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Sample records for anti-filarial drug target

  1. The heme biosynthetic pathway of the obligate Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi as a potential anti-filarial drug target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Filarial parasites (e.g., Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, and Wuchereria bancrofti are causative agents of lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, which are among the most disabling of neglected tropical diseases. There is an urgent need to develop macro-filaricidal drugs, as current anti-filarial chemotherapy (e.g., diethylcarbamazine [DEC], ivermectin and albendazole can interrupt transmission predominantly by killing microfilariae (mf larvae, but is less effective on adult worms, which can live for decades in the human host. All medically relevant human filarial parasites appear to contain an obligate endosymbiotic bacterium, Wolbachia. This alpha-proteobacterial mutualist has been recognized as a potential target for filarial nematode life cycle intervention, as antibiotic treatments of filarial worms harboring Wolbachia result in the loss of worm fertility and viability upon antibiotic treatments both in vitro and in vivo. Human trials have confirmed this approach, although the length of treatments, high doses required and medical counter-indications for young children and pregnant women warrant the identification of additional anti-Wolbachia drugs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Genome sequence analysis indicated that enzymes involved in heme biosynthesis might constitute a potential anti-Wolbachia target set. We tested different heme biosynthetic pathway inhibitors in ex vivo B. malayi viability assays and report a specific effect of N-methyl mesoporphyrin (NMMP, which targets ferrochelatase (FC, the last step. Our phylogenetic analysis indicates evolutionarily significant divergence between Wolbachia heme genes and their human homologues. We therefore undertook the cloning, overexpression and analysis of several enzymes of this pathway alongside their human homologues, and prepared proteins for drug targeting. In vitro enzyme assays revealed a approximately 600-fold difference in drug sensitivities to succinyl acetone (SA between

  2. Filamentation temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ) of Wolbachia, endosymbiont of Wuchereria bancrofti: a potential target for anti-filarial chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rohit; Hoti, S L; Vasuki, V; Sankari, T; Meena, R L; Das, P K

    2013-03-01

    instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus were treated with 0.25mg/ml of albendazole (test) or tetracycline (positive control) in the rearing medium for different intervals and tested for the presence of Wolbachia by FtsZ PCR. All the treated larvae were negative for the presence of the FtsZ band, whereas all the control larvae were positive. The findings of the study, thus indicated that FtsZ is sensitive to albendazole. In view of this albendazole appears to have dual targets; FtsZ in Wolbachia and β-tubulin in W. bancrofti. Further, the functional domain of the gene was assessed for polymorphism among recombinant clones representing 120 W. bancrofti parasites, prevalent across wide geographic areas of India and found to be highly conserved among them. Since it is highly conserved and plays an important role in Wolbachia cell division it appears to be a potential target for anti-filarial chemotherapy development. PMID:23262214

  3. Influence of anti-filarial chemotherapy strategies on the genetic structure of Wuchereria bancrofti populations

    OpenAIRE

    Dhamodharan Ramasamy; Hoti Sugeerappa Laxmanappa; Rohit Sharma; Manoj Kumar Das

    2011-01-01

    Lymphatic filarial (LF) parasites have been under anti-filarial drug pressure for more than half a century. Currently, annual mass drug administration (MDA) of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin in combination with albendazole (ALB) have been used globally to eliminate LF. Long-term chemotherapies exert significant pressure on the genetic structure of parasitic populations. We investigated the genetic variation among 210 Wuchereria bancrofti populations that were under three different che...

  4. C-cinnamoyl glycosides as a new class of anti-filarial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Priya; Dhara, Debashis; Parida, Pravat Kumar; Kar, Rajiv Kumar; Bhunia, Anirban; Jana, Kuladip; Sinha Babu, Santi P; Misra, Anup Kumar

    2016-05-23

    A series of C-cinnamoyl glycosides has been synthesized in good yield by the BF3·OEt2 catalyzed aldol condensation of C-glycosylated acetone derivative with a variety of aromatic aldehydes. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their potential as anti-filarial agents against bovine filarial parasite Setaria cervi and human filariid Wuchereria bancrofti using a number of biological assays such as relative movability (RM) assessment and MTT reduction assay. Among twenty seven test compounds six compounds were found active in terms of MIC, IC50 and LC50 values. Further biological studies were carried out using three lead compounds because of their significantly low MIC values and IC50 values compared to the standard anti-filarial drug Ivermectin. In addition, structure activity relationship study of the test compounds has been carried out using 3D-QSAR analysis. PMID:27015610

  5. Influence of anti-filarial chemotherapy strategies on the genetic structure of Wuchereria bancrofti populations

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    Dhamodharan Ramasamy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filarial (LF parasites have been under anti-filarial drug pressure for more than half a century. Currently, annual mass drug administration (MDA of diethylcarbamazine (DEC or ivermectin in combination with albendazole (ALB have been used globally to eliminate LF. Long-term chemotherapies exert significant pressure on the genetic structure of parasitic populations. We investigated the genetic variation among 210 Wuchereria bancrofti populations that were under three different chemotherapy strategies, namely MDA with DEC alone (group I, n = 74, MDA with DEC and ALB (group II, n = 60 and selective therapy (ST with DEC (group III, n = 34 to understand the impact of these three drug regimens on the parasite genetic structure. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA profiles were generated for the three groups of parasite populations; the gene diversity, gene flow and genetic distance values were determined and phylogenetic trees were constructed. Analysis of these parameters indicated that parasite populations under ST with a standard dose of DEC (group III were genetically more diverse (0.2660 than parasite populations under MDA with DEC alone (group I, H = 0.2197 or with DEC + ALB (group II, H = 0.2317. These results indicate that the MDA may reduce the genetic diversity of W. bancrofti populations when compared to the genetic diversity of parasite populations under ST.

  6. Mining predicted essential genes of Brugia malayi for nematode drug targets.

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    Sanjay Kumar

    Full Text Available We report results from the first genome-wide application of a rational drug target selection methodology to a metazoan pathogen genome, the completed draft sequence of Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode responsible for human lymphatic filariasis. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, a related filarial disease. Drug treatments for filariasis have not changed significantly in over 20 years, and with the risk of resistance rising, there is an urgent need for the development of new anti-filarial drug therapies. The recent publication of the draft genomic sequence for B. malayi enables a genome-wide search for new drug targets. However, there is no functional genomics data in B. malayi to guide the selection of potential drug targets. To circumvent this problem, we have utilized the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for B. malayi. Sequence comparisons between the two genomes allow us to map C. elegans orthologs to B. malayi genes. Using these orthology mappings and by incorporating the extensive genomic and functional genomic data, including genome-wide RNAi screens, that already exist for C. elegans, we identify potentially essential genes in B. malayi. Further incorporation of human host genome sequence data and a custom algorithm for prioritization enables us to collect and rank nearly 600 drug target candidates. Previously identified potential drug targets cluster near the top of our prioritized list, lending credibility to our methodology. Over-represented Gene Ontology terms, predicted InterPro domains, and RNAi phenotypes of C. elegans orthologs associated with the potential target pool are identified. By virtue of the selection procedure, the potential B. malayi drug targets highlight components of key processes in nematode biology such as central metabolism, molting and regulation of gene expression.

  7. GWAS and drug targets

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Chen; Moult, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a large number of links between genome variation and complex disease. Among other benefits, it is expected that these insights will lead to new therapeutic strategies, particularly the identification of new drug targets. In this paper, we evaluate the power of GWAS studies to find drug targets by examining how many existing drug targets have been directly 'rediscovered' by this technique, and the extent to which GWAS results may ...

  8. Magnetic targeted drug delivery

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    Timothy Wiedmann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer in both men and women. Treatment by intravenous or oral administration of chemotherapy agents results in serious and often treatment-limiting side effects. Delivery of drugs directly to the lung by inhalation of an aerosol holds the promise of achieving a higher concentration in the lung with lower blood levels. To further enhance the selective lung deposition, it may be possible to target deposition by using external magnetic fields to direct the delivery of drug coupled to magnetic particles. Moreover, alternating magnetic fields can be used to induce particle heating, which in turn controls the drug release rate with the appropriate thermal sensitive material.With this goal, superparamagetic nanoparticles (SPNP were prepared and characterized, and enhanced magnetic deposition was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. SPNPs were also incorporated into a lipid-based/SPNP aerosol formulation, and drug release was shown to be controlled by thermal activation. Because of the inherent imaging potential of SPNPs, this use of nanotechnology offers the possibility of coupling the diagnosis of lung cancer to drug release, which perhaps will ultimately provide the “magic bullet” that Paul Ehrlich originally sought.

  9. Evaluation and validation of drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-huaDU

    2004-01-01

    Drug target is one of the key factors for discovering and developing new drugs. To find and validate drug targets is a crucial technique required in drug discovery by the strategy of high throughput screening. Based on the knowledge of molecular biology, human genomics and proteomics, it has been predicted that 5000 to 10000 drug targets exist in human. So, it is important orocedure to evaluate and validate the drug targets.

  10. Drug targeting to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardridge, William M

    2007-09-01

    The goal of brain drug targeting technology is the delivery of therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), including the human BBB. This is accomplished by re-engineering pharmaceuticals to cross the BBB via specific endogenous transporters localized within the brain capillary endothelium. Certain endogenous peptides, such as insulin or transferrin, undergo receptor-mediated transport (RMT) across the BBB in vivo. In addition, peptidomimetic monoclonal antibodies (MAb) may also cross the BBB via RMT on the endogenous transporters. The MAb may be used as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry across the BBB large molecule pharmaceuticals, including recombinant proteins, antibodies, RNA interference drugs, or non-viral gene medicines. Fusion proteins of the molecular Trojan horse and either neurotrophins or single chain Fv antibodies have been genetically engineered. The fusion proteins retain bi-functional properties, and both bind the BBB receptor, to trigger transport into brain, and bind the cognate receptor inside brain to induce the pharmacologic effect. Trojan horse liposome technology enables the brain targeting of non-viral plasmid DNA. Molecular Trojan horses may be formulated with fusion protein technology, avidin-biotin technology, or Trojan horse liposomes to target to brain virtually any large molecule pharmaceutical. PMID:17554607

  11. Predicting new molecular targets for known drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Keiser, Michael J.; Setola, Vincent; Irwin, John J.; Laggner, Christian; Abbas, Atheir; Hufeisen, Sandra J.; Jensen, Niels H.; Kuijer, Michael B.; Matos, Roberto C.; Tran, Thuy B.; Whaley, Ryan; Glennon, Richard A.; Hert, Jérôme; THOMAS, KELAN L. H.; Edwards, Douglas D.

    2009-01-01

    Whereas drugs are intended to be selective, at least some bind to several physiologic targets, explaining both side effects and efficacy. As many drug-target combinations exist, it would be useful to explore possible interactions computationally. Here, we compared 3,665 FDA-approved and investigational drugs against hundreds of targets, defining each target by its ligands. Chemical similarities between drugs and ligand sets predicted thousands of unanticipated associations. Thirty were tested...

  12. Drug targeting through pilosebaceous route.

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    Chourasia, Rashmi; Jain, Sanjay K

    2009-10-01

    Local skin targeting is of interest for the pharmaceutical and the cosmetic industry. A topically applied substance has basically three possibilities to penetrate into the skin: transcellular, intercellular, and follicular. The transfollicular path has been largely ignored because hair follicles constitute only 0.1% of the total skin. The hair follicle is a skin appendage with a complex structure containing many cell types that produce highly specialised proteins. The hair follicle is in a continuous cycle: anagen is the hair growth phase, catagen the involution phase and telogen is the resting phase. Nonetheless, the hair follicle has great potential for skin treatment, owing to its deep extension into the dermis and thus provides much deeper penetration and absorption of compounds beneath the skin than seen with the transdermal route. In the case of skin diseases and of cosmetic products, delivery to sweat glands or to the pilosebaceous unit is essential for the effectiveness of the drug. Increased accumulation in the pilosebaceous unit could treat alopecia, acne and skin cancer more efficiently and improve the effect of cosmetic substances and nutrients. Therefore, we review herein various drug delivery systems, including liposomes, niosomes, microspheres, nanoparticles, nanoemulsions, lipid nanocarriers, gene therapy and discuss the results of recent researches. We also review the drugs which have been investigated for pilosebaceous delivery. PMID:19663765

  13. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Vihang S. Chawan; Abhishek M. Phatak; Kalpesh V. Gawand; Sagar V. Badwane; Sagar S. Panchal

    2016-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and...

  14. Antiepileptic drugs: newer targets and new drugs

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    Vihang S. Chawan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting 0.5-1% of the population in India. Majority of patients respond to currently available antiepileptic drugs (AEDs, but a small percentage of patients have shown poor and inadequate response to AEDs in addition to various side effects and drug interactions while on therapy. Thus there is a need to develop more effective AEDs in drug resistant epilepsy which have a better safety profile with minimal adverse effects. The United States food and drug administration (USFDA has approved eslicarbazepine acetate, ezogabine, perampanel and brivaracetam which have shown a promising future as better AEDs and drugs like ganaxolone, intranasal diazepam, ICA- 105665, valnoctamide, VX-765, naluzotan are in the pipeline. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 587-592

  15. Aquaporins as potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang WANG; Xue-chao FENG; Yong-ming LI; Hong YANG; Tong-hui MA

    2006-01-01

    The aquaporins (AQP) are a family of integral membrane proteins that selectively transport water and,in some cases,small neutral solutes such as glycerol and urea.Thirteen mammalian AQP have been molecularly identified and localized to various epithelial,endothelial and other tissues.Phenotype studies of transgenic mouse models of AQP knockout,mutation,and in some cases humans with AQP mutations have demonstrated essential roles for AQP in mammalian physiology and pathophysiology,including urinary concentrating function,exocrine glandular fluid secretion,brain edema formation,regulation of intracranial and intraocular pressure,skin hydration,fat metabolism,tumor angiogenesis and cell migration.These studies suggest that AQP may be potential drug targets for not only new diuretic reagents for various forms of pathological water retention,but also targets for novel therapy of brain edema,inflammatory disease,glaucoma,obesity,and cancer.However,potent AQP modulators for in vivo application remain to be discovered.

  16. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Eckmann, D.M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanoge...

  17. Targeted Drug Delivery in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    Effective drug delivery in pancreatic cancer treatment remains a major challenge. Because of the high resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, the overall survival rate for pancreatic cancer is extremely low. Recent advances in drug delivery systems hold great promise for improving cancer therapy. Using liposomes, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes to deliver cancer drugs and other therapeutic agents such as siRNA, suicide gene, oncolytic virus, small molecule inhibitor and antibody has been a success in recent pre-clinical trials. However, how to improve the specificity and stability of the delivered drug using ligand or antibody directed delivery represent a major problem. Therefore, developing novel, specific, tumor-targeted drug delivery systems is urgently needed for this terrible disease. This review summarizes the current progress on targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer, and provides important information on potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19853645

  18. Splicing regulators: targets and drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Yeo, Gene Wei-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Silencing of splicing regulators by RNA interference, combined with splicing-specific microarrays, has revealed a complex network of distinct alternative splicing events in Drosophila, while a high-throughput screen of more than 6,000 compounds has identified drugs that interfere specifically and directly with one class of splicing regulators in human cells.

  19. Drug targeting using solid lipid nanoparticles.

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    Rostami, Elham; Kashanian, Soheila; Azandaryani, Abbas H; Faramarzi, Hossain; Dolatabadi, Jafar Ezzati Nazhad; Omidfar, Kobra

    2014-07-01

    The present review aims to show the features of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) which are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery and research. Because of some unique features of SLNs such as their unique size dependent properties it offers possibility to develop new therapeutics. A common denominator of all these SLN-based platforms is to deliver drugs into specific tissues or cells in a pathological setting with minimal adverse effects on bystander cells. SLNs are capable to incorporate drugs into nanocarriers which lead to a new prototype in drug delivery which maybe used for drug targeting. Hence solid lipid nanoparticles hold great promise for reaching the goal of controlled and site specific drug delivery and hence attracted wide attention of researchers. This review presents a broad treatment of targeted solid lipid nanoparticles discussing their types such as antibody SLN, magnetic SLN, pH sensitive SLN and cationic SLN. PMID:24717692

  20. LIVER SPECIFIC DRUG TARGETING STRATEGIES: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh S. Gorad*, Satish K. Mandlik and Kishore N. Gujar

    2013-01-01

    Drug delivery to liver is one of the most challenging research areas in pharmaceutical sciences. The some physiological barrier such as opsonization, mechanical entrapment by pulmonary vascular bed, uptake by RES represents an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of proteins and drugs, including antibiotics, antineoplastic agents and antiviral agents to target liver disorders. Therefore, various strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of different drugs to liver and hepato...

  1. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Battisti; Federica Chiellini; Roberto Solaro

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, incl...

  2. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

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    Partha Ray

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX. SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  3. Drug-induced regulation of target expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iskar, Murat; Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    -induced differential expression of drug target mRNA was examined in three cell lines using the Connectivity Map. To overcome various biases in this valuable resource, we have developed a computational normalization and scoring procedure that is applicable to gene expression recording upon heterogeneous drug treatments...... further newly identified drug-induced differential regulation of Lanosterol 14-alpha demethylase, Endoplasmin, DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha and Calmodulin 1. The feedback regulation in these and other targets is likely to be relevant for the success or failure of the molecular intervention....

  4. Mathematical modelling of magnetically targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grief, Andrew D. [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: andrew.grief@nottingham.ac.uk; Richardson, Giles [Theoretical Mechanics, School of Mathematical Sciences, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: giles.richardson@nottingham.ac.uk

    2005-05-15

    A mathematical model for targeted drug delivery using magnetic particles is developed. This includes a diffusive flux of particles arising from interactions between erythrocytes in the microcirculation. The model is used to track particles in a vessel network. Magnetic field design is discussed and we show that it is impossible to specifically target internal regions using an externally applied field.

  5. Targeted Delivery of Protein Drugs by Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Battisti

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in biotechnology demonstrate that peptides and proteins are the basis of a new generation of drugs. However, the transportation of protein drugs in the body is limited by their high molecular weight, which prevents the crossing of tissue barriers, and by their short lifetime due to immuno response and enzymatic degradation. Moreover, the ability to selectively deliver drugs to target organs, tissues or cells is a major challenge in the treatment of several human diseases, including cancer. Indeed, targeted delivery can be much more efficient than systemic application, while improving bioavailability and limiting undesirable side effects. This review describes how the use of targeted nanocarriers such as nanoparticles and liposomes can improve the pharmacokinetic properties of protein drugs, thus increasing their safety and maximizing the therapeutic effect.

  6. Fluid mechanics aspects of magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbach, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations using a flow phantom for magnetic drug targeting have been undertaken. The flow phantom is a half y-branched tube configuration where the main tube represents an artery from which a tumour-supplying artery, which is simulated by the side branch of the flow phantom, branches off. In the experiments a quantification of the amount of magnetic particles targeted towards the branch by a magnetic field applied via a permanent magnet is achieved by impedance measurement using sensor coils. Measuring the targeting efficiency, i.e. the relative amount of particles targeted to the side branch, for different field configurations one obtains targeting maps which combine the targeting efficiency with the magnetic force densities in characteristic points in the flow phantom. It could be shown that targeting efficiency depends strongly on the magnetic field configuration. A corresponding numerical model has been set up, which allows the simulation of targeting efficiency for variable field configuration. With this simulation good agreement of targeting efficiency with experimental data has been found. Thus, the basis has been laid for future calculations of optimal field configurations in clinical applications of magnetic drug targeting. Moreover, the numerical model allows the variation of additional parameters of the drug targeting process and thus an estimation of the influence, e.g. of the fluid properties on the targeting efficiency. Corresponding calculations have shown that the non-Newtonian behaviour of the fluid will significantly influence the targeting process, an aspect which has to be taken into account, especially recalling the fact that the viscosity of magnetic suspensions depends strongly on the magnetic field strength and the mechanical load. PMID:26415215

  7. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

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    Yi Lu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies.

  8. LIVER SPECIFIC DRUG TARGETING STRATEGIES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S. Gorad*, Satish K. Mandlik and Kishore N. Gujar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery to liver is one of the most challenging research areas in pharmaceutical sciences. The some physiological barrier such as opsonization, mechanical entrapment by pulmonary vascular bed, uptake by RES represents an insurmountable obstacle for a large number of proteins and drugs, including antibiotics, antineoplastic agents and antiviral agents to target liver disorders. Therefore, various strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of different drugs to liver and hepatocytes which includes passive accumulation of nanoparticle therapeutics and active targeting by surface modifications of nanoparticles with specific ligands such as carbohydrates, peptides, proteins and antibodies. The present review enlightens about different pathologies of liver and targeting strategies employed in relation to liver anatomy and disease etiologies.

  9. Molecularly targeted drugs for metastatic colorectal cancer

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    Cheng YD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ying-dong Cheng, Hua Yang, Guo-qing Chen, Zhi-cao Zhang Department of General Surgery, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, People's Republic of China Abstract: The survival rate of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC has significantly improved with applications of molecularly targeted drugs, such as bevacizumab, and led to a substantial improvement in the overall survival rate. These drugs are capable of specifically targeting the inherent abnormal pathways in cancer cells, which are potentially less toxic than traditional nonselective chemotherapeutics. In this review, the recent clinical information about molecularly targeted therapy for mCRC is summarized, with specific focus on several of the US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted drugs for the treatment of mCRC in the clinic. Progression-free and overall survival in patients with mCRC was improved greatly by the addition of bevacizumab and/or cetuximab to standard chemotherapy, in either first- or second-line treatment. Aflibercept has been used in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–irinotecan (FOLFIRI chemotherapy in mCRC patients and among patients with mCRC with wild-type KRAS, the outcomes were significantly improved by panitumumab in combination with folinic acid (leucovorin–fluorouracil–oxaliplatin (FOLFOX or FOLFIRI. Because of the new preliminary studies, it has been recommended that regorafenib be used with FOLFOX or FOLFIRI as first- or second-line treatment of mCRC chemotherapy. In summary, an era of new opportunities has been opened for treatment of mCRC and/or other malignancies, resulting from the discovery of new selective targeting drugs. Keywords: metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC, antiangiogenic drug, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, cetuximab, panitumumab, clinical trial, molecularly targeted therapy

  10. P-glycoprotein targeted nanoscale drug carriers

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wengang

    2013-02-01

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a trend whereby tumor cells exposed to one cytotoxic agent develop cross-resistance to a range of structurally and functionally unrelated compounds. P -glycoprotein (P -gp) efflux pump is one of the mostly studied drug carrying processes that shuttle the drugs out of tumor cells. Thus, P -gp inhibitors have attracted a lot of attention as they can stop cancer drugs from being pumped out of target cells with the consumption of ATP. Using quantitive structure activity relationship (QSAR), we have successfully synthesized a series of novel P -gp inhibitors. The obtained dihydropyrroloquinoxalines series were fully characterized and then tested against bacterial and tumor assays with over-expressed P -gps. All compounds were bioactive especially compound 1c that had enhanced antibacterial activity. Furthermore, these compounds were utilized as targeting vectors to direct drug delivery vehicles such as silica nanoparticles (SNPs) to cancerous Hela cells with over expressed P -gps. Cell uptake studies showed a successful accumulation of these decorated SNPs in tumor cells compared to undecorated SNPs. The results obtained show that dihydropyrroloquinoxalines constitute a promising drug candidate for targeting cancers with MDR. Copyright © 2013 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.

  11. Possible implication of oxidative stress in anti filarial effect of certain traditionally used medicinal plants in vitro against Brugia malayi microfilariae

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    R D Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tropical disease research scheme of World Health Organization has duly recognized traditional medicine as alternative for antifilarial drug development. Polyphenolic compounds present in traditionally used herbal medicines are natural antioxidants; however, paradoxically they may exert pro-oxidant effect. Popular drug diethyl carbamazine citrate harnesses the innate inflammatory response and the consequent oxidative assault to combat invading microbes. Methods: With this perspective, extracts of Vitex negundo L. (roots, Butea monosperma L. (leaves, Aegle marmelos Corr. (leaves, and Ricinus communis L. (leaves were selected to explore the possible role of oxidative rationale in the antifilarial effect in vitro. Results: Apart from the last, other three plant extracts were reported to have polyphenolic compounds. Dose-dependent increase was found in the levels of lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation for all the three plant extracts except Ricinus communis L. (leaves. Such increase in oxidative parameters also showed some degree of plant-specific predilection in terms of relatively higher level of particular oxidative parameter. High degree of correlation was observed between the antifilarial effect and the levels of corresponding oxidative stress parameters for these three plants. However, extracts of Ricinus communis L. (leaves which is relatively deficient in polyphenolic ingredients recorded maximum 30% loss of motility and also did not show any significant difference in various stress parameters from corresponding control levels. Conclusion: These results reveal that targeted oxidative stress might be crucial in the pharmacodynamics.

  12. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  13. Targeting molecular networks for drug research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro Pinto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of molecular networks has recently moved into the limelight of biomedical research. While it has certainly provided us with plenty of new insights into cellular mechanisms, the challenge now is how to modify or even restructure these networks. This is especially true for human diseases, which can be regarded as manifestations of distorted states of molecular networks. Of the possible interventions for altering networks, the use of drugs is presently the most feasible. In this mini-review, we present and discuss some exemplary approaches of how analysis of molecular interaction networks can contribute to pharmacology (e.g., by identifying new drug targets or prediction of drug side effects, as well as listing pointers to relevant resources and software to guide future research. We also outline recent progress in the use of drugs for in vitro reprogramming of cells, which constitutes an example par excellence for altering molecular interaction networks with drugs.

  14. Meningococcal disease and future drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, L K; Colding, H; Hartzen, S H; Penkowa, M

    2011-01-01

    recent data and current knowledge on molecular mechanisms of meningococcal disease and explains how host immune responses ultimately may aggravate neuropathology and the clinical prognosis. Within this context, particular importance is paid to the endotoxic components that provide potential drug targets...

  15. Mystery unraveled about antifungal drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A long-standing mystery about the functional roles of the N-terminal region of protein N-myristoyltransferase, an ideal target for antifungal drugs, was recently decoded, thanks to the threeyear joint efforts of researchers from the CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology and their US colleagues at the DuPont Stine Haskell Research Center.

  16. Targeted drug discovery for pediatric leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AndrewDNapper

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite dramatic advances in the treatment of pediatric leukemia over the past 50 years, there remain subsets of patients who respond poorly to treatment. Many of the high-risk cases of childhood leukemia with the poorest prognosis have been found to harbor specific genetic signatures, often resulting from chromosomal rearrangements. With increased understanding of the genetic and epigenetic makeup of high-risk pediatric leukemia has come the opportunity to develop targeted therapies that promise to be both more effective and less toxic than current chemotherapy. Of particular importance is an understanding of the interconnections between different targets within the same cancer, and observations of synergy between two different targeted therapies or between a targeted drug and conventional chemotherapy. It has become clear that many cancers are able to circumvent a single specific blockade, and pediatric leukemias are no exception in this regard. This review highlights the most promising approaches to new drugs and drug combinations for high-risk pediatric leukemia. Key biological evidence supporting selection of molecular targets is presented, together with a critical survey of recent progress towards the discovery, pre-clinical development, and clinical study of novel molecular therapeutics.

  17. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B

    2009-08-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addition to directly blocking the activity of a targeted protease, one can take advantage of differential expression in disease states to selectively deliver therapeutic or imaging agents. Recent studies in targeted drug development for the metalloproteases (matrix metalloproteinases, adamalysins, pappalysins, neprilysin, angiotensin-converting enzyme, metallocarboxypeptidases, and glutamate carboxypeptidase II), serine proteases (elastase, coagulation factors, tissue/urokinase plasminogen activator system, kallikreins, tryptase, dipeptidyl peptidase IV) and cysteine proteases (cathepsin B) are discussed herein. PMID:19689354

  18. Reduction in acute filariasis morbidity during a mass drug administration trial to eliminate lymphatic filariasis in Papua New Guinea.

    OpenAIRE

    Tisch, Daniel J; Alexander, Neal D. E.; Benson Kiniboro; Henry Dagoro; Siba, Peter M.; Bockarie, Moses J.; Alpers, Michael P.; Kazura, James W.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute painful swelling of the extremities and scrotum are debilitating clinical manifestations of Wuchereria bancrofti infection. The ongoing global program to eliminate filariasis using mass drug administration is expected to decrease this and other forms of filarial morbidity in the future by preventing establishment of new infections as a consequence of eliminating transmission by the mosquito vector. We examined whether mass treatment with anti-filarial drugs has a more immedi...

  19. Reduction in Acute Filariasis Morbidity during a Mass Drug Administration Trial to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis in Papua New Guinea

    OpenAIRE

    Tisch, DJ; Alexander, NDE; Kiniboro, B.; Dagoro, H; Siba, PM; Bockarie, MJ; Alpers, MP; Kazura, JW

    2011-01-01

    Background: Acute painful swelling of the extremities and scrotum are debilitating clinical manifestations of Wuchereria bancrofti infection. The ongoing global program to eliminate filariasis using mass drug administration is expected to decrease this and other forms of filarial morbidity in the future by preventing establishment of new infections as a consequence of eliminating transmission by the mosquito vector. We examined whether mass treatment with anti-filarial drugs has a more immedi...

  20. Targeted proteins for diabetes drug design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a common metabolism disorder characterized by high glucose in the bloodstream, especially in the case of insulin resistance and relative insulin deficiency. Nowadays, it is very common in middle-aged people and involves such dangerous symptoms as increasing risk of stroke, obesity and heart failure. In Vietnam, besides the common treatment of insulin injection, some herbal medication is used but no unified optimum remedy for the disease yet exists and there is no production of antidiabetic drugs in the domestic market yet. In the development of nanomedicine at the present time, drug design is considered as an innovative tool for researchers to study the mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level. The aim of this article is to review some common protein targets involved in type 2 diabetes, offering a new idea for designing new drug candidates to produce antidiabetic drugs against type 2 diabetes for Vietnamese people. (review)

  1. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Huwyler

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Jörg Huwyler1, Jürgen Drewe2, Stephan Krähenbühl21University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Institute of Pharma Technology, Muttenz, Switzerland; 2Department of Research and Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles have beenused with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of application include lipid-based formulations to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble antitumordrugs, the use of pegylated liposomes for passive targeting of solid tumors as well as vector-conjugated liposomal carriers for active targeting of tumor tissue. Such formulation and drug targeting strategies enhance the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy and reduce at the same time the risk of toxic side-effects. The present article reviews the principles of different liposomal technologies and discusses current trends in this field of research.Keywords: tumor targeting, antineoplastic drugs, liposomes, pegylation, steric stabilization, immunoliposomes

  2. Mining metabolic networks for optimal drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Padmavati; Song, Bin; Kahveci, Tamer; Ranka, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in bioinformatics promote drug-design methods that aim to reduce side-effects. Efficient computational methods are required to identify the optimal enzyme-combination (i.e., drug targets) whose inhibition, will achieve the required effect of eliminating a given target set of compounds, while incurring minimal side-effects. We formulate the optimal enzyme-combination identification problem as an optimization problem on metabolic networks. We define a graph based computational damage model that encapsulates the impact of enzymes onto compounds in metabolic networks. We develop a branch-and-bound algorithm, named OPMET, to explore the search space dynamically. We also develop two filtering strategies to prune the search space while still guaranteeing an optimal solution. They compute an upper bound to the number of target compounds eliminated and a lower bound to the side-effect respectively. Our experiments on the human metabolic network demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the target enzymes for known successful drugs in the literature. Our experiments also show that OPMET can reduce the total search time by several orders of magnitude as compared to the exhaustive search. PMID:18229694

  3. Anti-Wolbachia drug discovery and development: safe macrofilaricides for onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Mark J; Hoerauf, Achim; TOWNSON, SIMON; Slatko, Barton E; Ward, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Anti-Wolbachia therapy delivers safe macrofilaricidal activity with superior therapeutic outcomes compared to all standard anti-filarial treatments, with the added benefit of substantial improvements in clinical pathology. These outcomes can be achieved, in principle, with existing registered drugs, e.g. doxycycline, that are affordable, available to endemic communities and have well known, albeit population-limiting, safety profiles. The key barriers to using doxycycline as an mass d...

  4. Prediction of potential drug targets based on simple sequence properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Luhua

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decades, research and development in drug discovery have attracted much attention and efforts. However, only 324 drug targets are known for clinical drugs up to now. Identifying potential drug targets is the first step in the process of modern drug discovery for developing novel therapeutic agents. Therefore, the identification and validation of new and effective drug targets are of great value for drug discovery in both academia and pharmaceutical industry. If a protein can be predicted in advance for its potential application as a drug target, the drug discovery process targeting this protein will be greatly speeded up. In the current study, based on the properties of known drug targets, we have developed a sequence-based drug target prediction method for fast identification of novel drug targets. Results Based on simple physicochemical properties extracted from protein sequences of known drug targets, several support vector machine models have been constructed in this study. The best model can distinguish currently known drug targets from non drug targets at an accuracy of 84%. Using this model, potential protein drug targets of human origin from Swiss-Prot were predicted, some of which have already attracted much attention as potential drug targets in pharmaceutical research. Conclusion We have developed a drug target prediction method based solely on protein sequence information without the knowledge of family/domain annotation, or the protein 3D structure. This method can be applied in novel drug target identification and validation, as well as genome scale drug target predictions.

  5. VNP: Interactive Visual Network Pharmacology of Diseases, Targets, and Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Q-N; Deng, Z.; Tu, W; X. Yang; Meng, Z-B; Deng, Z-X; Liu, J

    2014-01-01

    In drug discovery, promiscuous targets, multifactorial diseases, and “dirty” drugs construct complex network relationships. Network pharmacology description and analysis not only give a systems-level understanding of drug action and disease complexity but can also help to improve the efficiency of target selection and drug design. Visual network pharmacology (VNP) is developed to visualize network pharmacology of targets, diseases, and drugs with a graph network by using disease, target or dr...

  6. Targeting of antileishmanial drugs produced by nanotechnologies

    OpenAIRE

    Pujals Naranjo, Georgina

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to develop an effective new MGA delivery system by means of nanotechnology for the treatment of leishmaniosis which could be administered by parenteral or oral route in a future. Moreover, for ensuring the effectiveness of the formulations developed, their in vitro activities will be assessed against L. infantum. The intention is to prepare a target drug delivery system by means of different technological strategies like micro-nanoparticles by spray drying. These formu...

  7. Analyzing ferrofluid transport for magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and numerical investigations of magnetically induced localization of ferrofluid and its subsequent dispersion are performed in a forced flow. The ferrofluid accumulation behaves as a solid obstacle in the flow as the competing magnetic and fluid shear forces give rise to a rigidly bound core region followed by a washaway region at its wake. Results of the analysis provide meaningful information on ferrofluid transport for various magnetic drug targeting applications

  8. Extracellular proteases as targets for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Cudic, Mare; Fields, Gregg B.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases constitute one of the primary targets in drug discovery. In the present review, we focus on extracellular proteases (ECPs) because of their differential expression in many pathophysiological processes, including cancer, cardiovascular conditions, and inflammatory, pulmonary, and periodontal diseases. Many new ECP inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation and a significant increase in new therapies based on protease inhibition can be expected in the coming years. In addit...

  9. Functional genomics and cancer drug target discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Susan E; Boehm, Jesse S; Barbie, David A; Hahn, William C

    2010-06-01

    The recent development of technologies for whole-genome sequencing, copy number analysis and expression profiling enables the generation of comprehensive descriptions of cancer genomes. However, although the structural analysis and expression profiling of tumors and cancer cell lines can allow the identification of candidate molecules that are altered in the malignant state, functional analyses are necessary to confirm such genes as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Moreover, recent research suggests that tumor cells also depend on synthetic lethal targets, which are not mutated or amplified in cancer genomes; functional genomics screening can facilitate the discovery of such targets. This review provides an overview of the tools available for the study of functional genomics, and discusses recent research involving the use of these tools to identify potential novel drug targets in cancer. PMID:20521217

  10. Drug-therapy networks and the predictions of novel drug targets

    OpenAIRE

    Spiro, Zoltan; Kovacs, Istvan A.; Csermely, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a number of drug-therapy, disease, drug, and drug-target networks have been introduced. Here we suggest novel methods for network-based prediction of novel drug targets and for improvement of drug efficiency by analysing the effects of drugs on the robustness of cellular networks.

  11. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes. PMID:26529771

  12. Cooperative assembly in targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Described as cell analogues, liposomes are self-assembled lipid bilayer spheres that encapsulate aqueous volumes. Liposomes offer several drug delivery advantages due to their structural versatility related to size, composition, bilayer fluidity, and ability to encapsulate a large variety of compounds non-covalently. However, liposomes lack the structural information embedded within cell membranes. Partitioning of unsaturated and saturated lipids into liquid crystalline (Lα) and gel phase (Lβ) domains, respectively, affects local molecular diffusion and elasticity. Liposome microdomains may be used to pattern molecules, such as antibodies, on the liposome surface to create concentrated, segregated binding regions. We have synthesized, characterized, and evaluated a series of homogeneous and heterogeneous liposomal vehicles that target inflamed endothelium. These drug delivery vehicles are designed to complement the heterogeneous presentation of lipids and receptors on endothelial cells (ECs). EC surfaces are dynamic; they segregate receptors within saturated lipid microdomains on the cell surface to regulate binding and signaling events. We have demonstrated that cooperative binding of two antibodies enhances targeting by multiple fold. Further, we have shown that organization of these antibodies on the surface can further enhance cell uptake. The data suggest that EC targeting may be enhanced by designing liposomes that mirror the segregated structure of lipid and receptor molecules involved in neutrophil-EC adhesion. This strategy is employed in an atherosclerotic mouse model in vivo.

  13. Emerging migraine treatments and drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2011-01-01

    Migraine has a 1-year prevalence of 10% and high socioeconomic costs. Despite recent drug developments, there is a huge unmet need for better pharmacotherapy. In this review we discuss promising anti-migraine strategies such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists and 5......-hydroxytrypamine (5-HT)(1F) receptor agonists, which are in late-stage development. Nitric oxide antagonists are also in development. New forms of administration of sumatriptan might improve efficacy and reduce side effects. Botulinum toxin A has recently been approved for the prophylaxis of chronic migraine....... Tonabersat, a cortical spreading depression inhibitor, has shown efficacy in the prophylaxis of migraine with aura. Several new drug targets such as nitric oxide synthase, the 5-HT(1D) receptor, the prostanoid receptors EP(2) and EP(4), and the pituitary adenylate cyclase receptor PAC1 await development. The...

  14. New Drugs and Treatment Targets in Psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Skov, Lone; Zachariae, Claus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the increased understanding of the pathophysiology of psoriasis has resulted in several new treatments. The success of ustekinumab proved the importance of the IL-23/T helper cell 17 axis in psoriatic diseases. Several new biologics targeting this axis will reach the clinic in the...... phosphodiesterase inhibitors. We review published clinical trials, and conference abstracts presented during the last years, concerned with new drugs under development for the treatment of psoriasis. In conclusion, our psoriasis armamentarium will be filled with several new effective therapeutic options the coming...

  15. NSAIDs: Old Drugs Reveal New Anticancer Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A. Piazza

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is compelling evidence that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitors have antineoplastic activity, but toxicity from cyclooxygenase (COX inhibition and the suppression of physiologically important prostaglandins limits their use for cancer chemoprevention. Previous studies as reviewed here suggest that the mechanism for their anticancer properties does not require COX inhibition, but instead involves an off-target effect. In support of this possibility, recent molecular modeling studies have shown that the NSAID sulindac can be chemically modified to selectively design out its COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitory activity. Unexpectedly, certain derivatives that were synthesized based on in silico modeling displayed increased potency to inhibit tumor cell growth. Other experiments have shown that sulindac can inhibit phosphodiesterase to increase intracellular cyclic GMP levels and that this activity is closely associated with its ability to selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells. Together, these studies suggest that COX-independent mechanisms can be targeted to develop safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  16. The hydrogenosome as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benchimol, Marlene

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenosomes are spherical or slightly elongated organelles found in non-mitochondrial organisms. In Trichomonas hydrogenosomes measure between 200 to 500 nm, but under drug treatment they can reach 2 microm. Like mitochondria hydrogenosomes: (1) are surrounded by two closely apposed membranes and present a granular matrix: (2) divide in three different ways: segmentation, partition and the heart form; (3) they may divide at any phase of the cell cycle; (4) produce ATP; (5) participate in the metabolism of pyruvate formed during glycolysis; (6) are the site of molecular hydrogen formation; (7) present a relationship with the endoplasmic reticulum; (8) incorporate calcium; (9) import proteins post-translationally; (10) present cardiolipin. However, there are differences, such as: (1) absence of genetic material, at least in trichomonas; (2) lack a respiratory chain and cytochromes; (3) absence of the F(0)-F(1) ATPase; (4) absence of the tricarboxylic acid cycle; (5) lack of oxidative phosphorylation; (6) presence of peripheral vesicles. Hydrogenosomes are considered an excellent drug target since their metabolic pathway is distinct from those found in mitochondria and thus medicines directed to these organelles will probably not affect the host-cell. The main drug used against trichomonads is metronidazole, although other drugs such as beta-Lapachone, colchicine, Taxol, nocodazole, griseofulvin, cytochalasins, hydroxyurea, among others, have been used in trichomonad studies, showing: (1) flagella internalization forming pseudocyst; (2) dysfunctional hydrogenosomes; (3) hydrogenosomes with abnormal sizes and shapes and with an electron dense deposit called nucleoid; (4) intense autophagy in which hydrogenosomes are removed and further digested in lysosomes. PMID:18473836

  17. Multi-Target Drugs: The Trend of Drug Research and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Jin-Jian Lu; Wei Pan; Yuan-Jia Hu; Yi-Tao Wang

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing the status of drugs in the market and examining the trend of drug research and development is important in drug discovery. In this study, we compared the drug targets and the market sales of the new molecular entities approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to December 2009. Two networks, namely, the target-target and drug-drug networks, have been set up using the network analysis tools. The multi-target drugs have much more potential, as shown by the n...

  18. Drug-targeting methodologies with applications: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstreuer, Clement; Feng, Yu; Childress, Emily

    2014-12-16

    Targeted drug delivery to solid tumors is a very active research area, focusing mainly on improved drug formulation and associated best delivery methods/devices. Drug-targeting has the potential to greatly improve drug-delivery efficacy, reduce side effects, and lower the treatment costs. However, the vast majority of drug-targeting studies assume that the drug-particles are already at the target site or at least in its direct vicinity. In this review, drug-delivery methodologies, drug types and drug-delivery devices are discussed with examples in two major application areas: (1) inhaled drug-aerosol delivery into human lung-airways; and (2) intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting. The major problem addressed is how to deliver efficiently the drug-particles from the entry/infusion point to the target site. So far, most experimental results are based on animal studies. Concerning pulmonary drug delivery, the focus is on the pros and cons of three inhaler types, i.e., pressurized metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler and nebulizer, in addition to drug-aerosol formulations. Computational fluid-particle dynamics techniques and the underlying methodology for a smart inhaler system are discussed as well. Concerning intravascular drug-delivery for solid tumor targeting, passive and active targeting are reviewed as well as direct drug-targeting, using optimal delivery of radioactive microspheres to liver tumors as an example. The review concludes with suggestions for future work, considereing both pulmonary drug targeting and direct drug delivery to solid tumors in the vascular system. PMID:25516850

  19. Strategies to improve intracellular drug delivery by targeted liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Fretz, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Biotechnological advances increased the number of novel macromolecular drugs and new drug targets. The latter are mostly found intracellular. Unfortunately, most of the new macromolecular drugs rely on drug delivery tools for their intracellular delivery because their unfavourable physicochemical properties hamper them to cross cellular barriers, like the plasma and endosomal membranes. The work described in this thesis aims to improve intracellular drug delivery by applying targeted liposome...

  20. A computational approach to finding novel targets for existing drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Y Li

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Repositioning existing drugs for new therapeutic uses is an efficient approach to drug discovery. We have developed a computational drug repositioning pipeline to perform large-scale molecular docking of small molecule drugs against protein drug targets, in order to map the drug-target interaction space and find novel interactions. Our method emphasizes removing false positive interaction predictions using criteria from known interaction docking, consensus scoring, and specificity. In all, our database contains 252 human protein drug targets that we classify as reliable-for-docking as well as 4621 approved and experimental small molecule drugs from DrugBank. These were cross-docked, then filtered through stringent scoring criteria to select top drug-target interactions. In particular, we used MAPK14 and the kinase inhibitor BIM-8 as examples where our stringent thresholds enriched the predicted drug-target interactions with known interactions up to 20 times compared to standard score thresholds. We validated nilotinib as a potent MAPK14 inhibitor in vitro (IC50 40 nM, suggesting a potential use for this drug in treating inflammatory diseases. The published literature indicated experimental evidence for 31 of the top predicted interactions, highlighting the promising nature of our approach. Novel interactions discovered may lead to the drug being repositioned as a therapeutic treatment for its off-target's associated disease, added insight into the drug's mechanism of action, and added insight into the drug's side effects.

  1. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A; Irwin, John J; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L; Shoichet, Brian K

    2012-07-10

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to "de-orphanize" drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs with unknown targets; the number of drugs without molecular targets likely is far fewer than reported. The number of worldwide drugs without reasonable molecular targets similarly dropped, from 352 (25%) to 44 (4%). Nevertheless, there remained at least seven drugs for which reasonable mechanism-of-action targets were unknown but could be predicted, including the antitussives clemastine, cloperastine, and nepinalone; the antiemetic benzquinamide; the muscle relaxant cyclobenzaprine; the analgesic nefopam; and the immunomodulator lobenzarit. For each, predicted targets were confirmed experimentally, with affinities within their physiological concentration ranges. Turning this question on its head, we next asked which drugs were specific enough to act as chemical probes. Over 100 drugs met the standard criteria for probes, and 40 did so by more stringent criteria. A chemical information approach to drug-target association can guide therapeutic development and reveal applications to probe biology, a focus of much current interest. PMID:22711801

  2. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions for Drug Repositioning Only Based on Genomic Expression Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Kejian Wang; Jiazhi Sun; Shufeng Zhou; Chunling Wan; Shengying Qin; Can Li; Lin He; Lun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI). However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore develop...

  3. Drug target identification using side-effect similarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campillos, Monica; Kuhn, Michael; Gavin, Anne-Claude;

    2008-01-01

    Targets for drugs have so far been predicted on the basis of molecular or cellular features, for example, by exploiting similarity in chemical structure or in activity across cell lines. We used phenotypic side-effect similarities to infer whether two drugs share a target. Applied to 746 marketed...... drugs, a network of 1018 side effect-driven drug-drug relations became apparent, 261 of which are formed by chemically dissimilar drugs from different therapeutic indications. We experimentally tested 20 of these unexpected drug-drug relations and validated 13 implied drug-target relations by in vitro...... binding assays, of which 11 reveal inhibition constants equal to less than 10 micromolar. Nine of these were tested and confirmed in cell assays, documenting the feasibility of using phenotypic information to infer molecular interactions and hinting at new uses of marketed drugs....

  4. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly intercon- nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action in terms of informatics. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac- tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins in the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem- onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  5. Identifying drug-target proteins based on network features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU MingZhu; GAO Lei; LI Xia; LIU ZhiCheng

    2009-01-01

    Proteins rarely function in isolation Inside and outside cells, but operate as part of a highly Intercon-nected cellular network called the interaction network. Therefore, the analysis of the properties of drug-target proteins in the biological network is especially helpful for understanding the mechanism of drug action In terms of informatice. At present, no detailed characterization and description of the topological features of drug-target proteins have been available in the human protein-protein interac-tion network. In this work, by mapping the drug-targets in DrugBank onto the interaction network of human proteins, five topological indices of drug-targets were analyzed and compared with those of the whole protein interactome set and the non-drug-target set. The experimental results showed that drug-target proteins have higher connectivity and quicker communication with each other in the PPI network. Based on these features, all proteins In the interaction network were ranked. The results showed that, of the top 100 proteins, 48 are covered by DrugBank; of the remaining 52 proteins, 9 are drug-target proteins covered by the TTD, Matador and other databases, while others have been dem-onstrated to be drug-target proteins in the literature.

  6. MAGNETIC MICROSPHERES AS A TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM : A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TARUN PATEL

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The in-vivo targeting of tumors with magnetic microspheres is currently realized through the applicationof external non-uniform magnetic fields generated by rare-earth permanent magnets or electromagnets.This technique can be applied to magnetically targeted cancer therapy, magnetic embolization therapywith magnetic particles that contain anticancer agent, such as chemotherapeutic drugs or therapeuticradioisotopes. Drug targeting is one way of local or regional antitumor treatment. Magneticallycontrolled drug targeting is one of the various possible ways of drug targeting. This technology is basedon binding establish anticancer drug with ferrofluids that concentrate the drug in the area of interest(tumor site by means of magnetic fields. There has been keen interest in the development of amagnetically target drug delivery system. These drug delivery systems aims to deliver the drug at a ratedirected by the needs of the body during the period of treatment, and target the activity entity to the siteof action. This paper gives an overview of current application of magnetic microspheres (ferrofluid inconjunction with magnetic fields as they relate to the latest advances in medical application and inparticular to anticancer therapy and also discuss about mechanism of magnetic targeted delivery, drugrelease rate in-vitro, benefits and drawbacks of magnetic targeting.

  7. Multi-Target Drugs: The Trend of Drug Research and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Pan, Wei; Hu, Yuan-Jia; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2012-01-01

    Summarizing the status of drugs in the market and examining the trend of drug research and development is important in drug discovery. In this study, we compared the drug targets and the market sales of the new molecular entities approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration from January 2000 to December 2009. Two networks, namely, the target–target and drug–drug networks, have been set up using the network analysis tools. The multi-target drugs have much more potential, as shown by the n...

  8. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  9. Repurposing Drugs to Target the Diabetes Epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nigel; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Osborne, Brenna; Rogers, Suzanne; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Despite major investment by pharmaceutical companies in conventional drug discovery pipelines, development of new drugs has failed to keep up with the increasing incidence of many diseases, including type 2 diabetes (T2D). Drug repurposing, where existing drugs are applied to a new indication, is gaining momentum as a successful approach to overcome the bottlenecks commonly encountered with conventional approaches. Repurposing takes advantage of available information on the molecular pharmacology of clinical agents to drastically shorten drug development timelines. This review discusses recent advances in the discovery of new antidiabetic agents using repurposing strategies. PMID:26900045

  10. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Dong; Sun, Wei; Salas, Antonio; Antia, Avan; Carvajal, Cindy; Wang, Amy; Xu, Xin; Meng, Zhaojin; Zhou, Ming; Tawa, Gregory J.; Dehdashti, Jean; Zheng, Wei; Henderson, Christina M.; Zelazny, Adrian M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS) screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development. PMID:27486194

  11. Exploring drug-target interaction networks of illicit drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Atreya, Ravi V; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Background Drug addiction is a complex and chronic mental disease, which places a large burden on the American healthcare system due to its negative effects on patients and their families. Recently, network pharmacology is emerging as a promising approach to drug discovery by integrating network biology and polypharmacology, allowing for a deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms of drug actions at the systems level. This study seeks to apply this approach for investigation of illicit dru...

  12. Large-scale prediction of drug-target relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Michael; Campillos, Mónica; González, Paula;

    2008-01-01

    also provides a more global view on drug-target relations. Here we review recent attempts to apply large-scale computational analyses to predict novel interactions of drugs and targets from molecular and cellular features. In this context, we quantify the family-dependent probability of two proteins to...

  13. Hydrodynamic modeling of ferrofluid flow in magnetic targeting drug delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Han-dan; XU Wei; WANG Shi-gang; KE Zun-ji

    2008-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific locations within human body, magnetic drug targeting prevails due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Magnetic targeting drug delivery is a method of carrying drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles to a target tissue target under the applied magnetic field. This method increases the drug concentration in the target while reducing the adverse side-effects. Although there have been some theoretical analyses for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel. A mathematical model is presented to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. In this model, magnetic force and asymmetrical force are added, and an angular momentum equation of magnetic nanoparticles in the applied magnetic field is modeled. Engineering approximations are achieved by retaining the physically most significant items in the model due to the mathematical complexity of the motion equations. Numerical simulations are performed to obtain better insight into the theoretical model with computational fluid dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the important parameters leading to adequate drug delivery to the target site depending on the magnetic field intensity, which coincident with those of animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide important information and suggest strategies for improving delivery in clinical application.

  14. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Lu; Ye Li; Wei Wu

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modifi...

  15. NIOSOMES IN TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY : A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRAGNA GADHIYA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several years, treatment of infectious diseases and immunization has undergone aparadigm shift. Stemming from the nanobiotechnology research, not only a large number of diseasespecificbiologicals have been developed, but also enormous efforts have been made to effectivelydeliver these biologicals. Non-ionic surfactant vesicles (or niosomes are now widely studied asalternates to liposomes. Different novel approaches used for delivering these drugs include liposomes,Microspheres, nanotechnology, micro emulsions, antibody-loaded drug delivery, magneticMicrocapsules, implantable pumps and niosomes. Niosomes and liposomes are equiactive In drugdelivery potential and both increase drug efficacy as compared with that of free Drug. Niosomes arepreferred over liposomes because the former exhibit high chemical Stability and economy. Niosomes areself assembled vesicles composed primarily of synthetic surfactants and cholesterol. They are analogousin structure to the more widely studied liposomes formed from biologically derived phospholipids.Niosomes represent an emerging class of novel vesicular systems. Niosome formation requires thepresence of a particular class of amphiphile and aqueous solvent. In recent years a comprehensiveresearch carried over niosome as a drug carrier. Various drugs are enlisted and tried in niosomesurfactant vesicles. Niosome appears to be a Well preferred drug delivery system over liposome asniosome being stable and economic. Also niosomes have great drug delivery potential for targeteddelivery of anti-cancer, Anti-infective agents. Drug delivery potential of niosome can enhance by usingnovel Concepts like proniosomes, discomes and aspasome. Niosomes also serve better aid in diagnosticimaging and as a vaccine adjuvant.

  16. Identifying mechanism-of-action targets for drugs and probes

    OpenAIRE

    Gregori-Puigjané, Elisabet; Setola, Vincent; Hert, Jérôme; Crews, Brenda A.; Irwin, John J.; Lounkine, Eugen; Marnett, Lawrence; Roth, Bryan L.; Brian K Shoichet

    2012-01-01

    Notwithstanding their key roles in therapy and as biological probes, 7% of approved drugs are purported to have no known primary target, and up to 18% lack a well-defined mechanism of action. Using a chemoinformatics approach, we sought to “de-orphanize” drugs that lack primary targets. Surprisingly, targets could be easily predicted for many: Whereas these targets were not known to us nor to the common databases, most could be confirmed by literature search, leaving only 13 Food and Drug Adm...

  17. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro. (paper)

  18. Future target-based drug discovery for tuberculosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Bavesh Davandra; Karakousis, Petros C; Parish, Tanya; Dick, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    New drugs that retain potency against multidrug/extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with the additional benefit of a shortened treatment duration and ease of administration, are urgently needed by tuberculosis (TB) control programs. Efforts to develop this new generation of treatment interventions have been plagued with numerous problems, the most significant being our insufficient understanding of mycobacterial metabolism during disease. This, combined with limited chemical diversity and poor entry of small molecules into the cell, has limited the number of new bioactive agents that result from drug screening efforts. The biochemical, target-driven approach to drug development has been largely abandoned in the TB field, to be replaced by whole-cell or target-based whole-cell screening approaches. In this context, the properties of a good drug target are unclear, since these are directly determined by the ability to find compounds, using current screening algorithms, which are able to kill M. tuberculosis. In this review, we discuss issues related to the identification and validation of drug targets and highlight some key properties for promising targets. Some of these include essentiality for growth, vulnerability, druggability, reduced propensity to evolve drug resistance and target location to facilitate ready access to drugs during chemotherapy. We present these in the context of recent drugs that have emerged through various approaches with the aim of consolidating the knowledge gained from these experiences to inform future efforts. PMID:25458615

  19. Targeted liposomal drug delivery to monocytes and macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Ciara Kelly; Caroline Jefferies; Sally-Ann Cryan

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can ha...

  20. Drugs acting on central nervous system (CNS) targets as leads for non-CNS targets

    OpenAIRE

    Kharkar, Prashant S.

    2014-01-01

    Innovative drug discovery approaches are currently needed to rejuvenate the shrinking product pipelines of the pharmaceutical companies across the globe. Here a theme is presented – the use of central nervous system (CNS) drugs as leads for non-CNS targets. The approach is related to the use of existing drugs for new indications. Suitable chemical modifications of the CNS drugs abolish their CNS penetration. These novel analogs may then be screened for activity against non-CNS targets. Carefu...

  1. Polymeric micelles for solubilization and targeting of hydrophobic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focussed on the encapsulation of hydrophobic drugs into polymeric micelles and was intended to show the strengths and limitations of these self-assembling systems in terms of solubilization and drug targeting. Characterization of hydrophobic drug solubilization prior to intravenous injection was one of the key goals of this thesis. For this purpose a novel drug loading procedure was developed based on mechanistic considerations during the loading processes (Chapter 2). The cosolve...

  2. Drug Repurposing: Far Beyond New Targets for Old Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor; Mestres, J.

    2012-01-01

    Repurposing drugs requires finding novel therapeutic indications compared to the ones for which they were already approved. This is an increasingly utilized strategy for finding novel medicines, one that capitalizes on previous investments while derisking clinical activities. This approach is of...... repurposing, but may limit the commercial applications by patent applications. Certain clinical applications may be more feasible for repurposing than others because of marked differences in side effect tolerance. Other factors that ought to be considered when assessing drug repurposing opportunities include...

  3. Targeted drug induces responses in aggressive lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preliminary results from clinical trials in a subtype of lymphoma show that for a number of patients whose disease was not cured by other treatments, the drug ibrutinib can provide significant anti-cancer responses with modest side effects.

  4. Drug Discovery Targeted to Transthyretin Related Amyloidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Blasi Pérez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    [eng] Several drug discovery approaches has been performed to find new compounds able to interact with high affinity with the hormone binding site of the homotetrameric protein transthyretin (TTR), and stabilize this tetramer, becoming drug candidates to treat several rare amyloid diseases associated with TTR. With this aim, several computational workflows and chemico-biological databases have been developed, and in collaboration with two experimental research laboratories of our TTR Con...

  5. Systematic identification of synergistic drug pairs targeting HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xu; Hu, Long; Luquette, Lovelace J; Gao, Geng; Liu, Yifang; Qu, Hongjing; Xi, Ruibin; Lu, Zhi John; Park, Peter J; Elledge, Stephen J

    2012-11-01

    The systematic identification of effective drug combinations has been hindered by the unavailability of methods that can explore the large combinatorial search space of drug interactions. Here we present multiplex screening for interacting compounds (MuSIC), which expedites the comprehensive assessment of pairwise compound interactions. We examined ∼500,000 drug pairs from 1,000 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved or clinically tested drugs and identified drugs that synergize to inhibit HIV replication. Our analysis reveals an enrichment of anti-inflammatory drugs in drug combinations that synergize against HIV. As inflammation accompanies HIV infection, these findings indicate that inhibiting inflammation could curb HIV propagation. Multiple drug pairs identified in this study, including various glucocorticoids and nitazoxanide (NTZ), synergize by targeting different steps in the HIV life cycle. MuSIC can be applied to a wide variety of disease-relevant screens to facilitate efficient identification of compound combinations. PMID:23064238

  6. Chemical proteomics: terra incognita for novel drug target profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ce Bian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for new therapeutic strategies in the medical and pharmaceutic fields has resulted in a pressing need for novel druggable targets. Paradoxically, however, the targets of certain drugs that are already widely used in clinical practice have largely not been annotated. Because the pharmacologic effects of a drug can only be appreciated when its interactions with cellular components are clearly delineated, an integrated deconvolution of drug-target interactions for each drug is necessary. The emerging field of chemical proteomics represents a powerful mass spectrometry (MS-based affinity chromatography approach for identifying proteome-wide small molecule-protein interactions and mapping these interactions to signaling and metabolic pathways. This technique could comprehensively characterize drug targets, profile the toxicity of known drugs, and identify possible off-target activities. With the use of this technique, candidate drug molecules could be optimized, and predictable side effects might consequently be avoided. Herein, we provide a holistic overview of the major chemical proteomic approaches and highlight recent advances in this area as well as its potential applications in drug discovery.

  7. What makes a good anti-inflammatory drug target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, David L

    2006-03-01

    This review focuses on the major, 'successful' target families in inflammation and attempts to identify some of the key features of what makes a good anti-inflammatory target. The review is based on a systematic analysis of approved anti-inflammatory drugs grouped according to their drug-target family. The cytokine family is a drug-dense area. They have yielded and continue to yield a rich stream of drugs. As in other therapeutic areas, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), also known as seven-transmembrane pass receptors, have provided significant drug targets. In addition, the superfamilies of cell adhesion molecules and co-stimulatory molecules, which have special relevance to immune processes, have begun to provide the first approved drugs and might yield many more. The recent, rapid increase in the number of defined targets in the immune system -- leukocyte surface antigens, cytokines, GPCRs, adhesion molecules and co-stimulatory molecules -- will ensure a rich stream of future anti-inflammatory drug targets. PMID:16580598

  8. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com . PMID:27167132

  9. Leveraging Big Data to Transform Target Selection and Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Butte, AJ

    2016-01-01

    The advances of genomics, sequencing, and high throughput technologies have led to the creation of large volumes of diverse datasets for drug discovery. Analyzing these datasets to better understand disease and discover new drugs is becoming more common. Recent open data initiatives in basic and clinical research have dramatically increased the types of data available to the public. The past few years have witnessed successful use of big data in many sectors across the whole drug discovery pipeline. In this review, we will highlight the state of the art in leveraging big data to identify new targets, drug indications, and drug response biomarkers in this era of precision medicine. PMID:26659699

  10. Decorating Nanoparticle Surface for Targeted Drug Delivery: Opportunities and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiqiang Shen; Mu-Ping Nieh; Ying Li

    2016-01-01

    The size, shape, stiffness (composition) and surface properties of nanoparticles (NPs) have been recognized as key design parameters for NP-mediated drug delivery platforms. Among them, the surface functionalization of NPs is of great significance for targeted drug delivery. For instance, targeting moieties are covalently coated on the surface of NPs to improve their selectively and affinity to cancer cells. However, due to a broad range of possible choices of surface decorating molecules, it...

  11. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on ocular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Miki; Asai, Tomohiro; Oku, Naoto; Araki, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Minoru; Ebihara, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Poor drug delivery to lesions in patients' eyes is a major obstacle to the treatment of ocular diseases. The accessibility of these areas to drugs is highly restricted by the presence of barriers, including the corneal barrier, aqueous barrier, and the inner and outer blood-retinal barriers. In particular, the posterior segment is difficult to reach for drugs because of its structural peculiarities. This review discusses various barriers to drug delivery and provides comprehensive information for designing nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery systems for the treatment of ocular diseases. Nanoparticles can be designed to improve penetration, controlled release, and drug targeting. As highlighted in this review, the therapeutic efficacy of drugs in ocular diseases has been reported to be enhanced by the use of nanoparticles such as liposomes, micro/nanospheres, microemulsions, and dendrimers. Our recent data show that intravitreal injection of targeted liposomes encapsulating an angiogenesis inhibitor caused significantly greater suppression of choroidal neovascularization than did the injection of free drug. Recent progress in ocular drug delivery systems research has provided new insights into drug development, and the use of nanoparticles for drug delivery is thus a promising approach for advanced therapy of ocular diseases. PMID:23439842

  12. Tumor targeting using liposomal antineoplastic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Jörg Huwyler; Jürgen Drewe; Stephan Krähenbühl

    2008-01-01

    Jörg Huwyler1, Jürgen Drewe2, Stephan Krähenbühl21University of Applied Sciences Northwestern Switzerland, Institute of Pharma Technology, Muttenz, Switzerland; 2Department of Research and Division of Clinical Pharmacology, University Hospital Basel, Basel, SwitzerlandAbstract: During the last years, liposomes (microparticulate phospholipid vesicles) have beenused with growing success as pharmaceutical carriers for antineoplastic drugs. Fields of applicatio...

  13. Sequencing targeting insurgents and drugs in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Farrell, Michelle L.

    2007-01-01

    Colombia President Pastrana President Uribe Drug Trade Coca Counter-narcotics FARC FARC-EP Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia Government of Colombia Insurgency Terrorism Plan Colombia Plan Patriota Demilitarized Zone Democratic Defense and Security Policy DSP Peru's success in first defeating the Shining Path guerrilla movement in the early 1990s and then reducing coca cultivation in the mid-1990s demonstrates the effectiveness of a s...

  14. REVIEW ON ADVANCES IN COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunena Sethi, SL Harikumar* and Nirmala

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The colon is the terminal part of the GIT which has gained in recent years as a potential site for delivery of various novel therapeutic drugs, i.e. peptides. However, colon is rich in microflora which can be used to target the drug release in the colon. Colon is a site where both local and systemic drug delivery can take place. Local delivery allows the topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. If drug can be targeted directly into the colon, treatment can become more effective and side effects can be minimized. These systemic side effects can be minimized by primary approaches for CDDS (Colon specific drug delivery namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems and microbially triggered system which gained limited success and have limitations as compared with recently new CDDS namely pressure controlled colon delivery capsules (PCDCS, CODESTM (Novel colon targeted delivery system osmotic controlled drug delivery system, Pulsincap system, time clock system, chronotropic system. This review is to understand the pharmaceutical approaches to colon targeted drug delivery systems for better therapeutic action without compromising on drug degradation (or its low bioavailability.

  15. Targeted drug delivery to magnetic implants for therapeutic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for locally targeted drug delivery is proposed that employs magnetic implants placed directly in the cardiovascular system to attract injected magnetic carriers. Theoretical simulations and experimental results support the assumption that using magnetic implants in combination with externally applied magnetic field will optimize the delivery of magnetic drug to selected sites within a subject

  16. Targeting anti-HIV drugs to the CNS

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Kavitha S.; Ghorpade, Anuja; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The development of antiretroviral drugs over the past couple of decades has been commendable due to the identification of several new targets within the overall Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) replication cycle. However, complete control over HIV/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome is yet to be achieved. This is because the current anti-HIV drugs, although effective in reducing plasma viral levels, cannot eradicate the virus completely from the body. This occurs because most anti-HIV drugs...

  17. Design of Nanoparticle-Based Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaojiao Yu; Ian Trase; Muqing Ren; Kayla Duval; Xing Guo; Zi Chen

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown promise as both drug delivery vehicles and direct antitumor systems, but they must be properly designed in order to maximize efficacy. Computational modeling is often used both to design new nanoparticles and to better understand existing ones. Modeled processes include the release of drugs at the tumor site and the physical interaction between the nanoparticle and cancer cells. In this paper, we provide an overview of three different targeted drug delivery methods (p...

  18. Prediction of drug-target interactions for drug repositioning only based on genomic expression similarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejian Wang

    Full Text Available Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI. However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore developed to predict DTI with high throughput biological and clinical data. Here, we initiatively demonstrate that the on-target and off-target effects could be characterized by drug-induced in vitro genomic expression changes, e.g. the data in Connectivity Map (CMap. Thus, unknown ligands of a certain target can be found from the compounds showing high gene-expression similarity to the known ligands. Then to clarify the detailed practice of CMap based DTI prediction, we objectively evaluate how well each target is characterized by CMap. The results suggest that (1 some targets are better characterized than others, so the prediction models specific to these well characterized targets would be more accurate and reliable; (2 in some cases, a family of ligands for the same target tend to interact with common off-targets, which may help increase the efficiency of DTI discovery and explain the mechanisms of complicated drug actions. In the present study, CMap expression similarity is proposed as a novel indicator of drug-target interactions. The detailed strategies of improving data quality by decreasing the batch effect and building prediction models are also effectively established. We believe the success in CMap can be further translated into other public and commercial data of genomic expression, thus increasing research productivity towards valid drug repositioning and minimal side effects.

  19. "Nanotheranostics" for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Peng

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique is a promising tool that improves cancer detection, facilitates diagnosis and monitors therapeutic effects. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have emerged as MRI contrast agents for tumor imaging and as potential vectors for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery; nevertheless, the application of SPIOs has been hampered due to a lack of specificity to tumor tissues and premature drug release. This project aims at developing multifunctional SPIOs for both cancer imaging and targeted drug delivery via conjugation of tumor specific antibodies with SPIOs. The application of anti-TAG-72 antibodies as tumor targeting modalities was evaluated in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in xenograft models by using fluorescent imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It was demonstrated that antibody-labeled SPIOs were superior imaging agents and drug carriers for increased tumor specificity. The regulation and kinetics of intracellular drug release from SPIOs were explored by means of fluorescence imaging. In vitro and in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging was employed to investigate the mechanisms of premature drug release from nanocarriers. The large volume and high hydrophobicity of cell membranes were found to play an important role in premature drug release. The encapsulation of SPIOs into nanocarriers decreased drug release in a dose-dependent mode. This study provided future opportunities to improve the efficiency of nanocarriers by exploring the mechanism of drug release and disassembly of SPIO-loaded polymeric nanoparticles.

  20. Predicting drug-target interaction for new drugs using enhanced similarity measures and super-target clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian-Yu; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Li, Yiming; Leung, Henry C M; Chin, Francis Y L

    2015-07-15

    Predicting drug-target interaction using computational approaches is an important step in drug discovery and repositioning. To predict whether there will be an interaction between a drug and a target, most existing methods identify similar drugs and targets in the database. The prediction is then made based on the known interactions of these drugs and targets. This idea is promising. However, there are two shortcomings that have not yet been addressed appropriately. Firstly, most of the methods only use 2D chemical structures and protein sequences to measure the similarity of drugs and targets respectively. However, this information may not fully capture the characteristics determining whether a drug will interact with a target. Secondly, there are very few known interactions, i.e. many interactions are "missing" in the database. Existing approaches are biased towards known interactions and have no good solutions to handle possibly missing interactions which affect the accuracy of the prediction. In this paper, we enhance the similarity measures to include non-structural (and non-sequence-based) information and introduce the concept of a "super-target" to handle the problem of possibly missing interactions. Based on evaluations on real data, we show that our similarity measure is better than the existing measures and our approach is able to achieve higher accuracy than the two best existing algorithms, WNN-GIP and KBMF2K. Our approach is available at http://web.hku.hk/∼liym1018/projects/drug/drug.html or http://www.bmlnwpu.org/us/tools/PredictingDTI_S2/METHODS.html. PMID:25957673

  1. Preclinical validation of Aurora kinases-targeting drugs in osteosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tavanti, E; Sero, V; Vella, S; M. Fanelli; Michelacci, F; Landuzzi, L; Magagnoli, G; Versteeg, R; Picci, P; Hattinger, C M; M. Serra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aurora kinases are key regulators of cell cycle and represent new promising therapeutic targets in several human tumours. Methods: Biological relevance of Aurora kinase-A and -B was assessed on osteosarcoma clinical samples and by silencing these genes with specific siRNA in three human osteosarcoma cell lines. In vitro efficacy of two Aurora kinases-targeting drugs (VX-680 and ZM447439) was evaluated on a panel of four drug-sensitive and six drug-resistant human osteosarcoma cell...

  2. Bacterial Sortase A as a drug target

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Sortase A is a housekeeping enzyme of Gram-positive bacteria that catalyses the anchoring of surface proteins to the bacterial peptidoglycan. The enzyme works to establish an interaction between bacteria and host cells and is essential for pathogenesis. This makes Sortase A a potential suitable target for inhibition, in order to treat bacterial infections. In this degree project Sortase A from Staphylococcus aureus was explored and potential inhibitors were investigated by performing enzyme a...

  3. Glial cells as drug targets: What does it take?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Thomas; Boddeke, Hendrikus W G M

    2016-10-01

    The last two decades have brought a significant increase in our understanding of glial biology and glial contribution to CNS disease. Yet, despite the fact that glial cells make up the majority of CNS cells, no drug specifically targeting glial cells is on the market. Given the long development times of CNS drugs, on average over 12 years, this is not completely surprising. However, there is increasing interest from academia and industry to exploit glial targets to develop drugs for the benefit of patients with currently limited or no therapeutic options. CNS drug development has a high attrition rate and has encountered many challenges. It seems unlikely that developing drugs against glial targets would be any less demanding. However, the knowledge generated in traditional CNS drug discovery teaches valuable lessons, which could enable the glial community to accelerate the cycle time from basic discovery to drug development. In this review we will discuss steps necessary to bring a "glial target idea" to a clinical development program. GLIA 2016;64:1742-1754. PMID:27121701

  4. Nanostructured materials for selective recognition and targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective recognition requires the introduction of a molecular memory into a polymer matrix in order to make it capable of rebinding an analyte with a very high specificity. In addition, targeted drug delivery requires drug-loaded vesicles which preferentially localize to the sites of injury and avoid uptake into uninvolved tissues. The rapid evolution of nanotechnology is aiming to fulfill the goal of selective recognition and optimal drug delivery through the development of molecularly imprinted polymeric (MIP) nanoparticles, tailor-made for a diverse range of analytes (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides, amino acids, etc.) and of nanostructured targeted drug carriers (e.g., liposomes and micelles) with increased circulation lifetimes. In the present study, PLGA microparticles containing multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), and MIP nanoparticles were synthesized to be employed as drug carriers and synthetic receptors respectively

  5. Novel colon targeted drug delivery system using natural polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel colon targeted tablet formulation was developed using pectin as carrier and diltiazem HCl and indomethacin as model drugs. The tablets were coated with inulin followed by shellac and were evaluated for average weight, hardness and coat thickness. In vitro release studies for prepared tablets were carried out for 2 h in pH 1.2 HCl buffer, 3 h in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer and 6 h in simulated colonic fluid. The drug release from the coated systems was monitored using UV/Vis spectroscopy. In vitro studies revealed that the tablets coated with inulin and shellac have limited the drug release in stomach and small intestinal environment and released maximum amount of drug in the colonic environment. The study revealed that polysaccharides as carriers and inulin and shellac as a coating material can be used effectively for colon targeting of both water soluble and insoluble drugs.

  6. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn M; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark A; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Rickman, David S; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-06-14

    Mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a computational drug-repositioning approach for targeting TF activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions, and a global drug-protein network analysis supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently overexpressed oncogenic TF, predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of electronic medical record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy for identifying drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  7. Drug bioactivation, covalent binding to target proteins and toxicity relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chan, Eli; Duan, Wei; Huang, Min; Chen, Yu-Zong

    2005-01-01

    A number of therapeutic drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action have been reported to undergo metabolic activation by Phase I or Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivation gives rise to reactive metabolites/intermediates, which readily confer covalent binding to various target proteins by nucleophilic substitution and/or Schiff's base mechanism. These drugs include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen), antibacterial agents (e.g., sulfonamides and macrolide antibiotics), anticancer drugs (e.g., irinotecan), antiepileptic drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), anti-HIV agents (e.g., ritonavir), antipsychotics (e.g., clozapine), cardiovascular drugs (e.g., procainamide and hydralazine), immunosupressants (e.g., cyclosporine A), inhalational anesthetics (e.g., halothane), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDSs) (e.g., diclofenac), and steroids and their receptor modulators (e.g., estrogens and tamoxifen). Some herbal and dietary constituents are also bioactivated to reactive metabolites capable of binding covalently and inactivating cytochrome P450s (CYPs). A number of important target proteins of drugs have been identified by mass spectrometric techniques and proteomic approaches. The covalent binding and formation of drug-protein adducts are generally considered to be related to drug toxicity, and selective protein covalent binding by drug metabolites may lead to selective organ toxicity. However, the mechanisms involved in the protein adduct-induced toxicity are largely undefined, although it has been suggested that drug-protein adducts may cause toxicity either through impairing physiological functions of the modified proteins or through immune-mediated mechanisms. In addition, mechanism-based inhibition of CYPs may result in toxic drug-drug interactions. The clinical consequences of drug bioactivation and covalent binding to proteins are unpredictable, depending on many factors that are associated with the administered drugs and patients

  8. Membrane lipidomics for the discovery of new antiparasitic drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchal, Eric; Riou, Mickaël; Kerboeuf, Dominique; Beugnet, Frédéric; Chaminade, Pierre; Loiseau, Philippe M

    2011-11-01

    Advances in lipid separation methods and mass spectrometry technologies allow the fine characterization of the lipidome of parasites, ranging from unicellular protists to worms, which cause threatening infections in vertebrates, including humans. Specific lipid structures or lipid metabolic pathways can inspire the development of novel antiparasitic drugs. Changes in the lipid balance in membranes of parasites can also provide clues on the dynamics of drugs and some mechanisms of drug resistance. This review highlights recent trends in parasite lipidomics, combined with functional analyses, for the discovery of novel targets and the development of novel drugs. PMID:21862412

  9. Drug Elucidation: Invertebrate Genetics Sheds New Light on the Molecular Targets of CNS Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donard S. Dwyer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Many important drugs approved to treat common human diseases were discovered by serendipity, without a firm understanding of their modes of action. As a result, the side effects and interactions of these medications are often unpredictable, and there is limited guidance for improving the design of next-generation drugs. Here, we review the innovative use of simple model organisms, especially Caenorhabditis elegans, to gain fresh insights into the complex biological effects of approved CNS medications. Whereas drug discovery involves the identification of new drug targets and lead compounds/biologics, and drug development spans preclinical testing to FDA approval, drug elucidation refers to the process of understanding the mechanisms of action of marketed drugs by studying their novel effects in model organisms. Drug elucidation studies have revealed new pathways affected by antipsychotic drugs, e.g., the insulin signaling pathway, a trace amine receptor and a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Similarly, novel targets of antidepressant drugs and lithium have been identified in C. elegans, including lipid-binding/transport proteins and the SGK-1 signaling pathway, respectively. Elucidation of the mode of action of anesthetic agents has shown that anesthesia can involve mitochondrial targets, leak currents and gap junctions. The general approach reviewed in this article has advanced our knowledge about important drugs for CNS disorders and can guide future drug discovery efforts.

  10. Drug treatment and novel drug target against Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargala G.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis emergence triggered the screening of many compounds for potential anti-cryptosporidial activity in which the majority were ineffective. The outbreak of cryptosporidiosis which occurred in Milwaukee in 1993 was not only the first significant emergence of Cryptosporidium spp. as a major human pathogen but also a huge waterborne outbreak thickening thousands of people from a major city in North America. Since then, outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis are regularly occurring throughout the world. New drugs against this parasite became consequently urgently needed. Among the most commonly used treatments against cryptosporidiosis are paromomycin, and azithromycin, which are partially effective. Nitazoxanide (NTZ’s effectiveness was demonstrated in vitro, and in vivo using several animal models and finally in clinical trials. It significantly shortened the duration of diarrhea and decreased mortality in adults and in malnourished children. NTZ is not effective without an appropriate immune response. In AIDS patients, combination therapy restoring immunity along with antimicrobial treatment of Cryptosporidium infection is necessary. Recent investigations focused on the potential of molecular-based immunotherapy against this parasite. Others tested the effects of probiotic bacteria, but were unable to demonstrate eradication of C. parvum. New synthetic isoflavone derivatives demonstrated excellent activity against C. parvum in vitro and in a gerbil model of infection. Newly synthesized nitroor non nitro- thiazolide compounds, derived from NTZ, have been recently shown to be at least as effective as NTZ against C. parvum in vitro development and are promising new therapeutic agents.

  11. Genomes2Drugs: identifies target proteins and lead drugs from proteome data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Toomey, David

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome sequencing and bioinformatics have provided the full hypothetical proteome of many pathogenic organisms. Advances in microarray and mass spectrometry have also yielded large output datasets of possible target proteins\\/genes. However, the challenge remains to identify new targets for drug discovery from this wealth of information. Further analysis includes bioinformatics and\\/or molecular biology tools to validate the findings. This is time consuming and expensive, and could fail to yield novel drugs if protein purification and crystallography is impossible. To pre-empt this, a researcher may want to rapidly filter the output datasets for proteins that show good homology to proteins that have already been structurally characterised or proteins that are already targets for known drugs. Critically, those researchers developing novel antibiotics need to select out the proteins that show close homology to any human proteins, as future inhibitors are likely to cross-react with the host protein, causing off-target toxicity effects later in clinical trials. METHODOLOGY\\/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve many of these issues, we have developed a free online resource called Genomes2Drugs which ranks sequences to identify proteins that are (i) homologous to previously crystallized proteins or (ii) targets of known drugs, but are (iii) not homologous to human proteins. When tested using the Plasmodium falciparum malarial genome the program correctly enriched the ranked list of proteins with known drug target proteins. CONCLUSIONS\\/SIGNIFICANCE: Genomes2Drugs rapidly identifies proteins that are likely to succeed in drug discovery pipelines. This free online resource helps in the identification of potential drug targets. Importantly, the program further highlights proteins that are likely to be inhibited by FDA-approved drugs. These drugs can then be rapidly moved into Phase IV clinical studies under \\'change-of-application\\' patents.

  12. Large-scale prediction of drug-target interactions using protein sequences and drug topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Dongsheng [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu Shao [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Xu Qingsong [School of Mathematical Sciences and Computing Technology, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Lu Hongmei; Huang Jianhua [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu Qiannan [Key Laboratory of Combinatorial Biosynthesis and Drug Discovery (Wuhan University), Ministry of Education, and Wuhan University School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Liang Yizeng, E-mail: yizeng_liang@263.net [Research Center of Modernization of Traditional Chinese Medicines, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2012-11-08

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Drug-target interactions are predicted using an extended SAR methodology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A drug-target interaction is regarded as an event triggered by many factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular fingerprint and CTD descriptors are used to represent drugs and proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our approach shows compatibility between the new scheme and current SAR methodology. - Abstract: The identification of interactions between drugs and target proteins plays a key role in the process of genomic drug discovery. It is both consuming and costly to determine drug-target interactions by experiments alone. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new in silico prediction approaches capable of identifying these potential drug-target interactions in a timely manner. In this article, we aim at extending current structure-activity relationship (SAR) methodology to fulfill such requirements. In some sense, a drug-target interaction can be regarded as an event or property triggered by many influence factors from drugs and target proteins. Thus, each interaction pair can be represented theoretically by using these factors which are based on the structural and physicochemical properties simultaneously from drugs and proteins. To realize this, drug molecules are encoded with MACCS substructure fingerings representing existence of certain functional groups or fragments; and proteins are encoded with some biochemical and physicochemical properties. Four classes of drug-target interaction networks in humans involving enzymes, ion channels, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM models gave prediction accuracy of 90.31%, 88.91%, 84.68% and 83.74% for four datasets, respectively. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to predict the drug-target

  13. Process Modeling of Ferrofluids Flowfor Magnetic Targeting Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Handan; WANG Shigang; XU Wei

    2009-01-01

    Among the proposed techniques for delivering drugs to specific sites within the human body, magnetic targeting drug delivery surpasses due to its non-invasive character and its high targeting efficiency. Although there have been some analyses theoretically for magnetic drug targeting, very few researchers have addressed the hydrodynamic models of magnetic fluids in the blood vessel of human body. This paper presents a mathematical model to describe the hydrodynamics of ferrofluids as drug carriers flowing in a blood vessel under the applied magnetic field. A 3D flow field of magnetic particles in a blood vessel model is numerically simulated in order to further understand clinical application of magnetic targeting drug delivery. Simulation results show that magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a target region depending on the applied magnetic field intensity. Magnetic resonance imaging conftrms the enrichment of ferrofluids in a desired body tissue of Sprague-Dawley rats. The simulation results coincide with those animal experiments. Results of the analysis provide the important information and can suggest strategies for improving delivery in favor of the clinical application.

  14. Liposomes and nanotechnology in drug development: focus on ocular targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Miki Honda,1 Tomohiro Asai,2 Naoto Oku,2 Yoshihiko Araki,3 Minoru Tanaka,1 Nobuyuki Ebihara11Department of Ophthalmology, Juntendo University Urayasu Hospital, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Medical Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, Shizuoka, Japan; 3Institute for Environmental and Gender-Specific Medicine, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, JapanAbstract: Poor drug delivery to lesions in patients' eyes is a major obstacle to the treatment of ocular diseases. The accessibility of these areas to drugs is highly restricted by the presence of barriers, including the corneal barrier, aqueous barrier, and the inner and outer blood–retinal barriers. In particular, the posterior segment is difficult to reach for drugs because of its structural peculiarities. This review discusses various barriers to drug delivery and provides comprehensive information for designing nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery systems for the treatment of ocular diseases. Nanoparticles can be designed to improve penetration, controlled release, and drug targeting. As highlighted in this review, the therapeutic efficacy of drugs in ocular diseases has been reported to be enhanced by the use of nanoparticles such as liposomes, micro/nanospheres, microemulsions, and dendrimers. Our recent data show that intravitreal injection of targeted liposomes encapsulating an angiogenesis inhibitor caused significantly greater suppression of choroidal neovascularization than did the injection of free drug. Recent progress in ocular drug delivery systems research has provided new insights into drug development, and the use of nanoparticles for drug delivery is thus a promising approach for advanced therapy of ocular diseases.Keywords: intravitreal injection, drug delivery system, age-related macular degeneration, APRPG-modified PEGylated liposome, DDS

  15. Quantitative targeting maps based on experimental investigations for a branched tube model in magnetic drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitter, K., E-mail: kurt.gitter@tu-dresden.de [TU Dresden, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Odenbach, S. [TU Dresden, Institute of Fluid Mechanics, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    Magnetic drug targeting (MDT), because of its high targeting efficiency, is a promising approach for tumour treatment. Unwanted side effects are considerably reduced, since the nanoparticles are concentrated within the target region due to the influence of a magnetic field. Nevertheless, understanding the transport phenomena of nanoparticles in an artery system is still challenging. This work presents experimental results for a branched tube model. Quantitative results describe, for example, the net amount of nanoparticles that are targeted towards the chosen region due to the influence of a magnetic field. As a result of measurements, novel drug targeting maps, combining, e.g. the magnetic volume force, the position of the magnet and the net amount of targeted nanoparticles, are presented. The targeting maps are valuable for evaluation and comparison of setups and are also helpful for the design and the optimisation of a magnet system with an appropriate strength and distribution of the field gradient. The maps indicate the danger of accretion within the tube and also show the promising result of magnetic drug targeting that up to 97% of the nanoparticles were successfully targeted. - Highlights: > Quantitative targeting maps summarise a series of measurements. > Targeting maps combine quantitative data, magnetic volume forces and magnet position. > Here, up to 97% of injected particles were targeted towards the tumour region. > High concentration of injected ferrofluid brings the danger of accretion. > Low miscibility of ferrofluid by water modelling the blood flow is detected.

  16. Di/tri-peptide transporters as drug delivery targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C U; Brodin, Birger

    2003-01-01

    -dependent, and the transporters thus belong to the Proton-dependent Oligopeptide Transporter (POT)-family. The transporters are not drug targets per se, however due to their uniquely broad substrate specificity; they have proved to be relevant drug targets at the level of drug transport. Drug molecules such as...... oral active beta-lactam antibiotics, bestatin, prodrugs of aciclovir and ganciclovir have oral bioavailabilities, which largely are a result of their interaction with PepT1. In the last few years an increasing number of studies concerned with regulation of di/tri-peptide transporter capacity have...... the level of increased gene transcription. PepT1-mediated transport is up-regulated by short-term exposure to receptor agonists such as EGF, insulin, leptin, and clonidine, and down-regulated by VIP. Overall, the regulation of di/tri-peptide transport may be contributed to 1) changes in apical proton...

  17. Targeted drug delivery by ultrasound-triggered margination of microbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Guckenberger, Achim

    2016-01-01

    The ideal agent for targeted drug delivery should stay away from the biochemically active walls of the blood vessels during circulation. However, upon reaching its target it should attain a near-wall position. Though seemingly contradictory, we show that coated microbubbles (ultrasound contrast agents) possess precisely these two properties. Using numerical simulations we find that application of a localized ultrasound pulse at the target organ triggers their rapid migration from the vessel center toward the endothelial wall. This ultrasound-triggered margination is due to hydrodynamic interactions between the red blood cells and the oscillating bubbles. Importantly, we find that the effect is very robust, existing even if the duration in the stiff state is five times lower than the opposing time in the soft state. Our results might also explain why recent in-vivo studies found strongly enhanced drug uptake by co-administration of microbubbles with classical drug delivery agents.

  18. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciara Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS, particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation.

  19. Nanomechanics of Drug-target Interactions and Antibacterial Resistance Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Ndieyira, J. W.; Watari, M.; McKendry, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    The cantilever sensor, which acts as a transducer of reactions between model bacterial cell wall matrix immobilized on its surface and antibiotic drugs in solution, has shown considerable potential in biochemical sensing applications with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity(1-5). The drug-target interactions generate surface stress, causing the cantilever to bend, and the signal can be analyzed optically when it is illuminated by a laser. The change in surface stress measured with nano-...

  20. Targeting dengue virus NS4B protein for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xuping; Zou, Jing; Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-06-01

    The flavivirus nonstructural 4B protein (NS4B) has recently emerged as a valid antiviral target for drug discovery. Here we review (i) the current understanding of the structure and function of DENV NS4B, (ii) the approaches that have been taken to identify NS4B inhibitors, and (iii) the known inhibitors of flavivirus NS4B protein. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on flavivirus drug discovery. PMID:25796970

  1. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications Imaging, Targeting, and Delivery

    CERN Document Server

    Prud'homme, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book clearly demonstrates the progression of nanoparticle therapeutics from basic research to applications. Unlike other books covering nanoparticles used in medical applications, Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications presents the medical challenges that can be reduced or even overcome by recent advances in nanoscale drug delivery. Each chapter highlights recent progress in the design and engineering of select multifunctional nanoparticles with topics covering targeting, imaging, delivery, diagnostics, and therapy.

  2. Targeting protein kinases in the malaria parasite: update of an antimalarial drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Veronica M; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C

    2012-01-01

    Millions of deaths each year are attributed to malaria worldwide. Transmitted through the bite of an Anopheles mosquito, infection and subsequent death from the Plasmodium species, most notably P. falciparum, can readily spread through a susceptible population. A malaria vaccine does not exist and resistance to virtually every antimalarial drug predicts that mortality and morbidity associated with this disease will increase. With only a few antimalarial drugs currently in the pipeline, new therapeutic options and novel chemotypes are desperately needed. Hit-to-Lead diversity may successfully provide novel inhibitory scaffolds when essential enzymes are targeted, for example, the plasmodial protein kinases. Throughout the entire life cycle of the malaria parasite, protein kinases are essential for growth and development. Ongoing efforts continue to characterize these kinases, while simultaneously pursuing them as antimalarial drug targets. A collection of structural data, inhibitory profiles and target validation has set the foundation and support for targeting the malarial kinome. Pursuing protein kinases as cancer drug targets has generated a wealth of information on the inhibitory strategies that can be useful for antimalarial drug discovery. In this review, progress on selected protein kinases is described. As the search for novel antimalarials continues, an understanding of the phosphor-regulatory pathways will not only validate protein kinase targets, but also will identify novel chemotypes to thwart malaria drug resistance. PMID:22242850

  3. Identifying problematic drugs based on the characteristics of their targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Jose eDa Silva Lopes

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Identifying promising compounds during the early stages of drug development is a major challenge for both academia and the pharmaceutical industry. The difficulties are even more pronounced when we consider multi-target pharmacology, where the compounds often target more than one protein, or multiple compounds are used together. Here, we address this problem by using machine learning and network analysis to process sequence and interaction data from human proteins to identify promising compounds. We used this strategy to identify properties that make certain proteins more likely to cause harmful effects when targeted; such proteins usually have domains commonly found throughout the human proteome. Additionally, since currently marketed drugs hit multiple targets simultaneously, we combined the information from individual proteins to devise a score that quantifies the likelihood of a compound being harmful to humans. This approach enabled us to distinguish between approved and problematic drugs with an accuracy of 60%¬–70%. Moreover, our approach can be applied as soon as candidate drugs are available, as demonstrated with predictions for more than 5000 experimental drugs. These resources are available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/psin/.

  4. The concept of focused magnet for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A special focused magnet, designed for the use in the magnetic targeted drug delivery system, was constructed. The theoretical calculation of the adhesion condition for a magnetic fluid drop in magnetic field with obtained design showed that the constructed focused magnet generates a sufficient magnetic force for the capture of a magnetic drop on the vessel wall and can be used 2.5-3 cm deeper in an organism compared with the prism permanent magnet which could enable the non-invasivity of the magnetic drug targeting procedure. The maximal values for the magnetic field and gradient of the magnetic field are 0.38 T and 101 T/m

  5. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  6. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references

  7. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  8. Development of magnetically targeted drug delivery system using superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of a novel drug delivery system was made to accumulate/navigate magnetic drugs with the help of a superconducting magnet in order to control the drugs in blood vessels located deep inside the body. In the present paper, we tested the feasibility of a novel navigation system, made by applying a strong external (magnetic) field through SmBaCuO and YBaCuO bulk superconductors in order to realize the practice of using externally applied magnetic fields for targeting the magnetic particles to a circumscribed body region

  9. Polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery and targeting: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan Jawahar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many modern technologies have been established in the pharmaceutical research and development area. The field of nanotechnology has been revolutionary as substantial and technical, and scientific growth, in basic sciences plus manipulation by physical or chemical process of individual atoms and molecules have widened its horizon. Polymeric nanoparticles with a size in the nanometer range protect drugs against in vitro and in vivo degradation; it releases the drug in a controlled manner and also offers the possibility of drug targeting. The use of polymeric drug nanoparticles is a universal approach to increase the therapeutic performance of poorly soluble drugs in any route of administration. The present review discusses the physico-chemical properties of polymeric nanoparticles, production methods, routes of administration and potential therapeutic applications.

  10. Prediction of drug-target interactions and drug repositioning via network-based inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiong Cheng

    Full Text Available Drug-target interaction (DTI is the basis of drug discovery and design. It is time consuming and costly to determine DTI experimentally. Hence, it is necessary to develop computational methods for the prediction of potential DTI. Based on complex network theory, three supervised inference methods were developed here to predict DTI and used for drug repositioning, namely drug-based similarity inference (DBSI, target-based similarity inference (TBSI and network-based inference (NBI. Among them, NBI performed best on four benchmark data sets. Then a drug-target network was created with NBI based on 12,483 FDA-approved and experimental drug-target binary links, and some new DTIs were further predicted. In vitro assays confirmed that five old drugs, namely montelukast, diclofenac, simvastatin, ketoconazole, and itraconazole, showed polypharmacological features on estrogen receptors or dipeptidyl peptidase-IV with half maximal inhibitory or effective concentration ranged from 0.2 to 10 µM. Moreover, simvastatin and ketoconazole showed potent antiproliferative activities on human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in MTT assays. The results indicated that these methods could be powerful tools in prediction of DTIs and drug repositioning.

  11. Targeting Antibacterial Agents by Using Drug-Carrying Filamentous Bacteriophages

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoby, Iftach; Shamis, Marina; Bar, Hagit; Shabat, Doron; Benhar, Itai

    2006-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been used for more than a century for (unconventional) therapy of bacterial infections, for half a century as tools in genetic research, for 2 decades as tools for discovery of specific target-binding proteins, and for nearly a decade as tools for vaccination or as gene delivery vehicles. Here we present a novel application of filamentous bacteriophages (phages) as targeted drug carriers for the eradication of (pathogenic) bacteria. The phages are genetically modified to d...

  12. In silico search of DNA drugs targeting oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Triplex forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent a class of drug candidates for antigene therapy. Based on strict criteria, we investigated the potential of 25 known oncogenes to be regulated by TFOs in the mRNA synthesis level and we report specific target sequences found in seven of these genes. PMID:23221090

  13. The tuberculosis drug discovery and development pipeline and emerging drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdluli, Khisimuzi; Kaneko, Takushi; Upton, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The recent accelerated approval for use in extensively drug-resistant and multidrug-resistant-tuberculosis (MDR-TB) of two first-in-class TB drugs, bedaquiline and delamanid, has reinvigorated the TB drug discovery and development field. However, although several promising clinical development programs are ongoing to evaluate new TB drugs and regimens, the number of novel series represented is few. The global early-development pipeline is also woefully thin. To have a chance of achieving the goal of better, shorter, safer TB drug regimens with utility against drug-sensitive and drug-resistant disease, a robust and diverse global TB drug discovery pipeline is key, including innovative approaches that make use of recently acquired knowledge on the biology of TB. Fortunately, drug discovery for TB has resurged in recent years, generating compounds with varying potential for progression into developable leads. In parallel, advances have been made in understanding TB pathogenesis. It is now possible to apply the lessons learned from recent TB hit generation efforts and newly validated TB drug targets to generate the next wave of TB drug leads. Use of currently underexploited sources of chemical matter and lead-optimization strategies may also improve the efficiency of future TB drug discovery. Novel TB drug regimens with shorter treatment durations must target all subpopulations of Mycobacterium tuberculosis existing in an infection, including those responsible for the protracted TB treatment duration. This review summarizes the current TB drug development pipeline and proposes strategies for generating improved hits and leads in the discovery phase that could help achieve this goal. PMID:25635061

  14. On practicability of NGA as carrier of hepatic targeting drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) is a synthetic ligand specific for the hepatic binding protein (HBP) receptor, which resides at the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. We used NGA as a carrier of hepatic targeting drugs and coupled NGA with nortriptyline and primaquine respectively by succinyl bridge to obtain model compounds NGA-nortriptyline and NGA-primaquine. Both coupled compounds were labelled with 99mTc. The scintigraphy showed that both coupled compounds had remarkable liver taxis. The result of HPLC revealed that the coupled compound was stable in blood and the carried drug was released at liver in the tested rabbit. We think that NGA is a excellent carrier of hepatic targeting drugs

  15. Functional and mechanistic analysis of telomerase: An antitumor drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yinnan; Zhang, Yanmin

    2016-07-01

    The current research on anticancer drugs focuses on exploiting particular traits or hallmarks unique to cancer cells. Telomerase, a special reverse transcriptase, has been recognized as a common factor in most tumor cells, and in turn a distinctive characteristic with respect to non-malignant cells. This feature has made telomerase a preferred target for anticancer drug development and cancer therapy. This review aims to analyze the pharmacological function and mechanism and role of telomerase in oncogenesis; to provide fundamental knowledge for research on the structure, function, and working mechanism of telomerase; to expound the role that telomerase plays in the initiation and development of tumor and its relationship with tumor cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and related pathway molecules; and to display potential targets of antitumor drug for inhibiting the expression, reconstitution, and trafficking of the enzyme. We therefore summarize recent advances in potential telomerase inhibitors for antitumor including natural products, synthetic small molecules, peptides and proteins, which indicate that optimizing the delivery method and drug combination could be of help in a combinatorial drug treatment for tumor. More extensive understanding of the structure, biogenesis, and mechanism of telomerase will provide invaluable information for increasing the efficiency of rational antitumor drug design. PMID:27118336

  16. A conceptual framework for the identification of candidate drugs and drug targets in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marstrand, T T; Borup, R; Willer, A;

    2010-01-01

    transcriptional regulation, and (ii) the identification of candidate drugs and drug targets for therapeutic interventions. Significantly, our study provides a conceptual framework that can be applied to any subtype of AML and cancer in general to uncover novel information from published microarray data sets at...... low cost. In a broader perspective, our study provides strong evidence that genomic strategies might be used in a clinical setting to prospectively identify candidate drugs that subsequently are validated in vitro to define the most effective drug combination for individual cancer patients on a...

  17. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  18. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ρR, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ρL. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting

  19. Carbon nanotubes: an emerging drug carrier for targeting cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Yadav, Pragya; Bhattacharya, Shiv Sankar; Mishra, Arun Kumar; Verma, Navneet; Verma, Anurag; Pandit, Jayanta Kumar

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility, and specificity to cells, various cancer cells have been explored with CNTs for evaluation of pharmacokinetic parameters, cell viability, cytotoxicty, and drug delivery in tumor cells. This review attempts to highlight all aspects of CNTs which render them as an effective anticancer drug carrier and imaging agent. Also the potential application of CNT in targeting metastatic cancer cells by entrapping biomolecules and anticancer drugs has been covered in this review. PMID:24872894

  20. Multiple Targets for Drug-Induced Mitochondrial Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Kendall B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is rapidly gaining the interest of researchers and practitioners as a prominent liability in drug discovery and development, accounting for a growing proportion of preclinical drug attrition and post-market withdrawals or black box warnings by the U.S. FDA. To date, the focus of registries of drugs that elicit mitochondrial toxicity has been largely restricted to those that either inhibit the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) or uncouple mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Less appreciated are the toxicities that are secondary to the drug affecting either the molecular regulation, assembly or incorporation of the ETC into the inner mitochondrial membrane or those that limit substrate availability. The current article describes the complexities of molecular events and biochemical pathways required to sustain mitochondrial fidelity and substrate homeostasis with examples of drugs that interfere which the various pathways. The principal objective of this review is to shed light on the broader scope of drug-induced mitochondrial toxicities and how these secondary targets may account for a large portion of drug failures. PMID:25973981

  1. Structural genomics of infectious disease drug targets: the SSGCID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An introduction and overview of the focus, goals and overall mission of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is given. The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a consortium of researchers at Seattle BioMed, Emerald BioStructures, the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory that was established to apply structural genomics approaches to drug targets from infectious disease organisms. The SSGCID is currently funded over a five-year period by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to determine the three-dimensional structures of 400 proteins from a variety of Category A, B and C pathogens. Target selection engages the infectious disease research and drug-therapy communities to identify drug targets, essential enzymes, virulence factors and vaccine candidates of biomedical relevance to combat infectious diseases. The protein-expression systems, purified proteins, ligand screens and three-dimensional structures produced by SSGCID constitute a valuable resource for drug-discovery research, all of which is made freely available to the greater scientific community. This issue of Acta Crystallographica Section F, entirely devoted to the work of the SSGCID, covers the details of the high-throughput pipeline and presents a series of structures from a broad array of pathogenic organisms. Here, a background is provided on the structural genomics of infectious disease, the essential components of the SSGCID pipeline are discussed and a survey of progress to date is presented

  2. Drugs and drug delivery systems targeting amyloid-β in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder with no cure and limited treatment solutions that are unable to target any of the suspected causes. Increasing evidence suggests that one of the causes of neurodegeneration is the overproduction of amyloid beta (Aβ and the inability of Aβ peptides to be cleared from the brain, resulting in self-aggregation to form toxic oligomers, fibrils and plaques. One of the potential treatment options is to target Aβ and prevent self-aggregation to allow for a natural clearing of the brain. In this paper, we review the drugs and drug delivery systems that target Aβ in relation to Alzheimer's disease. Many attempts have been made to use anti-Aβ targeting molecules capable of targeting Aβ (with much success in vitro and in vivo animal models, but the major obstacle to this technique is the challenge posed by the blood brain barrier (BBB. This highly selective barrier protects the brain from toxic molecules and pathogens and prevents the delivery of most drugs. Therefore novel Aβ aggregation inhibitor drugs will require well thought-out drug delivery systems to deliver sufficient concentrations to the brain.

  3. Genetic Approaches To Identifying Novel Osteoporosis Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brommage, Robert

    2015-10-01

    During the past two decades effective drugs for treating osteoporosis have been developed, including anti-resorptives inhibiting bone resorption (estrogens, the SERM raloxifene, four bisphosphonates, RANKL inhibitor denosumab) and the anabolic bone forming daily injectable peptide teriparatide. Two potential drugs (odanacatib and romosozumab) are in late stage clinical development. The most pressing unmet need is for orally active anabolic drugs. This review describes the basic biological studies involved in developing these drugs, including the animal models employed for osteoporosis drug development. The genomics revolution continues to identify potential novel osteoporosis drug targets. Studies include human GWAS studies and identification of mutant genes in subjects having abnormal bone mass, mouse QTL and gene knockouts, and gene expression studies. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Wnt signaling plays a major role in regulating bone formation and continued study of this complex pathway is likely to lead to key discoveries. In addition to the classic Wnt signaling targets DKK1 and sclerostin, LRP4, LRP5/LRP6, SFRP4, WNT16, and NOTUM can potentially be targeted to modulate Wnt signaling. Next-generation whole genome and exome sequencing, RNA-sequencing and CRISPR/CAS9 gene editing are new experimental techniques contributing to understanding the genome. The International Knockout Mouse Consortium efforts to knockout and phenotype all mouse genes are poised to accelerate. Accumulating knowledge will focus attention on readily accessible databases (Big Data). Efforts are underway by the International Bone and Mineral Society to develop an annotated Skeletome database providing information on all genes directly influencing bone mass, architecture, mineralization or strength. PMID:25833316

  4. NIOSOMES: A ROLE IN TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Niosomes are non-ionic surfactant vesicles inclosing an aqueous phase and a wide range of molecules could be encapsulated within aqueous spaces of lipid membrane vesicles. They are microscopic lamellar structures formed on the admixture of a non-ionic surfactant, cholesterol and phosphate with subsequent hydration in aqueous media. Niosomes belongs to novel drug delivery system which offers a large number of advantages over other conventional and vesicular delivery systems. Namely they are the targeted drug delivery system which showing reduction of dose, stability and compatibility of non-ionic surfactants, easy modification, delayed clearance, suitability for a wide range of Active Pharmaceutical Agents.

  5. An efficient targeted drug delivery through apotransferrin loaded nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athuluri Divakar Sai Krishna

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano have diameters of 25-50 etam, which increase to 60-80 etam upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano, and showed further increase in dimension (75-95 etam in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano. The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus (b pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in

  6. Core as a Novel Viral Target for Hepatitis C Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Mousseau; Snyder, John K.; Arthur Donny Strosberg; Virginia Takahashi; Smitha Kota

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 130 million people worldwide and is a major cause of liver disease. No vaccine is available. Novel specific drugs for HCV are urgently required, since the standard-of-care treatment of pegylated interferon combined with ribavirin is poorly tolerated and cures less than half of the treated patients. Promising, effective direct-acting drugs currently in the clinic have been described for three of the ten potential HCV target proteins: NS3/NS4A protease, NS5B...

  7. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design. PMID:26764017

  8. Functional liposomes in the cancer-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tila, Dena; Ghasemi, Saeed; Yazdani-Arazi, Seyedeh Narjes; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is considered as one of the most severe health problems and is currently the third most common cause of death in the world after heart and infectious diseases. Novel therapies are constantly being discovered, developed and trialed. Many of the current anticancer agents exhibit non-ideal pharmaceutical and pharmacological properties and are distributed non-specifically throughout the body. This results in death of the both normal healthy and malignant cells and substantially leads to accruing a variety of serious toxic side effects. Therefore, the efficient systemic therapy of cancer is almost impossible due to harmful side effects of anticancer agents to the healthy organs and tissues. Furthermore, several problems such as low bioavailability of the drugs, low drug concentrations at the site of action, lack of drug specificity and drug-resistance also cause many restrictions on clinical applications of these drugs in the tumor therapy. Different types of the liposomal formulations have been used in medicine due to their distinctive advantages associated with their structural flexibility in the encapsulation of various agents with different physicochemical properties. They can also mediate delivery of the cargo to the appropriate cell type and subcellular compartment, reducing the effective dosage and possible side effects which are related to high systemic concentrations. Therefore, these novel systems were found very promising and encouraging dosage forms for the treatment of different types of cancer by increasing efficiency and reducing the systemic toxicity due to the specific drug delivery and targeting. PMID:25823898

  9. USE OF LIPOSOMES AND NANOPARTICLES FOR BRAIN DRUG TARGETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Pal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The Blood Brain Barrier (BBB poses a obstacle for a drugs, including antineoplastic agent, antibiotics, neuropeptides, CNS active agents, to be delivered to the brain for therapeutic reasons. The use of formulation dependent strategy such as the use of heterogenous pharmaceutical systems for its effective targeting to the brain is being explored recently. Liposomes and Nanoparticles are good possibilities to achieve the goal. Chemically modified liposomes and nanoparticles are tried in recent times to act as brain targeting aids, and this article tries to explain the possibilities and problems behind such an endeavor.KEY WORDS:

  10. Drug targets for lymphatic filariasis: A bioinformatics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Om Prakash Sharma

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This review article discusses the current scenario of the national and international burden due to lymphatic filariasis (LF and describes the active elimination programmes for LF and their achievements to eradicate this most debilitating disease from the earth. Since, bioinformatics is a rapidly growing field of biological study, and it has an increasingly significant role in various fields of biology. We have reviewed its leading involvement in the filarial research using different approaches of bioinformatics and have summarized available existing drugs and their targets to re-examine and to keep away from the resisting conditions. Moreover, some of the novel drug targets have been assembled for further study to design fresh and better pharmacological therapeutics. Various bioinformatics-based web resources, and databases have been discussed, which may enrich the filarial research.

  11. From hybrid compounds to targeted drug delivery in antimalarial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rudi; Miranda, Daniela; Magalhães, Joana; Capela, Rita; Perry, Maria J; O'Neill, Paul M; Moreira, Rui; Lopes, Francisca

    2015-08-15

    The discovery of new drugs to treat malaria is a continuous effort for medicinal chemists due to the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to nearly all used antimalarials. The rapid adaptation of the malaria parasite remains a major limitation to disease control. Development of hybrid antimalarial agents has been actively pursued as a promising strategy to overcome the emergence of resistant parasite strains. This review presents the journey that started with simple combinations of two active moieties into one chemical entity and progressed into a delivery/targeted system based on major antimalarial classes of drugs. The rationale for providing different mechanisms of action against a single or additional targets involved in the multiple stages of the parasite's life-cycle is highlighted. Finally, a perspective for this polypharmacologic approach is presented. PMID:25913864

  12. tcTKB: an integrated cardiovascular toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Rong; Wang, QuanQiu

    2015-01-01

    Targeted cancer drugs are often associated with unexpectedly high cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. Systematic approaches to studying CV events associated with targeted anticancer drugs have high potential for elucidating the complex pathways underlying targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this study, we built tcTKB, a comprehensive CV toxicity knowledge base for targeted cancer drugs, by extracting drug-CV pairs from five large-scale and complementary data sources. The data sources include FDA d...

  13. Antibody–drug conjugates: targeted weapons against cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Scotti, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Luisa Iamele, Luca Vecchia, Claudia ScottiDepartment of Molecular Medicine, Unit of Immunology and General Pathology, University of Pavia, Pavia, PV, Italy  All authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Antibody–drug conjugates (ADCs) are formed by a targeting antibody conjugated to a chemotherapeutic molecule through a linker. Recent data demonstrate that ADCs represent a valuable advancement for the clinics and, despite their recent appearance in medicine, they ...

  14. Decorating Nanoparticle Surface for Targeted Drug Delivery: Opportunities and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Shen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The size, shape, stiffness (composition and surface properties of nanoparticles (NPs have been recognized as key design parameters for NP-mediated drug delivery platforms. Among them, the surface functionalization of NPs is of great significance for targeted drug delivery. For instance, targeting moieties are covalently coated on the surface of NPs to improve their selectively and affinity to cancer cells. However, due to a broad range of possible choices of surface decorating molecules, it is difficult to choose the proper one for targeted functions. In this work, we will review several representative experimental and computational studies in selecting the proper surface functional groups. Experimental studies reveal that: (1 the NPs with surface decorated amphiphilic polymers can enter the cell interior through penetrating pathway; (2 the NPs with tunable stiffness and identical surface chemistry can be selectively accepted by the diseased cells according to their stiffness; and (3 the NPs grafted with pH-responsive polymers can be accepted or rejected by the cells due to the local pH environment. In addition, we show that computer simulations could be useful to understand the detailed physical mechanisms behind these phenomena and guide the design of next-generation NP-based drug carriers with high selectivity, affinity, and low toxicity. For example, the detailed free energy analysis and molecular dynamics simulation reveals that amphiphilic polymer-decorated NPs can penetrate into the cell membrane through the “snorkeling” mechanism, by maximizing the interaction energy between the hydrophobic ligands and lipid tails. We anticipate that this work will inspire future studies in the design of environment-responsive NPs for targeted drug delivery.

  15. Optimized shapes of magnetic arrays for drug targeting applications

    OpenAIRE

    Barnsley, Lester C.; Carugo, Dario; Stride, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of permanent magnet elements have been utilized as light-weight, inexpensive sources for applying external magnetic fields in magnetic drug targeting applications, but they are extremely limited in the range of depths over which they can apply useful magnetic forces. In this paper, designs for optimized magnet arrays are presented, which were generated using an optimization routine to maximize the magnetic force available from an arbitrary arrangement of magnetized elements, depending ...

  16. Metaphors in Nanomedicine: The Case of Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Bensaude Vincent, Bernadette; Loeve, Sacha

    2014-01-01

    The promises of nanotechnology have been framed by a variety of metaphors, that not only channel the attention of the public, orient the questions asked by researchers, and convey epistemic choices closely linked to ethical preferences. In particular, the image of the 'therapeutic missile' commonly used to present targeted drug delivery devices emphasizes precision, control, surveillance and efficiency. Such values are highly praised in the current context of crisis of pharmaceutical innovati...

  17. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although its total molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Therefore, the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several function and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in the disease processes. Newly evolving advances in disease diagnostics and therapy will further facilitate future growth in the field of mitochondrian biology, where there is a dire need for sensitive and more affordable diagnostic tools and an urgency to develop effective therapies and identify reliable drug to predict accurately the response to a cancer therapy. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. To avoid mitochondrial liabilities, routine screens need to be positioned within the drug-development process as targets of drug-induced cytotoxicity or cancer promotion, as regulators of apoptosis, as sources of cell signalling through reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial control of specific nuclear responses. However, several novel mitochondrial targets are now emerging, including the potential to manipulate the mitochondrial pool to maintain function via biogenesis and mitophagy. Forthcoming insights into the fine regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis will likely open future perspectives for cancer drug development.

  18. DNA topoisomerases in apicomplexan parasites: promising targets for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Estrada, Carlos; Prada, Christopher Fernández; Fernández-Rubio, Celia; Rojo-Vázquez, Francisco; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2010-06-22

    The phylum Apicomplexa includes a large group of protozoan parasites responsible for a wide range of animal and human diseases. Destructive pathogens, such as Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax, causative agents of human malaria, Cryptosporidium parvum, responsible of childhood diarrhoea, and Toxoplasma gondii, responsible for miscarriages and abortions in humans, are frequently associated with HIV immunosuppression in AIDS patients. The lack of effective vaccines, along with years of increasing pressure to eradicate outbreaks with the use of drugs, has favoured the formation of multi-drug resistant strains in endemic areas. Almost all apicomplexan of medical interest contain two endosymbiotic organelles that contain their own mitochondrial and apicoplast DNA. Apicoplast is an attractive target for drug testing because in addition to harbouring singular metabolic pathways absent in the host, it also has its own transcription and translation machinery of bacterial origin. Accordingly, apicomplexan protozoa contain an interesting mixture of enzymes to unwind DNA from eukaryotic and prokaryotic origins. On the one hand, the main mechanism of DNA unwinding includes the scission of one-type I-or both DNA strands-type II eukaryotic topoisomerases, establishing transient covalent bonds with the scissile end. These enzymes are targeted by camptothecin and etoposide, respectively, two natural drugs whose semisynthetic derivatives are currently used in cancer chemotherapy. On the other hand, DNA gyrase is a bacterial-borne type II DNA topoisomerase that operates within the apicoplast and is effectively targeted by bacterial antibiotics like fluoroquinolones and aminocoumarins. The present review is an update on the new findings concerning topoisomerases in apicomplexan parasites and the role of these enzymes as targets for therapeutic agents. PMID:20200034

  19. Core as a Novel Viral Target for Hepatitis C Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Mousseau

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infects over 130 million people worldwide and is a major cause of liver disease. No vaccine is available. Novel specific drugs for HCV are urgently required, since the standard-of-care treatment of pegylated interferon combined with ribavirin is poorly tolerated and cures less than half of the treated patients. Promising, effective direct-acting drugs currently in the clinic have been described for three of the ten potential HCV target proteins: NS3/NS4A protease, NS5B polymerase and NS5A, a regulatory phosphoprotein. We here present core, the viral capsid protein, as another attractive, non-enzymatic target, against which a new class of anti-HCV drugs can be raised. Core plays a major role in the virion’s formation, and interacts with several cellular proteins, some of which are involved in host defense mechanisms against the virus. This most conserved of all HCV proteins requires oligomerization to function as the organizer of viral particle assembly. Using core dimerization as the basis of transfer-of-energy screening assays, peptides and small molecules were identified which not only inhibit core-core interaction, but also block viral production in cell culture. Initial chemical optimization resulted in compounds active in single digit micromolar concentrations. Core inhibitors could be used in combination with other HCV drugs in order to provide novel treatments of Hepatitis C.

  20. New alginic acid–atenolol microparticles for inhalatory drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceschan, Nazareth Eliana; Bucalá, Verónica [Planta Piloto de Ingeniería Química (PLAPIQUI), CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Camino La Carrindanga Km 7, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Departamento de Ingeniería Química, UNS, Avenida Alem 1253, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Ramírez-Rigo, María Verónica, E-mail: vrrigo@plapiqui.edu.ar [Planta Piloto de Ingeniería Química (PLAPIQUI), CONICET, Universidad Nacional del Sur (UNS), Camino La Carrindanga Km 7, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina); Departamento de Biología, Bioquímica y Farmacia, UNS, San Juan 670, 8000 Bahía Blanca (Argentina)

    2014-08-01

    The inhalatory route allows drug delivery for local or systemic treatments in a noninvasively way. The current tendency of inhalable systems is oriented to dry powder inhalers due to their advantages in terms of stability and efficiency. In this work, microparticles of atenolol (AT, basic antihypertensive drug) and alginic acid (AA, acid biocompatible polyelectrolyte) were obtained by spray drying. Several formulations, varying the relative composition AT/AA and the total solid content of the atomized dispersions, were tested. The powders were characterized by: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Powder X-ray Diffraction, while also the following properties were measured: drug load efficiency, flow properties, particles size and density, moisture content, hygroscopicity and morphology. The ionic interaction between AA and AT was demonstrated, then the new chemical entity could improve the drug targeting to the respiratory membrane and increase its time residence due to the mucoadhesive properties of the AA polymeric chains. Powders exhibited high load efficiencies, low moisture contents, adequate mean aerodynamic diameters and high cumulative fraction of respirable particles (lower than 10 μm). - Highlights: • Novel particulate material to target atenolol to the respiratory membrane was developed. • Crumbled microparticles were obtained by spray drying of alginic–atenolol dispersions. • Ionic interaction between alginic acid and atenolol was demonstrated in the product. • Amorphous solids with low moisture content and high load efficiency were produced. • Relationships between the feed formulation and the product characteristics were found.

  1. New alginic acid–atenolol microparticles for inhalatory drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inhalatory route allows drug delivery for local or systemic treatments in a noninvasively way. The current tendency of inhalable systems is oriented to dry powder inhalers due to their advantages in terms of stability and efficiency. In this work, microparticles of atenolol (AT, basic antihypertensive drug) and alginic acid (AA, acid biocompatible polyelectrolyte) were obtained by spray drying. Several formulations, varying the relative composition AT/AA and the total solid content of the atomized dispersions, were tested. The powders were characterized by: Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry and Powder X-ray Diffraction, while also the following properties were measured: drug load efficiency, flow properties, particles size and density, moisture content, hygroscopicity and morphology. The ionic interaction between AA and AT was demonstrated, then the new chemical entity could improve the drug targeting to the respiratory membrane and increase its time residence due to the mucoadhesive properties of the AA polymeric chains. Powders exhibited high load efficiencies, low moisture contents, adequate mean aerodynamic diameters and high cumulative fraction of respirable particles (lower than 10 μm). - Highlights: • Novel particulate material to target atenolol to the respiratory membrane was developed. • Crumbled microparticles were obtained by spray drying of alginic–atenolol dispersions. • Ionic interaction between alginic acid and atenolol was demonstrated in the product. • Amorphous solids with low moisture content and high load efficiency were produced. • Relationships between the feed formulation and the product characteristics were found

  2. Disulfide-based multifunctional conjugates for targeted theranostic drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Hee; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-11-17

    Theranostics, chemical entities designed to combine therapeutic effects and imaging capability within one molecular system, have received considerable attention in recent years. Much of this interest reflects the promise inherent in personalized medicine, including disease-targeted treatments for cancer patients. One important approach to realizing this latter promise involves the development of so-called theranostic conjugates, multicomponent constructs that selectively target cancer cells and deliver cytotoxic agents while producing a readily detectable signal that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. This requires the synthesis of relatively complex systems comprising imaging reporters, masked chemotherapeutic drugs, cleavable linkers, and cancer targeting ligands. Ideally, the cleavage process should take place within or near cancer cells and be activated by cellular components that are associated with cancer states or specifically expressed at a higher level in cancer cells. Among the cleavable linkers currently being explored for the construction of such localizing conjugates, disulfide bonds are particularly attractive. This is because disulfide bonds are stable in most blood pools but are efficiently cleaved by cellular thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are generally found at elevated levels in tumors. When disulfide bonds are linked to fluorophores, changes in emission intensity or shifts in the emission maxima are typically seen upon cleavage as the result of perturbations to internal charge transfer (ICT) processes. In well-designed systems, this allows for facile imaging. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies involving disulfide-based fluorescent drug delivery conjugates, including preliminary tests of their biological utility in vitro and in vivo. To date, a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and camptothecin, have been used to create disulfide-based conjugates, as have

  3. Companion diagnostics for targeted cancer drugs - clinical and regulatory aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Dana; Jørgensen, Jan Trøst

    2014-01-01

    Companion diagnostics (CDx) holds the promise of improving the predictability of the oncology drug development process and become an important tool for the oncologist in relation to the choice of treatment for the individual patient. A number of drug-diagnostic co-development programs have already been completed successfully, and in the clinic, the use of several targeted cancer drugs is now guided by a CDx. This central role of the CDx assays has attracted the attention of the regulators, and especially the US Food and Drug Administration has been at the forefront in relation to developing regulatory strategies for CDx and the drug-diagnostic co-development project. For an increasing number of cancer patients the treatment selection will depend on the result generated by a CDx assay, and consequently this type of assay has become critical for the care and safety of the patients. In order to secure that the CDx assays have a high degree of analytical and clinical validity, they must undergo an extensive non-clinical and clinical testing before release for routine patient management. This review will give a brief introduction to some of the scientific and medical challenges related to the CDx development with specific emphasis on the regulatory requirements in different regions of the world. PMID:24904822

  4. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  5. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  6. Encapsulation of methotrexate loaded magnetic microcapsules for magnetic drug targeting and controlled drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakkarapani, Prabu [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Subbiah, Latha, E-mail: lathasuba2010@gmail.com [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Palanisamy, Selvamani; Bibiana, Arputha [Department of Pharmaceutical Technology & Centre for Excellence in Nanobio Translational Research, Anna University, Bharathidasan Institute of Technology Campus, Tiruchirappalli 620024, Tamil Nadu (India); Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    We report on the development and evaluation of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) for targeted rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Methotrexate was loaded into CaCO{sub 3}-PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)) doped microparticles that were coated successively with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) by layer-by-layer technique. Ferrofluid was incorporated between the polyelectrolyte layers. CaCO{sub 3}-PSS core was etched by incubation with EDTA yielding spherical MMC. The MMC were evaluated for various physicochemical, pharmaceutical parameters and magnetic properties. Surface morphology, crystallinity, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, drug release pattern, release kinetics and AC susceptibility studies revealed spherical particles of ~3 µm size were obtained with a net zeta potential of +24.5 mV, 56% encapsulation and 18.6% drug loading capacity, 96% of cumulative drug release obeyed Hixson-Crowell model release kinetics. Drug excipient interaction, surface area, thermal and storage stability studies for the prepared MMC was also evaluated. The developed MMC offer a promising mode of targeted and sustained release drug delivery for rheumatoid arthritis therapy. - Highlights: • Development of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) by layer-by-layer method. • Characterization of physicochemical, pharmaceutical and magnetic properties of MMC. • Multiple layers of alternative polyelectrolytes prolongs methotrexate release time. • MMC is capable for targeted and sustained release rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  7. Encapsulation of methotrexate loaded magnetic microcapsules for magnetic drug targeting and controlled drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the development and evaluation of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) for targeted rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Methotrexate was loaded into CaCO3-PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)) doped microparticles that were coated successively with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) by layer-by-layer technique. Ferrofluid was incorporated between the polyelectrolyte layers. CaCO3-PSS core was etched by incubation with EDTA yielding spherical MMC. The MMC were evaluated for various physicochemical, pharmaceutical parameters and magnetic properties. Surface morphology, crystallinity, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, drug release pattern, release kinetics and AC susceptibility studies revealed spherical particles of ~3 µm size were obtained with a net zeta potential of +24.5 mV, 56% encapsulation and 18.6% drug loading capacity, 96% of cumulative drug release obeyed Hixson-Crowell model release kinetics. Drug excipient interaction, surface area, thermal and storage stability studies for the prepared MMC was also evaluated. The developed MMC offer a promising mode of targeted and sustained release drug delivery for rheumatoid arthritis therapy. - Highlights: • Development of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) by layer-by-layer method. • Characterization of physicochemical, pharmaceutical and magnetic properties of MMC. • Multiple layers of alternative polyelectrolytes prolongs methotrexate release time. • MMC is capable for targeted and sustained release rheumatoid arthritis therapy

  8. Lymphatic Targeting of Nanosystems for Anticancer Drug Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abellan-Pose, Raquel; Csaba, Noemi; Alonso, Maria Jose

    2016-01-01

    The lymphatic system represents a major route of dissemination in metastatic cancer. Given the lack of selectivity of conventional chemotherapy to prevent lymphatic metastasis, in the last years there has been a growing interest in the development of nanocarriers showing lymphotropic characteristics. The goal of this lymphotargeting strategy is to facilitate the delivery of anticancer drugs to the lymph node-resident cancer cells, thereby enhancing the effectiveness of the anti-cancer therapies. This article focuses on the nanosystems described so far for the active or passive targeting of oncological drugs to the lymphatic circulation. To understand the design and performance of these nanosystems, we will discuss first the physiology of the lymphatic system and how physiopathological changes associated to tumor growth influence the biodistribution of nanocarriers. Second, we provide evidence on how the tailoring of the physicochemical characteristics of nanosystems, i.e. particle size, surface charge and hydrophilicity, allows the modulation of their access to the lymphatic circulation. Finally, we provide an overview of the relationship between the biodistribution and antimetastatic activity of the nanocarriers loaded with oncological drugs, and illustrate the most promising active targeting approaches investigated so far. PMID:26675222

  9. Functionalized Silica Nanoparticles As an Alternative Platform for Targeted Drug-Delivery of Water Insoluble Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Luciane França; Bouchmella, Karim; Gonçalves, Kaliandra de Almeida; Bettini, Jefferson; Kobarg, Jörg; Cardoso, Mateus Borba

    2016-04-01

    The selective action of drugs in tumor cells is a major problem in cancer therapy. Most chemotherapy drugs act nonspecifically and damage both cancer and healthy cells causing various side effects. In this study, the preparation of a selective drug delivery system, which is able to act as a carrier for hydrophobic and anticancer drugs is reported. Amino-functionalized silica nanoparticles loaded with curcumin were successfully synthesized via sol-gel approach and duly characterized. Thereafter, the targeting ligand, folate, was covalently attached to amino groups of nanoparticle surface through amide bond formation. The cytotoxic effect of nanoparticles on prostate cancer cells line was evaluated and compared to normal cells line (prostate epithelial cell). Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that folate-functionalized nanoparticles were significantly cytotoxic to tumor cells, whereas normal cells were much less affected by the presence of these structures. PMID:26930039

  10. Targeting the treatment of drug abuse with molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although imaging studies in and of themselves have significant contributions to the study of human behavior, imaging in drug abuse has a much broader agenda. Drugs of abuse bind to molecules in specific parts of the brain in order to produce their effects. Positron emission tomography (PET) provides a unique opportunity to track this process, capturing the kinetics with which an abused compound is transported to its site of action. The specific examples discussed here were chosen to illustrate how PET can be used to map the regional distribution and kinetics of compounds that may or may not have abuse liability. We also discussed some morphological and functional changes associated with drug abuse and different stages of recovery following abstinence. PET measurements of functional changes in the brain have also led to the development of several treatment strategies, one of which is discussed in detail here. Information such as this becomes more than a matter of academic interest. Such knowledge can provide the bases for anticipating which compounds may be abused and which may not. It can also be used to identify biological markers or changes in brain function that are associated with progression from drug use to drug abuse and also to stage the recovery process. This new knowledge can guide legislative initiatives on the optimal duration of mandatory treatment stays, promoting long-lasting abstinence and greatly reducing the societal burden of drug abuse. Imaging can also give some insights into potential pharmacotherapeutic targets to manage the reinforcing effects of addictive compounds, as well as into protective strategies to minimize their toxic consequences

  11. Targeted Tumor Therapy with "Magnetic Drug Targeting": Therapeutic Efficacy of Ferrofluid Bound Mitoxantrone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, Ch.; Schmid, R.; Jurgons, R.; Bergemann, Ch.; Arnold, W.; Parak, F.G.

    The difference between success or failure of chemotherapy depends not only on the drug itself but also on how it is delivered to its target. Biocompatible ferrofluids (FF) are paramagnetic nanoparticles, that may be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents in locoregional tumor therapy, called "magnetic drug targeting". Bound to medical drugs, such magnetic nanoparticles can be enriched in a desired body compartment (tumor) using an external magnetic field, which is focused on the area of the tumor. Through this form of target directed drug application, one attempts to concentrate a pharmacological agent at its site of action in order to minimize unwanted side effects in the organism and to increase its locoregional effectiveness. Tumor bearing rabbits (VX2 squamous cell carcinoma) in the area of the hind limb, were treated by a single intra-arterial injection (A. femoralis) of mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids (FF-MTX), while focusing an external magnetic field (1.7 Tesla) onto the tumor for 60 minutes. Complete tumor remissions could be achieved in these animals in a dose related manner (20% and 50% of the systemic dose of mitoxantrone), without any negative side effects, like e.g. leucocytopenia, alopecia or gastrointestinal disorders. The strong and specific therapeutic efficacy in tumor treatment with mitoxantrone bound ferrofluids may indicate that this system could be used as a delivery system for anticancer agents, like radionuclids, cancer-specific antibodies, anti-angiogenetic factors, genes etc.

  12. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster ... been finding the meaningful biological targets. What's been the problem? If a drug is aimed at the ...

  13. Motif mediated protein-protein interactions as drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPI) are involved in virtually every cellular process and thus represent an attractive target for therapeutic interventions. A significant number of protein interactions are frequently formed between globular domains and short linear peptide motifs (DMI). Targeting these DMIs has proven challenging and classical approaches to inhibiting such interactions with small molecules have had limited success. However, recent new approaches have led to the discovery of potent inhibitors, some of them, such as Obatoclax, ABT-199, AEG-40826 and SAH-p53-8 are likely to become approved drugs. These novel inhibitors belong to a wide range of different molecule classes, ranging from small molecules to peptidomimetics and biologicals. This article reviews the main reasons for limited success in targeting PPIs, discusses how successful approaches overcome these obstacles to discovery promising inhibitors for human protein double minute 2 (HDM2), B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), and provides a summary of the promising approaches currently in development that indicate the future potential of PPI inhibitors in drug discovery. PMID:26936767

  14. Targeting mitochondrial biogenesis to overcome drug resistance to MAPK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gao; Frederick, Dennie T; Wu, Lawrence; Wei, Zhi; Krepler, Clemens; Srinivasan, Satish; Chae, Young Chan; Xu, Xiaowei; Choi, Harry; Dimwamwa, Elaida; Ope, Omotayo; Shannan, Batool; Basu, Devraj; Zhang, Dongmei; Guha, Manti; Xiao, Min; Randell, Sergio; Sproesser, Katrin; Xu, Wei; Liu, Jephrey; Karakousis, Giorgos C; Schuchter, Lynn M; Gangadhar, Tara C; Amaravadi, Ravi K; Gu, Mengnan; Xu, Caiyue; Ghosh, Abheek; Xu, Weiting; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Jie; Zha, Shijie; Liu, Qin; Brafford, Patricia; Weeraratna, Ashani; Davies, Michael A; Wargo, Jennifer A; Avadhani, Narayan G; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Altieri, Dario C; Flaherty, Keith T; Herlyn, Meenhard

    2016-05-01

    Targeting multiple components of the MAPK pathway can prolong the survival of patients with BRAFV600E melanoma. This approach is not curative, as some BRAF-mutated melanoma cells are intrinsically resistant to MAPK inhibitors (MAPKi). At the systemic level, our knowledge of how signaling pathways underlie drug resistance needs to be further expanded. Here, we have shown that intrinsically resistant BRAF-mutated melanoma cells with a low basal level of mitochondrial biogenesis depend on this process to survive MAPKi. Intrinsically resistant cells exploited an integrated stress response, exhibited an increase in mitochondrial DNA content, and required oxidative phosphorylation to meet their bioenergetic needs. We determined that intrinsically resistant cells rely on the genes encoding TFAM, which controls mitochondrial genome replication and transcription, and TRAP1, which regulates mitochondrial protein folding. Therefore, we targeted mitochondrial biogenesis with a mitochondrium-targeted, small-molecule HSP90 inhibitor (Gamitrinib), which eradicated intrinsically resistant cells and augmented the efficacy of MAPKi by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibiting tumor bioenergetics. A subset of tumor biopsies from patients with disease progression despite MAPKi treatment showed increased mitochondrial biogenesis and tumor bioenergetics. A subset of acquired drug-resistant melanoma cell lines was sensitive to Gamitrinib. Our study establishes mitochondrial biogenesis, coupled with aberrant tumor bioenergetics, as a potential therapy escape mechanism and paves the way for a rationale-based combinatorial strategy to improve the efficacy of MAPKi. PMID:27043285

  15. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-28

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system. PMID:27074960

  16. Cyanobacterial Cyclopeptides as Lead Compounds to Novel Targeted Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Briasoulis

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial cyclopeptides, including microcystins and nodularins, are considered a health hazard to humans due to the possible toxic effects of high consumption. From a pharmacological standpoint, microcystins are stable hydrophilic cyclic heptapeptides with a potential to cause cellular damage following uptake via organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATP. Their intracellular biological effects involve inhibition of catalytic subunits of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1 and PP2, glutathione depletion and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, certain OATPs are prominently expressed in cancers as compared to normal tissues, qualifying MC as potential candidates for cancer drug development. In the era of targeted cancer therapy, cyanotoxins comprise a rich source of natural cytotoxic compounds with a potential to target cancers expressing specific uptake transporters. Moreover, their structure offers opportunities for combinatorial engineering to enhance the therapeutic index and resolve organ-specific toxicity issues. In this article, we revisit cyanobacterial cyclopeptides as potential novel targets for anticancer drugs by summarizing existing biomedical evidence, presenting structure-activity data and discussing developmental perspectives.

  17. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Sheikh Arslan; Hassan, Mubashir; Rashid, Sajid

    2014-01-01

    Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18). Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor-ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. PMID:24899801

  18. Companion Diagnostics for Targeted Cancer Drugs - Clinical and Regulatory Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan TrøstJørgensen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Companion diagnostics (CDx holds the promise of improving the predictability of the oncology drug development process and become an important tool for the oncologist in relation to the choice of treatment for the individual patient. A number of drug-diagnostic co-development programs have already been completed successfully, and in the clinic, the use of several targeted cancer drugs is now guided by a CDx. This central role of the CDx assays has attracted the attention of the regulators, and especially the US FDA has been at the forefront in relation to developing regulatory strategies for CDx and the drug-diagnostic co-development project. For an increasing number of cancer patients the treatment selection will depend on the result generated by a CDx assay, and consequently this type of assay has become critical for the care and safety of the patients. In order to secure that the CDx assays have a high degree of analytical and clinical validity they must undergo an extensive non-clinical and clinical testing before release for routine patient management. This review will give a brief introduction to some of the scientific and medical challenges related to the CDx development with specific emphasis on the regulatory requirements in different regions of the world.  

  19. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram, E-mail: tejabhiram@gmail.com [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Ramasamy, Shivaraman [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal [Nanotechnology Research Centre, SRM University, Chennai 603203 (India); Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy [Department of Pharmacy practice, SRM College of Pharmacy, Chennai 603203 (India)

    2015-04-15

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex.

  20. Dual responsive PNIPAM–chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation. - Highlights: • The use of gadolinium doped nickel ferrite with the suggested doping level. • The use of PNIPMA–chitosan polymer with folic acid and fluorescein as a drug carrier complex. • Magnetic hyperthermia studies of gadolinium doped nickel ferrites are being reported for the first time. • Proton relaxivity studies which indicate the MRI contrasting properties on the reported system are new. • Use of curcumin, a hydrophobic Indian spice as a cancer killing agent inside the reported magnetic polymer complex

  1. Genetic Validation of Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetases as Drug Targets in Trypanosoma brucei

    OpenAIRE

    Kalidas, Savitha; Cestari, Igor; Monnerat, Severine; Li, Qiong; Regmi, Sandesh; Hasle, Nicholas; Labaied, Mehdi; Parsons, Marilyn; Stuart, Kenneth; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Current drugs are unsatisfactory, and new drugs are being sought. Few validated enzyme targets are available to support drug discovery efforts, so our goal was to obtain essentiality data on genes with proven utility as drug targets. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known drug targets for bacterial and fungal pathogens and are required for protein synthesis. Here we survey the essentiality of...

  2. Chronic neuropathic pain: mechanisms, drug targets and measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix; Sindrup, Søren H.; Jensen, Troels Staehelin

    2007-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is common in many diseases or injuries of the peripheral or central nervous system, and has a substantial impact on quality of life and mood. Lesions of the nervous system may lead to potentially irreversible changes and imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems. Precli...... assess various symptoms and signs in neuropathic pain and knowledge of drug mechanisms are prerequisites for pursuing this approach. The present review summarizes mechanisms of neuropathic pain, targets of currently used drugs, and measures used in neuropathic pain trials.......Neuropathic pain is common in many diseases or injuries of the peripheral or central nervous system, and has a substantial impact on quality of life and mood. Lesions of the nervous system may lead to potentially irreversible changes and imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory systems...

  3. Nanomechanics of drug-target interactions and antibacterial resistance detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndieyira, Joseph W; Watari, Moyu; McKendry, Rachel A

    2013-01-01

    The cantilever sensor, which acts as a transducer of reactions between model bacterial cell wall matrix immobilized on its surface and antibiotic drugs in solution, has shown considerable potential in biochemical sensing applications with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. The drug-target interactions generate surface stress, causing the cantilever to bend, and the signal can be analyzed optically when it is illuminated by a laser. The change in surface stress measured with nano-scale precision allows disruptions of the biomechanics of model bacterial cell wall targets to be tracked in real time. Despite offering considerable advantages, multiple cantilever sensor arrays have never been applied in quantifying drug-target binding interactions. Here, we report on the use of silicon multiple cantilever arrays coated with alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers mimicking bacterial cell wall matrix to quantitatively study antibiotic binding interactions. To understand the impact of vancomycin on the mechanics of bacterial cell wall structures. We developed a new model(1) which proposes that cantilever bending can be described by two independent factors; i) namely a chemical factor, which is given by a classical Langmuir adsorption isotherm, from which we calculate the thermodynamic equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) and ii) a geometrical factor, essentially a measure of how bacterial peptide receptors are distributed on the cantilever surface. The surface distribution of peptide receptors (p) is used to investigate the dependence of geometry and ligand loading. It is shown that a threshold value of p ~10% is critical to sensing applications. Below which there is no detectable bending signal while above this value, the bending signal increases almost linearly, revealing that stress is a product of a local chemical binding factor and a geometrical factor combined by the mechanical connectivity of reacted regions and provides a new paradigm for design of powerful

  4. TRPV1: A Target for Rational Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Vincenzo; Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a non-selective, Ca(2+) permeable cation channel activated by noxious heat, and chemical ligands, such as capsaicin and resiniferatoxin (RTX). Many compounds have been developed that either activate or inhibit TRPV1, but none of them are in routine clinical practice. This review will discuss the rationale for antagonists and agonists of TRPV1 for pain relief and other conditions, and strategies to develop new, better drugs to target this ion channel, using the newly available high-resolution structures. PMID:27563913

  5. PEPTIDE TARGETING OF PLATINUM ANTI-CANCER DRUGS

    OpenAIRE

    Ndinguri, Margaret W.; Solipuram, Rajasree; Gambrell, Robert P.; Aggarwal, Sita; Hansel, William; Hammer, Robert P.

    2009-01-01

    Besides various side effects caused by platinum anticancer drugs, they are not efficiently absorbed by the tumor cells. Two Pt-peptide conjugates; cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pt (7) and cyclic mPeg-CNGRC-Pten (8) bearing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) targeting sequence, a malonoyl linker and low molecular weight miniPEG groups have been synthesized. The platinum ligand was attached to the peptide via the carboxylic end of the malonate group at the end of the peptide. The pegylated peptide is non toxic and high...

  6. Calculation of nanoparticle capture efficiency in magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implant assisted magnetic targeted drug delivery system of Aviles, Ebner and Ritter, which uses high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is considered. In this 2D model large ferromagnetic particles are implanted as seeds to aid collection of multiple domain nanoparticles (radius ∼200nm). Here, in contrast, single domain magnetic nanoparticles (radius in 20-100 nm) are considered and the Langevin function is used to describe the magnetization. Simulations based on this model were performed using the open source C++ finite volume library OpenFOAM. The simulations indicate that use of the Langevin function predicts greater collection efficiency than might be otherwise expected

  7. Development of modified pulsincap drug delivery system of metronidazole for drug targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Sindhu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified Pulsincap dosage form of metronidazole was developed to target drug release in the colon. Bodies of hard gelatin capsules were treated with formaldehyde keeping the caps as such. Metronidazole pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization method were incorporated into these specialized capsule shells and plugged with polymers guar gum, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 10K, carboxymethylcellulose sodium and sodium alginate separately at concentrations 20 mg, 30 mg and 40 mg. The filled capsules were completely coated with 5% cellulose acetate phthalate to prevent variable gastric emptying. All the formulations were assayed to determine drug content and the ability of the modified Pulsincap to provide colon-specific drug delivery was assessed by in vitro drug release studies in buffer pH 1.2 for 2 h, pH 7.4 (simulated intestinal fluid for 3 h and pH 6.8 (stimulated colonic fluid for 7 h. The results indicated that significant drug release occurred only after 5 h from the start of experiment. Thus, metronidazole could be successfully colon targeted by the use of the modified Pulsincap, thereby reducing systemic side effects.

  8. Encapsulation of methotrexate loaded magnetic microcapsules for magnetic drug targeting and controlled drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkarapani, Prabu; Subbiah, Latha; Palanisamy, Selvamani; Bibiana, Arputha; Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Jonasson, Christian; Johansson, Christer

    2015-04-01

    We report on the development and evaluation of methotrexate magnetic microcapsules (MMC) for targeted rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Methotrexate was loaded into CaCO3-PSS (poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate)) doped microparticles that were coated successively with poly (allylamine hydrochloride) and poly (sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) by layer-by-layer technique. Ferrofluid was incorporated between the polyelectrolyte layers. CaCO3-PSS core was etched by incubation with EDTA yielding spherical MMC. The MMC were evaluated for various physicochemical, pharmaceutical parameters and magnetic properties. Surface morphology, crystallinity, particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency, loading capacity, drug release pattern, release kinetics and AC susceptibility studies revealed spherical particles of ~3 μm size were obtained with a net zeta potential of +24.5 mV, 56% encapsulation and 18.6% drug loading capacity, 96% of cumulative drug release obeyed Hixson-Crowell model release kinetics. Drug excipient interaction, surface area, thermal and storage stability studies for the prepared MMC was also evaluated. The developed MMC offer a promising mode of targeted and sustained release drug delivery for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

  9. Virtual target screening to rapidly identify potential protein targets of natural products in drug discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Pevzner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Inherent biological viability and diversity of natural products make them a potentially rich source for new therapeutics. However, identification of bioactive compounds with desired therapeutic effects and identification of their protein targets is a laborious, expensive process. Extracts from organism samples may show desired activity in phenotypic assays but specific bioactive compounds must be isolated through further separation methods and protein targets must be identified by more specific phenotypic and in vitro experimental assays. Still, questions remain as to whether all relevant protein targets for a compound have been identified. The desire is to understand breadth of purposing for the compound to maximize its use and intellectual property, and to avoid further development of compounds with insurmountable adverse effects. Previously we developed a Virtual Target Screening system that computationally screens one or more compounds against a collection of virtual protein structures. By scoring each compound-protein interaction, we can compare against averaged scores of synthetic drug-like compounds to determine if a particular protein would be a potential target of a compound of interest. Here we provide examples of natural products screened through our system as we assess advantages and shortcomings of our current system in regards to natural product drug discovery.

  10. Predicting enzyme targets for cancer drugs by profiling human Metabolic reactions in NCI-60 cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching Wai-Ki

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drugs can influence the whole metabolic system by targeting enzymes which catalyze metabolic reactions. The existence of interactions between drugs and metabolic reactions suggests a potential way to discover drug targets. Results In this paper, we present a computational method to predict new targets for approved anti-cancer drugs by exploring drug-reaction interactions. We construct a Drug-Reaction Network to provide a global view of drug-reaction interactions and drug-pathway interactions. The recent reconstruction of the human metabolic network and development of flux analysis approaches make it possible to predict each metabolic reaction's cell line-specific flux state based on the cell line-specific gene expressions. We first profile each reaction by its flux states in NCI-60 cancer cell lines, and then propose a kernel k-nearest neighbor model to predict related metabolic reactions and enzyme targets for approved cancer drugs. We also integrate the target structure data with reaction flux profiles to predict drug targets and the area under curves can reach 0.92. Conclusions The cross validations using the methods with and without metabolic network indicate that the former method is significantly better than the latter. Further experiments show the synergism of reaction flux profiles and target structure for drug target prediction. It also implies the significant contribution of metabolic network to predict drug targets. Finally, we apply our method to predict new reactions and possible enzyme targets for cancer drugs.

  11. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  12. Essential gene identification and drug target prioritization in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenqi; Sillaots, Susan; Lemieux, Sebastien; Davison, John; Kauffman, Sarah; Breton, Anouk; Linteau, Annie; Xin, Chunlin; Bowman, Joel; Becker, Jeff; Jiang, Bo; Roemer, Terry

    2007-03-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne filamentous fungal pathogen in humans, causing severe and often fatal invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. Currently available antifungal drugs to treat invasive aspergillosis have limited modes of action, and few are safe and effective. To identify and prioritize antifungal drug targets, we have developed a conditional promoter replacement (CPR) strategy using the nitrogen-regulated A. fumigatus NiiA promoter (pNiiA). The gene essentiality for 35 A. fumigatus genes was directly demonstrated by this pNiiA-CPR strategy from a set of 54 genes representing broad biological functions whose orthologs are confirmed to be essential for growth in Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Extending this approach, we show that the ERG11 gene family (ERG11A and ERG11B) is essential in A. fumigatus despite neither member being essential individually. In addition, we demonstrate the pNiiA-CPR strategy is suitable for in vivo phenotypic analyses, as a number of conditional mutants, including an ERG11 double mutant (erg11BDelta, pNiiA-ERG11A), failed to establish a terminal infection in an immunocompromised mouse model of systemic aspergillosis. Collectively, the pNiiA-CPR strategy enables a rapid and reliable means to directly identify, phenotypically characterize, and facilitate target-based whole cell assays to screen A. fumigatus essential genes for cognate antifungal inhibitors. PMID:17352532

  13. Chemical Genomics and Emerging DNA Technologies in the Identification of Drug Mechanisms and Drug Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Louise Cathrine Braun; Færgeman, Nils J.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical genomics combines chemistry with molecular biology as a means of exploring the function of unknown proteins or identifying the proteins responsible for a particular phenotype induced by a small cell-permeable bioactive molecule. Chemical genomics therefore has the potential to identify and...... validate therapeutic targets and to discover drug candidates for rapidly and effectively generating new interventions for human diseases. The recent emergence of genomic technologies and their application on genetically tractable model organisms like Drosophila melanogaster,Caenorhabditis elegans and...... Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided momentum to cell biological and biomedical research, particularly in the functional characterization of gene functions and the identification of novel drug targets. We therefore anticipate that chemical genomics and the vast development of genomic technologies will play...

  14. Targeting Plasmodium Metabolism to Improve Antimalarial Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avitia-Domínguez, Claudia; Sierra-Campos, Erick; Betancourt-Conde, Irene; Aguirre-Raudry, Miriam; Vázquez-Raygoza, Alejandra; Luevano-De la Cruz, Artemisa; Favela-Candia, Alejandro; Sarabia-Sanchez, Marie; Ríos-Soto, Lluvia; Méndez-Hernández, Edna; Cisneros-Martínez, Jorge; Palacio-Gastélum, Marcelo Gómez; Valdez-Solana, Mónica; Hernández-Rivera, Jessica; De Lira-Sánchez, Jaime; Campos-Almazán, Mara; Téllez-Valencia, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is one of the main infectious diseases in tropical developing countries and represents high morbidity and mortality rates nowadays. The principal etiological agent P. falciparum is transmitted through the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito. The issue has escalated due to the emergence of resistant strains to most of the antimalarials used for the treatment including Chloroquine, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, and recently Artemisinin derivatives, which has led to diminished effectiveness and by consequence increased the severity of epidemic outbreaks. Due to the lack of effective compounds to treat these drug-resistant strains, the discovery or development of novel anti-malaria drugs is important. In this context, one strategy has been to find inhibitors of enzymes, which play an important role for parasite survival. Today, promising results have been obtained in this regard, involving the entire P. falciparum metabolism. These inhibitors could serve as leads in the search of a new chemotherapy against malaria. This review focuses on the achievements in recent years with regard to inhibition of enzymes used as targets for drug design against malaria. PMID:26983887

  15. New drugs targeting Th2 lymphocytes in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caramori, Gaetano; Groneberg, David; Ito, Kazuhiro; Casolari, Paolo; Adcock, Ian M; Papi, Alberto

    2008-02-27

    Asthma represents a profound worldwide public health problem. The most effective anti-asthmatic drugs currently available include inhaled beta2-agonists and glucocorticoids and control asthma in about 90-95% of patients. The current asthma therapies are not cures and symptoms return soon after treatment is stopped even after long term therapy. Although glucocorticoids are highly effective in controlling the inflammatory process in asthma, they appear to have little effect on the lower airway remodelling processes that appear to play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma at currently prescribed doses. The development of novel drugs may allow resolution of these changes. In addition, severe glucocorticoid-dependent and resistant asthma presents a great clinical burden and reducing the side-effects of glucocorticoids using novel steroid-sparing agents is needed. Furthermore, the mechanisms involved in the persistence of inflammation are poorly understood and the reasons why some patients have severe life threatening asthma and others have very mild disease are still unknown. Drug development for asthma has been directed at improving currently available drugs and findings new compounds that usually target the Th2-driven airway inflammatory response. Considering the apparently central role of T lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of asthma, drugs targeting disease-inducing Th2 cells are promising therapeutic strategies. However, although animal models of asthma suggest that this is feasible, the translation of these types of studies for the treatment of human asthma remains poor due to the limitations of the models currently used. The myriad of new compounds that are in development directed to modulate Th2 cells recruitment and/or activation will clarify in the near future the relative importance of these cells and their mediators in the complex interactions with the other pro-inflammatory/anti-inflammatory cells and mediators responsible of the different asthmatic

  16. Development of modified pulsincap drug delivery system of metronidazole for drug targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham Sindhu; Srinath M

    2007-01-01

    A modified Pulsincap dosage form of metronidazole was developed to target drug release in the colon. Bodies of hard gelatin capsules were treated with formaldehyde keeping the caps as such. Metronidazole pellets prepared by extrusion-spheronization method were incorporated into these specialized capsule shells and plugged with polymers guar gum, hydroxypropylmethylcellulose 10K, carboxymethylcellulose sodium and sodium alginate separately at concentrations 20 mg, 30 mg and 40 mg. The filled c...

  17. Pharmacoinformatics elucidation of potential drug targets against migraine to target ion channel protein KCNK18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sehgal SA

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sheikh Arslan Sehgal, Mubashir Hassan, Sajid Rashid National Center for Bioinformatics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan Abstract: Migraine, a complex debilitating neurological disorder is strongly associated with potassium channel subfamily K member 18 (KCNK18. Research has emphasized that high levels of KCNK18 may be responsible for improper functioning of neurotransmitters, resulting in neurological disorders like migraine. In the present study, a hybrid approach of molecular docking and virtual screening were followed by pharmacophore identification and structure modeling. Screening was performed using a two-dimensional similarity search against recommended migraine drugs, keeping in view the physicochemical properties of drugs. LigandScout tool was used for exploring pharmacophore properties and designing novel molecules. Here, we report the screening of four novel compounds that have showed maximum binding affinity against KCNK18, obtained through the ZINC database, and Drug and Drug-Like libraries. Docking studies revealed that Asp-46, Ile-324, Ile-44, Gly-118, Leu-338, Val-113, and Phe-41 are critical residues for receptor–ligand interaction. A virtual screening approach coupled with docking energies and druglikeness rules illustrated that ergotamine and PB-414901692 are potential inhibitor compounds for targeting KCNK18. We propose that selected compounds may be more potent than the previously listed drug analogs based on the binding energy values. Further analysis of these inhibitors through site-directed mutagenesis could be helpful for exploring the details of ligand-binding pockets. Overall, the findings of this study may be helpful for designing novel therapeutic targets to cure migraine. Keywords: migraine, bioinformatics, modeling and docking, KCNK18, TRESK, virtual screening, pharmacoinformatics

  18. RAS GTPase AS THE DRUG TARGET FOR ANTI-CANCER DESIGNING OF DRUG FROM TEMPLATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Krishnapriya and P.K. Krishnan Namboori*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ras proteins in association with GTP and GDP act as a bio-molecular switch for signaling cell growth, cell survival and signal transduction. The presence of mutated Ras proteins is found to vary in different cancer types and the highest occurrence of about 90% is observed in pancreatic cancer. The Ras GTPase binding site is mainly involved in signal cell proliferation. Hence, this binding site has been considered as a major target. At the same time, targeting a specific protein and designing the drug molecule with respect to that is practically of no use as the target proteins are fast mutating. In this scenario, designing the template from the hot spot of proteins and fitting the template for all the target protein molecules seem to be a promising technique. The templates are initially screened on the basis of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic requirements. Six templates are found to be satisfying conditions like IC50, lipophilic efficiency, ligand efficiency etc. and their efficiencies are compared with standard reference molecules. The computed enrichment factors support these templates to be leads for effective anti-cancer drugs subject to further in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

  19. New insight into p-glycoprotein as a drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, Albert; Gibalova, Lenka; Seres, Mario; Barancik, Miroslav; Sulova, Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    changes in cell sensitivity to substances that are not P-gp substrates or modulators. We recently reported that P-gppositive L1210 cells exhibit reduced sensitivity to cisplatin, concanavalin A, thapsigargin and tunicamycin. Thus, P-gp-mediated MDR represents a more complex process than was expected, and the unintended effects of P-gp overexpression should be considered when describing this phenotype. The present review aims to provide the most current informations about P-gp-mediated MDR while paying particular attention to the possible dual function of this protein as a drug efflux pump and a regulatory protein that influences diverse cell processes. From a clinical standpoint, overexpression of P-gp in cancer cells represents a real obstacle to effective chemotherapy for malignant diseases. Therefore, this protein should be considered as a viable target for pharmaceutical design. PMID:22931413

  20. A comparison of machine learning techniques for detection of drug target articles

    OpenAIRE

    Danger, Roxana; Segura Bedmar, Isabel; Martínez, Paloma; Rosso, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Important progress in treating diseases has been possible thanks to the identification of drug targets. Drug targets are the molecular structures whose abnormal activity, associated to a disease, can be modified by drugs, improving the health of patients. Pharmaceutical industry needs to give priority to their identification and validation in order to reduce the long and costly drug development times. In the last two decades, our knowledge about drugs, their mechanisms of action and dru...

  1. Quantitative analysis on the characteristics of targets with FDA approved drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meena K. Sakharkar, Peng Li, Zhaowei Zhong, Kishore R. Sakharkar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulated knowledge of genomic information, systems biology, and disease mechanisms provide an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate the genetic basis of diseases, and to discover new and novel therapeutic targets from the wealth of genomic data. With hundreds to a few thousand potential targets available in the human genome alone, target selection and validation has become a critical component of drug discovery process. The explorations on quantitative characteristics of the currently explored targets (those without any marketed drug and successful targets (targeted by at least one marketed drug could help discern simple rules for selecting a putative successful target. Here we use integrative in silico (computational approaches to quantitatively analyze the characteristics of 133 targets with FDA approved drugs and 3120 human disease genes (therapeutic targets not targeted by FDA approved drugs. This is the first attempt to comparatively analyze targets with FDA approved drugs and targets with no FDA approved drug or no drugs available for them. Our results show that proteins with 5 or fewer number of homologs outside their own family, proteins with single-exon gene architecture and proteins interacting with more than 3 partners are more likely to be targetable. These quantitative characteristics could serve as criteria to search for promising targetable disease genes.

  2. Cancer Drug Development: New Targets for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt

    1996-01-01

    cancer drug screening and cancer drug development. At the NCI, for example, the old in vivo mouse screen using mouse lymphomas has been shelved; it discovered compounds with some activity in lymphomas, but not the common solid tumors of adulthood. It has been replaced with an initial in vitro screen of some sixty cell lines, representing the common solid tumors-ovary, G.I., lung, breast, CNS, melanoma and others. The idea was to not only discover new drugs with specific anti-tumor activity but also to use the small volumes required for in vitro screening as a medium to screen for new natural product compounds, one of the richest sources of effective chemotherapy. The cell line project had an unexpected dividend. The pattern of sensitivity in the panel predicted the mechanism of action of unknown compounds. An antifolate suppressed cell growth of the different lines like other antifolates, anti-tubulin compounds suppressed like other anti-tubulins, and so on. It now became possible, at a very early stage of cancer drug screening, to select for drugs with unknown-and potentially novel-mechanisms of action. The idea was taken to the next logical step, and that was to characterize the entire panel for important molecular properties of human malignancy: mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53, expression of important oncogenes like ras or myc, the gp170 gene which confers multiple drug resistance, protein-specific kinases, and others. It now became possible to use the cell line panel as a tool to detect new drugs which targeted a specific genetic property of the tumor cell. Researchers can now ask whether a given drug is likely to inhibit multiple drug resistance or kill cells which over-express specific oncogenes at the earliest phase of drug discovery. In this issue of The Oncologist, Tom Connors celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of cancer chemotherapy. His focus is on the importance of international collaboration in clinical trials and the negative impact of

  3. Melanocortin receptors as drug targets for disorders of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Roger A H; van Dijk, Gertjan

    2006-06-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that the brain melanocortin system is a key regulator of energy balance, and dysregulations in the brain melanocortin system can lead to obesity. The melanocortin system is one of the major downstream leptin signaling pathways in the brain. In contrast to leptin, preclinical studies indicate that diet-induced obese animals are still responsive to the anorectic effects of melanocortin receptor agonists, suggesting the melanocortin system is an interesting therapeutic opportunity. Besides regulating energy balance, melanocortins are involved in a variety of other neuroendocrine processes, including inflammation, blood pressure regulation, addictive and sexual behavior, and sensation of pain. This review evaluates the melanocortin system function from the perspective to use specific melanocortin (MC) receptors as drug targets, with a focus on the treatment of obesity and eating disorders in humans, and the implications this may have on mechanisms beyond the control of energy balance. PMID:16787227

  4. Discovery of the target for immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Handa, Hiroshi

    2016-05-01

    Half a century ago, the sedative thalidomide caused a serious drug disaster because of its teratogenicity and was withdrawn from the market. However, thalidomide, which has returned to the market, is now used for the treatment of leprosy and multiple myeloma (MM) under strict control. The mechanism of thalidomide action had been a long-standing question. We developed a new affinity bead technology and identified cereblon (CRBN) as a thalidomide-binding protein. We found that CRBN functions as a substrate receptor of an E3 cullin-Ring ligase complex 4 (CRL4) and is a primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Recently, new thalidomide derivatives, called immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), have been developed by Celgene. Among them, lenalidomide (Len) and pomalidomide (Pom) were shown to exert strong therapeutic effects against MM. It was found that Len and Pom both bind CRBN-CRL4 and recruit neomorphic substrates (Ikaros and Aiolos). More recently it was reported that casein kinase 1a (Ck1a) was identified as a substrate for CRBN-CRL4 in the presence of Len, but not Pom. Ck1a breakdown explains why Len is specifically effective for myelodysplastic syndrome with 5q deletion. It is now proposed that binding of IMiDs to CRBN appears to alter the substrate specificity of CRBN-CRL4. In this review, we introduce recent findings on IMiDs. PMID:27263779

  5. Structures of Trypanosome Vacuolar Soluble Pyrophosphatases: Antiparasitic Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunyun; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chun-Chi; Huang, Guozhong; Zheng, Yingying; Liu, Weidong; Wang, Iren; Ho, Meng-Ru; Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; O'Dowd, Bing; Huff, Hannah C; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Docampo, Roberto; Oldfield, Eric; Guo, Rey-Ting

    2016-05-20

    Trypanosomatid parasites are the causative agents of many neglected tropical diseases, including the leishmaniases, Chagas disease, and human African trypanosomiasis. They exploit unusual vacuolar soluble pyrophosphatases (VSPs), absent in humans, for cell growth and virulence and, as such, are drug targets. Here, we report the crystal structures of VSP1s from Trypanosoma cruzi and T. brucei, together with that of the T. cruzi protein bound to a bisphosphonate inhibitor. Both VSP1s form a hybrid structure containing an (N-terminal) EF-hand domain fused to a (C-terminal) pyrophosphatase domain. The two domains are connected via an extended loop of about 17 residues. Crystallographic analysis and size exclusion chromatography indicate that the VSP1s form tetramers containing head-to-tail dimers. Phosphate and diphosphate ligands bind in the PPase substrate-binding pocket and interact with several conserved residues, and a bisphosphonate inhibitor (BPH-1260) binds to the same site. On the basis of Cytoscape and other bioinformatics analyses, it is apparent that similar folds will be found in most if not all trypanosomatid VSP1s, including those found in insects (Angomonas deanei, Strigomonas culicis), plant pathogens (Phytomonas spp.), and Leishmania spp. Overall, the results are of general interest since they open the way to structure-based drug design for many of the neglected tropical diseases. PMID:26907161

  6. Radiolabeling Strategies for Tumor-Targeting Proteinaceous Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Sugiura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Owing to their large size proteinaceous drugs offer higher operative information content compared to the small molecules that correspond to the traditional understanding of druglikeness. As a consequence these drugs allow developing patient-specific therapies that provide the means to go beyond the possibilities of current drug therapy. However, the efficacy of these strategies, in particular “personalized medicine”, depends on precise information about individual target expression rates. Molecular imaging combines non-invasive imaging methods with tools of molecular and cellular biology and thus bridges current knowledge to the clinical use. Moreover, nuclear medicine techniques provide therapeutic applications with tracers that behave like the diagnostic tracer. The advantages of radioiodination, still the most versatile radiolabeling strategy, and other labeled compounds comprising covalently attached radioisotopes are compared to the use of chelator-protein conjugates that are complexed with metallic radioisotopes. With the techniques using radioactive isotopes as a reporting unit or even the therapeutic principle, care has to be taken to avoid cleavage of the radionuclide from the protein it is linked to. The tracers used in molecular imaging require labeling techniques that provide site specific conjugation and metabolic stability. Appropriate choice of the radionuclide allows tailoring the properties of the labeled protein to the application required. Until the event of positron emission tomography the spectrum of nuclides used to visualize cellular and biochemical processes was largely restricted to iodine isotopes and 99m-technetium. Today, several nuclides such as 18-fluorine, 68-gallium and 86-yttrium have fundamentally extended the possibilities of tracer design and in turn caused the need for the development of chemical methods for their conjugation.

  7. Are Pharmaceuticals with Evolutionary Conserved Molecular Drug Targets More Potent to Cause Toxic Effects in Non-Target Organisms?

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Furuhagen; Anne Fuchs; Elin Lundström Belleza; Magnus Breitholtz; Elena Gorokhova

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized th...

  8. A comprehensive assessment of lymphatic filariasis in Sri Lanka six years after cessation of mass drug administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna U Rao

    Full Text Available The Sri Lankan Anti-Filariasis Campaign conducted 5 rounds of mass drug administration (MDA with diethycarbamazine plus albendazole between 2002 and 2006. We now report results of a comprehensive surveillance program that assessed the lymphatic filariasis (LF situation in Sri Lanka 6 years after cessation of MDA.Transmission assessment surveys (TAS were performed per WHO guidelines in primary school children in 11 evaluation units (EUs in all 8 formerly endemic districts. All EUs easily satisfied WHO criteria for stopping MDA. Comprehensive surveillance was performed in 19 Public Health Inspector (PHI areas (subdistrict health administrative units. The surveillance package included cross-sectional community surveys for microfilaremia (Mf and circulating filarial antigenemia (CFA, school surveys for CFA and anti-filarial antibodies, and collection of Culex mosquitoes with gravid traps for detection of filarial DNA (molecular xenomonitoring, MX. Provisional target rates for interruption of LF transmission were community CFA <2%, antibody in school children <2%, and filarial DNA in mosquitoes <0.25%. Community Mf and CFA prevalence rates ranged from 0-0.9% and 0-3.4%, respectively. Infection rates were significantly higher in males and lower in people who denied prior treatment. Antibody rates in school children exceeded 2% in 10 study sites; the area that had the highest community and school CFA rates also had the highest school antibody rate (6.9%. Filarial DNA rates in mosquitoes exceeded 0.25% in 10 PHI areas.Comprehensive surveillance is feasible for some national filariasis elimination programs. Low-level persistence of LF was present in all study sites; several sites failed to meet provisional endpoint criteria for LF elimination, and follow-up testing will be needed in these areas. TAS was not sensitive for detecting low-level persistence of filariasis in Sri Lanka. We recommend use of antibody and MX testing as tools to complement TAS for

  9. A Comprehensive Assessment of Lymphatic Filariasis in Sri Lanka Six Years after Cessation of Mass Drug Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ramakrishna U.; Nagodavithana, Kumara C.; Samarasekera, Sandhya D.; Wijegunawardana, Asha D.; Premakumara, Welmillage D. Y.; Perera, Samudrika N.; Settinayake, Sunil; Miller, J. Phillip; Weil, Gary J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Sri Lankan Anti-Filariasis Campaign conducted 5 rounds of mass drug administration (MDA) with diethycarbamazine plus albendazole between 2002 and 2006. We now report results of a comprehensive surveillance program that assessed the lymphatic filariasis (LF) situation in Sri Lanka 6 years after cessation of MDA. Methodology and Principal Findings Transmission assessment surveys (TAS) were performed per WHO guidelines in primary school children in 11 evaluation units (EUs) in all 8 formerly endemic districts. All EUs easily satisfied WHO criteria for stopping MDA. Comprehensive surveillance was performed in 19 Public Health Inspector (PHI) areas (subdistrict health administrative units). The surveillance package included cross-sectional community surveys for microfilaremia (Mf) and circulating filarial antigenemia (CFA), school surveys for CFA and anti-filarial antibodies, and collection of Culex mosquitoes with gravid traps for detection of filarial DNA (molecular xenomonitoring, MX). Provisional target rates for interruption of LF transmission were community CFA <2%, antibody in school children <2%, and filarial DNA in mosquitoes <0.25%. Community Mf and CFA prevalence rates ranged from 0–0.9% and 0–3.4%, respectively. Infection rates were significantly higher in males and lower in people who denied prior treatment. Antibody rates in school children exceeded 2% in 10 study sites; the area that had the highest community and school CFA rates also had the highest school antibody rate (6.9%). Filarial DNA rates in mosquitoes exceeded 0.25% in 10 PHI areas. Conclusions Comprehensive surveillance is feasible for some national filariasis elimination programs. Low-level persistence of LF was present in all study sites; several sites failed to meet provisional endpoint criteria for LF elimination, and follow-up testing will be needed in these areas. TAS was not sensitive for detecting low-level persistence of filariasis in Sri Lanka. We recommend use of

  10. Bacterial carbonic anhydrases as drug targets: towards novel antibiotics ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ClaudiuT.Supuran

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1 are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the a-, b-, and/or g-CA families. In the last decade, the a-CAs from Neisseria spp. and Helicobacter pylori as well as the b-class enzymes from Escherichia coli, H. pylori, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica and Haemophilus influenzae have been cloned and characterized in detail. For some of these enzymes the X-ray crystal structures were determined, and in vitro and in vivo inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates reported. Although efficient inhibitors have been reported for many such enzymes, only for Nessseria spp., H. pylori, B. suis and S. pneumoniae enzymes it has been possible to evidence inhibition of bacterial growth in vivo. Thus, bacterial CAs represent promising targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems of the clinically used such agents but further studies are needed to validate these and other less investigated enzymes as novel drug targets

  11. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanika Madaan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity.

  12. Leptin signaling molecular actions and drug target in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang N

    2014-11-01

    leptin and Ob-R in cancer cells compared to normal cells, makes leptin an ideal drug target for the prevention and treatment of HCC, especially in obese patients. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, leptin, leptin antagonist, leptin signaling, tumor angiogenesis, drug target

  13. Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins: Potential Targets for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathan Salma

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The function of a protein is dependent on its three-dimensional structure. However, numerous proteins lacking intrinsic globular 3D structure under physiological conditions had been recognized. These proteins are frequently involved in some of the most critical cellular control mechanisms and it appears that their rapid turnover, aided by their unstructured nature in the unbound state, provides a level of control that allows rapid and accurate responses of the cell to changing environmental conditions. Approach: A significant number of proteins known to be involved in protein deposition disorders were now considered to Be Intrinsically Unstructured Proteins (IUPs. For example, Aß peptide and tau protein in Alzheimer’s disease, PrP in Prion’s disease and a-Synuclein in Parkinson’s disease. The disorder of intrinsically unstructured proteins (IUP's was crucial to their functions. They may adopt defined but extended structures when bound to cognate ligands. Their amino acid compositions were less hydrophobic than those of soluble proteins. They lack hydrophobic cores and hence did not become insoluble when heated. About 40% of eukaryotic proteins had at least one long (>50 residues disordered region. Roughly 10% of proteins in various genomes had been predicted to be fully disordered. Presently over 100 IUP's had been identified; none are enzymes. Obviously, IUP's were greatly underrepresented in the Protein Data Bank, although there were few cases of an IUP bound to a folded (intrinsically structured protein. Results: The five functional categories for intrinsically unstructured proteins and domains were entropic chains (bristles to ensure spacing, springs, flexible spacers/linkers, effectors (inhibitors and disassemblers, scavengers, assemblers and display sites. These IUPs could serve as potential targets for Structure Based Drug Design (SBDD which stress on the transition

  14. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    See, Ronald E.; Luyi Zhou; Wei-Lun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of rel...

  15. Systematic Identification of Synergistic Drug Pairs Targeting HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Xu; Hu, Long; Luquette, Lovelace J.; Gao, Geng; Liu, Yifang; Qu, Hongjing; Xi, Ruibin; Lu, Zhi John; Park, Peter J.; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The systematic identification of effective drug combinations has been hindered by the unavailability of methods that can explore the large combinatorial search space of drug interactions. Here we present a multiplex screening method named MuSIC (Multiplex Screening for Interacting Compounds), which expedites the comprehensive assessment of pair-wise compound interactions. We examined ~500,000 drug pairs from 1000 FDA-approved or clinically tested drugs and identified drugs that synergize to i...

  16. Structure-Based DNA-Targeting Strategies with Small Molecule Ligands for Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Jia; Gan, Jianhua; Huang, Zhen

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids are the molecular targets of many clinical anticancer drugs. However, compared with proteins, nucleic acids have traditionally attracted much less attention as drug targets in structure-based drug design, partially because limited structural information of nucleic acids complexed with potential drugs is available. Over the past several years, enormous progresses in nucleic acid crystallization, heavy-atom derivatization, phasing, and structural biology have been made. Many compl...

  17. Serine Proteases of Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum: Potential as Antimalarial Drug Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Asrar Alam

    2014-01-01

    Malaria is a major global parasitic disease and a cause of enormous mortality and morbidity. Widespread drug resistance against currently available antimalarials warrants the identification of novel drug targets and development of new drugs. Malarial proteases are a group of molecules that serve as potential drug targets because of their essentiality for parasite life cycle stages and feasibility of designing specific inhibitors against them. Proteases belonging to various mechanistic classes...

  18. Off-Target Effects of Psychoactive Drugs Revealed by Genome-Wide Assays in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Ericson, Elke; Gebbia, Marinella; Heisler, Lawrence E.; Wildenhain, Jan; Tyers, Mike; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2008-01-01

    To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 comp...

  19. Recent Advances in the Discovery of Haem-Targeting Drugs for Malaria and Schistosomiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. de Villiers

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Haem is believed to be the target of some of the historically most important antimalarial drugs, most notably chloroquine. This target is almost ideal as haem is host-derived and the process targeted, haemozoin formation, is a physico-chemical process with no equivalent in the host. The result is that the target remains viable despite resistance to current drugs, which arises from mutations in parasite membrane transport proteins. Recent advances in high-throughput screening methods, together with a better understanding of the interaction of existing drugs with this target, have created new prospects for discovering novel haem-targeting chemotypes and for target-based structural design of new drugs. Finally, the discovery that Schistosoma mansoni also produces haemozoin suggests that new drugs of this type may be chemotherapeutic not only for malaria, but also for schistosomiasis. These recent developments in the literature are reviewed.

  20. RGD-modified lipid disks as drug carriers for tumor targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Xie, Cao; Zhang, Mingfei; Wei, Xiaoli; Yan, Zhiqiang; Ren, Yachao; Ying, Man; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-03-01

    Melittin, the major component of the European bee venom, is a potential anticancer candidate due to its lytic properties. However, in vivo applications of melittin are limited due to its main side effect, hemolysis, especially when applied through intravenous administration. The polyethylene glycol-stabilized lipid disk is a novel type of nanocarrier, and the rim of lipid disks has a high affinity to amphiphilic peptides. In our study, a c(RGDyK) modified lipid disk was developed as a tumor targeted drug delivery system for melittin. Cryo-TEM was used to confirm the shape and size of lipid disks with or without c(RGDyK) modification. In vitro and in vivo hemolysis analyses revealed that the hemolysis effect significantly decreased after melittin associated with lipid disks. Importantly, the results of our in vivo biodistribution and tumor growth inhibitory experiments showed that c(RGDyK) modification increased the distribution of lipid disks in the tumor and the anticancer efficacy of melittin loaded lipid disks. Thus, we successfully achieved a targeted drug delivery system for melittin and other amphiphilic peptides with a good therapeutic effect and low side effects.

  1. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO₂ hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4-8.3) × 10⁵ s(-1) and kcat/KM values of (4.7-8.5) × 10⁷ M(-1)·s(-1). In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3-90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2-88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  2. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudiu T. Supuran

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1 are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3 × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5 × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM. The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM. Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets.

  3. The antihelmintic drug pyrvinium pamoate targets aggressive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    Full Text Available WNT signaling plays a key role in the self-renewal of tumor initiation cells (TICs. In this study, we used pyrvinium pamoate (PP, an FDA-approved antihelmintic drug that inhibits WNT signaling, to test whether pharmacologic inhibition of WNT signaling can specifically target TICs of aggressive breast cancer cells. SUM-149, an inflammatory breast cancer cell line, and SUM-159, a metaplastic basal-type breast cancer cell line, were used in these studies. We found that PP inhibited primary and secondary mammosphere formation of cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, at least 10 times less than the dose needed to have a toxic effect on cancer cells. A comparable mammosphere formation IC50 dose to that observed in cancer cell lines was obtained using malignant pleural effusion samples from patients with IBC. A decrease in activity of the TIC surrogate aldehyde dehydrogenase was observed in PP-treated cells, and inhibition of WNT signaling by PP was associated with down-regulation of a panel of markers associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In vivo, intratumoral injection was associated with tumor necrosis, and intraperitoneal injection into mice with tumor xenografts caused significant tumor growth delay and a trend toward decreased lung metastasis. In in vitro mammosphere-based and monolayer-based clonogenic assays, we found that PP radiosensitized cells in monolayer culture but not mammosphere culture. These findings suggest WNT signaling inhibition may be a feasible strategy for targeting aggressive breast cancer. Investigation and modification of the bioavailability and toxicity profile of systemic PP are warranted.

  4. Drug delivery and drug targeting with parenteral lipid nanoemulsions - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörmann, Karl; Zimmer, Andreas

    2016-02-10

    Lipid nanosized emulsions or nanoemulsions (NE) are oil in water dispersions with an oil droplet size of about 200nm. This size of oil droplets dispersed in a continuous water phase is a prerequisite for the parenteral, namely intravenous administration. Many parenteral nutrition and drug emulsions on the market confirm the safe use of NE over years. Parenteral emulsions loaded with APIs (active pharmaceutical ingredients) are considered as drug delivery systems (DDS). DDS focuses on the regulation of the in vivo dynamics, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism, and extended bioavailability, thereby improving the effectiveness and the safety of the drugs. Using an emulsion as a DDS, or through the use of surface diversification of the dispersed oil droplets of emulsions, a targeted increase of the API concentration in some parts of the human body can be achieved. This review focuses on NE similar to the marketed once with no or only low amount of additional surfactants beside the emulsifier from a manufacturing point of view (technique, used raw materials). PMID:26699427

  5. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: →Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. → Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. → Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. → HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  6. Cancer therapy with drug loaded magnetic nanoparticles-magnetic drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexiou, Christoph, E-mail: c.alexiou@web.d [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany); Tietze, Rainer; Schreiber, Eveline [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany); Jurgons, Roland [Franz Penzoldt Center, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany); Richter, Heike; Trahms, Lutz [PTB Berlin (Germany); Rahn, Helene; Odenbach, Stefan [TU Dresden, Chair of Magnetofluiddynamics, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Lyer, Stefan [Department of Oto-rhino-laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Section for Experimental Oncology and Nanomedicine at the Else Kroener-Fresenius-Stiftung-Professorship (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    The aim of magnetic drug targeting (MDT) in cancer therapy is to concentrate chemotherapeutics to a tumor region while simultaneously the overall dose is reduced. This can be achieved with coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles bound to a chemotherapeutic agent. These particles are applied intra arterially close to the tumor region and focused to the tumor by a strong external magnetic field. The interaction of the particles with the field gradient leads to an accumulation in the region of interest (i.e. tumor). The particle enrichment and thereby the drug-load in the tumor during MDT has been proven by several analytical and imaging methods. Moreover, in pilot studies we investigated in an experimental in vivo tumor model the effectiveness of this approach. Complete tumor regressions without any negative side effects could be observed. - Research Highlights: Iron oxide nanoparticles can be enriched in tumors by external magnetic fields. Histology evidences the intravasation of particles enter the intracellular space. Non-invasive imaging techniques can display the spatial arrangement of particles. HPLC-analysis show outstanding drug enrichment in tumors after MDT.

  7. Drug target mining and analysis of the Chinese tree shrew for pharmacological testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhao

    Full Text Available The discovery of new drugs requires the development of improved animal models for drug testing. The Chinese tree shrew is considered to be a realistic candidate model. To assess the potential of the Chinese tree shrew for pharmacological testing, we performed drug target prediction and analysis on genomic and transcriptomic scales. Using our pipeline, 3,482 proteins were predicted to be drug targets. Of these predicted targets, 446 and 1,049 proteins with the highest rank and total scores, respectively, included homologs of targets for cancer chemotherapy, depression, age-related decline and cardiovascular disease. Based on comparative analyses, more than half of drug target proteins identified from the tree shrew genome were shown to be higher similarity to human targets than in the mouse. Target validation also demonstrated that the constitutive expression of the proteinase-activated receptors of tree shrew platelets is similar to that of human platelets but differs from that of mouse platelets. We developed an effective pipeline and search strategy for drug target prediction and the evaluation of model-based target identification for drug testing. This work provides useful information for future studies of the Chinese tree shrew as a source of novel targets for drug discovery research.

  8. Enzymology of the nematode cuticle: A potential drug target?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Antony P; Stepek, Gillian; Winter, Alan D; Pertab, David

    2014-08-01

    All nematodes possess an external structure known as the cuticle, which is crucial for their development and survival. This structure is composed primarily of collagen, which is secreted from the underlying hypodermal cells. Extensive studies using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans demonstrate that formation of the cuticle requires the activity of an extensive range of enzymes. Enzymes are required both pre-secretion, for synthesis of component proteins such as collagen, and post-secretion, for removal of the previous developmental stage cuticle, in a process known as moulting or exsheathment. The excretion/secretion products of numerous parasitic nematodes contain metallo-, serine and cysteine proteases, and these proteases are conserved across the nematode phylum and many are involved in the moulting/exsheathment process. This review highlights the enzymes required for cuticle formation, with a focus on the post-secretion moulting events. Where orthologues of the C. elegans enzymes have been identified in parasitic nematodes these may represent novel candidate targets for future drug/vaccine development. PMID:25057463

  9. Proline Rich Motifs as Drug Targets in Immune Mediated Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mythily Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current version of the human immunome network consists of nearly 1400 interactions involving approximately 600 proteins. Intermolecular interactions mediated by proline-rich motifs (PRMs are observed in many facets of the immune response. The proline-rich regions are known to preferentially adopt a polyproline type II helical conformation, an extended structure that facilitates transient intermolecular interactions such as signal transduction, antigen recognition, cell-cell communication and cytoskeletal organization. The propensity of both the side chain and the backbone carbonyls of the polyproline type II helix to participate in the interface interaction makes it an excellent recognition motif. An advantage of such distinct chemical features is that the interactions can be discriminatory even in the absence of high affinities. Indeed, the immune response is mediated by well-orchestrated low-affinity short-duration intermolecular interactions. The proline-rich regions are predominantly localized in the solvent-exposed regions such as the loops, intrinsically disordered regions, or between domains that constitute the intermolecular interface. Peptide mimics of the PRM have been suggested as potential antagonists of intermolecular interactions. In this paper, we discuss novel PRM-mediated interactions in the human immunome that potentially serve as attractive targets for immunomodulation and drug development for inflammatory and autoimmune pathologies.

  10. Structure determination of drug target proteins by neutron crystallography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution X-ray crystallography provides information for most of the atoms comprising the proteins, with the exception of hydrogen atoms. Whereas, neutron crystallography, which is a powerful technique for locating hydrogen atoms, enables us to obtain accurate atomic positions within proteins. Neutron diffraction data can provide information of the location of hydrogen atoms to the structural information determined by X-ray crystallography. Here, we show the recent results of the structural determination of drug-target proteins, porcine pancreatic elastase and human immuno-deficiency virus type-1 protease by both X-ray and neutron diffraction. The structure of porcine pancreatic elastase with its potent inhibitor was determined to 0.094 nm resolution by X-ray diffraction and 0.165 nm resolution by neutron diffraction. The structure of HIV-PR with its potent inhibitor was also determined to 0.093 nm resolution by X-ray diffraction and 0.19 nm resolution by neutron diffraction. The ionization state and the location of hydrogen atoms of the catalytic residue in these enzymes were determined by neutron diffraction. Furthermore, collaborative use of both X-ray and neutron crystallography to identify the location of ambiguous hydrogen atoms will be shown. (author)

  11. A small molecule nanodrug consisting of amphiphilic targeting ligand-chemotherapy drug conjugate for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Quanbing; Ma, Yuan; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2016-05-28

    Targeted drug delivery is a broadly applicable approach for cancer therapy. However, the nanocarrier-based targeted delivery system suffers from batch-to-batch variation, quality concerns and carrier-related toxicity issues. Thus, to develop a carrier-free targeted delivery system with nanoscale characteristics is very attractive. Here, a novel targeting small molecule nanodrug self-delivery system consisting of targeting ligand and chemotherapy drug was constructed, which combined the advantages of small molecules and nano-assemblies together and showed excellent targeting ability and long blood circulation time with well-defined structure, high drug loading ratio and on-demand drug release behavior. As a proof-of-concept, lactose (Lac) and doxorubicin (DOX) were chosen as the targeting ligand and chemotherapy drug, respectively. Lac and DOX were conjugated through a pH-responsive hydrazone group. For its intrinsic amphiphilic property, Lac-DOX conjugate could self-assemble into nanoparticles in water. Both in vitro and in vivo assays indicated that Lac-DOX nanoparticles exhibited enhanced anticancer activity and weak side effects. This novel active targeting nanodrug delivery system shows great potential in cancer therapy. PMID:27040815

  12. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster Past ... reason is that we're not selecting the right biological changes to target from the start. How ...

  13. Thiamin (Vitamin B1 Biosynthesis and Regulation: A Rich Source of Antimicrobial Drug Targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglin Du, Honghai Wang, Jianping Xie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug resistance of pathogens has necessitated the identification of novel targets for antibiotics. Thiamin (vitamin B1 is an essential cofactor for all organisms in its active form thiamin diphosphate (ThDP. Therefore, its metabolic pathways might be one largely untapped source of antibiotics targets. This review describes bacterial thiamin biosynthetic, salvage, and transport pathways. Essential thiamin synthetic enzymes such as Dxs and ThiE are proposed as promising drug targets. The regulation mechanism of thiamin biosynthesis by ThDP riboswitch is also discussed. As drug targets of existing antimicrobial compound pyrithiamin, the ThDP riboswitch might serves as alternative targets for more antibiotics.

  14. Tetrahydrobiopterin Biosynthesis as an Off-Target of Sulfa Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Haruki, H.; Pedersen, M.G.; Gorska, K. I.; Pojer, F.; Johnsson, K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of sulfa drugs for the chemotherapy of bacterial infections in 1935 revolutionized medicine. Although their mechanism of action is understood, the molecular bases for most of their side effects remain obscure. Here, we report that sulfamethoxazole and other sulfa drugs interfere with tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis through inhibition of sepiapterin reductase. Crystal structures of sepiapterin reductase with bound sulfa drugs reveal how structurally diverse sulfa drugs achiev...

  15. Sterol Biosynthesis Pathway as Target for Anti-trypanosomatid Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderley de Souza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Sterols are constituents of the cellular membranes that are essential for their normal structure and function. In mammalian cells, cholesterol is the main sterol found in the various membranes. However, other sterols predominate in eukaryotic microorganisms such as fungi and protozoa. It is now well established that an important metabolic pathway in fungi and in members of the Trypanosomatidae family is one that produces a special class of sterols, including ergosterol, and other 24-methyl sterols, which are required for parasitic growth and viability, but are absent from mammalian host cells. Currently, there are several drugs that interfere with sterol biosynthesis (SB that are in use to treat diseases such as high cholesterol in humans and fungal infections. In this review, we analyze the effects of drugs such as (a statins, which act on the mevalonate pathway by inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase, (b bisphosphonates, which interfere with the isoprenoid pathway in the step catalyzed by farnesyl diphosphate synthase, (c zaragozic acids and quinuclidines, inhibitors of squalene synthase (SQS, which catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis, (d allylamines, inhibitors of squalene epoxidase, (e azoles, which inhibit C14α-demethylase, and (f azasterols, which inhibit Δ24(25-sterol methyltransferase (SMT. Inhibition of this last step appears to have high selectivity for fungi and trypanosomatids, since this enzyme is not found in mammalian cells. We review here the IC50 values of these various inhibitors, their effects on the growth of trypanosomatids (both in axenic cultures and in cell cultures, and their effects on protozoan structural organization (as evaluted by light and electron microscopy and lipid composition. The results show that the mitochondrial membrane as well as the membrane lining the protozoan cell body and flagellum are the main targets. Probably as a consequence of these primary effects, other important changes take

  16. ORAL COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM: A REVIEW ON CURRENT AND NOVEL PERSPECTIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asija Rajesh

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Small intestine is mostly the site for drug absorption but in some cases the drug needs to be targeted to colon due to some factors like local colonic disease, degradation related conditions, delayed release of drugs, systemic delivery of protein and peptide drugs etc. Colon targeted drug delivery is important and relatively new concept for the absorption of drugs because it offers almost neutral pH and long residence time, thereby increasing the drug absorption. Colon has proved to be a site for the absorption of poorly soluble drugs. For the successful targeting of drugs to colon the dosage form should be designed such that it prevents the drug release in upper GIT and releasing it in the colonic region. This review article discusses in brief about introduction of colon along with the novel and emerging technologies for colon targeting of drug molecule. Treatment of these diseases with colon-specific drug delivery system provides an interesting alternative over systemic drug administration because of lower dosing and fewer systemic side effects.

  17. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: An example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Maslov, Mikhail Y.; Edelman, Elazer R.; Wei, Abraham E.; Pezone, Matthew J.; Lovich, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically syst...

  18. Are pharmaceuticals with evolutionary conserved molecular drug targets more potent to cause toxic effects in non-target organisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Furuhagen

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous use of pharmaceuticals has resulted in a continuous discharge into wastewater and pharmaceuticals and their metabolites are found in the environment. Due to their design towards specific drug targets, pharmaceuticals may be therapeutically active already at low environmental concentrations. Several human drug targets are evolutionary conserved in aquatic organisms, raising concerns about effects of these pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms. In this study, we hypothesized that the toxicity of a pharmaceutical towards a non-target invertebrate depends on the presence of the human drug target orthologs in this species. This was tested by assessing toxicity of pharmaceuticals with (miconazole and promethazine and without (levonorgestrel identified drug target orthologs in the cladoceran Daphnia magna. The toxicity was evaluated using general toxicity endpoints at individual (immobility, reproduction and development, biochemical (RNA and DNA content and molecular (gene expression levels. The results provide evidence for higher toxicity of miconazole and promethazine, i.e. the drugs with identified drug target orthologs. At the individual level, miconazole had the lowest effect concentrations for immobility and reproduction (0.3 and 0.022 mg L-1, respectively followed by promethazine (1.6 and 0.18 mg L-1, respectively. At the biochemical level, individual RNA content was affected by miconazole and promethazine already at 0.0023 and 0.059 mg L-1, respectively. At the molecular level, gene expression for cuticle protein was significantly suppressed by exposure to both miconazole and promethazine; moreover, daphnids exposed to miconazole had significantly lower vitellogenin expression. Levonorgestrel did not have any effects on any endpoints in the concentrations tested. These results highlight the importance of considering drug target conservation in environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals.

  19. In silico identification of candidate drug and vaccine targets from various pathways in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barh, Debmalya; Kumar, Anil

    2009-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for causing gonorrhea, one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases prevailing globally. Although extensive researches are in progress in order to control the transmission of the disease and to develop drug(s) against the pathogen, till date no effective vaccine or specific drug could be developed and only antibiotic treatment is in use. Perhaps, due to excess use of antibiotics, several resistant strains have been found. In the present study, metabolic pathways-related candidate drug and vaccine targets have been identified in N. gonorrhoeae virulent strain FA 1090 using an in silico subtractive genomics approach. 106 putative drug targets out of 537 essential genes have been predicted. 67 cytoplasmic and 9 membrane enzymes, along with 10 membrane transporters are found to be the potential drug targets from the host-pathogen common metabolic pathways. Among these targets, competence lipoproteins (NGO0277) and cysW have been identified as candidate vaccine targets. 20 drug targets have been identified from pathogen specific unique metabolic pathways. Out of these, 6 enzymes are involved in dual metabolic pathways and 2 are expressed in cell wall and fimbrium. These gonococci-specific proteins are expected to be better possible drug targets. Screening of the functional inhibitors against these novel targets may result in discovery of novel therapeutic compounds that can be effective against antibiotic resistant strains. PMID:20109152

  20. Glutamatergic Targets for Enhancing Extinction Learning in Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Cleva, R.M; Gass, J.T.; Widholm, J J; Olive, M.F.

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of the motivational salience of drug-related environmental cues and contexts is one of the most problematic obstacles to successful treatment of drug addiction. Behavioral approaches to extinguishing the salience of drug-associated cues, such as cue exposure therapy, have generally produced disappointing results which have been attributed to, among other things, the context specificity of extinction and inadequate consolidation of extinction learning. Extinction of any behavio...

  1. Network based elucidation of drug response: from modulators to targets

    OpenAIRE

    Iorio, Francesco; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Bernardo, Diego di

    2013-01-01

    Network-based drug discovery aims at harnessing the power of networks to investigate the mechanism of action of existing drugs, or new molecules, in order to identify innovative therapeutic treatments. In this review, we describe some of the most recent advances in the field of network pharmacology, starting with approaches relying on computational models of transcriptional networks, then moving to protein and signaling network models and concluding with “drug networks”. These networks are de...

  2. Protein target discovery of drug and its reactive intermediate metabolite by using proteomic strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianghai Hu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Identifying protein targets of bioactive compounds is an effective approach to discover unknown protein functions, identify molecular mechanisms of drug action, and obtain information for optimization of lead compounds. At the same time, metabolic activation of a drug can lead to cytotoxicities. Therefore, it is very important to systemically characterize the drug and its reactive intermediate. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach has emerged as the most efficient to study protein functions and modifications. This review will discuss method development for the drug target discovery and the application in different fields including the drug toxicity mechanism caused by reactive metabolites.

  3. Selection between Michaelis–Menten and target-mediated drug disposition pharmacokinetic models

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Mager, Donald E.; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models have been applied to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by its target due to high binding affinity and limited capacity. The Michaelis–Menten (M–M) model has also been frequently used to describe the pharmacokinetics of such drugs. The purpose of this study is to investigate conditions for equivalence between M–M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models and provide guidelines for selection between these...

  4. Preparation and Optimization of Nanoemulsions for targeting Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Sharma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanoemulsions have appeared as a novel drug delivery system which allows sustained or controlled release of drug, biological active ingredient and genetic material. Nanoemulsion is a dispersion consisting of oil, surfactant and an aqueous phase, which is a isotropically clear and thermo-dynamically or kinetically stable liquid solution, usually with droplet diameter within the range of 10-500nm. Although interest in nano-emulsions was developed for more than two decades now, mainly for nanoparticle preparation, it is in the last few years that direct applications of nano-emulsions in consumer products are being developed, mainly in pharmacy and cosmetics. These recent applications have made that studies on optimization methods for nano-emulsion preparation be a requirement. The design of effective formulations for drugs has long been a major task, because drug efficacy can severely limited by instability or poor solubility in the vehicle. Nanoemulsion is being applied to enhance the solubility and bioavailability of water insoluble drugs. The nanosized droplets leading to an enormous increase in interfacial areas associated with nanoemulsion would influence the transport properties of the drug [1, 2]. Recently, there has been a considerable attraction for this formulation, for the delivery of hydrophilic as well as hydrophobic drug as drug carriers because of its improved drug solubilization capacity, long shelf life, ease of preparation and improvement of bioavailability of drugs. This review is focused on the most recent literature on developments of nano-emulsions as final application products and on the optimization of their preparation.

  5. Optimizing drugs to reach treatment targets for children and adolescents living with HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Martina Penazzato; Janice Lee; Edmund Capparelli; Shaffiq Essajee; Nathan Ford; Atieno Ojoo; Fernando Pascual; Nandita Sugandhi; Marc Lallemant

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: As the global community makes progress towards the 90-90-90 targets by 2020, a key challenge is ensuring that antiretroviral drugs for children and adolescents are suitable to the context of resource-limited settings. Drug optimization aims to support the expanded use of more simplified, less toxic drug regimens with high barriers to drug resistance that require minimal clinical monitoring while maintaining therapeutic efficacy. This manuscript summarizes the progress made and o...

  6. Reduction in acute filariasis morbidity during a mass drug administration trial to eliminate lymphatic filariasis in Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Tisch

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute painful swelling of the extremities and scrotum are debilitating clinical manifestations of Wuchereria bancrofti infection. The ongoing global program to eliminate filariasis using mass drug administration is expected to decrease this and other forms of filarial morbidity in the future by preventing establishment of new infections as a consequence of eliminating transmission by the mosquito vector. We examined whether mass treatment with anti-filarial drugs has a more immediate health benefit by monitoring acute filariasis morbidity in Papua New Guinean communities that participated in a 5-year mass drug administration trial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Weekly active surveillance for acute filariasis morbidity defined by painful swelling of the extremities, scrotum and breast was performed 1 year before and each year after 4 annual mass administrations of anti-filarial drugs (16,480 person-years of observation. Acute morbidity events lasted <3 weeks in 92% of affected individuals and primarily involved the leg (74-79% of all annual events. The incidence for all communities considered together decreased from 0.39 per person-year in the pre-treatment year to 0.31, 0.15, 0.19 and 0.20 after each of 4 annual treatments (p<0.0001. Residents of communities with high pre-treatment transmission intensities (224-742 infective bites/person/year experienced a greater reduction in acute morbidity (0.62 episodes per person-year pre-treatment vs. 0.30 in the 4(th post-treatment year than residents of communities with moderate pre-treatment transmission intensities (24-167 infective bites/person/year; 0.28 episodes per person-year pre-treatment vs. 0.16 in the 4(th post-treatment year. CONCLUSIONS: Mass administration of anti-filarial drugs results in immediate health benefit by decreasing the incidence of acute attacks of leg and arm swelling in people with pre-existing infection. Reduction in acute filariasis morbidity parallels

  7. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg;

    2011-01-01

    benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based...... on 7684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the "adverse reactions" section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5 x 5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE......Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply...

  8. The use of microbubbles to target drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porter Richard

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ultrasound-mediated microbubbles destruction has been proposed as an innovative method for noninvasive delivering of drugs and genes to different tissues. Microbubbles are used to carry a drug or gene until a specific area of interest is reached, and then ultrasound is used to burst the microbubbles, causing site-specific delivery of the bioactive materials. Furthermore, the ability of albumin-coated microbubbles to adhere to vascular regions with glycocalix damage or endothelial dysfunction is another possible mechanism to deliver drugs even in the absence of ultrasound. This review focuses on the characteristics of microbubbles that give them therapeutic properties and some important aspects of ultrasound parameters that are known to influence microbubble-mediated drug delivery. In addition, current studies involving this novel therapeutical application of microbubbles will be discussed.

  9. For Some Skin Cancers, Targeted Drug Hits the Mark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 29 new BCCs among those who received a placebo . However, more than half of the patients taking vismodegib discontinued treatment because of side effects. Once patients stopped taking the drug, tumors began ...

  10. Identification of drug targets by chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Manhong

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE: To advance our understanding of disease biology, the characterization of the molecular target for clinically proven or new drugs is very important. Because of its simplicity and the availability of strains with individual deletions in all of its genes, chemogenomic profiling in yeast has been used to identify drug targets. As measurement of drug-induced changes in cellular metabolites can yield considerable information about the effects of a drug, we investigated whether combining chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast could improve the characterization of drug targets. BASIC METHODS: We used chemogenomic and metabolomic profiling in yeast to characterize the target for five drugs acting on two biologically important pathways. A novel computational method that uses a curated metabolic network was also developed, and it was used to identify the genes that are likely to be responsible for the metabolomic differences found. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: The combination of metabolomic and chemogenomic profiling, along with data analyses carried out using a novel computational method, could robustly identify the enzymes targeted by five drugs. Moreover, this novel computational method has the potential to identify genes that are causative of metabolomic differences or drug targets. © 2012 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  11. Molecular Targets Versus Models for New Antiepileptic Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Rogawski, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Animal models have played a key role in the discovery and characterization of all marketed antiepileptic drugs (AED). The conventional wisdom is that the standard animal screening models are becoming obsolete because they fail to identify compounds that act in mechanistically new ways and as a result do not offer therapeutic advantages over presently available agents. In fact, far from only detecting me-too drugs, the models often uncover compounds with distinctive profiles of activity in var...

  12. Predicted essential proteins ofPlasmodium falciparum for potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Feng He; Li Deng; Qin-Ying Xu; Zheng Shao

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective:To identify novel drug targets for treatment ofPlasmodium falciparum.Methods:LocalBLASTP were used to find the proteins non-homologous to human essential proteins as novel drug targets. Functional domains of novel drug targets were identified by InterPro and Pfam,3D structures of potential drug targets were predicated by theSWISS-MODELworkspace. Ligands and ligand-binding sites of the proteins were searched byEf-seek.Results:Three essential proteins were identified that might be considered as potential drug targets.AAN37254.1 belonged to1-deoxy-D-xylulose5-phosphate reductoisomerase,CAD50499.1 belonged to chorismate synthase,CAD51220.1 belonged toFAD binging3 family, but the function of CAD51220.1 was unknown. The3D structures, ligands and ligand-binding sites ofAAN37254.1 andCAD50499.1 were successfully predicated.Conclusions:Two of these potential drug targets are key enzymes in2-C-methyl-d-erythritol4-phosphate pathway and shikimate pathway, which are absent in humans, so these two essential proteins are good potential drug targets. The function and3D structures ofCAD50499.1 is still unknown, it still need further study.

  13. Off-target effects of psychoactive drugs revealed by genome-wide assays in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Ericson

    Full Text Available To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 compounds that inhibited wild-type yeast growth and were thus selected for genome-wide fitness profiling. Many of these drugs had a propensity to affect multiple cellular functions. The sensitivity profiles of half of the analyzed drugs were enriched for core cellular processes such as secretion, protein folding, RNA processing, and chromatin structure. Interestingly, fluoxetine (Prozac interfered with establishment of cell polarity, cyproheptadine (Periactin targeted essential genes with chromatin-remodeling roles, while paroxetine (Paxil interfered with essential RNA metabolism genes, suggesting potential secondary drug targets. We also found that the more recently developed atypical antipsychotic clozapine (Clozaril had no fewer off-target effects in yeast than the typical antipsychotics haloperidol (Haldol and pimozide (Orap. Our results suggest that model organism pharmacogenetic studies provide a rational foundation for understanding the off-target effects of clinically important psychoactive agents and suggest a rational means both for devising compound derivatives with fewer side effects and for tailoring drug treatment to individual patient genotypes.

  14. Smart linkers in polymer-drug conjugates for tumor-targeted delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Minglu; Zhang, Fang; Wei, Ting; Zuo, Tiantian; Guan, Yuanyuan; Lin, Guimei; Shao, Wei

    2016-07-01

    To achieve effective chemotherapy, many types of drug delivery systems have been developed for the specific environments in tumor tissues. Polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly used in tumor therapy due to several significant advantages over traditional delivery systems. In the fabrication of polymer-drug conjugates, a smart linker is an important component that joins two fragments or molecules together and can be cleared by a specific stimulus, which results in targeted drug delivery and controlled release. By regulating the conjugation between the drug and the nanocarriers, stimulus-sensitive systems based on smart linkers can offer high payloads, certified stability, controlled release and targeted delivery. In this review, we summarize the current state of smart linkers (e.g. disulfide, hydrazone, peptide, azo) used recently in various polymer-drug conjugate-based delivery systems with a primary focus on their sophisticated design principles and drug delivery mechanisms as well as in vivo processes. PMID:26560242

  15. Orexin Receptor Targets for Anti-Relapse Medication Development in Drug Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. See

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is a chronic illness characterized by high rates of relapse. Relapse to drug use can be triggered by re-exposure to drug-associated cues, stressful events, or the drug itself after a period of abstinence. Pharmacological intervention to reduce the impact of relapse-instigating factors offers a promising target for addiction treatment. Growing evidence has implicated an important role of the orexin/hypocretin system in drug reward and drug-seeking, including animal models of relapse. Here, we review the evidence for the role of orexins in modulating reward and drug-seeking in animal models of addiction and the potential for orexin receptors as specific targets for anti-relapse medication approaches.

  16. One for All? Hitting Multiple Alzheimer's Disease Targets with One Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Rebecca E.; Nikolic, Katarina; Ramsay, Rona R.

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Many AD target combinations are being explored for multi-target drug design.New databases and models increase the potential of computational drug designLiraglutide and other antidiabetics are strong candidates for repurposing to AD.Donecopride a dual 5-HT/AChE inhibitor shows promise in pre-clinical studies Alzheimer's Disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs (MTDs). Intended as an introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key MTD design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch, and the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer's Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic. PMID:27199640

  17. In vivo characteristics of targeted drug-carrying filamentous bacteriophage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaks Lilach

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines are a new class of nanomedicines that combines biological and chemical components into a modular nanometric drug delivery system. The core of the system is a filamentous phage particle that is produced in the bacterial host Escherichia coli. Target specificity is provided by a targeting moiety, usually an antibody that is displayed on the tip of the phage particle. A large drug payload is chemically conjugated to the protein coat of the phage via a chemically or genetically engineered linker that provides for controlled release of the drug after the particle homed to the target cell. Recently we have shown that targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines can be used to eradicate pathogenic bacteria and cultured tumor cells with great potentiation over the activity of the free untargeted drug. We have also shown that poorly water soluble drugs can be efficiently conjugated to the phage coat by applying hydrophilic aminoglycosides as branched solubility-enhancing linkers. Results With an intention to move to animal experimentation of efficacy, we tested anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines for toxicity and immunogenicity and blood pharmacokinetics upon injection into mice. Here we show that anti-bacterial drug-carrying phage nanomedicines that carry the antibiotic chloramphenicol conjugated via an aminoglycoside linker are non-toxic to mice and are greatly reduced in immunogenicity in comparison to native phage particles or particles to which the drug is conjugated directly and are cleared from the blood more slowly in comparison to native phage particles. Conclusion Our results suggest that aminoglycosides may serve as branched solubility enhancing linkers for drug conjugation that also provide for a better safety profile of the targeted nanomedicine.

  18. Sensation Seeking and Targeting of Televised Anti-Drug PSAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohew, Lewis; And Others

    A study was conducted to determine how to reach out in an effective manner via televised public service announcements (PSAs) to particular at-risk audiences to motivate participation in drug abuse prevention programs. The subjects (207 young adults in Fayette County, Kentucky) responded to the M. Zuckerman sensation-seeking questionnaire. They…

  19. Therapeutic Targets for Influenza - Perspectives in Drug Development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Majerová, Taťána; Hoffman, H.; Majer, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 1 (2010), s. 81-103. ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : influenza * drug research * protein structure * oligonucleotides Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  20. Discovering the first microRNA-targeted drug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important post-transcriptional regulators of nearly every biological process in the cell and play key roles in the pathogenesis of human disease. As a result, there are many drug discovery programs that focus on developing miRNA-based therapeutics. The most advanced...

  1. Thioredoxin reductase from s. Coelicolor as a drug target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koháryová, M.; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kollárová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 282, Suppl 1 (2015), s. 396. ISSN 1742-464X. [Congress of the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) - The Biochemical Basis of Life /40./. 04.07.2015-09.07.2015, Berlin] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : thioredoxin reductase * protein structure * drugs Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  2. Liposomal Tumor Targeting in Drug Delivery Utilizing MMP-2- and MMP-9-Binding Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oula Penate Medina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers an alternative to conventional treatment options by enabling different drug delivery and controlled-release delivery strategies. Liposomes being especially biodegradable and in most cases essentially nontoxic offer a versatile platform for several different delivery approaches that can potentially enhance the delivery and targeting of therapies to tumors. Liposomes penetrate tumors spontaneously as a result of fenestrated blood vessels within tumors, leading to known enhanced permeability and subsequent drug retention effects. In addition, liposomes can be used to carry radioactive moieties, such as radiotracers, which can be bound at multiple locations within liposomes, making them attractive carriers for molecular imaging applications. Phage display is a technique that can deliver various high-affinity and selectivity peptides to different targets. In this study, gelatinase-binding peptides, found by phage display, were attached to liposomes by covalent peptide-PEG-PE anchor creating a targeted drug delivery vehicle. Gelatinases as extracellular targets for tumor targeting offer a viable alternative for tumor targeting. Our findings show that targeted drug delivery is more efficient than non-targeted drug delivery.

  3. Versatile surface engineering of porous nanomaterials with bioinspired polyphenol coatings for targeted and controlled drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Wu, Shuxian; Wu, Cuichen; Qiu, Liping; Zhu, Guizhi; Cui, Cheng; Liu, Yuan; Hou, Weijia; Wang, Yanyue; Zhang, Liqin; Teng, I.-Ting; Yang, Huang-Hao; Tan, Weihong

    2016-04-01

    The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles, termed MSN@polyphenol. The polyphenol coatings not only improved colloidal stability and prevented premature drug leakage, but also provided a scaffold for immobilization of targeting moieties, such as aptamers. Both immobilization of targeting aptamers and synthesis of polyphenol coating are easily accomplished without the aid of any other organic reagents. Importantly, the polyphenol coating (EGCg) used in this study could be biodegraded by acidic pH and intracellular glutathione, resulting in the release of trapped anticancer drugs. Based on confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity experiments, drug-loaded and polyphenol-coated MSNs were shown to possess highly efficient internalization and an apparent cytotoxic effect on target cancer, but not control, cells. Our results suggest that these highly biocompatible and biodegradable polyphenol-coated MSNs are promising vectors for controlled-release biomedical applications and cancer therapy.The development of biocompatible drug delivery systems with targeted recognition and controlled release has experienced a number of design challenges, including, for example, complicated preparation steps and premature drug release. Herein, we address these problems through an in situ self-polymerization method that synthesizes biodegradable polyphenol-coated porous nanomaterials for targeted and controlled drug delivery. As a proof of concept, we synthesized polyphenol-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles

  4. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D.; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J.; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R.; Glickman, Jonathan N.; Vemula, Praveen K.; Glimcher, Laurie H.; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amph...

  5. Shear-stress sensitive lenticular vesicles for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Margaret N.; Fedotenko, Illya A.; Abegg, Daniel; Althaus, Jasmin; Babel, Lucille; Favarger, France; Reiter, Renate; Tanasescu, Radu; Zaffalon, Pierre-Léonard; Ziegler, André; Müller, Bert; Saxer, Till; Zumbuehl, Andreas

    2012-08-01

    Atherosclerosis results in the narrowing of arterial blood vessels and this causes significant changes in the endogenous shear stress between healthy and constricted arteries. Nanocontainers that can release drugs locally with such rheological changes can be very useful. Here, we show that vesicles made from an artificial 1,3-diaminophospholipid are stable under static conditions but release their contents at elevated shear stress. These vesicles have a lenticular morphology, which potentially leads to instabilities along their equator. Using a model cardiovascular system based on polymer tubes and an external pump to represent shear stress in healthy and constricted vessels of the heart, we show that drugs preferentially release from the vesicles in constricted vessels that have high shear stress.

  6. Nitric oxide-related drug targets in headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jes

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so-called del......SUMMARY: Nitric oxide (NO) is a very important molecule in the regulation of cerebral and extra cerebral cranial blood flow and arterial diameters. It is also involved in nociceptive processing. Glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), a pro-drug for NO, causes headache in normal volunteers and a so...... experimentation make it highly likely that antagonizing NO effects will be effective in the treatment of primary headaches. Nonselective NOS inhibitors are likely to have side effects whereas selective compounds are now in early clinical trials. Antagonizing the rate limiting cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin seems...

  7. Formulation, Evaluation and Optimization of Pectin- Bora Rice Beads for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Hemraj Ramteke

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this research was to established new polysaccharide for the colon targeted drug delivery system, its formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Methods: Microspheres containing pectin and bora rice were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique using zinc acetate as cross linking agent and model drug used was glipizide. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, polymer to drug ratio (A, and concentration of cross linking agent (B on dependent variables, particle size, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency and percentage drug release. Results: Results of trial batches indicated that polymer to drug ratio and concentration of cross linking agent affects characteristics of beads. Beads were discrete, spherical and free flowing. Beads exhibited small particle size and showed higher percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. The optimized batch P2 exhibited satisfactory drug entrapment efficiency 68% and drug release was also controlled for more than 24 hours. The polymer to drug ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study of optimized pectin-bora rice beads demonstrated degradation of beads whenever they reached to the colon. Conclusion: Bora rice is potential polysaccharide for colon targeted drug delivery system.

  8. Carbon Nanotubes: An Emerging Drug Carrier for Targeting Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Vaibhav Rastogi; Pragya Yadav; Shiv Sankar Bhattacharya; Arun Kumar Mishra; Navneet Verma; Anurag Verma; Jayanta Kumar Pandit

    2014-01-01

    During recent years carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted by many researchers as a drug delivery carrier. CNTs are the third allotropic form of carbon-fullerenes which were rolled into cylindrical tubes. To be integrated into the biological systems, CNTs can be chemically modified or functionalised with therapeutically active molecules by forming stable covalent bonds or supramolecular assemblies based on noncovalent interactions. Owing to their high carrying capacity, biocompatibility,...

  9. DRUG TARGETING TO THE KIDNEY WITH LOW-MOLECULAR-WEIGHT PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSSEN, EJF; MOOLENAAR, F; DEZEEUW, D; MEIJER, DKF

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the design of a drug targeting strategy for renal specific delivery and endorenal release of drugs using low-molecular-weight proteins (LMWPs). In general, LMWPs are known to be filtered and subsequently reabsorbed by the proximal tubular cells of the kidneys. Within these cells L

  10. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  11. A new look at drugs targeting malignant melanoma--an application for mass spectrometry imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Yutaka; Végvári, Akos; Welinder, Charlotte; Jönsson, Göran; Ingvar, Christian; Lundgren, Lotta; Olsson, Håkan; Breslin, Thomas; Wieslander, Elisabet; Laurell, Thomas; Rezeli, Melinda; Jansson, Bo; Nishimura, Toshihide; Fehniger, Thomas E; Baldetorp, Bo; Marko-Varga, György

    2014-09-01

    Malignant melanoma (MM) patients are being treated with an increasing number of personalized medicine (PM) drugs, several of which are small molecule drugs developed to treat patients with specific disease genotypes and phenotypes. In particular, the clinical application of protein kinase inhibitors has been highly effective for certain subsets of MM patients. Vemurafenib, a protein kinase inhibitor targeting BRAF-mutated protein, has shown significant efficacy in slowing disease progression. In this paper, we provide an overview of this new generation of targeted drugs, and demonstrate the first data on localization of PM drugs within tumor compartments. In this study, we have introduced MALDI-MS imaging to provide new information on one of the drugs currently used in the PM treatment of MM, vemurafenib. In a proof-of-concept in vitro study, MALDI-MS imaging was used to identify vemurafenib applied to metastatic lymph nodes tumors of subjects attending the regional hospital network of Southern Sweden. The paper provides evidence of BRAF overexpression in tumors isolated from MM patients and localization of the specific drug targeting BRAF, vemurafenib, using MS fragment ion signatures. Our ability to determine drug uptake at the target sites of directed therapy provides important opportunity for increasing our understanding about the mode of action of drug activity within the disease environment. PMID:25044963

  12. Drug targeting strategies for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease: a mechanistic update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Arik; Amidon, Gordon L; Zimmermann, Ellen M

    2010-07-01

    The therapeutic management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) represents the perfect scenario for drug targeting to the site(s) of action. While existing formulation-based targeting strategies include rectal dosage forms and oral systems that target the colon by pH-, time-, microflora- and pressure-triggered drug release, novel approaches for site-specific delivery in IBD therapy will target the inflamed intestine per se rather than intestinal region. The purpose of this article is to present a mechanistic update on the strategies employed to achieve minimal systemic exposure accompanied by maximal drug levels in the inflamed intestinal tissue. The introduction of biological agents, micro/nanoparticulate carriers including liposomes, transgenic bacteria, and gene therapy opportunities are discussed, as well as the challenges remaining to be achieved in the targeted treatment of IBD. PMID:20594127

  13. Grants4Targets - an innovative approach to translate ideas from basic research into novel drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessl, Monika; Schoepe, Stefanie; Sommer, Anette; Schneider, Martin; Asadullah, Khusru

    2011-04-01

    Collaborations between industry and academia are steadily gaining importance. To combine expertises Bayer Healthcare has set up a novel open innovation approach called Grants4Targets. Ideas on novel drug targets can easily be submitted to http://www.grants4targets.com. After a review process, grants are provided to perform focused experiments to further validate the proposed targets. In addition to financial support specific know-how on target validation and drug discovery is provided. Experienced scientists are nominated as project partners and, depending on the project, tools or specific models are provided. Around 280 applications have been received and 41 projects granted. According to our experience, this type of bridging fund combined with joint efforts provides a valuable tool to foster drug discovery collaborations. PMID:21129498

  14. Protein target discovery of drug and its reactive intermediate metabolite by using proteomic strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Lianghai Hu; John Paul Fawcett; Jingkai Gu

    2012-01-01

    Identifying protein targets of bioactive compounds is an effective approach to discover unknown protein functions, identify molecular mechanisms of drug action, and obtain information for optimization of lead compounds. At the same time, metabolic activation of a drug can lead to cytotoxicities. Therefore, it is very important to systemically characterize the drug and its reactive intermediate. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic approach has emerged as the most efficient to study protein funct...

  15. MITOCHONDRIA: INSIGHT TARGET OF DRUG DEVELOPMENT IN CANCER CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Ataur Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in different physiological and pathological processes that are crucial for tumor cell physiology, growth and survival and its dysfunction leads to many human abnormalities, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders and cancer. The present review is focused on the different experimental and therapeutic cancer strategies addressed to either target mitochondria directly, or use mitochondria as mediators of apoptosis, although it...

  16. The AEROPATH project targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa: crystallographic studies for assessment of potential targets in early-stage drug discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A focused strategy has been directed towards the structural characterization of selected proteins from the bacterial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The objective is to exploit the resulting structural data, in combination with ligand-binding studies, and to assess the potential of these proteins for early-stage antimicrobial drug discovery. Bacterial infections are increasingly difficult to treat owing to the spread of antibiotic resistance. A major concern is Gram-negative bacteria, for which the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs has been particularly scarce. In an effort to accelerate early steps in drug discovery, the EU-funded AEROPATH project aims to identify novel targets in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by applying a multidisciplinary approach encompassing target validation, structural characterization, assay development and hit identification from small-molecule libraries. Here, the strategies used for target selection are described and progress in protein production and structure analysis is reported. Of the 102 selected targets, 84 could be produced in soluble form and the de novo structures of 39 proteins have been determined. The crystal structures of eight of these targets, ranging from hypothetical unknown proteins to metabolic enzymes from different functional classes (PA1645, PA1648, PA2169, PA3770, PA4098, PA4485, PA4992 and PA5259), are reported here. The structural information is expected to provide a firm basis for the improvement of hit compounds identified from fragment-based and high-throughput screening campaigns

  17. Large-scale prediction of drug–target interactions using protein sequences and drug topological structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Drug–target interactions are predicted using an extended SAR methodology. ► A drug–target interaction is regarded as an event triggered by many factors. ► Molecular fingerprint and CTD descriptors are used to represent drugs and proteins. ► Our approach shows compatibility between the new scheme and current SAR methodology. - Abstract: The identification of interactions between drugs and target proteins plays a key role in the process of genomic drug discovery. It is both consuming and costly to determine drug–target interactions by experiments alone. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop new in silico prediction approaches capable of identifying these potential drug–target interactions in a timely manner. In this article, we aim at extending current structure–activity relationship (SAR) methodology to fulfill such requirements. In some sense, a drug–target interaction can be regarded as an event or property triggered by many influence factors from drugs and target proteins. Thus, each interaction pair can be represented theoretically by using these factors which are based on the structural and physicochemical properties simultaneously from drugs and proteins. To realize this, drug molecules are encoded with MACCS substructure fingerings representing existence of certain functional groups or fragments; and proteins are encoded with some biochemical and physicochemical properties. Four classes of drug–target interaction networks in humans involving enzymes, ion channels, G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and nuclear receptors, are independently used for establishing predictive models with support vector machines (SVMs). The SVM models gave prediction accuracy of 90.31%, 88.91%, 84.68% and 83.74% for four datasets, respectively. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to predict the drug–target interactions, and show a general compatibility between the new scheme and current SAR

  18. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuhorn, Inge; Georgieva, Julia V.; Hoekstra, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics in

  19. One For All? Hitting multiple Alzheimer’s Disease targets with one drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ellen Hughes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease is a complex and multifactorial disease for which the mechanism is still not fully understood. As new insights into disease progression are discovered, new drugs must be designed to target those aspects of the disease that cause neuronal damage rather than just the symptoms currently addressed by single target drugs. It is becoming possible to target several aspects of the disease pathology at once using multi-target drugs. Intended as a introduction for non-experts, this review describes the key multi-target drug design approaches, namely structure-based, in silico, and data-mining, to evaluate what is preventing compounds progressing through the clinic to the market. Repurposing current drugs using their off-target effects reduces the cost of development, time to launch and also the uncertainty associated with safety and pharmacokinetics. The most promising drugs currently being investigated for repurposing to Alzheimer’s Disease are rasagiline, originally developed for the treatment of Parkinson’s Disease, and liraglutide, an antidiabetic. Rational drug design can combine pharmacophores of multiple drugs, systematically change functional groups, and rank them by virtual screening. Hits confirmed experimentally are rationally modified to generate an effective multi-potent lead compound. Examples from this approach are ASS234 with properties similar to rasagiline, and donecopride, a hybrid of an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor and a 5-HT4 receptor agonist with pro-cognitive effects. Exploiting these interdisciplinary approaches, public-private collaborative lead factories promise faster delivery of new drugs to the clinic.

  20. Anti-cancer drug loaded iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles (Fe@Au) for magnetic drug targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayal, Sibnath; Ramanujan, Raju Vijayaraghavan

    2010-09-01

    Magnetic drug targeting, using core-shell magnetic carrier particles loaded with anti-cancer drugs, is an emerging and significant method of cancer treatment. Gold shell-iron core nanoparticles (Fe@Au) were synthesized by the reverse micelle method with aqueous reactants, surfactant, co-surfactant and oil phase. XRD, XPS, TEM and magnetic property measurements were utilized to characterize these core-shell nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements showed that the particles were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that the saturation magnetization decreased with increasing gold concentration. The anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto these Fe@Au nanoparticle carriers and the drug release profiles showed that upto 25% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h. It was found that the amine (-NH2) group of DOX binds to the gold shell. An in vitro apparatus simulating the human circulatory system was used to determine the retention of these nanoparticle carriers when exposed to an external magnetic field. A high percentage of magnetic carriers could be retained for physiologically relevant flow speeds of fluid. The present findings show that DOX loaded gold coated iron nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery. PMID:21133071

  1. Novel drug designing rationale againstBrugia malayi microfilariae using herbal extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SharmaRD; PetareS; ShindeGB; KalyanGoswami; ReddyMVR

    2010-01-01

    Objective:To explore the effect of herbal polyphenolics on filariasisin vitro.Methods: Two herbal extracts, methanolic extracts of roots ofVitex negundo Linn. (Nirgundi) and leaves ofAegle marmelos Juss. (Beal) in different concentrations ranging from40-80ng/mL were tested for their antifilarial activity either alone or in combination with diethyl carbonate (DEC)(300μg/mL) and/orH2O2 (0.5 mM).Results:Combination of DEC and each extract had significant anti-filarial effect. And fractions of both extracts were not effective as crude herbal extract.Conclusions:Such unique pharmacodynamics reported in this study might provide new drug development stratagem against filariasis.

  2. Polymer-drug conjugates for targeted tumor theraphy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Etrych, Tomáš; Chytil, Petr; Koziolová, Eva; Šírová, Milada; Hoffman, S.; Müller, T.; Mäder, K.; Říhová, Blanka; Ulbrich, Karel

    Athens : International Institute of Anticancer Research, 2014, Roč. 34, č. 10, s. 5896-5898. ISSN 0250-7005. [International Conference of Anticancer Research /9./. Sithonia (GR), 06.10.2014-10.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/11/0325; GA ČR GCP207/12/J030; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0029 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * drug carrier Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry; FD - Oncology ; Hematology (MBU-M)

  3. Neoadjuvant Window Studies of Metformin and Biomarker Development for Drugs Targeting Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Simon R; Patel, Neel; Liu, Dan; Fenwick, John; Gleeson, Fergus; Buffa, Francesca; Harris, Adrian L

    2015-05-01

    There has been growing interest in the potential of the altered metabolic state typical of cancer cells as a drug target. The antidiabetes drug, metformin, is now under intense investigation as a safe method to modify cancer metabolism. Several studies have used window of opportunity in breast cancer patients before neoadjuvant chemotherapy to correlate gene expression analysis, metabolomics, immunohistochemical markers, and metabolic serum markers with those likely to benefit. We review the role metabolite measurement, functional imaging and gene sequencing analysis play in elucidating the effects of metabolically targeted drugs in cancer treatment and determining patient selection. PMID:26063894

  4. Label-free integrative pharmacology on-target of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrie, Ann M.; Sun, Haiyan; Fang, Ye

    2011-07-01

    We describe a label-free integrative pharmacology on-target (iPOT) method to assess the pharmacology of drugs at the β2-adrenergic receptor. This method combines dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays using an array of probe molecule-hijacked cells with similarity analysis. The whole cell DMR assays track cell system-based, ligand-directed, and kinetics-dependent biased activities of the drugs, and translates their on-target pharmacology into numerical descriptors which are subject to similarity analysis. We demonstrate that the approach establishes an effective link between the label-free pharmacology and in vivo therapeutic indications of drugs.

  5. Visualization of network target crosstalk optimizes drug synergism in myocardial ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Wan

    Full Text Available Numerous drugs and compounds have been validated as protecting against myocardial ischemia (MI, a leading cause of heart failure; however, synergistic possibilities among them have not been systematically explored. Thus, there appears to be significant room for optimization in the field of drug combination therapy for MI. Here, we propose an easy approach for the identification and optimization of MI-related synergistic drug combinations via visualization of the crosstalk between networks of drug targets corresponding to different drugs (each drug has a unique network of targets. As an example, in the present study, 28 target crosstalk networks (TCNs of random pairwise combinations of 8 MI-related drugs (curcumin, capsaicin, celecoxib, raloxifene, silibinin, sulforaphane, tacrolimus, and tamoxifen were established to illustrate the proposed method. The TCNs revealed a high likelihood of synergy between curcumin and the other drugs, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments. Further drug combination optimization showed a synergistic protective effect of curcumin, celecoxib, and sililinin in combination against H₂O₂-induced ischemic injury of cardiomyocytes at a relatively low concentration of 500 nM. This result is in agreement with the earlier finding of a denser and modular functional crosstalk between their networks of targets in the regulation of cell apoptosis. Our study offers a simple approach to rapidly search for and optimize potent synergistic drug combinations, which can be used for identifying better MI therapeutic strategies. Some new light was also shed on the characteristic features of drug synergy, suggesting that it is possible to apply this method to other complex human diseases.

  6. Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

    2012-02-01

    The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings. PMID:22328057

  7. Novel Methods for Drug-Target Interaction Prediction using Graph Mining

    KAUST Repository

    Ba Alawi, Wail

    2016-08-31

    The problem of developing drugs that can be used to cure diseases is important and requires a careful approach. Since pursuing the wrong candidate drug for a particular disease could be very costly in terms of time and money, there is a strong interest in minimizing such risks. Drug repositioning has become a hot topic of research, as it helps reduce these risks significantly at the early stages of drug development by reusing an approved drug for the treatment of a different disease. Still, finding new usage for a drug is non-trivial, as it is necessary to find out strong supporting evidence that the proposed new uses of drugs are plausible. Many computational approaches were developed to narrow the list of possible candidate drug-target interactions (DTIs) before any experiments are done. However, many of these approaches suffer from unacceptable levels of false positives. We developed two novel methods based on graph mining networks of drugs and targets. The first method (DASPfind) finds all non-cyclic paths that connect a drug and a target, and using a function that we define, calculates a score from all the paths. This score describes our confidence that DTI is correct. We show that DASPfind significantly outperforms other state-of-the-art methods in predicting the top ranked target for each drug. We demonstrate the utility of DASPfind by predicting 15 novel DTIs over a set of ion channel proteins, and confirming 12 out of these 15 DTIs through experimental evidence reported in literature and online drug databases. The second method (DASPfind+) modifies DASPfind in order to increase the confidence and reliability of the resultant predictions. Based on the structure of the drug-target interaction (DTI) networks, we introduced an optimization scheme that incrementally alters the network structure locally for each drug to achieve more robust top 1 ranked predictions. Moreover, we explored effects of several similarity measures between the targets on the prediction

  8. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor Subtypes as Potential Drug Targets for the Treatment of Schizophrenia, Drug Abuse and Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Thomsen, Morgane; Wörtwein, Gitta;

    2011-01-01

    's disease and drug abuse. Dopaminergic systems are regulated by cholinergic, especially muscarinic, input. Not surprisingly, increasing evidence implicates muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated pathways as potential targets for the treatment of these disorders classically viewed as "dopamine based......) acetylcholine binding site. Such agents may lead to the development of novel classes of drugs useful for the treatment of psychosis, drug abuse and Parkinson's disease. The present review highlights recent studies carried out using muscarinic receptor knock-out mice and new subtype-selective allosteric ligands...... to assess the roles of M(1), M(4), and M(5) receptors in various central processes that are under strong dopaminergic control. The outcome of these studies opens new perspectives for the use of novel muscarinic drugs for several severe disorders of the CNS....

  9. UDP-galactopyranose mutase, a potential drug target against human pathogenic nematode Brugia malayi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sweta; Valicherla, Guru R; Mohd Shahab; Gupta, Jyoti; Gayen, Jiaur R; Misra-Bhattacharya, Shailja

    2016-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis, a vector-borne neglected tropical disease affects millions of population in tropical and subtropical countries. Vaccine unavailability and emerging drug resistance against standard antifilarial drugs necessitate search of novel drug targets for developing alternate drugs. Recently, UDP-galactopyranose mutases (UGM) have emerged as a promising drug target playing an important role in parasite virulence and survival. This study deals with the cloning and characterization of Brugia malayi UGM and further exploring its antifilarial drug target potential. The recombinant protein was actively involved in conversion of UDP-galactopyranose (substrate) to UDP-galactofuranose (product) revealing Km and Vmax to be ∼51.15 μM and ∼1.27 μM/min, respectively. The purified protein appeared to be decameric in native state and its 3D homology modeling using Aspergillus fumigatus UGM enzyme as template revealed conservation of active site residues. Two specific prokaryotic inhibitors (compounds A and B) of the enzyme inhibited B. malayi UGM enzymatic activity competitively depicting Ki values ∼22.68 and ∼23.0 μM, respectively. These compounds were also active in vitro and in vivo against B. malayi The findings suggest that B. malayi UGM could be a potential antifilarial therapeutic drug target. PMID:27465638

  10. Identification of potential drug targets in Helicobacter pylori strain HPAG1 by in silico genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelapu, Nageswara R R; Mutha, Naresh V R; Akula, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric carcinoma. Drugs for treatment of H. pylori relieve from gastritis or pain but are not specific to H. pylori. Therefore, there is an immediate requirement for new therapeutic molecules to treat H. pylori. Current study investigates identification of drug targets in the strain HPAG1 of H. pylori by in silico genome analysis. Genome of HPAG1 was reconstructed for metabolic pathways and compared with Homosapien sapiens to identify genes which are unique to H. pylori. These unique genes were subjected to gene property analysis to identify the potentiality of the drug targets. Among the total number of genes analysed in H. pylori strain HPAG1, nearly 542 genes qualified as unique molecules and among them 29 were identified to be potential drug targets. Co/Zn/Cd efflux system membrane fusion protein, Ferric sidephore transport system and biopolymer transport protein EXbB were found to be critical drug targets to H. pylori HPAG1. Five genes (superoxide dismutase, HtrA protease/chaperone protein, Heatinducible transcription repressor HrcA, HspR, transcriptional repressor of DnaK operon, Cobalt-zinccadmium resistance protein CzcA) of the 29 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lending credence to our unique approach. PMID:26205802

  11. Inhibition of Glutamine Synthetase: A Potential Drug Target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L. Mowbray

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Globally, tuberculosis is second only to AIDS in mortality and the disease is responsible for over 1.3 million deaths each year. The impractically long treatment schedules (generally 6–9 months and unpleasant side effects of the current drugs often lead to poor patient compliance, which in turn has resulted in the emergence of multi-, extensively- and totally-drug resistant strains. The development of new classes of anti-tuberculosis drugs and new drug targets is of global importance, since attacking the bacterium using multiple strategies provides the best means to prevent resistance. This review presents an overview of the various strategies and compounds utilized to inhibit glutamine synthetase, a promising target for the development of drugs for TB therapy.

  12. Recent discoveries of influenza A drug target sites to combat virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hershna; Kukol, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Sequence variations in the binding sites of influenza A proteins are known to limit the effectiveness of current antiviral drugs. Clinically, this leads to increased rates of virus transmission and pathogenicity. Potential influenza A inhibitors are continually being discovered as a result of high-throughput cell based screening studies, whereas the application of computational tools to aid drug discovery has further increased the number of predicted inhibitors reported. This review brings together the aspects that relate to the identification of influenza A drug target sites and the findings from recent antiviral drug discovery strategies. PMID:27284062

  13. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous carbon nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Long; Jiao, Jian; Cui, Yu; Guo, Jingwen; Han, Ning; Di, Donghua; Chang, Di; Wang, Pu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Siling

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, hyaluronic acid (HA) functionalized uniform mesoporous carbon spheres (UMCS) were synthesized for targeted enzyme responsive drug delivery using a facile electrostatic attraction strategy. This HA modification ensured stable drug encapsulation in mesoporous carbon nanoparticles in an extracellular environment while increasing colloidal stability, biocompatibility, cell-targeting ability, and controlled cargo release. The cellular uptake experiments of fluorescently labeled mesoporous carbon nanoparticles, with or without HA functionalization, demonstrated that HA-UMCS are able to specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Moreover, the cargo loaded doxorubicin (DOX) and verapamil (VER) exhibited a dual pH and hyaluronidase-1 responsive release in the tumor microenvironment. In addition, VER/DOX/HA-UMCS exhibited a superior therapeutic effect on an in vivo HCT-116 tumor in BALB/c nude mice. In summary, it is expected that HA-UMCS will offer a new method for targeted co-delivery of drugs to tumors overexpressing CD44 receptors.

  14. Quantitative modeling of selective lysosomal targeting for drug design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Rosania, G.; Horobin, R.W.;

    2008-01-01

    Lysosomes are acidic organelles and are involved in various diseases, the most prominent is malaria. Accumulation of molecules in the cell by diffusion from the external solution into cytosol, lysosome and mitochondrium was calculated with the Fick–Nernst–Planck equation. The cell model considers...... the diffusion of neutral and ionic molecules across biomembranes, protonation to mono- or bivalent ions, adsorption to lipids, and electrical attraction or repulsion. Based on simulation results, high and selective accumulation in lysosomes was found for weak mono- and bivalent bases with intermediate...... to high log K ow. These findings were validated with experimental results and by a comparison to the properties of antimalarial drugs in clinical use. For ten active compounds, nine were predicted to accumulate to a greater extent in lysosomes than in other organelles, six of these were in the...

  15. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Leach

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA, was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells.

  16. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, John C.; Wang, Andrew; Ye, Kaiming; Jin, Sha

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA), was designed. A super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-aptamer-doxorubicin (SPIO-Apt-Dox) was fabricated and employed as a targeted drug delivery platform for cancer therapy. This DNA RNA hybridized aptamer antitumor agent was able to enhance the cytotoxicity of targeted cells while minimizing collateral damage to non-targeted cells. This SPIO-Apt-Dox nanoparticle has specificity to PSMA+ prostate cancer cells. Aptamer inhibited nonspecific uptake of membrane-permeable doxorubic to the non-target cells, leading to reduced untargeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake while enhancing targeted cytotoxicity and endocytic uptake. The experimental results indicate that the drug delivery platform can yield statistically significant effectiveness being more cytotoxic to the targeted cells as opposed to the non-targeted cells. PMID:26985893

  17. In-silico prediction of drug targets, biological activities, signal pathways and regulating networks of dioscin based on bioinformatics

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Lianhong; Zheng, Lingli; Xu, Lina; Dong, Deshi; Han, Xu; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Xu, Youwei; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Inverse docking technology has been a trend of drug discovery, and bioinformatics approaches have been used to predict target proteins, biological activities, signal pathways and molecular regulating networks affected by drugs for further pharmacodynamic and mechanism studies. Methods In the present paper, inverse docking technology was applied to screen potential targets from potential drug target database (PDTD). Then, the corresponding gene information of the obtained drug-targe...

  18. Electrospun medicated shellac nanofibers for colon-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Yu, Deng-Guang; Li, Xiao-Yan; Bligh, S W Annie; Williams, Gareth R

    2015-07-25

    Medicated shellac nanofibers providing colon-specific sustained release were fabricated using coaxial electrospinning. A solution of 7.5 g shellac and 1.5 g of ferulic acid (FA) in 10 mL ethanol was used as the core fluid, and a mixture of ethanol and N,N-dimethylformamide (8/10 v/v) as the shell. The presence of the shell fluid was required to prevent frequent clogging of the spinneret. The diameters of the fibers (D) can be manipulated by varying the ratio of shell to core flow rates (F), according to the equation D=0.52 F(-0.19). Scanning electron microscopy images revealed that fibers prepared with F values of 0.1 and 0.25 had linear morphologies with smooth surfaces, but when the shell fluid flow rate was increased to 0.5 the fiber integrity was compromised. FA was found to be amorphously distributed in the fibers on the basis of X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry results. This can be attributed to good compatibility between the drug and carrier: IR spectra indicated the presence of hydrogen bonds between the two. In vitro dissolution tests demonstrated that there was minimal FA release at pH 2.0, and sustained release in a neutral dissolution medium. The latter occurred through an erosion mechanism. During the dissolution processes, the shellac fibers were gradually converted into nanoparticles as the FA was freed into solution, and ultimately completely dissolved. PMID:26043827

  19. Polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers for oral colon-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Sang, Yuan; Feng, Jing; Li, Zhaoming; Zhao, Aili

    2016-08-01

    Oral colon-targeted drug delivery has attracted many researchers because of its distinct advantages of increasing the bioavailability of the drug at the target site and reducing the side effects. Polysaccharides that are precisely activated by the physiological environment of the colon hold greater promise for colon targeting. Considerable research efforts have been directed towards developing polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers. Types of polysaccharides for colon targeting and in vitro/in vivo assessments of polysaccharide-based carriers for oral colon-targeted drug delivery are summarised. Polysaccharide-based microspheres have gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon (colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), amoebiasis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)), but also for it's potential for the delivery of anti-rheumatoid arthritis and anti-chronic stable angina drugs. Besides, Polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers such as microbeads, microcapsules, microparticles, nanoparticles, nanogels and nanospheres are also introduced in this review. PMID:26766303

  20. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  1. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  2. Predicting Molecular Targets for Small-Molecule Drugs with a Ligand-Based Interaction Fingerprint Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ran; Wang, Yanli

    2016-06-20

    The computational prediction of molecular targets for small-molecule drugs remains a great challenge. Herein we describe a ligand-based interaction fingerprint (LIFt) approach for target prediction. Together with physics-based docking and sampling methods, we assessed the performance systematically by modeling the polypharmacology of 12 kinase inhibitors in three stages. First, we examined the capacity of this approach to differentiate true targets from false targets with the promiscuous binder staurosporine, based on native complex structures. Second, we performed large-scale profiling of kinase selectivity on the clinical drug sunitinib by means of computational simulation. Third, we extended the study beyond kinases by modeling the cross-inhibition of bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4) for 10 well-established kinase inhibitors. On this basis, we made prospective predictions by exploring new kinase targets for the anticancer drug candidate TN-16, originally known as a colchicine site binder and microtubule disruptor. As a result, p38α was highlighted from a panel of 187 different kinases. Encouragingly, our prediction was validated by an in vitro kinase assay, which showed TN-16 as a low-micromolar p38α inhibitor. Collectively, our results suggest the promise of the LIFt approach in predicting potential targets for small-molecule drugs. PMID:26222196

  3. 5HT3 receptors: Target for new antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepali; Prabhakar, Visakh; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2016-05-01

    5HT3 receptors (5HT3Rs) have long been identified as a potential target for antidepressants. Several studies have reported that antagonism of 5HT3Rs produces antidepressant-like effects. However, the exact role of 5HT3Rs and the mode of antidepressant action of 5HT3R antagonists still remain a mystery. Here, we provide a comprehensive overview of 5HT3Rs: (a) regional and subcellular distribution of 5HT3Rs in discrete brain regions, (b) preclinical and clinical evidence supporting the antidepressant effect of 5HT3R antagonists, and (c) neurochemical, biological and neurocellular signaling pathways associated with the antidepressant action of 5HT3R antagonists. 5HT3Rs located on the serotonergic and other neurotransmitter interneuronal projections control their release and affect mood and emotional behavior; however, new evidence suggests that apart from modulating the neurotransmitter functions, 5HT3R antagonists have protective effects in the pathogenic events including hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-axis hyperactivity, brain oxidative stress and impaired neuronal plasticity, pointing to hereby unknown and novel mechanisms of their antidepressant action. Nonetheless, further investigations are warranted to establish the exact role of 5HT3Rs in depression and antidepressant action of 5HT3R antagonists. PMID:26976353

  4. Identifying co-targets to fight drug resistance based on a random walk model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang-Chun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug resistance has now posed more severe and emergent threats to human health and infectious disease treatment. However, wet-lab approaches alone to counter drug resistance have so far still achieved limited success due to less knowledge about the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance. Our approach apply a heuristic search algorithm in order to extract active network under drug treatment and use a random walk model to identify potential co-targets for effective antibacterial drugs. Results We use interactome network of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and gene expression data which are treated with two kinds of antibiotic, Isoniazid and Ethionamide as our test data. Our analysis shows that the active drug-treated networks are associated with the trigger of fatty acid metabolism and synthesis and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-related processes and those results are consistent with the recent experimental findings. Efflux pumps processes appear to be the major mechanisms of resistance but SOS response is significantly up-regulation under Isoniazid treatment. We also successfully identify the potential co-targets with literature confirmed evidences which are related to the glycine-rich membrane, adenosine triphosphate energy and cell wall processes. Conclusions With gene expression and interactome data supported, our study points out possible pathways leading to the emergence of drug resistance under drug treatment. We develop a computational workflow for giving new insights to bacterial drug resistance which can be gained by a systematic and global analysis of the bacterial regulation network. Our study also discovers the potential co-targets with good properties in biological and graph theory aspects to overcome the problem of drug resistance.

  5. Prediction of Effective Drug Combinations by Chemical Interaction, Protein Interaction and Target Enrichment of KEGG Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug combinatorial therapy could be more effective in treating some complex diseases than single agents due to better efficacy and reduced side effects. Although some drug combinations are being used, their underlying molecular mechanisms are still poorly understood. Therefore, it is of great interest to deduce a novel drug combination by their molecular mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective drug combinations by a combined consideration of: (1 chemical interaction between drugs, (2 protein interactions between drugs’ targets, and (3 target enrichment of KEGG pathways. A benchmark dataset was constructed, consisting of 121 confirmed effective combinations and 605 random combinations. Each drug combination was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three properties. Some feature selection techniques, including Minimum Redundancy Maximum Relevance and Incremental Feature Selection, were adopted to extract the key features. Random forest model was built with its performance evaluated by 5-fold cross-validation. As a result, 55 key features providing the best prediction result were selected. These important features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of drug combinations, and the proposed prediction model could become a useful tool for screening possible drug combinations.

  6. ‘VIROSOMES’ A NOVEL STRATEGY FOR DELIVERY OF DRUGS AND TARGETING: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gowtham

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the years there has been a great revolution in drug delivery technologies. Virosomes drug delivery systems are an example of the various novel drug delivery systems available. A virosome is a drug or vaccine delivery mechanism consisting of unilamellar phospholipid bilayer vesicle incorporating virus derived proteins to allow the virosomes to fuse with target cells. Virosomes are not able to replicate but are pure fusion-active vesicle. These are reconstituted viral envelopes that can serve as vaccines and as vehicles for cellular delivery of macromolecules. The prospect of drug delivery and targeting using virosomes is an interesting field of research and development. Because virosomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, nontoxic, and non-autoimmunogenic, attempts have been made to use them as vaccines or adjuvants as well as delivery systems for drugs, nucleic acids, or genes for therapeutic purposes. The success of virosomal drug delivery depends on the methods used to prepare the encapsulated bioactive materials and incorporate them into the virosomes, as are characterization and formulation of the finished preparation. This article gives an insight of virosomes as a newer method of drug delivery. This article gives an insight of hydrogels and virosomes as a newer futuristic tool.

  7. Iontophoresis of minoxidil sulphate loaded microparticles, a strategy for follicular drug targeting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfuso, Guilherme M; Barros, M Angélica de Oliveira; Delgado-Charro, M Begoña; Guy, Richard H; Lopez, Renata F V

    2015-10-01

    The feasibility of targeting drugs to hair follicles by a combination of microencapsulation and iontophoresis has been evaluated. Minoxidil sulphate (MXS), which is used in the treatment of alopecia, was selected as a relevant drug with respect to follicular penetration. The skin permeation and disposition of MXS encapsulated in chitosan microparticles (MXS-MP) was evaluated in vitro after passive and iontophoretic delivery. Uptake of MXS was quantified at different exposure times in the stratum corneum (SC) and hair follicles. Microencapsulation resulted in increased (6-fold) drug accumulation in the hair follicles relative to delivery from a simple MXS solution. Application of iontophoresis enhanced follicular delivery for both the solution and the microparticle formulations. It appears, therefore, that microencapsulation and iontophoresis can act synergistically to enhance topical drug targeting to hair follicles. PMID:26222406

  8. Cryptococcal therapies and drug targets: the old, the new and the promising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Carolina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2016-06-01

    Half a century after the introduction of Amphotericin B the management of cryptococcosis remains unsatisfactory. The disease, caused primarily by the two fungal species Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii, remains responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality despite standard medical care. Current therapeutic options are limited to Amphotericin B, azoles and 5-flucytosine. However, this organism has numerous well-characterized virulence mechanisms that are amenable to pharmacological interference and are thus potential therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss existing approved antifungal drugs, resistance mechanisms to these drugs and non-standard antifungal drugs that have potential in treatment of cryptococcosis, including immunomodulatory strategies that synergize with antifungal drugs, such as cytokine administration or monoclonal antibodies. Finally, we summarize attempts to target well-described virulence factors of Cryptococcus, the capsule or fungal melanin. This review emphasizes the pressing need for new therapeutic alternatives for cryptococcosis. PMID:26990050

  9. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers

  10. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jiang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX, are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems.

  11. Multidrug resistance in oncology and beyond : from imaging of drug efflux pumps to cellular drug targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagengast, Wouter B; Oude Munnink, Thijs H; Dijkers, Eli; Hospers, Geesiena; Brouwers, Adrienne H; Schröder, Carolien P; Lub-de Hooge, Marjolijn; de Vries, Elisabeth G E

    2010-01-01

    Resistance of tumor cells to several structurally unrelated classes of natural products, including anthracyclines, taxanes, and epipodophyllotoxines, is often referred as multidrug resistance (MDR). This is associated with ATP-binding cassette transporters, which function as drug efflux pumps such a

  12. High concentrations of drug in target tissues following local controlled release are utilized for both drug distribution and biologic effect: an example with epicardial inotropic drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, Mikhail Y; Edelman, Elazer R; Wei, Abraham E; Pezone, Matthew J; Lovich, Mark A

    2013-10-28

    Local drug delivery preferentially loads target tissues with a concentration gradient from the surface or point of release that tapers down to more distant sites. Drug that diffuses down this gradient must be in unbound form, but such drug can only elicit a biologic effect through receptor interactions. Drug excess loads tissues, increasing gradients and driving penetration, but with limited added biological response. We examined the hypothesis that local application reduces dramatically systemic circulating drug levels but leads to significantly higher tissue drug concentration than might be needed with systemic infusion in a rat model of local epicardial inotropic therapy. Epinephrine was infused systemically or released locally to the anterior wall of the heart using a novel polymeric platform that provides steady, sustained release over a range of precise doses. Epinephrine tissue concentration, upregulation of cAMP, and global left ventricular response were measured at equivalent doses and at doses equally effective in raising indices of contractility. The contractile stimulation by epinephrine was linked to drug tissue levels and commensurate cAMP upregulation for IV systemic infusion, but not with local epicardial delivery. Though cAMP was a powerful predictor of contractility with local application, tissue epinephrine levels were high and variable--only a small fraction of the deposited epinephrine was utilized in second messenger signaling and biologic effect. The remainder of deposited drug was likely used in diffusive transport and distribution. Systemic side effects were far more profound with IV infusion which, though it increased contractility, also induced tachycardia and loss of systemic vascular resistance, which were not seen with local application. Local epicardial inotropic delivery illustrates then a paradigm of how target tissues differentially handle and utilize drug compared to systemic infusion. PMID:23872515

  13. Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PKKKRKV (Pro-Lys-Lys-Lys-Arg-Lys-Val, PV7), a seven amino acid peptide, has emerged as one of the primary nuclear localization signals that can be targeted into cell nucleus via the nuclear import machinery. Taking advantage of chemical diversity and biological activities of this short peptide sequence, in this study, Pluronic F127 nanomicelles engineered with nuclear localized functionality were successfully developed for intracellular drug delivery. These nanomicelles with the size ∼ 100 nm were self-assembled from F127 polymer that was flanked with two PV7 sequences at its both terminal ends. Hydrophobic anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) with inherent fluorescence was chosen as the model drug, which was found to be efficiently encapsulated into nanomicelles with the encapsulation efficiency at 72.68%. In comparison with the non-functionalized namomicelles, the microscopic observation reveals that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles display a higher cellular uptake, especially into the nucleus of HepG2 cells, due to the nuclear localization signal effects. Both cytotoxicity and apoptosis studies show that the DOX-loaded nanomicelles were more potent than drug nanomicelles without nuclear targeting functionality. It was thus concluded that PV7 functionalized nanomicelles could be a potentially alternative vehicle for nuclear targeting drug delivery. - Highlights: ► A new nuclear targeted drug delivery system based on micelles is developed. ► This micellar system features a core-shell structure with the size peaked at 100 nm. ► PV7, a short peptide sequence, is adopted as a nuclear targeting ligand. ► PV7 functionalized drug loaded micelles are more potent in killing tumor cells

  14. Natural Polymeric Nanoparticles for Brain-Targeting: Implications on Drug and Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzoghby, Ahmed O; Abd-Elwakil, Mahmoud M; Abd-Elsalam, Kholod; Elsayed, Mustafa T; Hashem, Yosra; Mohamed, Ola

    2016-01-01

    There is a broad range of biological, chemical and physical hurdles for drugs to reach the brain. Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems hold tremendous potential for diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders, including the capacity of crossing the blood-brain barrier and accessing to the brain after systemic administration. Thus, nanoparticles enable the delivery of a great variety of drugs including anticancer drugs, analgesics, anti- Alzheimer`s drugs, protease inhibitors, and several macromolecules into the brain. Moreover, nanoparticles may importantly reduce the drug`s toxicity and adverse effects due to an alteration of the body distribution. A very critical and important requirement for nanoparticulate brain delivery is that the employed nanoparticles are biocompatible and, moreover, rapidly biodegradable. Therefore, nanocarriers fabricated from natural polymers including polysaccharides and proteins are particularly interesting. Meeting requirements such as low cytotoxicity, abundant surface functional groups, high drug binding capacity and significant uptake into the targeted cells, natural polymer-based nanocarriers represent promising candidates for efficient drug and gene delivery to the brain. The current review highlights the latest advances achieved in developing drug-loaded polysaccharide and protein nanocarriers for brain delivery. The nanoparticles are discussed with respect to their formulation aspects, advantages, limitations, as well as the major outcomes of the in vitro and in vivo investigations. Modification of the nanoparticle surface with specific brain targeting ligands or by coating with certain surfactants for enhanced brain delivery is also reviewed. In addition, the mechanisms of the nanoparticle-mediated drug transport across the BBB are also discussed in this review. PMID:26845323

  15. Anti-HIV-1 Therapeutics: From FDA-approved Drugs to Hypothetical Future Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, Catherine S; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty-five years after its discovery, HIV-1 remains one of the world’s most formidable and destructive pathogens. Several classes of anti-HIV-1 agents are currently in widespread clinical use in developed nations; however, viral resistance to these drugs limits their effectiveness in a growing number of patients. It is therefore imperative that novel drugs be developed. Recent advances in the fields of HIV-1 molecular virology and cell biology have revealed possible new targets for...

  16. Colon Targeting Drug - Synthesis and evaluation of prodrugs of Quiniodochlor by -Glucosidase enzyme with HPLC methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Gera Parul; Sharma S.K; Budhiraja Rajat

    2012-01-01

    Quiniodochlor has well established antimicrobial properties. It is used for treatment of amoebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica. The drug is to be delivered to the colon for its effective action against Entamoeba histolytica. But the pharmacokinetic profile of Quiniodochlor indicates that the drug is not completely and promptly absorbed after oral administration. Quiniodochlor is specifically targeted to colon by making its prodrugs. Chemical structure of Quiniodochlor posses a hydroxyl g...

  17. Is the beta3-adrenoceptor (ADRB3) a potential target for uterorelaxant drugs?

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The management of premature birth still remains unsatisfactory. Since the relative lack of efficiency and/or safety of current tocolytic agents have been highlighted, it is necessary to develop new uterorelaxant drugs deprived of important maternal and foetal side effects. Our work reported in this review focuses on a potential new target for tocolytic drugs, the beta3-adrenoceptor (ADRB3). This third type of ADRB is shown to be present and functional in human myometrium. We demonstrated that...

  18. Studies in Multifunctional Drug Development: Preparation and Evaluation of 11beta-Substituted Estradiol-Drug Conjugates, Cell Membrane Targeting Imaging Agents, and Target Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, KinhLuan Lenny D.

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death after cardiovascular disease in the United State. Despite extensive research in development of antitumor drugs, most of these therapeutic entities often possess nonspecific toxicity, thus they can only be used to treat tumors in higher doses or more frequently. Because of the cytotoxicity and severe side effects, the drug therapeutic window normally is limited. Beside the toxicity issue, antitumor drug are also not selectively taken up by tumor cells, thus the necessitating concentrations that would eradicate the tumor can often not be used. In addition, tumor cells tend to develop resistance against the anticancer drugs after prolonged treatment. Therefore, alleviating the systemic cytotoxicity and side effects, improving in tumor selectivity, high potency, and therapeutic efficacy are still major obstacles in the area of anticancer drug development. A more promising approach for developing a selective agent for cancer is to conjugate a potent therapeutic drug, or an imaging agent with a targeting group, such as antibody or a high binding-specificity small molecule, that selectively recognize the overexpressed antigens or proteins on tumor cells. My research combines several approaches to describe this strategy via using different targeting molecules to different diseases, as well as different potent cytotoxic drugs for different therapies. Three studies related to the preparation and biological evaluation of new therapeutic agents, such as estradiol-drug hybrids, cell membrane targeted molecular imaging agents, and multifunctional NPs will be discussed. The preliminary results of these studies indicated that our new reagents achieved their initial objectives and can be further improved for optimized synthesis and in vivo experiments. The first study describes the method in which we employed a modular assembly approach to synthesize a novel 11beta-substituted steroidal anti-estrogen. The key intermediate was synthesized

  19. Octreotide-Mediated Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery via a Cleavable Doxorubicin-Peptide Conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelle, Marco; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Freidel, Christoph; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Musheev, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Stalla, Günter; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-12-01

    Although recent methods for targeted drug delivery have addressed many of the existing problems of cancer therapy associated with undesirable side effects, significant challenges remain that have to be met before they find significant clinical relevance. One such area is the delicate chemical bond that is applied to connect a cytotoxic drug with targeting moieties like antibodies or peptides. Here we describe a novel platform that can be utilized for the preparation of drug-carrier conjugates in a site-specific manner, which provides excellent versatility and enables triggered release inside cancer cells. Its key feature is a cleavable doxorubicin-octreotide bioconjugate that targets overexpressed somatostatin receptors on tumor cells, where the coupling between the two components was achieved through the first cleavable disulfide-intercalating linker. The tumor targeting ability and suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in AtT-20 cells by both octreotide and the doxorubicin hybrid were determined via a specific radioimmunoassay. Both substances reduced the hormone secretion to a similar extent, which demonstrated that the tumor homing peptide is able to interact with the relevant cell surface receptors after the attachment of the drug. Effective drug release was quickly accomplished in the presence of the physiological reducing agent glutathione. We also demonstrate the relevance of this scaffold in biological context in cytotoxicity assays with pituitary, pancreatic, and breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26524088

  20. Confidence from uncertainty - A multi-target drug screening method from robust control theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petzold Linda R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Robustness is a recognized feature of biological systems that evolved as a defence to environmental variability. Complex diseases such as diabetes, cancer, bacterial and viral infections, exploit the same mechanisms that allow for robust behaviour in healthy conditions to ensure their own continuance. Single drug therapies, while generally potent regulators of their specific protein/gene targets, often fail to counter the robustness of the disease in question. Multi-drug therapies offer a powerful means to restore disrupted biological networks, by targeting the subsystem of interest while preventing the diseased network from reconciling through available, redundant mechanisms. Modelling techniques are needed to manage the high number of combinatorial possibilities arising in multi-drug therapeutic design, and identify synergistic targets that are robust to system uncertainty. Results We present the application of a method from robust control theory, Structured Singular Value or μ- analysis, to identify highly effective multi-drug therapies by using robustness in the face of uncertainty as a new means of target discrimination. We illustrate the method by means of a case study of a negative feedback network motif subject to parametric uncertainty. Conclusions The paper contributes to the development of effective methods for drug screening in the context of network modelling affected by parametric uncertainty. The results have wide applicability for the analysis of different sources of uncertainty like noise experienced in the data, neglected dynamics, or intrinsic biological variability.

  1. Colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems: design trends and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-08-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS. PMID:26070545

  2. Crowd sourcing a new paradigm for interactome driven drug target identification in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Vashisht

    Full Text Available A decade since the availability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb genome sequence, no promising drug has seen the light of the day. This not only indicates the challenges in discovering new drugs but also suggests a gap in our current understanding of Mtb biology. We attempt to bridge this gap by carrying out extensive re-annotation and constructing a systems level protein interaction map of Mtb with an objective of finding novel drug target candidates. Towards this, we synergized crowd sourcing and social networking methods through an initiative 'Connect to Decode' (C2D to generate the first and largest manually curated interactome of Mtb termed 'interactome pathway' (IPW, encompassing a total of 1434 proteins connected through 2575 functional relationships. Interactions leading to gene regulation, signal transduction, metabolism, structural complex formation have been catalogued. In the process, we have functionally annotated 87% of the Mtb genome in context of gene products. We further combine IPW with STRING based network to report central proteins, which may be assessed as potential drug targets for development of drugs with least possible side effects. The fact that five of the 17 predicted drug targets are already experimentally validated either genetically or biochemically lends credence to our unique approach.

  3. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Glickman, Jonathan N; Vemula, Praveen K; Glimcher, Laurie H; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-08-12

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD. PMID:26268315

  4. Anti-tumor targeted drug delivery systems mediated by aminopeptidase N/CD13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Wang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aminopeptidase N (APN/CD13 is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is overexpressed on tumor neovascular endothelial cells and most tumor cells, where it plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis. Peptides containing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR motif can specifically recognize APN/CD13 allowing them to act as tumor-homing peptides for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor drugs to tumor neovascular endothelial cells and tumor cells. This article reviews the literature and recent developments related to APN/CD13, its role in tumor growth and some anti-tumor drug delivery systems containing NGR peptides designed to target APN/CD13.

  5. A novel targeted system to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to EphA2-expressing cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Si; Placzek, William J.; Stebbins, John L.; Mitra, Sayantan; Noberini, Roberta; Koolpe, Mitchell; Zhang, Ziming; Dahl, Russell; Pasquale, Elena B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of anti-cancer drugs is often limited by their systemic toxicities and adverse side effects. We report that the EphA2 receptor is over-expressed preferentially in several human cancer cell lines compared to normal tissues and that an EphA2 targeting peptide (YSAYPDSVPMMS) can be effective in delivering anti-cancer agents to such tumors. Hence, we report on the synthesis and characterizations of a novel EphA2-targeting agent conjugated with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel. We...

  6. Virus-encoded chemokine receptors--putative novel antiviral drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2005-01-01

    Large DNA viruses, in particular herpes- and poxviruses, have evolved proteins that serve as mimics or decoys for endogenous proteins in the host. The chemokines and their receptors serve key functions in both innate and adaptive immunity through control of leukocyte trafficking, and have as such a...... receptors. The chemokine receptors belong to the superfamily of G-protein coupled 7TM receptors that per se are excellent drug targets. At present, non-peptide antagonists have been developed against many chemokine receptors. The potentials of the virus-encoded chemokine receptors as drug targets--ie. as...

  7. The case for soluble Aβ oligomers as a drug target in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefti, Franz; Goure, William F; Jerecic, Jasna; Iverson, Kent S; Walicke, Patricia A; Krafft, Grant A

    2013-05-01

    Soluble Aβ oligomers are now widely recognized as key pathogenic structures in Alzheimer's disease. They inhibit synaptic function, leading to early memory deficits and synaptic degeneration, and they trigger the downstream neuronal signaling responsible for phospho-tau Alzheimer's pathology. The marginal effects observed in recent clinical studies of solanezumab, targeting monomeric Aβ, and bapineuzumab, targeting amyloid plaques, prompted expert comments that drug discovery efforts in Alzheimer's disease should focus on soluble forms of Aβ rather than fibrillar Aβ deposits found in amyloid plaques. Accumulating scientific data suggest that soluble Aβ oligomers represent the optimal intervention target within the amyloid manifold. Active drug discovery approaches include antibodies that selectively capture soluble Aβ oligomers, selective modifiers of oligomer assembly, and receptor antagonists. The onset of symptomatic clinical benefit is expected to be rapid for such agents, because neuronal memory signaling should normalize on blockage of soluble Aβ oligomers. This key feature is not shared by amyloid-lowering therapeutics, and it should translate into streamlined clinical development for oligomer-targeting drugs. Oligomer-targeting drugs should also confer long-term disease modification and slowing of disease progression, because they prevent the downstream signaling responsible for phospho-tau mediated cytoskeletal degeneration. PMID:23582316

  8. Methodologies and Application of New Target Identification, Drug Action Mechanism Investigation and New Molecular Entity Discovery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ The group, headed by Prof.JIANG Hualiang with the CAS Shanghai Institute of Materia Medica, has been centering on the basic research of pharmaceutical science, including identifying new targets, studying new drug action mechanisms and discovering new drug candidates.On the basis of new methodology development, an effective multi-disciplinary research platform for drug research and discovery has been established through the integration of different disciplines of computational chemistry, organic synthesis, molecular and cellular biology.A bunch of creative results have been achieved in these areas.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF ENZYMATICALY TRIGGERED MULTIPARTICULATE COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohapatra Santosh K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The most critical challenge in oral colon specific drug delivery approach is to preserve the formulation during its passage through the stomach and about first six meters of the small intestine. Microbial enzyme-triggering mechanisms seem to be promising to provide more reliable colonic delivery .The objective of the present study was to develop biodegradable colon targeted multiparticulate system by using guar gum. In this study drug (Budesonide loaded pellets were coated with aqueous guar gum solution and subjected to In-vitro drug release studies simulating GIT with and without enzyme as well as coating properties were evaluated by SEM. In-vitro release studies indicates that drug release after 4.5 h lag time in presence of enzyme and lag time increase in absence of enzyme which indicated the enzyme triggered system for colonic release. This Multiparticulate system can be effectively used for colonic drug delivery for effective treatment of colonic diseases.

  10. NASAL ROUTE: A NOVELISTIC APPROACH FOR TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY TO CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary Rakhi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery through nasal route has attracted the interest of scientific community as it has been potentially explored as an alternative route for the administration of vaccines and biomolecules such as proteins, peptides and non-peptide drugs that are susceptible to enzymatic or acidic degradation and first-pass hepatic metabolism. The nasal mucosa is one of the most permeable and highly vascularised sites for drug administration ensuring rapid absorption and onset of therapeutic action. Intranasal administration is a non-invasive route for drug delivery, which is widely used for the local treatment of rhinitis or nasal polyposis. Since drugs can be absorbed into the systemic circulation through the nasal mucosa, this route may also be used in a range of acute or chronic conditions requiring considerable systemic exposure. In addition it minimizes the lag time associated with oral drug delivery and offers non-invasiveness, self medication, patient comfort and patient compliance which are hurdled in intravenous drug therapy. The objective of this review is to provide an anatomical, histological and physiological overview of nose, absorption enhancers, barriers related to nasal drug delivery, physicochemical, biological and formulation related factors affecting nasal drug delivery system and its advantages. It also highlights research approaches on brain targeting through nasal cavity.

  11. Layered Double Hydroxide Modified by PEGylated Hyaluronic Acid as a Hybrid Nanocarrier for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董岸杰; 李雪; 王伟伟; 韩尚聪; 刘鉴锋; 刘金剑; 赵军强; 许舒欣; 邓联东

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, organic-inorganic hybrid nanocarriers are explored for effective drug delivery and pref-erable disease treatments. In this study, using 5-fluorouracil(5-FU)as electronegative model drug, a new type of organic-inorganic hybrid drug delivery system(LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU)was conceived and manufactured by the ad-sorption of PEGylated hyaluronic acid(HA-PEG)on the surface of layered double hydroxide(LDH, prepared via hydrothermal method)and the intercalation of 5-FU in the interlamination of LDH via ion exchange strategy. The drug loading amount of LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU achieved as high as 34.2%. LDH, LDH/5-FU and LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, TGA, laser particle size analyzer and SEM. With the benefit of pH-degradable feature of LDH and enzyme-degradable feature of HA, LDH/HA-PEG/5-FU showed pH-degradable and enzyme-degradable capacity inin vitro drug release. Moreover, the drug carrier LDH/HA-PEG contained biocom-patible PEG and tumor-targeted HA, resulting in lower cytotoxicity and better endocytosis compared with LDHin vitro. It was suggested that the organic-inorganic hybrid drug delivery system, which was endowed with the proper-ties of controlled release, low toxicity and tumor-targeting delivery for ameliorative cancer therapy, was advisable and might be applied further to fulfill other treatments.

  12. Gene Ontology and KEGG Pathway Enrichment Analysis of a Drug Target-Based Classification System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    Full Text Available Drug-target interaction (DTI is a key aspect in pharmaceutical research. With the ever-increasing new drug data resources, computational approaches have emerged as powerful and labor-saving tools in predicting new DTIs. However, so far, most of these predictions have been based on structural similarities rather than biological relevance. In this study, we proposed for the first time a "GO and KEGG enrichment score" method to represent a certain category of drug molecules by further classification and interpretation of the DTI database. A benchmark dataset consisting of 2,015 drugs that are assigned to nine categories ((1 G protein-coupled receptors, (2 cytokine receptors, (3 nuclear receptors, (4 ion channels, (5 transporters, (6 enzymes, (7 protein kinases, (8 cellular antigens and (9 pathogens was constructed by collecting data from KEGG. We analyzed each category and each drug for its contribution in GO terms and KEGG pathways using the popular feature selection "minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR" method, and key GO terms and KEGG pathways were extracted. Our analysis revealed the top enriched GO terms and KEGG pathways of each drug category, which were highly enriched in the literature and clinical trials. Our results provide for the first time the biological relevance among drugs, targets and biological functions, which serves as a new basis for future DTI predictions.

  13. Combating malaria with nanotechnology-based targeted and combinatorial drug delivery strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Miloni; S, Brijesh

    2016-08-01

    Despite the advancement of science, infectious diseases such as malaria remain an ongoing challenge globally. The main reason this disease still remains a menace in many countries around the world is the development of resistance to many of the currently available anti-malarial drugs. While developing new drugs is rather expensive and the prospect of a potent vaccine is still evading our dream of a malaria-free world, one of the feasible options is to package the older drugs in newer ways. For this, nano-sized drug delivery vehicles have been used and are proving to be promising prospects in the way malaria will be treated in the future. Since, monotherapy has given way to combination therapy in malaria treatment, nanotechnology-based delivery carriers enable to encapsulate various drug moieties in the same package, thus avoiding the complications involved in conjugation chemistry to produce hybrid drug molecules. Further, we envisage that using targeted delivery approaches, we may be able to achieve a much better radical cure and curb the side effects associated with the existing drug molecules. Thus, this review will focus on some of the nanotechnology-based combination and targeted therapies and will discuss the possibilities of better therapies that may be developed in the future. PMID:27067712

  14. Doxorubicin loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayal, S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ramanujan, R.V., E-mail: ramanujan@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2010-04-06

    Magnetic drug targeting is a drug delivery system that can be used in locoregional cancer treatment. Coated magnetic particles, called carriers, are very useful for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs. Magnetic carriers were synthesized by coprecipitation of iron oxide followed by coating with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, TEM, TGA, FTIR and VSM techniques. The magnetic core of the carriers was magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), with average size of 10 nm. The room temperature VSM measurements showed that magnetic particles were superparamagnetic. The amount of PVA bound to the iron oxide nanoparticles were estimated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the attachment of PVA to the iron oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR analysis. Doxorubicin (DOX) drug loading and release profiles of PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed that up to 45% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h, the drug release followed the Fickian diffusion-controlled process. The binding of DOX to the PVA was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The present findings show that DOX loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

  15. Doxorubicin loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic drug targeting is a drug delivery system that can be used in locoregional cancer treatment. Coated magnetic particles, called carriers, are very useful for delivering chemotherapeutic drugs. Magnetic carriers were synthesized by coprecipitation of iron oxide followed by coating with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, TEM, TGA, FTIR and VSM techniques. The magnetic core of the carriers was magnetite (Fe3O4), with average size of 10 nm. The room temperature VSM measurements showed that magnetic particles were superparamagnetic. The amount of PVA bound to the iron oxide nanoparticles were estimated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the attachment of PVA to the iron oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by FTIR analysis. Doxorubicin (DOX) drug loading and release profiles of PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles showed that up to 45% of adsorbed drug was released in 80 h, the drug release followed the Fickian diffusion-controlled process. The binding of DOX to the PVA was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The present findings show that DOX loaded PVA coated iron oxide nanoparticles are promising for magnetically targeted drug delivery.

  16. Simulating Serial-Target Antibacterial Drug Synergies Using Flux Balance Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krueger, Andrew S.; Munck, Christian; Dantas, Gautam;

    2016-01-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is an increasingly useful approach for modeling the behavior of metabolic systems. However, standard FBA modeling of genetic knockouts cannot predict drug combination synergies observed between serial metabolic targets, even though such synergies give rise to some of the....... However, we find very different predictions for combinations, where flux diversion, which mimics the kinetics of competitive metabolic inhibitors, can explain serial target synergies between metabolic enzyme inhibitors that we confirmed in Escherichia coli cultures. FBA flux diversion opens the...

  17. Targeted Skipping of Human Dystrophin Exons in Transgenic Mouse Model Systemically for Antisense Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wu; Ehsan Benrashid; Peijuan Lu; Caryn Cloer; Allen Zillmer; Mona Shaban; Qi Long Lu

    2011-01-01

    Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs). However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD/...

  18. Exploiting bacterial DNA gyrase as a drug target: current state and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Collin, Frédéric; Karkare, Shantanu; Maxwell, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    DNA gyrase is a type II topoisomerase that can introduce negative supercoils into DNA at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. It is essential in all bacteria but absent from higher eukaryotes, making it an attractive target for antibacterials. The fluoroquinolones are examples of very successful gyrase-targeted drugs, but the rise in bacterial resistance to these agents means that we not only need to seek new compounds, but also new modes of inhibition of this enzyme. We review known gyrase-specifi...

  19. Phytochemical-mediated Protein Expression Profiling and the Potential Applications in Therapeutic Drug Target Identifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fai-Chu; Tan, Siok-Thing; Chai, Tsun-Thai

    2016-07-29

    Many phytochemicals derived from edible medicinal plants have been investigated intensively for their various bioactivities. However, the detailed mechanism and their corresponding molecular targets frequently remain elusive. In this review, we present a summary of the research works done on phytochemical-mediated molecular targets, identified via proteomic approach. Concurrently, we also highlighted some pharmaceutical drugs which could be traced back to their origins in phytochemicals. For ease of presentation, these identified protein targets were categorized into two important healthcare-related fields, namely anti-bacterial and anti-cancer research. Through this review, we hope to highlight the usefulness of comparative proteomic as a powerful tool in phytochemical-mediated protein target identifications. Likewise, we wish to inspire further investigations on some of these protein targets identified over the last few years. With contributions from all researchers, the accumulative efforts could eventually lead to the discovery of some target-specific, low-toxicity therapeutic agents. PMID:26193174

  20. An improved approach for predicting drug-target interaction: proteochemometrics to molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Naeem; Sharma, Mahesh; Garg, Prabha

    2016-02-23

    Proteochemometric (PCM) methods, which use descriptors of both the interacting species, i.e. drug and the target, are being successfully employed for the prediction of drug-target interactions (DTI). However, unavailability of non-interacting dataset and determining the applicability domain (AD) of model are a main concern in PCM modeling. In the present study, traditional PCM modeling was improved by devising novel methodologies for reliable negative dataset generation and fingerprint based AD analysis. In addition, various types of descriptors and classifiers were evaluated for their performance. The Random Forest and Support Vector Machine models outperformed the other classifiers (accuracies >98% and >89% for 10-fold cross validation and external validation, respectively). The type of protein descriptors had negligible effect on the developed models, encouraging the use of sequence-based descriptors over the structure-based descriptors. To establish the practical utility of built models, targets were predicted for approved anticancer drugs of natural origin. The molecular recognition interactions between the predicted drug-target pair were quantified with the help of a reverse molecular docking approach. The majority of predicted targets are known for anticancer therapy. These results thus correlate well with anticancer potential of the selected drugs. Interestingly, out of all predicted DTIs, thirty were found to be reported in the ChEMBL database, further validating the adopted methodology. The outcome of this study suggests that the proposed approach, involving use of the improved PCM methodology and molecular docking, can be successfully employed to elucidate the intricate mode of action for drug molecules as well as repositioning them for new therapeutic applications. PMID:26822863

  1. Exploring New Drug Targets through the Identification of Target Molecules of Bioactive Natural Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    With the development of cell biology and microbiology, it has become easy to culture many types of animal cells and microbes, and they are frequently used for phenotypic screening to explore medicinal seeds. On the other hand, it is recognized that cells and pathogenic microbes present in pathologic sites and infected regions of the human body display unique properties different from those under general culture conditions. We isolated several bioactive compounds from marine medicinal resources using constructed bioassay-guided separation focusing on the unique changes in the characteristics of cells and pathogenic microbes (Mycobacterium spp.) in the human body under disease conditions. In addition, we also carried out identification studies of target molecules of the bioactive compounds by methods utilizing the gene expression profile, transformants of cells or microbes, synthetic probe molecules of the isolated compounds, etc., since bioactive compounds isolated from the phenotypic screening system often target new molecules. This review presents our phenotypic screening systems, isolation of bioactive compounds from marine medicinal resources, and target identification of bioactive compounds. PMID:27040348

  2. Application of CellDesigner to the Selection of Anticancer Drug Targets: Test Case using P53

    OpenAIRE

    Isea, Raul; Hoebeke, Johan; Mayo, Rafael; Alvarez, Fernando; Holmes, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving many genes, consequently it has been difficult to design anticancer drugs that are efficacious over a broad range of cancers. The robustness of cellular responses to gene knockout and the need to reduce undesirable side effects also contribute to the problem of effective anti-cancer drug design. To promote the successful selection of drug targets, each potential target should be subjected to a systems biology scrutiny to locate effective and specific targets whil...

  3. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Intraocular Drug Delivery System to Target Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannaccini, Martina; Giannini, Marianna; Calatayud, M. Pilar; Goya, Gerardo F.; Cuschieri, Alfred; Dente, Luciana; Raffa, Vittoria

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging efforts in drug delivery is the targeting of the eye. The eye structure and barriers render this organ poorly permeable to drugs. Quite recently the entrance of nanoscience in ocular drug delivery has improved the penetration and half-life of drugs, especially in the anterior eye chamber, while targeting the posterior chamber is still an open issue. The retina and the retinal pigment epithelium/choroid tissues, located in the posterior eye chamber, are responsible for the majority of blindness both in childhood and adulthood. In the present study, we used magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a nanotool for ocular drug delivery that is capable of specific localization in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) layer. We demonstrate that, following intraocular injection in Xenopus embryos, MNPs localize specifically in RPE where they are retained for several days. The specificity of the localization did not depend on particle size and surface properties of the MNPs used in this work. Moreover, through similar experiments in zebrafish, we demonstrated that the targeting of RPE by the nanoparticles is not specific for the Xenopus species. PMID:24451140

  4. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Intraocular Drug Delivery System to Target Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Giannaccini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging efforts in drug delivery is the targeting of the eye. The eye structure and barriers render this organ poorly permeable to drugs. Quite recently the entrance of nanoscience in ocular drug delivery has improved the penetration and half-life of drugs, especially in the anterior eye chamber, while targeting the posterior chamber is still an open issue. The retina and the retinal pigment epithelium/choroid tissues, located in the posterior eye chamber, are responsible for the majority of blindness both in childhood and adulthood. In the present study, we used magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs as a nanotool for ocular drug delivery that is capable of specific localization in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE layer. We demonstrate that, following intraocular injection in Xenopus embryos, MNPs localize specifically in RPE where they are retained for several days. The specificity of the localization did not depend on particle size and surface properties of the MNPs used in this work. Moreover, through similar experiments in zebrafish, we demonstrated that the targeting of RPE by the nanoparticles is not specific for the Xenopus species.

  5. Identification of attractive drug targets in neglected-disease pathogens using an in silico approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Crowther

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The increased sequencing of pathogen genomes and the subsequent availability of genome-scale functional datasets are expected to guide the experimental work necessary for target-based drug discovery. However, a major bottleneck in this has been the difficulty of capturing and integrating relevant information in an easily accessible format for identifying and prioritizing potential targets. The open-access resource TDRtargets.org facilitates drug target prioritization for major tropical disease pathogens such as the mycobacteria Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; the kinetoplastid protozoans Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei, and Trypanosoma cruzi; the apicomplexan protozoans Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, and Toxoplasma gondii; and the helminths Brugia malayi and Schistosoma mansoni. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present strategies to prioritize pathogen proteins based on whether their properties meet criteria considered desirable in a drug target. These criteria are based upon both sequence-derived information (e.g., molecular mass and functional data on expression, essentiality, phenotypes, metabolic pathways, assayability, and druggability. This approach also highlights the fact that data for many relevant criteria are lacking in less-studied pathogens (e.g., helminths, and we demonstrate how this can be partially overcome by mapping data from homologous genes in well-studied organisms. We also show how individual users can easily upload external datasets and integrate them with existing data in TDRtargets.org to generate highly customized ranked lists of potential targets. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Using the datasets and the tools available in TDRtargets.org, we have generated illustrative lists of potential drug targets in seven tropical disease pathogens. While these lists are broadly consistent with the research community's current interest in certain specific proteins, and suggest

  6. Degradable Magnetic Composites for Minimally Invasive Interventions: Device Fabrication, Targeted Drug Delivery, and Cytotoxicity Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Christian; Hoop, Marcus; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J; Hierold, Christofer

    2016-01-20

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles and a functional, degradable polymer matrix based on poly(ethylene glycol) are combined to enable fully degradable magnetic microdevices for minimally invasive biomedical applications. A bioinspired helical microrobot platform mimicking Escherichia coli bacteria is fabricated and actuated using weak rotating magnetic fields. Locomotion based on corkscrew propulsion, targeted drug delivery, and low-degradation-product cytotoxicity are demonstrated. PMID:26603856

  7. Neuronal and non-neuronal GABA transporters as targets for antiepileptic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Karsten K; White, H Steve; Schousboe, Arne

    2010-01-01

    Epileptic seizure activity is associated with an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activities. The latter is mediated by GABA, and several currently used antiepileptic drugs target entities of the GABAergic synapse such as the receptors or the inactivation mechanism consisting ...

  8. Mechanisms of acquired resistance to androgen receptor targeting drugs in castration resistant prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chism, David D.; De Silva, Dinuka; Whang, Young E.

    2014-01-01

    After initial response to androgen receptor targeting drugs abiraterone or enzalutamide, most patients develop progressive disease and therefore, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains a terminal disease. Multiple mechanisms underlying acquired resistance have been postulated. Intratumoral androgen synthesis may resume after abiraterone treatment. A point mutation in the ligand binding domain of androgen receptor may confer resistance to enzalutamide. Emergence of androgen recept...

  9. Characterizing EPR-mediated passive drug targeting using contrast-enhanced functional ultrasound imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Theek, B.; Gremse, F.; Kunjachan, S.; Fokong, S.; Pola, Robert; Pechar, Michal; Deckers, R.; Storm, G.; Ehling, J.; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, T.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 182, 28 May (2014), s. 83-89. ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA ČR GCP207/12/J030 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : drug targeting * nanomedicine * theranostics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 7.705, year: 2014

  10. Proteins with complex architecture as potential targets for drug design: a case study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Mészáros

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Lengthy co-evolution of Homo sapiens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the main causative agent of tuberculosis, resulted in a dramatically successful pathogen species that presents considerable challenge for modern medicine. The continuous and ever increasing appearance of multi-drug resistant mycobacteria necessitates the identification of novel drug targets and drugs with new mechanisms of action. However, further insights are needed to establish automated protocols for target selection based on the available complete genome sequences. In the present study, we perform complete proteome level comparisons between M. tuberculosis, mycobacteria, other prokaryotes and available eukaryotes based on protein domains, local sequence similarities and protein disorder. We show that the enrichment of certain domains in the genome can indicate an important function specific to M. tuberculosis. We identified two families, termed pkn and PE/PPE that stand out in this respect. The common property of these two protein families is a complex domain organization that combines species-specific regions, commonly occurring domains and disordered segments. Besides highlighting promising novel drug target candidates in M. tuberculosis, the presented analysis can also be viewed as a general protocol to identify proteins involved in species-specific functions in a given organism. We conclude that target selection protocols should be extended to include proteins with complex domain architectures instead of focusing on sequentially unique and essential proteins only.

  11. The Research and Applications of Quantum Dots as Nano-Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery and Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Bing-Jie

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), nano-carriers for drugs, can help realize the targeting of drugs, and improve the bioavailability of drugs in biological fields. And, a QD nano-carrier system for drugs has the potential to realize early detection, monitoring, and localized treatments of specific disease sites. In addition, QD nano-carrier systems for drugs can improve stability of drugs, lengthen circulation time in vivo, enhance targeted absorption, and improve the distribution and metabolism process of drugs in organization. So, the development of QD nano-carriers for drugs has become a hotspot in the fields of nano-drug research in recent years. In this paper, we review the advantages and applications of the QD nano-carriers for drugs in biological fields. PMID:27090658

  12. The Research and Applications of Quantum Dots as Nano-Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery and Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Xia; Zhu, Bing-Jie

    2016-04-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), nano-carriers for drugs, can help realize the targeting of drugs, and improve the bioavailability of drugs in biological fields. And, a QD nano-carrier system for drugs has the potential to realize early detection, monitoring, and localized treatments of specific disease sites. In addition, QD nano-carrier systems for drugs can improve stability of drugs, lengthen circulation time in vivo, enhance targeted absorption, and improve the distribution and metabolism process of drugs in organization. So, the development of QD nano-carriers for drugs has become a hotspot in the fields of nano-drug research in recent years. In this paper, we review the advantages and applications of the QD nano-carriers for drugs in biological fields.

  13. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, Julia V; Hoekstra, Dick; Zuhorn, Inge S

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics into the brain. This concept relies on the application of natural or genetically engineered proteins or small peptides, capable of specifically ferrying a drug-payload that is either directly coupled or encapsulated in an appropriate nanocarrier, across the blood-brain barrier via receptor-mediated transcytosis. Specifically, in this process the nanocarrier-drug system ("Trojan horse complex") is transported transcellularly across the brain endothelium, from the blood to the brain interface, essentially trailed by a native receptor. Naturally, only certain properties would favor a receptor to serve as a transporter for nanocarriers, coated with appropriate ligands. Here we briefly discuss brain microvascular endothelial receptors that have been explored until now, highlighting molecular features that govern the efficiency of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery into the brain. PMID:25407801

  14. Smuggling Drugs into the Brain: An Overview of Ligands Targeting Transcytosis for Drug Delivery across the Blood–Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia V. Georgieva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood–brain barrier acts as a physical barrier that prevents free entry of blood-derived substances, including those intended for therapeutic applications. The development of molecular Trojan horses is a promising drug targeting technology that allows for non-invasive delivery of therapeutics into the brain. This concept relies on the application of natural or genetically engineered proteins or small peptides, capable of specifically ferrying a drug-payload that is either directly coupled or encapsulated in an appropriate nanocarrier, across the blood–brain barrier via receptor-mediated transcytosis. Specifically, in this process the nanocarrier–drug system (“Trojan horse complex” is transported transcellularly across the brain endothelium, from the blood to the brain interface, essentially trailed by a native receptor. Naturally, only certain properties would favor a receptor to serve as a transporter for nanocarriers, coated with appropriate ligands. Here we briefly discuss brain microvascular endothelial receptors that have been explored until now, highlighting molecular features that govern the efficiency of nanocarrier-mediated drug delivery into the brain.

  15. Genetic validation of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases as drug targets in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalidas, Savitha; Cestari, Igor; Monnerat, Severine; Li, Qiong; Regmi, Sandesh; Hasle, Nicholas; Labaied, Mehdi; Parsons, Marilyn; Stuart, Kenneth; Phillips, Margaret A

    2014-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is an important public health threat in sub-Saharan Africa. Current drugs are unsatisfactory, and new drugs are being sought. Few validated enzyme targets are available to support drug discovery efforts, so our goal was to obtain essentiality data on genes with proven utility as drug targets. Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) are known drug targets for bacterial and fungal pathogens and are required for protein synthesis. Here we survey the essentiality of eight Trypanosoma brucei aaRSs by RNA interference (RNAi) gene expression knockdown, covering an enzyme from each major aaRS class: valyl-tRNA synthetase (ValRS) (class Ia), tryptophanyl-tRNA synthetase (TrpRS-1) (class Ib), arginyl-tRNA synthetase (ArgRS) (class Ic), glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS) (class 1c), threonyl-tRNA synthetase (ThrRS) (class IIa), asparaginyl-tRNA synthetase (AsnRS) (class IIb), and phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (α and β) (PheRS) (class IIc). Knockdown of mRNA encoding these enzymes in T. brucei mammalian stage parasites showed that all were essential for parasite growth and survival in vitro. The reduced expression resulted in growth, morphological, cell cycle, and DNA content abnormalities. ThrRS was characterized in greater detail, showing that the purified recombinant enzyme displayed ThrRS activity and that the protein localized to both the cytosol and mitochondrion. Borrelidin, a known inhibitor of ThrRS, was an inhibitor of T. brucei ThrRS and showed antitrypanosomal activity. The data show that aaRSs are essential for T. brucei survival and are likely to be excellent targets for drug discovery efforts. PMID:24562907

  16. How Beyond Rule of 5 Drugs and Clinical Candidates Bind to Their Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doak, Bradley C; Zheng, Jie; Dobritzsch, Doreen; Kihlberg, Jan

    2016-03-24

    To improve discovery of drugs for difficult targets, the opportunities of chemical space beyond the rule of 5 (bRo5) were examined by retrospective analysis of a comprehensive set of structures for complexes between drugs and clinical candidates and their targets. The analysis illustrates the potential of compounds far beyond rule of 5 space to modulate novel and difficult target classes that have large, flat, and groove-shaped binding sites. However, ligand efficiencies are significantly reduced for flat- and groove-shape binding sites, suggesting that adjustments of how to use such metrics are required. Ligands bRo5 appear to benefit from an appropriate balance between rigidity and flexibility to bind with sufficient affinity to their targets, with macrocycles and nonmacrocycles being found to have similar flexibility. However, macrocycles were more disk- and spherelike, which may contribute to their superior binding to flat sites, while rigidification of nonmacrocycles lead to rodlike ligands that bind well to groove-shaped binding sites. These insights should contribute to altering perceptions of what targets are considered "druggable" and provide support for drug design in beyond rule of 5 space. PMID:26457449

  17. Individualization of anticancer therapy; molecular targets of novel drugs in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Regulska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of cellular signal transduction, caused by gene mutations, has been recognized as a basic factor of cancer initiation, promotion and progression. Thus, the ability to control the activity of overstimulated signal molecules by the use of appropriate inhibitors became the idea of targeted cancer therapy, which has provided an effective tool to normalize the molecular disorders in malignant cells and to treat certain types of cancer. The molecularly targeted drugs are divided into two major pharmaceutical classes: monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule kinase inhibitors. This review presents a summary of their characteristics, analyzing their chemical structures, specified molecular targets, mechanisms of action and indications for use. Also the molecules subjected to preclinical trials or phase I, II and III clinical trials evaluating their efficiency and safety are presented. Moreover, the article discusses further perspectives for development of targeted therapies focusing on three major directions: systematic searching and discovery of new targets that are oncogenic drivers, improving the pharmacological properties of currently known drugs, and developing strategies to overcome drug resistance. Finally, the role of proper pharmacodiagnostics as a key to rational anticancer therapy has been emphasized since the verification of reliable predictive biomarkers is a basis of individualized medicine in oncology. 

  18. Functional expression of parasite drug targets and their human orthologs in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Bilsland

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exacting nutritional requirements and complicated life cycles of parasites mean that they are not always amenable to high-throughput drug screening using automated procedures. Therefore, we have engineered the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to act as a surrogate for expressing anti-parasitic targets from a range of biomedically important pathogens, to facilitate the rapid identification of new therapeutic agents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using pyrimethamine/dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR as a model parasite drug/drug target system, we explore the potential of engineered yeast strains (expressing DHFR enzymes from Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, Homo sapiens, Schistosoma mansoni, Leishmania major, Trypanosoma brucei and T. cruzi to exhibit appropriate differential sensitivity to pyrimethamine. Here, we demonstrate that yeast strains (lacking the major drug efflux pump, Pdr5p expressing yeast ((ScDFR1, human ((HsDHFR, Schistosoma ((SmDHFR, and Trypanosoma ((TbDHFR and (TcDHFR DHFRs are insensitive to pyrimethamine treatment, whereas yeast strains producing Plasmodium ((PfDHFR and (PvDHFR DHFRs are hypersensitive. Reassuringly, yeast strains expressing field-verified, drug-resistant mutants of P. falciparum DHFR ((Pfdhfr(51I,59R,108N are completely insensitive to pyrimethamine, further validating our approach to drug screening. We further show the versatility of the approach by replacing yeast essential genes with other potential drug targets, namely phosphoglycerate kinases (PGKs and N-myristoyl transferases (NMTs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have generated a number of yeast strains that can be successfully harnessed for the rapid and selective identification of urgently needed anti-parasitic agents.

  19. Targeted Killing of Cancer Cells In vivo and In vitro with EGF-directed Carbon Nanotube-based Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Bhirde, Ashwin A; Patel, Vyomesh; Gavard, Julie; Zhang, Guofeng; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Masedunskas, Andrius; Leapman, Richard D.; Weigert, Roberto; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Rusling, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube-based drug delivery holds great promise for cancer therapy. Herein we report the first targeted, in vivo killing of cancer cells using a drug-single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bioconjugate, and demonstrate efficacy superior to non-targeted bioconjugates. First line anti-cancer agent cisplatin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were attached to SWNTs to specifically target squamous cancer, and the non-targeted control was SWNT-cisplatin without EGF. Initialin vitro imaging stud...

  20. Identification of the Schistosoma mansoni Molecular Target for the Antimalarial Drug Artemether

    KAUST Repository

    Lepore, Rosalba

    2011-11-28

    Plasmodium falciparum and Schistosoma mansonii are the parasites responsible for most of the malaria and schistosomiasis cases in the world. Notwithstanding their many differences, the two agents have striking similarities in that they both are blood feeders and are targets of an overlapping set of drugs, including the well-known artemether molecule. Here we explore the possibility of using the known information about the mode of action of artemether in Plasmodium to identify the molecular target of the drug in Schistosoma and provide evidence that artemether binds to SmSERCA, a putative Ca2+-ATPase of Schistosoma. We also predict the putative binding mode of the molecule for both its Plasmodium and Schistosoma targets. Our analysis of the mode of binding of artemether to Ca2+-ATPases also provides an explanation for the apparent paradox that, although the molecule has no side effect in humans, it has been shown to possess antitumoral activity. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Liver X receptor as a drug target for the treatment of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Yu, Dan-Dan; Yan, Da-Li; Hu, Yong; Chen, Dan; Liu, Yun; Zhang, He-da; Yu, Shao-Rong; Cao, Hai-Xia; Feng, Ji-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR) has been exploited widely as a drug target in breast cancer treatment, and various mechanisms underlying the effects of LXR in this area are well studied. The activated LXR plays important roles in estrogen receptor α (ERα) breast cancer cells, such as reducing cell proliferation and arresting cell cycle progression. Different LXR ligands have diverse effects on the development of breast cancer, such as the inhibitory effect of oxysterol, which can return cells to normocholesterol conditions and target other metabolic genes. Moreover, 27-hydroxycholesterol, a locally produced cholesterol metabolite, reportedly promotes the proliferation of ERα breast cancer cells in vitro and facilitates tumor metastasis with other LXR ligands. Moreover, the expression of LXR also exerts potential effects on immune surveillance, tumor immunity, and tumor microenvironment. These advances in breast cancer research indicate that LXR may be a new therapeutic target to treat the refractory or drug-resistant subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:26872310

  2. Non-polymeric nano-carriers in HIV/AIDS drug delivery and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Umesh; Jain, Narendra K

    2010-03-18

    Development of an effective drug delivery approach for the treatment of HIV/AIDS is a global challenge. The conventional drug delivery approaches including Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) have increased the life span of the HIV/AIDS patient. However, the eradication of HIV is still not possible with these approaches due to some limitations. Emergence of polymeric and non-polymeric nanotechnological approaches can be opportunistic in this direction. Polymeric carriers like, dendrimers and nanoparticles have been reported for the targeting of anti HIV drugs. The synthetic pathways as well polymeric framework create some hurdles in their successful formulation development as well as in the possible drug delivery approaches. In the present article, we have discussed the general physiological aspects of the infection along with the relevance of non-polymeric nanocarriers like liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), ethosomes, etc. in the treatment of this disastrous disease. PMID:19913579

  3. FLOATING GASTRO-RETENTIVE DOSAGE FORMS - A NOVEL APPROACH FOR TARGETED AND CONTROLLED DRUG DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Aleksovski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Controlled (modified release dosage forms are one of the key concepts in drug delivery, leading to enhanced drug bioavailability and increased patient’s compliance. However conventional modified release dosage forms encounter one big disadvantage- lack of site-specific drug delivery. Scientists developed different kinds of targeted oral controlled release forms. One of these are gastro-retentive systems- systems which can remain in the stomach region for prolonged period of time and thereby release the active compound in controlled fashion. Floating dosage forms are the most promising approach of all gastro-retentive systems. They are capable to float over the gastric content in longer time intervals. This article makes a review on floating dosage forms in general, different approaches for achieving flotation, advantages and disadvantages of this drug delivery concept. For better understanding the topic,an emphasis is made also on the anatomical and physiological features of the stomach and on the factors affecting gastric retention.

  4. Feasibility of subcutaneously implanted magnetic microarrays for site specific drug and gene targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Babincová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic nanoparticles play a crucial role as a drug carriers in the human body. The wedge like magnetic arrays creatinga strongly non-homogeneous magnetic field are considered as a useful way to focus magnetic nanoparticles functionalizedwith various drugs or genes to desired sites. The goal of this study is to develop a numerical model of drug targetingusing subcutaneously implanted magnetic microarrays. The Finite Element Method is applied to solve partial differentialequations describing electromagnetic field (Maxwell equations and motion of these particles in a given magnetic field isobtained solving set of ordinary differential equations expressed by Newton law of motion. The results are encouragingshowing the potential to target drug to the tumour cell locally, without unwanted side effects.

  5. A novel in situ gel for sustained drug delivery and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Sudipta; Dash, Alekha K

    2004-05-19

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel chitosan-glyceryl monooleate (GMO) in situ gel system for sustained drug delivery and targeting. The delivery system consisted of 3% (w/v) chitosan and 3% (w/v) GMO in 0.33M citric acid. In situ gel was formed at a biological pH. In vitro release studies were conducted in Sorensen's phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and drugs were analyzed either by HPLC or spectrophotometry. Characterization of the gel included the effect of cross-linker, determination of diffusion coefficient and water uptake by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Mucoadhesive property of the gel was evaluated in vitro using an EZ-Tester. Incorporation of a cross-linker (glutaraldehyde) retarded the rate and extent of drug release. The in vitro release can further be sustained by replacing the free drug with drug-encapsulated microspheres. Drug release from the gel followed a matrix diffusion controlled mechanism. Inclusion of GMO enhanced the mucoadhesive property of chitosan by three- to sevenfold. This novel in situ gel system can be useful in the sustained delivery of drugs via oral as well as parenteral routes. PMID:15113617

  6. HER2-mediated anticancer drug delivery: strategies to prepare targeting ligands highly specific for the receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calce, Enrica; Monfregola, Luca; Saviano, Michele; De Luca, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    HER2 receptor, for its involvement in tumorigenesis, has been largely studied as topic in cancer research. In particular, the employment of trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized anti-HER2 antibody, showed several clinical benefits in the therapy against the breast cancer. Moreover, for its accessible extracellular domain, this receptor is considered an ideal target to deliver anticancer drugs for the receptormediated anticancer therapy. By now, monoclonal antibody and its fragments, affibody, and some peptides have been employed as targeting agents in order to deliver various drugs to HER2 positive tumor cells. In particular, the ability to perform a fast and reliable screening of a large number of peptide molecules would make possible the selection of highly specific compounds to the receptor target. In this regard, the availability of preparing a simplified synthetic model which is a good mimetic of the receptor target and can be used in a reliable screening method of ligands would be of a strategic importance for the development of selective HER2-targeting peptide molecules. Herein, we illustrate the importance of HER2-targeted anticancer therapies. We also report on a synthetic and effective mimetic of the receptor, which revealed to be a useful tool for the selection of specific HER2 ligands. PMID:25994863

  7. Laser-induced disruption of systemically administered liposomes for targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Larabi, Malika; Shinde, Rajesh; Simanovskii, Dmitrii M.; Guccione, Samira; Contag, Christopher H.

    2009-07-01

    Liposomal formulations of drugs have been shown to enhance drug efficacy by prolonging circulation time, increasing local concentration and reducing off-target effects. Controlled release from these formulations would increase their utility, and hyperthermia has been explored as a stimulus for targeted delivery of encapsulated drugs. Use of lasers as a thermal source could provide improved control over the release of the drug from the liposomes with minimal collateral tissue damage. Appropriate methods for assessing local release after systemic delivery would aid in testing and development of better formulations. We use in vivo bioluminescence imaging to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of luciferin, used as a model small molecule, and demonstrate laser-induced release from liposomes in animal models after systemic delivery. These liposomes were tested for luciferin release between 37 and 45 °C in PBS and serum using bioluminescence measurements. In vivo studies were performed on transgenic reporter mice that express luciferase constitutively throughout the body, thus providing a noninvasive readout for controlled release following systemic delivery. An Nd:YLF laser was used (527 nm) to heat tissues and induce rupture of the intravenously delivered liposomes in target tissues. These data demonstrate laser-mediated control of small molecule delivery using thermally sensitive liposomal formulations.

  8. Targeting AMPK Signaling Pathway to Overcome Drug Resistance for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyu; Liu, Pengxi; Chen, Qianjun; Deng, Shigui; Liu, Xiaoyan; Situ, Honglin; Zhong, Shaowen; Hann, Swei; Lin, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Mulitdrug resistance (MDR) is one of critical factorslimiting the efficacy of cancer chemoor radiotherapy. Emerging evidence has indicated that MDR is a complex process regulated by multiple factors, among which stress response molecules are considered as central players. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major regulator balancing energy supply and ultimately protects cells from harmful stresses via coordinating multiple metabolic pathways Notably, AMPK activation was recently shown to mediate the metabolism reprogramming in drug resistant cancer cells including promoting Warburg effects and mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, AMPK activity has also been shown to regulate the self-renewal ability of cancer stem cells that are often refractory to chemotherapy. In addition, AMPK phosphorylation was critical in mediating autophagy induction, a process demonstrated to be effective in chemosensitivity modulation via degrading cellular components to satisfy nutrients requirement under stressful condition. Meanwhile, drug discovery targeting AMPK has been developed to validate the pathological significance of AMPK in cancer prevention and treatment. Although conflicting evidence focusing on the AMPK modulation for cancer treatment is still remained, this might be attributed to differences in AMPK isotypes in specific tissues, off-targets effects, the degree and duration of drug administration and experimental setting of stress conditions. This review will focus on AMPK mediated resistance to cancer therapy and discuss its potential therapeutic implication and targeting drug development. PMID:25777274

  9. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  10. Parallel shRNA and CRISPR-Cas9 screens enable antiviral drug target identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Richard M; Morgens, David W; Ökesli, Ayşe; Pillay, Sirika; Horlbeck, Max A; Kampmann, Martin; Gilbert, Luke A; Li, Amy; Mateo, Roberto; Smith, Mark; Glenn, Jeffrey S; Carette, Jan E; Khosla, Chaitan; Bassik, Michael C

    2016-05-01

    Broad-spectrum antiviral drugs targeting host processes could potentially treat a wide range of viruses while reducing the likelihood of emergent resistance. Despite great promise as therapeutics, such drugs remain largely elusive. Here we used parallel genome-wide high-coverage short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 screens to identify the cellular target and mechanism of action of GSK983, a potent broad-spectrum antiviral with unexplained cytotoxicity. We found that GSK983 blocked cell proliferation and dengue virus replication by inhibiting the pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). Guided by mechanistic insights from both genomic screens, we found that exogenous deoxycytidine markedly reduced GSK983 cytotoxicity but not antiviral activity, providing an attractive new approach to improve the therapeutic window of DHODH inhibitors against RNA viruses. Our results highlight the distinct advantages and limitations of each screening method for identifying drug targets, and demonstrate the utility of parallel knockdown and knockout screens for comprehensive probing of drug activity. PMID:27018887

  11. Hepatocellular carcinoma: Will novel targeted drugs really impact the next future?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montella, Liliana; Palmieri, Giovannella; Addeo, Raffaele; Del Prete, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment has been revolutionized by the advent of new molecular targeted and immunotherapeutic agents. Identification of the role of tumor angiogenesis changed the understanding of many tumors. After the unsuccessful results with chemotherapy, sorafenib, by interfering with angiogenic pathways, has become pivotal in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma. Sorafenib is the only systemic treatment to show a modest but statistically significant survival benefit. All novel drugs and strategies for treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma must be compared with the results obtained with sorafenib, but no new drug or drug combination has yet achieved better results. In our opinion, the efforts to impact the natural history of the disease will be directed not only to drug development but also to understanding the underlying liver disease (usually hepatitis B virus- or hepatitis C virus-related) and to interrupting the progression of cirrhosis. It will be important to define the role and amount of mutations in the complex pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma and to better integrate locoregional and systemic therapies. It will be important also to optimize the therapeutic strategies with existing chemotherapeutic drugs and new targeted agents.

  12. Drug targets for cell cycle dysregulators in leukemogenesis: in silico docking studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archana Jayaraman

    Full Text Available Alterations in cell cycle regulating proteins are a key characteristic in neoplastic proliferation of lymphoblast cells in patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL. The aim of our study was to investigate whether the routinely administered ALL chemotherapeutic agents would be able to bind and inhibit the key deregulated cell cycle proteins such as--Cyclins E1, D1, D3, A1 and Cyclin Dependent Kinases (CDK 2 and 6. We used Schrödinger Glide docking protocol to dock the chemotherapeutic drugs such as Doxorubicin and Daunorubicin and others which are not very common including Clofarabine, Nelarabine and Flavopiridol, to the crystal structures of these proteins. We observed that the drugs were able to bind and interact with cyclins E1 and A1 and CDKs 2 and 6 while their docking to cyclins D1 and D3 were not successful. This binding proved favorable to interact with the G1/S cell cycle phase proteins that were examined in this study and may lead to the interruption of the growth of leukemic cells. Our observations therefore suggest that these drugs could be explored for use as inhibitors for these cell cycle proteins. Further, we have also highlighted residues which could be important in the designing of pharmacophores against these cell cycle proteins. This is the first report in understanding the mechanism of action of the drugs targeting these cell cycle proteins in leukemia through the visualization of drug-target binding and molecular docking using computational methods.

  13. Mesoporous Fe3O4/hydroxyapatite composite for targeted drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Mesoporous Fe3O4/hydroxyapatite composite was synthesized by a simple, efficient and environmental friendly method. • The prepared material had a large surface area, high pore volume, and good magnetic separability. • DOX-loaded Fe3O4/hydroxyapatite composite exhibited surprising slow drug release behavior and pH-dependent behavior. - Abstract: In this contribution, we introduced a simple, efficient, and green method of preparing a mesoporous Fe3O4/hydroxyapatite (HA) composite. The as-prepared material had a large surface area, high pore volume, and good magnetic separability, which made it suitable for targeted drug delivery systems. The chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX) was used to investigate the drug release behavior of Fe3O4/HA composite. The drug release profiles displayed a little burst effect and pH-dependent behavior. The release rate of DOX at pH 5.8 was larger than that at pH 7.4, which could be attributed to DOX protonation in acid medium. In addition, the released DOX concentrations remained at 0.83 and 1.39 μg/ml at pH 7.4 and 5.8, respectively, which indicated slow, steady, and safe release rates. Therefore, the as-prepared Fe3O4/hydroxyapatite composite could be an efficient platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery

  14. Image-guided and tumor-targeted drug delivery with radiolabeled unimolecular micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jintang; Hong, Hao; Chen, Guojun; Shi, Sixiang; Zheng, Qifeng; Zhang, Yin; Theuer, Charles P; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo; Gong, Shaoqin

    2013-11-01

    Unimolecular micelles formed by dendritic amphiphilic block copolymers poly(amidoamine)-poly(L-lactide)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) conjugated with anti-CD105 monoclonal antibody (TRC105) and 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-N, N', N-triacetic acid (NOTA, a macrocyclic chelator for (64)Cu) (abbreviated as PAMAM-PLA-b-PEG-TRC105) were synthesized and characterized. Doxorubicin (DOX), a model anti-cancer drug, was loaded into the hydrophobic core of the unimolecular micelles formed by PAMAM and PLA via physical encapsulation. The unimolecular micelles exhibited a uniform size distribution and pH-sensitive drug release behavior. TRC105-conjugated unimolecular micelles showed a CD105-associated cellular uptake in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) compared with non-targeted unimolecular micelles, which was further validated by cellular uptake in CD105-negative MCF-7 cells. In 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice, (64)Cu-labeled targeted micelles exhibited a much higher level of tumor accumulation than (64)Cu-labeled non-targeted micelles, measured by serial non-invasive positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and confirmed by biodistribution studies. These unimolecular micelles formed by dendritic amphiphilic block copolymers that synergistically integrate passive and active tumor-targeting abilities with pH-controlled drug release and PET imaging capabilities provide the basis for future cancer theranostics. PMID:23932288

  15. The anti-dementia drug candidate, (-)-clausenamide, improves memory impairment through its multi-target effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shifeng; Liu, Shaolin; Duan, Wenzhen; Cheng, Yong; Jiang, Xueying; Zhu, Chuanjiang; Tang, Kang; Wang, Runsheng; Xu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoying; Yu, Xiaoming; Wu, Kemei; Wang, Yan; Wang, Muzou; Huang, Huiyong; Zhang, Juntian

    2016-06-01

    Multi-target drugs, such as the cocktail therapy used for treating AIDS, often show stronger efficacy than single-target drugs in treating complicated diseases. This review will focus on clausenamide (clau), a small molecule compound originally isolated from the traditional Chinese herbal medicine, Clausenalansium. The finding of four chiral centers in clau molecules predicted the presence of 16 clau enantiomers, including (-)-clau and (+)-clau. All of the predicted enantiomers have been successfully synthesized via innovative chemical approaches, and pharmacological studies have demonstrated (-)-clau as a eutomer and (+)-clau as a distomer in improving cognitive function in both normal physiological and pathological conditions. Mechanistically, the nootropic effect of (-)-clau is mediated by its multi-target actions, which include mild elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations, modulation of the cholinergic system, regulation of synaptic plasticity, and activation of cellular and molecular signaling pathways involved in learning and memory. Furthermore, (-)-clau suppresses the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease by inhibiting multiple etiological processes: (1) beta amyloid protein-induced intracellular Ca(2+) overload and apoptosis and (2) tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration. In conclusion, the nature of the multi-target actions of (-)-clau substantiates it as a promising chiral drug candidate for enhancing human cognition in normal conditions and treating memory impairment in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26812265

  16. Proteome scale comparative modeling for conserved drug and vaccine targets identification in Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Syed Shah; Tiwari, Sandeep; Guimarães, Luís Carlos; Jamal, Syed Babar; Folador, Edson; Sharma, Neha Barve; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Almeida, Síntia; Ali, Amjad; Islam, Arshad; Póvoa, Fabiana Dias; de Abreu, Vinicius Augusto Carvalho; Jain, Neha; Bhattacharya, Antaripa; Juneja, Lucky; Miyoshi, Anderson; Silva, Artur; Barh, Debmalya; Turjanski, Adrian Gustavo; Azevedo, Vasco; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado

    2014-01-01

    Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis (Cp) is a pathogenic bacterium that causes caseous lymphadenitis (CLA), ulcerative lymphangitis, mastitis, and edematous to a broad spectrum of hosts, including ruminants, thereby threatening economic and dairy industries worldwide. Currently there is no effective drug or vaccine available against Cp. To identify new targets, we adopted a novel integrative strategy, which began with the prediction of the modelome (tridimensional protein structures for the proteome of an organism, generated through comparative modeling) for 15 previously sequenced C. pseudotuberculosis strains. This pan-modelomics approach identified a set of 331 conserved proteins having 95-100% intra-species sequence similarity. Next, we combined subtractive proteomics and modelomics to reveal a set of 10 Cp proteins, which may be essential for the bacteria. Of these, 4 proteins (tcsR, mtrA, nrdI, and ispH) were essential and non-host homologs (considering man, horse, cow and sheep as hosts) and satisfied all criteria of being putative targets. Additionally, we subjected these 4 proteins to virtual screening of a drug-like compound library. In all cases, molecules predicted to form favorable interactions and which showed high complementarity to the target were found among the top ranking compounds. The remaining 6 essential proteins (adk, gapA, glyA, fumC, gnd, and aspA) have homologs in the host proteomes. Their active site cavities were compared to the respective cavities in host proteins. We propose that some of these proteins can be selectively targeted using structure-based drug design approaches (SBDD). Our results facilitate the selection of C. pseudotuberculosis putative proteins for developing broad-spectrum novel drugs and vaccines. A few of the targets identified here have been validated in other microorganisms, suggesting that our modelome strategy is effective and can also be applicable to other pathogens. PMID:25573232

  17. A Folate Receptor-Targeting Nanoparticle Minimizes Drug Resistance in a Human Cancer Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xu; Li, Jun; Wang, Yuxiang; Koenig, Lydia; Gjyrezi, Ada; Giannakakou, Paraskevi; Shin, Edwin H.; TIGHIOUART, MOURAD; Chen, Zhuo; Nie, Shuming; Shin, Dong M.

    2011-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle in cancer therapy. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of a folate receptor-targeting nanoparticle to overcome/minimize drug resistance and to explore the underlying mechanisms. This is accomplished with enhanced cellular accumulation and retention of paclitaxel (one of the most effective anticancer drugs in use today and a well-known P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate) in a P-gp-overexpressing cancer model. The folate recept...

  18. Biological characteristics of dengue virus and potential targets for drug design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-feng Qi; Ling Zhang; Cheng-wu Chi

    2008-01-01

    Dengue infection is a major cause of morbidity in tropical and subtropical regions, bringing nearly 40% of the world population at risk and causing more than 20,000 deaths per year. But there is neither a vaccine for dengue disease nor antiviral drugs to treat the infection. In recent years, dengue infection has been particularly prevalent in India, Southeast Asia, Brazil, and Guangdong Province, China. In this article, we present a brief summary of the biological characteristics of dengue virus and associated flaviviruses, and outline the progress on studies of vaccines and drugs based on potential targets of the dengue virus.

  19. Phage display:development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Babak Bakhshinejad; Marzieh Karimi; Mohammad Khalaj-Kondori

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systemati-cally administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for ifnding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface func-tionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efifcient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future.

  20. A folate-integrated magnetic polymer micelle for MRI and dual targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Bi; Liu, Peng; Huang, Liang; Yue, Caixia; Gao, Duyang; Wu, Chunlei; Su, Wu

    2014-08-01

    This paper devotes a novel micellar structure for cancer theranostics by incorporating magnetic and therapeutic functionalities into a natural sourced targeting polymer vehicle. Heparin-folic acid micelles taking advantage of both excellent loading capability and cancer targeting ability have been employed to simultaneously incorporate superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and doxorubicin through an ultrasonication-assisted microemulsion method. In this system, folic acids not only take the responsibility of micelle construction, but also facilitate cellular uptake due to their specific reorganization by MCF-7 cells over-expressing folate receptors. The obtained micelles exhibit good colloidal stability, a high magnetic content, considerable drug loading and sustained in vitro drug release. These clustered SPIONs exhibited high r2 relaxivity (243.65 mM-1 s-1) and further served as efficient probes for MR imaging. Notably, the transport efficiency of these micelles could be significantly improved under an external magnetic field, owing to their quick magnetic response. As a result, the as-proposed micelle shows great potential in multimodal theranostics, including active targeting, MRI diagnosis and drug delivery.This paper devotes a novel micellar structure for cancer theranostics by incorporating magnetic and therapeutic functionalities into a natural sourced targeting polymer vehicle. Heparin-folic acid micelles taking advantage of both excellent loading capability and cancer targeting ability have been employed to simultaneously incorporate superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and doxorubicin through an ultrasonication-assisted microemulsion method. In this system, folic acids not only take the responsibility of micelle construction, but also facilitate cellular uptake due to their specific reorganization by MCF-7 cells over-expressing folate receptors. The obtained micelles exhibit good colloidal stability, a high magnetic content

  1. Pharmacological Targeting of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase and Opportunities for Computer-Aided Drug Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglianico, Marie; Nicolaes, Gerry A F; Neumann, Dietbert

    2016-04-14

    As a central regulator of metabolism, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an established therapeutic target for metabolic diseases. Beyond the metabolic area, the number of medical fields that involve AMPK grows continuously, expanding the potential applications for AMPK modulators. Even though indirect AMPK activators are used in the clinics for their beneficial metabolic outcome, the few described direct agonists all failed to reach the market to date, which leaves options open for novel targeting methods. As AMPK is not actually a single molecule and has different roles depending on its isoform composition, the opportunity for isoform-specific targeting has notably come forward, but the currently available modulators fall short of expectations. In this review, we argue that with the amount of available structural and ligand data, computer-based drug design offers a number of opportunities to undertake novel and isoform-specific targeting of AMPK. PMID:26510622

  2. CPP-ZFN: A potential DNA-targeting anti-malarial drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nain Vikrant

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multidrug-resistant Plasmodium is of major concern today. Effective vaccines or successful applications of RNAi-based strategies for the treatment of malaria are currently unavailable. An unexplored area in the field of malaria research is the development of DNA-targeting drugs that can specifically interact with parasitic DNA and introduce deleterious changes, leading to loss of vital genome function and parasite death. Presentation of the hypothesis Advances in the development of zinc finger nuclease (ZFN with engineered DNA recognition domains allow us to design and develop nuclease of high target sequence specificity with a mega recognition site that typically occurs only once in the genome. Moreover, cell-penetrating peptides (CPP can cross the cell plasma membrane and deliver conjugated protein, nucleic acid, or any other cargo to the cytoplasm, nucleus, or mitochondria. This article proposes that a drug from the combination of the CPP and ZFN systems can effectively enter the intracellular parasite, introduce deleterious changes in its genome, and eliminate the parasite from the infected cells. Testing the hypothesis Availability of a DNA-binding motif for more than 45 triplets and its modular nature, with freedom to change number of fingers in a ZFN, makes development of customized ZFN against diverse target DNA sequence of any gene feasible. Since the Plasmodium genome is highly AT rich, there is considerable sequence site diversity even for the structurally and functionally conserved enzymes between Plasmodium and humans. CPP can be used to deliver ZFN to the intracellular nucleus of the parasite. Signal-peptide-based heterologous protein translocation to Plasmodium-infected RBCs (iRBCs and different Plasmodium organelles have been achieved. With successful fusion of CPP with mitochondrial- and nuclear-targeting peptides, fusion of CPP with 1 more Plasmodium cell membrane translocation peptide seems achievable

  3. Localization and distribution of magnetic chemotherapeutic drugs with magnetic targeting in rat brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI An-min; ZHANG Chuan-xiu; FU Xiang-ping; ZHANG Zhi-wen; XUE Qing-hui; YAN Run-min; YI Lin-hua

    2005-01-01

    Background Magnetic targeting therapy may be a new method for the treatment of malignent tumors. The purpose of this study was to investigate the localization and distribution of ferrofluid microsphere of human serum albumin methotrexate (FM-HSA-MTX) carriers in the brain and to explore the magnetic targeting chemotherapy for malignant brain tumor. Methods Ninety SD rats were divided into three groups: targeting group, non-magnetic targeting group, and control group. Synthesized FM-HSA-MTX carriers (MTX 25 mg/kg) were injected into the systemic circulation via the caudal vein (magnetic targeting group, n=30). A 0.6 T magnetic field was placed around the right hemisphere. The non-magnetic targeting group (n=30) was administered with FM-HSA-MTX without external magnetic field, meanwhile the control group (n=30) was treated with MTX and a magnetic field. Random serial sacrifices (n=10) were conducted at 15, 30 and 45 minutes after drug administration. Bilateral hemispheres were collected respectively, and analyzed for total MTX content. Results MTX content in the right hemisphere of the magnetic targeting group was significantly higher than that in the other two groups at 15, 30 and 45 minutes after drug administration (P<0.05) No difference was seen between the non-targeting group and control group. In the magnetic targeting group, MTX returned to the peak level [(0.564±0.018) mg/g, q15-45=32.252, P<0.05] 45 minutes after the injection but it deceased in the other two groups [non-magnetic targeting group: (0.060±0.015) mg/g, q15-45=9.245, P<0.05, control group: (0.074±0.045) mg/g, q15-45=6.299, P<0.05]. In the magnetic targeting group, the concentration of MTX in the right hemisphere was significantly higher than that in the left hemisphere (t45min=21.135, P=0.000) but no difference was observed between bilateral hemispheres in the other two groups (non-magnetic targeting group: t45min=0.434, P=0.670; control group: t45min=0.533, P=0.600). Conclusion In

  4. In Vivo Tumor Targeting and Image-Guided Drug Delivery with Antibody-Conjugated, Radiolabeled Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Shi, Sixiang; Kwon, Glen S.; Theuer, Charles P.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Cai, Weibo

    2013-01-01

    Since the first use of biocompatible mesoporous silica (mSiO2) nanoparticles as drug delivery vehicles, in vivo tumor targeted imaging and enhanced anti-cancer drug delivery has remained a major challenge. In this work, we describe the development of functionalized mSiO2 nanoparticles for actively targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and drug delivery in 4T1 murine breast tumor-bearing mice. Our structural design involves the synthesis, surface functionalization with thiol grou...

  5. Interaction Characteristics of Viral Protease Targets and Inhibitors : Perspectives for drug discovery and development of model systems

    OpenAIRE

    Shuman, Cynthia F

    2003-01-01

    Viral proteases are important targets for anti-viral drugs. Discovery of protease inhibitors as anti-viral drugs is aided by an understanding of the interactions between viral protease and inhibitors. This thesis addresses the characterization of protease-inhibitor interactions for application to drug discovery and model system development. The choice of a relevant target is essential to molecular interaction studies. Therefore, full-length NS3 protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) was obtained,...

  6. Assessing the therapeutic efficacy of VEGFR-1-targeted polymer drug conjugates in mouse tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay, Yosi; Golan, Moran; Tyomkin, Dalia; David, Ayelet

    2016-05-10

    Polymer-drug conjugates that can actively target the tumor vasculature have emerged as an attractive technology for improving the therapeutic efficacy of cytotoxic drugs. We have recently provided, for the first time, in vivo evidence showing the significant advantage of the E-selectin-targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin conjugate, P-(Esbp)-DOX, in inhibiting primary tumor growth and preventing the formation and development of cancer metastases. Here, we describe the design of a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1-targeted HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugate (P-(F56)-DOX) that can actively and simultaneously target different cell types in the tumor microenvironment, such as endothelial cells (ECs), bone marrow-derived cells and many human cancer cells of diverse tumor origin. The VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer was tested for its binding, internalization and in vitro cytotoxicity in ECs (bEnd.3 and cEND cells) and cancer cells (B16-F10, 3LL and HT29). The in vivo anti-cancer activity of P-(F56)-DOX was then tested in two tumor-bearing mice (TBM) models (i.e., primary Lewis lung carcinoma (3LL) tumors and B16-F10 melanoma pulmonary metastases), relative to that of the E-selectin-targeted system (P-(Esbp)-DOX) that solely targets ECs. Our results indicate that the binding and internalization profiles of the VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer were superior towards ECs as compared to cancer cells and correlated well to the level of VEGFR-1 expression in cells. Accordingly, the VEGFR-1-targeted copolymer (P-(F56)-DOX) was more toxic towards bEnd.3 cells than to cancer cells, and exhibited significantly higher cytotoxicity than did the non-targeted control copolymer. P-(F56)-DOX inhibited 3LL tumor growth and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with B16-F10 pulmonary metastases. When compared to a system that actively targets only tumor vascular ECs, P-(F56)-DOX and P-(Esbp)-DOX exhibited comparable efficacy in slowing the

  7. A RNA-DNA Hybrid Aptamer for Nanoparticle-Based Prostate Tumor Targeted Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, John C.; Andrew Wang; Kaiming Ye; Sha Jin

    2016-01-01

    The side effects of radio- and chemo-therapy pose long-term challenges on a cancer patient’s health. It is, therefore, highly desirable to develop more effective therapies that can specifically target carcinoma cells without damaging normal and healthy cells. Tremendous efforts have been made in the past to develop targeted drug delivery systems for solid cancer treatment. In this study, a new aptamer, A10-3-J1, which recognizes the extracellular domain of the prostate specific membrane antig...

  8. Targeting imperfect vaccines against drug-resistance determinants: a strategy for countering the rise of drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Joice

    Full Text Available The growing prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in major pathogens is outpacing discovery of new antimicrobial classes. Vaccines mitigate the effect of antimicrobial resistance by reducing the need for treatment, but vaccines for many drug-resistant pathogens remain undiscovered or have limited efficacy, in part because some vaccines selectively favor pathogen strains that escape vaccine-induced immunity. A strain with even a modest advantage in vaccinated hosts can have high fitness in a population with high vaccine coverage, which can offset a strong selection pressure such as antimicrobial use that occurs in a small fraction of hosts. We propose a strategy to target vaccines against drug-resistant pathogens, by using resistance-conferring proteins as antigens in multicomponent vaccines. Resistance determinants may be weakly immunogenic, offering only modest specific protection against resistant strains. Therefore, we assess here how varying the specific efficacy of the vaccine against resistant strains would affect the proportion of drug-resistant vs. -sensitive strains population-wide for three pathogens--Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and influenza virus--in which drug resistance is a problem. Notably, if such vaccines confer even slightly higher protection (additional efficacy between 1% and 8% against resistant variants than sensitive ones, they may be an effective tool in controlling the rise of resistant strains, given current levels of use for many antimicrobial agents. We show that the population-wide impact of such vaccines depends on the additional effect on resistant strains and on the overall effect (against all strains. Resistance-conferring accessory gene products or resistant alleles of essential genes could be valuable as components of vaccines even if their specific protective effect is weak.

  9. Pharmacogenomic association study on the role of drug metabolizing, drug transporters and drug target gene polymorphisms in drug-resistant epilepsy in a north Indian population

    OpenAIRE

    Ritu Kumari; Ram Lakhan; Garg, R. K.; Kalita, J; Misra, U K; Balraj Mittal

    2011-01-01

    Background: In epilepsy, in spite of the best possible medications and treatment protocols, approximately one-third of the patients do not respond adequately to anti-epileptic drugs. Such interindividual variations in drug response are believed to result from genetic variations in candidate genes belonging to multiple pathways. Materials and Methods: In the present pharmacogenetic analysis, a total of 402 epilepsy patients were enrolled. Of them, 128 were diagnosed as multiple drug-resist...

  10. Using mitochondrial sirtuins as drug targets: disease implications and available compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, Melanie; Steegborn, Clemens

    2016-08-01

    Sirtuins are an evolutionary conserved family of NAD(+)-dependent protein lysine deacylases. Mammals have seven Sirtuin isoforms, Sirt1-7. They contribute to regulation of metabolism, stress responses, and aging processes, and are considered therapeutic targets for metabolic and aging-related diseases. While initial studies were focused on Sirt1 and 2, recent progress on the mitochondrial Sirtuins Sirt3, 4, and 5 has stimulated research and drug development for these isoforms. Here we review the roles of Sirtuins in regulating mitochondrial functions, with a focus on the mitochondrially located isoforms, and on their contributions to disease pathologies. We further summarize the compounds available for modulating the activity of these Sirtuins, again with a focus on mitochondrial isoforms, and we describe recent results important for the further improvement of compounds. This overview illustrates the potential of mitochondrial Sirtuins as drug targets and summarizes the status, progress, and challenges in developing small molecule compounds modulating their activity. PMID:27007507

  11. Advanced targeted therapies in cancer: Drug nanocarriers, the future of chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Herrero, Edgar; Fernández-Medarde, Alberto

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, exceeded only by cardiovascular diseases. It is characterized by uncontrolled cell proliferation and an absence of cell death that, except for hematological cancers, generates an abnormal cell mass or tumor. This primary tumor grows thanks to new vascularization and, in time, acquires metastatic potential and spreads to other body sites, which causes metastasis and finally death. Cancer is caused by damage or mutations in the genetic material of the cells due to environmental or inherited factors. While surgery and radiotherapy are the primary treatment used for local and non-metastatic cancers, anti-cancer drugs (chemotherapy, hormone and biological therapies) are the choice currently used in metastatic cancers. Chemotherapy is based on the inhibition of the division of rapidly growing cells, which is a characteristic of the cancerous cells, but unfortunately, it also affects normal cells with fast proliferation rates, such as the hair follicles, bone marrow and gastrointestinal tract cells, generating the characteristic side effects of chemotherapy. The indiscriminate destruction of normal cells, the toxicity of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs, as well as the development of multidrug resistance, support the need to find new effective targeted treatments based on the changes in the molecular biology of the tumor cells. These novel targeted therapies, of increasing interest as evidenced by FDA-approved targeted cancer drugs in recent years, block biologic transduction pathways and/or specific cancer proteins to induce the death of cancer cells by means of apoptosis and stimulation of the immune system, or specifically deliver chemotherapeutic agents to cancer cells, minimizing the undesirable side effects. Although targeted therapies can be achieved directly by altering specific cell signaling by means of monoclonal antibodies or small molecules inhibitors, this review focuses on indirect targeted approaches that

  12. Magnetorelaxometric quantification of magnetic nanoparticles in an artery model after ex vivo magnetic drug targeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In magnetic drug targeting a chemotherapeutic agent is bound to coated magnetic nanoparticles, which are administered to the blood vessel system and subsequently focused by an external applied magnetic field. The optimization of intra-arterial magnetic drug targeting (MDT) requires detailed knowledge about the biodistribution of particles in the artery and the respective surrounding after the application. Here, we demonstrate the potential of magnetorelaxometry for quantifying the distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in the artery. To this end, we present a magnetorelaxometry investigation of a MDT study in an artery model. In particular, the absolute magnetic nanoparticle accumulation along the artery as well as the uptake profile along the region around the MDT-magnet position was quantified. (note)

  13. Magnetorelaxometric quantification of magnetic nanoparticles in an artery model after ex vivo magnetic drug targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, H; Wiekhorst, F; Schwarz, K; Trahms, L [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Lyer, S; Tietze, R; Alexiou, Ch [Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg (Germany)], E-mail: heike.richter@ptb.de, E-mail: lutz.trahms@ptb.de

    2009-09-21

    In magnetic drug targeting a chemotherapeutic agent is bound to coated magnetic nanoparticles, which are administered to the blood vessel system and subsequently focused by an external applied magnetic field. The optimization of intra-arterial magnetic drug targeting (MDT) requires detailed knowledge about the biodistribution of particles in the artery and the respective surrounding after the application. Here, we demonstrate the potential of magnetorelaxometry for quantifying the distribution of magnetic nanoparticles in the artery. To this end, we present a magnetorelaxometry investigation of a MDT study in an artery model. In particular, the absolute magnetic nanoparticle accumulation along the artery as well as the uptake profile along the region around the MDT-magnet position was quantified. (note)

  14. Cell-targeted 114Inm and drug (BCNU) combination therapy in a rat acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A proportion of syngeneic female rats inoculated intramuscularly with a lethal T-cell lymphoblastic (Roser) leukaemia are cured by a single intraperitoneal injection of bischloroethylnitrosourea (BCNU) (Carmustine)(10 mg kg-1) given towards the end of the preleukaemic phase (day 7). Additional therapy on day 4, using intravenous leukaemia cells lethally labelled with the radionuclide 114Inm, enhanced the overall cure rate by 30%. The spleen is a major site of indium concentration from the targeting cells so that the continuous local radiation field appears to result in a substantial reduction of the body load of leukaemia cells in the enlarged spleen particularly, thus enhancing the curative potential of the drug. The results demonstrate in principle that in patients in remission a single dose of targeted radiotherapy in the spleen combined sequentially with an appropriate drug might provide considerable aid in eliminating a residual population of leukaemia cells. (author)

  15. MDA Program against lymphatic filariasis: Are we on the path to success? Experience from Uttara Kannada District, Karnataka

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen Kulkarni; Ravi Kumar; Ravi Marinayakanakoppalu Rajegowda; Harshith Gowdra Channabasappa; NC Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Context: Lymphatic filariasis or elephantiasis a serious public health problem in India. Millennium Development Goals and National Health Policies purport to eliminate filariasis by 2015. The concept of mass drug administration (MDA) is to approach every individual in the target community and administer annual single dose of anti-filarial drugs (DEC or DEC+Albendazole). Aims: 1. Assess the coverage and compliance to MDA in the district. 2. Assess the awareness of elephantiasis among beneficia...

  16. Comparative genomics allowed the identification of drug targets against human fungal pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins Natalia F

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prevalence of invasive fungal infections (IFIs has increased steadily worldwide in the last few decades. Particularly, there has been a global rise in the number of infections among immunosuppressed people. These patients present severe clinical forms of the infections, which are commonly fatal, and they are more susceptible to opportunistic fungal infections than non-immunocompromised people. IFIs have historically been associated with high morbidity and mortality, partly because of the limitations of available antifungal therapies, including side effects, toxicities, drug interactions and antifungal resistance. Thus, the search for alternative therapies and/or the development of more specific drugs is a challenge that needs to be met. Genomics has created new ways of examining genes, which open new strategies for drug development and control of human diseases. Results In silico analyses and manual mining selected initially 57 potential drug targets, based on 55 genes experimentally confirmed as essential for Candida albicans or Aspergillus fumigatus and other 2 genes (kre2 and erg6 relevant for fungal survival within the host. Orthologs for those 57 potential targets were also identified in eight human fungal pathogens (C. albicans, A. fumigatus, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Paracoccidioides lutzii, Coccidioides immitis, Cryptococcus neoformans and Histoplasma capsulatum. Of those, 10 genes were present in all pathogenic fungi analyzed and absent in the human genome. We focused on four candidates: trr1 that encodes for thioredoxin reductase, rim8 that encodes for a protein involved in the proteolytic activation of a transcriptional factor in response to alkaline pH, kre2 that encodes for α-1,2-mannosyltransferase and erg6 that encodes for Δ(24-sterol C-methyltransferase. Conclusions Our data show that the comparative genomics analysis of eight fungal pathogens enabled the identification of

  17. Aptamers as targeting delivery devices or anti-cancer drugs for fighting tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaggiante, Bruna; Dapas, Barbara; Farra, Rossella; Grassi, Mario; Pozzato, Gabriele; Giansante, Carlo; Fiotti, Nicola; Tamai, Elisa; Tonon, Federica; Grassi, Gabriele

    2013-06-01

    Aptamer researches applied to the treatment of human cancers have increased since their discovery in 1990. This is due to different factors including: 1) the technical possibility to select, by SELEX-based procedures, specific aptamers targeting virtually any given molecule, 2) the aptamer favorable bio-activity in vivo, 3) the low production costs and 4) the ease synthesis and storage for the marketing. In the field of cancer treatments, aptamers have been studied as tumor-specific agents driving drugs into cancer cells; additionally they have been used as anti-neoplastic agents, able to inhibit tumor cell growth and dissemination when administered alone or in combination with conventional anti-neoplastic drugs. Aptamers are gaining an increased interest for pharmaceutical companies and some of them are under clinical evaluation trials. In this review we update the findings about the use of aptamers as "escort" molecules able to drive drugs into the cells and as antineoplastic drugs. Current anti-neoplastic treatments suffer from the intrinsic toxicity related to the un-specific targeting of both normal and tumorigenic proliferating cells. The aptamers could be useful to improve: 1) the selective targeting of molecules essential for the viability and expansion of tumor cells and/or the selective driving of chemotherapies into tumor cells, thus resulting in higher effectiveness and lower systemic side-effects compared to conventional anti-neoplastic drugs alone and 2) to improve the therapeutic index of currently used chemotherapies. Even if some problems related to the in vivo stability and pharmacokinetic/dynamics of aptamers remain to be improved, their potential use in the treatment of different human cancers is getting closer and closer to a practical therapeutic use. PMID:23687927

  18. Targeting oncoprotein stability overcomes drug resistance caused by FLT3 kinase domain mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjiang Yu

    Full Text Available FLT3 is the most frequently mutated kinase in acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Internal tandem duplications (ITDs in the juxta-membrane region constitute the majority of activating FLT3 mutations. Several FLT3 kinase inhibitors were developed and tested in the clinic with significant success. However, recent studies have reported the development of secondary drug resistance in patients treated with FLT3 inhibitors. Since FLT3-ITD is an HSP90 client kinase, we here explored if targeting the stability of drug-resistant FLT3 mutant protein could be a potential therapeutic option. We observed that HSP90 inhibitor treatment resulted in the degradation of inhibitor-resistant FLT3-ITD mutants and selectively induced toxicity in cells expressing FLT3-ITD mutants. Thus, HSP90 inhibitors provide a potential therapeutic choice to overcome secondary drug resistance following TKI treatment in FLT3-ITD positive AML.

  19. Functionalization of Self-Organized Nanoparticles for Biological Targeting and Active Drug Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jølck, Rasmus Irming

    and drug delivery. The objective of this PhD thesis was to expand the field of liposomal drug delivery by developing novel methods to efficienctly functionalize and subsequently sensitize liposomes towards internal stimuli, such as matrix metalloproteinases. Initially, we investigated a novel method...... to the importance of the relative position of the reactive functionalities. Surface conjugation reactions of octreotate by Michael addition, Click chemistry, Cu-free Click chemistry or oxime bond formation were investigated. From these studies it was evident that chemical reactions performed directly on the surface...... was significantly higher than for the controlliposomes, which indicated that active targeting can improve tumor-to-muscle contrast, thus, improving bioimaging for diagnostic applications. Finally, a novel drug delivery system based on charge-triggering of matrix metalloproteinase 2/9 sensitive PEGylated...

  20. Recombinant human elastin-like magnetic microparticles for drug delivery and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciofani, Gianni; Genchi, Giada Graziana; Guardia, Pablo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio; Bandiera, Antonella

    2014-05-01

    Bioinspired recombinant polypeptides represent a highly promising tool in biomedical research, being protein intrinsic constituents of both cells and their natural matrices. In this regard, a very interesting model is represented by polypeptides inspired by elastin, which naturally confers rubber-like elasticity to tissues, and is able to undergo wide deformations without rupture. In this paper, a microparticle system based on a recombinant human elastin-like polypeptide (HELP) is reported for drug delivery applications. HELP microparticles are prepared through a water-in-oil emulsion of an aqueous solution of recombinant polypeptide in isoctane, followed by enzymatic cross-linking. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are introduced in this system with the purpose of conferring magnetic properties to the microspheres, and thus controlling their targeting and tracking as drug vectors. The obtained microparticles are characterized in terms of morphology, structure, magnetic properties, drug release, and magnetic drivability, showing interesting and promising results for further biomedical applications. PMID:24318291

  1. In silico characterization of putative drug targets in Staphylococcus saprophyticus, causing bovine mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasme, Pramod C; Kurjogi, Mahantesh M; Sanakal, Rajeshwari D; Kaliwal, Rohit B; Kaliwal, Basappa B

    2013-01-01

    The bovine mastitis caused by coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) has increased in many herds of urban and rural areas of India. Emergence of multi drug resistant bacteria has further made its management more complex and serious. Therefore, innovation of novel specific drug for the treatment of disease caused by particular organism remained to be a challenge. Hence, in the present study a bacterium was isolated from milk of the cow with bovine mastitis and was identified as S. saprophyticus, 44 pathways of S. saprophyticus retrieved (KEGG) from web server were found to be non homologous to the host Bos taurus, out of which 39 pathways were found to be in cytoplasm, 2 in cell wall and 3 in the cell membrane. The knowledge of the present study could make the drug discovery easier which have high affinity to the target site of the causative organism. PMID:23750077

  2. Convergent pathogenic pathways in Alzheimer’s and Huntington disease: Shared targets for drug development

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrnhoefer, Dagmar E.; Wong, Bibiana K. Y.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases exemplified by Alzheimer’s and Huntington disease are characterized by the progressive neuropsychiatric dysfunction and loss of specific neuronal subtypes. Even though there are differences in the exact sites of pathology and clinical profiles only partially overlap, considerable similarities in disease mechanisms and pathogenic pathways can be observed. These shared mechanisms raise the possibility of common therapeutic targets for drug development. Huntington dise...

  3. Chemoattractant receptors in drug discovery: FPR2 and CCR2-two potential targets

    OpenAIRE

    Kalderén, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Chemoattractants and chemoattractant receptors have many important functions in multicellular organisms, not least for their role in regulating migration of leukocytes. The receptors are also involved in many pathologies and they have, since they were cloned in the 1990ies, been regarded as attractive targets for development of drugs against cancer, viral infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune diseases. Although chemotactic molecules are very heterogeneous in terms of chemi...

  4. Perspective of Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) as a Drug Target

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kryštof, Vladimír; Baumli, S.; Fürst, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 20 (2012), s. 2883-2890. ISSN 1381-6128 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/12/0783 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Cancer * inflammation * kinase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.311, year: 2012 http://www.benthamdirect.org/pages/article/1/3177374/perspective-of-cyclin-dependent-kinase-9-cdk9-as-a-drug-target.html

  5. Membrane domain formation—a key factor for targeted intracellular drug delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Popov-Čeleketić, Dušan; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein molecules, toxins and viruses internalize into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) using specific proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is a barrier for many pharmaceutical agents to enter into the cytoplasm of target cells. In the case of cancer cells, tissue-specific biomarkers in the plasma membrane, like cancer-specific growth factor receptors, could be excellent candidates for RME-dependent drug delivery. Recent data suggest that agent bindi...

  6. Host-bacterial coevolution and the search for new drug targets

    OpenAIRE

    Zaneveld, Jesse; Turnbaugh, Peter J.; Lozupone, Catherine; Ley, Ruth E.; Hamady, Micah; Gordon, Jeffrey I; Knight, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Understanding coevolution between humans and our microbial symbionts and pathogens requires complementary approaches, ranging from community analysis to in-depth analysis of individual genomes. Here we review the evidence for coevolution between symbionts and their hosts, the role of horizontal gene transfer in coevolution, and genomic and metagenomic approaches to identifying drug targets. Recent studies have shown that our symbiotic microbes confer many metabolic capabilities that our mamma...

  7. Anti-tumor targeted drug delivery systems mediated by aminopeptidase N/CD13

    OpenAIRE

    Xun Wang; Bin Wang; Qiang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN)/CD13 is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is overexpressed on tumor neovascular endothelial cells and most tumor cells, where it plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis. Peptides containing the Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motif can specifically recognize APN/CD13 allowing them to act as tumor-homing peptides for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor drugs to tumor neovascular endothelial cells and tumor cells. This article reviews the literature and recent developments rela...

  8. FEASIBILITY OF KONDAGOGU GUM AS A CARRIER FOR COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Srujana N.; Valluru Ravi; Pramod Kumar T.M; Vinay S; Kulkarni R. Ajay

    2011-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to develop colon targeted drug delivery system for metoprolol succinate using kondagogu gum as a polymer. Matrix tablets of metoprolol were prepared using PVP K-30 as binder and kondagogu gum as a rate controlling polymer. The prepared tablets were evaluated for properties such as hardness, thickness, friability etc. The prepared tablets were coated with shellac as an enteric coat polymer and evaluated for enteric coat test. In vitro release studies of we...

  9. Targeting sigma receptors: novel medication development for drug abuse and addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2009-01-01

    Psychostimulant abuse is a serious health and societal problem in industrialized and developing countries. However, the identification of an effective pharmacotherapy to treat it has remained elusive. It has long been known that many psychostimulant drugs, including cocaine and methamphetamine, interact with sigma receptors in the brain and heart, offering a logical target for medication development efforts. However, selective pharmacological agents and molecular biological tools have only re...

  10. A dual-targeting drug co-delivery system for tumor chemo- and gene combined therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fangrong; Li, Min; Su, Yujie; Zhou, Jianping; Wang, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of gene expression using p53 is a promising strategy for treatment of numerous cancers, and chemotherapeutic drug dichloroacetate (DCA) induces apoptosis and growth inhibition in tumor, without apparent toxicity in normal tissues. Combining DCA and p53 gene could be an effective way to treat tumors. The progress towards broad applications of DCA/p53 combination requires the development of safe and efficient vectors that target to specific cells. In this study, we developed a DSPE-PEG-AA (1,2-distearoryl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethyleneglycol-2000)] ammonium salt-anisamide) modified reconstituted high-density lipoprotein-based DCA/p53-loaded nanoparticles (DSPE-PEG-AA/rHDL/DCA-PEI/p53 complexes), which was fabricated as a drug/gene dual-targeting co-delivery system for potential cancer therapy. Here, DCA-PEI was utilized to effectively condense the p53 plasmid, to incorporate the plasmid into rHDL and to act as an antitumor drug to inhibit tumor cell growth. The DSPE-PEG-AA/rHDL/DCA-PEI/p53 complexes exhibited desirable and homogenous particle size, neutral surface charge and low cytotoxicity for normal cells in vitro. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry confirmed that the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and sigma receptor mediated dual-targeting function of the complexes inducing efficient cytoplasmic drug delivery and gene transfection in human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. And in vivo investigation on nude mice bearing A549 tumor xenografts revealed that DSPE-PEG-AA/rHDL/DCA-PEI/p53 complexes possessed specific tumor targeting and strong antitumor activity. The work described here demonstrated that the DSPE-PEG-AA/rHDL/DCA-PEI/p53 complexes might offer a promising tool for effective cancer therapy. PMID:27127046

  11. Targeted drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier using ultrasound technique

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Cheri X.

    2010-01-01

    Effective delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain can greatly improve the treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Application of focused ultrasound facilitated by microbubbles has shown the potential to deliver drugs across the blood–brain barrier into targeted sites within the brain noninvasively. This review provides a summary of the technological background and principle, highlights of recent significant developments and research progress, as well as a critical com...

  12. A target repurposing approach identifies N-myristoyltransferase as a new candidate drug target in filarial nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan D Galvin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Myristoylation is a lipid modification involving the addition of a 14-carbon unsaturated fatty acid, myristic acid, to the N-terminal glycine of a subset of proteins, a modification that promotes their binding to cell membranes for varied biological functions. The process is catalyzed by myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT, an enzyme which has been validated as a drug target in human cancers, and for infectious diseases caused by fungi, viruses and protozoan parasites. We purified Caenorhabditis elegans and Brugia malayi NMTs as active recombinant proteins and carried out kinetic analyses with their essential fatty acid donor, myristoyl-CoA and peptide substrates. Biochemical and structural analyses both revealed that the nematode enzymes are canonical NMTs, sharing a high degree of conservation with protozoan NMT enzymes. Inhibitory compounds that target NMT in protozoan species inhibited the nematode NMTs with IC50 values of 2.5-10 nM, and were active against B. malayi microfilariae and adult worms at 12.5 µM and 50 µM respectively, and C. elegans (25 µM in culture. RNA interference and gene deletion in C. elegans further showed that NMT is essential for nematode viability. The effects observed are likely due to disruption of the function of several downstream target proteins. Potential substrates of NMT in B. malayi are predicted using bioinformatic analysis. Our genetic and chemical studies highlight the importance of myristoylation in the synthesis of functional proteins in nematodes and have shown for the first time that NMT is required for viability in parasitic nematodes. These results suggest that targeting NMT could be a valid approach for the development of chemotherapeutic agents against nematode diseases including filariasis.

  13. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  14. Electrosprayed nanocomposites based on hyaluronic acid derivative and Soluplus for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Song Yi; Lee, Jeong-Jun; Park, Ju-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Young; Ko, Seung-Hak; Shim, Jae-Seong; Lee, Jongkook; Heo, Moon Young; Kim, Dae-Duk; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2016-09-01

    Nanocomposite (NC) based on hyaluronic acid-ceramide (HACE) and Soluplus (SP) was fabricated by electrospraying for the tumor-targeted delivery of resveratrol (RSV). Amphiphilic property of both HACE and SP has been used to entrap RSV in the internal cavity of NC. Electrospraying with established experimental conditions produced HACE/SP/RSV NC with 230nm mean diameter, narrow size distribution, negative zeta potential, and >80% drug entrapment efficiency. Sustained and pH-dependent drug release profiles were observed in drug release test. Cellular uptake efficiency of HACE/SP NC was higher than that of SP NC, mainly based on HA-CD44 receptor interaction, in MDA-MB-231 (CD44 receptor-positive human breast cancer) cells. Selective tumor targetability of HACE/SP NC, compared to SP NC, was also confirmed in MDA-MB-231 tumor-xenograted mouse model using a near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. According to the results of pharmacokinetic study in rats, decreased in vivo clearance and increased half-life of RSV in NC group, compared to drug solution group, were shown. Given that these experimental results, developed HACE/SP NC can be a promising theranostic nanosystem for CD44 receptor-expressed cancers. PMID:27208440

  15. Solubility Enhancement of Budesonide and Statistical Optimization of Coating Variables for Targeted Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to present Budesonide (BUD as a novel formulation showing improved aqueous solubility, which may decrease variability in Cmax⁡ and Tmax⁡ found in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD patients, and drug targeting to colon. To improve aqueous solubility, solid dispersion (SD of the BUD with poloxamer 188 was prepared by melting method. Physical characterization of solid dispersion was performed. The SD was used to prepare tablet equivalent to 9 mg of BUD. The tablet was coated with enteric polymers Eudragit S100 and Eudragit L100 to target colon. The ratio of polymers and percentage coating was optimized using statistical design. Variables studied in design were ratio of enteric polymers and the effect of percentage coating on in vitro drug release. Dissolution at different pH showed that drug release in colon could be modified by optimizing the ratio of polymers and percentage coating. The dissolution data showed that the percentage coating and ratio of polymers are very important to get lag time and optimum formulation. The optimized batch from statistical design was kept under accelerated condition for three months. After accelerated stability study, there was no significant change in the drug release.

  16. Pegylated polyelectrolyte nanoparticles containing paclitaxel as a promising candidate for drug carriers for passive targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanowicz, Krzysztof; Bzowska, Monika; Kruk, Tomasz; Karabasz, Alicja; Bereta, Joanna; Warszynski, Piotr

    2016-07-01

    Targeted drug delivery systems are of special importance in cancer therapies, since serious side effects resulting from unspecific accumulation of highly toxic chemotherapeutics in healthy tissues can restrict effectiveness of the therapy. In this work we present the method of preparing biocompatible, polyelectrolyte nanoparticles containing the anticancer drug that may serve as a vehicle for passive tumor targeting. The nanoparticles were prepared via direct encapsulation of emulsion droplets in a polyelectrolyte multilayer shell. The oil cores that contained paclitaxel were stabilized by docusate sodium salt/poly-l-lysine surface complex (AOT/PLL) and were encapsulated in shells formed by the LbL adsorption of biocompatible polyelectrolytes, poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA) and PLL up to 5 or 6 layers. The surface of the nanoparticles was pegylated through the adsorption of the pegylated polyelectrolyte (PGA-g-PEG) as the outer layer to prolong the persistence of the nanocarriers in the circulation. The synthesized nanoparticles were stable in cell culture medium containing serum and their average size was 100nm, which makes them promising candidates for passive targeted drug delivery. This notion was further confirmed by the results of studying the biological effects of nanoformulations on two tumor cell lines: mouse colon carcinoma cell line CT26-CEA and the mouse mammary carcinoma cell line 4T1. The empty polyelectrolyte nanoparticles did not affect the viability of the tested cells, whereas encapsulated paclitaxel retained its strong cytotoxic/cytostatic activity. PMID:27037784

  17. Antimalarial drug targets in Plasmodium falciparum predicted by stage-specific metabolic network analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huthmacher Carola

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite enormous efforts to combat malaria the disease still afflicts up to half a billion people each year of which more than one million die. Currently no approved vaccine is available and resistances to antimalarials are widely spread. Hence, new antimalarial drugs are urgently needed. Results Here, we present a computational analysis of the metabolism of Plasmodium falciparum, the deadliest malaria pathogen. We assembled a compartmentalized metabolic model and predicted life cycle stage specific metabolism with the help of a flux balance approach that integrates gene expression data. Predicted metabolite exchanges between parasite and host were found to be in good accordance with experimental findings when the parasite's metabolic network was embedded into that of its host (erythrocyte. Knock-out simulations identified 307 indispensable metabolic reactions within the parasite. 35 out of 57 experimentally demonstrated essential enzymes were recovered and another 16 enzymes, if additionally the assumption was made that nutrient uptake from the host cell is limited and all reactions catalyzed by the inhibited enzyme are blocked. This predicted set of putative drug targets, shown to be enriched with true targets by a factor of at least 2.75, was further analyzed with respect to homology to human enzymes, functional similarity to therapeutic targets in other organisms and their predicted potency for prophylaxis and disease treatment. Conclusions The results suggest that the set of essential enzymes predicted by our flux balance approach represents a promising starting point for further drug development.

  18. Adverse drug reaction prediction using scores produced by large-scale drug-protein target docking on high-performance computing machines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montiago X LaBute

    Full Text Available Late-stage or post-market identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs is a significant public health issue and a source of major economic liability for drug development. Thus, reliable in silico screening of drug candidates for possible ADRs would be advantageous. In this work, we introduce a computational approach that predicts ADRs by combining the results of molecular docking and leverages known ADR information from DrugBank and SIDER. We employed a recently parallelized version of AutoDock Vina (VinaLC to dock 906 small molecule drugs to a virtual panel of 409 DrugBank protein targets. L1-regularized logistic regression models were trained on the resulting docking scores of a 560 compound subset from the initial 906 compounds to predict 85 side effects, grouped into 10 ADR phenotype groups. Only 21% (87 out of 409 of the drug-protein binding features involve known targets of the drug subset, providing a significant probe of off-target effects. As a control, associations of this drug subset with the 555 annotated targets of these compounds, as reported in DrugBank, were used as features to train a separate group of models. The Vina off-target models and the DrugBank on-target models yielded comparable median area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic-curves (AUCs during 10-fold cross-validation (0.60-0.69 and 0.61-0.74, respectively. Evidence was found in the PubMed literature to support several putative ADR-protein associations identified by our analysis. Among them, several associations between neoplasm-related ADRs and known tumor suppressor and tumor invasiveness marker proteins were found. A dual role for interstitial collagenase in both neoplasms and aneurysm formation was also identified. These associations all involve off-target proteins and could not have been found using available drug/on-target interaction data. This study illustrates a path forward to comprehensive ADR virtual screening that can potentially scale with

  19. Potential of targeted drug delivery system for the treatment of bone metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinay, Raichur; KusumDevi, V

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a devastating complication of cancer that requires an immediate attention. Although our understanding of the metastatic process has improved over the years, yet a number of questions still remain unanswered, and more research is required for complete understanding of the skeletal consequences of metastasis. Furthermore, as no effective treatments are available for some of the most common skeleton disorders such as arthritis, osteoarthritis, osteosarcoma and metastatic bone cancer, there is an urgent need to develop new drugs and drug delivery systems for safe and efficient clinical treatments. Hence this article describes the potential of targeted delivery platforms aimed specifically at bone metastasized tumors. The review gives a brief understanding of the proposed mechanisms of metastasis and focuses primarily on the targeting moieties such as bisphosphonates, which represent the current gold standard in bone metastasis therapies. Special focus has been given to the targeted nanoparticulate systems for treating bone metastasis and its future. Also highlighted are some of the therapeutic targets that can be exploited for designing therapies for bone metastasis. Some of the patented molecules for bone metastasis prevention and treatment have also been discussed. Recently proposed HIFU-CHEM, which utilizes High Intensity Focused ultrasound (HIFU) guided by MRI in combination with temperature-sensitive nanomedicines has also been briefed. The study has been concluded with a focus on the innovations requiring an immediate attention that could improve the treatment modality of bone metastasis. PMID:24839990

  20. Peptide Phage Display as a Tool for Drug Discovery: Targeting Membrane Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaz Bratkovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ligands selected from phage-displayed random peptide libraries tend to be directed to biologically relevant sites on the surface of the target protein. Consequently, peptides derived from library screenings often modulate the target protein’s activity in vitro and in vivo and can be used as lead compounds in drug design and as alternatives to antibodies for target validation in both genomics and drug discovery. This review discusses the use of phage display to identify membrane receptor modulators with agonistic or antagonistic activities. Because isolating or producing recombinant membrane proteins for use as target molecules in library screening is often impossible, innovative selection strategies such as panning against whole cells or tissues, recombinant receptor ectodomains, or neutralizing antibodies to endogenous binding partners were devised. Prominent examples from a two-decade history of peptide phage display will be presented, focusing on the design of affinity selection experiments, methods for improving the initial hits, and applications of the identified peptides.

  1. DNA Gyrase Is the Target for the Quinolone Drug Ciprofloxacin in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Wall, Melisa K.; Leroux, Julie; Mylne, Joshua S.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains four genes that were originally annotated as potentially encoding DNA gyrase: ATGYRA, ATGYRB1, ATGYRB2, and ATGYRB3. Although we subsequently showed that ATGYRB3 does not encode a gyrase subunit, the other three genes potentially encode subunits of a plant gyrase. We also showed evidence for the existence of supercoiling activity in A. thaliana and that the plant is sensitive to quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics, compounds that target DNA gyrase in bacteria. However, it was not possible at that time to show whether the A. thaliana genes encoded an active gyrase enzyme, nor whether that enzyme is indeed the target for the quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics. Here we show that an A. thaliana mutant resistant to the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin has a point mutation in ATGYRA. Moreover we show that, as in bacteria, the quinolone-sensitive (wild-type) allele is dominant to the resistant gene. Further we have heterologously expressed ATGYRA and ATGYRB2 in a baculovirus expression system and shown supercoiling activity of the partially purified enzyme. Expression/purification of the quinolone-resistant A. thaliana gyrase yields active enzyme that is resistant to ciprofloxacin. Taken together these experiments now show unequivocally that A. thaliana encodes an organelle-targeted DNA gyrase that is the target of the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin; this has important consequences for plant physiology and the development of herbicides. PMID:26663076

  2. Targeted skipping of human dystrophin exons in transgenic mouse model systemically for antisense drug development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wu

    Full Text Available Antisense therapy has recently been demonstrated with great potential for targeted exon skipping and restoration of dystrophin production in cultured muscle cells and in muscles of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD patients. Therapeutic values of exon skipping critically depend on efficacy of the drugs, antisense oligomers (AOs. However, no animal model has been established to test AO targeting human dystrophin exon in vivo systemically. In this study, we applied Vivo-Morpholino to the hDMD mouse, a transgenic model carrying the full-length human dystrophin gene, and achieved for the first time more than 70% efficiency of targeted human dystrophin exon skipping in vivo systemically. We also established a GFP-reporter myoblast culture to screen AOs targeting human dystrophin exon 50. Antisense efficiency for most AOs is consistent between the reporter cells, human myoblasts and in the hDMD mice in vivo. However, variation in efficiency was also clearly observed. A combination of in vitro cell culture and a Vivo-Morpholino based evaluation in vivo systemically in the hDMD mice therefore may represent a prudent approach for selecting AO drug and to meet the regulatory requirement.

  3. Herbal and polymeric approaches for liver-targeting drug delivery: novel strategies and their significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohilla, Raman; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit K; Rath, Goutam

    2016-06-01

    The liver is a vital organ present in vertebrates, which performs many functions including detoxification, protein synthesis and production of various bio-chemicals which are very important for digestion. A large number of serious liver disorders affect millions of people worldwide which are very difficult to treat properly despite many efforts. There are several factors which are responsible for liver injuries, include plants (Crotalaria Senecio Heliotropium Symphytum officinale), drugs (analgesic and antibiotics), industrial toxins (mercury and lead), water, alcohol and so on. Herbal medicinal preparations can be used for the treatment of a large number of human liver disorders like cirrhosis, hepatitis, carcinomas, etc. Indian Medicinal Practitioner's Co-operative pharmacy and Stores (IMPCPS) approved herbal-based systems (Unani, Siddha and Ayurveda) for the treatment of various chronic liver disorders. Different types of the receptors are found on the surface of hepatocytes, Kupffer cell, hepatic stellate cell and sinusoidal endothelial cells, etc., which can be used for achieving liver targeting. These receptors bind to different types of ligands (galactosylated, lactobionic acid, asialofetuin, etc.) which can be used in the formulation to achieve targeted delivery of the drug. Various novel particulate approaches (liposomes, niosomes, nanoparticles, micelles, nanosuspensions, etc.) can be used to enhance the targeting efficiency of systems to receptors found on the surface of different cells present in the liver. In this review, we focused on the status of liver targeting via herbal and nanotechnology inspired formulation approaches. PMID:25101832

  4. Targeting choroid plexus epithelia and ventricular ependyma for drug delivery to the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stopa Edward G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the choroid plexus (CP is uniquely suited to control the composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, there may be therapeutic benefits to increasing the levels of biologically active proteins in CSF to modulate central nervous system (CNS functions. To this end, we sought to identify peptides capable of ligand-mediated targeting to CP epithelial cells reasoning that they could be exploited to deliver drugs, biotherapeutics and genes to the CNS. Methods A peptide library displayed on M13 bacteriophage was screened for ligands capable of internalizing into CP epithelial cells by incubating phage with CP explants for 2 hours at 37C and recovering particles with targeting capacity. Results Three peptides, identified after four rounds of screening, were analyzed for specific and dose dependant binding and internalization. Binding was deemed specific because internalization was prevented by co-incubation with cognate synthetic peptides. Furthermore, after i.c.v. injection into rat brains, each peptide was found to target phage to epithelial cells in CP and to ependyma lining the ventricles. Conclusion These data demonstrate that ligand-mediated targeting can be used as a strategy for drug delivery to the central nervous system and opens the possibility of using the choroid plexus as a portal of entry into the brain.

  5. Low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs in melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Judith; Krijgsman, Oscar; Tsoi, Jennifer; Robert, Lidia; Hugo, Willy; Song, Chunying; Kong, Xiangju; Possik, Patricia A.; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien D.M.; Foppen, Marnix H. Geukes; Kemper, Kristel; Goding, Colin R.; McDermott, Ultan; Blank, Christian; Haanen, John; Graeber, Thomas G.; Ribas, Antoni; Lo, Roger S.; Peeper, Daniel S.

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of the Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) contributes to melanoma progression and resistance to BRAF pathway inhibition. Here we show that the lack of MITF is associated with more severe resistance to a range of inhibitors, while its presence is required for robust drug responses. Both in primary and acquired resistance, MITF levels inversely correlate with the expression of several activated receptor tyrosine kinases, most frequently AXL. The MITF-low/AXL-high/drug-resistance phenotype is common among mutant BRAF and NRAS melanoma cell lines. The dichotomous behaviour of MITF in drug response is corroborated in vemurafenib-resistant biopsies, including MITF-high and -low clones in a relapsed patient. Furthermore, drug cocktails containing AXL inhibitor enhance melanoma cell elimination by BRAF or ERK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that a low MITF/AXL ratio predicts early resistance to multiple targeted drugs, and warrant clinical validation of AXL inhibitors to combat resistance of BRAF and NRAS mutant MITF-low melanomas. PMID:25502142

  6. FEASIBILITY OF KONDAGOGU GUM AS A CARRIER FOR COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srujana N.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been undertaken to develop colon targeted drug delivery system for metoprolol succinate using kondagogu gum as a polymer. Matrix tablets of metoprolol were prepared using PVP K-30 as binder and kondagogu gum as a rate controlling polymer. The prepared tablets were evaluated for properties such as hardness, thickness, friability etc. The prepared tablets were coated with shellac as an enteric coat polymer and evaluated for enteric coat test. In vitro release studies of were carried out for 2 hrs in pH 1.2 HCl buffer, 3 hrs in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer and 7 hrs in the presence of 200 ml of simulated colonic fluid (SCF. In addition, kinetics of drug release from the matrices and stability of the tablet formulations were also investigated. Mathematical analysis of the release kinetics was done using PCP-V02 disso software and it showed that the nature of drug release from the matrix tablets has followed super case II transport which means drug release fro this system is by both diffusion and relaxation of polymer chain. FTIR and DSC studies have shown that no chemical interaction occurred between the drug and polymers used. The optimized formulation (F9 showed negligible difference in release mechanism as well as release kinetics when stability study was done for three months at 40±20 C and 75±5% RH.

  7. Facile synthesis of manganese ferrite/graphene oxide nanocomposites for controlled targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangshuo; Ma, Yingying; Zhang, Lina; Mu, Jingbo; Zhang, Zhixiao; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Che, Hongwei; Bai, Yongmei; Hou, Junxian

    2016-03-01

    In this study, manganese ferrite/graphene oxide (MnFe2O4/GO) nanocomposites as controlled targeted drug delivery were prepared by a facile sonochemical method. It was found that GO nanosheets were fully exfoliated and decorated with MnFe2O4 nanoparticles having diameters of 5-13 nm. The field-dependent magnetization curve indicated superparamagnetic behavior of the obtained MnFe2O4/GO with saturation magnetization of 34.9 emu/g at room temperature. The in vitro cytotoxicity testing exhibited negligible cytotoxicity of as-prepared MnFe2O4/GO even at the concentration as high as 150 μg/mL. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) as an anti-tumor model drug was utilized to explore the application potential of MnFe2O4/GO for controlled drug delivery. The drug loading capacity of this nanocarrier was as high as 0.97 mg/mg and the drug release behavior showed a sustained and pH-responsive way.

  8. Development of high drug-loading nanomicelles targeting steroids to the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng S

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Sijia Zheng,1,* Yanqi Xie,1,* Yuan Li,1 Ling Li,1 Ning Tian,1 Wenbo Zhu,2 Guangmei Yan,2 Chuanbin Wu,1 Haiyan Hu1 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmacology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate high drug-loading ligand-modified nanomicelles to deliver a steroidal compound to the brain. YC1 (5α-cholestane-24-methylene-3β, 5α, 6β, 19-tetraol, with poor solubility and limited access to the brain, for the first time, has been proved to be an effective neuroprotective steroid by our previous studies. Based on the principle of ‘like dissolves like’, cholesterol, which shares the same steroidal parent nucleus with YC1, was selected to react with sodium alginate, producing amphiphilic sodium alginate–cholesterol derivatives (SACDs. To increase the grafting ratio and drug loading, cholesterol was converted to cholesteryl chloroformate, for the first time, before reacting with sodium alginate. Further, lactoferrin was conjugated on SACDs to provide lactoferrin-SACDs (Lf-SACD, which was established by immune electron microscopy (IEM and self-assembled into brain-targeting nanomicelles. These nanomicelles were negatively charged and spherical in nature, with an average size of <200 nm. The YC1 drug loading was increased due to the cholesteryl inner cores of the nanomicelles, and the higher the grafting ratio was, the lower the critical micelle concentration (CMC value of SACD, and the higher drug loading. The in vitro drug release, studied by bulk-equilibrium dialysis in 20 mL of 6% hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin solution at 37°C, indicated a prolonged release profile. The YC1 concentration in mouse brain delivered by lactoferrin-modified nanomicelles was higher than in those delivered by non-modified nanomicelles and YC1 solution. The unique brain-targeting

  9. HER2 Targeting Peptides Screening and Applications in Tumor Imaging and Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lingling; Wang, Zihua; Jia, Xiangqian; Han, Qiuju; Xiang, Zhichu; Li, Dan; Yang, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Di; Bu, Xiangli; Wang, Weizhi; Hu, Zhiyuan; Fang, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Herein, computational-aided one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide library design combined with in situ single-bead sequencing microarray methods were successfully applied in screening peptides targeting at human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2), a biomarker of human breast cancer. As a result, 72 novel peptides clustered into three sequence motifs which are PYL***NP, YYL***NP and PPL***NP were acquired. Particularly one of the peptides, P51, has nanomolar affinity and high specificity for HER2 in ex vivo and in vivo tests. Moreover, doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded liposome nanoparticles were modified with peptide P51 or P25 and demonstrated to improve the targeted delivery against HER2 positive cells. Our study provides an efficient peptide screening method with a combination of techniques and the novel screened peptides with a clear binding site on HER2 can be used as probes for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery. PMID:27279916

  10. Dual Functional Peptide-Driven Nanoparticles for Highly Efficient Glioma-Targeting and Drug Codelivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Yuyang; Jiang, Xutao; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Yifei; Ma, Haojun; Guo, Yubo; Zhang, Yujie; An, Sai; Li, Jianfeng; Liu, Lisha; Wu, Yinhao; Liang, Jianying; Jiang, Chen

    2016-05-01

    Compared with peripheral tumors, glioma is very difficult to treat, not only because it has general features of tumor but also because the therapy has been restricted by the brain-blood barrier (BBB). The two main features of tumor growth are angiogenesis and proliferation of tumor cells. RNA interference (RNAi) can downregulate VEGF overexpression to inhibit tumor neovascularization. Meanwhile, doxorubicin (DOX) has been used for cytotoxic chemotherapy to kill tumor cells. Thus, combining RNAi and chemotherapy has been regarded as a potential strategy for cancer treatment. However, the BBB limits the shVEGF-DOX codelivery system to direct into glioma. Here, a smart drug delivery system modified with a dual functional peptide was established, which could target to transferrin receptor (TfR) overexpressing on both the BBB and glioma. It showed that the dual-targeting delivery system had high tumor targeting efficiency in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27058780

  11. Trypanothione Reductase: A Viable Chemotherapeutic Target for Antitrypanosomal and Antileishmanial Drug Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Omar F. Khan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are two debilitating disease groups caused by parasites of Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. and affecting millions of people worldwide. A brief outline of the potential targets for rational drug design against these diseases are presented, with an emphasis placed on the enzyme trypanothione reductase. Trypanothione reductase was identified as unique to parasites and proposed to be an effective target against trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The biochemical basis of selecting this enzyme as a target, with reference to the simile and contrast to human analogous enzyme glutathione reductase, and the structural aspects of its active site are presented. The process of designing selective inhibitors for the enzyme trypanothione reductase has been discussed. An overview of the different chemical classes of inhibitors of trypanothione reductase with their inhibitory activities against the parasites and their prospects as future chemotherapeutic agents are briefl y revealed.

  12. Metabolic network analysis-based identification of antimicrobial drug targets in category A bioterrorism agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yeol Ahn

    Full Text Available The 2001 anthrax mail attacks in the United States demonstrated the potential threat of bioterrorism, hence driving the need to develop sophisticated treatment and diagnostic protocols to counter biological warfare. Here, by performing flux balance analyses on the fully-annotated metabolic networks of multiple, whole genome-sequenced bacterial strains, we have identified a large number of metabolic enzymes as potential drug targets for each of the three Category A-designated bioterrorism agents including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis. Nine metabolic enzymes- belonging to the coenzyme A, folate, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and nucleic acid pathways common to all strains across the three distinct genera were identified as targets. Antimicrobial agents against some of these enzymes are available. Thus, a combination of cross species-specific antibiotics and common antimicrobials against shared targets may represent a useful combinatorial therapeutic approach against all Category A bioterrorism agents.

  13. Orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs):biological functions and potential drug targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-long TANG; Ying WANG; Da-li LI; Jian LUO; Ming-yao LIU

    2012-01-01

    The superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) includes at least 800 seven-transmembrane receptors that participate in diverse physiological and pathological functions.GPCRs are the most successful targets of modern medicine,and approximately 36%of marketed pharmaceuticals target human GPCRs.However,the endogenous ligands of more than 140 GPCRs remain unidentified,leaving the natural functions of those GPCRs in doubt.These are the so-called orphan GPCRs,a great source of drug targets.This review focuses on the signaling transduction pathways of the Adhesion GPCR family,the LGR subfamily,and the PSGR subfamily,and their potential functions in immunology,development,and cancers.In this review,we present the current approaches and difficulties of orphan GPCR deorphanization and characterization.

  14. Multi-ligand nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to the injured vascular wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kona, Soujanya

    Pathological conditions like coronary artery disease, acute myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral artery diseases as well as cardiovascular interventions used in the treatment of coronary artery diseases such as angioplasty and stenting damage/injure the blood vessel wall, leading to inflamed or activated endothelial cells that have been implicated in events leading to thrombosis, inflammation, and restenosis. Oral administration of anti-coagulant and anti-inflammatory drugs causes systemic toxicity, bleeding, patient incompliance, and inadequate amounts of drugs at the injured area. Though drug-eluting stents have shown therapeutic benefits, complications such as in-stent restenosis and late thrombosis still remain and are a cause for concern. Rapid growth in the field of nanotechnology and nanoscience in recent years has paved the way for new targeted and controlled drug delivery strategies. In this perspective, the development of biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted intracellular drug delivery to the inflamed endothelial cells may offer an improved avenue for treatment of cardiovascular diseases. The major objective of this research was to develop "novel multi-ligand nanoparticles," as drug carriers that can efficiently target and deliver therapeutic agents to the injured/inflamed vascular cells under dynamic flow conditions. Our approach mimics the natural binding ability of platelets to injured/activated endothelial cells through glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) bound to P-selectin expressed on inflamed endothelial cells and to the subendothelium through GPIb binding to von Willebrand factor (vWF) deposited onto the injured vascular wall. Our design also exploits the natural cell membrane translocation ability of the internalizing cell peptide - trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) to enhance the nanoparticle uptake by the targeted cells. Our hypothesis is that these multi-ligand nanoparticles would show an increased accumulation at the injury site since GPIb

  15. A folate receptor-targeting nanoparticle minimizes drug resistance in a human cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Jun; Wang, Yuxiang; Koenig, Lydia; Gjyrezi, Ada; Giannakakou, Paraskevi; Shin, Edwin H; Tighiouart, Mourad; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Nie, Shuming; Shin, Dong M

    2011-08-23

    Resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle in cancer therapy. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of a folate receptor-targeting nanoparticle to overcome/minimize drug resistance and to explore the underlying mechanisms. This is accomplished with enhanced cellular accumulation and retention of paclitaxel (one of the most effective anticancer drugs in use today and a well-known P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate) in a P-gp-overexpressing cancer model. The folate receptor-targeted nanoparticle, HFT-T, consists of a heparin-folate-paclitaxel (HFT) backbone with an additional paclitaxel (T) loaded in its hydrophobic core. In vitro analyses demonstrated that the HFT-T nanoparticle was superior to free paclitaxel or nontargeted nanoparticle (HT-T) in inhibiting proliferation of P-gp-overexpressing cancer cells (KB-8-5), partially due to its enhanced uptake and prolonged intracellular retention. In a subcutaneous KB-8-5 xenograft model, HFT-T administration enhanced the specific delivery of paclitaxel into tumor tissues and remarkably prolonged retention within tumor tissues. Importantly, HFT-T treatment markedly retarded tumor growth in a xenograft model of resistant human squamous cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis further indicated that increased in vivo efficacy of HFT-T nanoparticles was associated with a higher degree of microtubule stabilization, mitotic arrest, antiangiogenic activity, and inhibition of cell proliferation. These findings suggest that when the paclitaxel was delivered as an HFT-T nanoparticle, the drug is better retained within the P-gp-overexpressing cells than the free form of paclitaxel. These results indicated that the targeted HFT-T nanoparticle may be promising in minimizing P-gp related drug resistance and enhancing therapeutic efficacy compared with the free form of paclitaxel. PMID:21728341

  16. Aurora kinase inhibitors: a new class of drugs targeting the regulatory mitotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Fidalgo, José Alejandro; Roda, Desamparados; Roselló, Susana; Rodríguez-Braun, Edith; Cervantes, Andrés

    2009-12-01

    The present review gives a perspective on the Aurora kinase family members, their function in normal cells, their role in cancer progression as well as their potential as target for anticancer treatment. Mitosis has been an important target for anticancer therapy development, leading to some specific drugs mainly addressing Tubulines, as a key structure of the mitotic spindle. Vinca alkaloids, taxanes or epotilones are good examples of conventionally developed antimitotic agents. However, novel classes of antineoplastic drugs are being studied, targeting the regulatory system that controls functional aspects of mitosis, such as Aurora or Polo-like kinases or Kinespondin inhibitors. The specific role of the different Aurora kinase proteins as regulator enzymes of the mitotic process in normal cells is discussed. Some of the mechanisms that link Aurora overexpression with cancer are also considered. Thereafter, the clinical and preclinical development of the different Aurora kinase inhibitors is presented. This is nowadays a very active area of therapeutic research and at least, sixteen new compounds are being studied as potential antineoplastic drugs. Most of them are in a very early phase of clinical development. However, we summarized the most recently published findings related with these drugs: main characteristics, way of administration, dose limiting toxicities and recommended doses for further studies. Another important aspect in Aurora kinase inhibition is the study and validation of potential biomarkers to optimize the clinical development. Several studies included pharmacodynamic assessments in normal blood cells, skin or/and tumor biopsies. Several proposals included a higher mitotic index, a decreased number of mitosis with bipolar spindles or normal alignment of chromosomes and inhibition of histone H3 phosphorylation. Future strategies and challenges for trials with Aurora kinase inhibitors are also discussed. PMID:20045785

  17. Brain-inspired cheminformatics of drug-target brain interactome, synthesis, and assay of TVP1022 derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Durán, Francisco J; Alonso, Nerea; Yañez, Matilde; Caamaño, Olga; García-Mera, Xerardo; González-Díaz, Humberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of Cheminformatics tools is gaining importance in the field of translational research from Medicinal Chemistry to Neuropharmacology. In particular, we need it for the analysis of chemical information on large datasets of bioactive compounds. These compounds form large multi-target complex networks (drug-target interactome network) resulting in a very challenging data analysis problem. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) algorithms may help us predict the interactions of drugs and targets in CNS interactome. In this work, we trained different ANN models able to predict a large number of drug-target interactions. These models predict a dataset of thousands of interactions of central nervous system (CNS) drugs characterized by > 30 different experimental measures in >400 different experimental protocols for >150 molecular and cellular targets present in 11 different organisms (including human). The model was able to classify cases of non-interacting vs. interacting drug-target pairs with satisfactory performance. A second aim focus on two main directions: the synthesis and assay of new derivatives of TVP1022 (S-analogues of rasagiline) and the comparison with other rasagiline derivatives recently reported. Finally, we used the best of our models to predict drug-target interactions for the best new synthesized compound against a large number of CNS protein targets. PMID:26721628

  18. In silico analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei genome sequence for potential drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Chan-Eng; Lim, Boon-San; Nathan, Sheila; Mohamed, Rahmah

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have enabled elucidation of whole genome information from a plethora of organisms. In parallel with this technology, various bioinformatics tools have driven the comparative analysis of the genome sequences between species and within isolates. While drawing meaningful conclusions from a large amount of raw material, computer-aided identification of suitable targets for further experimental analysis and characterization, has also led to the prediction of non-human homologous essential genes in bacteria as promising candidates for novel drug discovery. Here, we present a comparative genomic analysis to identify essential genes in Burkholderia pseudomallei. Our in silico prediction has identified 312 essential genes which could also be potential drug candidates. These genes encode essential proteins to support the survival of B. pseudomallei including outer-inner membrane and surface structures, regulators, proteins involved in pathogenenicity, adaptation, chaperones as well as degradation of small and macromolecules, energy metabolism, information transfer, central/intermediate/miscellaneous metabolism pathways and some conserved hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Therefore, our in silico approach has enabled rapid screening and identification of potential drug targets for further characterization in the laboratory. PMID:16922696

  19. Development of high drug-loading nanomicelles targeting steroids to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sijia; Xie, Yanqi; Li, Yuan; Li, Ling; Tian, Ning; Zhu, Wenbo; Yan, Guangmei; Wu, Chuanbin; Hu, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research was to develop and evaluate high drug-loading ligand-modified nanomicelles to deliver a steroidal compound to the brain. YC1 (5α-cholestane-24-methylene-3β, 5α, 6β, 19-tetraol), with poor solubility and limited access to the brain, for the first time, has been proved to be an effective neuroprotective steroid by our previous studies. Based on the principle of 'like dissolves like', cholesterol, which shares the same steroidal parent nucleus with YC1, was selected to react with sodium alginate, producing amphiphilic sodium alginate- cholesterol derivatives (SACDs). To increase the grafting ratio and drug loading, cholesterol was converted to cholesteryl chloroformate, for the first time, before reacting with sodium alginate. Further, lactoferrin was conjugated on SACDs to provide lactoferrin-SACDs (Lf-SACD), which was established by immune electron microscopy (IEM) and self-assembled into brain-targeting nanomicelles. These nanomicelles were negatively charged and spherical in nature, with an average size of cyclodextrin solution at 37°C, indicated a prolonged release profile. The YC1 concentration in mouse brain delivered by lactoferrin-modified nanomicelles was higher than in those delivered by non-modified nanomicelles and YC1 solution. The unique brain-targeting nanomicelle system may provide a promising carrier to deliver hydrophobic drugs across the blood-brain barrier for the treatment of brain diseases. PMID:24379663

  20. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Lo Sciuto

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery.

  1. The periplasmic protein TolB as a potential drug target in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Fernández-Piñar, Regina; Bertuccini, Lucia; Iosi, Francesca; Superti, Fabiana; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded pathogens in the hospital setting, and represents a prototype of multi-drug resistant "superbug" for which effective therapeutic options are very limited. The identification and characterization of new cellular functions that are essential for P. aeruginosa viability and/or virulence could drive the development of anti-Pseudomonas compounds with novel mechanisms of action. In this study we investigated whether TolB, the periplasmic component of the Tol-Pal trans-envelope protein complex of Gram-negative bacteria, represents a potential drug target in P. aeruginosa. By combining conditional mutagenesis with the analysis of specific pathogenicity-related phenotypes, we demonstrated that TolB is essential for P. aeruginosa growth, both in laboratory and clinical strains, and that TolB-depleted P. aeruginosa cells are strongly defective in cell-envelope integrity, resistance to human serum and several antibiotics, as well as in the ability to cause infection and persist in an insect model of P. aeruginosa infection. The essentiality of TolB for P. aeruginosa growth, resistance and pathogenicity highlights the potential of TolB as a novel molecular target for anti-P. aeruginosa drug discovery. PMID:25093328

  2. Caleosin-based nanoscale oil bodies for targeted delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale artificial oil bodies (NOBs) could be assembled from plant oil, phospholipids (PLs), and oleosin (Ole) as previously reported. NOBs have a lipid-based structure that contains a central oil space enclosed by a monolayer of Ole-bound PLs. As an oil structural protein, Ole functions to maintain the integrity of NOBs. Like Ole, caleosin (Cal) is a plant oil-associated protein. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of NOBs assembled by Cal for targeted delivery of drugs. Cal was first fused with anti-HER2/neu affibody (ZH2), and the resulting fusion gene (Cal–ZH2) was then expressed in Escherichia coli. Consequently, NOBs assembled with the fusion protein were selectively internalized by HER2/neu-positive tumor cells. The internalization efficiency could reach as high as 90%. Furthermore, a hydrophobic anticancer drug, Camptothecin (CPT), was encapsulated into Cal-based NOBs. These CPT-loaded NOBs had a size around 200 nm and were resistant to hemolysis. Release of CPT from NOBs at the non-permissive condition followed a sustained and prolonged profile. After administration of the CPT formulation, Cal–ZH2-displayed NOBs exhibited a strong antitumor activity toward HER2/neu-positive cells both in vitro and in vivo. The result indicates the potential of Cal-based NOBs for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  3. Colon Targeting Drug - Synthesis and evaluation of prodrugs of Quiniodochlor by -Glucosidase enzyme with HPLC methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gera Parul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Quiniodochlor has well established antimicrobial properties. It is used for treatment of amoebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica. The drug is to be delivered to the colon for its effective action against Entamoeba histolytica. But the pharmacokinetic profile of Quiniodochlor indicates that the drug is not completely and promptly absorbed after oral administration. Quiniodochlor is specifically targeted to colon by making its prodrugs. Chemical structure of Quiniodochlor posses a hydroxyl group which can be exploited to make glycosides through glycosidic conjugation. Prodrugs of Quiniodochlor were synthesized and their colon targeting evaluation by HPLC was done in order to deliver it specifically to colon for treatment of amoebiasis and other colonic diseases. Three prodrugs of quiniodochlor QG1, QG2, QG5 are synthesized and In vitro drug release studies of the synthesized glucosides in simulated GIT fluids containing &-glucosidase was done. The studies showed that these prodrugs hydrolyzed most rapidly in simulated ceacal fluid (0.1 M HCl, pH 1.2, rapidly in simulated intestinal fluid ( phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 and slowly in simulated gastric fluid (acetate buffer, pH 5.0.By comparing all the results with time period, it may be concluded that - Quiniodochlor Acetylated Glucoside (QG1 > Quiniodochlor Acetylated Galactoside (QG2 > Quiniodochlor Acetylated Xyloside (QG5 .The antiprotozoal activity is best for acetylated glucoside of quiniodochlor as compared to acetylated galactoside and xyloside.

  4. Antibody therapy alone and in combination with targeted drugs in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robak, Tadeusz; Blonski, Jerzy Z; Robak, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    The development of non-chemotherapeutic agents, including monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and other targeted drugs, makes chemotherapy-free treatment an attractive option for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The classical mAb, rituximab, has been authorized for use in both first-line and second-line therapy for CLL. New mAbs directed against CD20, ofatumumab, and obinutuzumab (GA-101) have also been approved for the treatment of this disease. Recently, several new mAbs with potential benefits over the approved anti-CD20 antibodies have been developed for use in CLL. Anti-CD37, anti-CD19, and anti-CD40 mAbs are in early clinical trials and show promise in treating CLL. In addition, the combination of mAbs with B-cell receptor signaling pathway inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs makes the chemotherapy-free option a reality today. Combinations of antibodies with targeted drugs like ibrutinib, idelalisib, or lenalidomide are expected to replace chemotherapy-based combinations for treating CLL in the near future. However, phase III trials should confirm the benefit of these new treatment strategies and establish their exact place in the therapeutic armamentarium for CLL. PMID:27040707

  5. Tumor-Targeting Co-Delivery of Drug and Gene from Temperature-Triggered Micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seog-Jin; Lee, Seon-Young; Choi, Seong-Jun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2015-09-01

    Co-delivery strategy using multifunctional nanocarriers is an attractive option for the synergistic and enhanced effects in cancer treatment, but one system integrating multiple functions for controlled release at the target is still challenging. Herein, this study shows the synthesis and characterization of our stimulus-responsive co-delivery system for the controlled release into tumors, which is composed of polyethylenimine (PEI)-linked Pluronic F127 (PF127) and folic acid (FA), called PF127-PEI-FA. PF127-PEI-FA system facilitated drug loading and gene complex formation, and showed controlled release behaviors in response to hitting temperature to hyperthermia. PF127-PEI-FA system was demonstrated to be biocompatible and showed receptor-mediated gene delivery. The results of our multifunctional nanocarrier system that enabled co-delivery suggest a promising potential for controlled drug release at targeted areas. However, further in-depth studies on the use of therapeutic drugs and genes in multiple cell types and the animal response are required. PMID:25990042

  6. Synthesis, characterization and target protein binding of drug-conjugated quantum dots in vitro and in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Youngseon; Kim, Minjung; Cho, Yoojin; Yun, Eunsuk; Song, Rita

    2013-02-01

    Elucidation of unknown target proteins of a drug is of great importance in understanding cell biology and drug discovery. There have been extensive studies to discover and identify target proteins in the cell. Visualization of targets using drug-conjugated probes has been an important approach to gathering mechanistic information of drug action at the cellular level. As quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals have attracted much attention as a fluorescent probe in the bioimaging area, we prepared drug-conjugated QD to explore the potential of target discovery. As a model drug, we selected a well-known anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX), which has been known to target dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) with high affinity binding (Kd = 0.54 nM). MTX molecules were covalently attached to amino-PEG-polymer-coated QDs. Specific interactions of MTX-conjugated QDs with DHFR were identified using agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence microscopy. Cellular uptake of the MTX-conjugated QDs in living CHO cells was investigated with regard to their localization and distribution pattern. MTX-QD was found to be internalized into the cells via caveolae-medicated endocytosis without significant sequestration in endosomes. A colocalization experiment of the MTX-QD conjugate with antiDHFR-TAT-QD also confirmed that MTX-QD binds to the target DHFR. This study showed the potential of the drug-QD conjugate to identify or visualize drug-target interactions in the cell, which is currently of great importance in the area of drug discovery and chemical biology.

  7. Hsp90 is a direct target of the anti-allergic drugs disodium cromoglycate and amlexanox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Miki; Itoh, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Takashi; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2003-09-01

    Hsp90 (heat-shock protein 90) alone can act to prevent protein aggregation and promote refolding in vitro, but in vivo it operates as a part of a multichaperone complex, which includes Hsp70 and cohort proteins. Since the physiological function of Hsp90 is not yet fully understood, the development of specific antagonists might open new lines of investigation on the role of Hsp90. In an effort to discover Hsp90 antagonists, we screened many drugs and found that the anti-allergic drugs DSCG (disodium cromoglycate) and amlexanox target Hsp90. Both drugs were found to bind directly wild-type Hsp90 via the N- and C-terminal domains. Both drugs strongly suppressed the in vitro chaperone activity of native Hsp90 towards citrate synthase at 1.5-3.0 microM. Amlexanox suppressed C-terminal chaperone activity in vitro, but not N-terminal chaperone activity, and inhibited the association of cohort proteins, such as cyclophilin 40 and Hsp-organizing protein, to the C-terminal domain of Hsp90. These data suggest that amlexanox might disrupt the multichaperone complex, including Hsp70 and cohort proteins, both in vitro and in vivo. Although DSCG inhibited the in vitro chaperone activity of the N-terminal domain, the drug had no effect either on the C-terminal chaperone activity or on the association of the cohort proteins with the C-terminus of Hsp90. The physiological significance of these interactions in vivo remains to be investigated further, but undoubtedly must be taken into account when considering the pharmacology of anti-allergic drugs. DSCG and amlexanox may serve as useful tools for evaluating the physiological significance of Hsp90. PMID:12803546

  8. Fighting cancer with nanomedicine---drug-polyester nanoconjugates for targeted cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qian

    The aim of my Ph. D. research is to develop drug-polyester nanoconjugates (NCs) as a novel translational polymeric drug delivery system that can successfully evade non-specific uptake by reticuloendothelial system (RES) and facilitate targeted cancer diagnosis and therapy. By uniquely integrating well-established chemical reaction-controlled ring opening polymerization (ROP) with nanoprecipitation technique, I successfully developed a polymeric NC system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(O-carboxyanhydrides) (OCA) that allows for the quantitative loading and controlled release of a variety of anticancer drugs. The developed NC system could be easily modified with parmidronate, one of bisphosphonates commonly used as the treatment for disease characterized by osteolysis, to selectively deliver doxorubicin (Doxo) to the bone tissues and substantially to improve their therapeutic efficiency in inhibiting the growth of osteosarcoma in both murine and canine models. More importantly, the developed NCs could avidly bind to human serum albumin, a ubiquitous protein in the blood, to bypass the endothelium barrier and penetrate into tumor tissues more deeply and efficiently. When compared with PEGylated NCs, these albumin-bound NCs showed significantly reduced accumulation in RES and enhanced tumor accumulation, which consequently contributed to higher their tumor inhibition capabilities. In addition, the developed NC system allows easy incorporation of X-ray computed tomography (CT) contrast agents to largely facilitate personalized therapy by improving diagnosis accuracy and monitoring therapeutic efficacy. Through the synthetic and formulation strategy I developed, a large quantity (grams or larger-scale) of drug-polyester NCs can be easily obtained, which can be used as a model drug delivery system for fundamental studies as well as a real drug delivery system for disease treatment in clinical settings.

  9. Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells have different metabolic properties from normal cells. Normal cells mostly rely upon the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy whereas cancer cells have developed an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates. Cancer cells could predominantly produce energy by glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This alternative metabolic characteristic is known as the “Warburg Effect.” Although the exact mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are unclear, recent progress indicates that glycolytic pathway of cancer cells could be a critical target for drug discovery. With a long history in cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is recognized as a valuable source for seeking bioactive anticancer compounds. A great progress has been made to identify active compounds from herbal medicine targeting on glycolysis for cancer treatment. Herein, we provide an overall picture of the current understanding of the molecular targets in the cancer glycolytic pathway and reviewed active compounds from Chinese herbal medicine with the potentials to inhibit the metabolic targets for cancer treatment. Combination of TCM with conventional therapies will provide an attractive strategy for improving clinical outcome in cancer treatment.

  10. A smart multifunctional nanocomposite for intracellular targeted drug delivery and self-release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Chan; Tao Shengyang; Hu Tao; Yang Jingbang; Meng Changgong [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning (China); Lv Piping; Wei Wei, E-mail: taosy@dlut.edu.cn [National Key Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2011-10-14

    A multifunctional 'all-in-one' nanocomposite is fabricated using a colloid, template and surface-modification method. This material encompasses magnetic induced target delivery, cell uptake promotion and controlled drug release in one system. The nanocomposite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} adsorption and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared material has a diameter of 350-400 nm, a high surface area of 420.29 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, a pore size of 1.91 nm and a saturation magnetization of 32 emu g{sup -1}. Doxorubicin (DOX) is loaded in mesopores and acid-sensitive blockers are introduced onto the orifices of the mesopores by a Schiff base linker to implement pH-dependent self-release. Folate was also introduced to improve DOX targeted delivery and endocytosis. The linkers remained intact to block pores with ferrocene valves and inhibit the diffusion of DOX at neutral pH. However, in lysosomes of cancer cells, which have a weak acidic pH, hydrolysis of the Schiff base group removes the nanovalves and allows the trapped DOX to be released. These processes are demonstrated by UV-visible absorption spectra, confocal fluorescence microscopy images and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays in vitro, which suggest that the smart nanocomposite successfully integrates targeted drug delivery with internal stimulus induced self-release and is a potentially useful material for nanobiomedicine.

  11. Complement therapeutics in inflammatory diseases: promising drug candidates for C3-targeted intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, D C; Ricklin, D; Hajishengallis, E; Hajishengallis, G; Lambris, J D

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing appreciation that complement dysregulation lies at the heart of numerous immune-mediated and inflammatory disorders. Complement inhibitors are therefore being evaluated as new therapeutic options in various clinical translation programs and the first clinically approved complement-targeted drugs have profoundly impacted the management of certain complement-mediated diseases. Among the many members of the intricate protein network of complement, the central component C3 represents a 'hot-spot' for complement-targeted therapeutic intervention. C3 modulates both innate and adaptive immune responses and is linked to diverse immunomodulatory systems and biological processes that affect human pathophysiology. Compelling evidence from preclinical disease models has shown that C3 interception may offer multiple benefits over existing therapies or even reveal novel therapeutic avenues in disorders that are not commonly regarded as complement-driven, such as periodontal disease. Using the clinically developed compstatin family of C3 inhibitors and periodontitis as illustrative examples, this review highlights emerging therapeutic concepts and developments in the design of C3-targeted drug candidates as novel immunotherapeutics for oral and systemic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26332138

  12. A smart multifunctional nanocomposite for intracellular targeted drug delivery and self-release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multifunctional 'all-in-one' nanocomposite is fabricated using a colloid, template and surface-modification method. This material encompasses magnetic induced target delivery, cell uptake promotion and controlled drug release in one system. The nanocomposite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared material has a diameter of 350-400 nm, a high surface area of 420.29 m2 g-1, a pore size of 1.91 nm and a saturation magnetization of 32 emu g-1. Doxorubicin (DOX) is loaded in mesopores and acid-sensitive blockers are introduced onto the orifices of the mesopores by a Schiff base linker to implement pH-dependent self-release. Folate was also introduced to improve DOX targeted delivery and endocytosis. The linkers remained intact to block pores with ferrocene valves and inhibit the diffusion of DOX at neutral pH. However, in lysosomes of cancer cells, which have a weak acidic pH, hydrolysis of the Schiff base group removes the nanovalves and allows the trapped DOX to be released. These processes are demonstrated by UV-visible absorption spectra, confocal fluorescence microscopy images and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays in vitro, which suggest that the smart nanocomposite successfully integrates targeted drug delivery with internal stimulus induced self-release and is a potentially useful material for nanobiomedicine.

  13. Triphenylphosphonium Decorated Liposomes and Dendritic Polymers: Prospective Second Generation Drug Delivery Systems for Targeting Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paleos, Constantinos M; Tsiourvas, Dimitris; Sideratou, Zili

    2016-07-01

    Targeting specific intracellular organelles has been a biological process of significant interest. Specifically, for mitochondrial targeting, conventional liposomal and dendritic polymer nanoparticles were selected to be presented in this miniperspective. Both types of nanoparticles were decorated on their external surface with triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP), a well-known and effective mitochondrial targeting moiety. Due to their advantageous specificity toward mitochondria, these nanoparticles may be considered as prospective second generation drug delivery systems (DDSs). Functionalized liposomal and dendritic nanoparticles are conveniently prepared, and although they encounter several hurdles on their route from the extracellular environment to the interior of mitochondria, they manage to be accumulated inside them in experiments in vitro. Therefore, the TPP-functionalized nanoparticles presented in this miniperspective can prove effective DDSs and efforts should be continued to obtain results that will trigger further studies including clinical studies, hopefully leading to effective drugs for mitochondrial diseases. In fact, since these DDSs enter and act at the site where the dysfunction exists, a new medicine subspecialty is emerging, the so-called mitochondrial medicine. PMID:27280339

  14. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu W

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Wenyi Gu,1,2 Chengtie Wu,3 Jiezhong Chen,1 Yin Xiao1 1Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 2Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; 3State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Abstract: Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. Keywords: nanoparticles, nanostructured scaffold, cancer bone metastasis, bone diseases, target drug delivery, bone regeneration

  15. Cholesterol-modified poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-Jun; Lee, Song Yi; Park, Ju-Hwan; Kim, Dae-Duk; Cho, Hyun-Jong

    2016-07-25

    Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-cholesterol (PLGA-C)-based nanoparticles (NPs) were developed for the tumor-targeted delivery of curcumin (CUR). PLGA-C/CUR NPs with ∼200nm mean diameter, narrow size distribution, and neutral zeta potential were fabricated by a modified emulsification-solvent evaporation method. The existence of cholesterol moiety in PLGA-C copolymer was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) analysis. In vitro stability of developed NPs after 24h incubation was confirmed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and serum media. Sustained (∼6days) and pH-responsive drug release profiles from PLGA-C NPs were presented. Blank PLGA and PLGA-C NPs exhibited a negligible cytotoxicity in Hep-2 (human laryngeal carcinoma) cells in the tested concentration range. According to the results of flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) studies, PLGA-C NPs presented an improved cellular accumulation efficiency, compared to PLGA NPs, in Hep-2 cells. Enhanced in vivo tumor targetability of PLGA-C NPs, compared to PLGA NPs, in Hep-2 tumor-xenografted mouse model was also verified by a real-time near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging study. Developed PLGA-C NPs may be a candidate of efficient and biocompatible nanosystems for tumor-targeted drug delivery and cancer imaging. PMID:27286639

  16. Metabolic network analysis predicts efficacy of FDA-approved drugs targeting the causative agent of a neglected tropical disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chavali Arvind K

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systems biology holds promise as a new approach to drug target identification and drug discovery against neglected tropical diseases. Genome-scale metabolic reconstructions, assembled from annotated genomes and a vast array of bioinformatics/biochemical resources, provide a framework for the interrogation of human pathogens and serve as a platform for generation of future experimental hypotheses. In this article, with the application of selection criteria for both Leishmania major targets (e.g. in silico gene lethality and drugs (e.g. toxicity, a method (MetDP to rationally focus on a subset of low-toxic Food and Drug Administration (FDA-approved drugs is introduced. Results This metabolic network-driven approach identified 15 L. major genes as high-priority targets, 8 high-priority synthetic lethal targets, and 254 FDA-approved drugs. Results were compared to previous literature findings and existing high-throughput screens. Halofantrine, an antimalarial agent that was prioritized using MetDP, showed noticeable antileishmanial activity when experimentally evaluated in vitro against L. major promastigotes. Furthermore, synthetic lethality predictions also aided in the prediction of superadditive drug combinations. For proof-of-concept, double-drug combinations were evaluated in vitro against L. major and four combinations involving the drug disulfiram that showed superadditivity are presented. Conclusions A direct metabolic network-driven method that incorporates single gene essentiality and synthetic lethality predictions is proposed that generates a set of high-priority L. major targets, which are in turn associated with a select number of FDA-approved drugs that are candidate antileishmanials. Additionally, selection of high-priority double-drug combinations might provide for an attractive and alternative avenue for drug discovery against leishmaniasis.

  17. An integrated structure- and system-based framework to identify new targets of metabolites and known drugs

    KAUST Repository

    Naveed, Hammad

    2015-08-18

    Motivation: The inherent promiscuity of small molecules towards protein targets impedes our understanding of healthy versus diseased metabolism. This promiscuity also poses a challenge for the pharmaceutical industry as identifying all protein targets is important to assess (side) effects and repositioning opportunities for a drug. Results: Here, we present a novel integrated structure- and system-based approach of drug-target prediction (iDTP) to enable the large-scale discovery of new targets for small molecules, such as pharmaceutical drugs, co-factors and metabolites (collectively called ‘drugs’). For a given drug, our method uses sequence order–independent structure alignment, hierarchical clustering, and probabilistic sequence similarity to construct a probabilistic pocket ensemble (PPE) that captures promiscuous structural features of different binding sites on known targets. A drug’s PPE is combined with an approximation of its delivery profile to reduce false positives. In our cross-validation study, we use iDTP to predict the known targets of eleven drugs, with 63% sensitivity and 81% specificity. We then predicted novel targets for these drugs—two that are of high pharmacological interest, the nuclear receptor PPARγ and the oncogene Bcl-2, were successfully validated through in vitro binding experiments. Our method is broadly applicable for the prediction of protein-small molecule interactions with several novel applications to biological research and drug development.

  18. Silicon-containing nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery: synthesis, physicochemical properties and acute toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonin, Dmitry L; Korolev, Dmitry V; Postnov, Viktor N; Naumysheva, Elena B; Pochkaeva, Evgenia I; Vasyutina, Marina L; Galagudza, Michael M

    2016-06-01

    Silicon-containing nanoparticles (NPs) are considered promising drug carriers for targeted drug delivery. In this study, we investigated the physical and chemical properties of silicon-containing NPs, including silica and organomodified silica NPs (SiO2NPs and OrSiO2NPs, respectively), with different surface modifications, with the aim of increasing drug-loading efficiency. In addition, we described the original synthesis methods of different sizes of OrSiO2NPs, as well as new hybrid OrSiO2NPs with a silica core (SiO2 + OrSiO2NPs). Animal experiments revealed that the silicon-containing NPs investigated were non-toxic, as evidenced by a lack of hemodynamic response after intravenous administration. Bioelimination studies showed rapid renal excretion of OrSiO2NPs. In drug release kinetics studies, adenosine was immobilized on SiO2NPs using three different approaches: physical adsorption, ionic, and covalent bonding. We observed that the rate of adenosine desorption critically depended on the type of immobilization; therefore, adenosine release kinetics can be adjusted by SiO2NP surface modification technique. Adsorption of adenosine on SiO2 + OrSiO2NPs resulted in a significant attenuation of adenosine-induced hypotension and bradycardia. PMID:26203803

  19. Nano materials for the Local and Targeted Delivery of Osteoarthritis Drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano technology has found its potential in every possible field of science and engineering. It offers a plethora of options to design tools at the nanometer scale, which can be expected to function more effectively than micro- and macro systems for specific applications. Although the debate regarding the safety of synthetic nano materials for clinical applications endures, it is a promising technology due to its potential to augment current treatments. Various materials such as synthetic polymer, biopolymers, or naturally occurring materials such as proteins and peptides can serve as building blocks for adaptive nano scale formulations. The choice of materials depends highly on the application. We focus on the use of nanoparticles for the treatment of degenerative cartilage diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA). Current therapies for OA focus on treating the symptoms rather than modifying the disease. The usefulness of OA disease modifying drugs is hampered by side effects and lack of suitable drug delivery systems that target, deliver, and retain drugs locally. This challenge can be overcome by using nano technological formulations. We describe the different nano drug delivery systems and their potential for cartilage repair. This paper provides the reader basal understanding of nano materials and aims at drawing new perspectives on the use of existing nano technological formulations for the treatment of osteoarthritis.

  20. Quantitatively integrating molecular structure and bioactivity profile evidence into drug-target relationship analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tianlei

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public resources of chemical compound are in a rapid growth both in quantity and the types of data-representation. To comprehensively understand the relationship between the intrinsic features of chemical compounds and protein targets is an essential task to evaluate potential protein-binding function for virtual drug screening. In previous studies, correlations were proposed between bioactivity profiles and target networks, especially when chemical structures were similar. With the lack of effective quantitative methods to uncover such correlation, it is demanding and necessary for us to integrate the information from multiple data sources to produce an comprehensive assessment of the similarity between small molecules, as well as quantitatively uncover the relationship between compounds and their targets by such integrated schema. Results In this study a multi-view based clustering algorithm was introduced to quantitatively integrate compound similarity from both bioactivity profiles and structural fingerprints. Firstly, a hierarchy clustering was performed with the fused similarity on 37 compounds curated from PubChem. Compared to clustering in a single view, the overall common target number within fused classes has been improved by using the integrated similarity, which indicated that the present multi-view based clustering is more efficient by successfully identifying clusters with its members sharing more number of common targets. Analysis in certain classes reveals that mutual complement of the two views for compound description helps to discover missing similar compound when only single view was applied. Then, a large-scale drug virtual screen was performed on 1267 compounds curated from Connectivity Map (CMap dataset based on the fused similarity, which obtained a better ranking result compared to that of single-view. These comprehensive tests indicated that by combining different data representations; an improved

  1. Multifunctional hybrid-carbon nanotubes: new horizon in drug delivery and targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Neelesh Kumar; Jain, Narendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as an intriguing nanotechnological tool for numerous biomedical applications including biocompatible modules for the bioactives delivery ascribed to their unique properties, such as greater loading efficiency, biocompatibility, non-immunogenicity, high surface area and photoluminescence, that make them ideal candidate in pharmaceutical and biomedical science. The design of multifunctional hybrid-CNTs for drug delivery and targeting may differ from the conventional drug delivery system. The conventional nanocarriers have few limitations, such as inappropriate availability of surface-chemical functional groups for conjugation, low entrapment/loading efficiency as well as stability as per ICH guidelines with generally regarded as safe (GRAS) prominences. The multifunctional hybrid-CNTs will sparked and open a new door for researchers, scientist of the pharmaceutical and biomedical arena. This review summarizes the vivid aspects of CNTs like characterization, supramolecular chemistry of CNTs-dendrimer, CNTs-nanoparticles, CNTs-quantum dots conjugate for delivery of bioactives, not discussed so far. PMID:26147085

  2. Hydrodynamic interactions for complex-shaped nanocarriers in targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaohong; Eckmann, David; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo

    2014-11-01

    Nanocarrier motion in a blood vessel involves hydrodynamic and Brownian interactions, which collectively dictate the efficacy in targeted drug delivery. The shape of nanocarriers plays a crucial role in drug delivery. In order to quantify the flow and association properties of elliptical nanoparticles, we have developed an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework with capabilities to simulate the hydrodynamic motion of nanoparticles of arbitrary shapes. We introduce the quaternions for rotational motion, and two collision models, namely, (a) an impulse-based model for wall-particle collision, and (b) the short-range repulsive Gay-Berne potential for particle-particle collision. We also study the red blood cell and nanocarrier (such as ellipsoid) interactions. We compare our results with those obtained for a hard sphere model for both RBCs and nanocarriers. Supported by NIH through grant U01-EB016027.

  3. Designing of Anti Dengue Drug Molecule against Insilico Modeled Target DC-Sign (CD-209

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashantha C.N

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The C-type lectin DC-SIGN (CD209 plays a major role in receptor on human dendritic cells, it binds to several glycoproteins of viruses that facilitate disease progression. In dengue fever, the disease targets of arbovirus infection, show dendritic and reticuloendothelial cells that may affect immune system. The phytochemical extracts of Bosenbergia rotunda (BR have been effectively used as potential small molecular inhibitors to inhibit DC-SIGN (CD209 function. Using rational drug designing the training sets include Panduratin-A and 4-hydroxypanduratin is designed from BR derivatives could be an effective inhibitor of a DC-SIGN (CD209 binding towards the drug discovery/ therapy against dengue fever.

  4. The cytoskeleton as a drug target for neuroprotection: the case of the autism- mutated ADNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozes, Illana

    2016-03-01

    Fifteen years ago we discovered activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP), and showed that it is essential for brain formation/function. Our protein interaction studies identified ADNP as a member of the chromatin remodeling complex, SWI/SNF also associated with alternative splicing of tau and prediction of tauopathy. Recently, we have identified cytoplasmic ADNP interactions with the autophagy regulating microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) and with microtubule end-binding (EB) proteins. The ADNP-EB-binding SIP domain is shared with the ADNP snippet drug candidate, NAPVSIPQ termed NAP (davunetide). Thus, we identified a precise target for ADNP/NAP (davunetide) neuroprotection toward improved drug development. PMID:25955282

  5. Non-Target Screening of Veterinary Drugs Using Tandem Mass Spectrometry on SmartMass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bing; Liu, Xin; Gu, Yu-Cheng; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Wang, Hai-Yan; Ding, Li-Sheng; Zhou, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Non-target screening of veterinary drugs using tandem mass spectrometric data was performed on the SmartMass platform. This newly developed software uses the characteristic fragmentation patterns (CFP) to identify chemicals, especially those containing particular substructures. A mixture of 17 sulfonamides was separated by ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), and SmartMass was used to process the tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data acquired on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The data were automatically extracted, and each sulfonamide was recognized and analyzed with a prebuilt analysis rule. By using this software, over 98 % of the false candidate structures were eliminated, and all the correct structures were found within the top 10 of the ranking lists. Furthermore, SmartMass could also be used to identify slightly modified contraband drugs and metabolites with simple prebuilt rules. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. In situ crosslinked smart polypeptide nanoparticles for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Huqiang; Liu, Peng; Sheng, Nan; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2016-03-01

    Smart tumor-targeted drug delivery is crucial for improving the effect of chemotherapy and reducing the adverse effects. Here, we synthesized a smart polypeptide copolymer based on n-butylamine-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-cysteine) (PLL-PLC) with functionalization of folic acid (FA) and 1,2-dicarboxylic-cyclohexene anhydride (DCA) for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery. The copolymers (FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC) spontaneously crosslinked in situ to form redox and pH dual responsive FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC nanoparticles (FD-NPs), which had a reversible zeta potential around -30 mV at pH 7.4, but switched to +15 mV at pH 5.0. Moreover, FD-NPs effectively loaded DOX with a loading capacity at 15.7 wt%. At pH 7.4, only 24.5% DOX was released within 60 h. However, at pH 5.0, the presence of 10 mM DTT dramatically accelerated DOX release with over 90% of DOX released within 10 h. Although the FD-NPs only enhanced DOX uptake in FA receptor positive (FR+) cancer cells at pH 7.4, a weak acidic condition promoted FD-NP-facilitated DOX uptake in both FR+ HeLa and FR- A549 cells, as well as significantly improving cellular binding and end/lysosomal escape. In vivo studies in a HeLa cancer model demonstrated that the charge-reversible FD-NPs delivered DOX into tumors more effectively than charge-irreversible nanoparticles. Hence, these multistage responsive FD-NPs would serve as highly efficient drug vectors for targeted cancer chemotherapy.Smart tumor-targeted drug delivery is crucial for improving the effect of chemotherapy and reducing the adverse effects. Here, we synthesized a smart polypeptide copolymer based on n-butylamine-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-cysteine) (PLL-PLC) with functionalization of folic acid (FA) and 1,2-dicarboxylic-cyclohexene anhydride (DCA) for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery. The copolymers (FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC) spontaneously crosslinked in situ to form redox and pH dual responsive FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC nanoparticles (FD-NPs), which had a reversible

  7. Rule of five in 2015 and beyond: Target and ligand structural limitations, ligand chemistry structure and drug discovery project decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Christopher A

    2016-06-01

    The rule of five (Ro5), based on physicochemical profiles of phase II drugs, is consistent with structural limitations in protein targets and the drug target ligands. Three of four parameters in Ro5 are fundamental to the structure of both target and drug binding sites. The chemical structure of the drug ligand depends on the ligand chemistry and design philosophy. Two extremes of chemical structure and design philosophy exist; ligands constructed in the medicinal chemistry synthesis laboratory without input from natural selection and natural product (NP) metabolites biosynthesized based on evolutionary selection. Exceptions to Ro5 are found mostly among NPs. Chemistry chameleon-like behavior of some NPs due to intra-molecular hydrogen bonding as exemplified by cyclosporine A is a strong contributor to NP Ro5 outliers. The fragment derived, drug Navitoclax is an example of the extensive expertise, resources, time and key decisions required for the rare discovery of a non-NP Ro5 outlier. PMID:27154268

  8. AVN-101: A Multi-Target Drug Candidate for the Treatment of CNS Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivachtchenko, Alexandre V; Lavrovsky, Yan; Okun, Ilya

    2016-05-25

    Lack of efficacy of many new highly selective and specific drug candidates in treating diseases with poorly understood or complex etiology, as are many of central nervous system (CNS) diseases, encouraged an idea of developing multi-modal (multi-targeted) drugs. In this manuscript, we describe molecular pharmacology, in vitro ADME, pharmacokinetics in animals and humans (part of the Phase I clinical studies), bio-distribution, bioavailability, in vivo efficacy, and safety profile of the multimodal drug candidate, AVN-101. We have carried out development of a next generation drug candidate with a multi-targeted mechanism of action, to treat CNS disorders. AVN-101 is a very potent 5-HT7 receptor antagonist (Ki = 153 pM), with slightly lesser potency toward 5-HT6, 5-HT2A, and 5HT-2C receptors (Ki = 1.2-2.0 nM). AVN-101 also exhibits a rather high affinity toward histamine H1 (Ki = 0.58 nM) and adrenergic α2A, α2B, and α2C (Ki = 0.41-3.6 nM) receptors. AVN-101 shows a good oral bioavailability and facilitated brain-blood barrier permeability, low toxicity, and reasonable efficacy in animal models of CNS diseases. The Phase I clinical study indicates the AVN-101 to be well tolerated when taken orally at doses of up to 20 mg daily. It does not dramatically influence plasma and urine biochemistry, nor does it prolong QT ECG interval, thus indicating low safety concerns. The primary therapeutic area for AVN-101 to be tested in clinical trials would be Alzheimer's disease. However, due to its anxiolytic and anti-depressive activities, there is a strong rational for it to also be studied in such diseases as general anxiety disorders, depression, schizophrenia, and multiple sclerosis. PMID:27232215

  9. Overcoming MITF-conferred drug resistance through dual AURKA/MAPK targeting in human melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathria, G; Garg, B; Borgdorff, V; Garg, K; Wagner, C; Superti-Furga, G; Wagner, S N

    2016-01-01

    MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor) is a frequently amplified lineage-specific oncogene in human melanoma, whose role in intrinsic drug resistance has not been systematically investigated. Utilizing chemical inhibitors for major signaling pathways/cellular processes, we witness MITF as an elicitor of intrinsic drug resistance. To search kinase(s) targets able to bypass MITF-conferred drug resistance, we employed a multi-kinase inhibitor-directed chemical proteomics-based differential affinity screen in human melanocytes carrying ectopic MITF overexpression. A subsequent methodical interrogation informed mitotic Ser/Thr kinase Aurora Kinase A (AURKA) as a crucial regulator of melanoma cell proliferation and migration, independent of the underlying molecular alterations, including TP53 functional status and MITF levels. Crucially, assessing the efficacy of investigational AURKA inhibitor MLN8237, we pre-emptively witness the procurement of a molecular program consistent with acquired drug resistance. This involved induction of multiple MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) signaling pathway components and their downstream proliferation effectors (Cyclin D1 and c-JUN) and apoptotic regulators (MITF and Bcl-2). A concomitant AURKA/BRAF and AURKA/MEK targeting overcame MAPK signaling activation-associated resistance signature in BRAF- and NRAS-mutated melanomas, respectively, and elicited heightened anti-proliferative activity and apoptotic cell death. These findings reveal a previously unreported MAPK signaling-mediated mechanism of immediate resistance to AURKA inhibitors. These findings could bear significant implications for the application and the success of anti-AURKA approaches that have already entered phase-II clinical trials for human melanoma. PMID:26962685

  10. Multifunctional aptamer-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to circumvent cancer resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Juan; Wei, Tuo; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Yuanyu; Deng, Hua; Kumar, Anil; Wang, Chenxuan; Liang, Zicai; Ma, Xiaowei; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2016-06-01

    By its unique advantages over traditional medicine, nanomedicine has offered new strategies for cancer treatment. In particular, the development of drug delivery strategies has focused on nanoscale particles to improve bioavailability. However, many of these nanoparticles are unable to overcome tumor resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. Recently, new opportunities for drug delivery have been provided by oligonucleotides that can self-assemble into three-dimensional nanostructures. In this work, we have designed and developed functional DNA nanostructures to deliver the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin (Dox) to resistant cancer cells. These nanostructures have two components. The first component is a DNA aptamer, which forms a dimeric G-quadruplex nanostructure to target cancer cells by binding with nucleolin. The second component is double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which is rich in -GC- base pairs that can be applied for Dox delivery. We demonstrated that Dox was able to efficiently intercalate into dsDNA and this intercalation did not affect the aptamer's three-dimensional structure. In addition, the Aptamer-dsDNA (ApS) nanoparticle showed good stability and protected the dsDNA from degradation in bovine serum. More importantly, the ApS&Dox nanoparticle efficiently reversed the resistance of human breast cancer cells to Dox. The mechanism circumventing doxorubicin resistance by ApS&Dox nanoparticles may be predominantly by cell cycle arrest in S phase, effectively increased cell uptake and decreased cell efflux of doxorubicin. Furthermore, the ApS&Dox nanoparticles could effectively inhibit tumor growth, while less cardiotoxicity was observed. Overall, this functional DNA nanostructure provides new insights into the design of nanocarriers to overcome multidrug resistance through targeted drug delivery. PMID:26994877

  11. Antitumor efficacy of conventional anticancer drugs is enhanced by the vascular targeting agent ZD6126

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The present report reviews the preclinical data on combined chemotherapy/vascular targeting agent treatments. Basic principles are illustrated in studies evaluating the antitumor efficacy of the vascular targeting agent ZD6126 (N-acetylcochinol-O-phosphate) when combined with the anticancer drug cisplatin in experimental rodent (KHT sarcoma) and human renal (Caki-1) tumor models. Methods and Materials: C3H/HeJ and NCR/nu-nu mice bearing i.m. tumors were injected i.p. with ZD6126 (0-150 mg/kg) or cisplatin (0-20 mg/kg) either alone or in combination. Tumor response to treatment was assessed by clonogenic cell survival. Results: Treatment with ZD6126 was found to damage existing neovasculature, leading to a rapid vascular shutdown. Histologic evaluation showed dose-dependent morphologic damage of tumor cells within a few hours after drug exposure, followed by extensive central tumor necrosis and neoplastic cell death as a result of prolonged ischemia. ZD6126 doses that led to pathophysiologic effects also enhanced the tumor cell killing of cisplatin when administered either 24 h before or 1-24 h after chemotherapy. In both tumor models, the administration of a 150 mg/kg dose of ZD6126 1 h after a range of doses of cisplatin resulted in an increase in tumor cell kill 10-500-fold greater than that seen with chemotherapy alone. In contrast, the inclusion of the antivascular agent did not increase bone marrow stem cell toxicity associated with this anticancer drug. Conclusion: The results obtained in the KHT and Caki-1 tumor models indicate that ZD6126 effectively enhanced the antitumor effects of cisplatin therapy. These findings are representative of the marked enhancements generally observed when vascular targeting agents are combined with chemotherapy in solid tumor therapy

  12. A new kind of magnetic targeting induction heating drug carrier and its physical and biological properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Nano-carbon and iron composite―carbon-coated iron nanoparticles (CCINs) produced by carbon arc method can be used as a new kind of magnetic targeting induction heating drug carrier for cancer therapy. The structure and morphology of CCINs are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Mossbauer spectra of these nanoparticles show that they contain only iron and carbon, without ferric carbide and ferric oxide. CCINs can be used as the magnetic drug carrier, with the effect of targeting magnetic induction heating in its inner core and higher drug adsorption in its nano-carbon shell outside because of its high specific surface area. CCINs can absorb Epirubicin (EPI) of 160 μg/mg measured by an optical spectrometer. In acute toxicity experiment with mice, the median lethal dose (LD50) of EPI is 16.9 mg/kg, while that of EPI-CCINs mixture is 20.7 mg/kg and none of the mice died after pure CCINs medication. The results show that pure CCINs belong to non-toxic grade and EPI delivery in mixture with CCINs can reduce its acute toxicity in mice. The magnetic properties of CCINs and their magnetic induction heating are investigated. The iron nanoparticle in its inner core has better magnetism with a good effect on targeting magnetic induction heating. When the CCINs are mixed with physiological salt water and are injected uniformly in pig’s liver, the temperature goes up to 48℃. While in the case that CCINs are filled in a certain section of pig’s liver, the temperature goes up to 52℃. In both cases the temperature is high enough to kill the cancer cell. CCINs have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  13. Development of Drugs Targeting the PI3K Signalling Pathway in Leukaemias and Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Arcaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K family of signalling enzymes play a key role in the transduction of signals from activated cell surface receptors controlling cell growth and proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. The intracellular signalling pathway from activated receptors to PI3K and its downstream targets v-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR is very frequently deregulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in human cancer, including leukaemia and lymphoma. In the past decade, an arsenal of small molecule inhibitors of key enzymes in this pathway has been developed and evaluated in pre-clinical studies and clinical trials in cancer patients. These include pharmacological inhibitors of Akt, mTOR, and PI3K, some of which are approved for the treatment of leukaemia and lymphoma. The PI3K family comprises eight different catalytic isoforms in humans, which have been subdivided into three classes. Class I PI3K isoforms have been extensively studied in the context of human cancer, and the isoforms p110α and p110δ are validated drug targets. The recent approval of a p110δ-specific PI3K inhibitor (idelalisib/Zydelig® for the treatment of selected B cell malignancies represents the first success in developing these molecules into anti-cancer drugs. In addition to PI3K inhibitors, mTOR inhibitors are intensively studied in leukaemia and lymphoma, and temsirolimus (Torisel® is approved for the treatment of a type of lymphoma. Based on these promising results it is hoped that additional novel PI3K pathway inhibitors will in the near future be further developed into new drugs for leukaemia and lymphoma.

  14. Selection between Michaelis-Menten and target-mediated drug disposition pharmacokinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaoyu; Mager, Donald E; Krzyzanski, Wojciech

    2010-02-01

    Target-mediated drug disposition (TMDD) models have been applied to describe the pharmacokinetics of drugs whose distribution and/or clearance are affected by its target due to high binding affinity and limited capacity. The Michaelis-Menten (M-M) model has also been frequently used to describe the pharmacokinetics of such drugs. The purpose of this study is to investigate conditions for equivalence between M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models and provide guidelines for selection between these two approaches. Theoretical derivations were used to determine conditions under which M-M and TMDD pharmacokinetic models are equivalent. Computer simulations and model fitting were conducted to demonstrate these conditions. Typical M-M and TMDD profiles were simulated based on literature data for an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (TRX1) and phenytoin administered intravenously. Both models were fitted to data and goodness of fit criteria were evaluated for model selection. A case study of recombinant human erythropoietin was conducted to qualify results. A rapid binding TMDD model is equivalent to the M-M model if total target density R ( tot ) is constant, and R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 where K ( D ) represents the dissociation constant and C is the free drug concentration. Under these conditions, M-M parameters are defined as: V ( max ) = k ( int ) R ( tot ) V ( c ) and K ( m ) = K ( D ) where k ( int ) represents an internalization rate constant, and V ( c ) is the volume of the central compartment. R ( tot ) is constant if and only if k ( int ) = k ( deg,) where k ( deg ) is a degradation rate constant. If the TMDD model predictions are not sensitive to k ( int ) or k ( deg ) parameters, the condition of R ( tot ) K ( D ) /(K ( D ) + C) ( 2 ) < 1 alone can preserve the equivalence between rapid binding TMDD and M-M models. The model selection process for drugs that exhibit TMDD should involve a full mechanistic model as well as reduced models. The best model

  15. Catechol Polymers for pH-Responsive, Targeted Drug Delivery to Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Jing; Chen, Feng; Cryns, Vincent L.; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2011-01-01

    A novel cell-targeting, pH-sensitive polymeric carrier was employed in this study for delivery of the anticancer drug bortezomib (BTZ) to cancer cells. Our strategy is based on facile conjugation of BTZ to catechol-containing polymeric carriers that are designed to be taken up selectively by cancer cells through cell surface receptor-mediated mechanisms. The polymer used as a building block in this study was poly(ethylene glycol), which was chosen for its ability to reduce nonspecific interac...

  16. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Brumlik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known.

  17. Pediatric Malignant Bone Tumors: A Review and Update on Current Challenges, and Emerging Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Twana M; Bittman, Mark; Granowetter, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) and the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) are the most common malignant bone tumors in children and adolescents. While significant improvements in survival have been seen in other pediatric malignancies the treatment and prognosis for pediatric bone tumors has remained unchanged for the past 3 decades. This review and update of pediatric malignant bone tumors will provide a general overview of osteosarcoma and the Ewing sarcoma family of tumors, discuss bone tumor genomics, current challenges, and emerging drug targets. PMID:27265835

  18. Rho, ROCK and actomyosin contractility in metastasis as drug targets [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Rodriguez-Hernandez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the spread of cancer cells around the body and the cause of the majority of cancer deaths. Metastasis is a very complex process in which cancer cells need to dramatically modify their cytoskeleton and cope with different environments to successfully colonize a secondary organ. In this review, we discuss recent findings pointing at Rho-ROCK or actomyosin force (or both as major drivers of many of the steps required for metastatic success. We propose that these are important drug targets that need to be considered in the clinic to palliate metastatic disease.

  19. Crystal structure of human T cell leukemia virus protease, a novel target for anticancer drug design

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Mi; Laco, Gary S.; Jaskolski, Mariusz; Rozycki, Jan; Alexandratos, Jerry; Wlodawer, Alexander; Gustchina, Alla

    2005-01-01

    The successful development of a number of HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors for the treatment of AIDS has validated the utilization of retroviral PRs as drug targets and necessitated their detailed structural study. Here we report the structure of a complex of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) PR with a substrate-based inhibitor bound in subsites P5 through P5′. Although HTLV-1 PR exhibits an overall fold similar to other retroviral PRs, significant structural differences are present i...

  20. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  1. Importance of polar solvation and configurational entropy for design of antiretroviral drugs targeting HIV-1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Parimal; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Knecht, Volker

    2013-05-16

    Both KNI-10033 and KNI-10075 are high affinity preclinical HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors with affinities in the picomolar range. In this work, the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method has been used to investigate the potency of these two HIV-1 PR inhibitors against the wild-type and mutated proteases assuming that potency correlates with the affinity of the drugs for the target protein. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the origin of binding affinities or mutation-induced affinity changes. Our calculations indicate that the mutation I50V causes drug resistance against both inhibitors. On the other hand, we predict that the mutant I84V causes drug resistance against KNI-10075 while KNI-10033 is more potent against the I84V mutant compared to wild-type protease. Drug resistance arises mainly from unfavorable shifts in van der Waals interactions and configurational entropy. The latter indicates that neglecting changes in configurational entropy in the computation of relative binding affinities as often done is not appropriate in general. For the bound complex PR(I50V)-KNI-10075, an increased polar solvation free energy also contributes to the drug resistance. The importance of polar solvation free energies is revealed when interactions governing the binding of KNI-10033 or KNI-10075 to the wild-type protease are compared to the inhibitors darunavir or GRL-06579A. Although the contributions from intermolecular electrostatic and van der Waals interactions as well as the nonpolar component of the solvation free energy are more favorable for PR-KNI-10033 or PR-KNI-10075 compared to PR-DRV or PR-GRL-06579A, both KNI-10033 and KNI-10075 show a similar affinity as darunavir and a lower binding affinity relative to GRL-06579A. This is because of the polar solvation free energy which is less unfavorable for darunavir or GRL-06579A relative to KNI-10033 or KNI-10075. The importance of the polar solvation as revealed here

  2. Synthesis, characterization and target protein binding of drug-conjugated quantum dots in vitro and in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elucidation of unknown target proteins of a drug is of great importance in understanding cell biology and drug discovery. There have been extensive studies to discover and identify target proteins in the cell. Visualization of targets using drug-conjugated probes has been an important approach to gathering mechanistic information of drug action at the cellular level. As quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals have attracted much attention as a fluorescent probe in the bioimaging area, we prepared drug-conjugated QD to explore the potential of target discovery. As a model drug, we selected a well-known anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX), which has been known to target dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) with high affinity binding (Kd = 0.54 nM). MTX molecules were covalently attached to amino-PEG-polymer-coated QDs. Specific interactions of MTX-conjugated QDs with DHFR were identified using agarose gel electrophoresis and fluorescence microscopy. Cellular uptake of the MTX-conjugated QDs in living CHO cells was investigated with regard to their localization and distribution pattern. MTX–QD was found to be internalized into the cells via caveolae-medicated endocytosis without significant sequestration in endosomes. A colocalization experiment of the MTX–QD conjugate with antiDHFR-TAT-QD also confirmed that MTX–QD binds to the target DHFR. This study showed the potential of the drug-QD conjugate to identify or visualize drug–target interactions in the cell, which is currently of great importance in the area of drug discovery and chemical biology. (paper)

  3. Drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction: A promising therapy method

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Jing; DU, LIAN FANG; Chen, Ming; WANG, HANG HUI; XING, LING XI; JING, LI FANG; LI, YUN HUA

    2013-01-01

    The nano-microcapsules drug delivery system is currently a promising method for the treatment of many types of diseases, particularly tumors. However, the drug delivery efficiency does not reach a satisfactory level to meet treatment demands. Therefore, the effectiveness of delivery needs to be improved. Based on the alterations in the structure and modification of nano-microcapsules, ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), a safe physical targeted method, may increase tissue pene...

  4. Enzymatic synthesis of antibody-human serum albumin conjugate for targeted drug delivery using tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus

    OpenAIRE

    Rollett, Alexandra; Thallinger, Barbara; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Walenta, Evelyn; Paulo, Artur Cavaco; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G.; Stockinger, Hannes; Guebitz, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Highly specific targeted drug delivery devices can be obtained with antibody-human serum albumin (mAb-HSA) conjugates. However, their conventional production involves several reaction steps including chemical modification and activation of both proteins followed by cross-linking often involving toxic chemicals. Here, we describe the enzymatic synthesis of mAb-HSA conjugates for targeted drug delivery devices using tyrosinase from Agaricus bisporus under mild reaction conditions (pH 6.8, 25 [d...

  5. DNA-templated antibody conjugation for targeted drug delivery to cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Tianqiang

    2016-01-01

    state to get a good pharmacological performance. Recombinant antibody engineering with non-natural amino acids, or enzyme-mediated conjugation approaches (transglutaminase, Sortase A or endoglycosidase) have been reported for producing homogeneous antibody conjugates. However, these methods require......-templated organic synthesis due to the wide existence of the 3-histidine cluster in most wild-type proteins. In this thesis, three projects that relate to targeted drug delivery to cancer cells based on the DTPC method is described. The first project was a delivery system which uses transferrin as the targeting...... ligand and saporin (ribosome inactivating protein) as the warhead to achieve enhanced cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of saporin to transferrin receptor overexpressed cancer cell line. The transferrin-saporin conjugate complex are formed by linking the site-selective DNA-transferrin conjugates with mono...

  6. DNA G-quadruplex and its potential as anticancer drug target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buket, ONEL; Clement, LIN; DanZhou, YANG

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex secondary structures are four-stranded globular nucleic acid structures form in the specific DNA and RNA G-rich sequences with biological significance such as human telomeres, oncogene-promoter regions, replication initiation sites, and 5′ and 3′-untranslated (UTR) regions. The non-canonical G-quadruplex secondary structures can readily form under physiologically relevant ionic conditions and are considered to be new molecular target for cancer therapeutics. This review discusses the essential progress in our lab related to the structures and functions of biologically relevant DNA G-quadruplexes in human gene promoters and telomeres, and the opportunities presented for the development of G-quadruplex-targeted small- molecule drugs.

  7. Drug target prediction and prioritization: using orthology to predict essentiality in parasite genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall Ross S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New drug targets are urgently needed for parasites of socio-economic importance. Genes that are essential for parasite survival are highly desirable targets, but information on these genes is lacking, as gene knockouts or knockdowns are difficult to perform in many species of parasites. We examined the applicability of large-scale essentiality information from four model eukaryotes, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to discover essential genes in each of their genomes. Parasite genes that lack orthologues in their host are desirable as selective targets, so we also examined prediction of essential genes within this subset. Results Cross-species analyses showed that the evolutionary conservation of genes and the presence of essential orthologues are each strong predictors of essentiality in eukaryotes. Absence of paralogues was also found to be a general predictor of increased relative essentiality. By combining several orthology and essentiality criteria one can select gene sets with up to a five-fold enrichment in essential genes compared with a random selection. We show how quantitative application of such criteria can be used to predict a ranked list of potential drug targets from Ancylostoma caninum and Haemonchus contortus - two blood-feeding strongylid nematodes, for which there are presently limited sequence data but no functional genomic tools. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the utility of using orthology information from multiple, diverse eukaryotes to predict essential genes. The data also emphasize the challenge of identifying essential genes among those in a parasite that are absent from its host.

  8. Associations Between Target Lesion Restenosis and Drug-Eluting Balloon Use: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Chieh; Wu, Chiung-Jen; Chen, Yung-Lung; Chung, Wen-Jung; Hsueh, Shu-Kai; Hang, Chi-Ling; Fang, Chih-Yuan; Fang, Hsiu-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) with drug-eluting balloons (DEBs) have emerged as an adjunctive treatment for in-stent restenosis (ISR) lesions. However, recurrent restenosis still occurs following DEB use. Our study aimed to identify the associations of target lesion restenosis following DEB use over a 1-year clinical follow-up.Between November 2011 and May 2014, 246 patients were diagnosed with coronary artery ISR in our hospital. A total of 335 coronary ISR lesions were treated with DEBs. The 1-year patent coronary artery group was defined as those with negative noninvasive examinations and no clinical symptoms, or those with no angiographic restenosis. The 1-year current restenosis group was defined as those with angiographic restenosis. Clinical results were compared between 2 groups. Univariate and multivariate cox regression analyses were performed to identify the associations of target lesion restenosis following DEB use.Patients' average age was 64.96 ± 10.68 years, and 77.2% were men. Non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction was more frequent as the clinical presentation in the 1-year current restenosis group, whereas stable angina was more frequent in the 1-year patent coronary artery group. The 1-year current restenosis group exhibited higher percentages of comorbidities, including hypertension, diabetes, prior myocardial infarction, heart failure, prior coronary artery bypass grafting, and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Regardless of ostial ISR or nonostial ISR, the results of drug-eluting stent ISR were worse than those for bare-metal stent ISR. Multivariate analysis revealed that ESRD, and coronary ostial lesion, and the severity of pre-PCI stenosis were independently associated with target lesion restenosis following DEB use (P = 0.020, P = 0.009, P = 0.026, respectively).ESRD, and coronary ostial lesion, and the severity of pre-PCI stenosis were independently associated with recurrent target lesion restenosis

  9. TRPV1 channel as a target for cancer therapy using CNT-based drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Guerrero, Andres; Espinosa-Duran, John M; Velasco-Medina, Jaime

    2016-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being considered for the design of drug delivery systems (DDSs) due to their capacity to internalize molecules and control their release. However, for cellular uptake of drugs, this approach requires an active translocation pathway or a channel to transport the drug into the cell. To address this issue, it is suggested to use TRPV1 ion channels as a potential target for drug release by nano-DDSs since these channels are overexpressed in cancer cells and allow the permeation of large cationic molecules. Considering these facts, this work presents three studies using molecular dynamics simulations of a human TRPV1 (hTRPV1) channel built here. The purpose of these simulations is to study the interaction between a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and hTRPV1, and the diffusion of doxorubicin (DOX) across hTRPV1 and across a POPC lipid membrane. The first study shows an attractive potential between the SWCNT surface and hTRPV1, tilting the adsorbed SWCNT. The second study shows low diffusion probability of DOX across the open hTRPV1 due to a high free energy barrier. Although, the potential energy between DOX and hTRPV1 reveals an attractive interaction while DOX is inside hTRPV1. These results suggest that if the channel is dilated, then DOX diffusion could occur. The third study shows a lower free energy barrier for DOX across the lipid membrane than for DOX across hTRPV1. Taking into account the results obtained, it is feasible to design novel nano-DDSs based on SWCNTs to accomplish controlled drug release into cells using as translocation pathway, the hTRPV1 ion channel. PMID:26872481

  10. Structural Basis for Induction of Peripheral Neuropathy by Microtubule-Targeting Cancer Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer A; Slusher, Barbara S; Wozniak, Krystyna M; Farah, Mohamed H; Smiyun, Gregoriy; Wilson, Leslie; Feinstein, Stuart; Jordan, Mary Ann

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a serious, dose-limiting side effect of cancer treatment with microtubule-targeting drugs. Symptoms present in a "stocking-glove" distribution, with longest nerves affected most acutely, suggesting a length-dependent component to the toxicity. Axonal transport of ATP-producing mitochondria along neuronal microtubules from cell body to synapse is crucial to neuronal function. We compared the effects of the drugs paclitaxel and ixabepilone that bind along the lengths of microtubules and the drugs eribulin and vincristine that bind at microtubule ends, on mitochondrial trafficking in cultured human neuronal SK-N-SH cells and on axonal transport in mouse sciatic nerves. Antiproliferative concentrations of paclitaxel and ixabepilone significantly inhibited the anterograde transport velocity of mitochondria in neuronal cells, whereas eribulin and vincristine inhibited transport only at significantly higher concentrations. Confirming these observations, anterogradely transported amyloid precursor protein accumulated in ligated sciatic nerves of control and eribulin-treated mice, but not in paclitaxel-treated mice, indicating that paclitaxel inhibited anterograde axonal transport, whereas eribulin did not. Electron microscopy of sciatic nerves of paclitaxel-treated mice showed reduced organelle accumulation proximal to the ligation consistent with inhibition of anterograde (kinesin based) transport by paclitaxel. In contrast, none of the drugs significantly affected retrograde (dynein based) transport in neuronal cells or mouse nerves. Collectively, these results suggest that paclitaxel and ixabepilone, which bind along the lengths and stabilize microtubules, inhibit kinesin-based axonal transport, but not dynein-based transport, whereas the microtubule-destabilizing drugs, eribulin and vincristine, which bind preferentially to microtubule ends, have significantly less effect on all microtubule-based axonal transport. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5115-23.

  11. On-chip microreactor system for the production of nano-emulsion loaded liposomes: towards targeted delivery of lipophilic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langelaan, M.L.P.; Emmelkamp, J.; Segers, M.J.A.; Lenting, H.B.M.

    2011-01-01

    An on-chip microreactor system for the production of novel nano-biodevices is presented. This nano-biodevice consists of a nano-emulsion loaded with lipophilic drugs, entrapped in liposomes. These nano-biodevices can be equipped with targeting molecules for higher drug efficiency. The microreactor s

  12. Targeted Drug Delivery with Polymers and Magnetic Nanoparticles: Covalent and Noncovalent Approaches, Release Control, and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Karel; Holá, Kateřina; Šubr, Vladimir; Bakandritsos, Aristides; Tuček, Jiří; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-05-11

    Targeted delivery combined with controlled drug release has a pivotal role in the future of personalized medicine. This review covers the principles, advantages, and drawbacks of passive and active targeting based on various polymer and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle carriers with drug attached by both covalent and noncovalent pathways. Attention is devoted to the tailored conjugation of targeting ligands (e.g., enzymes, antibodies, peptides) to drug carrier systems. Similarly, the approaches toward controlled drug release are discussed. Various polymer-drug conjugates based, for example, on polyethylene glycol (PEG), N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA), polymeric micelles, and nanoparticle carriers are explored with respect to absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME scheme) of administrated drug. Design and structure of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and condensed magnetic clusters are classified according to the mechanism of noncovalent drug loading involving hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions, coordination chemistry, and encapsulation in porous materials. Principles of covalent conjugation of drugs with SPIONs including thermo- and pH-degradable bonds, amide linkage, redox-cleavable bonds, and enzymatically-cleavable bonds are also thoroughly described. Finally, results of clinical trials obtained with polymeric and magnetic carriers are analyzed highlighting the potential advantages and future directions in targeted anticancer therapy. PMID:27109701

  13. Validation of N-myristoyltransferase as an antimalarial drug target using an integrated chemical biology approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Megan H.; Clough, Barbara; Rackham, Mark D.; Rangachari, Kaveri; Brannigan, James A.; Grainger, Munira; Moss, David K.; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Heal, William P.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Serwa, Remigiusz A.; Brady, Declan; Mann, David J.; Leatherbarrow, Robin J.; Tewari, Rita; Wilkinson, Anthony J.; Holder, Anthony A.; Tate, Edward W.

    2014-02-01

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium, which leads to approximately one million deaths per annum worldwide. Chemical validation of new antimalarial targets is urgently required in view of rising resistance to current drugs. One such putative target is the enzyme N-myristoyltransferase, which catalyses the attachment of the fatty acid myristate to protein substrates (N-myristoylation). Here, we report an integrated chemical biology approach to explore protein myristoylation in the major human parasite P. falciparum, combining chemical proteomic tools for identification of the myristoylated and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteome with selective small-molecule N-myristoyltransferase inhibitors. We demonstrate that N-myristoyltransferase is an essential and chemically tractable target in malaria parasites both in vitro and in vivo, and show that selective inhibition of N-myristoylation leads to catastrophic and irreversible failure to assemble the inner membrane complex, a critical subcellular organelle in the parasite life cycle. Our studies provide the basis for the development of new antimalarials targeting N-myristoyltransferase.

  14. Green design "bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy" applied for improved tumor-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ruoning; Gu, Xiaochen; Zhou, Jianping; Shen, Lingjia; Yin, Lifang; Hua, Peiying; Ding, Yang

    2016-08-10

    In this study, a simple and green approach 'bioinspired disassembly-reassembly strategy' was employed to reconstitute lipoprotein nanoparticles (RLNs) using whole-components of endogenous ones (contained dehydrated human lipids and native apolipoproteins). These RLNs were engineered to mimic the configuration and properties of natural lipoproteins for efficient drug delivery. In testing therapeutic targeting to microtubules, paclitaxel (PTX) was reassembled into RLNs to achieve improved targeted anti-carcinoma treatment and minimize adverse effects, demonstrating ultimately more applicable than HDL-like particles which are based on exogenous lipid sources. We have characterized that apolipoprotein-decoration of PTX-loaded RLNs (RLNs-PTX) led to favoring uniformly dispersed distribution, increasing PTX-encapsulation with a sustained-release pattern, while enhancing biostability during blood circulation. The innate biological RLNs induced efficient intracellular trafficking of cargos in situ via multi-targeting mechanisms, including scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated direct transmembrane delivery, as well as other lipoprotein-receptors associated endocytic pathways. The resulting anticancer treatment from RLNs-PTX was demonstrated a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 0.20μg/mL, cell apoptosis of 18.04% 24h post-incubation mainly arresting G2/M cell cycle in vitro, and tumor weight inhibition of 70.51% in vivo. Collectively, green-step assembly-based RLNs provided an efficient strategy for mediating tumor-targeted accumulation of PTX and enhanced anticancer efficacy. PMID:27238442

  15. Network target for screening synergistic drug combinations with application to traditional Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ningbo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multicomponent therapeutics offer bright prospects for the control of complex diseases in a synergistic manner. However, finding ways to screen the synergistic combinations from numerous pharmacological agents is still an ongoing challenge. Results In this work, we proposed for the first time a “network target”-based paradigm instead of the traditional "single target"-based paradigm for virtual screening and established an algorithm termed NIMS (Network target-based Identification of Multicomponent Synergy to prioritize synergistic agent combinations in a high throughput way. NIMS treats a disease-specific biological network as a therapeutic target and assumes that the relationship among agents can be transferred to network interactions among the molecular level entities (targets or responsive gene products of agents. Then, two parameters in NIMS, Topology Score and Agent Score, are created to evaluate the synergistic relationship between each given agent combinations. Taking the empirical multicomponent system traditional Chinese medicine (TCM as an illustrative case, we applied NIMS to prioritize synergistic agent pairs from 63 agents on a pathological process instanced by angiogenesis. The NIMS outputs can not only recover five known synergistic agent pairs, but also obtain experimental verification for synergistic candidates combined with, for example, a herbal ingredient Sinomenine, which outperforms the meet/min method. The robustness of NIMS was also showed regarding the background networks, agent genes and topological parameters, respectively. Finally, we characterized the potential mechanisms of multicomponent synergy from a network target perspective. Conclusions NIMS is a first-step computational approach towards identification of synergistic drug combinations at the molecular level. The network target-based approaches may adjust current virtual screen mode and provide a systematic paradigm for facilitating the

  16. Benzothiophen-pyrazine scaffold as a potential membrane targeting drug carrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazuryk, Olga [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Niemiec, Elżbieta [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Institute of Organic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Orléans, UMR-CNRS 7311, rue de Chartres, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Stochel, Grażyna [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland); Gillaizeau, Isabelle, E-mail: isabelle.gillaizeau@univ-orleans.fr [Institute of Organic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Orléans, UMR-CNRS 7311, rue de Chartres, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Brindell, Małgorzata, E-mail: brindell@chemia.uj.edu.pl [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Jagiellonian University, Ingardena 3, 30-060 Krakow (Poland)

    2013-08-15

    The fluorescent properties of 2,5-di(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrazine as a potential membrane targeting drug carrier were characterized and it was shown that its fluorescence intensity was much higher in organic solvent than in water. The embedding of studied compound by liposomes leads to ca. 2 orders of magnitude increase in its fluorescence intensity, suggesting its preferential accumulation in membranes. Preliminary biological studies showed its ability to accumulate in cells, and the concentration of 10 μM was sufficient for homogeneous staining of cells. The treatment of mouse carcinoma CT26 cells with studied compound up to 200 μM resulted in decreasing of viable cells by ca. 30%. Its reactivity towards albumin was found to be moderate with an association constant of 6×10{sup 4} M{sup −1}, while no interaction with DNA was observed. Our findings encourage for further studies on functionalization of this molecule to obtain a new class of anticancer drugs targeting membrane. Highlights: ► The fluorescence of 2,5-di(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrazine is solvent dependent. ► Weak fluorescence is found in water while high in organic solvents (DMSO, chloroform). ► Embedding of compound in liposomes remarkably increased its fluorescence. ► No interaction with DNA is observed but moderate reactivity towards albumin is found. ► Homogeneous staining of cells is feasible using nontoxic dose of compound.

  17. Leveraging structure determination with fragment screening for infectious disease drug targets: MECP synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begley, Darren W.; Hartley, Robert C.; Davies, Douglas R.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Leonard, Jess T.; Abendroth, Jan; Burris, Courtney A.; Bhandari, Janhavi; Myler, Peter J.; Staker, Bart L.; Stewart, Lance J. (UWASH); (Emerald)

    2011-09-28

    As part of the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease, we seek to enhance structural genomics with ligand-bound structure data which can serve as a blueprint for structure-based drug design. We have adapted fragment-based screening methods to our structural genomics pipeline to generate multiple ligand-bound structures of high priority drug targets from pathogenic organisms. In this study, we report fragment screening methods and structure determination results for 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2,4-cyclo-diphosphate (MECP) synthase from Burkholderia pseudomallei, the gram-negative bacterium which causes melioidosis. Screening by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as well as crystal soaking followed by X-ray diffraction led to the identification of several small molecules which bind this enzyme in a critical metabolic pathway. A series of complex structures obtained with screening hits reveal distinct binding pockets and a range of small molecules which form complexes with the target. Additional soaks with these compounds further demonstrate a subset of fragments to only bind the protein when present in specific combinations. This ensemble of fragment-bound complexes illuminates several characteristics of MECP synthase, including a previously unknown binding surface external to the catalytic active site. These ligand-bound structures now serve to guide medicinal chemists and structural biologists in rational design of novel inhibitors for this enzyme.

  18. Protein painting reveals solvent-excluded drug targets hidden within native protein–protein interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchini, Alessandra; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the contact regions between a protein and its binding partners is essential for creating therapies that block the interaction. Unfortunately, such contact regions are extremely difficult to characterize because they are hidden inside the binding interface. Here we introduce protein painting as a new tool that employs small molecules as molecular paints to tightly coat the surface of protein–protein complexes. The molecular paints, which block trypsin cleavage sites, are excluded from the binding interface. Following mass spectrometry, only peptides hidden in the interface emerge as positive hits, revealing the functional contact regions that are drug targets. We use protein painting to discover contact regions between the three-way interaction of IL1β ligand, the receptor IL1RI and the accessory protein IL1RAcP. We then use this information to create peptides and monoclonal antibodies that block the interaction and abolish IL1β cell signalling. The technology is broadly applicable to discover protein interaction drug targets. PMID:25048602

  19. Lactobionic acid and carboxymethyl chitosan functionalized graphene oxide nanocomposites as targeted anticancer drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qixia; Lv, Yao; Williams, Gareth R; Tao, Lei; Yang, Huihui; Li, Heyu; Zhu, Limin

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we report a targeted drug delivery system built by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), fluorescein isothiocyanate and lactobionic acid (LA). Analogous systems without LA were prepared as controls. Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the composites through adsorption. The release behavior from both the LA-functionalized and the LA-free material is markedly pH sensitive. The modified GOs have high biocompatibility with the liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721, but can induce cell death after 24h incubation if loaded with DOX. Tests with shorter (2h) incubation times were undertaken to investigate the selectivity of the GO composites: under these conditions, neither DOX-loaded system was found to be toxic to the non-cancerous L929 cell line, but the LA-containing composite showed the ability to selectively induce cell death in cancerous (SMMC-7721) cells while the LA-free analogue was inactive here also. These findings show that the modified GO materials are strong potential candidates for targeted anticancer drug delivery systems. PMID:27474628

  20. Drugging PI3K in cancer: refining targets and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Timothy A; Bjerke, Lynn; Clarke, Paul A; Workman, Paul

    2015-08-01

    The phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) pathway is one of the most frequently activated pathogenic signalling routes in human cancers, making it a rational and important target for innovative anticancer drug development and precision medicine. The three main classes of PI3K inhibitors currently in clinical testing comprise dual pan-Class I PI3K/mTOR inhibitors, pan-Class I PI3K inhibitors lacking significant mTOR activity and isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors. A major step forward in recent years is the progression of over 30 small molecule PI3K inhibitors into clinical trials and the first regulatory approval of the PI3Kδ inhibitor idelalisib for multiple B-cell malignancies. This review article focuses on the progress made in the discovery and development of novel PI3K inhibitors, with an emphasis on antitumour activity and tolerability profiles for agents that have entered clinical trials. We also discuss the key issues of drug resistance, patient selection approaches and rational targeted combinations. Finally, we envision the future development and use of PI3K inhibitors for the treatment of patients with a range of malignancies. PMID:26117819