher colonization rate in the mice stomach one week after infection. Difference (P < 0.05) in IgA titers was observed between the infected mice and the controls as well as between 19B and 4B infected mice, two weeks after the last challenge. Immunofluorescence and SEM results showed tightly colonizing H. pylori in stomach mucosal sections and in squamous and glandular epithelium. Conclusion: H. pylori is able to form biofilm in the mouse stomach and induce IgA production, reflecting the same potential as in humans. Firm attachment of coccoid form bacteria to host cells suggests the importance of this state in biofilm formation by H. pylori. Occurrence of biofilm in squamous and glandular epithelium of the mouse stomach proposes that H. pylori can all parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26997224

  7. Effects of killing Helicobacter pylori quadruple therapy on peptic ulcer: A randomized double-blind clinical trial

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Ying Feng; Xi-Xian Yao; Shu-Lin Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the therapeutic efficacy of a Chinese and Western integrated regimen, killing Helicobacter pylori quadruple therapy on H pylori-associated peptic ulcers(PU).METHODS: With prospective and double-blind controlled method, seventy-five active PU patients with H pylori infection were randomized to receive one of the following three regimens: (1) new triple therapy (group A:lansoprazole 30 mg qd, plus clarithromycin 250 mg bid,plus amoxycillin 500 mg tid, each for 10 d); (2) killing Hp quadruple therapy(group B: the three above drugs plus killing H pylori capsule 6 capsules bid for 4 wk) and (3)placebo(group C: gastropine 3 tablets bid for 4 wk).H pylori eradication and ulcer healing quality were evaluated under an endoscope 4 wk after treatment. The patients were followed up for 5 years.RESULTS: Both the healing rate of PU and H pylori eradication rate in group B were significantly higher than those in group C (100% and 96.4% vs 20% and 0%,respectively, P<0.005), but there was no significant difference compared to those in group A (88% and92%, P>0.05). The healing quality of ulcer in group B was superior to that in groups C and A (P<0.05). The recurrence rate of PU in group B (4%) was lower than that in group A (10%) and group C (100%, P<0.01).CONCLUSION: Killing Helicobacter pylori quadruple therapy can not only promote the eradication of H pylori and healing quality of ulcer but also reduce recurrence rate of ulcer.

  8. Clinical practice: Helicobacter pylori infection in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertem, Deniz

    2013-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is recognised as a cause of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and usually acquired during the first years of life. While there is a decline in the prevalence of H. pylori infection in northern and western European countries, the infection is still common in southern and eastern parts of Europe and Asia. Symptoms of H. pylori-related PUD are nonspecific in children and may include epigastric pain, nausea and/or vomiting, anorexia, iron deficiency anaemia and hematemesis. Besides, only a small proportion of children develop symptoms and clinically relevant gastrointestinal disease. H. pylori infection can be diagnosed either by invasive tests requiring endoscopy and biopsy or non-invasive tests including the (13)C-urea breath test, detection of H. pylori antigen in stool and detection of antibodies in serum, urine and saliva. The aim of treatment is at least 90 % eradication rate of the bacteria, and a combination of two antibiotics plus a proton pump inhibitor has been recommended as first-line treatment. However, frequent use of antibiotics during childhood is associated with a decline in eradication rates and the search for new treatment strategies as well. This is an overview of the latest knowledge and evidence-based guidelines regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of H. pylori infection in childhood. PMID:23015042

  9. Helicobacter pylori: immunoproteomics related to different pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Giulia; Braconi, Daniela; Lusini, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2007-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that causes ulcer, atrophic gastritis, adenocarcinoma and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Moreover, an ongoing controversial role of this bacterium infection has been suggested in the etiopathogenesis of some extradigestive diseases. The humoral response to H. pylori during a natural infection can be used for diagnostic purposes and as a basis for vaccine development. Host-pathogen interactions may be investigated by means of immunoproteomics, which provides global information about relevant specific and nonspecific antigens, and thus might be suitable to identify novel vaccine candidates or serological markers of H. pylori infection as well as of different related diseases. In this review, we describe how several research groups used H. pylori proteomics combined with western blotting analysis, using sera from patients affected with different H. pylori-related pathologies, to investigate potential associations between host immune response and clinical outcomes of H. pylori infection, resulting in the rapid identification of novel, highly immunoreactive antigens. PMID:17941822

  10. Helicobacter pylori screening: options and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venerito, Marino; Goni, Elisabetta; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori gastritis is the most frequent infectious disease in the gastrointestinal tract. Clinical sequelae of the infection including peptic ulcer disease, sporadic gastric cancer (GC) and primary B-cell gastric lymphoma (MALT-lymphoma) may develop in up to 20% of the infected individuals. The H. pylori screen-and-treat strategy is addressed to members of communities with high GC incidence, and first-degree relatives of GC patients. For primary GC prevention, H. pylori screen-and-treat is most effective in patients without precancerous conditions. In populations at moderate risk, strategies for GC prevention need to be explored. A special clinical scenario for primary and secondary prevention of H. pylori related benign complications are patients on non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and low-dose aspirin. Vaccination represents another option for eliminating H. pylori infection in the population and a new H. pylori vaccine has shown promising results. However, long-term effects with the use of vaccine are not available. PMID:26619972

  11. Study of serum Helicobacter pylori soluble antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴勤动; 朱永良

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to explore a new serological method for detecting Helicobac ter pylori ( H. pylori ) infection. Methods: Serum soluble antigen of H. p ylor i was detected by using avidin-biotin ELISA technique to evaluate the status of H. pylori infection and for comparison with rapid urease test ( RUT ), histo logi c examination and serology. Results: The sensitivity, specificity, positive pred ictive value and negative predictive value were 77.46%, 91.07%, 91.67% a nd 76.12 %, respectively. The prevalence rate of serum H. pylori soluble antigen in 138 patients undergoing endoscopy was similar to the rate obtained by 14 C-UBT met hods ( P>0.05 ). Conclusions: The detection of serum H. pylori solub le antigen( HpSAg) could be used as a new serological method which is accurate, and convenie nt, not affected by the memorizing reaction of serum antibody; is more sensitive , m ore specific and suitable for clinical diagnosis, and evaluation of eradication and for follow-up of H. pylori as well as for detection in children and pre gnant women.

  12. CXC chemokine CXCL12 tissue expression and circulating levels in peptic ulcer patients with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Vahid; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Mirzaee, Vahid; Khorramdelazad, Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is among the most prevalent human infections. CXCL12 is a well-known CXC chemokine involved in inflammation and play major roles in angiogenesis. There is currently very limited data on the role of CXCL12 in peptic ulcer disease. Hence, we aimed to explore whether CXCL12 is involved in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer induced by H. pylori. In this study, we enrolled 102 H. pylori-infected patients, including 51 with active ulcer (GA) and 51 with healing ulcer (GH). We also recruited 50 healthy subjects as control, which did not show any sign or symptoms of chronic inflammatory diseases, infection, or immune-related disorders. Endoscopy was performed to determine the stage of the disease. ELISA was used for detection of H. pylori infection and CXCL12 measurement. We also employed western blotting to detect CXCL12 in ulcerative lesions of H. pylori. Demographic data were also collected by questionnaire. Our results demonstrated that CXCL12 serum levels in GA group (151.8±18.31pg/mL) were significantly higher than those in GH (36.89±6.78pg/mL) and control groups (33.77±9.12pg/mL) (Pdisease. PMID:27269177

  13. Antiadhesion and anti-inflammation effects of noni (Morinda citrifolia) fruit extracts on AGS cells during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsin-Lun; Ko, Chien-Hui; Yan, Yeong-Yu; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2014-03-19

    Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen that adheres to host cells and injects cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) to induce interleukin-8 (IL-8), inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Noni (Morinda citrifolia) is found to possess antibacteria, anti-inflammation, and antioxidation activities, but its effect on H. pylori infection is still unknown. Ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts of noni fruit were used in this study. The inhibitory effect on CagA and H. pylori-induced IL-8, iNOS, and COX-2 were determined. The coculture medium was collected for measuring neutrophil chemotaxis. Both extracts of noni fruit showed weak inhibition on H. pylori. Both ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts provided antiadhesion of H. pylori to AGS cells and down-regulation on the CagA, IL-8, COX-2, and iNOS expressions. Results also indicated both extracts relieved neutrophil chemotaxis. Noni fruit extracts down-regulated inflammatory responses during H. pylori infection, and the phenolic compounds play key role in antiadhesion. PMID:24528133

  14. Identification of self-growth-inhibiting compounds lauric acid and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid from Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Shinpei; Igarashi, Masayuki; Hayashi, Chigusa; Shitara, Tetsuo; Nomoto, Akio; Mizote, Tomoko; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori growth medium is usually supplemented with horse serum (HS) or FCS. However, cyclodextrin derivatives or activated charcoal can replace serum. In this study, we purified self-growth-inhibiting (SGI) compounds from H. pylori growth medium. The compounds were recovered from porous resin, Diaion HP-20, which was added to the H. pylori growth medium instead of known supplements. These SGI compounds were also identified from 2,6-di-O-methyl-β-cyclodextrin, which was supplemented in a pleuropneumonia-like organisms broth. The growth-inhibiting compounds were identified as lauric acid (LA) and 7-(Z)-tetradecenoic acid [7-(Z)-TDA]. Although several fatty acids had been identified in H. pylori, these specific compounds were not previously found in this species. However, we confirmed that these fatty acids were universally present in the cultivation medium of the H. pylori strains examined in this study. A live/dead assay carried out without HS indicated that these compounds were bacteriostatic; however, no significant growth-inhibiting effect was observed against other tested bacterial species that constituted the indigenous bacterial flora. These findings suggested that LA and 7-(Z)-TDA might play important roles in the survival of H. pylori in human stomach epithelial cells. PMID:25767109

  15. ETS2 and Twist1 promote invasiveness of Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer cells by inducing Siah2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Rath, Suvasmita; Rout, Niranjan; Singh, Shivaram Prasad; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most potent factors leading to gastric carcinogenesis. The seven in absentia homologue (Siah2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase which has been implicated in various cancers but its role in H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis has not been established. We investigated the involvement of Siah2 in gastric cancer metastasis which was assessed by invasiveness and migration of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cancer cells. Cultured gastric cancer cells (GCCs) MKN45, AGS and Kato III showed significantly induced expression of Siah2, increased invasiveness and migration after being challenged with the pathogen. Siah2-expressing stable cells showed increased invasiveness and migration after H. pylori infection. Siah2 was transcriptionally activated by E26 transformation-specific sequence 2 (ETS2)- and Twist-related protein 1 (Twist1) induced in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. These transcription factors dose-dependently enhanced the aggressiveness of infected GCCs. Our data suggested that H. pylori-infected GCCs gained cell motility and invasiveness through Siah2 induction. As gastric cancer biopsy samples also showed highly induced expression of ETS2, Twist1 and Siah2 compared with noncancerous gastric tissue, we surmise that ETS2- and Twist1-mediated Siah2 up-regulation has potential diagnostic and prognostic significance and could be targeted for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27048589

  16. Effects of Helicobacter pylori eradication on atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia: A 3-year follow-up study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Lu; Ming-Tao Chen; Yi-Hong Fan; Yan Liu; Li-Na Meng

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of H pylori eradication on atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia (IM).METHODS: Two hundred and fifty-nine patients with atrophic gastritis in the antrum were included in the study, 154 patients were selected for H pylori eradication therapy and the remaining 105 patients served as untreated group. Gastroscopy and biopsies were performed both at the beginning and at the end of a 3-year follow-up study. Gastritis was graded according to the updated Sydney system.RESULTS: One hundred and seventy-nine patients completed the follow-up, 92 of them received H pylori eradication therapy and the remaining 87 H pyloriinfected patients were in the untreated group. Chronic gastritis, active gastritis and the grade of atrophy significantly decreased in H pylori eradication group (P<0.01). However, the grade of IM increased in H pylori -infected group (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: H pylori eradication may improve gastric mucosal inflammation, atrophy and prevent the progression of IM.

  17. Campylobacter pylori-associated gastritis: attempts to eradicate the bacteria by various antibiotics and anti-ulcer regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glupczynski, Y; Burette, A; Nyst, J F; De Prez, C; De Koster, E; Deltenre, M

    1988-01-01

    The efficacy of various antimicrobial and anti-ulcer agents on the eradication of Campylobacter pylori in patients with antral gastritis or duodenal ulcers was investigated by several open studies or double-blind, placebo-controlled protocols. Among the anti-ulcer agents, ranitidine, cimetidine or sucraflate had no effect on C. pylori. Colloidal bismuth subcitrate achieved clearance of C. pylori in 40% of treated patients at the end of therapy but a high relapse rate (14/16 patients) was observed after a 6-month follow-up period. The antibacterial agents doxycycline, minocycline, ofloxacin, clindamycin, paromomycin and nifuroxazide failed to eradicate C. pylori in most patients. By contrast, short term elimination of C. pylori could be achieved in more than 90% of patients treated with amoxycillin. However, relapse occurred as a rule in all amoxycillin-treated patients within one month after therapy. Overall, we observed no correlation between the in-vitro activity of the different antibacterial agents and their in vivo efficacy. Development of resistance during therapy does not seem to account for this discrepancy since it occurred only with ofloxacin. On the basis of these results, we conclude that long term eradication of C. pylori from the gastric antrum cannot be achieved after monotherapy either with antibiotics or with bismuth salts. PMID:2979039

  18. Mutation of cytotoxin-associated gene A affects expressions of antioxidant proteins of Hellcobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Huang; Guang-Cai Duan; Qing-Tang Fan; Wei-Dong Zhang; Chun-Hua Song; Xue-Yong Huang; Rong-Guang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine if disruption of the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) has an effect on the expression of other proteins at proteome level.METHODS: Construction of a cagA knock out mutant Hp27_. cagA ( cagA-) via homologous recombinat ion wi th the wi ld- type st rain Hp27 ( cagA+) as a recipient was performed. The method of sonicat ion-urea-CHAPS-DTT was employed to extract bacterial proteins from both strains. Soluble proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Images of 2-DE gels were digitalized and analyzed. Only spots that had a statistical significance in differential expression were selected and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionizationtime of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Biological information was used to search protein database and identify the biological function of proteins. RESULTS: The proteome expressions between wild-type strain and isogenic mutant with the cagA gene knocked-out were compared. Five protein spots with high abundance in bacteria proteins of wild-type strains, down-regulated or absently expressed in bacteria proteins of mutants, were identified and analyzed. From a quantitative point of view, the identified proteins are related to the cagA gene and important antioxidant proteins of H pylori, including alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (Ahp), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and modulator of drug activity (Mda66), respectively, suggesting that cagA is important to maintain the normal activity of antioxidative stress and ensure H pylori persistent colonization in the host. CONCLUSION: cagA gene i s relevant to the expressions of antioxidant proteins of H pylori, which may be a novel mechanism involved in H pylori cagA pathogenesis.

  19. Predictive computational modeling of the mucosal immune responses during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adria Carbo

    Full Text Available T helper (Th cells play a major role in the immune response and pathology at the gastric mucosa during Helicobacter pylori infection. There is a limited mechanistic understanding regarding the contributions of CD4+ T cell subsets to gastritis development during H. pylori colonization. We used two computational approaches: ordinary differential equation (ODE-based and agent-based modeling (ABM to study the mechanisms underlying cellular immune responses to H. pylori and how CD4+ T cell subsets influenced initiation, progression and outcome of disease. To calibrate the model, in vivo experimentation was performed by infecting C57BL/6 mice intragastrically with H. pylori and assaying immune cell subsets in the stomach and gastric lymph nodes (GLN on days 0, 7, 14, 30 and 60 post-infection. Our computational model reproduced the dynamics of effector and regulatory pathways in the gastric lamina propria (LP in silico. Simulation results show the induction of a Th17 response and a dominant Th1 response, together with a regulatory response characterized by high levels of mucosal Treg cells. We also investigated the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ activation on the modulation of host responses to H. pylori by using loss-of-function approaches. Specifically, in silico results showed a predominance of Th1 and Th17 cells in the stomach of the cell-specific PPARγ knockout system when compared to the wild-type simulation. Spatio-temporal, object-oriented ABM approaches suggested similar dynamics in induction of host responses showing analogous T cell distributions to ODE modeling and facilitated tracking lesion formation. In addition, sensitivity analysis predicted a crucial contribution of Th1 and Th17 effector responses as mediators of histopathological changes in the gastric mucosa during chronic stages of infection, which were experimentally validated in mice. These integrated immunoinformatics approaches

  20. Helicobacter Pylori in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

    OpenAIRE

    B Allahverdi; Esfahani ST; Najafi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.Pylori) is considered to cause gastritis and peptic ulcer. In dialysis patients this study was done in order to determine the role of H pylori in gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). Methods: Upper digestive tract endoscopy was conducted on 69 patients with ESRD. Gimsa staining and pathology evaluation were performed on Specimen of antrum for H pylori evaluation. Results: sixty five patients (94.2%) had pathologic defect...

  1. Helicobacter pylori gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase and its pathogenic role

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Vittorio; Giannouli, Maria; Romano, Marco; Zarrilli, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is a bacterial virulence factor that converts glutamine into glutamate and ammonia, and converts glutathione into glutamate and cysteinylglycine. H. pylori GGT causes glutamine and glutathione consumption in the host cells, ammonia production and reactive oxygen species generation. These products induce cell-cycle arrest, apoptosis, and necrosis in gastric epithelial cells. H. pylori GGT may also inhibit apoptosis and induce ...

  2. Association Between Helycobacter Pylori Infection and Pathological Oral Manifestations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carini Francesco; Samir Mallat; Cappello Francesco; Zummo Giovani; Jurjus Abdo; Tomasello Giovanni; Leone Angelo; Di Pasquale Roberto; Saniflippo Beatrice; Sinagra Emanuele; Damiani Provvidenza; Rosalyn Jurjus; Alice Gerges-Geagea; Inaya Hajj Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Data from the literature are controversial regarding the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dental plaque and its association with gastric infection. One of the possible mechanisms suggested for re-infection is the recolonization with H. pylori from dental plaque. The purpose of this review was to determine whether dental plaque, poor oral hygiene, and periodontal disease were risk factors for H. pylori infection.

  3. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori: Changes towards the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Behnam Kalali; Luca Formichella; Markus Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Since the first evidence demonstrating the dramatically high incidence of H. pylori infection and the subsequent medical challenges it incurs, health management of H. pylori infection has been a high priority for health authorities worldwide. Despite a decreasing rate of infection in western countries, prevalence of H. pylori infection in developing and in some industrial countries is still very high. Whereas treatment and vaccination against H. pylori is a contemporary issue in medical comm...

  4. Eradicating Helicobacter pylori reduces hypergastrinaemia during long term omeprazole treatment

    OpenAIRE

    El-Nujumi, A; Williams, C; Ardill, J; Oien, K; McColl, K

    1998-01-01

    Background—Both proton pump inhibitor drug treatment and Helicobacter pylori infection cause hypergastrinaemia in man. 
Aims—To determine whether eradicating H pylori is a means of reducing hypergastrinaemia during subsequent proton pump inhibitor treatment. 
Methods—Patients with H pylori were randomised to treatment with either anti-H pylori or symptomatic treatment. One month later, all received four weeks treatment with omeprazole 40 mg/day for one month followed by 2...

  5. Indications for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: a systematic overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Veldhuyzen van Zanten, S J; Sherman, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine (a) the advantages and disadvantages of treatment options for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori and (b) whether eradication of H. pylori is indicated in patients with duodenal ulcer, nonucler dyspepsia and gastric cancer. DATA SOURCES: A MEDLINE search for articles published in English between January 1983 and December 1992 with the use of MeSH terms Helicobacter pylori (called Campylobacter pylori before 1990) and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, dyspepsia and cli...

  6. Detection of oral Helicobacter Pylori infection using saliva test cassette

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Min; Zhang, Xue-Yan; Yu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the incidence of oral infection with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and identify related epidemiological factors among freshmen of four colleges in Yancheng. Methods: The data, scored positive or negative, were collected on 160 individuals who had been diagnosed by H. pylori Saliva Test Cassette (HPS) during October 2013 to October 2014. H. pylori Saliva Test Cassette (HPS) is to use colloidal gold technique to specifically identify urease in saliva. A standard ques...

  7. Interaction of Helicobacter pylori with glycosylated salivary proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Walz, Anke

    2006-01-01

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in 1983 enormous progress has been made in determining the pathogenesis of this microbe in gastric disease. While the way of transmission is still under dispute, it is generally accepted that H. pylori must reach the stomach via the oral cavity. During this passage it comes into contact with salivary components. However, there are only few studies about interactions of H. pylori with salivary components and no study about the influence of...

  8. Helicobacter pylori typing as a tool for tracking human migration

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaoka, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains from different geographic areas exhibit clear phylogeographical differentiation; therefore, the genotypes of H. pylori strains can serve as markers for the migration of human populations. Currently, the genotypes of two virulence factors of H. pylori, cagA and vacA, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) are widely used markers for genomic diversity within H. pylori populations. There are two types of cagA: the East Asian type and the Western type. In addition, the ...

  9. Emerging antimicrobial resistance pattern of Helicobacter pylori in central Gujarat

    OpenAIRE

    H B Pandya; Harihar Har Agravat; J S Patel; NRK Sodagar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antimicrobial resistance is a growing problem in H. pylori treatment. The study was intended to evaluate the prevalence of resistance amongst 80 H.pylori isolates cultured from biopsy taken during routine endoscopies in 2008-2011. Materials and Methods: 855 gastro duodenal biopsies were collected and cultured on H.pylori selective medium (containing Brucella agar and Columbia agar (Hi media), with Skirrow′s supplement (antibiotic supplement) and 7% human blood cells). H.pylori was...

  10. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori: therapies and clinical implications.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, H J

    1992-01-01

    This review presents a critical evaluation of the role of Helicobacter pylori eradication in the management of peptic ulcer disease and non-ulcer dyspepsia. On current evidence, H. pylori eradication therapy seems likely to emerge as the most rational and cost-effective treatment for duodenal ulcer. The role of H. pylori eradication in the treatment of gastric ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia is unclear and requires further study. The emerging problem of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori is of ...

  11. Helicobacter Pylori Gastritis, a Presequeale to Coronary Plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Raut, Shrikant C.; Patil, Vinayak W; Dalvi, Shubhangi M; Bakhshi, Girish D.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori are considered the most common human pathogen colonizing gastric mucosa. Gastritis with or without H. pylori infection is associated with increase in levels of homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) but a more pronounced increase is noted in gastritis with H. pylori infection. Increasing level of homocysteine, due to decreased absorption of vitamin B12 and folic acid, together with increased CRP levels in gastritis with H. pylori infection may be the...

  12. Genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Perng, Chin-Lin; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lo, Wen-Ching; Tseng, Guan-Ying; Sun, I-Chen; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma. Different genotypes of Helicobacter pylori are confirmed from diverse geographic areas. Its association with bleeding peptic ulcer remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the Helicobacter pylori vacA alleles, cagA and iceA in patients with bleeding peptic ulcer.

  13. Furazolidone therapy for Helicobacter pylori: Is it effective and safe?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vincenzo De Francesco; Enzo Ierardi; Cesare Hassan; Angelo Zullo

    2009-01-01

    Some aspects related with the use of furazolidone as a rescue therapy for Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) infection should be remarked, especially regarding its potential oncologic risk. The inclusion of furazolidone in a treatment regimen for H pylori infection is, at least, controversial, and it does not appear to be safe.

  14. Crosstalks between cytokines and Sonic Hedgehog in Helicobacter pylori infection: a mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Marwaha

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection of gastric tissue results in an immune response dominated by Th1 cytokines and has also been linked with dysregulation of Sonic Hedgehog (SHH signaling pathway in gastric tissue. However, since interactions between the cytokines and SHH during H. pylori infection are not well understood, any mechanistic understanding achieved through interpretation of the statistical analysis of experimental results in the context of currently known circuit must be carefully scrutinized. Here, we use mathematical modeling aided by restraints of experimental data to evaluate the consistency between experimental results and temporal behavior of H. pylori activated cytokine circuit model. Statistical analysis of qPCR data from uninfected and H. pylori infected wild-type and parietal cell-specific SHH knockout (PC-SHHKO mice for day 7 and 180 indicate significant changes that suggest role of SHH in cytokine regulation. The experimentally observed changes are further investigated using a mathematical model that examines dynamic crosstalks among pro-inflammatory (IL1β, IL-12, IFNγ, MIP-2 cytokines, anti-inflammatory (IL-10 cytokines and SHH during H. pylori infection. Response analysis of the resulting model demonstrates that circuitry, as currently known, is inadequate for explaining of the experimental observations; suggesting the need for additional specific regulatory interactions. A key advantage of a computational model is the ability to propose putative circuit models for in-silico experimentation. We use this approach to propose a parsimonious model that incorporates crosstalks between NFĸB, SHH, IL-1β and IL-10, resulting in a feedback loop capable of exhibiting cyclic behavior. Separately, we show that analysis of an independent time-series GEO microarray data for IL-1β, IFNγ and IL-10 in mock and H. pylori infected mice further supports the proposed hypothesis that these cytokines may follow a cyclic trend. Predictions

  15. Iron status and Helicobacter pylori infection in symptomatic children: an international multi-centered study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dulciene Maria Magalhaes Queiroz

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Iron deficiency (ID and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA are global major public health problems, particularly in developing countries. Whilst an association between H. pylori infection and ID/IDA has been proposed in the literature, currently there is no consensus. We studied the effects of H. pylori infection on ID/IDA in a cohort of children undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for upper abdominal pain in two developing and one developed country. METHODS: In total 311 children (mean age 10.7±3.2 years from Latin America--Belo Horizonte/Brazil (n = 125, Santiago/Chile (n = 105--and London/UK (n = 81, were studied. Gastric and duodenal biopsies were obtained for evaluation of histology and H. pylori status and blood samples for parameters of ID/IDA. RESULTS: The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 27.7% being significantly higher (p<0.001 in Latin America (35% than in UK (7%. Multiple linear regression models revealed H. pylori infection as a significant predictor of low ferritin and haemoglobin concentrations in children from Latin-America. A negative correlation was observed between MCV (r = -0.26; p = 0.01 and MCH (r = -0.27; p = 0.01 values and the degree of antral chronic inflammation, and between MCH and the degree of corpus chronic (r = -0.29, p = 0.008 and active (r = -0.27, p = 0.002 inflammation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that H. pylori infection in children influences the serum ferritin and haemoglobin concentrations, markers of early depletion of iron stores and anaemia respectively.

  16. Expression of adhesion molecules on human granulocytes after stimulation with Helicobacter pylori membrane proteins: comparison with membrane proteins from other bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Enders, G; Brooks, W.; von Jan, N; Lehn, N.; Bayerdörffer, E; Hatz, R

    1995-01-01

    Type B gastritis in its active form is characterized by a dense infiltration of the lamina propria with granulocytes. Since the bacterium Helicobacter pylori does not invade the epithelial barrier, a signaling pathway chemoattractive for granulocytes must exist across this mucosal boarder. One possible mechanism tested was whether granulocytes are directly activated by water-soluble membrane proteins (WSP) from H. pylori. These findings were compared with the effects of WSP from other bacteri...

  17. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection and diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori by Helicobacter pylori outer membrane proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jiang; Ai-Long Huang; Xiao-Hong Tao; Pi-Long Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the serological response of patients with upper gastrointestinal diseases and Helicobocter pylori(Hpylori)infection to two H pylori outer membrane proteins (OMPs)(Mr18 000 and Mr26 000) acquired by gene recombinanttechnique, and to determine the diagnostic significance of serological tests derived from these OMPs.METHODS: Recombinant vectors encoding the two H pylori OMPs were used to transform and express in BL21 (DE3)E. coli. After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin, colloid gold kits were prepared with purified recombinant proteins to detect H pylori infection and H pylori-associated diseases by the immunity-marker technology. We selected 150 patients with H pyloriinfection and digestive symptoms without previous treatment, induding chronic gastritis (n = 60), duodenal ulcer (n = 30), gastric ulcer (n = 30), and gastric cancer (n = 30).As controls, 33 H pylori-negative healthy volunteers were also recruited. Serum samples were collected from all subjects, and the antibodies to specific proteins of H pylori were tested with the colloid gold test kits. The sensitivity,specificity and accuracy of the colloid gold tests were evaluated, by using the combination of standard diagnostic methods (13C urea breath test and bacteria culture) and classic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) as reference.RESULTS: After purification with Ni2+-NTA agarose resin,the purity of recombinant fusion proteins was about 95%.The recombinant fusion proteins were recognized by the specific monoclonal antibodies against the two H pylori OMPs,as demonstrated by the ELISA. Of the 150 serum samples from patients infected with H pylori 141 (94.0%) responded positively to the recombinant protein with Mr26 000, while the seropositive rates were 95.0%, 96.7%, 96.7% and 90.0%for patients with H pylori-associated chronic gastritis,duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer respectively.The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the colloid gold kit with Mr26 000

  18. Comparison of IL-6, IL-8 Concentrations in H. pylori- and non-H. pylori-associated Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gontar Alamsyah Siregar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is a non-invasive microorganism causing intense gastric mucosal inflammatory and immune reaction. The gastric mucosal levels of the proinflammatory cytokines Interleukin 6 (IL-6 and IL-8 have been reported to be increased in H. pylori infection, but the serum levels in H. pylori infection is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-6 and IL-8 in H. pylori infection. METHODS: A cross sectional study was done on eighty consecutive gastritis patients admitted to endoscopy units at Adam Malik General Hospital and Permata Bunda Hospital, Medan, Indonesia from May-October 2014. Histopathology was performed for the diagnosis of gastritis. Rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Serum samples were obtained to determine circulating IL-6 and IL-8. Univariate and bivariate analysis (independent t test were done. RESULTS: There were 41.25% patients infected with H. pylori. Circulatory IL-6 levels were significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori negative, but there were no differences between serum levels of IL-8 in H. pylori positive and negative patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected in an increased level of serum IL-6. Serum levels of IL-8 were not significantly different between H. pylori positive and negative. KEYWORDS: Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, IL-6, IL-8, cytokine.

  19. Agglutination of Helicobacter pylori coccoids by lectins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mar Mar Khin; Jie Song Hua; Hah Cong Ng; Bow Ho; Torkel Wadstrorr

    2000-01-01

    AIM To study the agglutination pattern of Helicobacter pylori coccoid and spiral forms.METHODS Assays of agglutination and agglutination inhibition were applied using fifteen commercial lectins. RESULTS Strong agglutination was observed with mannose-specific Concanavalin A (Con A ),fucose-specific Tetragonolobus purpureas ( Lotus A ) and N-acetyl glucosamine-specific Triticum vulgaris (WGA) lectins. Mannose and fucose specific lectins were reactive with all strains of H. pylori coccoids as compared to the spirals. Specific carbohydrates, glycoproteins and mucin were shown to inhibit H. pylori lectin-agglutination reactions. Pre-treatment of the bacterial cells with formalin and sulphuric acid did not alter the agglutination patterns with lectins. However, sodium periodate treatment of bacterial cells were shown to inhibit agglutination reaction with Con A, Lotus A and WGA lectins. On the contrary, enzymatic treatment of coccoids and spirals did not show marked inhibition of H. pylori-lectin agglutination. Interestingly, heating of H.pylori cells at 60℃ for 1 hour was shown to augment the agglutination with all of the lectins tested. CONCLUSION The considerable differences in lectin agglutination patterns seen among the two differentiated forms of H. pylori might be attributable to the structural changes during theevents of morphological transformation,resulting in exposing or masking some of the sugar residues on the cell surface. Possibility of various sugar residues on the cell wall of the coccoids may allow them to bind to different carbohydrate receptors on gastric mucus and epithelial cells. The coccoids with adherence characteristics like the spirals could aid in the pathogenic process of Helicobacter infection.This may probably lead to different clinical outcome of H. pylori associated gastroduodenal disease.

  20. Helicobacter Pylori and Gastric Cancer: Clinical Aspects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Qiang Song; Li-Ya Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Although Helicobacterpylori (H.pylori) is considered as the main etiological factor for gastric cancer, the strategy of screening and treating the oncogenic bacterium is still controversial.The objective was to evaluate the status and progress of the cognition about the relationship between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer from a clinical aspect.Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from the PubMed articles published in English from 1984 to 2015.Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic.Results: Gastric cancer is the fifth most common malignancy and the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide.The main etiological factor for gastric cancer is H.pylori infection.About 74.7-89.0% gastric cancer was related to H.pylori infection.Up to date, some regional gastric cancer prevention programs including the detection and treatment of H.pylori infection are under way.Current data obtained from the randomized controlled trials suggest that population-based H.pylori screening and treatment is feasible and cost-effective in preventing gastric cancer;however, a population-based H.pylori eradication campaign would potentially lead to bacterial resistance to the corresponding antibiotics, as well as a negative impact on the normal flora.Conclusions: The important questions of feasibility, program costs, appropriate target groups for intervention, and the potential harm of mass therapy with antibiotics must first be answered before implementing any large-scale program.

  1. Efficacy of omeprazole and amoxicillin with either clarithromycin or metronidazole on eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Chinese peptic ulcer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hao Sun; Han Su; Xi-Long Ou; Da-Zhong Cao; Qian Yu; Ting Yu; Jin-Ming Hu; Feng Zhu; Yun-Liang Sun; Xi-Ling Fu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: One-week triple therapy with proton pump inhibitors, clarithromycin and amoxicillin has recently been proposed as the first-line treatment for Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) infection; however, data regarding the effects of this regimen in China are scarce. The aim of this prospective and randomized study was to compare the efficacy of clarithromycin and metronidazole when they were combined with omeprazole and amoxicillin on eradication of H pylori and ulcer healing in Chinese peptic ulcer patients.METHODS: A total of 103 subjects with H pylori-positive peptic ulcer were randomly divided into two groups, and accepted triple therapy with omeprazole 20 mg, amoxicillin 1 000 mg and either clarithromycin 500 mg (OAC group,n = 58) or metronidazole 400 mg (OAM group, n = 45).All drugs were given twice daily for 7 d. Patients with active peptic ulcer were treated with omeprazole 20 mg daily for 2-4 wk after anti-H pylori therapy. Six to eight weeks after omeprazole therapy, all patients underwent endoscopies and four biopsies (two from the antrum and two others from the corpus of stomach) were taken for rapid urease test and histological analysis (with modified Giemsa staining) to examine H pylori. Successful eradication was defined as negative results from both examination methods.RESULTS: One hundred patients completed the entire course of therapy and returned for follow-up. The eradication rate of H pylori for the per-protocol analysis was 89.3% (50/56) in OAC group and 84.1% (37/44) in OAM group. Based on the intention-to-treat analysis, the eradication rate of H pylori was 86.2% (50/58) in OAC group and 82.2% (37/45) in OAM group. There were no significant differences in eradication rates between the two groups on either analysis. The active ulcer-healing rate was 96.7% (29/30) in OAC group and 100% (21/21)in OAM group (per-protocol analysis, P>0.05). Six patients in OAC group (10.3%) and five in OAM group (11.1%)reported adverse events (P>0.05).CONCLUSION

  2. Therapeutic efficacy of oral immunization with a non-genetically modified Lactococcus lactis-based vaccine CUE-GEM induces local immunity against Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tan, Zhoulin; Xue, Jinfeng; Luo, Wenjin; Song, Hui; Lv, Xiaobo; Zheng, Tianjing; Xi, Tao; Xing, Yingying

    2016-07-01

    The gastric bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the gastric mucosa of humans and plays a critical role in the development of gastritis, peptic ulceration and gastric adenocarcinoma. Consequently, the eradication of H. pylori might contribute to the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric diseases. In this study, a multi-epitope vaccine CTB-UE (CUE) was displayed on the surface of non-genetically modified Lactococcus lactis particles (GEM) to enhance immunogenicity. This particulate vaccine CUE-GEM induced serum and mucosal specific antibody responses against native H. pylori urease and provided potent protection to eliminate H. pylori colonization and relieve gastritis in an H. pylori-infected BALB/c mouse model. The immuno-protective mechanisms are highly associated with CD4(+) Th cell-mediated and humoral immunity, especially local immunity. There might be two main aspects of this association. One aspect is related to the suppression of urease activity by promotion of the production of specific mucosal neutralizing antibody. The other aspect is correlated with alleviating gastritis by regulating the gastric pro-inflammatory cytokine profile, especially IFN-γ and IL-17. These results demonstrated that conjugating antigen vaccines with GEM particles could lead to promising oral therapeutic vaccine formulations against H. pylori infection. PMID:26846746

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a new peptide deformylase from human pathogenic bacterium Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium, which is associated with peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. It is urgent to discover novel drug targets for appropriate antimicrobial agents against this human pathogen. In bacteria, peptide deformylase (PDF) catalyzes the removal of a formyl group from the N-termini of nascent polypeptides. Due to its essentiality and absence in mammalian cells, PDF has been considered as an attractive target for the discovery of novel antibiotics. In this work, a new PDF gene (def) from H. pylori strain SS1 was cloned, expressed, and purified in Escherichia coli system. Sequence alignment shows that H. pylori PDF (HpPDF) shares about 40% identity to E. coli PDF (EcPDF). The enzymatic properties of HpPDF demonstrate its relatively high activity toward formyl-Met-Ala-Ser, with Kcat of 3.4 s-1, Km of 1.7 mM, and Kcat/Km of 2000 M-1 s-1. HpPDF enzyme appears to be fully active at pH between 8.0 and 9.0, and temperature 50 deg. C. The enzyme activity of Co2+-containing HpPDF is apparently higher than that of Zn2+-containing HpPDF. This present work thereby supplies a potential platform that facilitates the discovery of novel HpPDF inhibitors and further of possible antimicrobial agents against H. pylori

  4. Glycated Hemoglobin, Gastric Juice Nitric Oxide and Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Patients Infected by Helicobacter Pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puramini, N. (BSc

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Recently, diabetes mellitus has been known as one of the main cause of upper gastrointestinal symptoms. Since a high prevalence of H. Pylori in diabetic patients has been reported, we aimed to evaluate the level of gastric juice Nitric Oxide (NO°, Oxidative Stress and Glycated Hemoglobin. Material and Methods: In case group, the participants were 60 diabetic patients infected with H. Pylori, and in control groups 60 diabetic patients without H. Pylori and 60 healthy individuals. The level of NO° in gastric juice was measured calorimetrically and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX in gastric biopsy was determined using standard methods. The percentage of Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1C was measured by ion exchange chromatography. Results: In case group compared to controls, significantly increased level of blood HbA1C, nitric oxide in gastric juice, activity of SOD and GPX in the gastric mucosa were observed (p<0.0001. Conclusion: A significant increase of glycated hemoglobin in diabetic patients with H. Pylori and high activity of antioxidant enzymes in the case group may indicate a high production of reactive oxygen species and the presence of oxidative stress in these patients.

  5. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori: are rifaximin-based regimens effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasbarrini, Antonio; Gasbarrini, Giovanni; Pelosini, Iva; Scarpignato, Carmelo

    2006-01-01

    Rifaximin is a non-absorbed semisynthetic rifamycin derivative with a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity including Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, both aerobes and anaerobes. Although originally developed for the treatment of infectious diarrhea, the appreciation of the pathogenic role of gut bacteria in several organic and functional gastrointestinal diseases has increasingly broadened its clinical use. Being the antibiotic active against Helicobacter pylori, even towards clarithromycin-resistant strain, and being the primary resistance very rare, several investigations explored its potential use for eradication of the microorganism. Rifaximin alone proved to be effective, but even the highest dose (1,200 mg daily) gave a cure rate of only 30%. Dual and triple therapies were also studied, with the better results obtained with rifaximin-clarithromycin and rifaximin-clarithromycin-esomeprazole combinations. However, the eradication rates (60-70%) obtained with these regimens were still below the standard set by the Maastricht Consensus guidelines. Although rifaximin-based eradication therapies are promising, new antimicrobial combinations (with and without proton pump inhibitors) need to be explored in well-designed clinical trials including a large cohort of H. pylori-infected patients. The remarkable safety of rifaximin will allow high-dose regimens of longer duration (e.g. 10 or 14 days) to be tested with confidence in the hope of achieving better eradication rates. A drawback of rifaximin could be its inability to reach sufficiently high concentrations in the gastric mucus layer under and within which H. pylori is commonly located and this would likely affect eradication rate. Taking these considerations into account, bioadhesive rifaximin formulations able to better and persistently cover gastric mucosa, or combination with mucolytic agents, such as pronase or acetylcysteine, need to be evaluated in order to better define the place of this

  6. Helicobacter pylori Infection and atherosclerosis: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Karbasi-Afshar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a spiral-shaped gram negative bacterium that naturally colonizes the human gastric epithelium. In recent years, large evidence has come to the literature strongly proposing causal link between H. pylori and extra gastric disorders. Cardiovascular system is one of the extra gastric organs that can be affected by H. pylori infection. The first evidence suggestive of such an association comes from seroepidemiological evaluations, but histopathological and eradication studies have strongly confirmed existence of a causal association between H. pylori infection and cardiovascular events.

  7. Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Famouri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Childrenwith Helicobacter infection need treatment. The aim of treatment is elimination of H.Pylori. Most patients with this infection are asymptomatic and without peptic disease. Treatment and management of these patients are controversy. Conventional Treatment: The best treatment for H. pylori eradication regimens should have cure rates of at least 80%, be without major side effects, and induce minimal bacterial resistance. Antibiotics alone have not achieved this. Luminal acidity influences both the effectiveness of some antimicrobial agents and the survival of the bacteri; thus antibiotics have been combined with acid suppression such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, bismuth, or H2 antagonists. The “classic” regimen is treatment twice daily for 7 days with a PPI and clarithromycin plus either amoxicillin or metronidazole Bismuth has been used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease and 1 part o quadruple therapy for H.Pylori but compliance of children for it is low.   Sequential Therapy  Sequential therapyinvolves dual therapy with a PPI and amoxicillin for 5 days followed sequentially by clarithromycin, Tinidazole and omeperazole for 5 days or other triple therapy for 7 days. This treatment has had 97% efficacy.   Adjunctive Therapies A number of studies have showed the potential benefits of probiotic therapy in H. pylori treatment regimens.Consumption of these drugs accompanied with other medications increase H.Pylori eradication.    

  8. Helicobacter pylori infection and acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakić, Dario; Vcev, Aleksandar; Jović, Albino; Patrk, Jogen; Zekanović, Drazen; Klarin, Ivo; Ivanac, Kresimir; Mrden, Anamarija; Balen, Sanja

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine whether H. pylori infection is an independent risk factor for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), determine is there a link between H. pylori infection and severity of disease. In this prospective, single centre study, were enrolled 100 patients with AMI and control group was consisted 93 healthy individuals. The results of this study showed no difference between H. pylori seropositivity distribution in the investigate and control group (29 vs. 26 %) and there was no significant difference on the severity of the disease. There was significant association in the patients with three and more risk factors, where the patients with lower blood pressure (124.4/77.4 vs. 145.9/87.7 mmHg) and better controlled diabetes (HbA1c 6.1% vs. 6.9%) had greater risk for AMI if they are H. pylori seropositive. The large multicentric trials would be needed to define a precise role of H. pylori infection on the developement of AMI. PMID:22053556

  9. Rare Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genotypes in Bhutan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunari, Osamu; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Shiota, Seiji; Suzuki, Rumiko; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Uchida, Tomohisa; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Both the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the incidence of gastric cancer are high in Bhutan. The high incidence of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer suggest the phylogeographic origin of an infection with a more virulent strain of H. pylori. More than 90% of Bhutanese strains possessed the highly virulent East Asian-type CagA and all strains had the most virulent type of vacA (s1 type). More than half also had multiple repeats in East Asian-type CagA, which are rare in other countries and are reported characteristictly found in assciation with atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer consistent with Bhutanese strains having multiple H. pylori virulence factors associated with an increase in gastric cancer risk. Phylogeographic analyses showed that most Bhutanese strains belonged to the East Asian population type with some strains (17.5%) sharing East Asian and Amerindian components. Only 9.5% belonged to the European type consistant with H. pylori in Bhutan representing an intermediate evolutionary stage between H. pylori from European and East Asian countries. PMID:26931643

  10. Paediatric halitosis and helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the presence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection by stool antigen test in children with and without halitosis. Study Design: Comparative study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Paediatrics, Fatih University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between December 2008 and June 2009. Methodology: Fifty-three patients aged between 3-15 years who presented to paediatrics outpatient clinic with halitosis and 55 healthy children aged between 4-15 years without halitosis were included in the study. Halitosis was confirmed with organoleptic test. Stool antigen test was performed in both groups. Inter group proportions were compared using chi square and Fisher exact tests with significance at p 0.05). Two weeks eradication treatment was administered to 11 patients with H. pylori infection and halitosis. After treatment, the symptoms of 8 patients with halitosis (72.7%) completely resolved and persisted in 3 patients (27.3%). Seven of the 11 patients who were administered eradication treatment also had abdominal pain along with halitosis. Both symptoms completely resolved in all those patients after treatment. Conclusion: Although no statistically significant difference existed between the rate of H. pylori infections among those with and without halitosis. Eradication treatment was found beneficial in the treatment of children with halitosis and positive H. pylori stool antigen test. (author)

  11. N-acetylcysteine, a novel treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Hien Quoc; Couper, Richard T L; Tran, Cuong D; Moore, Lynette; Kelso, Richard; Butler, Ross N

    2004-01-01

    N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), being both a mucolytic agent and a thiol-containing antioxidant, may affect the establishment and maintenance of H. pylori infection within the gastric mucus layer and mucosa. Agar and broth dilution susceptibility tests determined the MIC of H. pylori strain SSI to NAC. H. pylori load in SSI strain-infected C57BL mice was determined as colony forming units per gram of gastric tissue. Gastritis assessment was scored and gastric surface hydrophobicity was determined by contact angle measurement. MICs of NAC were 5 to 10 and 10 to 15 mg/ml using the agar dilution and broth dilution methods, respectively. NAC (120 mg per day for 14 days) reduced the H. pylori load in mice by almost 1 log compared with sham treatment. Pretreatment with NAC (40 mg/day) also significantly reduced the H. pylori load but did not prevent H. pylori colonization. Both H. pylori infection and NAC reduced the surface hydrophobicity of murine gastric mucosa. No significant differences were observed in the gastritis scores of H. felis- or H. pylori-infected mice receiving either NAC or sham treatments. This study demonstrates that NAC inhibits the growth of H. pylori in both agar and broth susceptibility tests and in H. pylori-infected mice. NAC did not alter the severity of H. pylori- or H. felis-induced gastritis. PMID:15628716

  12. Helicobacter Pylori in Patients with Chronic Renal Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Allahverdi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (H.Pylori is considered to cause gastritis and peptic ulcer. In dialysis patients this study was done in order to determine the role of H pylori in gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD. Methods: Upper digestive tract endoscopy was conducted on 69 patients with ESRD. Gimsa staining and pathology evaluation were performed on Specimen of antrum for H pylori evaluation. Results: sixty five patients (94.2% had pathologic defect in endoscopy and 57 patients (82.6% had gastrointestinal symptoms. Prevalence of H pylori positive was 21.7% (15 patients. H pylori was positive in 21% patients with gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusion: Chronic renal failure and dialysis had no effect on prevalence of H pylori.

  13. Association between Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and Hepatic Encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The knowledge on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) contribution in the pathology of the liver and biliary tract diseases in human is very limited. The aim of this study was to assess the probable association between H. pylori seropositivity and hepatic encephalopathy. Methodology: This is a case control study conducted through three groups, cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy (HE), cirrhotics without HE and healthy controls. All subjects were examined serologically for determination of IgG class antibodies to H. pylori based on ELISA technique. Results: H. pylori seropositivity was present in 88% cirrhotic patients with hepatic encephalopathy, 86% cirrhotics without hepatic encephalopathy and 66% healthy controls. Conclusion: According to our results, H. pylori seropositivity rate in cirrhotic patients with or without hepatic encephalopathy was higher than healthy controls. But H. pylori seropositivity rate was not significantly different among cirrhotics with hepatic encephalopathy and those without it.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection generates genetic instability in gastric cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machado, Ana Manuel; Figueiredo, C.; Seruca, R.; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2010-01-01

    The discovery that Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastric cancer has led to numerous studies that investigate the mechanisms by which H. pylori induces carcinogenesis. Gastric cancer shows genetic instability both in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA, besides impairment of important DNA repair...... pathways. As such, this review highlights the consequences of H. pylori infection on the integrity of DNA in the host cells. By down-regulating major DNA repair pathways, H. pylori infection has the potential to generate mutations. In addition, H. pylori infection can induce direct changes on the DNA of...... the host, such as oxidative damage, methylation, chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability, and mutations. Interestingly, H. pylori infection generates genetic instability in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. Based on the reviewed literature we conclude that H. pylori infection promotes gastric...

  15. The Effect of Cholecystectomy on the Histology of Antrum and Helicobacter Pylori Colonization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Özer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Notwithstanding cholecystectomy’s being the standard cure for symptomatic gallbladder stones, it might as well trigger changes that result in the increase of duodenogastric reflux and the emergence of relevant clinic and laboratorial data. The aim of this thesis is to explore the effect of cholecystectomy on the duodenogastric reflux, histopathologic changes in the antral mucosa and Helicobacter pylori colonization. Material and Method: This prospective research is based upon data collected from 45 patients (28 of them being female and 17 of them being male patients with an average age of 50.9, who would undergo cholecystectomic surgery. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy has been performed on patients before the operation and at least two months after the operation in order to examine the existence of bile in the stomach. The tissues removed from the antrum during these endoscopic biopsies have been examined to spot the histopathologic changes and the existence of Helicobacter pylori in the mucosa (chronic gastritis, activation findings, and intestinal metaplasia. Results: Duodenogastric reflux, chronic gastritis, and intestinal metaplasia have been observed to increase significantly after cholecystectomy (p<0.001 for duodenogastric reflux and chronic gastritis, p<0.05 for intestinal metaplasia. On the other hand, no significant data have been attained in terms of activation findings and the existence of H.pylori before and after the operation. Discussion: Although cholecystectomy cause duodenogastric reflux and histopathologic changes in the antrum, it does not affect  H.pylori colonization.

  16. Semiempirical model for diagnostication Helicobacter pylori infection by use of 14C labelled urea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of this study was to create a semiempirical model, helpful in estimating severity of the Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection by using the urea breath test (UBT), when urea labelled 14C has been used for diagnostics. The model consists of four compartments representing stomach (1), blood vascular system (2), lungs (3) and urinary system (4). Mathematical model is based on the balance of radioactive 14C in compartments from 1 to 4. The histological investigations were used as reference methods. Comparison of the results obtained from simulation, which yields dependence of 14C activity on time, to experimental results of UBT, made it possible to determine the ranges of coefficient HB value, which characterized each degrees of severity of H. pylori infection: degree 0 (lack of infection) - hB below 0.025; degree 1 (not large) - hB in range 0.025-0.115; degree 2 (moderate) - hB in the range 0.115-0.300; degree 3 (significant) - hB above 0.300. It was possible to estimate severity of H.pylori infection in clinical practice on the basis of comparing the 14C activity value of experimental points as obtained from the breath test, to the results of simulation with suitable value of the fitted parameter hB indicating degree of severity of infection. (author)

  17. Analysis of T4SS-induced signaling by H. pylori using quantitative phosphoproteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frithjof eGlowinski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen colonizing the human stomach. Infection with H. pylori causes chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and may lead to peptic ulceration and/or gastric cancer. A major virulence determinant of H. pylori is the type IV secretion system (T4SS, which is used to inject the virulence factor CagA into the host cell, triggering a wide range of cellular signaling events. Here, we used a phosphoproteomic approach to investigate tyrosine signaling in response to host-pathogen interaction, using stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC of AGS cells to obtain a differential picture between multiple infection conditions. Cells were infected with wild type H. pylori P12, a P12ΔCagA deletion mutant, and a P12ΔT4SS deletion mutant to compare signaling changes over time and in the absence of CagA or the T4SS. Tryptic peptides were enriched for tyrosine (Tyr phosphopeptides and analysed by nano-LC-Orbitrap MS. In total, 58 different phosphosites were found to be regulated following infection. The majority of phosphosites identified were kinases of the MAPK familiy. CagA and the T4SS were found to be key regulators of Tyr phosphosites. Our findings indicate that CagA primarily induces activation of ERK1 and integrin linked factors, whereas the T4SS primarily modulates JNK and p38 activation.

  18. Recent "omics" advances in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthenet, Elvire; Sheppard, Sam; Vale, Filipa F

    2016-09-01

    The development of high-throughput whole genome sequencing (WGS) technologies is changing the face of microbiology, facilitating the comparison of large numbers of genomes from different lineages of a same organism. Our aim was to review the main advances on Helicobacter pylori "omics" and to understand how this is improving our knowledge of the biology, diversity and pathogenesis of H. pylori. Since the first H. pylori isolate was sequenced in 1997, 510 genomes have been deposited in the NCBI archive, providing a basis for improved understanding of the epidemiology and evolution of this important pathogen. This review focuses on works published between April 2015 and March 2016. Helicobacter "omics" is already making an impact and is a growing research field. Ultimately these advances will be translated into a routine clinical laboratory setting in order to improve public health. PMID:27531533

  19. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Anthony

    2012-02-01

    This article reviews the literature published pertaining to Helicobacter pylori eradication over the last year. The general perception among clinicians and academics engaged in research on H. pylori has been that eradication rates for first-line therapies are falling, although some data published this year have cast doubt on this. The studies published this year have therefore focussed on developing alternative strategies for the first-line eradication of H. pylori. In this regard, clear evidence now exists that both levofloxacin and bismuth are viable options for first-line therapy. The sequential and "concomitant" regimes have also been studied in new settings and may have a role in future algorithms also. In addition, data have emerged that the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii may be a useful adjunct to antibiotic therapy. Other studies promote individualized therapies based on host polymorphisms, age, and other such demographic factors.

  20. Helicobacter pylori upregulates Nanog and Oct4 via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway to promote cancer stem cell-like properties in human gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Xin; Tang, Bo; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Xie, Rui; Qin, Yong; Luo, Gang; Hu, Chang-Jiang; Dong, Hui; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is considered a major risk factor for gastric cancer. CagA behaves as a major bacterial oncoprotein playing a key role in H. pylori-induced tumorigenesis. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to possess the ability to initiate tumorigenesis and promote progression. Although studies have suggested that cancer cells can exhibit CSC-like properties in the tumor microenvironment, it remains unclear whether H. pylori infection could induce the emergence of CSC-like properties in gastric cancer cells and, the underlying mechanism. Here, gastric cancer cells were co-cultured with a CagA-positive H. pylori strain or a CagA isogenic mutant strain. We found that H. pylori-infected gastric cancer cells exhibited CSC-like properties, including an increased expression of CSC specific surface markers CD44 and Lgr5, as well as that of Nanog, Oct4 and c-myc, which are known pluripotency genes, and an increased capacity for self-renewal, whereas these properties were not observed in the CagA isogenic mutant strain-infected cells. Further studies revealed that H. pylori activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in a CagA-dependent manner and that the activation of this pathway was dependent upon CagA-positive H. pylori-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at the C-terminal Ser675 and Ser552 residues in a c-met- and/or Akt-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that this activation was responsible for H. pylori-induced CSC-like properties. Moreover, we found the promoter activity of Nanog and Oct4 were upregulated, and β-catenin was observed to bind to these promoters during H. pylori infection, while a Wnt/β-catenin inhibitor suppressed promoter activity and binding. Taken together, these results suggest that H. pylori upregulates Nanog and Oct4 via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway to promote CSC-like properties in gastric cancer cells. PMID:26940070

  1. Study of Helicobacter pylori genotype status in saliva, dental plaques, stool and gastric biopsy samples

    OpenAIRE

    Momtaz, Hassan; Souod, Negar; Dabiri, Hossein; Sarshar, Meysam

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To compare genotype of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolated from saliva, dental plaques, gastric biopsy, and stool of each patient in order to evaluate the mode of transmission of H. pylori infection.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients in Shiraz, Southern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Farshad, Shohreh; Alborzi, Abdolvahab; Japoni, Aziz; Ranjbar, Reza; Hosseini Asl, Kazem; Badiee, Parisa; Amin Shahidi, Maneli; Hosseini, Marziyeh

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To improve our understanding of Iranian regional variation in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) antibiotic resistance rates to find the best antibiotic therapy for eradication of H. pylori infections.

  3. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori increases childhood growth and serum acylated ghrelin levels

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yao-Jong; Sheu, Bor-Shyang; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Chuang, Ching-Chun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected children have reduced body weight (BW) and height (BH) growth, and if H. pylori eradication may restore growth while improving serum acylated ghrelin.

  4. Helicobacter pylori ATCC 43629/NCTC 11639 Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs) from Biofilm and Planktonic Phase Associated with Extracellular DNA (eDNA)

    OpenAIRE

    Grande, Rossella; Di Marcantonio, Maria C.; Robuffo, Iole; Pompilio, Arianna; Celia, Christian; Di Marzio, Luisa; Paolino, Donatella; Codagnone, Marilina; Muraro, Raffaella; Stoodley, Paul; Hall-Stoodley, Luanne; Mincione, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistence is associated with its capacity to develop biofilms as a response to changing environmental conditions and stress. Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a component of H. pylori biofilm matrix but the lack of DNase I activity supports the hypothesis that eDNA might be protected by other extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and/or Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs), which bleb from the bacteria surface during growth. The aim of the present study was to both identify the e...

  5. Endoscopic faces of Helicobacter Pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geanina Spulber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The infection caused by H. pylori appears secondary after a bacterial colonization of the stomach and the initial portion of the small bowel. H. pylori –infected patients can develop gastritis, peptic ulcer, stomach cancer or MALT lymphoma. H. pylori infection is defined by WHO like a type I carcinogen, its role in gastric carcinogenesis being supported by the greatest researchers. Objectives: In this study our purpose was to determine the endoscopic appearances in H. pylori infection quoted in medical literature until now and the frequency of their appearance in our group of interest. Materials and methods: In this study it was made an analytic study in which it was realized a retrospective cohort investigation at the Emergency Central Military and University Hospital “Dr. Carol Davila” Bucharest, gastroenterology branch –endoscopic department between 18.12.2012- 21.08.2013 on 1694 patients between 18 and 92 years old, with the medium age of 55 years old. As a diagnostic method for H. pylori infection we used superior digestive endoscopy during which were taken biopsies and it was made a fast urease test. Results: Regarding the variation of the endoscopic aspects at the population of study, we have found gastritis with all its aspects (which was Sidney classified in the biggest percentage meaning 59.3% of the cases, followed with a percentage of 18.8% by those without any endoscopic abnormality, and then in 10,33% of the cases we have found peptic ulcer. With a smaller percentage, under 10%, we have found duodenitis at 8.67% of this patients, and finally the most severe lesions represented by gastric cancer and lymphoma were found at 2,7% of the H.pylori infected patients.

  6. Giardia lamblia and Helicobater pylori Coinfection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shafie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Giardia lamblia and Helicobacter pylori are two flagellate microorganisms that grow in duodenum and stom­ach. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of them in patients with dyspepsia and other GI disorders. "nMethods: In this cross-sectional study, co-infection of above-mentioned agents was investigated in a group of 130 patients [me­dian age of 40 yr (range=11-79 including 76 males (58.8%] with dyspepsia using three methods of duodenal aspiration sam­ple, duodenal biopsy samples and evaluation of stool samples."nResults: : From 105 patients (59 males, 46 females, median age 40 years, range 11-79 entering this study from 3 hospitals, 4 patients (3.8% had G. lamblia and 61 patients (58% had H. pylori. All 4 patients infected by Giardia had also H. pylori infec­tion. Tenesmus (3 out of 4 patients was the most common symptom in patients with H. pylori infection (48 out of 61 pa­tients was reflux. Other symptoms in patients infected with both organisms (4 patients included diarrhea (2 cases, weight loss (2 cases, and loss of appetite (1 case but no report of vomiting."nConclusion: In patients co-infected with Giardia, H.pylori differentiation by physical examination is not possible. So in those patients with positive Rapid Urease Test (RUT, stool examination for Giardia detection is recommended. In addition, met­ronidazole (broad spectrum, anti-protozoal drug can be useful in H. pylori infection.

  7. Gene expression profiling in gastric mucosa from Helicobacter pylori-infected and uninfected patients undergoing chronic superficial gastritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Min Yang

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection reprograms host gene expression and influences various cellular processes, which have been investigated by cDNA microarray using in vitro culture cells and in vivo gastric biopsies from patients of the Chronic Abdominal Complaint. To further explore the effects of H. pylori infection on host gene expression, we have collected the gastric antral mucosa samples from 6 untreated patients with gastroscopic and pathologic confirmation of chronic superficial gastritis. Among them three patients were infected by H. pylori and the other three patients were not. These samples were analyzed by a microarray chip which contains 14,112 cloned cDNAs, and microarray data were analyzed via BRB ArrayTools software and Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA website. The results showed 34 genes of 38 differentially expressed genes regulated by H. pylori infection had been annotated. The annotated genes were involved in protein metabolism, inflammatory and immunological reaction, signal transduction, gene transcription, trace element metabolism, and so on. The 82% of these genes (28/34 were categorized in three molecular interaction networks involved in gene expression, cancer progress, antigen presentation and inflammatory response. The expression data of the array hybridization was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR assays. Taken together, these data indicated that H. pylori infection could alter cellular gene expression processes, escape host defense mechanism, increase inflammatory and immune responses, activate NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, disturb metal ion homeostasis, and induce carcinogenesis. All of these might help to explain H. pylori pathogenic mechanism and the gastroduodenal pathogenesis induced by H. pylori infection.

  8. Inhibitory effect of nordihydroguaiaretic acid, a plant lignan, on Helicobacter pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis in Mongolian gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Takeshi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Nishibe, Sansei; Deyama, Takeshi; Takenaka, Yoshiharu; Hirano, Naoki; Tanaka, Harunari; Takasu, Shinji; Ban, Hisayo; Kumagai, Toshiko; Inada, Ken-Ichi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Tatematsu, Masae

    2007-11-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have demonstrated that consumption of certain natural products can lower cancer risk in humans. For example, plant-derived lignans have been shown to exert chemopreventive effects against cancer in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of three such lignans, termed arctiin, arctigenin, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), on the proliferation of Helicobacter pylori and the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric cancer were investigated in Mongolian gerbils. To examine the effects of arctigenin and NDGA on stomach carcinogenesis, specific pathogen-free male, 5-week-old gerbils were infected with H. pylori, administered 10 p.p.m. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea in their drinking water and fed diets containing various concentrations of lignans until they were killed after 52 weeks. At a dietary level of 0.25%, NDGA significantly decreased the incidence of gastric adenocarcinomas. Arctigenin, in contrast, failed to attenuate neoplasia at a level of 0.1%. Both NDGA and arctigenin significantly reduced serum 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels at doses of 0.25 and 0.05% (NDGA), and 0.1% (arctigenin). Administration of 0.25% NDGA significantly suppressed the formation of intestinal metaplasia both in the antrum and the corpus. Although all three lignans dose-dependently inhibited the in vitro proliferation of H. pylori, there were no differences in the titers of anti-H. pylori antibodies or the amount of the H. pylori-specific urease A gene among all H. pylori-infected groups. These results suggest that NDGA might be effective for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. The possible mechanisms appear to be related to inhibitory effects on progression of gastritis and antioxidative activity rather than direct antimicrobial influence. PMID:17894552

  9. 3rd Brazilian consensus on Helicobacter pylori 3º Consenso Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter pylori

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    Luiz Gonzaga Coelho

    Full Text Available Significant progress has been obtained since the Second Brazilian Consensus Conference on Helicobacter pylori Infection held in 2004, in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, and justify a third meeting to establish updated guidelines on the current management of H. pylori infection. The Third Brazilian Consensus Conference on H pylori Infection was organized by the Brazilian Nucleus for the Study of Helicobacter, a Department of the Brazilian Federation of Gastroenterology and took place on April 12-15, 2011, in Bento Gonçalves, RS, Brazil. Thirty-one delegates coming from the five Brazilian regions and one international guest, including gastroenterologists, pathologists, epidemiologists, and pediatricians undertook the meeting. The participants were allocated in one of the five main topics of the meeting: H pylori, functional dyspepsia and diagnosis; H pylori and gastric cancer; H pylori and other associated disorders; H pylori treatment and retreatment; and, epidemiology of H pylori infection in Brazil. The results of each subgroup were submitted to a final consensus voting to all participants. Relevant data were presented, and the quality of evidence, strength of recommendation, and level of consensus were graded. Seventy per cent and more votes were considered as acceptance for the final statement. This article presents the main recommendations and conclusions to guide Brazilian doctors involved in the management of H pylori infection.Os avanços significativos ocorridos desde o Segundo Consenso Brasileiro sobre H. pylori realizado em 2004, em São Paulo, justificam este terceiro consenso. O evento foi organizado pelo Núcleo Brasileiro para Estudo do Helicobacter, departamento da Federação Brasileira de Gastroenterologia, tendo sido realizado em Bento Gonçalves, RS, nos dias 12 a 15 de abril de 2011. Contou com a participação de 30 delegados provenientes das cinco regiões brasileiras e um convidado internacional, incluindo gastroenterologistas

  10. Helicobacterium pylori in pediatric peptic ulcer

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    Fallahi G

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, as a causing agent of peptic ulcer in adults, is also encountered in children although in a lower incidence. Endoscopic biopsy studies of gastrointestinal mucosa in 110 children with clinical signs of peptic ulcer (continuous vomiting, chronic abdominal pain, hematemesis and melena in Amir-Kabir Children's Hospital in Tehran showed positive helicobacter pylori findings in Giemsa or Hematoxylin-Eosin stained specimens. Doudenal ulcer with 81.1% was the most frequent lesions involved, the next more frequent lesions being gastric ulcer (805, dudenitis (75% and gastritis (51.7%

  11. Rare Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genotypes in Bhutan

    OpenAIRE

    Osamu Matsunari; Muhammad Miftahussurur; Seiji Shiota; Rumiko Suzuki; Ratha-korn Vilaichone; Tomohisa Uchida; Thawee Ratanachu-ek; Lotay Tshering; Varocha Mahachai; Yoshio Yamaoka

    2016-01-01

    Both the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and the incidence of gastric cancer are high in Bhutan. The high incidence of atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer suggest the phylogeographic origin of an infection with a more virulent strain of H. pylori. More than 90% of Bhutanese strains possessed the highly virulent East Asian-type CagA and all strains had the most virulent type of vacA (s1 type). More than half also had multiple repeats in East Asian-type CagA, which are rare in oth...

  12. Optori: A Diagnostic Tool for H. pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Christopher; Dave , Kunal; Kwan, Elliott; Matlock, Alex; Young, Leanne

    2013-01-01

    Goal:  To noninvasively detect H. pylori infections in patients within one hour for under $10.  Background: •H. pylori infects the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract and causes: •Peptic Ulcers •Stomach Cancer •Dyspepsia •Heartburn •Abdominal Pain •Early Satiety & Bloating •70% of Developing World’s Population •30-40% of Developed Nation’s Population Advisor(s): Prof. Bruce Tromberg; Dr. Albert Cerussi;Dr. Thom...

  13. One-week triple therapy for eradication of helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The optimum therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection is yet to be defined in Pakistan despite a high prevalence of helicobacter associated diseases in this community. The most popular and effective regimen was therefore chosen among the currently recommended combinations used worldwide to document its efficacy in our symptomatic Helicobacter positive dyspeptic patients. Design: It was a prospective, non-randomized study. Place and duration of Study: The study lasted from January 1998 till June 1999 at the Postgraduate Institute, Government Lady Reading Hospital and Fauji Foundation Hospital, Peshawar. Subjects and Methods: Consecutive dyspeptic patients with peptic ulcer disease as well as non ulcer dyspepsia with a positive H. pylori status on histology from the specimens obtained from the antral region of the stomach, who consented to take part in the study were enrolled. They were given omeprazole 20 mg bd, clarithromycin 500 mg bd. And amoxycillin 1 gm bd for one week. One group comprised patients with confirmed peptic ulcer disease while the second group comprised patients with macroscopic/microscopic antral gastritis. Patients with peptic ulcer disease were given additional course of omerprazol for another 4 weeks to ensure healing of their ulcers. All patients were re scoped after stopping all drugs and their H. pylori status re-assessed on histology. Results: A total of 84 patients consented to enter the study. Fifty-nine were males and twenty-five were females. Fifty-eight patients completed the study while others were lost followup. There were no dropouts due to side effects of the drugs. Sixteen patients had peptic ulcer disease while 68 had macroscopic/microscopic active antral gastric only. The Helicobacter pylori eradication has been successful in only 12 patients giving a cure rate of 20.60% as determined per protocol analysis. The eradication rates were disappointingly low in both groups. Conclusion: The results are extremely

  14. Cationic amino acid transporter 2 enhances innate immunity during Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Barry

    Full Text Available Once acquired, Helicobacter pylori infection is lifelong due to an inadequate innate and adaptive immune response. Our previous studies indicate that interactions among the various pathways of arginine metabolism in the host are critical determinants of outcomes following infection. Cationic amino acid transporter 2 (CAT2 is essential for transport of L-arginine (L-Arg into monocytic immune cells during H. pylori infection. Once within the cell, this amino acid is utilized by opposing pathways that lead to elaboration of either bactericidal nitric oxide (NO produced from inducible NO synthase (iNOS, or hydrogen peroxide, which causes macrophage apoptosis, via arginase and the polyamine pathway. Because of its central role in controlling L-Arg availability in macrophages, we investigated the importance of CAT2 in vivo during H. pylori infection. CAT2(-/- mice infected for 4 months exhibited decreased gastritis and increased levels of colonization compared to wild type mice. We observed suppression of gastric macrophage levels, macrophage expression of iNOS, dendritic cell activation, and expression of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in CAT2(-/- mice suggesting that CAT2 is involved in enhancing the innate immune response. In addition, cytokine expression in CAT2(-/- mice was altered from an antimicrobial Th1 response to a Th2 response, indicating that the transporter has downstream effects on adaptive immunity as well. These findings demonstrate that CAT2 is an important regulator of the immune response during H. pylori infection.

  15. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity and risk of lung cancer.

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    Jill Koshiol

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a risk factor for distal stomach cancer, and a few small studies have suggested that H. pylori may be a potential risk factor for lung cancer. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study of 350 lung adenocarcinoma cases, 350 squamous cell carcinoma cases, and 700 controls nested within the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (ATBC cohort of male Finnish smokers. Controls were one-to-one matched by age and date of baseline serum draw. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to detect immunoglobulin G antibodies against H. pylori whole-cell and cytotoxin-associated gene (CagA antigens, we calculated odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs for associations between H. pylori seropositivity and lung cancer risk using conditional logistic regression. H. pylori seropositivity was detected in 79.7% of cases and 78.5% of controls. After adjusting for pack-years and cigarettes smoked per day, H. pylori seropositivity was not associated with either adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.75-1.6 or squamous cell carcinoma (OR: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.77-1.7. Results were similar for CagA-negative and CagA-positive H. pylori seropositivity. Despite earlier small studies suggesting that H. pylori may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, H. pylori seropositivity does not appear to be associated with lung cancer.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection in apparently healthy South Indian children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric colonization by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and its association with gastritis and peptic ulcer has been strongly established in adults and children. H. pylori has also been implicated to cause gastric carcinomas. Many studies have suggested a supposed association between non-gastrointestinal tract disorders and H. pylori infection, however evidence is sparse and inconclusive. A recent review that looked into the evidence of association between H. pylori infection and non-gastrointestinal disorders has found inconclusive evidence of a causal relationship of this infection in coronary heart disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, thyroiditis, etc. H. pylori prevalence various across populations of children and ranges from about 10% to over 80%. Countries such as the U.S., Canada and countries in Western and Northern Europe have low prevalence. However, a high prevalence of H. pylori occurs in countries such as India, Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe. Studies on Indians using serology and endoscopic biopsies have shown a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. An earlier study done by our centre studied 50 children (29 male and 21 female) from a lower socio-economic school in Bangalore. These children showed a high prevalence of 82% for H. pylori infection, which confirmed the high prevalence of H. pylori in Indians that was predicted by earlier serological studies

  17. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: Updates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is highly prevalentin human, affecting nearly half of the world'spopulation; however, infection remains asymptomaticin majority of population. During its co-existence withhumans, H. pylori has evolved various strategies tomaintain a mild gastritis and limit the immune responseof host. On the other side, presence of H. pylori is alsoassociated with increased risk for the development ofvarious gastric pathologies including gastric cancer (GC).A complex combination of host genetics, environmentalagents, and bacterial virulence factors are consideredto determine the susceptibility as well as the severityof outcome in a subset of individuals. GC is one of themost common cancers and considered as the third mostcommon cause of cancer related death worldwide. Manystudies had proved H. pylori as an important risk factorin the development of non-cardia GC. Although both H.pylori infection and GC are showing decreasing trendsin the developed world, they still remain a major threatto human population in the developing countries. Thecurrent review attempts to highlight recent progress inthe field of research on H. pylori induced GC and aimsto provide brief insight into H. pylori pathogenesis,the role of major virulence factors of H. pylori thatmodulates the host environment and transform thenormal gastric epithelium to neoplastic one. This reviewalso emphasizes on the mechanistic understanding ofhow colonization and various virulence attributes of H.pylori as well as the host innate and adaptive immuneresponses modulate the diverse signaling pathways thatleads to different disease outcomes including GC.

  18. The Role of Helicobacter pylori Outer Membrane Proteins in Adherence and Pathogenesis

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    Armelle Ménard

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is one of the most successful human pathogens, which colonizes the mucus layer of the gastric epithelium of more than 50% of the world’s population. This curved, microaerophilic, Gram-negative bacterium induces a chronic active gastritis, often asymptomatic, in all infected individuals. In some cases, this gastritis evolves to more severe diseases such as peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori has developed a unique set of factors, actively supporting its successful survival and persistence in its natural hostile ecological niche, the human stomach, throughout the individual’s life, unless treated. In the human stomach, the vast majority of H. pylori cells are motile in the mucus layer lining, but a small percentage adheres to the epithelial cell surfaces. Adherence to the gastric epithelium is important for the ability of H. pylori to cause disease because this intimate attachment facilitates: (1 colonization and persistence, by preventing the bacteria from being eliminated from the stomach, by mucus turnover and gastric peristalsis; (2 evasion from the human immune system and (3 efficient delivery of proteins into the gastric cell, such as the CagA oncoprotein. Therefore, bacteria with better adherence properties colonize the host at higher densities. H. pylori is one of the most genetically diverse bacterial species known and is equipped with an extraordinarily large set of outer membrane proteins, whose role in the infection and persistence process will be discussed in this review, as well as the different receptor structures that have been so far described for mucosal adherence.

  19. Galectin 3 acts as an enhancer of survival responses in H. pylori-infected gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Ho, Bow

    2016-02-01

    Galectin 3 (Gal-3) is upregulated in gastric epithelial cells as a host response to Helicobacter pylori infection. However, the significance of Gal-3 expression in H. pylori-infected cells is not well established. We analyzed Gal-3 intracellular expression, localization, and its effects in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. The predominantly nuclear confined Gal-3 was shown to be upregulated and exported out to the cytoplasm in H. pylori-infected AGS cells. The nuclear export was channeled through CRM-1 (exportin-1) protein. Interestingly, knock down of Gal-3 expression led to reduced NF-κB promoter activity and interleukin-8 (IL-8) secretion, suggesting its pro-inflammatory roles. Furthermore, Gal-3 was found to be pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic in nature, as its knock down caused a reduction in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis, respectively. Taken together, our data suggest the expression and upregulation of Gal-3 as a critical endogenous event in H. pylori infection that interferes with various intracellular events, causing prolonged cell survival, which is characteristic in carcinogenesis. PMID:27044250

  20. Mucosal Inducible NO Synthase-Producing IgA+ Plasma Cells in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Laura; Mueller, Mattea; Moos, Verena; Heller, Frank; Meyer, Thomas F; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Bojarski, Christian; Fehlings, Michael; Doerner, Thomas; Allers, Kristina; Aebischer, Toni; Ignatius, Ralf; Schneider, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The mucosal immune system is relevant for homeostasis, immunity, and also pathological conditions in the gastrointestinal tract. Inducible NO synthase (iNOS)-dependent production of NO is one of the factors linked to both antimicrobial immunity and pathological conditions. Upregulation of iNOS has been observed in human Helicobacter pylori infection, but the cellular sources of iNOS are ill defined. Key differences in regulation of iNOS expression impair the translation from mouse models to human medicine. To characterize mucosal iNOS-producing leukocytes, biopsy specimens from H. pylori-infected patients, controls, and participants of a vaccination trial were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, along with flow cytometric analyses of lymphocytes for iNOS expression and activity. We newly identified mucosal IgA-producing plasma cells (PCs) as one major iNOS(+) cell population in H. pylori-infected patients and confirmed intracellular NO production. Because we did not detect iNOS(+) PCs in three distinct infectious diseases, this is not a general feature of mucosal PCs under conditions of infection. Furthermore, numbers of mucosal iNOS(+) PCs were elevated in individuals who had cleared experimental H. pylori infection compared with those who had not. Thus, IgA(+) PCs expressing iNOS are described for the first time, to our knowledge, in humans. iNOS(+) PCs are induced in the course of human H. pylori infection, and their abundance seems to correlate with the clinical course of the infection. PMID:27456483

  1. Red wine and green tea reduce H pylori- or VacA-induced gastritis in a mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paolo Ruggiero; Giacomo Rossi; Francesco Tombola; Laura Pancotto; Laura Lauretti; Giuseppe Del Giudice; Mario Zoratti

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether red wine and green tea could exert anti-H pylori or anti-VacA activity in vivo in a mouse model of experimental infection.METHODS: Ethanol-free red wine and green tea concentrates were administered orally as a mixture of the two beverages to H pylori infected mice, or separately to VacA-treated mice. Gastric colonization and gastric inflammation were quantified by microbiological,histopathological, and immunohistochemical analyses.RESULTS: In H pylori-infected mice, the red wine and green tea mixture significantly prevented gastritis and limited the localization of bacteria and VacA to the surface of the gastric epithelium. Similarly, both beverages significantly prevented gastric epithelium damage in VacA-treated mice; green tea, but not red wine, also altered the VacA localization in the gastric epithelium.CONCLUSION: Red wine and green tea are able to prevent H pylori-induced gastric epithelium damage,possibly involving VacA inhibition. This observation supports the possible relevance of diet on the pathological outcome of H pylori infection.

  2. Assessment of Helicobacter pylori eradication in patients on NSAID treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vonkeman Harald E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this post-hoc analysis of a randomized, double blind, placebo controlled trial, we measured the sensitivity and specificity of Helicobacter pylori IgG-antibody titer changes, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E stains, immunohistochemical (IHC stains and culture results in NSAID using patients, following H. pylori eradication therapy or placebo. Methods 347 NSAID using patients who were H. pylori positive on serological testing for H. pylori IgG-antibodies were randomized for H. pylori eradication therapy or placebo. Three months after randomization, gastric mucosal biopsies were taken for H. pylori culture and histological examination. At 3 and 12 months, blood samples were taken for repeated serological testing. The gold standard for H. pylori infection was based on a positive culture or both a positive histological examination and a positive serological test. Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating curves (ROC were calculated. Results H. pylori eradication therapy was successful in 91% of patients. Culture provided an overall sensitivity of 82%, and 73% after eradication, with a specificity of 100%. Histological examination with either H&E or IHC stains provided sensitivities and specificities between 93% and 100%. Adding IHC to H&E stains did not improve these results. The ROC curve for percent change in H. pylori IgG-antibody titers had good diagnostic power in identifying H. pylori negative patients, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.70 (95 % CI 0.59 to 0.79, P = 0.085 at 3 months and 0.83 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.89, P H. pylori IgG-antibody titers at 3 months and 58% at 12 months provided a sensitivity of 64% and 87% and a specificity of 81% and 74% respectively, for successful eradication of H. pylori. Conclusions In NSAID using patients, following H. pylori eradication therapy or placebo, histological examination of gastric mucosal tissue biopsies provided good sensitivity and specificity ratios for evaluating

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastric cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Matysiak-Budnik, Tamara; Mégraud, Francis

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Animals;complications;Cell Transformation,Neoplastic;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Diet;Evaluation;France;genetics;Gastritis;Helicobacter Infections;Helicobacter pylori;Humans;lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;microbiology;Models,Animal;pathogenicity;pathology;Paris;Precancerous Conditions;secretion;Stomach Neoplasms;Virulence.

  4. Helicobacter pylori: diagnosi colturale e ribotipizzazione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Ricci

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection may be established by invasive test. Culture of the organism is an invasive technique and is the most specific method.The test requiring endoscopic biopsy should be performed on the antrum and also at the upper to middle part of the gastric body. Culture can be considered as the reference method and is important if antimicrobial susceptibility testing is required. Sensitivity of the culture is variable and differs among laboratories because of the quality of the organism growth varies with the conditions used.When the culture is performed it is preferable to collect Helicobacter pylori isolates for future studies.Typing systems are used to discriminate between isolates of H. pylori for epidemiological and clinical purposes. Typeability is an important performance criteria of typing systems and the meta-analysis of studies confirmed that PCR- RFLP and RAPD analyses are excellent tecniques. A typeability could be obtained with Automates Ribotyping System when two enzymes, Hae III and Hind III for digestion DNA, are used. Microbiological isolation of Helicobacter pylori is important to determine the resistance status because the failure of therapy is often associated with secondary antibiotic resistance, retreatment should ideally be guided by data on susceptibility.

  5. Epithelial cell proliferation and glandular atrophy in lymphocytic gastritis: Effect of H pylori treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Johanna M. Makinen; Seppo Niemela; Tuomo Kerola; Juhani Lehtola; Tuomo J. Karttunen

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Lymphocytic gastritis is commonly ass ociated with Helicobacter pylori infection. The presence of glandular atrophy and foveolar hyperplasia in lymphocytic gastritis suggests abnormalities in cell proliferation and differentiation,forming a potential link with the suspected association with gastric cancer. Our aim was to compare epithelial cell proliferation and morphology in H pylori associated lymphocytic gastritis and H pylori gastritis without features of lymphocytic gastritis,and to evaluate the effect of H pylori treatment.METHODS: We studied 14 lymphocytic gastritis patients with H pylori infection. For controls, we selected 14 matched dyspeptic patients participating in another treatment trial whose H pylori infection had successfully been eradicated.Both groups were treated with a triple therapy and followed up with biopsies for 6-18 months (patients) or 3 months (controls). Blinded evaluation for histopathological features was carried out. To determine the cell proliferation index,the sections were labeled with Ki-67 antibody.RESULTS: Before treatment, lymphocytic gastritis was characterized by foveolar hyperplasia (P=0.001) and glandular atrophy in the body (P=0.008), and increased proliferation in both the body (P=0.001) and antrum (P=0.002). Proliferation correlated with foveolar hyperplasia and inflammation activity. After eradication therapy, the number of intraepithelial lymphocytes decreased in the body (P=0.004)and antrum (P=0.065), remaining higher than in controls (P<0.001). Simultaneously, the proliferation index decreased in the body from 0.38 to 0.15 (P=0.043), and in the antrum from 0.34 to 0.20 (P=0.069), the antral index still being higher in lymphocytic gastritis than in controls (P=0.010).Foveolar hyperplasia and glandular atrophy in the body improved (P=0.021), reaching the non-LG level.CONCLUSION: In lymphocytic gastritis, excessive epithelial cell proliferation is predominantly present in the body, where it associates with

  6. Comparison of the virulence markers of helicobacter pylori and their associated diseases in patients from Pakistan and Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Yakoob

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria, which is associated with development of gastroduodenal diseases. The prevalence of H. pylori and the virulence markers cytotoxin-associated gene A and E (cagA, cagE and vacuolating-associated cytotoxin gene (vacA alleles varies in different parts of the world. H. pylori virulence markers cagA, cagE, and vacA alleles in local and Afghan nationals with H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases were studied. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and ten patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms and positive for H. pylori by the urease test and histology were included. One hundred and nineteen were local nationals and 91 were Afghans. The cagA, cagE, and vacA allelic status was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results: The nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD was common in the Afghan patients (P = 0.025. In Afghan H. pylori strains, cagA was positive in 14 (82% with gastric carcinoma (GC compared with 29 (45% with NUD (P = 0.006, whereas cagE was positive in 11 (65% with GC and 4 (67% with duodenal ulcer (DU compared with 12 (18% with NUD (P < 0.001 and 0.021, respectively. The vacA s1a/b1was positive in 10 (59% of GC compared with 20 (31% in NUD (P = 0.033. In Pakistani strains, cagE was positive in 12 (60% with GC, 7 (58% with GU, 12 (60% with DU compared with 11 (16% with NUD (P < 0.001, 0.004, and < 0.001, respectively. In Pakistani strains, cagA/s1a/m1 was 39 (33% compared with Afghans in 17 (19% (P = 0.022. Moderate to severe mucosal inflammation was present in 51 (43% Pakistani patients compared with 26 (28% (P = 0.033 in Afghans. It was also associated with grade 1 lymphoid aggregate development in Pakistani patients 67 (56% compared with 36 (40% (P = 0.016 in Afghans. Conclusion: Distribution of H. pylori virulence marker cagE with DU was similar in Afghan and Pakistan H. pylori strains. Chronic active inflammation was significantly associated with Pakistani H. pylori strains.

  7. Changes in gastrin and serum pepsinogens in monitoring of Helicobacter pylori response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Paramo, M; Albillos, A; Calleja, J L; Salas, C; Marín, M C; Marcos, M L; Cacho, G; Escartín, P; Ortiz-Berrocal, J

    1997-08-01

    The aims of this study in 50 patients with H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcer were to examine the effect of eradication therapy on the serum levels of gastrin, pepsinogen I, and pepsinogen II and to investigate whether monitoring of the serum changes in these peptides after treatment could predict patient outcome. H. pylori status was assessed at entry and one and six months after therapy by culturing and microscopic analysis of the gastric mucosa and by [14C]urea breath test. Significant decreases were observed in the serum levels of gastrin (-11.4 +/- 3%), pepsinogen I (-28.9 +/- 4%), and pepsinogen II (-40.4 +/- 3%) in the 45 patients whose infection was eradicated, but not in the patients without eradication. Serum values of these peptides were unchanged in an additional group of 10 patients that only received omeprazol, none of whom had H. pylori eradicated. The best cutoff point of the percentage of each peptide to predict patient outcome was 10% for gastrin and pepsinogen I, and 15% for pepsinogen II. A pepsinogen II decrease > 15% resulted in the best marker of H. pylori clearance, accurately identifying patient outcome 86.6% of the time, whereas the diagnostic accuracy of gastrin and pepsinogen I was 61.7% and 76.6%, respectively. Significant correlations were found between the bacterial load assessed by histology with the serum concentrations of pepsinogen I and II and with the urease activity as measured by the amount of 14CO2 excreted. In conclusion, eradication of H. pylori infection is followed by a significant drop in serum levels of gastrin, pepsinogen I, and pepsinogen II. Changes in the latter are the most uniform and may be used as an indirect tool to predict treatment outcome. PMID:9286242

  8. Molecular Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Nepal: Specific Ancestor Root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Sharma, Rabi Prakash; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Suzuki, Rumiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Nepal, a low-risk country for gastric cancer, is debatable. To our knowledge, no studies have examined H. pylori virulence factors in Nepal. We determined the prevalence of H. pylori infection by using three different tests, and the genotypes of virulence factors were determined by PCR followed by sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing was used to analyze the population structure of the Nepalese strains. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was 38.4% (56/146), and was significantly related with source of drinking water. In total, 51 strains were isolated and all were cagA-positive. Western-type-cagA (94.1%), cagA pre-EPIYA type with no deletion (92.2%), vacA s1a (74.5%), and m1c (54.9%) were the predominant genotypes. Antral mucosal atrophy levels were significantly higher in patients infected with vacA s1 than in those infected with s2 genotypes (P = 0.03). Several Nepalese strains were H. pylori recombinants with genetic features of South Asian and East Asian genotypes. These included all East-Asian-type-cagA strains, with significantly lesser activity and inflammation in the corpus than the strains of the specific South Asian genotype (P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively). Although the population structure confirmed that most Nepalese strains belonged to the hpAsia2 population, some strains shared hpEurope- and Nepalese-specific components. Nepalese patients infected with strains belonging to hpEurope showed higher inflammation in the antrum than strains from the Nepalese specific population (P = 0.05). These results support that ancestor roots of Kathmandu`s people not only connected with India alone. PMID:26226153

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Nepal: Specific Ancestor Root.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Miftahussurur

    Full Text Available Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Nepal, a low-risk country for gastric cancer, is debatable. To our knowledge, no studies have examined H. pylori virulence factors in Nepal. We determined the prevalence of H. pylori infection by using three different tests, and the genotypes of virulence factors were determined by PCR followed by sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing was used to analyze the population structure of the Nepalese strains. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was 38.4% (56/146, and was significantly related with source of drinking water. In total, 51 strains were isolated and all were cagA-positive. Western-type-cagA (94.1%, cagA pre-EPIYA type with no deletion (92.2%, vacA s1a (74.5%, and m1c (54.9% were the predominant genotypes. Antral mucosal atrophy levels were significantly higher in patients infected with vacA s1 than in those infected with s2 genotypes (P = 0.03. Several Nepalese strains were H. pylori recombinants with genetic features of South Asian and East Asian genotypes. These included all East-Asian-type-cagA strains, with significantly lesser activity and inflammation in the corpus than the strains of the specific South Asian genotype (P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively. Although the population structure confirmed that most Nepalese strains belonged to the hpAsia2 population, some strains shared hpEurope- and Nepalese-specific components. Nepalese patients infected with strains belonging to hpEurope showed higher inflammation in the antrum than strains from the Nepalese specific population (P = 0.05. These results support that ancestor roots of Kathmandu`s people not only connected with India alone.

  10. HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN PATIENTS WITH DIFFERENT GASTROINTESTINAL DISEASES FROM NORTHERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Dias Ferreira VINAGRE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - The mechanisms whereby Helicobacter pylori produces different pathological manifestations in the stomach and duodenum are not fully understood. Considering the geographic diversity in the prevalence of virulence factors of this microorganism and their association with the development of different diseases, the search for pathogenicity markers such as CagA and VacA alleles by molecular techniques has intensified. Objectives - To investigate the presence of H. pylori infection and the frequency of different genotypes of this bacterium in patients with gastrointestinal diseases from Northern Brazil, and to establish their association with the histopathological findings. Methods - In a prospective study, samples were collected from 554 patients with different gastrointestinal diseases (gastritis, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer seen at a referral hospital attending the entire State of Pará, located in the metropolitan region of Belém. Data such as gender and age obtained with an epidemiological questionnaire were analyzed. The presence of H. pylori and the bacterial genotype were investigated by PCR. Gastric biopsies were assessed histologically. Results - The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 91%. Infection was more frequent among patients with gastric ulcer and gastric cancer. In these groups, there was a predominance of men and older patients when compared to the other two groups studied. The predominant bacterial genotype was s1m1cagA+, which was more frequent among patients with gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer and gastric cancer. A significant association was observed between s1m1cagA+ strains and a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity and development of intestinal metaplasia. Conclusion - The present study demonstrates a high incidence of H. pylori infection in the patients analyzed, especially among those with gastric ulcer and gastric cancer. Virulent s1m1cagA+ strains predominated and were

  11. Chronic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Helicobacter pylori (HP have recently emerged as a novel eliciting factor for chronic urticaria (CU. The possible association between HP and CU has enormous potential, as eradicating HP could cure CU. Aims and Objectives: We conducted a study to assess the prevalence of HP infection and effect of bacterium eradication on skin lesions in patients of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU. Settings and Design: Four hundred sixty patients of CU attending the allergy clinic, SMS hospital, Jaipur during the period February 6, 2004, to February 6, 2006, were screened for possible eliciting factors. Patients with CIU were enrolled and others were excluded. Materials and Methods: Sixty-eight patients of CIU and similar number of age and sex matched controls, attending the allergy clinic, SMS Hospital, Jaipur were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent endoscopy with antral biopsy for urease and histopathology to identify HP-associated gastritis. Infected patients were given HP eradication therapy. Eradication of bacterium was confirmed by fecal antigen assay. Subjective response to treatment was judged using chronic urticaria quality-of-life questionnaire (CU-Q 2 oL while objective response to treatment was judged by need for ′rescue medication′ (antihistaminics. Statistical Analysis: Data were analyzed using Chi square and paired′t′ test for their level of significance. Results: HP associated gastritis was present in 48 (70.58% patients, out of which 39 (81.25% patients responded to eradication therapy. Ten (50.00% patients without HP associated gastritis showed response to symptomatic therapy. Overall 49 (72.05% patients responded and 19 (27.94% showed no response. The value of χ2 was 28.571 (P = 0.003, which showed significant association between presence of HP and response to eradication regimen. Conclusion: The response of HP eradication therapy in infected patients of CIU is significant. HP should be included in diagnostic

  12. Dyslipidemia and H pylori in gastric xanthomatosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Young Yi

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship among gastric xanthomatosis (GX),H pylori, dyslipidemia, and gastritis in Korea, a well-known H pylori endemic area.METHODS: A total of 771 patients who had undergone gastroduodenoscopy by one endoscopist were included in this study. Among them, 54 patients with GX were assessed for H pylori infection and their endoscopic characteristics and serum lipid profiles. The findings were compared with 54 age- and sex-matched control subjects without GX.RESULTS: The prevalence of GX was 7% (54/771) with no sex difference. GX was mainly single (64.8%) and located in the antrum (53.7%). The mean diameter was 7 ± 3 mm. Mean body mass index (BMI) of patients with GX was 23.1 ± 2.8 and no one was above 30.Compared with the controls, lipid profiles of GX group showed significantly lower HDL-cholesterol (48.8 ± 12.3vs 62.9 ± 40.5, P = 0.028) and higher LDL-cholesterol (112.9 ± 29.9 vs 95.9 ± 22.4, P = 0.032). The level of total serum cholesterol, triglyceride and the existence of dyslipoproteinemia were not related to the presence of GX. However, GX showed a close relationship with endoscopically determined atrophic gastritis and histologic severity (24/53, 44.4% vs 8/54, 14.8%, P =0.0082). H pylori infection and bile reflux gastritis were not significantly related with GX.CONCLUSION: The prevalence of GX is 7% and it may be an increasing entity in Korea. Moreover, dyslipidemia and atrophic gastritis are found to be related to GX, but H pylori infection is not.

  13. Helicobacter pylori-negative Russell body gastritis: Case report

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbo, Alessandro Del; Elli, Luca; Braidotti, Paola; Nuovo, Franca Di; Bosari, Silvano; Romagnoli, Solange

    2011-01-01

    Russell body gastritis is an unusual form of chronic gastritis characterized by the permeation of lamina propria by numerous plasma cells with eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions. Very few cases have been reported in the literature; the majority of which have shown Helicobacter Pylori (H. pylori) infection, thus suggesting a correlation between plasma cell presence and antigenic stimulation by H. pylori. We present a case of Russell body gastritis in a 78-year-old woman who was undergoing eso...

  14. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori is decreasing in Iranian patients

    OpenAIRE

    Ashtari, Sara; Pourhoseingholi, Mohamad Amin; Molaei, Mahsa; Taslimi, Hajar; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this study was to evaluate the time trend of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) prevalence and presence of intestinal Metaplasia over the period of seven years among gastritis Iranian patients. Background: H. pylori is the major causal factor in chronic gastritis. Its acquisition leads to a chronic, usually lifelong, inflammation of the gastric mucosa, which may gradually progress to atrophy with intestinal metaplasia in a significant proportion of infected individuals. Pat...

  15. Comparison of commercial diagnostic tests for Helicobacter pylori antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Schembri, M. A.; Lin, S K; Lambert, J R

    1993-01-01

    A number of serological tests measuring the presence of Helicobacter pylori-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) are now commercially available. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical accuracy of five commercial H. pylori antibody tests: GAP-IgG (Biomerica), HELpTEST (AMRAD, Kew, Victoria, Australia), HELICO-G (Porton Cambridge), Pyloriset (Orion Diagnostica), and ROCHE (Roche Diagnostics). A total of 162 subjects presenting for routine upper endoscopy were studied. H. pylori was...

  16. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection on nutrition and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Franceschi, Francesco de (fl.1561-1599), ed.imp.lib; Annalisa, Tortora; Teresa, Di Rienzo; Giovanna, D’Angelo; Ianiro, Gianluca; Franco, Scaldaferri; Viviana, Gerardi; Valentina, Tesori; Riccardo, Lopetuso Loris; Antonio, Gasbarrini

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative pathogen that is widespread all over the world, infecting more than 50% of the world’s population. It is etiologically associated with non-atrophic and atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer and shows a deep association with primary gastric B-cell lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Recently, the medical research focused on the modification of the gastric environment induced by H. pylori infection, possibly affecting the absorption of nutrients an...

  17. Coadaptation of Helicobacter pylori and humans: ancient history, modern implications

    OpenAIRE

    Atherton, John C.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2009-01-01

    Humans have been colonized by Helicobacter pylori for at least 50,000 years and probably throughout their evolution. H. pylori has adapted to humans, colonizing children and persisting throughout life. Most strains possess factors that subtly modulate the host environment, increasing the risk of peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and possibly other diseases. H. pylori genes encoding these and other factors rapidly evolve through mutation and recombination, changing the bacteria-host i...

  18. Natural Acquisition of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Newborn Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Solnick, Jay V.; Chang, Kikuko; Canfield, Don R; Parsonnet, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is usually acquired in childhood, but precise estimates of the age of acquisition are difficult to obtain in young children. Since serial endoscopic biopsies are not feasible in human infants, we examined acquisition of H. pylori infection that is known to occur in socially housed nonhuman primates. By 12 weeks of age, 8 of 20 newborns (40%) were culture positive for H. pylori, and prevalence reached 90% by 1 year of age. Newborns from infected dams were more com...

  19. Metabolic consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection and eradication

    OpenAIRE

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is still the most prevalent infection of the world. Colonization of the stomach by this agent will invariably induce chronic gastritis which is a low-grade inflammatory state leading to local complications (peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, lymphoma) and remote manifestations. While H. pylori does not enter circulation, these extragastric manifestations are probably mediated by the cytokines and acute phase proteins produced by the inflammed mucosa. The epidemiolog...

  20. Helicobacter pylori seropositivity in subjects with acute myocardial infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Rathbone, B; Martin, D.; Stephens, J.; Thompson, J. R.; Samani, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether Helicobacter pylori infection increases the risk of myocardial infarction. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: University teaching hospital. METHODS: Serological evidence of H pylori infection was determined in 342 consecutive patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted into the coronary care unit and in 236 population-based controls recruited from visitors to patients on medical and surgical wards. RESULTS: 206/342 (60.2%) of cases were H pylori positi...

  1. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Sarita Bajaj; Lokendra Rekwal; SP Misra; Vatsala Misra; Rakesh Kumar Yadav; Anubha Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been associated with increased levels of inflammatory cytokines and subsequent insulin resistance and epidemiologically linked to type 2 diabetes. Objectives: To study the prevalence rate of H. pylori infection in type 2 diabetes and its relation with HbA1C levels. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional case-control study, 80 patients (≥18 years) who met the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) criteria for diabetes were rec...

  2. “Rescue” regimens after Helicobacter pylori treatment failure

    OpenAIRE

    Javier P Gisbert

    2008-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. After more than 20 years of experience in H pylori treatment, in my opinion, the ideal regimen to treat this infection is still to be found. Currently, apart from having to know first-line eradication regimens well, we must also be prepared to face treatment failures. Therefore, in designing a treatment strategy we should not focus on the results of primary therapy alone,...

  3. Adherence of Helicobacter pylori to primary human gastrointestinal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Clyne, M.; Drumm, B

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori adheres only to gastric cells in vivo. However, the organism adheres to a wide variety of nongastric cells in vitro. In this study, we have used flow cytometry to assess the adherence of H. pylori to primary epithelial cells isolated from gastric, duodenal, and colonic biopsy specimens by collagenase digestion. After incubation of bacteria and cells together and subsequent staining with a two-stage fluorescein isothiocyanate-labelled H. pylori antibody method, cells with a...

  4. Is saliva serology useful for the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori?

    OpenAIRE

    Christie, J.M.; McNulty, C A; Shepherd, N A; Valori, R M

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Cortecs Diagnostics Helisal Assay test is a quantitative immunoassay for salivary IgG antibodies against Helicobacter pylori. Saliva can be obtained simply with the kit in the general practitioners surgery. AIMS: To compare the new saliva serological test for H pylori with 'gold standard' evidence of H pylori infection (antral biopsy specimens for histology, culture, and urease test) and a new serum serological test. PATIENTS: Eighty six unselected dyspeptic patients undergoin...

  5. PCR Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Clinical Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Rimbara, Emiko; Sasatsu, Masanori; David Y Graham

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen whose primary niche is the human stomach. H. pylori is etio-logically associated with gastric inflammation (gastritis), peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Both noninvasive (e.g., urea breath and stool antigen tests) and invasive (gastric biopsy for histology, culture, or PCR) tests are used for diagnosis. PCR detection of H. pylori has been reported using a variety of clinical samples including gastric biopsy, gastric juice, saliva, dental p...

  6. Intrafamillial Clustering of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Saubi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Knawy, BA; Ahmed, M-Elbagir K; Mirdad, S; ElMekki, A; Al-Ammari, O

    2000-01-01

    AIM: To study the pattern of Helicobacter pylori infection among family members in the Saudi population.METHODS: A cross-sectional, population-based, seroepidemiological study of family members was undertaken in a Saudi population using saliva H pylori immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies (Helisal kit).RESULTS: A total of 42 families comprising 271 children and 84 parents were studied (355 subjects; mean age 23 years, SD 19 years) The overall frequencies of H pylori IgG antibodies in mothers, fat...

  7. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in healthcare workers

    OpenAIRE

    METANAT, Maliheh; Sharifi-Mood, Batool; Izadi, Shahrokh

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major factor in inflammatory and malignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. The epidemiologic pattern of this infection varies among developed and developing countries, and is related to the general standards of living in each region. In view of the importance of this infection and its different prevalence in different regions of Iran, as well as its long-term complications, this study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infecti...

  8. Prevalence of peptic ulcer in Helicobacter pylori positive blood donors.

    OpenAIRE

    Vaira, D; Miglioli, M; Mulè, P; Holton, J; M. Menegatti; Vergura, M; Biasco, G.; Conte, R.; Logan, R P; Barbara, L

    1994-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the importance of raised antibodies to Helicobacter pylori in an asymptomatic population. A total of 128 asymptomatic blood donors who were seropositive for H pylori and consented to endoscopy were investigated. These subjects were from a population of 1010 blood donors screened for antibodies to H pylori. A questionnaire was completed to determine if any subjects had complained of symptoms, and they subsequently had endoscopy. Altogether 121 of 128 were positive...

  9. Treatment of helicobacter pylori infection : Experimental and clinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Sörberg, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    Treatment of Helicobacter Pylori Infection Experimental and Clinical Studies Mikael Sörberg, Division of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet Danderyd Hospital, S-182 88 Danderyd, Sweden The general aims of the present study were to investigate the reason for failed H. pylori eradication, and to improve the recommendations for treating H. pylori infection. Our in vitro studies are based on microscopy, viable count and bioluminescence assay of bacterial adenos...

  10. "Targeted disruption of the epithelial-barrier by Helicobacter pylori"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wroblewski Lydia E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human gastric epithelium and induces chronic gastritis, which can lead to gastric cancer. Through cell-cell contacts the gastric epithelium forms a barrier to protect underlying tissue from pathogenic bacteria; however, H. pylori have evolved numerous strategies to perturb the integrity of the gastric barrier. In this review, we summarize recent research into the mechanisms through which H. pylori disrupts intercellular junctions and disrupts the gastric epithelial barrier.

  11. Precise role of H pylori in duodenal ulceration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Hobsley; Frank I Tovey; John Holton

    2006-01-01

    The facts that H pylori infection is commoner in duodenal ulcer (DU) patients than in the normal population, and that eradication results in most cases being cured,have led to the belief that it causes DU. However, early cases of DU are less likely than established ones to be infected. H pylori-negative cases are usually ascribed to specific associated factors such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), Crohn's disease,and hypergastrinaemia, but even after excluding these, several H pylori-negative cases remain and are particularly common in areas of low prevalence of H pylori infection. Moreover, this incidence of H pylori negative DU is not associated with a fall in overall DU prevalence when compared with countries with a higher H pylori prevalence. In countries with a high H pylori prevalence there are regional differences in DU prevalence, but no evidence of an overall higher prevalence of DU than in countries with a low H pylori prevalence. There is no evidence that virulence factors are predictive of clinical outcome. After healing following eradication of H pylori infection DU can still recur.Medical or surgical measures to reduce acid output can lead to long-term healing despite persistence of H pylori infection. Up to half of cases of acute DU perforation are H pylori negative. These findings lead to the conclusion that H pylori infection does not itself cause DU, but leads to resistance to healing, i.e., chronicity. This conclusion is shown not to be incompatible with the universally high prevalence of DU compared with controls.

  12. Colonization of an acid resistant Kingella denitrificans in the stomach may contribute to gastric dysbiosis by Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Takeshi; Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Hidekazu; Yanai, Hideo; Nishikawa, Jun; Nakazawa, Teruko; Iizasa, Hisashi; Jinushi, Masahisa; Sakaida, Isao; Yoshiyama, Hironori

    2014-03-01

    In the stomach of a gastric ulcer patient who had been administered an anti-acid, a gram-negative and urease-negative bacillus similar in size to Helicobacter pylori was infected together with H. pylori. According to biochemical test and 16S rRNA gene analysis, the urease-negative bacterium was identified as Kingella denitrificans, a human nasopharyngeal commensal. In contrast to the standard strain of K. denitrificans, the isolate showed catalase activity, did not produce acid from glucose, and exhibited acid tolerance. Acid tolerance of H. pylori was increased by cocultivation with the K. denitrificans isolate, but not with other isolates of K. denitrificans. Disruption of physiological and immunological niche by dysbiotic colonization of bacterium may provide pathological attributes to human stomach. Collectively, a careful administration of anti-acids to the elderly, especially those with atrophic gastritis, is necessary to avoid repression of the gastric barrier to bacteria. PMID:24462438

  13. [Helicobacter pylori infection and state of antioxidant protection in patients with the unstable course of ischemic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratnov, A E; Pavlov, O N

    2004-01-01

    92 patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) have been examined. Unlike stable angina pectoris, unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction occur more often against the aggravation of chronic atrophic gastritis with a high degree of H. pylori colonization in the mucous coat of the antral part of the stomach. The development of repeated coronary phenomena within one year in patients with unstable angina and acute myocardial infarction was related to the high degree of H. pylori colonization in the mucous coat of the stomach. Irrespective of the presence of IHD in patients, increased H. pylori colonization in the mucous coat was accompanied by a drop in the antioxidant protection activity against the growth of the blood malonic dialdehyde content. PMID:15770853

  14. Histidine Residue 94 Is Involved in pH Sensing by Histidine Kinase ArsS of Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Müller; Monika Götz; Dagmar Beier

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ArsRS two-component system is the master regulator of acid adaptation in the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. Low pH is supposed to trigger the autophosphorylation of the histidine kinase ArsS and the subsequent transfer of the phosphoryl group to its cognate response regulator ArsR which then acts as an activator or repressor of pH-responsive genes. Orthologs of the ArsRS two-component system are also present in H. pylori's close relatives H. hepaticus, Campylobact...

  15. Transformation of heat shock protein gene (HspB-C) of helicobacter pylori into sweet potato varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet potato which is one of the most important crops in the world has many advantages as a new bioreactor. Helicobacter pylori, as a kind of cancer-causing factor by the World Health Organization, has a strong immunogenicity, and its monoclonal antibody has bactericidal activity, which has the possibility as the vaccine components. In this research, we have constructed the plant expression vector with heat shock protein gene (HspB-C) of Helicobacter pylori. This vector was transformed by agrobactrium tumefaciens EHA105 into four sweet potato varieties. After callus-induction and re-differentiation, we got the transgenic plants from sweet potato variety of Nancy holl. (authors)

  16. Caveolin-1 Protects B6129 Mice against Helicobacter pylori Gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Hitkova, Ivana; Yuan, Gang; Anderl, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Claus; Schmid, Roland M; Vogelmann, Roger; Ebert, Matthias P A; Burgermeister, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC) where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, deve...

  17. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in saliva and esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellini, Luigina; Grande, Rossella; Artese, Luciano; Marzio, Leonardo

    2010-10-01

    The route of Helicobacter pylori transmission remains unclear and the currently suggested route is person-to-person transfer by faecal-oral and oral-oral mode. The aim of this study was to verify the presence of H. pylori in esophagus and saliva of humans. Saliva samples, mucosal biopsies from esophagus, gastric antrum and fundus were collected from 19 patients with positive Urea Breath Test (UBT). Gastric biopsies were used for H. pylori colture and antimicrobial susceptibility tests whereas saliva samples were collected to detect H. pylori with a Nested-PCR targeting 16S rRNA gene as well as esophagus biopsies which were also investigated with immunohistochemical staining. Helicobacter pylori was isolated in 18 patients both in gastric antrum and fundus. The molecular analysis, confirmed by comparative sequences evaluation, gave positive results in all saliva and esophageal samples whereas the immunohistochemistry revealed the presence of H. pylori in 15.8% (3/19) of the esophagus samples. Our data suggest that saliva and esophagus may be considered reservoirs for H. pylori in humans and emphasize the need to use more susceptible techniques for H. pylori detection, in particular in over-crowded sites. Identification of the transmission route of H. pylori is crucial in developing an effective plan of surveillance by finding new means of disease management. PMID:21213594

  18. Nobeli auhinna tõi Helicobacter pylori / Juhan Kaldre

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldre, Juhan

    2005-01-01

    Nobeli meditsiiniauhind määrati sel aastal Austraalia teadlastele Robin Warrenile ja Barry Marshallile, kes avastasid, et gastriit ning peptiline haavand tekib Helicobacter pylori infektsiooni tulemusena

  19. Helicobacter pylori vs coronary heart disease- searching for connections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Magdalena; Chmiela; Adrian; Gajewski; Karolina; Rudnicka

    2015-01-01

    In this review,we discussed the findings and concepts underlying the potential role of Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori) infections in the initiation,development or persistence of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease(CHD).This Gram-negative bacterium was described by Marshall and Warren in 1984.The majority of infected subjects carries and transmits H.pylori with no symptoms; however,in some individuals these bacteria may cause peptic ulcers,and even gastric cancers.The widespread prevalence of H.pylori infections and the fact that frequently they remain asymptomatic may suggest that,similarly to intestinal microflora,H.pylori may deliver antigens that stimulate not only local,but also systemic inflammatory response.Recently,possible association between H.pylori infection and extragastric disorders has been suggested.Knowledge on the etiology of atherosclerosis together with current findings in the area of H.pylori infections constitute the background for the newly proposed hypothesis that those two processes may be related.Many research studies confirm the indirect association between the prevalence of H.pylori and the occurrence of CHD.According to majority of findings the involvement of H.pylori in this process is based on the chronic inflammation which might facilitate the CHDrelated pathologies.It needs to be elucidated,if the infection initiates or just accelerates the formation of atheromatous plaque.

  20. Inflammation, immunity, and vaccines for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velin, Dominique; Straubinger, Kathrin; Gerhard, Markus

    2016-09-01

    The tight control of the innate and adaptive immune responses in the stomach mucosa during chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is of prime importance for the bacteria to persist and for the host to prevent inflammation-driven diseases. This review summarizes recent data on the roles of innate and adaptive immune responses during H. pylori/host interactions. In addition, the latest preclinical developments of H. pylori vaccines are discussed with a special focus on the clinical trial reported by Zeng et al., who provided evidence that oral vaccination significantly reduces the acquisition of natural H. pylori infection in children. PMID:27531535

  1. Age-dependent eradication of Helicobacter pylori in Japanese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Satoshi; Mamori; Akihiro; Higashida; Fumiaki; Kawara; Katsuhiro; Ohnishi; Akihiko; Takeda; Eri; Senda; Cho; Ashida; Hajime; Yamada

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the general risk factors affecting the failure rate of first-line eradication therapy in Japanese patients with Helicobacter pylori(H.pylori)infection.METHODS:The present study enrolled 253 patients who had an H.pylori infection,underwent gastroendoscopy,and were treated with H.pylori eradication therapy.Eradication therapy consisted of 30 mg lansoprazole plus 750 mg amoxicillin and 400 mg clarithromycin twice daily for 7 d.All of the patients underwent a 13 C urea breath test at least 1 mo...

  2. Helicobacter pylori damages human gallbladder epithelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Feng Chen; Lu Hu; Ping Yi; Wei-Wen Liu; Dian-Chun Fang; Hong Cao

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori (Hpy/orO damages human gallbladder epithelial cells (HGBEC).METHODS: H pylori isolated from gallbladder were cultured in a liquid medium. Different concentration supernatants and sonicated extracts of H pylori cells were then added to HGBEC in a primary culture. The morphological changes in HGBEC as well as changes in the levels of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutamyltransferase (GGT)were measured.RESULTS: According to the culture curve of HGBEC,it was convenient to study the changes in HGBEC by adding H pylori sonicated extracts and H pylori culture supernatants. Both H pylori sonicated extracts and H pylori culture supernatants had a significant influence on HGBEC morphology, i.e. HGBEC grew more slowly, their viability decreased and their detachment increased. Furthermore, HGBEC ruptured and died. The levels of ALP (33.84 ± 6.00 vs 27.01± 4.67, P < 0.05), LDH (168.37 ± 20.84 vs 55.51 ±17.17, P < 0.01) and GGT (42.01 ± 6.18 vs 25.34 ±4.33, P < 0.01) significantly increased in the HGBEC culture supernatant in a time- and concentrationdependent. The damage to HGBEC in Hpylori culture liquid was more significant than that in H pylori sonicated extracts.CONCLUSION: H pylori induces no obvious damage to HGBEC.

  3. Relationship between VacA Toxin and Host Cell Autophagy in Helicobacter pylori Infection of the Human Stomach: A Few Answers, Many Questions

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    Vittorio Ricci

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of about half the global population and represents the greatest risk factor for gastric malignancy. The relevance of H. pylori for gastric cancer development is equivalent to that of tobacco smoking for lung cancer. VacA toxin seems to play a pivotal role in the overall strategy of H. pylori towards achieving persistent gastric colonization. This strategy appears to involve the modulation of host cell autophagy. After an overview of autophagy and its role in infection and carcinogenesis, I critically review current knowledge about the action of VacA on host cell autophagy during H. pylori infection of the human stomach. Although VacA is a key player in modulation of H. pylori-induced autophagy, a few discrepancies in the data are also evident and many questions remain to be answered. We are thus still far from a definitive understanding of the molecular mechanisms through which VacA affects autophagy and the consequences of this toxin action on the overall pathogenic activity of H. pylori.

  4. Prevalence of Helicobacter Pylori in gastric cancer in a south-east Asian population by 14C-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori is believed to play an important role in the aetiology of gastric cancer. There is a great variability in seropositivity and histological frequency of H. pylori in gastric cancer. The present prospective study investigates the prevalence of H. pylori infection in gastric cancer patients using 14C-urea breath testing. Patients with endoscopic biopsy-proven gastric cancer were fasted for 6 h prior to ingesting 18.5 x 104 Bq of 14C-urea cocktail orally. Breath samples were collected after 20 min by AS/King them to blow into a hyamine solution and measurements were read in a scintillation counter. Fifty out of 51 patients (98%) with gastric cancer were positive on the 14C-urea breath test compared to 29 patients (61%) who were positive on histology. There was no association between sex, age or tumour site, stage, differentiation, Lauren type and H. pylori status. The test was negative in one patient with cardiac tumour in which histology of the resected specimen was also negative for the bacteria. Active H. pylori infection is highly prevalent in gastric cancer in a South-East Asian population. The 14C-urea breath test is a highly sensitive method for detecting the presence of H. pylori even in gastric adenocarcinoma irrespective of the stage

  5. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and related gastroduodenal lesions in spouses of Helicobacter pylori positive patients with duodenal ulcer.

    OpenAIRE

    Parente, F.; Maconi, G; Sangaletti, O; Minguzzi, M; Vago, L; Rossi, E.; Bianchi Porro, G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To date, very few studies have evaluated the risk of infection among spouses of Helicobacter pylori positive patients and their results are conflicting. AIM: To assess the seroprevalence of H pylori infection in spouse of H pylori positive patients with duodenal ulcer as compared with age and sex matched volunteer blood donors, as well as the frequency of endoscopic gastroduodenal lesions in these spouses, according to the presence or absence of gastrointestinal complaints. METHOD...

  6. Association between Helicobacter pylori concentration and the combining frequency of histopathological findings in gastric biopsies specimens Associação entre a concentração de Helicobacter pylori e a freqüência de combinação de alterações histopatológicas em biopsias gástricas

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    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is the most prevalent infectious agent worldwide. About 90% of patients with chronic gastritis are infected with this bacterium. Some studies have shown a association between the H. pylori concentration and the scores of gastritis activity and severity. AIM: To evaluate the association between H. pylori concentration and the combining frequency of findings on histopathological examination. METHODS: Two hundred consecutive gastric endoscopic biopsies diagnosed as chronic gastritis were retrospectively investigated. The Warthin-Starry silver stain was used to study H. pylori and the following parameters were assessed (according to the Sydney system: 1. infiltration by polymorphonuclear cells in chorio and epithelium (activity graded as mild, moderate and marked; 2. presence of lymphoid follicles; 3. presence of intestinal metaplasia; 4. presence of regenerative cell atypias, graded as mild, moderate and marked; and 5. H. pylori concentration on the mucous covering the foveolar epithelium. RESULTS: The most frequent association was chronic gastritis and activity, regardless of H. pylori concentration. The association of five histopathological findings in the same biopsy has not occurred in the cases of higher concentration of H. pylori. CONCLUSION: Our study has not revealed any association between H. pylori concentration and an increasing in the number of histopathological findings found in the gastric mucosa. Since referring to its presence is much more important than to its concentration.RACIONAL: O Helicobacter pylori é o agente infeccioso com maior prevalência em todo o mundo. Cerca de 90% dos pacientes com gastrite crônica têm infecção por esta bactéria. Alguns estudos demonstram correlação entre a concentração de H. pylori e o grau de severidade e atividade da gastrite. OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a associação entre a concentração de H. pylori e a freqüência de combinações de alterações no exame

  7. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant upper gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasapolli, Riccardo; Malfertheiner, Peter; Kandulski, Arne

    2016-09-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has been further decreased over the last decades along with decreasing prevalence of Helicobacter pylori-associated PUD. A delayed H. pylori eradication has been associated with an increased risk of rehospitalization for complicated recurrent peptic ulcer and reemphasized the importance of eradication especially in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). PUB associated with NSAID/aspirin intake and H. pylori revealed an additive interaction in gastric pathophysiology which favors the "test-and-treat" strategy for H. pylori in patients with specific risk factors. The H. pylori-negative and NSAID-negative "idiopathic PUD" have been increasingly observed and associated with slower healing tendency, higher risk of recurrence, and greater mortality. Helicobacter pylori-associated dyspepsia has been further investigated and finally defined by the Kyoto consensus. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy is advised as first option in this group of patients. Only in the case of symptom persistence or recurrence after eradication therapy, dyspeptic patients should be classified as functional dyspepsia (FD). There were few new data in 2015 on the role of H. pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in particular Barrett's esophagus. A lower prevalence of gastric atrophy with less acid output in patients with erosive esophagitis confirmed previous findings. In patients with erosive esophagitis, no difference was observed in healing rates neither between H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative patients nor between patients that underwent eradication therapy compared to patients without eradication. These findings are in line with the current consensus guidelines concluding that H. pylori eradication has no effects on symptoms and does not aggravate preexisting GERD. PMID:27531536

  8. Oral and gastric Helicobacter pylori: effects and associations.

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    Nélio Veiga

    Full Text Available This study consisted in the comparison of the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori present in the stomach and in saliva of a sample of Portuguese adolescents and the assessment of the association between H. pylori infection with socio-demographic variables and prevalence of dental caries.A cross-sectional study was designed including a sample of 447 adolescents aged 12 to 19 years old, attending a public school in Sátão, Portugal. A questionnaire about socio-demographic variables and oral health behaviors was applied. Gastric H. pylori infection was determined using the urease breath test (UBT. Saliva collection was obtained and DNA was extracted by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR in order to detect the presence of oral H. pylori.The prevalence of gastric H. pylori detected by UBT was 35.9%. Within the adolescents with a gastric UBT positive, only 1.9% were positive for oral H. pylori. The presence of gastric H. pylori was found to be associated with age (>15years, Odds ratio (OR=1.64, 95%CI=1.08-2.52, residence area (urban, OR=1.48, 95%CI=1.03-2.29 and parents´ professional situation (unemployed, OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.02-1.23. Among those with detected dental caries during the intra-oral observation, 37.4% were positive for gastric H. pylori and 40.2% negative for the same bacterial strain (p=0.3.The oral cavity cannot be considered a reservoir for infection of H. pylori. Gastric H. pylori infection was found to be associated with socio-demographic variables such as age, residence area and socioeconomic status.

  9. Helicobacter pylori Colonization in Biopsies of the Adenotonsillectomy Specimens

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    M. J. Zahedi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori is a microaerophilic, gram negative bacillus, which can cause peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Recurrent infection with this agent is considered as one of the reasons for failure of peptic ulcer treatment. Some studies have reported colonization of H. pylori in dental plaques, tonsils and adenoid tissues. Therefore oral cavity could be the source of H. pylori and it might be the reason for unsuccessful eradication. Approach: In this cross sectional study, 95 patients with the average age of 12.1±7.5 years undergoing adenotonsillectomy were chosen consecutively. Intra-operatively a 2 mm section of the tonsils were removed and investigated for H. pylori by Rapid Urease Test (RUT. Post-operatively the removed tonsils were stained by hematoxylin-eosin (H and E and Gimsa for direct investigation of H. pylori bacterium. Serum samples of the patients were also tested for the presence of H. pylori IgG antibody. Results: Overall 70 patients (73.7% had positive anti- H. pylori IgG antibody in their sera. The results of RUT on adeno-tonsils showed that 42.1% of the specimens were positive for H. pylori. In histology examination, 9 patients (9.5% were positive for the presence of bacterium. Conclusion: Based on our findings it seems that tonsils and adenoid tissues are the candidate places for the growth of H. pylori. Further studies about the role of tonsillar colonization of H. pylori in re-infection after treatment are recommended.

  10. Association between efficient adhesion to HEp-2 cells and severity of gastritis in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from children

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    Tahereh Falsafi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and is a risk factor for gastric cancer. More than half of the world`s population is infected with this pathogen, however the disease outcome varies. Among the virulence factors of H. pylori, specific adhesions to gastric epithelium may be an important step in the induction of active inflammation. H. pylori displays considerable genetic diversity attributed to genetic drift during long-term colonization. Heterogeneity of clinical-isolates has considerably impacted in understanding the role of each factor in infection outcome. However, genetic change may be more limited in the stomach of children in the short period after infection. This work evaluates differences in adherence potential of strains isolated from children with various chronic- inflammation status."nMaterials and Methods: A total of 157 children admitted to Medical Center of Tehran for upper gastrointestinal problems underwent endoscopy for H. pylori infection. Histological examination of their biopsies was performed after H& E and Giemsa staining. Gastritis and inflammation were graded according to the updated Sydney system. 70 culture-positive children, 20 were selected according to their histopathological status. Adherence of their H. pylori isolates to HEp- 2 cells was evaluated by viable count of bacteria associated with host cells in an optimized procedure developed in this study."nResults: Correlation was seen between inflammation severity score and efficiency of adhesion to HEp-2 cells. This correlation was not observed in the KB cell line as an epithelial cell-model."nConclusion: Specific interaction of H. pylori with host gastric epithelium may be associated with disease outcome

  11. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in a group of morbidly obese Saudi patients undergoing bariatric surgery: A preliminary report

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    Al-Akwaa Ahmad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Earlier reports from Saudi Arabia have shown high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, recent studies have documented a reduction in the infection prevalence. No prior study has assessed the prevalence in morbidly obese Saudi patients. We aimed to study the prevalence of H. pylori infection in a group morbidly obese Saudi patients referred for endoscopy prior to bariatric surgery. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients who were referred for upper endoscopy prior to bariatric surgery from June 2006 to September 2008. All data were recorded including patient′s demographics, comorbid conditions, endoscopic and histological findings. Results: There were 62 patients included, 20 males and 42 females. The mean age was 34 years (range 18 - 51 with a mean BMI of 55 Kg/m 2 (range 35 -92. H. pylori were present in 53 patients (85.5% with chronic active gastritis. All patients with positive H. pylori had chronic gastritis of variable severity. Intestinal metaplasia was present in 5%. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was similar in patients with and without co-morbid conditions. Main endoscopic findings were gastritis in 67.7%, hiatus hernia in 13%, and gastric erosions in 13%. No patient had duodenal or gastric ulcer. Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of H. pylori infection in morbidly obese Saudi patients undergoing bariatric surgery being referred for upper GI endoscopy. Further prospective studies are needed to evaluate the clinical implication and benefit of eradication treatment of infection in these patients.

  12. Helicobacter mustelae and Helicobacter pylori bind to common lipid receptors in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Gold, B D; M. Huesca; Sherman, P. M.; Lingwood, C A

    1993-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a recently recognized human pathogen causing chronic-active gastritis in association with duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. Helicobacter mustelae is a closely related bacterium with similar biochemical and morphologic characteristics. H. mustelae infection of antral and fundic mucosa in adult ferrets causes chronic gastritis. An essential virulence property of both Helicobacter species is bacterial adhesion to mucosal surfaces. The aim of this study was to determine w...

  13. Thoughts on pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori related gastrosis with splenogastric hygropyrexia syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Ling

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Splenogastric hygropyrexia syndrome, a common syndome in clinical practice, responds well to the therapy of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In view of the complexity of TCM syndrome formation, proceeding from different aspects such as Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, expression of inflammatory factors, mucosal protection and change in micro-ecosystem, the authors proposed that Hp infection in gastric mucosa, nuclear factor-κB activation, over-expression of heat shock protein ...

  14. A fluid model for Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigh, Shang-Yik; Lauga, Eric

    2015-11-01

    Swimming microorganisms and self-propelled nanomotors are often found in confined environments. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori survives in the acidic environment of the human stomach and is able to penetrate gel-like mucus layers and cause infections by locally changing the rheological properties of the mucus from gel-like to solution-like. In this talk we propose an analytical model for the locomotion of Helicobacter pylori as a confined spherical squirmer which generates its own confinement. We solve analytically the flow field around the swimmer, and derive the swimming speed and energetics. The role of the boundary condition in the outer wall is discussed. An extension of our model is also proposed for other biological and chemical swimmers. Newton Trust.

  15. Gastric leptin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    OpenAIRE

    Azuma, T; Suto, H.; Ito, Y.; Ohtani, M.; Dojo, M; Kuriyama, M; Kato, T.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Leptin regulates feeding behaviour and therefore may be a mediator of anorexia associated with acute and chronic inflammation. Recently, leptin mRNA and leptin protein were found in the gastric epithelium.
AIM—The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric leptin expression to investigate the pathophysiological role of gastric leptin.
METHODS—Surgically resected human stomach tissues were subjected to immunohistochemistry and reve...

  16. Hybrid Therapy Regimen for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Jian; Zhou, Li-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication remains a challenge with increasing antibiotic resistance. Hybrid therapy has attracted widespread attention because of initial report with good efficacy and safety. However, many issues on hybrid therapy are still unclear such as the eradication efficacy, safety, compliance, influencing factors, correlation with antibiotic resistance, and comparison with other regimens. Therefore, a comprehensive review on the evidence of hybrid therapy for H. pylori infection was conducted. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to September 30, 2015, searching by the terms of “Helicobacter pylori” or “H. pylori”, and “hybrid”. Study Selection: Clinical research articles were selected mainly according to their level of relevance to this topic. Results: Totally, 1871 patients of 12 studies received hybrid therapy. The eradication rates were 77.6–97.4% in intention-to-treat and 82.6–99.1% in per-protocol analyses. Compliance was 93.3–100.0%, overall adverse effects rate was 14.5–67.5%, and discontinued medication rate due to adverse effects was 0–6.7%. H. pylori culture and sensitivity test were performed only in 13.3% patients. Pooled analysis showed that the eradication rates with dual clarithromycin and metronidazole susceptible, isolated metronidazole or clarithromycin resistance, and dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance were 98.5%, 97.6%, 92.9%, and 80.0%, respectively. Overall, the efficacy, compliance, and safety of hybrid therapy were similar with sequential or concomitant therapy. However, hybrid therapy might be superior to sequential therapy in Asians. Conclusions: Hybrid therapy showed wide differences in the efficacy but consistently good compliance and safety across different regions. Dual clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance were the key factor to efficacy. Hybrid therapy was similar to sequential or concomitant

  17. Urease from Helicobacter pylori is inactivated by sulforaphane and other isothiocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Jed W; Stephenson, Katherine K; Wade, Kristina L; Talalay, Paul

    2013-05-24

    Infections by Helicobacter pylori are very common, causing gastroduodenal inflammation including peptic ulcers, and increasing the risk of gastric neoplasia. The isothiocyanate (ITC) sulforaphane [SF; 1-isothiocyanato-4-(methylsulfinyl)butane] derived from edible crucifers such as broccoli is potently bactericidal against Helicobacter, including antibiotic-resistant strains, suggesting a possible dietary therapy. Gastric H. pylori infections express high urease activity which generates ammonia, neutralizes gastric acidity, and promotes inflammation. The finding that SF inhibits (inactivates) urease (jack bean and Helicobacter) raised the issue of whether these properties might be functionally related. The rates of inactivation of urease activity depend on enzyme and SF concentrations and show first order kinetics. Treatment with SF results in time-dependent increases in the ultraviolet absorption of partially purified Helicobacter urease in the 260-320 nm region. This provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the formation of dithiocarbamates between the ITC group of SF and cysteine thiols of urease. The potencies of inactivation of Helicobacter urease by isothiocyanates structurally related to SF were surprisingly variable. Natural isothiocyanates closely related to SF, previously shown to be bactericidal (berteroin, hirsutin, phenethyl isothiocyanate, alyssin, and erucin), did not inactivate urease activity. Furthermore, SF is bactericidal against both urease positive and negative H. pylori strains. In contrast, some isothiocyanates such as benzoyl-ITC, are very potent urease inactivators, but are not bactericidal. The bactericidal effects of SF and other ITC against Helicobacter are therefore not obligatorily linked to urease inactivation, but may reduce the inflammatory component of Helicobacter infections. PMID:23583386

  18. ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori cagA infection: evidence of an association

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    DE Mattos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection appear to be dependent on a host of genetic traits and virulence factors possessed by this microorganism. This paper aimed to investigate the association between the ABO histo-blood groups and H. pylori cagA infections. Genomic DNA samples (n = 110 of gastric biopsies obtained from patients with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcers (n = 25 and chronic active gastritis (n = 85 were analyzed by PCR using specific primers for the cagA gene. Of the samples, 66.4% (n = 73 tested positive and 33.6% (n = 37 negative for the gene. The cagA strain was predominant in peptic ulcers (n = 21; 84.0% compared with chronic active gastritis (n = 52; 61.2% (p = 0.05; OR 3.332; 95% CI: 1.050-10.576. Additionally, the cagA strain was prevalent in the type O blood (48/63; 76.2% compared with other ABO phenotypes (25/47; 53.2% (p = 0.01; OR 2.816; 95% CI: 1.246-6.364. These results suggest that H. pylori cagA infection is associated with the O blood group in Brazilian patients suffering from chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcers.

  19. OVERVIEW: DISINFECTION OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI AND AEROMONAS SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori and Aeromonas hydrophila are contaminants listed on the USEPA's 1998 Contaminant Candidate List (CCL).The sensitivity of H. pylori to chlorine and of Aeromonas spp. to inactivation by free chlorine, chloramine and ultraviolet (UV) was examined. Selective and...

  20. The relationship between helicobacter pylori infection and myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Azarkar, Zohreh; Jafarnejad, Majid; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2011-01-01

    Background: Coronary Artery Disease is known as the main cause of death in industrialized countries. Relation between this disease and some infections such as Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) has been shown in several studies. The purpose of this study was to dermine the relationship between Hypylori and mycardical infarctions.