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Sample records for anti-fas antibodies leads

  1. Therapeutic effect of the anti-Fas antibody on arthritis in HTLV-1 tax transgenic mice.

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    Fujisawa, K; Asahara, H; Okamoto, K; Aono, H; Hasunuma, T; Kobata, T; Iwakura, Y; Yonehara, S; Sumida, T; Nishioka, K

    1996-07-15

    We have recently demonstrated Fas-mediated apoptosis in the synovium, of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and suggested that it may be one factor responsible for the regression of RA. To examine whether the induction of apoptosis caused by anti-Fas mAb may play a potential role as a new therapeutic strategy for RA, we investigated the effect of anti-Fas mAb (RK-8) on synovitis in an animal model of RA, the human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) tax transgenic mice. We report here that administration of anti-Fas mAb into mice intra-articularly improved the paw swelling and arthritis within 48 h. Immunohistochemical study and in vitro culture studies showed that 35% of synovial fibroblasts, 75% of mononuclear cells, and some of polymorphonuclear leukocytes infiltrating in synovium underwent apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb. In situ nick end labeling analysis and electron microscope analysis clearly showed that many cells in synovium were induced apoptosis by anti-Fas mAb administration. However, local administration of anti-Fas mAb did not produce systemic side effects. Results demonstrated that administration of anti-Fas mAb in arthritic joints of the HTLV-1 tax transgenic mice produced improvement of arthritis. These findings suggest that local administration of anti-Fas mAb may represent a useful therapeutic strategy for proliferative synovitis such as RA.

  2. Transfer of Fas (CD95 protein from the cell surface to the surface of polystyrene beads coated with anti-Fas antibody clone CH-11

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    H. Sawai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse monoclonal anti-Fas (CD95 antibody clone CH-11 has been widely used in research on apoptosis. CH-11 has the ability to bind to Fas protein on cell surface and induce apoptosis. Here, we used polystyrene beads coated with CH-11 to investigate the role of lipid rafts in Fas-mediated apoptosis in SKW6.4 cells. Unexpectedly, by treatment of the cells with CH-11-coated beads Fas protein was detached from cell surface and transferred to the surface of CH-11-coated beads. Western blot analysis showed that Fas protein containing both extracellular and intracellular domains was attached to the beads. Fas protein was not transferred from the cells to the surface of the beads coated with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand. Similar phenomenon was observed in Jurkat T cells. Furthermore, CH-11-induced apoptosis was suppressed by pretreatment with CH-11-coated beads in Jurkat cells. These results suggest that CH-11 might possess distinct properties on Fas protein compared with other anti-Fas antibodies or Fas ligand, and also suggest that caution should be needed to use polystyrene beads coated with antibodies such as CH-11.

  3. Resistance of SKW6 cell to apoptosis induction with anti-Fas antibody upon transduction of a reverse fragment to a cDNA encoding human 6A8 α-mannosidase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史耕先; 靳玉兰; 王壮志; 崔巍; 刘音; 王讯; 朱立平

    2001-01-01

    The effect of transduction with a reverse fragment to a cDNA encoding human 6A8 a-mannosidase on apoptosis induction of human B cell line SKW6 by anti-Fas antibody was tested. Apoptosis-inducer of anti-Fas monoclonal antibody was used to induce apoptosis in SKW6 cells. Giemsa's staining, Annexin-V-FLUOS staining and DNA ladder test were used to determine the events of apoptosis. Indirect immunofluorescent staining with anti-Fas antibody was performed to detect the surface Fas expression. In a time-course test of 12, 24 and 36 h for apoptosis induction by anti-Fas antibody, DNA ladder was observed in the wild-type SKW6 cells in a time-dependent fashion. Mock transduction had no effect on DNA ladder production. However, no DNA ladder was detected in the rAAV-antisense 6A8 cDNA-transduced SKW6. Results from Annexin-V-FLUOS staining on anti-Fas antibody-treated cells revealed that the staining-positive rate in the rAAV-antisense 6A8 cDNA-transduced SKW6 cells was decreased in comparison to that in the wild-type and the mock-transduced cells. Giemsa's staining observation showed that the number of dying (with apoptotic bodies) and dead cells was reduced in the rAAV-antisense 6A8 cDNA-transduced SKW6 cells in comparison with that in the wild-type and the mock-transduced cells upon anti-Fas antibody induction. The transduction did not affect the expression of Fas molecular on cell surface. 100% cells in all the groups showed Fas expression. The SKW6 cells became resistant to apoptosis induction by anti-Fas antibody upon transduction with a reverse fragment to a cDNA encoding human 6A8 a-mannosidase. The transduction did not affect the expression of Fas molecule on cells.

  4. Inhibiting Apoptosis of CTLL-2 Cells to Enhance Their GVL Effects via Anti-Fas Ribozyme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min ZHANG; Fang LIU; Lin-Bo LIU; Yong YOU; Zhi-Chao CHEN; Ping ZOU

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the inhibition role of anti-Fas hammerhead ribozyme on fas expression and Fas-mediated apoptosis of CTL cell line CTLL-2 cells,the cDNA of an anti-Fas hammerhead ribozyme was synthesized,its expression plasmid was constructed and transfected into CTLL-2 cells by electroporation.fas expression of CTLL-2 cells was detected by RT-PCR and Western blot.CTLL-2 cell viability was measured using MTT assay when co-cultured with mouse T cell leukemia cell line EL4 cells that highly expressed Fas ligand(FasL).Meanwhile,caspase-3 proteolytic activity was detected,and cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry and Hochest-PI double staining.Killing activity of CTLL-2 cells was detected by lactate dehydrogenase(LDH)releasing assay in vitro.Results showed that the expression of both Fas mRNA and protein in CTLL-2 cells were decreased after transfection of anti-Fas ribozyme.Compared with mocktransfected group and mutant ribozyme-transfected group,viability of CTLL-2 cells co-cultured with EL4 cells was increased significantly and cells killing activity was enhanced after transfected with anti-Fas ribozyme,while the caspase-3 activity and apoptosis rate was significantly decreased.The results demonstrated anti-Fas ribozyme could efficiently cleave Fas and inhibit Fas-mediated apoptosis of CTLL-2 cells to improve their viability.Our study made a basis for enhancing CTLL-2 cells anti-leukemia effect in DLI.

  5. HIV-1 resistance to neutralizing antibodies: Determination of antibody concentrations leading to escape mutant evolution.

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    Magnus, Carsten; Reh, Lucia; Trkola, Alexandra

    2016-06-15

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considered vital components of novel therapeutics and blueprints for vaccine research. Yet escape to even the most potent of these antibodies is imminent in natural infection. Measures to define antibody efficacy and prevent mutant selection are thus urgently needed. Here, we derive a mathematical framework to predict the concentration ranges for which antibody escape variants can outcompete their viral ancestors, referred to as mutant selection window (MSW). When determining the MSW, we focus on the differential efficacy of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in two canonical infection routes, free-virus infection and cell-cell transmission. The latter has proven highly effective in vitro suggesting its importance for both in vivo spread as well as for escaping targeted intervention strategies. We observed a range of MSW patterns that highlight the potential of mutants to arise in both transmission pathways and over wide concentration ranges. Most importantly, we found that only when the arising mutant has both, residual sensitivity to the neutralizing antibody and reduced infectivity compared to the parental virus, antibody dosing outside of the MSW to restrict mutant selection is possible. Emergence of mutants that provide complete escape and have no considerable fitness loss cannot be prevented by adjusting antibody doses. The latter may in part explain the ubiquitous resistance to neutralizing antibodies observed in natural infection and antibody treatment. Based on our findings, combinations of antibodies targeting different epitopes should be favored for antibody-based interventions as this may render complete resistance less likely to occur and also increase chances that multiple escapes result in severe fitness loss of the virus making longer-term antibody treatment more feasible.

  6. Antibody

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    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  7. Maternal antibody transfer can lead to suppression of humoral immunity in developing zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

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    Merrill, Loren; Grindstaff, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Maternally transferred antibodies have been documented in a wide range of taxa and are thought to adaptively provide protection against parasites and pathogens while the offspring immune system is developing. In most birds, transfer occurs when females deposit immunoglobulin Y into the egg yolk, and it is proportional to the amount in the female's plasma. Maternal antibodies can provide short-term passive protection as well as specific and nonspecific immunological priming, but high levels of maternal antibody can result in suppression of the offspring's humoral immune response. We injected adult female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) with one of two antigens (lipopolysaccharide [LPS] or keyhole limpet hemocyanin [KLH]) or a control and then injected offspring with LPS, KLH, or a control on days 5 and 28 posthatch to examine the impact of maternally transferred antibodies on the ontogeny of the offspring's humoral immune system. We found that offspring of females exposed to KLH had elevated levels of KLH-reactive antibody over the first 17-28 days posthatch but reduced KLH-specific antibody production between days 28 and 36. We also found that offspring exposed to either LPS or KLH exhibited reduced total antibody levels, compared to offspring that received a control injection. These results indicate that high levels of maternal antibodies or antigen exposure during development can have negative repercussions on short-term antibody production and may have long-term fitness repercussions for the offspring.

  8. Anti-PIT-1 antibody syndrome; a novel clinical entity leading to hypopituitarism.

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    Bando, Hironori; Iguchi, Genzo; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Hidaka-Takeno, Ryoko; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2015-03-01

    Various hypothalamic-pituitary diseases cause hypopituitarism. Inflammation related to autoimmunity also causes hypopituitarism. Hypophysitis is a representative disease caused by autoimmunity. Generally, anterior pituitary hormones are non-specifically impaired in this condition, but specific hormone defects have been reported in some cases. Anti-PIT-1 (pituitary-specific transcription factor 1) antibody syndrome is a novel clinical entity that presents an acquired combined pituitary hormone deficiency characterized by a specific defect in growth hormone, prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Circulating anti-PIT-1 antibody along with various autoantibodies are detected with multiple endocrine organopathy, meeting the definition of autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Mechanistically, cytotoxic T lymphocytes that specifically react with PIT-1 protein play an important role in the development of this syndrome.

  9. Anti-Hemagglutinin Antibody Derived Lead Peptides for Inhibitors of Influenza Virus Binding.

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    Henry Memczak

    Full Text Available Antibodies against spike proteins of influenza are used as a tool for characterization of viruses and therapeutic approaches. However, development, production and quality control of antibodies is expensive and time consuming. To circumvent these difficulties, three peptides were derived from complementarity determining regions of an antibody heavy chain against influenza A spike glycoprotein. Their binding properties were studied experimentally, and by molecular dynamics simulations. Two peptide candidates showed binding to influenza A/Aichi/2/68 H3N2. One of them, termed PeB, with the highest affinity prevented binding to and infection of target cells in the micromolar region without any cytotoxic effect. PeB matches best the conserved receptor binding site of hemagglutinin. PeB bound also to other medical relevant influenza strains, such as human-pathogenic A/California/7/2009 H1N1, and avian-pathogenic A/Mute Swan/Rostock/R901/2006 H7N1. Strategies to improve the affinity and to adapt specificity are discussed and exemplified by a double amino acid substituted peptide, obtained by substitutional analysis. The peptides and their derivatives are of great potential for drug development as well as biosensing.

  10. Lead

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    ... found? Who is at risk? What are the health effects of lead? Get educational material about lead Get certified as a Lead Abatement Worker, or other abatement discipline Lead in drinking water Lead air pollution Test your child Check and maintain your home ...

  11. Using Monoclonal Antibody to Determine Lead Ions with a Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Fiber-optic Biosensor

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    Mon-Fu Chung

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel reflection-based localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR fiber-optic probe has been developed to determine the heavy metal lead ion concentration. Monoclonal antibody as the detecting probe containing massive amino groups to capture Pb(II-chelate complexes was immobilized onto gold nanoparticle-modified optical fiber (NMAuOF. The optimal immobilizing conditions of monoclonal antibody on to the NMAuOF are 189 μg/mL in pH7.4 PBS for 2 h at 25°C. The absorbability of the functionalized NMAuOF sensor increases to 12.2 % upon changing the Pb(II-EDTA level from 10 to 100 ppb with a detection limit of 0.27 ppb. The sensor retains 92.7 % of its original activity and gives reproducible results after storage in 5% D-( -Trehalose dehydrate solution at 4°C for 35 days. In conclusion, the monoclonal antibody-functionalized NMAuOF sensor shows a promising result for determining the concentration of Pb(II with high sensitivity.

  12. A single center 14 years study of infectious complications leading to hospitalization of patients with primary antibody deficiencies

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    Setareh Mamishi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs are a heterogeneous group of disorders, characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and increased susceptibility to bacterial infections, leading to hospitalizations. This study was performed to determine the main infectious causes of hospital admissions in selective Iranian patients with PADs. Forty patients with PADs, who were admitted to the Infectious Ward of Children's Medical Center Hospital during a 14-year period, were reviewed in this study. There were 115 documented episodes of hospital admission during a 14-year period. The average length of hospital stay was 33.30 ± 25.72 days. Pneumonia was the most prominent infection leading to hospitalization among these patients (n = 48, followed by gastroenteritis (n = 23. Other less frequent causes of hospitalization were fever and neutropenia, septic arthritis, encephalitis, orbital cellulitis, sepsis, urinary tract infection, meningitis, oral ulcer, and lung abscess. The most common causative organisms of diarrhea were: Giardia lamblia, followed by Candida albicans, and Salmonella sp. Many patients with PADs suffer from repeated infections leading to hospitalization, in spite of immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Respiratory tract infections were the prominent cause of hospitalization among studied patients, followed by gastrointestinal infections.

  13. Antithyroglobulin antibody

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    Thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Hypothyroidism - thyroglobulin antibody; Thyroiditis - thyroglobulin antibody; Graves disease - thyroglobulin antibody; Underactive thyroid - thyroglobulin antibody

  14. Decreased blood hepatitis B surface antibody levels linked to e-waste lead exposure in preschool children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xijin [Laboratory of Environmental Medicine and Developmental Toxicology, and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Department of Cell Biology and Genetics, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Chen, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jian [Laboratory of Environmental Medicine and Developmental Toxicology, and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Guo, Pi [Department of Public Health, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Fu, Tingzao; Dai, Yifeng [Laboratory of Environmental Medicine and Developmental Toxicology, and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Lin, Stanley L. [Department of Pathophysiology and Key Immunopathology Laboratory of Guangdong Province, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China); Huo, Xia, E-mail: xhuo@stu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Environmental Medicine and Developmental Toxicology, and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Infectious Diseases, Shantou University Medical College, Shantou 515041, Guangdong (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Secondary exploratory analyses displayed a correlation of blood Pb to HBsAb levels. • Generalized linear mixed models were used to analyze two-phase data. • Children from an e-waste area had higher blood Pb levels and lower HBsAb titers. • Nearly 50% of Pb-exposed children fail to develop sufficient HBV immunity. • Different vaccination strategies are required for in e-waste areas. - Abstract: Lead (Pb) is a widespread environmental contaminant that can profoundly affect the immune system in vaccinated children. To explore the association between blood Pb and HBsAb levels in children chronically exposed to Pb, we measured hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb) titers, to reflect the immune response in the children of Guiyu, an electronic and electrical waste (e-waste) recycling area well known for environmental Pb contamination. We performed secondary exploratory analyses of blood Pb levels and plasma HBsAb titers in samples, taken in two phases between 2011 and 2012, from 590 children from Guiyu (exposed group) and Haojiang (reference group). Children living in the exposed area had higher blood Pb levels and lower HBsAb titers compared with children from the reference area. At each phase, generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) showed that HBsAb titers were significantly negatively associated with child blood Pb levels. This work shows that a decreased immune response to hepatitis B vaccine and immune system might have potential harm to children with chronic Pb exposure. Importantly, nearly 50% of chronically exposed children failed to develop sufficient immunity to hepatitis in response to vaccination. Thus different vaccination strategies are needed for children living under conditions of chronic Pb exposure.

  15. Conformation Selective Antibody Enables Genome Profiling and Leads to Discovery of Parallel G-Quadruplex in Human Telomeres.

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    Liu, Hui-Yun; Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Tian-Peng; Wu, Yue; Xiong, Yun-Xia; Wang, Shi-Ke; Ge, Yuan-Long; He, Jin-Hui; Lv, Peng; Ou, Tian-Miao; Tan, Jia-Heng; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Ren, Jian; Zhao, Yong; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2016-10-20

    G-quadruplexes are specialized secondary structures in nucleic acids that possess significant conformational polymorphisms. The precise G-quadruplex conformations in vivo and their relevance to biological functions remain controversial and unclear, especially for telomeric G-quadruplexes. Here, we report a novel single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody, D1, with high binding selectivity for parallel G-quadruplexes in vitro and in vivo. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation using D1 and deep-sequencing revealed the consensus sequence for parallel G-quadruplex formation, which is characterized by G-rich sequence with a short loop size (G-quadruplex was identified and its formation was regulated by small molecular ligands targeting and telomere replication. Together, parallel G-quadruplex specific antibody D1 was found to be a valuable tool for determination of G-quadruplex and its conformation, which will prompt further studies on the structure of G-quadruplex and its biological implication in vivo.

  16. Exposure to Folate Receptor Alpha Antibodies during Gestation and Weaning Leads to Severe Behavioral Deficits in Rats: A Pilot Study.

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    Jeffrey M Sequeira

    Full Text Available The central nervous system continues to develop during gestation and after birth, and folate is an essential nutrient in this process. Folate deficiency and folate receptor alpha autoantibodies (FRα-AuAb have been associated with pregnancy-related complications and neurodevelopmental disorders. In this pilot study, we investigated the effect of exposure to FRα antibodies (Ab during gestation (GST, the pre-weaning (PRW, and the post weaning (POW periods on learning and behavior in adulthood in a rat model. In the open field test and novel object recognition task, which examine locomotor activity and anxiety-like behavior, deficits in rats exposed to Ab during gestation and pre-weaning (GST+PRW included more time spent in the periphery or corner areas, less time in the central area, frequent self-grooming akin to stereotypy, and longer time to explore a novel object compared to a control group; these are all indicative of increased levels of anxiety. In the place avoidance tasks that assess learning and spatial memory formation, only 30% of GST+PRW rats were able to learn the passive place avoidance task. None of these rats learned the active place avoidance task indicating severe learning deficits and cognitive impairment. Similar but less severe deficits were observed in rats exposed to Ab during GST alone or only during the PRW period, suggesting the extreme sensitivity of the fetal as well as the neonatal rat brain to the deleterious effects of exposure to Ab during this period. Behavioral deficits were not seen in rats exposed to antibody post weaning. These observations have implications in the pathology of FRα-AuAb associated with neural tube defect pregnancy, preterm birth and neurodevelopmental disorders including autism.

  17. Modeling of cell culture damage and recovery leads to increased antibody and biomass productivity in CHO cell cultures.

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    Naderi, Saeideh; Nikdel, Ali; Meshram, Mukesh; McConkey, Brendan; Ingalls, Brian; Budman, Hector; Scharer, Jeno

    2014-09-01

    The development of an efficient and productive cell-culture process requires a deep understanding of intracellular mechanisms and extracellular conditions for optimal product synthesis. Mathematical modeling provides an effective strategy to predict, control, and optimize cell performance under a range of culture conditions. In this study, a mathematical model is proposed for the investigation of cell damage of a Chinese hamster ovary cell culture secreting recombinant anti-RhD monoclonal antibody (mAb). Irreversible cell damage was found to be correlated with a reduction in pH. This irreversible damage to cellular function is described mathematically by a Tessier-based model, in which the actively growing fraction of cells is dependent on an intracellular metabolic product acting as a growth inhibitor. To further verify the model, an offline model-based optimization of mAb production in the cell culture was carried out, with the goal of minimizing cell damage and thereby enhancing productivity through intermittent refreshment of the culture medium. An experimental implementation of this model-based strategy resulted in a doubling of the yield as compared to the batch operation and the resulting biomass and productivity profiles agreed with the model predictions.

  18. Repopulation of bcl-2 gene transfection on HepaRG cells in an animal model of severe combined immunodeficient mice with chimeric human liver using mouse-specific anti-fas antibody%利用bcl-2抗Fas凋亡特性联合Fas抗体促进人鼠嵌合肝中人肝细胞的增殖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋黎; 兰林; 李俊刚; 王宇明; 刘国栋

    2009-01-01

    目的 移植bcl-2转基因HepaRG细胞到小鼠体内,并联合使用Jo2抗体诱导鼠肝细胞凋亡策略,促进人鼠嵌合肝中人肝细胞的增殖.方法 SCID鼠经脾移植2×106 bcl-2转基因HepaRG细胞,移植后1d始腹腔注射0.2mg/kg Jo2抗体,每周1次,持续10周为实验组;移植未转染bcl-2基因的HepaRG细胞,同样给予Jo2 抗体腹腔注射为对照1组,移植未转染bcl-2基因的HepaRG细胞,未腹腔注射Jo2抗体为对照2组,建立人鼠嵌合肝动物模型.从2周开始,后4、8、12、16、20、24周,分别采用免疫组化、免疫荧光和逆转录聚合酶链反应(RT-PCR)检测不同时相点实验组和对照组嵌合肝中肝组织人清蛋白以及人清蛋白mRNA,并用酶联免疫法(ELISA)定量检测鼠血清人清蛋白的含量.结果 实验组和对照组小鼠均能存活至24周,鼠肝组织和血清中均能检测到清蛋白的表达.实验组肝组织和血清人清蛋白的表达均可持续到24周,人血清清蛋白高峰值为95.32ng/mL,出现在16周;而对照1组肝组织和血清人清蛋白的表达可持续到20周,人血清清蛋白高峰值为42.37ng/mL,出现在12周;对照2组肝组织和血清人清蛋白的表达可持续到12周,人血清清蛋白高峰值为22.91ng/mL,出现在8周.结论 利用bcl-2抗Fas凋亡特性,转染bcl-2基因的HepaRG细胞移植并联合小剂量Jo2抗体腹腔注射SCID鼠,有利于人鼠嵌合肝中人肝细胞的增殖和存活.

  19. Attenuated Disease in SIV-Infected Macaques Treated with a Monoclonal Antibody against FasL

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    Maria S. Salvato

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute SIVmac infection in macaques is accompanied by high levels of plasma viremia that decline with the appearance of viral immunity and is a model for acute HIV disease in man. Despite specific immune responses, the virus establishes a chronic, persistent infection. The destruction of CD4+ and CD4- lymphocyte subsets in macaques contributes to viral persistence and suggests the importance of mechanisms for depleting both infected and uninfected (bystander cells. Bystander cell killing can occur when FasL binds the Fas receptor on activated lymphocytes, which include T and B cell subpopulations that are responding to the infection. Destruction of specific immune cells could be an important mechanism for blunting viral immunity and establishing persistent infection with chronic disease. We inhibited the Fas pathway in vivo with a monoclonal antibody against FasL (RNOK203. Here we show that treatment with anti-FasL reduced cell death in circulating T and B cells, increased CTL and antibody responses to viral proteins, and lowered the setpoint viremia. By blocking FasL during only the first few weeks after infection, we attenuated SIVmac disease and increased the life span for infected and treated macaques.

  20. Heterozygous Mutation in IκBNS Leads to Reduced Levels of Natural IgM Antibodies and Impaired Responses to T-Independent Type 2 Antigens.

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    Pedersen, Gabriel K; Ádori, Monika; Stark, Julian M; Khoenkhoen, Sharesta; Arnold, Carrie; Beutler, Bruce; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B

    2016-01-01

    Mice deficient in central components of classical NF-κB signaling have low levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and fail to respond to immunization with T-independent type 2 (TI-2) antigens. A plausible explanation for these defects is the severely reduced numbers of B-1 and marginal zone B (MZB) cells in such mice. By using an ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen, we identified a role for the atypical IκB protein IκBNS in humoral immunity. IκBNS-deficient mice lack B-1 cells and have severely reduced numbers of MZB cells, and thus resemble several other strains with defects in classical NF-κB signaling. We analyzed mice heterozygous for the identified IκBNS mutation and demonstrate that these mice have an intermediary phenotype in terms of levels of circulating IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens. However, in contrast to mice that are homozygous for the IκBNS mutation, the heterozygous mice had normal frequencies of B-1 and MZB cells. These results suggest that there is a requirement for IκBNS expression from two functional alleles for maintaining normal levels of circulating natural IgM antibodies and responses to TI-2 antigens.

  1. Antimitochondrial antibody

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    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003529.htm Antimitochondrial antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. ...

  2. Synthetic peptides for antibody production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, N.D.

    1995-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are useful tools for the generation of antibodies. The use of antibodies as specific reagents in inununochemical assays is widely applied. In this chapter, the application of synthetic peptides for the generation of antibodies is described. The different steps that lead to the uni

  3. An undetectable source of technical error that could lead to false negative results in enzyme linked immunosorbent assay of antibodies to HIV-1.

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    Wiltbank, T B; McCarroll, D R; Wartick, M G

    1989-01-01

    Since the institution of routine testing for antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the specificity and sensitivity of this assay system has received significant scrutiny. During previous use of this methodology, we have quantified rates of false biological positive results using commercial kit assays in a normal donor population. In this study, we have identified a potential source for false negative results. Using multiple lots of two different commercial ELISA kits, the absorbance readings at the test end point could not differentiate between normal non-reactive donor samples and blanks containing no sample. These results occur using normal donor samples, even though the assays could distinguish between blank wells and the manufacturers' "normal controls", provided with the assay. Our findings suggest that a technical pipetting error is presently undetectable, either visually or by statistical methods, and could permit an untested, potentially HIV-1 positive, unit to be released into the transfusable blood supply. A possible solution is suggested.

  4. Antibody ligation of CM1 on cisplatin-exposed HeLa cells induces apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-dependent Fas ligand expression.

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    Park, Ga Bin; Kim, Daejin; Yoon, Hoi Soo; Kim, Yeong-Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Ki Tae; Jeong, Dae Hoon; Hur, Dae Young

    2014-06-01

    Centrocyte/centroblast marker 1 (CM1) has been identified as a pro-apoptosis molecule on B-cell lymphoma cells as well as several types of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated its signaling mechanism in HeLa cells after treatment with cisplatin in order to potentially identify a new therapeutic target. The CM1 molecule was induced on the surface of cisplatin-exposed HeLa cells. In these cells, ligation of CM1 with anti-CM1 monoclonal antibodies inhibited cell proliferation and produced reactive oxygen species. Fas ligand (FasL) expression was upregulated without upregulating Fas in cisplatin-exposed HeLa cells after CM1 stimulation. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine, a pan-capase inhibitor, and ZB4, an antagonistic anti-Fas antibody, effectively inhibited the apoptotic effect triggered by CM1. CM1 ligation induced apoptosis through disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, decreased Bcl-2 and phosphorylated ERK expression. These findings identify CM1 as a potential new therapeutic target related to cisplatin-exposed cervical cancer.

  5. The Mutation Glu151Asp in the B-Component of the Bacillus cereus Non-Hemolytic Enterotoxin (Nhe Leads to a Diverging Reactivity in Antibody-Based Detection Systems

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    Andrea Didier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Bacillus cereus to cause foodborne toxicoinfections leads to increasing concerns regarding consumer protection. For the diarrhea-associated enterotoxins, the assessment of the non-hemolytic enterotoxin B (NheB titer determined by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay (EIA correlates best with in vitro cytotoxicity. In general, the regulation of enterotoxin expression of B. cereus is a coordinately-regulated process influenced by environmental, and probably also by host factors. As long as these factors are not completely understood, the currently-applied diagnostic procedures are based on indirect approaches to assess the potential virulence of an isolate. To date, sandwich EIA results serve as a surrogate marker to categorize isolates as either potentially low or highly toxic. Here, we report on a single amino acid exchange in the NheB sequence leading to an underestimation of the cytotoxic potential in a limited number of strains. During the screening of a large panel of B. cereus isolates, six showed uncommon features with low sandwich EIA titers despite high cytotoxicity. Sequence analysis revealed the point-mutation Glu151Asp in the potential binding region of the capture antibody. Application of this antibody also results in low titers in an indirect EIA format and shows variable detection intensities in Western-immunoblots. A commercially-available assay based on a lateral flow device detects all strains correctly as NheB producers in a qualitative manner. In conclusion, isolates showing low NheB titers should additionally be assayed in an indirect EIA or for their in vitro cytotoxicity to ensure a correct classification as either low or highly toxic.

  6. The mutation Glu151Asp in the B-component of the Bacillus cereus non-hemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) leads to a diverging reactivity in antibody-based detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didier, Andrea; Jeßberger, Nadja; Krey, Victoria; Dietrich, Richard; Scherer, Siegfried; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2015-11-09

    The ability of Bacillus cereus to cause foodborne toxicoinfections leads to increasing concerns regarding consumer protection. For the diarrhea-associated enterotoxins, the assessment of the non-hemolytic enterotoxin B (NheB) titer determined by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay (EIA) correlates best with in vitro cytotoxicity. In general, the regulation of enterotoxin expression of B. cereus is a coordinately-regulated process influenced by environmental, and probably also by host factors. As long as these factors are not completely understood, the currently-applied diagnostic procedures are based on indirect approaches to assess the potential virulence of an isolate. To date, sandwich EIA results serve as a surrogate marker to categorize isolates as either potentially low or highly toxic. Here, we report on a single amino acid exchange in the NheB sequence leading to an underestimation of the cytotoxic potential in a limited number of strains. During the screening of a large panel of B. cereus isolates, six showed uncommon features with low sandwich EIA titers despite high cytotoxicity. Sequence analysis revealed the point-mutation (Glu)151(Asp) in the potential binding region of the capture antibody. Application of this antibody also results in low titers in an indirect EIA format and shows variable detection intensities in Western-immunoblots. A commercially-available assay based on a lateral flow device detects all strains correctly as NheB producers in a qualitative manner. In conclusion, isolates showing low NheB titers should additionally be assayed in an indirect EIA or for their in vitro cytotoxicity to ensure a correct classification as either low or highly toxic.

  7. Engineering antibodies by yeast display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Eric T; Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Price, J Vincent

    2012-10-15

    Since its first application to antibody engineering 15 years ago, yeast display technology has been developed into a highly potent tool for both affinity maturing lead molecules and isolating novel antibodies and antibody-like species. Robust approaches to the creation of diversity, construction of yeast libraries, and library screening or selection have been elaborated, improving the quality of engineered molecules and certainty of success in an antibody engineering campaign and positioning yeast display as one of the premier antibody engineering technologies currently in use. Here, we summarize the history of antibody engineering by yeast surface display, approaches used in its application, and a number of examples highlighting the utility of this method for antibody engineering.

  8. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  9. Pathogenic role of antiphospholipid antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, J. E.; de Groot, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is characterized by recurrent arterial and venous thrombosis and/or pregnancy in association with antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies. The pathogenic mechanisms in APS that lead to in vivo injury are incompletely understood. Recent evidence suggests that AP

  10. Thyroid Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... e.g., at regular intervals after thyroid cancer treatment) Thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody, Thyroid Stimulating Immunoglobulin TRAb, TSHR Ab, TSI Graves disease When a person has symptoms of hyperthyroidism If a pregnant woman has a known autoimmune ...

  11. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Presenting with Unilateral Adrenal Hemmorhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Kifayat; Butt, Ghias; Neopane, Sippy; Arshi, Shahana

    2016-06-01

    The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presents with vascular thrombosis which involve both arterial and venous systems. The clinical presentation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome includes obstetric complications leading to recurrent abortions, presence of circulating antibodies against phospholipids, and multi-organ thromboembolisms. We report a case of a patient who presented with unilateral adrenal hemorrhage and subsequently found to have antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and lupus nephritis.

  12. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    APCA; Anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Atrophic gastritis - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; ...

  13. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead is a metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust. Lead can be found in all parts of our ... from human activities such as mining and manufacturing. Lead used to be in paint; older houses may ...

  14. Lead Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... including some imported jewelry. What are the health effects of lead? • More commonly, lower levels of lead in children over time may lead to reduced IQ, slow learning, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), or behavioral issues. • Lead also affects other ...

  15. [Antinuclear antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabiedes, Javier; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos A

    2010-01-01

    Anti-nuclear antibodies (ANA) are immunoglobulin directed against autologous cell nuclear and cytoplasmic components. Besides the autoimmune ANA there are other ANA that can be detected in circulation, like natural and infectious ANA. Because of its high sensibility, detection of the ANA must be done by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) as screening test and all of those positive samples are convenient to confirm its specificity by ELISA, western blot or other techniques. Positive ANA detected by IIF must be evaluated taking in to account the pattern and titer. The following recommended step is the specificity characterization (reactivity against extractable nuclear antigens [ENA], dsDNA, etc.) which is useful for the diagnosis and follow up of patients with autoimmune diseases, and by such reasoning, its detection must be performed in an orderly and reasonable way using guides or strategies focused to the good use and interpretation of the autoantibodies. The objective of this review is to present a compilation of the literature and our experience in the detection and study of the ANA.

  16. Primary Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadeli, Deepak K; Hanjagi, Siddaraya Y

    2015-10-01

    Primary Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a rare disease associated with thromboembolic events which may affect either the arterial or the venous vasculature. It presents with an increased risk of thrombosis in pregnant woman leading to repeated fetal losses. We present here a case of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome in young women who had previous event of gangrene of toes leading to their amputation and repeated fetal losses.

  17. Induction of T regulatory cells by the superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody D665 leads to decreased pathogenic IgG autoantibodies against desmoglein 3 in a HLA-transgenic mouse model of pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Willenborg, Sebastian; Hünig, Thomas; Deeg, Cornelia A; Sonderstrup, Grete; Hertl, Michael; Eming, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a potentially life-threatening autoimmune disease of the skin and mucous membranes. Its pathogenesis is based on IgG autoantibodies that target the desmosomal cadherins, desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) and desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) and induce intra-epidermal loss of adhesion. Although the PV pathogenesis is well-understood, therapeutic options are still limited to immunosuppressive drugs, particularly corticosteroids, which are associated with significant side effects. Dsg3-reactive T regulatory cells (Treg) have been previously identified in PV and healthy carriers of PV-associated HLA class II alleles. Ex vivo, Dsg3-specific Treg cells down-regulated the activation of pathogenic Dsg3-specific T-helper (Th) 2 cells. In this study, in a HLA-DRB1*04:02 transgenic mouse model of PV, peripheral Treg cells were modulated by the use of Treg-depleting or expanding monoclonal antibodies, respectively. Our findings show that, in vivo, although not statistically significant, Treg cells exert a clear down-regulatory effect on the Dsg3-driven T-cell response and, accordingly, the formation of Dsg3-specific IgG antibodies. These observations confirm the powerful immune regulatory functions of Treg cells and identify Treg cells as potential therapeutic modulators in PV.

  18. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science.

  19. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... months, and at 3, 4, 5, and 6 years of age. A blood lead level test should be done only if the risk ... recommended if the person is symptomatic at any level below 70 mcg/dL. Because lead will pass through the blood to an unborn child, pregnant ...

  20. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... menopause.) Once the lead is released from the mother's bones, it re-enters the blood stream and ... drinks. Avoid eating off any colorfully painted ceramic plates, and avoid drinking from any ceramic mugs unless ...

  1. Lead Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Environment & Health Healthy Living Pollution Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Science – How It Works The Natural World Games ... OTHERS: Lead has recently been found in some plastic mini-blinds and vertical blinds which were made ...

  2. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  3. Antinuclear antibody panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003535.htm Antinuclear antibody panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The antinuclear antibody panel is a blood test that looks at ...

  4. Lyme disease antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  5. The antibody mining toolbox

    OpenAIRE

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew RM; Kiss, Csaba

    2013-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput ...

  6. Ecotoxicology: Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuhammer, A.M.; Beyer, W.N.; Schmitt, C.J.; Jorgensen, Sven Erik; Fath, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead (Pb) is a naturally occurring metallic element; trace concentrations are found in all environmental media and in all living things. However, certain human activities, especially base metal mining and smelting; combustion of leaded gasoline; the use of Pb in hunting, target shooting, and recreational angling; the use of Pb-based paints; and the uncontrolled disposal of Pb-containing products such as old vehicle batteries and electronic devices have resulted in increased environmental levels of Pb, and have created risks for Pb exposure and toxicity in invertebrates, fish, and wildlife in some ecosystems.

  7. [VGKC-complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-04-01

    Various antibodies are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs). Representative antibodies to VGKCs were first identified by radioimmunoassays using radioisotope-labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were detected only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in patients with Morvan's syndrome and in those with a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins (for example LGI-1 and CASPR-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now commonly known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most commonly detected in patients with limbic encephalitis with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. CASPR-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability. Furthermore, VGKC-complex antibodies are tightly associated with chronic idiopathic pain. Hyperexcitability of nociceptive pathways has also been implicated. These antibodies may be detected in sera of some patients with neurodegenerative diseases (for example, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease).

  8. Lead grids

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    One of the 150 lead grids used in the multiwire proportional chamber g-ray detector. The 0.75 mm diameter holes are spaced 1 mm centre to centre. The grids were made by chemical cutting techniques in the Godet Workshop of the SB Physics.

  9. Leading men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Nielsen, Tønnes

    2016-01-01

    Through a systematic comparison of c. 50 careers leading to the koinarchate or high priesthood of Asia, Bithynia, Galatia, Lycia, Macedonia and coastal Pontus, as described in funeral or honorary inscriptions of individual koinarchs, it is possible to identify common denominators but also...

  10. Generation of HER2 monoclonal antibodies using epitopes of a rabbit polyclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Francis Jingxin; Uhlen, Mathias; Rockberg, Johan

    2014-01-25

    One of the issues in using polyclonal antibodies is the limited amount of reagent available from an immunisation, leading to batch-to-batch variation and difficulties in obtaining the same antibody performance when the same antigen is re-immunised into several separate animals. This led to the development of hybridoma technology allowing, at least theoretically, for an unlimited production of a specific binder. Nevertheless, polyclonal antibodies are widely used in research and diagnostics and there exists a need for robust methods to convert a polyclonal antibody with good binding performance into a renewable monoclonal with identical or similar binding specificity. Here we have used precise information regarding the functional recognition sequence (epitope) of a rabbit polyclonal antibody with attractive binding characteristics as the basis for generation of a renewable mouse monoclonal antibody. First, the original protein fragment antigen was used for immunisation and generation of mouse hybridoma, without obtaining binders to the same epitope region. Instead a peptide designed using the functional epitope and structural information was synthesised and used for hybridoma production. Several of the monoclonal antibodies generated were found to have similar binding characteristics to those of the original polyclonal antibody. These monoclonal antibodies detected native HER2 on cell lines and were also able to stain HER2 in immunohistochemistry using xenografted mice, as well as human normal and cancer tissues.

  11. Thermodynamics of antibody-antigen interaction revealed by mutation analysis of antibody variable regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiba, Hiroki; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2015-07-01

    Antibodies (immunoglobulins) bind specific molecules (i.e. antigens) with high affinity and specificity. In order to understand their mechanisms of recognition, interaction analysis based on thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, as well as structure determination is crucial. In this review, we focus on mutational analysis which gives information about the role of each amino acid residue in antibody-antigen interaction. Taking anti-hen egg lysozyme antibodies and several anti-small molecule antibodies, the energetic contribution of hot-spot and non-hot-spot residues is discussed in terms of thermodynamics. Here, thermodynamics of the contribution from aromatic, charged and hydrogen bond-forming amino acids are discussed, and their different characteristics have been elucidated. The information gives fundamental understanding of the antibody-antigen interaction. Furthermore, the consequences of antibody engineering are analysed from thermodynamic viewpoints: humanization to reduce immunogenicity and rational design to improve affinity. Amino acid residues outside hot-spots in the interface play important roles in these cases, and thus thermodynamic and kinetic parameters give much information about the antigen recognition. Thermodynamic analysis of mutant antibodies thus should lead to advanced strategies to design and select antibodies with high affinity.

  12. Expression of recombinant antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with "human-like" post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications.

  13. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  14. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D'Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew R M

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products.

  15. Hybridization-based antibody cDNA recovery for the production of recombinant antibodies identified by repertoire sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Alemán, Javier; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Ovilla-Muñoz, Marbella; Godoy-Lozano, Elizabeth; Velázquez-Ramírez, Daniel; Valdovinos-Torres, Humberto; Gómez-Barreto, Rosa E; Martinez-Barnetche, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire is enabling a thorough analysis of B cell diversity and clonal selection, which may improve the novel antibody discovery process. Theoretically, an adequate bioinformatic analysis could allow identification of candidate antigen-specific antibodies, requiring their recombinant production for experimental validation of their specificity. Gene synthesis is commonly used for the generation of recombinant antibodies identified in silico. Novel strategies that bypass gene synthesis could offer more accessible antibody identification and validation alternatives. We developed a hybridization-based recovery strategy that targets the complementarity-determining region 3 (CDRH3) for the enrichment of cDNA of candidate antigen-specific antibody sequences. Ten clonal groups of interest were identified through bioinformatic analysis of the heavy chain antibody repertoire of mice immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL). cDNA from eight of the targeted clonal groups was recovered efficiently, leading to the generation of recombinant antibodies. One representative heavy chain sequence from each clonal group recovered was paired with previously reported anti-HEL light chains to generate full antibodies, later tested for HEL-binding capacity. The recovery process proposed represents a simple and scalable molecular strategy that could enhance antibody identification and specificity assessment, enabling a more cost-efficient generation of recombinant antibodies.

  16. Anti-insulin antibody test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test; Insulin resistance - insulin antibodies; Diabetes - insulin antibodies ... You appear to have an allergic response to insulin Insulin no longer seems to control your diabetes

  17. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutteh, William H; Hinote, Candace D

    2014-03-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) are acquired antibodies directed against negatively charged phospholipids. Obstetric antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is diagnosed in the presence of certain clinical features in conjunction with positive laboratory findings. Obstetric APS is one of the most commonly identified causes of recurrent pregnancy loss. Thus, obstetric APS is distinguished from APS in other organ systems where the most common manifestation is thrombosis. Several pathophysiologic mechanisms of action of aPLs have been described. This article discusses the diagnostic and obstetric challenges of obstetric APS, proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms of APS during pregnancy, and the management of women during and after pregnancy.

  18. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  19. Anti-cartilage antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbury, C L; Skingle, J

    1979-08-01

    Antibody to cartilage has been demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence on rat trachea in the serum of about 3% of 1126 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Titres ranged from 1:20 to 1:640. The antibody was not found in 284 patients with primary or secondary osteoarthritis or in 1825 blood donors, nor, with the exception of two weak reactors, in 1314 paraplegic patients. In most cases the antibody appears to be specific for native type II collagen. Using this as an antigen in a haemagglutination test 94% of anti-cartilage sera were positive, whereas among 100 rheumatoid control sera there were only three weak positives. More than 80% of patients with antibody had some erosion of articular cartilage, but there was no correlation with age, sex, duration of disease, nor any recognisable clinical event or change.

  20. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to confirm the cause of thyroid problems, including Hashimoto thyroiditis . The test is also used to find ... positive test may be due to: Granulomatous thyroiditis Hashimoto thyroiditis High levels of these antibodies have also ...

  1. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2. HSV-1 most often causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test ... whether a person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  2. Phage Display for the Generation of Antibodies for Proteome Research, Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hust

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years after its development, antibody phage display using filamentous bacteriophage represents the most successful in vitro antibody selection technology. Initially, its development was encouraged by the unique possibility of directly generating recombinant human antibodies for therapy. Today, antibody phage display has been developed as a robust technology offering great potential for automation. Generation of monospecific binders provides a valuable tool for proteome research, leading to highly enhanced throughput and reduced costs. This review presents the phage display technology, application areas of antibodies in research, diagnostics and therapy and the use of antibody phage display for these applications.

  3. Phage display for the generation of antibodies for proteome research, diagnostics and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirrmann, Thomas; Meyer, Torsten; Schütte, Mark; Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael

    2011-01-10

    Twenty years after its development, antibody phage display using filamentous bacteriophage represents the most successful in vitro antibody selection technology. Initially, its development was encouraged by the unique possibility of directly generating recombinant human antibodies for therapy. Today, antibody phage display has been developed as a robust technology offering great potential for automation. Generation of monospecific binders provides a valuable tool for proteome research, leading to highly enhanced throughput and reduced costs. This review presents the phage display technology, application areas of antibodies in research, diagnostics and therapy and the use of antibody phage display for these applications.

  4. Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia Antibody Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Global Sites Search Help? Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia PF4 Antibody Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Heparin-PF4 Antibody; HIT Antibody; HIT PF4 Antibody; Heparin Induced Antibody; ...

  5. [New antibodies in cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Knuth, A

    2004-09-22

    Since the development of hybridoma technology in 1975 monoclonal antibodies with pre-defined specificity can be produced. Only twenty years later did it become possible to make therapeutic use of monoclonal antibodies in oncology. To this end it was necessary to attach the antigen-binding site of a mouse antibody onto the scaffold of a human antibody molecule. Such chimeric or "humanized" antibodies may be used in passive immunotherapy without eliciting an immune response. Rituximab and trastuzumab are such humanized antibodies. They are used today routinely in the treatment of malignant lymphoma and breast cancer, respectively. These antibodies are usually used in combination with conventional cytostatic anticancer drugs.

  6. Engineering antibodies for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boder, Eric T; Jiang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The advent of modern antibody engineering has led to numerous successes in the application of these proteins for cancer therapy in the 13 years since the first Food and Drug Administration approval, which has stimulated active interest in developing more and better drugs based on these molecules. A wide range of tools for discovering and engineering antibodies has been brought to bear on this challenge in the past two decades. Here, we summarize mechanisms of monoclonal antibody therapeutic activity, challenges to effective antibody-based treatment, existing technologies for antibody engineering, and current concepts for engineering new antibody formats and antibody alternatives as next generation biopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment.

  7. Calciphylaxis in catastrophic antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Surbhi; Larson, Andrew; Datta, Yvonne

    2015-06-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by vascular thrombosis and presence of circulating autoantibodies. The presence of APS can predispose to macrovascular as well as microvascular thrombotic events. Renal involvement is a common occurrence especially in the background of systemic lupus erythematosus. Skin appears to be another frequent target organ and a significant proportion of patients may present with skin lesions at the time of diagnosis. We present the case of a patient who presented with skin necrosis secondary to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome despite being on therapeutic anticoagulation and then developed dystrophic calcification secondary to her renal insufficiency. This complex skin condition eventually leads to her demise, as she was not a candidate for surgical management of these lesions. Why is this important? This case brings to our attention the need to consider calciphylaxis as a cause of ecchymotic-appearing skin lesions in dialysis patients on warfarin in patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

  8. Natural and Man-made Antibody Repertories for Antibody Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C eAlmagro

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are the fastest-growing segment of the biologics market. The success of antibody-based drugs resides in their exquisite specificity, high potency, stability, solubility, safety and relatively inexpensive manufacturing process in comparison with other biologics. We outline here the structural studies and fundamental principles that define how antibodies interact with diverse targets. We also describe the antibody repertoires and affinity maturation mechanisms of human, mice and chickens, plus the use of novel single-domain antibodies in camelids and sharks. These species all utilize diverse evolutionary solutions to generate specific and high affinity antibodies and illustrate the plasticity of natural antibody repertoires. In addition, we discuss the multiple variations of man-made antibody repertoires designed and validated in the last two decades, which have served as tools to explore how the size, diversity and composition of a repertoire impact the antibody discovery process.

  9. [Standardized indirect immunofluorescence. Differentiation of mitochondrial, microsomal and ribosomal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, W

    1977-02-15

    By an extensive standardisation of the indirect immunofluorescence for the demonstration espeially of mitochondrial antibodies we succeeded in recognizing atypical fluorescence patterns and in describing their exact localisation. On the basis of absorption studies with mitochondrias, microsomas and ribosomas by comparative observation of sections of liver, stomach and kidneys of rats the preferred sort of reaction and the intensity of fluorescence of antibodies against mitochondria, microsomas and ribosomas were empirically established. Antimitochondrial antibodies react above all with the parietal cells of the stomach and the distal epithelia of the tubulus of the kidney. Antibodies against microsomas of liver and kidney are characterized by a brilliant diffuse cytoplasmatic fluorescence of the hepatocytes and by a comparatively weaker fluorescence of exclusively proximal tubuli of the kidneys of rats. Antibodies against ribosomas lead to a fluorescence especially of the main cells of the stomach. The differentiation of several cytoplasmatic antibodies is among others of interest for the diagnosis of certain autoimmune diseases. Although there are numerous still unclear findings and "overlap" phenomena the existence of high titre antibodies against mitochondrias speaks for a primarily biliary cirrhosis or a pseudo-LE-syndrome, the existence of antibodies against microsomas of kidney and liver of rats for a special form of a chronically active hepatitis and the existence of the very rare antibodies against ribosomas for an active lupus erythematodes disseminatus.

  10. [Anti-NMDA Receptor Antibody-Related Encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Shigemi; Tanaka, Keiko

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the search for diagnostic antibody markers has drawn considerable attention in relation to autoimmune encephalitis. Among the antibody markers, the most frequently detected is the anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)antibody. Patients with this antibody develop characteristic clinical features. This disease tends to affect young women, and starts with psychiatric symptoms followed by seizures, involuntary movements, autonomic failure, and respiratory failure. Nearly half of these female patients have ovarian teratoma. Some of the patients with anti-NMDAR antibody show atypical clinical features. Approximately 4% show only psychiatric symptoms, which might lead to a diagnosis of malignant catatonia. Other reports describe patients experiencing refractory seizures to have the anti-NMDAR antibody. Some of the antibody-positive patients are associated with demyelinating disorders, and some develop anti-NMDAR encephalitis after recovery from herpes simplex encephalitis. It is important to test the anti-NMDAR antibody in these groups since immunotherapy ameliorates their symptoms. The anti-NMDAR antibody binds to the constitutional epitope at the extracellular domain of GluN1 and disrupts its function. Early introduction of immunotherapy together with tumor resection will results in improvement of neurological symptoms.

  11. Antibody affinity maturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, Mette Louise

    surface expression of various antibody formats in the generated knockout strain. Functional scFv and scFab fragments were efficiently displayed on yeast whereas impaired chain assembly and heavy chain degradation was observed for display of full-length IgG molecules. To identify the optimal polypeptide...... linker for yeast surface display of scFv and scFab fragments, we compared a series of different Gly-Ser-based linkers in display and antigen binding proficiency. We show that these formats of the model antibody can accommodate linkers of different lengths and that introduction of alanine or glutamate...... fragments by in vivo homologous recombination large combinatorial antibody libraries can easily be generated. We have optimized ordered assembly of three CDR fragments into a gapped vector and observed increased transformation efficiency in a yeast strain carrying a deletion of the SGS1 helicase...

  12. Antibody informatics for drug discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shirai, Hiroki; Prades, Catherine; Vita, Randi;

    2014-01-01

    to the antibody science in every project in antibody drug discovery. Recent experimental technologies allow for the rapid generation of large-scale data on antibody sequences, affinity, potency, structures, and biological functions; this should accelerate drug discovery research. Therefore, a robust bioinformatic...... infrastructure for these large data sets has become necessary. In this article, we first identify and discuss the typical obstacles faced during the antibody drug discovery process. We then summarize the current status of three sub-fields of antibody informatics as follows: (i) recent progress in technologies...... for antibody rational design using computational approaches to affinity and stability improvement, as well as ab-initio and homology-based antibody modeling; (ii) resources for antibody sequences, structures, and immune epitopes and open drug discovery resources for development of antibody drugs; and (iii...

  13. Antithyroglobulin Antibodies and Antimicrosomal Antibodies in Various Thyroid Diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gwon Jun; Hong, Key Sak; Choi, Kang Won; Lee, Kyu; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho; Park, Sung Hoe; Chi, Je Geun; Lee, Sang Kook [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-03-15

    The authors investigated the incidence of antithyroglobulin antibodies and antibodies and antimicrosomal antibodies measured by tanned red cell hemagglutination method in subjects suffering from various thyroid disorders. 1) In 15 normal patients, neither suffering from any thyroid diseases nor from any other autoimmune disorders, the antithyroglobulin antibodies were all negative, but the antimicrosomal antibody was positive only in one patient (6.7%). 2) The antithyroglobulin antibodies were positive in 31.5% (34 patients) of 108 patients with various thyroid diseases, and the antimicrosomal antibodies were positive in 37.0% (40 patients). 3) of the 25 patients with Graves' diseases, 7 patients (28.0%) showed positive for the antithyroglobulin antibodies, and 9 (36.0%) for the antimicrosomal antibodies. There was no definite differences in clinical and thyroid functions between the groups with positive and negative results. 4) Both antibodies were positive in 16 (88.9%) and 17 (94.4%) patients respectively among 18 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, all of them were diagnosed histologically. 5) Three out of 33 patients with thyroid adenoma showed positive antibodies, and 3 of 16 patients with thyroid carcinoma revealed positive antibodies. 6) TRCH antibodies demonstrated negative results in 2 patients with subacute thyroiditis, but positive in one patient with idiopathic primary myxedema. 7) The number of patients with high titers(>l:802) was 16 for antithyroglobulin antibody, and 62.5% (10 patients) of which was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Thirteen (65.0) of 20 patients with high titers (>l:802) for antimicrosomal antibody was Hashimoto's thyroiditis. TRCH test is a simple, sensitive method, and has high reliability and reproducibility. The incidences and titers of antithyroglobulin antibody and antimicrosomal antibody are especially high in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

  14. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity...... to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin.Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody...

  15. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-09-11

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  16. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Yu, Rui; Fang, Ting; Yu, Ting; Chi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Shuling; Fu, Ling; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc) as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H) can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose) of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective. PMID:27626445

  17. Tetanus Neurotoxin Neutralizing Antibodies Screened from a Human Immune scFv Antibody Phage Display Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT produced by Clostridium tetani is one of the most poisonous protein substances. Neutralizing antibodies against TeNT can effectively prevent and cure toxicosis. Using purified Hc fragments of TeNT (TeNT-Hc as an antigen, three specific neutralizing antibody clones recognizing different epitopes were selected from a human immune scFv antibody phage display library. The three antibodies (2-7G, 2-2D, and S-4-7H can effectively inhibit the binding between TeNT-Hc and differentiated PC-12 cells in vitro. Moreover, 2-7G inhibited TeNT-Hc binding to the receptor via carbohydrate-binding sites of the W pocket while 2-2D and S-4-7H inhibited binding of the R pocket. Although no single mAb completely protected mice from the toxin, they could both prolong survival when challenged with 20 LD50s (50% of the lethal dose of TeNT. When used together, the mAbs completely neutralized 1000 LD50s/mg Ab, indicating their high neutralizing potency in vivo. Antibodies recognizing different carbohydrate-binding pockets could have higher synergistic toxin neutralization activities than those that recognize the same pockets. These results could lead to further production of neutralizing antibody drugs against TeNT and indicate that using TeNT-Hc as an antigen for screening human antibodies for TeNT intoxication therapy from human immune antibody library was convenient and effective.

  18. Compositions, antibodies, asthma diagnosis methods, and methods for preparing antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongjun; Zangar, Richard C.

    2017-01-17

    Methods for preparing an antibody are provided with the method including incorporating 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid into a protein to form an antigen, immunizing a mammalian host with the antigen, and recovering an antibody having an affinity for the antigen from the host. Antibodies having a binding affinity for a monohalotyrosine are provided as well as composition comprising an antibody bound with monohalotyrosine. Compositions comprising a protein having a 3-bromo-4-hydroxy-benzoic acid moiety are also provided. Methods for evaluating the severity of asthma are provide with the methods including analyzing sputum of a patient using an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of antibody bound to protein. Methods for determining eosinophil activity in bodily fluid are also provided with the methods including exposing bodily fluid to an antibody having a binding affinity for monohalotyrosine, and measuring the amount of bound antibody to determine the eosinophil activity.

  19. Human germline antibody gene segments encode polyspecific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jordan R; Briney, Bryan S; DeLuca, Samuel L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Structural flexibility in germline gene-encoded antibodies allows promiscuous binding to diverse antigens. The binding affinity and specificity for a particular epitope typically increase as antibody genes acquire somatic mutations in antigen-stimulated B cells. In this work, we investigated whether germline gene-encoded antibodies are optimal for polyspecificity by determining the basis for recognition of diverse antigens by antibodies encoded by three VH gene segments. Panels of somatically mutated antibodies encoded by a common VH gene, but each binding to a different antigen, were computationally redesigned to predict antibodies that could engage multiple antigens at once. The Rosetta multi-state design process predicted antibody sequences for the entire heavy chain variable region, including framework, CDR1, and CDR2 mutations. The predicted sequences matched the germline gene sequences to a remarkable degree, revealing by computational design the residues that are predicted to enable polyspecificity, i.e., binding of many unrelated antigens with a common sequence. The process thereby reverses antibody maturation in silico. In contrast, when designing antibodies to bind a single antigen, a sequence similar to that of the mature antibody sequence was returned, mimicking natural antibody maturation in silico. We demonstrated that the Rosetta computational design algorithm captures important aspects of antibody/antigen recognition. While the hypervariable region CDR3 often mediates much of the specificity of mature antibodies, we identified key positions in the VH gene encoding CDR1, CDR2, and the immunoglobulin framework that are critical contributors for polyspecificity in germline antibodies. Computational design of antibodies capable of binding multiple antigens may allow the rational design of antibodies that retain polyspecificity for diverse epitope binding.

  20. Prediction of antibody persistency from antibody titres to natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Poul Erik H; Koch-Henriksen, Nils; Sellebjerg, Finn Thorup;

    2012-01-01

    In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients.......In a subgroup of patients with multiple sclerosis natalizumab therapy causes generation of anti-natalizumab antibodies that may be transient or persistent. It is recommended to discontinue natalizumab therapy in persistently antibody-positive patients....

  1. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  2. Antibody Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What do I do if I have a negative blood test (or panel) but I’m still having symptoms? While it is rare, it is possible for patients to have a negative antibody test results and still have celiac disease. ...

  3. RBC Antibody Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... test also may be used to help diagnose autoimmune-related hemolytic anemia in conjunction with a DAT. This condition may be caused when a person produces antibodies against his or her own RBC antigens. This can happen with some autoimmune disorders , such as lupus , with diseases such as ...

  4. Heparin platelet factor 4 antibody positivity in pseudothrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcik, Ozlem Sahin; Akdeniz, Derya; Cipil, Handan; Uysal, Sema; Isik, Ayse; Kosar, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP) is a laboratory event of platelet clustering related to drugs used for anticoagulation. This condition is engendered by autoantibodies against platelets in usually EDTA-anticoagulated blood. Pseudothrombocytopenia has no clinical significance but when evaluated as true thrombocytopenia, this misconception may lead to unnecessary diagnostic procedures. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia with thrombosis (HITT) is a complication of heparin treatment caused by heparin platelet factor 4 (HPF-4) antibodies, leading to platelet activation and hypercoagulability. In our study, 48 patients with PTCP and 36 healthy volunteers were included. Heparin platelet factor 4 antibody positivity was detected in 12 patients from PTCP group; nobody from control group had. Citrated serum samples and peripheral blood smears showed normal platelet count. Of the 4 patients using heparin derivative, 1 (2.1%) had antibody positivity but without any bleeding symptoms. In conclusion, HPF-4 antibody positivity might be a risk factor for PTCP. Clinicians should be aware of this kind of condition.

  5. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome? Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody ... weeks or months. This condition is called catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). People who have APS also are at ...

  6. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; RBC ... I should know? How is it used? Red blood cell (RBC) antibody identification is used as a follow- ...

  7. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  8. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the presence ...

  9. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A.; Burton, Dennis R.; Adams, Gregory P.; Weiner, Louis M.; Scott, Jamie K.; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M.

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Bi...

  10. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The role of proteins as very effective immunogens for the generation of antibodies is indisputable. Nevertheless, cases in which protein usage for antibody production is not feasible or convenient compelled the creation of a powerful alternative consisting of synthetic peptides. Synthetic peptides...... can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  11. Lead Poisoning Prevention Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or removed safely. How are children exposed to lead? Lead-based paint and lead contaminated dust are ... What can be done to prevent exposure to lead? It is important to determine the construction year ...

  12. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us As ... and protect aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. Lead (Pb) Air Pollution Lead Air Pollution Basics How does lead get ...

  13. Antiphospholipid Antibody and Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴竞生

    2008-01-01

    @@ Antiphospholipid antibodies (APA) APA is a big category for all kinds of negative charge phospholipid or lecithin - a protein complex autoantibodies or the same antibody, through its recognition of antigen (target protein) different, and phospholipids or lecithin - protein complex combination of various rely on the interference Phospholipid clotting and anti-coagulation factor, and promote endothelial cells, platelets, complement activation and play a role. APA including lupus anticoagulant(LA) and anticardiolipin antibody (ACA), In addition, there are anti-β2 glycoprotein-I (β2-GPI) antibody, anti-prothrombin (a- PT) antibody, anti-lysophosphatidic acid antibody and anti-phosphatidylserine antibody, and so on. APA as the main target of phospholipid-binding protein, including β2-GPI, prothrombin, annexin, protein C (PC) and protein S (PS), plasminogen, and so on.

  14. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future.

  15. Monoclonal antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-05-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics.

  16. Defining the recognition elements of Lewis Y-reactive antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somdutta Saha

    Full Text Available Antibody response to carbohydrate antigens is often independent of T cells and the process of affinity/specificity improvement is considered strictly dependent on the germinal centers. Antibodies induced during a T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2 response are less variable and less functionally versatile than those induced with T cell help. The antigen specificity consequences of accumulation of somatic mutations in antibodies during TI-2 responses of Marginal Zone (MZ B cells is a fact that still needs explanation. Germline genes that define carbohydrate-reactive antibodies are known to sculpt antibody-combining sites containing innate, key side-chain contacts that define the antigen recognition step. However, substitutions associated with MZ B cell derived antibodies might affect the mobility and polyspecificity of the antibody. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed antibodies reactive with the neolactoseries antigen Lewis Y (LeY to define the residue subset required for the reactive repertoire for the LeY antigen. Our molecular simulation studies of crystallographically determined and modeled antibody-LeY complexes suggests that the heavy-chain germline gene VH7183.a13.20 and the light-chain Vκ cr1 germline gene are sufficient to account for the recognition of the trisaccharide-H determinant Types 1-4, while the specificity for LeY is driven by the CDR3 backbone conformation of the heavy chain and not the side chain interactions. These results confirm that these monoclonals use germline-encoded amino acids to recognize simple carbohydrate determinants like trisaccharide-H but relies on somatic mutations in the periphery of the combining site to modify affinity for LeY through electrostatic interactions that leads to their optimized binding. These observations bring further attention to the role of mutations in T-cell independent antibodies to distinguish self from non-self carbohydrate antigens.

  17. Defining the Recognition Elements of Lewis Y-Reactive Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somdutta; Pashov, Anastas; Siegel, Eric R.; Murali, Ramachandran; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Antibody response to carbohydrate antigens is often independent of T cells and the process of affinity/specificity improvement is considered strictly dependent on the germinal centers. Antibodies induced during a T cell-independent type 2 (TI-2) response are less variable and less functionally versatile than those induced with T cell help. The antigen specificity consequences of accumulation of somatic mutations in antibodies during TI-2 responses of Marginal Zone (MZ) B cells is a fact that still needs explanation. Germline genes that define carbohydrate-reactive antibodies are known to sculpt antibody-combining sites containing innate, key side-chain contacts that define the antigen recognition step. However, substitutions associated with MZ B cell derived antibodies might affect the mobility and polyspecificity of the antibody. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed antibodies reactive with the neolactoseries antigen Lewis Y (LeY) to define the residue subset required for the reactive repertoire for the LeY antigen. Our molecular simulation studies of crystallographically determined and modeled antibody-LeY complexes suggests that the heavy-chain germline gene VH7183.a13.20 and the light-chain Vκ cr1 germline gene are sufficient to account for the recognition of the trisaccharide-H determinant Types 1–4, while the specificity for LeY is driven by the CDR3 backbone conformation of the heavy chain and not the side chain interactions. These results confirm that these monoclonals use germline-encoded amino acids to recognize simple carbohydrate determinants like trisaccharide-H but relies on somatic mutations in the periphery of the combining site to modify affinity for LeY through electrostatic interactions that leads to their optimized binding. These observations bring further attention to the role of mutations in T-cell independent antibodies to distinguish self from non-self carbohydrate antigens. PMID:25117628

  18. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed.

  19. The antibody Hijikata Tatsumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éden Peretta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered one of the most influential modern dance representatives in Japan, Tatsumi Hijikata’s work was a milestone in the Japanese post-war experimental artistic scene. Heretic son of his time, he staged a fertile mix of artistic and cultural influences, overlapping subversive elements of European arts and philosophy with radical references from pre-modern Japanese culture. In this way he built the foundations of its unstable antibody, its political-artistic project of dissolution of a organism, both physical and social.

  20. Lead and the Romans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who consumed the…

  1. Lead and the Romans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Aravind; Braun, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    Lead poisoning has been a problem since early history and continues into modern times. An appealing characteristic of lead is that many lead salts are sweet. In the absence of cane and beet sugars, early Romans used "sugar of lead" (lead acetate) to sweeten desserts, fruits, and sour wine. People most at risk would have been those who…

  2. Cancer imaging with radiolabeled antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldenberg, D.M. (Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology, Newark, NJ (US))

    1990-01-01

    This book presents a perspective of the use of antibodies to target diagnostic isotopes to tumors. Antibodies with reasonable specificity can be developed against almost any substance. If selective targeting to cancer cells can be achieved, the prospects for a selective therapy are equally intriguing. But the development of cancer detection, or imaging, with radiolabeled antibodies has depended upon advances in a number of different areas, including cancer immunology and immunochemistry for identifying suitable antigen targets and antibodies to these targets, tumor biology for model systems, radiochemistry for he attachment of radionuclides to antibodies, molecular biology for reengineering the antibodies for safer and more effective use in humans, and nuclear medicine for providing the best imaging protocols and instrumentation to detect minute amounts of elevated radioactivity against a background of considerable noise. Accordingly, this book has been organized to address the advances that are being made in many of these areas.

  3. VIRAL ANTIBODIES IN PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saidi

    1974-08-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sera from children 1 - 6 years of age, representative of a large serum collection, were tested for the prevalence of antibodies against different viruses. Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI antibodies were found in 68% for measles; 61 % for rubella; 75'% for influenza A2/Hong Kong/68, 16% for influenza B/Md./59, 0% for group A arboviruses, 10% for group B arboviruses, 3% for phlebotomus fever group and 4% for Congo-Crimean hemorrhagic fever (C-CHF group of arboviruses Poliomyelitis-neutralizing antibodies for type 1, 2 and 3 were 90%; 85% and 84%~ respectively. Antibody to EH virus was detected in 84% of the sera by immuno-fluorescence. None of the sera were positive for hepatitis-B antigen or antibody by immuno-precipitation test. The prevalence of some viral antibodies found in this survey are compared with results obtained from surveys in other parts of the country.

  4. Immunoblotting with monoclonal antibodies: importance of the blocking solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, H P; Bucher, K

    1986-12-01

    Four commonly used blocking agents, i.e., fetal calf serum, mammalian gelatin-Nonidet-P40, fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40, and defatted powdered milk were compared with respect to their efficiency to block the nonspecific background and to promote maximal immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human intestinal sucrase-isomaltase during immunoblotting. Two of five monoclonal antibodies were found to react with the electroblotted enzyme. However, one of the reacting antibodies gave optimal results with fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40 and the other with defatted powdered milk, while fetal calf serum lead to unacceptably high backgrounds. The results suggest that some of the difficulties encountered with monoclonal antibodies in immunoblotting may be due to inappropriate blocking conditions.

  5. Jinde Lead lead smelting project starts construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>On Dec.20,the lead smelting project of Jiangxi Jinde Lead started construction in Dexin as a technical renovation project on environmental treatment of Jiangxi Metallurgical Group.The project is the one with the largest investment of Provincial Metallurgical Group in non-ferrous

  6. Lead - nutritional considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead poisoning - nutritional considerations; Toxic metal - nutritional considerations ... Markowitz M. Lead poisoning. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, ... Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. ...

  7. Antibodies against antibodies: immunogenicity of adalimumab as a model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schouwenburg, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Upon repeated adalimumab exposure part of the patients start to produce ADA. The antibody response is polyclonal and consists mainly of antibodies of IgG1 and IgG4 isotype. In the majority of ADA positive patients ADA are already produced within the first 28 weeks of treatment and in part of the pat

  8. Broad epitope coverage of a human in vitro antibody library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Arvind; Lynaugh, Heather; Yu, Yao; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Schutz, Kevin; Piffath, Crystal; Boland, Nadthakarn; Durand, Stéphanie; Boland, Todd; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Xu, Yingda; Abdiche, Yasmina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful discovery of therapeutic antibodies hinges on the identification of appropriate affinity binders targeting a diversity of molecular epitopes presented by the antigen. Antibody campaigns that yield such broad “epitope coverage” increase the likelihood of identifying candidates with the desired biological functions. Accordingly, epitope binning assays are employed in the early discovery stages to partition antibodies into epitope families or “bins” and prioritize leads for further characterization and optimization. The collaborative program described here, which used hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) as a model antigen, combined 3 key capabilities: 1) access to a diverse panel of antibodies selected from a human in vitro antibody library; 2) application of state-of-the-art high-throughput epitope binning; and 3) analysis and interpretation of the epitope binning data with reference to an exhaustive set of published antibody:HEL co-crystal structures. Binning experiments on a large merged panel of antibodies containing clones from the library and the literature revealed that the inferred epitopes for the library clones overlapped with, and extended beyond, the known structural epitopes. Our analysis revealed that nearly the entire solvent-exposed surface of HEL is antigenic, as has been proposed for protein antigens in general. The data further demonstrated that synthetic antibody repertoires provide as wide epitope coverage as those obtained from animal immunizations. The work highlights molecular insights contributed by increasingly higher-throughput binning methods and their broad utility to guide the discovery of therapeutic antibodies representing a diverse set of functional epitopes. PMID:27748644

  9. Anti-microbial antibodies in celiac disease: Trick or treat?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Papp; Ildiko Foldi; Istvan Altorjay; Eszter Palyu; Miklos Udvardy; Judit Tumpek; Sandor Sipka; Ilma Rita Korponay-Szabo; Eva Nemes; Gabor Veres; Tamas Dinya; Attila Tordai; Hajnalka Andrikovics; Gary L Norman; Peter Laszlo Lakatos

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of a new set of anti-glycan and anti-outer membrane protein (anti- OMP) antibodies in a Hungarian cohort of adult Celiac disease (CD) patients. METHODS: 190 consecutive CD patients [M/F: 71/119, age:39.9 (SD:14.1) years], 100 healthy, and 48 gastrointestinal controls were tested for glycan anti- Saccharomyces cerevisiae (gASCA), anti-laminaribioside (ALCA), anti-chitobioside, anti-mannobioside, anti-OMP antibodies and major NOD2/CARD15 mutations. Thirty out of 82 CD patients enrolled at the time of diagnosis were re-evaluated for the same antibodies after longstanding gluten-free diet (GFD).RESULTS: 65.9% of the CD patients were positive for at least one of the tested antibodies at the time of the diagnosis. Except anti-OMP and ALCA, antimicrobial antibodies were exclusively seen in untreated CD; however, the overall sensitivity was low. Any glycan positivity (LR+: 3.13; 95% CI: 2.08-4.73)was associated with an increased likelihood ratio for diagnosing CD. Significant correlation was found between the levels of anti-glycan and anti-endomysial or anti-transglutaminase antibodies. Anti-glycan positivity was lost after longstanding GFD. Anti-glycan antibody titers were associated with symptoms at presentation, but not the presence of NOD2/CARD15 mutations. Patients with severe malabsorption more frequently had multiple antibodies at diagnosis ( P = 0.019).CONCLUSION: The presence of anti-glycan antibodies in CD seems to be secondary to the impaired small bowel mucosa which can lead to increased antigen presentation.Furthermore, anti-glycan positivity may be considered an additional marker of CD and dietary adherence.

  10. Cryogenic current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zizek, F.

    1982-01-01

    Theoretical, technical and design questions are examined of cryogenic current leads for SP of magnetic systems. Simplified mathematical models are presented for the current leads. To illustrate modeling, the calculation is made of the real current leads for 500 A and three variants of current leads for 1500 A for the enterprise ''Shkoda.''

  11. Educational paper: Primary antibody deficiencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); M. van der Burg (Mirjam)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies and are characterized by a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen-specific antibodies. PADs represent a heterogeneous spectrum of conditions, ranging from often asymptomatic selective IgA a

  12. Targeting of Antibodies using Aptamers

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    The chapter presents a methodology for the rapid selection of aptamers against antibody targets. It is a detailed account of the various methodological steps that describe the selection of aptamers, including PCR steps, buffers to be used, target immobilisation, partitioning and amplification of aptamers, clonning and sequencing, to results in high affinity and specificity ligands for the chosen target antibody.

  13. New engineered antibodies against prions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  14. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed.

  15. Dengue virus antibodies enhance Zika virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Lauren M; Carlin, Eric R; Jenkins, Meagan M; Tan, Amanda L; Barcellona, Carolyn M; Nicholson, Cindo O; Michael, Scott F; Isern, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    For decades, human infections with Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-transmitted flavivirus, were sporadic, associated with mild disease, and went underreported since symptoms were similar to other acute febrile diseases. Recent reports of severe disease associated with ZIKV have greatly heightened awareness. It is anticipated that ZIKV will continue to spread in the Americas and globally where competent Aedes mosquito vectors are found. Dengue virus (DENV), the most common mosquito-transmitted human flavivirus, is both well-established and the source of outbreaks in areas of recent ZIKV introduction. DENV and ZIKV are closely related, resulting in substantial antigenic overlap. Through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE), anti-DENV antibodies can enhance the infectivity of DENV for certain classes of immune cells, causing increased viral production that correlates with severe disease outcomes. Similarly, ZIKV has been shown to undergo ADE in response to antibodies generated by other flaviviruses. We tested the neutralizing and enhancing potential of well-characterized broadly neutralizing human anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) and human DENV immune sera against ZIKV using neutralization and ADE assays. We show that anti-DENV HMAbs, cross-react, do not neutralize, and greatly enhance ZIKV infection in vitro. DENV immune sera had varying degrees of neutralization against ZIKV and similarly enhanced ZIKV infection. Our results suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity may enhance ZIKV infection in vivo and may lead to increased disease severity. Understanding the interplay between ZIKV and DENV will be critical in informing public health responses and will be particularly valuable for ZIKV and DENV vaccine design and implementation strategies. PMID:28090318

  16. Antibodies to Phospholipids and Liposomes: Binding of Antibodies to Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    LIPOSOMES: BINDING OF ANTIBODIES TO CELLS 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) W.E. FOGLER , G. M. SWARTZ, AND C.R. ALVING 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE...Elsevier BBA 73693 Antibodies to phospholipids and liposomes: binding of antibodies to cells William E. Fogler *, Glenn M. Swartz, Jr. and Carl R. Alving...Immunol. 21. Research Associateship from the U.S. National 12863-86812Hall. T. and Esser, K. (1984) 3. Immunol. 132. 2059-2063 Research Council. 13 Fogler

  17. Simultaneous expression of displayed and secreted antibodies for antibody screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanping Zhou

    Full Text Available The display of full-length antibody on the cell surface was achieved by fusing a transmembrane domain of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR to the C-terminus of the heavy chain constant region. We also incorporated a furin cleavage site between the constant region and PDGFR transmembrane domain to obtain secreted antibodies. As a result, antibodies can be expressed simultaneously on the cell surface in a membrane-anchored version for screening and selecting through fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analysis, as well as in conditioned medium in a secreted version for function analysis.

  18. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFranco, Anthony L

    2016-01-01

    The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1.

  19. [Neutralizing Monoclonal and Chimeric Antibodies to Human IFN-γ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, M V; Aliev, T K; Solopova, O N; Pozdnyakova, L P; Korobova, S V; Yakimov, S A; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autoiminune disorders are chronic diseases characterized by abnormal immune response directed against self-antigens that leads to tissue damage and violation of its normal functioning. Such diseases often result in disability or even death of patients. Nowadays a number of monoclonal antibodies to pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors are successfully used for the targeted treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the perspective targets in autoimmune disease therapy is interferon gamma, a key cytokine in Th1 cells differentiation, activation of macrophages, and inflammation. In the present work, 5 monoclonal antibodies to human IFN-γ were obtained. For the development of potential therapeutic agent, we have performed neutralizing activity and affinity analysis of the antibodies. Based on the data obtained, the monoclonal antibody F1 was selected. This antibody has a dissociation constant 1.7 x 10(-9) M and IC90 = 8.9 ± 2.0 nM measured upon antibody inhibition of the IFN-γ-induced HLA-DR expression on the surface of U937 cells. We have constructed a bicistronic vector for the production of recombinant chimeric Fab fragment F1 chim in E. coli cells. The recombinant chimeric Fab fragment Fl chim neutralizes IFN-γ activity in vitro and has a dissociation constant 1.8 x 10(-9) M.

  20. Opportunities for functional selectivity in GPCR antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, David R; Handel, Tracy M; Kretz-Rommel, Anke; Stevens, Raymond C

    2013-01-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been used for decades as tools to probe the biology and pharmacology of receptors in cells and tissues. They are also increasingly being developed for clinical purposes against a broad range of targets, albeit to a lesser extent for G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) relative to other therapeutic targets. Recent pharmacological, structural and biophysical data have provided a great deal of new insight into the molecular details, complexity and regulation of GPCR function. Whereas GPCRs used to be viewed as having either "on" or "off" conformational states, it is now recognized that their structures may be finely tuned by ligands and other interacting proteins, leading to the selective activation of specific signaling pathways. This information coupled with new technologies for the selection of mAbs targeting GPCRs will be increasingly deployed for the development of highly selective mAbs that recognize conformational determinants leading to novel therapeutics.

  1. Rapid Lead Screening Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vitro Diagnostics Tests Used In Clinical Care Rapid Lead Screening Test Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reducing the need for a follow-up visit. Lead Risk Links Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ( ...

  2. Lead and tap water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water contaminated with lead ... The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitors drinking water in the United States. It requires water suppliers to produce annual water quality reports. These reports include information about lead amounts, and they ...

  3. Exposures to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callan, Anna C; Hinwood, Andrea L

    2011-01-01

    The Pacific Basin Consortium for Environment and Health hosted a workshop on Exposures to Lead. Speakers from Australia and the United States of America addressed current research knowledge on lead exposures and health effects in children, risk assessment and communication issues in dealing with lead exposure sources, different methods for assessing exposure, and the variety of scenarios where lead still remains a pollutant of concern. Mining continues to be a source of lead for many communities, and approaches to reducing exposures in these settings present particular challenges. A Perth Declaration for the Global Reduction of Childhood Lead Exposure was signed by participants of the meeting and is aimed at increasing attention to the need to continue to assess lead in the environment and to develop strategies to reduce lead in the environment and exposure by communities.

  4. Lead and Your Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who works with lead, like in auto repair, construction or in a plant that makes paint, batteries, ... who works with lead, like in auto repair, construction or in a plant that makes paint, batteries, ...

  5. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... organs and tissues that need it, thus causing anemia. Most lead ends up in the bone, where it causes ... vomiting or nausea constipation pallor (pale skin) from ... look for lead poisoning or other health problems. Treatment Treatment for ...

  6. Fusion proteins of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 with CD4-induced antibodies showed enhanced binding to CD4 and CD4 binding site antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizao, E-mail: chenw3@mail.nih.gov [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Feng, Yang [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Wang, Yanping [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); The Basic Research Program, Science Applications International Corporation-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Dimiter S. [Protein Interactions Group, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some recombinant HIV-1 gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We hypothesize that CD4i antibodies could induce conformational changes in gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibodies enhance binding of CD4 and CD4bs antibodies to gp120. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4i antibody-gp120 fusion proteins could have potential as vaccine immunogens. -- Abstract: Development of successful AIDS vaccine immunogens continues to be a major challenge. One of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 evades antibody-mediated neutralizing responses is the remarkable conformational flexibility of its envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120. Some recombinant gp120s do not preserve their conformations on gp140s and functional viral spikes, and exhibit decreased recognition by CD4 and neutralizing antibodies. CD4 binding induces conformational changes in gp120 leading to exposure of the coreceptor-binding site (CoRbs). In this study, we test our hypothesis that CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies, which target the CoRbs, could also induce conformational changes in gp120 leading to better exposed conserved neutralizing antibody epitopes including the CD4-binding site (CD4bs). We found that a mixture of CD4i antibodies with gp120 only weakly enhanced CD4 binding. However, such interactions in single-chain fusion proteins resulted in gp120 conformations which bound to CD4 and CD4bs antibodies better than the original or mutagenically stabilized gp120s. Moreover, the two molecules in the fusion proteins synergized with each other in neutralizing HIV-1. Therefore, fusion proteins of gp120 with CD4i antibodies could have potential as components of HIV-1 vaccines and inhibitors of HIV-1 entry, and could be used as reagents to explore the conformational flexibility of gp120 and mechanisms of entry and immune evasion.

  7. Occupational lead poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Ramírez, Augusto V; Médico del Trabajo. American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.

    2013-01-01

    Lead, a ubiquitous heavy metal, has been found in places as unlikely as Greenland’s fossil ice. Egyptians and Hebrews used it. In Spain, Phoenicians c. 2000 BC worked ores of lead. At the end of the XX century, occupational lead’s poisoning became a public health problem in developed countries. In non-developed countries occupational lead poisoning is still frequent. Diagnosis is directed to recognize lead existence at the labor environment and good clinical and occupational documentation. Di...

  8. NA49: lead-lead collision

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    This is an image of an actual lead ion collision taken from tracking detectors on the NA49 experiment, part of the heavy ion project at CERN. These collisions produce a very complicated array of hadrons as the heavy ions break up. It is hoped that one of these collisions will eventually create a new state of matter known as quark-gluon plasma.

  9. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can...... elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity...

  10. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  11. Machine learning methods enable predictive modeling of antibody feature:function relationships in RV144 vaccinees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ickwon Choi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune response to vaccination or infection can lead to the production of specific antibodies to neutralize the pathogen or recruit innate immune effector cells for help. The non-neutralizing role of antibodies in stimulating effector cell responses may have been a key mechanism of the protection observed in the RV144 HIV vaccine trial. In an extensive investigation of a rich set of data collected from RV144 vaccine recipients, we here employ machine learning methods to identify and model associations between antibody features (IgG subclass and antigen specificity and effector function activities (antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis, cellular cytotoxicity, and cytokine release. We demonstrate via cross-validation that classification and regression approaches can effectively use the antibody features to robustly predict qualitative and quantitative functional outcomes. This integration of antibody feature and function data within a machine learning framework provides a new, objective approach to discovering and assessing multivariate immune correlates.

  12. Palatal insufficiency as isolated sign of GQ1b antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhelst, Helene; Maes, Michaela; Deblaere, Karel; Van Coster, Rudy

    2011-04-01

    Antiganglioside GQ1b antibodies mediate a continuum of disorders with overlapping features, fostering the concept of anti-GQ1b antibody syndrome. We present a patient whose palatal insufficiency was the only clinical sign of postinfectious GQ1b antibody syndrome. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging confirmed involvement of the glossopharyngeal nerve and vagus nerve bilaterally, revealing gadolinium enhancement of both nerves bilaterally and thickening of the left nervus vagus. Magnetic resonance imaging may help in diagnosing postinfectious GQ1b antibody syndrome, especially at early stages and in monosymptomatic patients. Early diagnosis may lead to early therapy, resulting in a milder disease course by preventing further deterioration leading to the ataxia and ophthalmoplegia usually observed in patients with postinfectious GQ1b antibody syndrome.

  13. Identifying the Conditions Under Which Antibodies Protect Against Infection by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa J. Schwartz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the conditions under which antibodies protect against viral infection would transform our approach to vaccine development. A more complete understanding is needed of antibody protection against lentivirus infection, as well as the role of mutation in resistance to an antibody vaccine. Recently, an example of antibody-mediated vaccine protection has been shown via passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies before equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV infection of horses with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID. Viral dynamic modeling of antibody protection from EIAV infection in SCID horses may lead to insights into the mechanisms of control of infection by antibody vaccination. In this work, such a model is constructed in conjunction with data from EIAV infection of SCID horses to gain insights into multiple strain competition in the presence of antibody control. Conditions are determined under which wild-type infection is eradicated with the antibody vaccine. In addition, a three-strain competition model is considered in which a second mutant strain may coexist with the first mutant strain. The conditions that permit viral escape by the mutant strains are determined, as are the effects of variation in the model parameters. This work extends the current understanding of competition and antibody control in lentiviral infection, which may provide insights into the development of vaccines that stimulate the immune system to control infection effectively.

  14. Co-evolution of a broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibody and founder virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Lynch, Rebecca; Zhou, Tongqing; Gao, Feng; Alam, S Munir; Boyd, Scott D; Fire, Andrew Z; Roskin, Krishna M; Schramm, Chaim A; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhu, Jiang; Shapiro, Lawrence; Mullikin, James C; Gnanakaran, S; Hraber, Peter; Wiehe, Kevin; Kelsoe, Garnett; Yang, Guang; Xia, Shi-Mao; Montefiori, David C; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey E; Scearce, Richard M; Soderberg, Kelly A; Cohen, Myron; Kamanga, Gift; Louder, Mark K; Tran, Lillian M; Chen, Yue; Cai, Fangping; Chen, Sheri; Moquin, Stephanie; Du, Xiulian; Joyce, M Gordon; Srivatsan, Sanjay; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H; Kepler, Thomas B; Korber, Bette T M; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R; Haynes, Barton F

    2013-04-25

    Current human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) vaccines elicit strain-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies arise in approximately 20% of HIV-1-infected individuals, and details of their generation could provide a blueprint for effective vaccination. Here we report the isolation, evolution and structure of a broadly neutralizing antibody from an African donor followed from the time of infection. The mature antibody, CH103, neutralized approximately 55% of HIV-1 isolates, and its co-crystal structure with the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 revealed a new loop-based mechanism of CD4-binding-site recognition. Virus and antibody gene sequencing revealed concomitant virus evolution and antibody maturation. Notably, the unmutated common ancestor of the CH103 lineage avidly bound the transmitted/founder HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, and evolution of antibody neutralization breadth was preceded by extensive viral diversification in and near the CH103 epitope. These data determine the viral and antibody evolution leading to induction of a lineage of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies, and provide insights into strategies to elicit similar antibodies by vaccination.

  15. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng Chen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction.

  16. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 ScFv Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    ECBC-TR-1356 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR ANTIBODY CHARACTERIZATION...From - To) Oct 2010 – Sep 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization...Arlington, VA 22203-2114 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) DARPA 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT

  17. ALICE: Simulated lead-lead collision

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This track is an example of simulated data modelled for the ALICE detector on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, which will begin taking data in 2008. ALICE will focus on the study of collisions between nuclei of lead, a heavy element that produces many different particles when collided. It is hoped that these collisions will produce a new state of matter known as the quark-gluon plasma, which existed billionths of a second after the Big Bang.

  18. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) might contaminate murine monoclonal antibodies after purification on protein G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Jörg A; Fettke, Joerg; Lenz, Christine; Albers, Katharina; Mallwitz, Frank; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Ehrentreich-Förster, Eva; Kusch, Emely; Sellrie, Frank

    2012-03-31

    The large scale production of a monoclonal anti-progesterone antibody in serum free medium followed by affinity chromatography on protein G lead to a contamination of the antibody sample with a protein of about 14 kDa. This protein was identified by mass spectrometry as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). This SLPI contamination lead to a failure of the fiber-optic based competitive fluorescence assay to detect progesterone in milk. Purification of the monoclonal antibody using protein A columns circumvented this problem.

  19. Evolution of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baviskar, Rutuja R; Amonkar, Gayathri P; Chaudhary, Vinod A; Balasubramanian, Meenakshi; Mohite, Shailesh C; Puranik, Gururaj V

    2012-12-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a very important cause of cerebral infarction, myocardial infarction, and repeated pregnancy losses in women. We present an extremely rare case of a 44-year-old man with antiphospholipid syndrome who collapsed and died suddenly. At autopsy, he was found to have both cerebral and myocardial infarction. In all young patients with cerebral infarction, myocardial infarction, pulmonary embolism, recurrent miscarriages, and unexplained low platelet count, one must consider the strong possibility of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

  20. Antibodies to watch in 2016

    OpenAIRE

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, ar...

  1. Tabhu: tools for antibody humanization.

    KAUST Repository

    Olimpieri, Pier Paolo

    2014-10-09

    SUMMARY: Antibodies are rapidly becoming essential tools in the clinical practice, given their ability to recognize their cognate antigens with high specificity and affinity, and a high yield at reasonable costs in model animals. Unfortunately, when administered to human patients, xenogeneic antibodies can elicit unwanted and dangerous immunogenic responses. Antibody humanization methods are designed to produce molecules with a better safety profile still maintaining their ability to bind the antigen. This can be accomplished by grafting the non-human regions determining the antigen specificity into a suitable human template. Unfortunately, this procedure may results in a partial or complete loss of affinity of the grafted molecule that can be restored by back-mutating some of the residues of human origin to the corresponding murine ones. This trial-and-error procedure is hard and involves expensive and time-consuming experiments. Here we present tools for antibody humanization (Tabhu) a web server for antibody humanization. Tabhu includes tools for human template selection, grafting, back-mutation evaluation, antibody modelling and structural analysis, helping the user in all the critical steps of the humanization experiment protocol. AVAILABILITY: http://www.biocomputing.it/tabhu CONTACT: anna.tramontano@uniroma1.it, pierpaolo.olimpieri@uniroma1.it SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  2. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  3. Lead-Free Piezoelectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Nahm, Sahn

    2012-01-01

    Ecological restrictions in many parts of the world are demanding the elimination of Pb from all consumer items. At this moment in the piezoelectric ceramics industry, there is no issue of more importance than the transition to lead-free materials. The goal of Lead-Free Piezoelectrics is to provide a comprehensive overview of the fundamentals and developments in the field of lead-free materials and products to leading researchers in the world. The text presents chapters on demonstrated applications of the lead-free materials, which will allow readers to conceptualize the present possibilities and will be useful for both students and professionals conducting research on ferroelectrics, piezoelectrics, smart materials, lead-free materials, and a variety of applications including sensors, actuators, ultrasonic transducers and energy harvesters.

  4. Lead Poison Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    With NASA contracts, Whittaker Corporations Space Science division has developed an electro-optical instrument to mass screen for lead poisoning. Device is portable and detects protoporphyrin in whole blood. Free corpuscular porphyrins occur as an early effect of lead ingestion. Also detects lead in urine used to confirm blood tests. Test is inexpensive and can be applied by relatively unskilled personnel. Similar Whittaker fluorometry device called "drug screen" can measure morphine and quinine in urine much faster and cheaper than other methods.

  5. Validating Antibodies to the Cannabinoid CB2 Receptor: Antibody Sensitivity Is Not Evidence of Antibody Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchalant, Yannick; Brownjohn, Philip W; Bonnet, Amandine; Kleffmann, Torsten; Ashton, John C

    2014-06-01

    Antibody-based methods for the detection and quantification of membrane integral proteins, in particular, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), have been plagued with issues of primary antibody specificity. In this report, we investigate one of the most commonly utilized commercial antibodies for the cannabinoid CB2 receptor, a GPCR, using immunoblotting in combination with mass spectrometry. In this way, we were able to develop powerful negative and novel positive controls. By doing this, we are able to demonstrate that it is possible for an antibody to be sensitive for a protein of interest-in this case CB2-but still cross-react with other proteins and therefore lack specificity. Specifically, we were able to use western blotting combined with mass spectrometry to unequivocally identify CB2 protein in over-expressing cell lines. This shows that a common practice of validating antibodies with positive controls only is insufficient to ensure antibody reliability. In addition, our work is the first to develop a label-free method of protein detection using mass spectrometry that, with further refinement, could provide unequivocal identification of CB2 receptor protein in native tissues.

  6. Production and Purification of Polyclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masami; Mukumoto, Mari; Miyatake, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies consist of a mixture of antibodies produced by multiple B-cell clones that have differentiated into antibody-producing plasma cells in response to an immunogen. Polyclonal antibodies raised against an antigen recognize multiple epitopes on a target molecule, which results in a signal amplification in indirect immunoassays including immune-electron microscopy. In this chapter, we present a basic procedure to generate polyclonal antibodies in rabbits.

  7. Focusing antibody responses against distraction and loss in diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shenshen; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup

    Pathogens are complex and evolving fast. They have developed full ranges of disguises to divert immune responses and often manage to escape recognition and thereby outpace natural immunity. A prominent example is the scarce and staggered development of broadly neutralizing antibodies against highly mutable viruses. It remains unclear under what evolutionary conditions these exceptional antibodies could emerge and dominate the response. To address this challenge, we construct an individual-based stochastic model of the Darwinian evolution of antibody-producing immune cells. We consider complexity of viral epitopes, vary seeding diversity of the immune cell population, and allow a time varying population size and extinction - new aspects essential for designing a realistic vaccine. We show that various temporal statistics of antigenic environments would select distinct evolutionary paths that lead to predominantly non-neutralizing, strain-specific or broadly neutralizing antibody responses. We suggest strategies to focus antibody responses on the targeted vulnerability of the virus and confer selective advantage to cross-reactive lineages. This implies a new step toward an effective vaccine against rapidly mutating complex pathogens. This work is supported by NIH.

  8. Lead toxicity: Current concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyer, R.A. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1993-04-01

    Over the 20-year period since the first issue of Environmental Health Perspectives was published, there has been considerable progress in the understanding of the potential toxicity of exposure to lead. Many of these advances have been reviewed in published symposia, conferences, and review papers in EHP. This brief review identifies major advances as well as a number of current concerns that present opportunities for prevention and intervention strategies. The major scientific advance has been the demonstration that blood lead (PbB) levels of 10-15 micrograms/dL in newborn and very young infants result in cognitive and behavioral deficits. Further support for this observation is being obtained by prospective or longitudinal studies presently in progress. The mechanism(s) for the central nervous system effects of lead is unclear but involve lead interactions within calcium-mediated intracellular messenger systems and neurotransmission. Effects of low-level lead exposure on blood pressure, particularly in adult men, may be related to the effect of lead on calcium-mediated control of vascular smooth muscle contraction and on the renin-angiotensin system. Reproductive effects of lead have long been suspected, but low-level effects have not been well studied. Whether lead is a carcinogen or its association with renal adenocarcinoma is a consequence of cystic nephropathy is uncertain. Major risk factors for lead toxicity in children in the United States include nutrition, particularly deficiencies of essential metals, calcium, iron, and zinc, and housing and socioeconomic status. A goal for the year 2000 is to reduce prevalence of blood lead levels exceeding 15 micrograms/dL. 97 refs.

  9. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015.

  10. Oral antibiotics enhance antibody responses to keyhole limpet hemocyanin in orally but not muscularly immunized chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Atsushi; Kitahara, Kazuki; Okumura, Shouta; Kobayashi, Misato; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have emphasized the crucial role of gut microbiota in triggering and modulating immune response. We aimed to determine whether the modification of gut microbiota by oral co-administration of two antibiotics, ampicillin and neomycin, would lead to changes in the antibody response to antigens in chickens. Neonatal chickens were given or not given ampicillin and neomycin (0.25 and 0.5 g/L, respectively) in drinking water. At 2 weeks of age, the chicks were muscularly or orally immunized with antigenic keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), and then serum anti-KLH antibody levels were examined by ELISA. In orally immunized chicks, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced antibody responses (IgM, IgA, IgY) by 2-3-fold compared with the antibiotics-free control, while the antibiotics did not enhance antibody responses in the muscularly immunized chicks. Concomitant with their enhancement of antibody responses, the oral antibiotics also lowered the Lactobacillus species in feces. Low doses of antibiotics (10-fold and 100-fold lower than the initial trial), which failed to change the fecal Lactobacillus population, did not modify any antibody responses when chicks were orally immunized with KLH. In conclusion, oral antibiotics treatment enhanced the antibody response to orally exposed antigens in chickens. This enhancement of antibody response was associated with a modification of the fecal Lactobacillus content, suggesting a possible link between gut microbiota and antibody response in chickens.

  11. Lead Time Study,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    AD-A128 318 LEAD TIME STUDY (U) ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT CDMMAND DOVER NJ SYSTEMS ANALYSIS DIV dI-T~~ CHU MAY 82 ARRAA 82- 3/ /l N...EhhEEE--E 1111.0 U 1 - I 1120 1.25I1,,-. 11.6 MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TESI CHARI NATIONAL BUREAU 01 STANDARDt 19t,3 A co LEAD TIME STUDY c*A JULIE CHU MAY...188 D I.-f . . .... .. - r - .. " ’- -~ L - - _ _ __ ARRAA 82-3 LEAD TIME STUDY Prepared by:_ JL CHU Reviewed by:Li t’ ( LAWRENCE J. QWUNI Chief, Sys

  12. Lead effects on fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullino, M.L.; Fiussello, N.

    1976-01-01

    Addition of 0.01M lead nitrate to media caused complete inhibition of most of a group of 80 strains of fungi of several genera. Those which did grow at all had an extended lag period in comparison to controls. At 0.001M all the fungi grew, but had thinner-than-normal mycelia and delayed fruiting body formation. Fusarium species and members of Class Basidiomycetes were among the most sensitive, and Penicillium and Aspergillus species were the most tolerant. Lead uptake rates varied positively with lead nitrate concentration in the media. 9 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Antibodies to watch in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The transitions of antibody therapeutics to late-stage clinical development, regulatory review and the market are proceeding at a rapid pace in 2013. Since late 2012, two monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics (itolizumab, trastuzumab emtansine) received their first approvals, first marketing applications for three mAbs (vedolizumab, ramucirumab, obinutuzumab) were submitted to regulatory agencies, and five mAbs (brodalumab, MABp1, moxetumomab pasudotox, tildrakizumab, rilotumumab) entered their first Phase 3 studies. The current total of commercially-sponsored antibody therapeutics undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies is 30. Recently announced study results for farletuzumab, naptumomab estafenatox, and tabalumab indicate that clinical endpoints were not met in some Phase 3 studies of these product candidates. PMID:23727858

  14. Epigenetics of the antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guideng; Zan, Hong; Xu, Zhenming; Casali, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    Epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, histone post-translational modifications and miRNAs, are induced in B cells by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. They play major roles in regulating somatic hypermutation (SHM), class switch DNA recombination (CSR), and differentiation to plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. Histone modifications target the CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the immunoglobulin locus; they together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the expression of critical elements of that machinery, such as activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), as well as factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks instruct the maturation of antibody responses. Their dysregulation plays an important role in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens, such as those of microbial pathogens, and self-antigens, such as those targeted in autoimmunity, and B cell neoplasia.

  15. Autologous antibodies that bind neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yujing; Sholler, Giselle S; Shukla, Girja S; Pero, Stephanie C; Carman, Chelsea L; Zhao, Ping; Krag, David N

    2015-11-01

    Antibody therapy of neuroblastoma is promising and our goal is to derive antibodies from patients with neuroblastoma for developing new therapeutic antibodies. The feasibility of using residual bone marrow obtained for clinical indications as a source of tumor cells and a source of antibodies was assessed. From marrow samples, neuroblastoma cells were recovered, grown in cell culture and also implanted into mice to create xenografts. Mononuclear cells from the marrow were used as a source to generate phage display antibody libraries and also hybridomas. Growth of neuroblastoma patient cells was possible both in vitro and as xenografts. Antibodies from the phage libraries and from the monoclonal hybridomas bound autologous neuroblastoma cells with some selectivity. It appears feasible to recover neuroblastoma cells from residual marrow specimens and to generate human antibodies that bind autologous neuroblastoma cells. Expansion of this approach is underway to collect more specimens, optimize methods to generate antibodies, and to evaluate the bioactivity of neuroblastoma-binding antibodies.

  16. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  17. Learn about Lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jump to main content US EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Lead Share Facebook Twitter Google+ ... 2 pp, 291 K, About PDF ) The most important step parents, doctors, and others can take is ...

  18. Lead levels - blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood lead levels ... A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside ... may be used to puncture the skin. The blood collects in a small glass tube called a ...

  19. Lead User Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brem, Alexander; Larsen, Henry

    2015-01-01

    , deliver and capture the value of an innovatively new device together. From the perspective of the lead user, we show antecedents and effects of social interaction between organizational actors and the lead user on the development of social capital, especially trust and shared imagination. The second case......User innovation and especially the integration of lead users is a key topic in the innovation management literature of recent years. This paper contributes by providing a rare perspective into what easily could be seen as innovation failure, shown from two perspectives. We show how a lack of shared...... imagination hampers participation and kills innovation between interdependent stakeholders at the threshold between invention and innovation in practice. We present a first case in the fun-sport industry where an external lead user and diverse firm representatives in different functions fail to create...

  20. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  1. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  2. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2017-03-28

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  3. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  4. Lead-210 contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, P. [Peter Gray and Associates, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Nearly all scrap dealers, smelters and other recyclers routinely monitor for radioactivity in shipments entering their facility. These sensitive radiation gate monitors easily detect radium-226 and most other radioactive nuclides. However, the type of detector normally used, sodium iodide scintillation crystals, will not detect the low energy gamma radiation emitted by lead-210 and its progeny. Since lead-210 is a common radioactive contaminant in certain industries, contaminated scrap metal from these industries may avoid detection at the recycler. Lead-210 is a decay product of radon-222 which is produced in small concentrations with natural gas. As the natural gas liquids, particularly ethane and propane, are separated from the natural gas, the radon concentrates in the ethane/propane fraction. The natural gas industry, particularly gas processing facilities and industries using ethane and propane as feed stocks can be significantly contaminated with the radon decay products, especially lead-210, bismuth-210 and polonium-210. Unless the scrap metal is decontaminated before sending to the recycler, the lead-210 contaminated scrap may be processed, resulting in some degree of radioactive contamination of the recycling facilities. Methods of detecting the low energy gamma radiation associated with lead-210 include the pancake G-M detector and the thin crystal-thin window scintillation detector.

  5. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Rochella A; Robinson, John A

    2008-02-01

    The arbitrary division between antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and secondary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome has not proven useful. Antiphospholipid antibodies in the absence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome often occur as epiphenomena in many autoimmune diseases. They are very common in systemic lupus erythematosus. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is a significant comorbidity in lupus but is uncommon in Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, and systemic vasculitis. Evidence is growing that antiphospholipid antibodies may have a pathogenic role in pulmonary hypertension and accelerated atherosclerosis of autoimmune diseases.

  6. Cerebellar Ataxia and Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariño, Helena; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Blanco, Yolanda; Martínez-Hernández, Eugenia; Sabater, Lidia; Petit-Pedrol, Mar; Rouco, Idoia; Bataller, Luis; Dalmau, Josep O.; Saiz, Albert; Graus, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    frequencies of serum GAD67-Abs were found in patients with CA (24 of 34 patients [71%]) and in patients with stiff person syndrome (20 of 28 patients [71%]). However, GAD67-Abs were found in all of the cerebrospinal fluid samples examined (22 samples from patients with CA and 17 samples from patients with stiff person syndrome). Glycine receptor antibodies but not other cell surface antibodies were identified in 4 patients with CA. The presence of glycine receptor antibodies did not correlate with any specific clinical feature. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In patients with CA and GAD65-Abs, subacute onset of symptoms and prompt immunotherapy are associated with good outcome. Persistent vertigo or brainstem and cerebellar episodes can herald CA and should lead to GAD65-Ab testing, particularly in patients with systemic organ-specific autoimmunities. PMID:24934144

  7. Uptake of antigen-antibody complexes by human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, N A; Guyre, P M; Graziano, R F

    2001-01-01

    Fc receptors specific for IgG (FcγR) potentiate the immune response by facilitating the interaction between myeloid cells and antibody-coated targets (1-3). Monocyte and neutrophil FcyR engagement can lead to the induction of lytic-type mechanisms associated with innate responses. FcyR triggering can also play a key role in adaptive immune responses. For example, FcyR-directed capture and uptake of antigens (Ag) by dendritic cells (DC) results in processing and presentation to naive Ag-specific T cells, leading to their expansion and maturation into effector T-cell populations. This chapter describes methodology currently in use to explore and manipulate antigen-antibody (Ag-Ab) uptake by FcyR expressed on DC.

  8. Magnesium Diboride Current Leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, John

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered superconductor, magnesium diboride (MgB2), can be used to fabricate conducting leads used in cryogenic applications. Dis covered to be superconducting in 2001, MgB2 has the advantage of remaining superconducting at higher temperatures than the previously used material, NbTi. The purpose of these leads is to provide 2 A of electricity to motors located in a 1.3 K environment. The providing environment is a relatively warm 17 K. Requirements for these leads are to survive temperature fluctuations in the 5 K and 11 K heat sinks, and not conduct excessive heat into the 1.3 K environment. Test data showed that each lead in the assembly could conduct 5 A at 4 K, which, when scaled to 17 K, still provided more than the required 2 A. The lead assembly consists of 12 steelclad MgB2 wires, a tensioned Kevlar support, a thermal heat sink interface at 4 K, and base plates. The wires are soldered to heavy copper leads at the 17 K end, and to thin copper-clad NbTi leads at the 1.3 K end. The leads were designed, fabricated, and tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe - Institut foer Technische Physik before inclusion in Goddard's XRS (X-Ray Spectrometer) instrument onboard the Astro-E2 spacecraft. A key factor is that MgB2 remains superconducting up to 30 K, which means that it does not introduce joule heating as a resistive wire would. Because the required temperature ranges are 1.3-17 K, this provides a large margin of safety. Previous designs lost superconductivity at around 8 K. The disadvantage to MgB2 is that it is a brittle ceramic, and making thin wires from it is challenging. The solution was to encase the leads in thin steel tubes for strength. Previous designs were so brittle as to risk instrument survival. MgB2 leads can be used in any cryogenic application where small currents need to be conducted at below 30 K. Because previous designs would superconduct only at up to 8 K, this new design would be ideal for the 8-30 K range.

  9. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of human IgG4 antibodies by dynamic Fab arm exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Neut Kolfschoten, Marijn; Schuurman, Janine; Losen, Mario; Bleeker, Wim K; Martínez-Martínez, Pilar; Vermeulen, Ellen; den Bleker, Tamara H; Wiegman, Luus; Vink, Tom; Aarden, Lucien A; De Baets, Marc H; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Aalberse, Rob C; Parren, Paul W H I

    2007-09-14

    Antibodies play a central role in immunity by forming an interface with the innate immune system and, typically, mediate proinflammatory activity. We describe a novel posttranslational modification that leads to anti-inflammatory activity of antibodies of immunoglobulin G, isotype 4 (IgG4). IgG4 antibodies are dynamic molecules that exchange Fab arms by swapping a heavy chain and attached light chain (half-molecule) with a heavy-light chain pair from another molecule, which results in bispecific antibodies. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the third constant domain is critical for this activity. The impact of IgG4 Fab arm exchange was confirmed in vivo in a rhesus monkey model with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. IgG4 Fab arm exchange is suggested to be an important biological mechanism that provides the basis for the anti-inflammatory activity attributed to IgG4 antibodies.

  11. DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 Human IgG Antibody Produced by AnaptysBio, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    ECBC-TR-1339 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR ANTIBODY...CHARACTERIZATION: CHARACTERIZATION OF AN MS2 HUMAN IGG ANTIBODY PRODUCED BY ANAPTYSBIO, INC. DARPA ATP Standardized Test Bed for Antibody...Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 human IgG antibody produced by AnaptysBio DARPA ATP Standardized Test Bed for Antibody

  12. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  13. Antibody Engineering for Pursuing a Healthier Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Abdullah F. U. H.; Wang, Rongzhi; Ling, Sumei; Wang, Shihua

    2017-01-01

    Since the development of antibody-production techniques, a number of immunoglobulins have been developed on a large scale using conventional methods. Hybridoma technology opened a new horizon in the production of antibodies against target antigens of infectious pathogens, malignant diseases including autoimmune disorders, and numerous potent toxins. However, these clinical humanized or chimeric murine antibodies have several limitations and complexities. Therefore, to overcome these difficulties, recent advances in genetic engineering techniques and phage display technique have allowed the production of highly specific recombinant antibodies. These engineered antibodies have been constructed in the hunt for novel therapeutic drugs equipped with enhanced immunoprotective abilities, such as engaging immune effector functions, effective development of fusion proteins, efficient tumor and tissue penetration, and high-affinity antibodies directed against conserved targets. Advanced antibody engineering techniques have extensive applications in the fields of immunology, biotechnology, diagnostics, and therapeutic medicines. However, there is limited knowledge regarding dynamic antibody development approaches. Therefore, this review extends beyond our understanding of conventional polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Furthermore, recent advances in antibody engineering techniques together with antibody fragments, display technologies, immunomodulation, and broad applications of antibodies are discussed to enhance innovative antibody production in pursuit of a healthier future for humans.

  14. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to Treponema Pallidum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; J.D.A. van Embden; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThree successive fusions of mouse myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes of a mouse immunized with Treponema Pallidum resulted in one hybridoma producing anti T. pallidum antibodies for each fusion. The mice were immunized with live pallidum cells respectively 1, 3 and 5 months before fusi

  16. Antibody Isotype Switching in Vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Kate; Hackney, Jason; Payandeh, Jian; Zarrin, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The humoral or antibody-mediated immune response in vertebrates has evolved to respond to diverse antigenic challenges in various anatomical locations. Diversification of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) constant region via isotype switching allows for remarkable plasticity in the immune response, including versatile tissue distribution, Fc receptor binding, and complement fixation. This enables antibody molecules to exert various biological functions while maintaining antigen-binding specificity. Different immunoglobulin (Ig) classes include IgM, IgD, IgG, IgE, and IgA, which exist as surface-bound and secreted forms. High-affinity autoantibodies are associated with various autoimmune diseases such as lupus and arthritis, while defects in components of isotype switching are associated with infections. A major route of infection used by a large number of pathogens is invasion of mucosal surfaces within the respiratory, digestive, or urinary tract. Most infections of this nature are initially limited by effector mechanisms such as secretory IgA antibodies. Mucosal surfaces have been proposed as a major site for the genesis of adaptive immune responses, not just in fighting infections but also in tolerating commensals and constant dietary antigens. We will discuss the evolution of isotype switching in various species and provide an overview of the function of various isotypes with a focus on IgA, which is universally important in gut homeostasis as well as pathogen clearance. Finally, we will discuss the utility of antibodies as therapeutic modalities.

  17. Development of Antibody Against Sulfamethazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIZi-ying; XUWen-ge; LIUYi-bing; ZHANGLi-ling; GUOWei-zheng; HANShi-quan

    2003-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies(PcAbs) against sulfamethazine(SMT) are obtained by immunizing rabbits with SMT-conjugated bovine serum albumin(BSA). The affinity constants (Ka) of the PcAbs are higher than 1×108 and the cross-reactivities with sulfadiazine(SD), sulfaquinoxaline (SQX) are lower than 0.05% (R/A).

  18. Leading healthcare in complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare institutions and providers are in complexity. Networks of interconnections from relationships and technology create conditions in which interdependencies and non-linear dynamics lead to surprising, unpredictable outcomes. Previous effective approaches to leadership, focusing on top-down bureaucratic methods, are no longer effective. Leading in complexity requires leaders to accept the complexity, create an adaptive space in which innovation and creativity can flourish and then integrate the successful practices that emerge into the formal organizational structure. Several methods for doing adaptive space work will be discussed. Readers will be able to contrast traditional leadership approaches with leading in complexity. They will learn new behaviours that are required of complexity leaders, along with challenges they will face, often from other leaders within the organization.

  19. Automated pipeline for rapid production and screening of HIV-specific monoclonal antibodies using pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kartik A; Clark, John J; Goods, Brittany A; Politano, Timothy J; Mozdzierz, Nicholas J; Zimnisky, Ross M; Leeson, Rachel L; Love, J Christopher; Love, Kerry R

    2015-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind and neutralize human pathogens have great therapeutic potential. Advances in automated screening and liquid handling have resulted in the ability to discover antigen-specific antibodies either directly from human blood or from various combinatorial libraries (phage, bacteria, or yeast). There remain, however, bottlenecks in the cloning, expression and evaluation of such lead antibodies identified in primary screens that hinder high-throughput screening. As such, "hit-to-lead identification" remains both expensive and time-consuming. By combining the advantages of overlap extension PCR (OE-PCR) and a genetically stable yet easily manipulatable microbial expression host Pichia pastoris, we have developed an automated pipeline for the rapid production and screening of full-length antigen-specific mAbs. Here, we demonstrate the speed, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of our approach by generating several broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

  20. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  1. [Neuroimmunological diseases associated with VGKC complex antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Osamu

    2013-05-01

    Antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels(VGKC) were first identified by radioimmunoassay of radioisotope labeled alpha-dendrotoxin-VGKCs solubilized from rabbit brain. These antibodies were found only in a proportion of patients with acquired neuromyotonia (Isaacs' syndrome). VGKC antibodies were also detected in Morvan's syndrome and in a form of autoimmune limbic encephalitis. Recent studies indicated that the "VGKC" antibodies are mainly directed toward associated proteins(for example LGI-1, Caspr-2) that complex with the VGKCs themselves. The "VGKC" antibodies are now usually known as VGKC-complex antibodies. In general, LGI-1 antibodies are most common in limbic encephalitis with SIADH. Caspr-2 antibodies are present in the majority of patients with Morvan's syndrome. These patients develop combinations of CNS symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and peripheral nerve hyperexcitability.

  2. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  3. Platelet antigens and antibodies. Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Mineeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet antigens structure, role of platelet antibodies in the pathogenesis of various clinical conditions, characteristic of modern antibodies detection methods are presented in this article.

  4. Chemical engineering of cell penetrating antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Lou, D; Burkett, J; Kohler, H

    2001-08-01

    Antibodies, being exquisitely specific tools in biology, are routinely used to detect and identify intra-cellular structures. However, current intra-cellular application of antibodies requires that the membrane be rendered leaky, resulting in the death of cells. Here, we present a novel method to allow antibodies to penetrate the cellular membrane of living cells without affecting cell viability. A peptide (MTS, membrane transport sequence) that facilitates transport across membranes has been site-specifically attached to antibodies. MTS-antibodies enter the living cells in culture and can be detected by immunofluorescence and ELISA after extraction. Cellular structures are visualized in living cells using a specific MTS-antibody. Antibodies with membrane penetrating properties can become an important tool for the study of intra-cellular processes in living cells. Furthermore, such membrane penetrating antibodies can be used to selectively stimulate or suppress functions of the cellular machinery.

  5. A robust robotic high-throughput antibody purification platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter M; Abdo, Michael; Butcher, Rebecca E; Yap, Min-Yin; Scotney, Pierre D; Ramunno, Melanie L; Martin-Roussety, Genevieve; Owczarek, Catherine; Hardy, Matthew P; Chen, Chao-Guang; Fabri, Louis J

    2016-07-15

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become the fastest growing segment in the drug market with annual sales of more than 40 billion US$ in 2013. The selection of lead candidate molecules involves the generation of large repertoires of antibodies from which to choose a final therapeutic candidate. Improvements in the ability to rapidly produce and purify many antibodies in sufficient quantities reduces the lead time for selection which ultimately impacts on the speed with which an antibody may transition through the research stage and into product development. Miniaturization and automation of chromatography using micro columns (RoboColumns(®) from Atoll GmbH) coupled to an automated liquid handling instrument (ALH; Freedom EVO(®) from Tecan) has been a successful approach to establish high throughput process development platforms. Recent advances in transient gene expression (TGE) using the high-titre Expi293F™ system have enabled recombinant mAb titres of greater than 500mg/L. These relatively high protein titres reduce the volume required to generate several milligrams of individual antibodies for initial biochemical and biological downstream assays, making TGE in the Expi293F™ system ideally suited to high throughput chromatography on an ALH. The present publication describes a novel platform for purifying Expi293F™-expressed recombinant mAbs directly from cell-free culture supernatant on a Perkin Elmer JANUS-VariSpan ALH equipped with a plate shuttle device. The purification platform allows automated 2-step purification (Protein A-desalting/size exclusion chromatography) of several hundred mAbs per week. The new robotic method can purify mAbs with high recovery (>90%) at sub-milligram level with yields of up to 2mg from 4mL of cell-free culture supernatant.

  6. Engineered single chain antibody fragments for radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhalov, A.; Chester, K. A. [Cancer Research UK Imaging and Targeting Group Royal Free, London (United Kingdom). Department of Oncology; University College Medical School Royal Free Campus, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-12-01

    An ideal molecule to deliver radioimmunotherapy (RIT) would be target specific and have prolonged residence time at high concentrations in the tumour with rapid clearance from normal tissues. It would also be non-immunogenic. These features can be rationally introduced into recombinant antibody-based proteins using antibody engineering techniques. This reviews focuses on the use of antibody engineering in the design and development of RIT molecules which have single chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragments as building blocks.

  7. Recombinant bispecific antibodies for cancer therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roland E KONTERMANN

    2005-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies can serve as mediators to retarget effector mechanisms to disease-associated sites. Studies over the past two decades have revealed the potentials but also the limitations of conventional bispecific antibodies. The development of recombinant antibody formats has opened up the possibility of generating bispecific molecules with improved properties. This review summarizes recent developments in the field of recombinant bispecific antibodies and discusses further requirements for clinical development.

  8. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  9. Relational Perspectives on Leading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Vinther; Rasmussen, Jørgen Gulddahl

    2015-01-01

    Relational Perspectives on Leading discusses leadership from a relational and social constructionism perspective as practiced on an everyday basis between people. The book pursues a fast growing, practice-based approach - particularly within the Anglo-Saxon parts of the world - to organization...... studies and organizational phenomena....

  10. Change, Lead, Succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Linda; von Frank, Valerie

    2010-01-01

    Redefine leadership in your school, and create capacity through school leadership teams that successfully coordinate professional learning. "Change, Lead, Succeed" shows school leaders and teachers in leadership roles what they need to know to effectively create a culture for change. Find out what distinguishes a school leadership team from other…

  11. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    As well as accelerators to boost particles up to high energy, physicists need detectors to see what happens when those particles collide. This lead glass block is part of a CERN detector called OPAL. OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  12. Engineering Venom’s Toxin-Neutralizing Antibody Fragments and Its Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa M. Alvarenga

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Serum therapy remains the only specific treatment against envenoming, but anti-venoms are still prepared by fragmentation of polyclonal antibodies isolated from hyper-immunized horse serum. Most of these anti-venoms are considered to be efficient, but their production is tedious, and their use may be associated with adverse effects. Recombinant antibodies and smaller functional units are now emerging as credible alternatives and constitute a source of still unexploited biomolecules capable of neutralizing venoms. This review will be a walk through the technologies that have recently been applied leading to novel antibody formats with better properties in terms of homogeneity, specific activity and possible safety.

  13. AVIDITY EVALUATION OF LOCAL IgA ANTIBODIES IN PERSONS IMMUNIZED WITH LIVE INFLUENZA VACCINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Donina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. At present, immunogenicity evaluation of influenza vaccines is performed by quantitative assessment of increased serum antibodies. It was, however, shown that the degree of human defense against influenza is mostly related to their qualitative characteristics, i.e., avidity (functional activity. Leading role of local immunity is demonstrated in protection against influenza. Such immunity is mediated by IgA antibodies from mucosal airways. Meanwhile, the avidity issues for local antibodies still remain open.In present study, an attempt was undertaken to evaluate post-vaccination local immunological memory for influenza A virus, according to IgA antibodies from upper respiratory secretions. Two techniques were used to evaluate antibody avidity, that were previously applied for studying this phenomenon with serum imunoglobulins, i.e., a dynamic test (measurement of antigen-antibody reaction rates, and a test with urea, a chaotropic agent (avidity is determined as a strength of antigen-antibody complex. A total of 202 persons (18 to 20 years old were enrolled into the study.With both tests, a broad range of individual avidity values was observed for the antibodies. A significant cohort (up to 30 per cent of persons immunized with live influenza vaccine, showed sharply increased avidity of secretory IgA antibodies by both methods, along with accumulation of these immunoglobulins after vaccination. A reverse relationship is revealed between avidity levels of these antibodies before vaccination, and increase of this parameter post-immunization. The data present convincing arguments for specific renewal of local humoral immunological memory, as induced by live influenza vaccine. The study substantiates a necessity for application of the both tests in parallel, when determining avidity of secretory IgA antibodies. (Med. Immunol., vol. 10, N 4-5, pp 423-430.

  14. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  15. Nanoparticles for the delivery of therapeutic antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sousa, Flávia; Castro, Pedro; Fonte, Pedro;

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Over the past two decades, therapeutic antibodies have demonstrated promising results in the treatment of a wide array of diseases. However, the application of antibody-based therapy implies multiple administrations and a high cost of antibody production, resulting in costly therapy...

  16. Antibodies to staphylococcal enterotoxin in laboratory personnel.

    OpenAIRE

    Jozefczyk, Z; Robbins, R N; Spitz, J M; Bergdoll, M S

    1980-01-01

    Eighty-five percent of laboratory personnel working with staphylococcal enterotoxin had antibodies to enterotoxin in their sera, whereas only 23% of the control group had antibodies specific for enterotoxin. Two persons who carried enterotoxin B-producing staphylococci in their noses, throats, or both, had antibodies to enterotoxin B in their sera.

  17. An antidote approach to reduce risk and broaden utility of antibody based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnoff, Alyse D; Gao, Cuihua; Borrok, M Jack; Gao, Xizhe; Gao, Changshou; Rainey, G Jonah

    2017-03-03

    Antibody therapeutics offer safe and effective treatment options for a broad range of diseases. One of the greatest benefits of antibody therapeutics is their extraordinarily long serum half-life, allowing infrequent dosing with long-lasting effects. One characteristic of antibodies that drives long half-life is the ability to interact with the recycling receptor, FcRn, in a pH-dependent manner. The benefit of long half-life, however, carries with it liabilities. While the positive effects of antibody therapeutics are long-lasting, any acute adverse events or chronic negative impacts, such as immunosuppression in the face of an infection, are also long-lasting. Therefore, we sought to develop antibodies with a chemical handle that alone would enjoy the long half-life of normal antibodies, but upon addition of a small-molecule antidote, would interact with the chemical handle and inhibit the antibody recycling mechanism thus leading to rapid degradation and shortened half-life in vivo. Here we present a proof of concept study where we identify sites to incorporate a nnAA that can be chemically modified to modulate FcRn interaction in vitro and antibody half-life in vivo. This is an important first step in developing safer therapeutics, and the next step will be development of technology that can perform the modifying chemistry in vivo.

  18. Rationalization and design of the complementarity determining region sequences in an antibody-antigen recognition interface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Ming Yu

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are critical determinants in biological systems. Engineered proteins binding to specific areas on protein surfaces could lead to therapeutics or diagnostics for treating diseases in humans. But designing epitope-specific protein-protein interactions with computational atomistic interaction free energy remains a difficult challenge. Here we show that, with the antibody-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor interaction as a model system, the experimentally observed amino acid preferences in the antibody-antigen interface can be rationalized with 3-dimensional distributions of interacting atoms derived from the database of protein structures. Machine learning models established on the rationalization can be generalized to design amino acid preferences in antibody-antigen interfaces, for which the experimental validations are tractable with current high throughput synthetic antibody display technologies. Leave-one-out cross validation on the benchmark system yielded the accuracy, precision, recall (sensitivity and specificity of the overall binary predictions to be 0.69, 0.45, 0.63, and 0.71 respectively, and the overall Matthews correlation coefficient of the 20 amino acid types in the 24 interface CDR positions was 0.312. The structure-based computational antibody design methodology was further tested with other antibodies binding to VEGF. The results indicate that the methodology could provide alternatives to the current antibody technologies based on animal immune systems in engineering therapeutic and diagnostic antibodies against predetermined antigen epitopes.

  19. A novel antibody humanization method based on epitopes scanning and molecular dynamics simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Zhang

    Full Text Available 1-17-2 is a rat anti-human DEC-205 monoclonal antibody that induces internalization and delivers antigen to dendritic cells (DCs. The potentially clinical application of this antibody is limited by its murine origin. Traditional humanization method such as complementarity determining regions (CDRs graft often leads to a decreased or even lost affinity. Here we have developed a novel antibody humanization method based on computer modeling and bioinformatics analysis. First, we used homology modeling technology to build the precise model of Fab. A novel epitope scanning algorithm was designed to identify antigenic residues in the framework regions (FRs that need to be mutated to human counterpart in the humanization process. Then virtual mutation and molecular dynamics (MD simulation were used to assess the conformational impact imposed by all the mutations. By comparing the root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs of CDRs, we found five key residues whose mutations would destroy the original conformation of CDRs. These residues need to be back-mutated to rescue the antibody binding affinity. Finally we constructed the antibodies in vitro and compared their binding affinity by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance (SPR assay. The binding affinity of the refined humanized antibody was similar to that of the original rat antibody. Our results have established a novel method based on epitopes scanning and MD simulation for antibody humanization.

  20. Early developability screen of therapeutic antibody candidates using Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoisier, Alexandra; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies represent one of the fastest growing segments in the pharmaceutical market. They are used in a broad range of disease fields, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases. The growth of the segment has necessitated development of new analytical platforms for faster and better antibody selection and characterization. Early quality control and risk assessment of biophysical parameters help prevent failure in later stages of antibody development, and thus can reduce costs and save time. Critical parameters such as aggregation, conformational stability, colloidal stability and hydrophilicity, are measured during the early phase of antibody generation and guide the selection process of the best lead candidates in terms of technical developability. We report on the use of a novel instrument (ActiPix/Viscosizer) for measuring both the hydrodynamic radius and the absolute viscosity of antibodies based on Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging. The looped microcapillary-based method combines low sample consumption, fast throughput and high precision compared to other conventional methods. From a random panel of 130 antibodies in the early selection process, we identified some with large hydrodynamic radius outside the normal distribution and others with non-Gaussian Taylor dispersion profiles. The antibodies with such abnormal properties were confirmed later in the selection process to show poor developability profiles. Moreover, combining these results with those of the viscosity measurements at high antibody concentrations allows screening, with limited amounts of materials, candidates with potential issues in pre-formulation development.

  1. Human lymphocyte markers defined by antibodies derived from somatic cell hybrids. II. A hybridoma secreting antibody against an antigen expressed by human B and null lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, I G; Bradley, J; Brooks, D A; Kupa, A; McNamara, P J; Thomas, M E; Zola, H

    1980-06-01

    A hybridoma (FMC4) has been derived which secretes antibody showing selective reaction with human B lymphocytes, monocytes and some null lymphocytes. Few, if any, T lymphocytes in normal blood are stained, although stimulation of lymphocytes with PHA leads to an increase in the proportion of cells reacting with the hybridoma antibody. The antibody reacts with B and null lymphoblastoid cell lines but not with T cell lines. B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells but not T-CLLs are stained and null-type acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells but not T-type ALL also react. Normal blood myeloid cells do not react with FMC4 supernatant whilst some myeloid leukaemias do. The expression of the antigen reacting with FMC4 supernatant suggests that FMC4 may secrete an antibody against the human equivalent of the Ia antigen.

  2. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruser, Tim J. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States); Wheeler, Deric L., E-mail: dlwheeler@wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  3. Neutralizing Antibodies and Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Stoll-Keller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. The interplay between the virus and host innate and adaptive immune responses determines the outcome of infection. There is increasing evidence that host neutralizing responses play a relevant role in the resulting pathogenesis. Furthermore, viral evasion from host neutralizing antibodies has been revealed to be an important contributor in leading both to viral persistence in acute liver graft infection following liver transplantation, and to chronic viral infection. The development of novel model systems to study HCV entry and neutralization has allowed a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms of virus-host interactions during antibody-mediated neutralization. The understanding of these mechanisms will ultimately contribute to the development of novel antiviral preventive strategies for liver graft infection and an urgently needed vaccine. This review summarizes recent concepts of the role of neutralizing antibodies in viral clearance and protection, and highlights consequences of viral escape from neutralizing antibodies in the pathogenesis of HCV infection.

  4. Phenotypic screening: the future of antibody discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Munoz, Andrea L; Minter, Ralph R; Rust, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Most antibody therapeutics have been isolated from high throughput target-based screening. However, as the number of validated targets diminishes and the target space becomes increasingly competitive, alternative strategies, such as phenotypic screening, are gaining momentum. Here, we review successful phenotypic screens, including those used to isolate antibodies against cancer and infectious agents. We also consider exciting advances in the expression and phenotypic screening of antibody repertoires in single cell autocrine systems. As technologies continue to develop, we believe that antibody phenotypic screening will increase further in popularity and has the potential to provide the next generation of therapeutic antibodies.

  5. Leading Generation Y

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    ensure the success of their child, failure is not often experienced. These successes and the ease of childhood lead to not only confidence but an...Messaging, chatting on the cell phone and working on homework is a common place scene for teens and college students. “The level of multiprocessing...to Gen Yers entering the workforce with unrealistic expectations and a sense of entitlement. Barbara Dwyer, CEO of the Job Journey, states that

  6. Serum Antibody Biomarkers for ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    their mothers in many studies (e.g., Ashwood & Van deWater, 2004; Jyonouchi et al., 2005; Molloy et al., 2006; Braunschweig et al., 2013). Systemic...against brain and CNS proteins. For example, both abnormalities in serum antibody concentrations and T cells have been reported for ASD compared to...Accomplishments: - Nearly all serum samples have been obtained and processed. - Two unique peptoid libraries have been synthesized and validated. - The peptoid

  7. Superconductivity of lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boorse, H.A.; Cook, D.B.; Zemansky, W.M.

    1950-06-01

    Numerous determinations of the zero-field transition temperature of lead have been made. All of these observations except that of Daunt were made by the direct measurement of electrical resistance. Daunt`s method involved the shielding effect of persistent currents in a hollow cylinder. In the authors work on columbium to be described in a forthcoming paper an a.c. induction method was used for the measurement of superconducting transitions. The superconductor was mounted as a cylindrical core of a coil which functioned as the secondary of a mutual inductance. The primary coil was actuated by an oscillator which provided a maximum a.c. field within the secondary of 1.5 oersteds at a frequency of 1000 cycles per second. The secondary e.m.f. which was dependent for its magnitude on the permeability of the core was amplified, rectifie, and observed on a recording potentiometer. During the application of this method to the study of columbium it appeared that a further check on the zero-field transition temperature of lead would be worth while especially if agreement between results for very pure samples could be obtained using this method. Such result would help in establishing the lead transition temperature as a reasonably reproducible reference point in the region between 4 deg and 10 deg K.

  8. Bovine milk antibodies for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, H; Marnila, P; Gill, H S

    2000-11-01

    The immunoglobulins of bovine colostrum provide the major antimicrobial protection against microbial infections and confer a passive immunity to the newborn calf until its own immune system matures. The concentration in colostrum of specific antibodies against pathogens can be raised by immunising cows with these pathogens or their antigens. Immune milk products are preparations made of such hyperimmune colostrum or antibodies enriched from it. These preparations can be used to give effective specific protection against different enteric diseases in calves and suckling pigs. Colostral immunoglobulin supplements designed for farm animals are commercially available in many countries. Also, some immune milk products containing specific antibodies against certain pathogens have been launched on the market. A number of clinical studies are currently in progress to evaluate the efficacy of immune milks in the prevention and treatment of various human infections, including those caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria. Bovine colostrum-based immune milk products have proven effective in prophylaxis against various infectious diseases in humans. Good results have been obtained with products targeted against rotavirus, Shigella flexneri, Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, Streptococcus mutans, Cryptosporidium parvum and Helicobacter pylori. Some successful attempts have been made to use immune milk in balancing gastrointestinal microbial flora. Immune milk products are promising examples of health-promoting functional foods, or nutraceuticals. This review summarises the recent progress in the development of these products and evaluates their potential as dietary supplements and in clinical nutrition.

  9. Endowing self-binding feature restores the activities of a loss-of-function chimerized anti-GM2 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunfeng; Russ, Michael; Retter, Marc; Fanger, Gary; Morgan, Charles; Kohler, Heinz; Muller, Sybille

    2007-02-01

    Our previous studies have described a rare type of antibody that spontaneously binds to itself, or homodimerizes. This self-binding, or autophilic antibody provides stronger protection against bacterial infection than a non-self-binding antibody with identical specificity and affinity, due to an increase of polymeric avidity. Furthermore, we have shown that a peptide derived from the self-binding domain of the autophilic T15 antibody can be crosslinked to the Fc carbohydrate of monoclonal antibodies specific for the B-cell receptor of B-cell tumors. These peptide-crosslinked antibodies can exert self-binding properties, leading to an increase in binding efficiency to the target cells as well as an increase in potential to induce apoptosis. Herein, we report a novel finding that crosslinking of the autophilic T15 peptide rescues a loss-of-function chimerized (ch) anti-GM2 antibody. The parental antibody demonstrates in vivo anti-tumor activity against melanoma xenografts. The T15 peptide-conjugated antibody shows the ability to bind to itself, as well as an increased binding to its antigen, ganglioside GM2. Moreover, the peptide-conjugated antibody also demonstrates an increased ability to bind to two GM2-positive tumor cell lines and notably important, restores its ability to induce apoptosis in two types of tumor cells. These results provide strong support for the clinical potential of the autophilic technology.

  10. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies has long been considered a potential treatment modality for infectious diseases, including HIV. Early efforts to use antibodies to suppress HIV replication, however, were largely unsuccessful, as the antibodies that were studied neutralized only a relatively narrow spectrum of viral strains and were not very potent. Recent advances have led to the discovery of a large portfolio of human monoclonal antibodies that are broadly neutralizing across many HIV-1 subtypes and are also substantially more potent. These antibodies target multiple different epitopes on the HIV envelope, thus allowing for the development of antibody combinations. In this review, we discuss the application of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for HIV treatment and HIV eradication strategies. We highlight bNAbs that target key epitopes, such as the CD4 binding site and the V2/V3-glycan-dependent sites, and we discuss several bNAbs that are currently in the clinical development pipeline.

  11. 9 CFR 113.452 - Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody... REQUIREMENTS Antibody Products § 113.452 Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Antibody is a specific antibody product containing antibodies directed against one or more somatic...

  12. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to intermediate filament proteins of human cells: unique and cross-reacting antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gown, A M; Vogel, A M

    1982-11-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were generated against the intermediate filament proteins of different human cells. The reactivity of these antibodies with the different classes of intermediate filament proteins was determined by indirect immunofluorescence on cultured cells, immunologic indentification on SDS polyacrylamide gels ("wester blot" experiments), and immunoperoxidase assays on intact tissues. The following four antibodies are described: (a) an antivimentin antibody generated against human fibroblast cytoskeleton; (b), (c) two antibodies that recognize a 54-kdalton protein in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells; and (d) an antikeratin antibody made to stratum corneum that recognizes proteins of molecular weight 66 kdaltons and 57 kdaltons. The antivimentin antibody reacts with vimentin (58 kdaltons), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and keratins from stratum corneum, but does not recognize hepatoma intermediate filaments. In immunofluorescence assays, the antibody reacts with mesenchymal cells and cultured epithelial cells that express vimentin. This antibody decorates the media of blood vessels in tissue sections. One antihepatoma filament antibody reacts only with the 54 kdalton protein of these cells and, in immunofluorescence and immunoperoxidase assays, only recognizes epithelial cells. It reacts with almost all nonsquamous epithelium. The other antihepatoma filament antibody is much less selective, reacting with vimentin, GFAP, and keratin from stratum corneum. This antibody decorates intermediate filaments of both mesenchymal and epithelial cells. The antikeratin antibody recognizes 66-kdalton and 57-kdalton proteins in extracts of stratum corneum and also identifies proteins of similar molecular weights in all cells tested. However, by immunofluorescence, this antibody decorates only the intermediate filaments of epidermoid carcinoma cells. When assayed on tissue sections, the antibody reacts with squamous epithelium and some, but not all

  14. lead glass brick

    CERN Multimedia

    When you look through the glass at a picture behind, the picture appears raised up because light is slowed down in the dense glass. It is this density (4.06 gcm-3) that makes lead glass attractive to physicists. The refractive index of the glass is 1.708 at 400nm (violet light), meaning that light travels in the glass at about 58% its normal speed. At CERN, the OPAL detector uses some 12000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies.

  15. Leading change: 2--planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, Joanna

    National initiatives have outlined the importance of involving frontline staff in service improvement, and the ability to influence and manage change has been identified as an essential skill for delivering new models of care. Nurses often have to take the lead in managing change in clinical practice. The second in a three-part series is designed to help nurses at all levels develop the knowledge and skills to function as change agents within their organisations. This article focuses on planning the change and dealing with resistance.

  16. Optimization leads to symmetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chenghong WANG; Yuqian GUO; Daizhan CHENG

    2004-01-01

    The science of complexity studies the behavior and properties of complex systems in nature and human society.Particular interest has been put on their certain simple common properties.Symmetry is one of such properties.Symmetric phenomena can be found in many complex systems.The purpose of this paper is to reveal the internal reason of the symmetry.Using some physical systems and geometric objects,the paper shows that many symmetries are caused by optimization under certain criteria.It has also been revealed that an evolutional process may lead to symmetry.

  17. Turning lead into gold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    For years the field of entrepreneurship has been blinded by the alchemical promise of turning lead into gold, of finding the ones most likely to become the next Branson, Zuckerberg or Gates. The promise has been created in the midst of political and scientific agendas where certain individuals...... is not to accumulate state or market wealth, but for entrepreneurial skills to become tools towards the liberation of the individual from oppressive systems of control – essentially to add public value rather than economic value. In this presentation I will sketch an anarchist perspective on entrepreneurship, looking...

  18. Generation of monospecific antibodies based on affinity capture of polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelm, Barbara; Forsström, Björn; Igel, Ulrika; Johannesson, Henrik; Stadler, Charlotte; Lundberg, Emma; Ponten, Fredrik; Sjöberg, Anna; Rockberg, Johan; Schwenk, Jochen M; Nilsson, Peter; Johansson, Christine; Uhlén, Mathias

    2011-11-01

    A method is described to generate and validate antibodies based on mapping the linear epitopes of a polyclonal antibody followed by sequential epitope-specific capture using synthetic peptides. Polyclonal antibodies directed towards four proteins RBM3, SATB2, ANLN, and CNDP1, potentially involved in human cancers, were selected and antibodies to several non-overlapping epitopes were generated and subsequently validated by Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and immunofluorescence. For all four proteins, a dramatic difference in functionality could be observed for these monospecific antibodies directed to the different epitopes. In each case, at least one antibody was obtained with full functionality across all applications, while other epitope-specific fractions showed no or little functionality. These results present a path forward to use the mapped binding sites of polyclonal antibodies to generate epitope-specific antibodies, providing an attractive approach for large-scale efforts to characterize the human proteome by antibodies.

  19. Structure of a Human Astrovirus Capsid-Antibody Complex and Mechanistic Insights into Virus Neutralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Campos, Jocelyn; Perez, Edmundo I.; Yin, Lu; Alexander, David L.; DuBois, Rebecca M. (UCSC)

    2016-11-02

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses (HAstVs) are a leading cause of viral diarrhea in young children, the immunocompromised, and the elderly. There are no vaccines or antiviral therapies against HAstV disease. Several lines of evidence point to the presence of protective antibodies in healthy adults as a mechanism governing protection against reinfection by HAstV. However, development of anti-HAstV therapies is hampered by the gap in knowledge of protective antibody epitopes on the HAstV capsid surface. Here, we report the structure of the HAstV capsid spike domain bound to the neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2. The antibody uses all six complementarity-determining regions to bind to a quaternary epitope on each side of the dimeric capsid spike. We provide evidence that the HAstV capsid spike is a receptor-binding domain and that the antibody neutralizes HAstV by blocking virus attachment to cells. We identify patches of conserved amino acids that overlap the antibody epitope and may comprise a receptor-binding site. Our studies provide a foundation for the development of therapies to prevent and treat HAstV diarrheal disease.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. Despite the prevalence of this virus, little is known about how antibodies in healthy adults protect them against reinfection. Here, we determined the crystal structure of a complex of the HAstV capsid protein and a virus-neutralizing antibody. We show that the antibody binds to the outermost spike domain of the capsid, and we provide evidence that the antibody blocks virus attachment to human cells. Importantly, our findings suggest that a subunit-based vaccine focusing the immune system on the HAstV capsid spike domain could be effective in protecting children against HAstV disease.

  20. Long-term outcome of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody disease treated with immunoadsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Biesenbach

    Full Text Available Anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM antibody disease may lead to acute crescentic glomerulonephritis with poor renal prognosis. Current therapy favours plasma exchange (PE for removal of pathogenic antibodies. Immunoadsorption (IAS is superior to PE regarding efficiency of antibody-removal and safety. Apart from anecdotal data, there is no systemic analysis of the long-term effects of IAS on anti-GBM-disease and antibody kinetics.To examine the long-term effect of high-frequency IAS combined with standard immunosuppression on patient and renal survival in patients with anti-GBM-disease and to quantify antibody removal and kinetics through IAS.Retrospective review of patients treated with IAS for anti-GBM-antibody disease confirmed by biopsy and/or anti-GBM-antibodies.University Hospital of Vienna, Austria.10 patients with anti-GBM-disease treated with IAS.Patient and renal survival, renal histology, anti-GBM-antibodies.Anti-GBM-antibodies were reduced by the first 9 IAS treatments (mean number of 23 to negative levels in all patients. Renal survival was 40% at diagnosis, 70% after the end of IAS, 63% after one year and 50% at the end of observation (mean 84 months, range 9 to 186. Dialysis dependency was successfully reversed in three of six patients. Patient survival was 90% at the end of observation.IAS efficiently eliminates anti-GBM-antibodies suggesting non-inferiority to PE with regard to renal and patient survival. Hence IAS should be considered as a valuable treatment option for anti-GBM-disease, especially in patients presenting with a high percentage of crescents and dialysis dependency due to an unusual high proportion of responders.

  1. OptMAVEn--a new framework for the de novo design of antibody variable region models targeting specific antigen epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Li

    Full Text Available Antibody-based therapeutics provides novel and efficacious treatments for a number of diseases. Traditional experimental approaches for designing therapeutic antibodies rely on raising antibodies against a target antigen in an immunized animal or directed evolution of antibodies with low affinity for the desired antigen. However, these methods remain time consuming, cannot target a specific epitope and do not lead to broad design principles informing other studies. Computational design methods can overcome some of these limitations by using biophysics models to rationally select antibody parts that maximize affinity for a target antigen epitope. This has been addressed to some extend by OptCDR for the design of complementary determining regions. Here, we extend this earlier contribution by addressing the de novo design of a model of the entire antibody variable region against a given antigen epitope while safeguarding for immunogenicity (Optimal Method for Antibody Variable region Engineering, OptMAVEn. OptMAVEn simulates in silico the in vivo steps of antibody generation and evolution, and is capable of capturing the critical structural features responsible for affinity maturation of antibodies. In addition, a humanization procedure was developed and incorporated into OptMAVEn to minimize the potential immunogenicity of the designed antibody models. As case studies, OptMAVEn was applied to design models of neutralizing antibodies targeting influenza hemagglutinin and HIV gp120. For both HA and gp120, novel computational antibody models with numerous interactions with their target epitopes were generated. The observed rates of mutations and types of amino acid changes during in silico affinity maturation are consistent with what has been observed during in vivo affinity maturation. The results demonstrate that OptMAVEn can efficiently generate diverse computational antibody models with both optimized binding affinity to antigens and reduced

  2. Surface activity of a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Senner, Frank; Maeder, Karsten; Mueller, Robert

    2009-12-01

    The development of high concentration antibody formulations presents a major challenge for the formulation scientist, as physical characteristics and stability behavior change compared to low concentration protein formulations. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential correlation between surface activity and shaking stress stability of a model antibody-polysorbate 20 formulation. The surface activities of pure antibody and polysorbate 20 were compared, followed by a study on the influence of a model antibody on the apparent critical micelle concentration (CMC) of polysorbate 20 over a protein concentration range from 10 to 150 mg/mL. In a shaking stress experiment, the stability of 10, 75, and 150 mg/mL antibody formulations was investigated containing different concentrations of polysorbate 20, both below and above the CMC. The antibody increased significantly the apparent CMC of antibody-polysorbate 20 mixtures in comparison to the protein-free buffer. However, the concentration of polysorbate required for stabilization of the model antibody in a shaking stress experiment did not show dependence on the CMC. A polysorbate 20 level of 0.005% was found sufficient to stabilize both at low and high antibody concentration against antibody aggregation and precipitation.

  3. Novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies: synergy and antagonism with tumor necrosis factor-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceran Ceyhan

    2012-10-01

    , but antagonistically on BT-474 cells. A representative anti-HER2 antibody inhibited Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation leading to cyclin D1 accumulation and growth arrest in SK-BR-3 cells, independently from TNF-α. Conclusions Novel antibodies against extracellular domain of HER2 may serve as potent anti-cancer bioactive molecules. Cell-dependent synergy and antagonism between anti-HER2 antibodies and TNF-α provide evidence for a complex interplay between HER2 and TNF-α signaling pathways. Such complexity may drastically affect the outcome of HER2-directed therapeutic interventions.

  4. Cofilin takes the lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DesMarais, Vera; Ghosh, Mousumi; Eddy, Robert; Condeelis, John

    2005-01-01

    Cofilin has emerged as a key regulator of actin dynamics at the leading edge of motile cells. Through its actin-severing activity, it creates new actin barbed ends for polymerization and also depolymerizes old actin filaments. Its function is tightly regulated in the cell. Spatially, its activity is restricted by other actin-binding proteins, such as tropomyosin, which compete for accessibility of actin filament populations in different regions of the cell. At the molecular level, it is regulated by phosphorylation, pH and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate binding downstream of signaling cascades. In addition, it also appears to be regulated by interactions with 14-3-3zeta and cyclase-associated protein. In vivo, cofilin acts synergistically with the Arp2/3 complex to amplify local actin polymerization responses upon cell stimulation, which gives it a central role in setting the direction of motility in crawling cells.

  5. Lead telluride alloy thermoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. LaLonde

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to use solid-state thermoelectrics for waste heat recovery has reinvigorated the field of thermoelectrics in tackling the challenges of energy sustainability. While thermoelectric generators have decades of proven reliability in space, from the 1960s to the present, terrestrial uses have so far been limited to niche applications on Earth because of a relatively low material efficiency. Lead telluride alloys were some of the first materials investigated and commercialized for generators but their full potential for thermoelectrics has only recently been revealed to be far greater than commonly believed. By reviewing some of the past and present successes of PbTe as a thermoelectric material we identify the issues for achieving maximum performance and successful band structure engineering strategies for further improvements that can be applied to other thermoelectric materials systems.

  6. Genetic engineering of cell lines using lentiviral vectors to achieve antibody secretion following encapsulated implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathuilière, Aurélien; Bohrmann, Bernd; Kopetzki, Erhard; Schweitzer, Christoph; Jacobsen, Helmut; Moniatte, Marc; Aebischer, Patrick; Schneider, Bernard L

    2014-01-01

    The controlled delivery of antibodies by immunoisolated bioimplants containing genetically engineered cells is an attractive and safe approach for chronic treatments. To reach therapeutic antibody levels there is a need to generate renewable cell lines, which can long-term survive in macroencapsulation devices while maintaining high antibody specific productivity. Here we have developed a dual lentiviral vector strategy for the genetic engineering of cell lines compatible with macroencapsulation, using separate vectors encoding IgG light and heavy chains. We show that IgG expression level can be maximized as a function of vector dose and transgene ratio. This approach allows for the generation of stable populations of IgG-expressing C2C12 mouse myoblasts, and for the subsequent isolation of clones stably secreting high IgG levels. Moreover, we demonstrate that cell transduction using this lentiviral system leads to the production of a functional glycosylated antibody by myogenic cells. Subsequent implantation of antibody-secreting cells in a high-capacity macroencapsulation device enables continuous delivery of recombinant antibodies in the mouse subcutaneous tissue, leading to substantial levels of therapeutic IgG detectable in the plasma.

  7. [Liver diseases with microsomal antibodies. Frequency, clinical and immunological findings and course observations (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G; Kienle, J; Schmidt, D S; Wolf, H

    1978-08-01

    Microsomal antibodies (LKM-antibodies) differ in the indirect immunfluorescence by use of rat organ sections (kidney, stomach, and liver) from mitochondrial antibodies by there reaction with proximal renal tubules and hepatocytes while parietal cells usually fail to stain. In contrast to other humoral autoantibodies LKM-antibodies are rare. In a prospective study on 930 adults and 33 children with two third chronic hepatitis resp. cirrhosis frequency in the first group amounts to 0.38% and in the latter to 6.9% of all liver diseases. Among six patients with LKW-antibodies and chronic active hepatitis there were three children aged 4-13 and three adults between 45-55 years. On common results two children showed beside LKM-antibodies by absence of other immunphenomenons a rise of gamma-globulins in the electrophoresis and immunglobulin G as well as a chronic active hepatitis with necrosis leading in spite of initial rapid progression and persistent antibodies into inactive postnecrotiv cirrhosis. The other four patients showed no common course in respect to clinical, histological and immunological findings.

  8. Anti-DNA antibodies cross-react with C1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchin, Giovanni; Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Zhang, Jie; Diamond, Betty

    2013-08-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder that involves multiple organ systems and typically presents as a chronic inflammatory disease. Antibodies to double-stranded (ds) DNA are present in approximately 70% of patients and form nucleic acid containing immune complexes which activate dendritic cells through engagement of toll-like receptors, leading to a pro-inflammatory, pro-immunogenic milieu. In addition, anti-dsDNA antibodies deposit in kidneys to initiate glomerulonephritis. Antibodies to C1q have also been implicated in lupus nephritis and are found in 30-50% of patients. C1q is a known suppressor of immune activation and C1q deficiency is the strongest risk factor for SLE. We previously identified a subset of anti-DNA antibodies that binds the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. We now show that both mouse and human anti-DNA antibodies with this specificity bind C1q. These antibodies bind to Clq in glomeruli and exhibit decreased glomerular deposition in the absence of C1q. We propose that this subset of anti-DNA antibodies participates in lupus pathogenesis through direct targeting of C1q on glomeruli and also through removal of soluble C1q thereby limiting the ability of C1q to mediate immune homeostasis.

  9. Controlled delivery of antibodies from injectable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Nathan A; Babcock, Lyndsey R; Murray, Ellen A; Krebs, Melissa D

    2016-02-01

    Therapeutic antibodies are currently used for the treatment of various diseases, but large doses delivered systemically are typically required. Localized controlled delivery techniques would afford major benefits such as decreasing side effects and required doses. Injectable biopolymer systems are an attractive solution due to their minimally invasive potential for controlled release in a localized area. Here, alginate-chitosan hydrogels are demonstrated to provide controlled delivery of IgG model antibodies and also of Fab antibody fragments. Also, an alternate delivery system comprised of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded with antibodies and encapsulated in alginate was shown to successfully provide another level of control over release. These biopolymer systems that offer controlled delivery for antibodies and antibody fragments will be promising for many applications in drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  10. Antibody response to measles immunization in India*

    OpenAIRE

    Job, J. S.; John, T J; Joseph, A.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody response to measles vaccine was measured in 238 subjects aged 6-15 months. Seroconversion rates ranged from 74% at 6 months of age to 100% at 13-15 months; the differences in age-specific rates were not statistically significant. The postimmunization antibody titres increased with increasing age of the vaccinee. Seroconversion rates and antibody titres in 49 subjects with grades I and II malnutrition were not significantly different from those in the 189 normal subjects.

  11. Antiphospholipid Antibodies and Systemic Scleroderma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awa Oumar Touré

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLs could be associated with an increased risk of vascular pathologies in systemic scleroderma. The aim of our study was to search for APLs in patients affected by systemic scleroderma and to evaluate their involvement in the clinical manifestations of this disease. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional descriptive study, from January 2009 until August 2010, with patients received at the Department of Dermatology (Dakar, Senegal. Blood samples were taken at the hematology laboratory and were analyzed for the presence of APLs. Results: Forty patients were recruited. Various types of either isolated or associated APLs were found in 23 patients, i.e. 57.5% of the study population. The most frequently encountered antibody was IgG anti-β2 GPI (37.5% of the patients, followed by anticardiolipins (17.5% and lupus anticoagulants (5%. No statistically significant association of positive antiphospholipid-related tests to any of the scleroderma complications could be demonstrated. Conclusion: A high proportion of patients showing association of systemic scleroderma and APLs suggests the presence of a morbid correlation between these 2 pathologies. It would be useful to follow a cohort of patients affected by systemic scleroderma in order to monitor vascular complications following confirmation of the presence of antiphospholipid syndrome.

  12. Antibody engineering and therapeutics, The Annual Meeting of the Antibody Society: December 8-12, 2013, Huntington Beach, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul W H I; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates.

  13. 6th Annual European Antibody Congress 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The 6th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapinn Ltd., was held in Geneva, Switzerland, which was also the location of the 4th and 5th EAC.1,2 As was the case in 2008 and 2009, the EAC was again the largest antibody congress held in Europe, drawing nearly 250 delegates in 2010. Numerous pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical companies active in the field of therapeutic antibody development were represented, as were start-up and academic organizations and representatives from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The global trends in antibody research and development were discussed, including success stories of recent marketing authorizations of golimumab (Simponi®) and canakinumab (Ilaris®) by Johnson & Johnson and Novartis, respectively, updates on antibodies in late clinical development (obinutuzumab/GA101, farletuzumab/MORAb-003 and itolizumab/T1 h, by Glycart/Roche, Morphotek and Biocon, respectively) and success rates for this fast-expanding class of therapeutics (Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development). Case studies covering clinical progress of girentuximab (Wilex), evaluation of panobacumab (Kenta Biotech), characterization of therapeutic antibody candidates by protein microarrays (Protagen), antibody-drug conjugates (sanofi-aventis, ImmunoGen, Seattle Genetics, Wyeth/Pfizer), radio-immunoconjugates (Bayer Schering Pharma, Université de Nantes) and new scaffolds (Ablynx, AdAlta, Domantis/GlaxoSmithKline, Fresenius, Molecular Partners, Pieris, Scil Proteins, Pfizer, University of Zurich) were presented. Major antibody structural improvements were showcased, including the latest selection engineering of the best isotypes (Abbott, Pfizer, Pierre Fabre), hinge domain (Pierre Fabre), dual antibodies (Abbott), IgG-like bispecific antibodies (Biogen Idec), antibody epitope mapping case studies (Eli Lilly), insights in FcγRII receptor (University of Cambridge), as well as novel tools for antibody fragmentation (Genovis). Improvements

  14. Isoimmunization with anti-U antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R J; Holder, W T; McCord, D L

    1984-03-01

    Isoimmunization with anti-U antibody is a rare but significant cause of hemolytic disease in black newborns. In this case report, an lgG antibody stimulated by fetomaternal transfusion produced a positive direct Coombs' test on cord blood but not neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. A review of the literature suggests the pathophysiology is similar to Rh isoimmunization. The anti-U antibody may develop as a result of pregnancy or blood transfusion in the 1.2 percent of American blacks who are at risk for developing the antibody. The principles of treatment employed in Rh isoimmunization can be successfully used in isoimmunization due to anti-U.

  15. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Gearhart

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations.

  16. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development.

  17. Polymorphism of lead oxoborate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyulyupa, A.G. [Middle School, Sablinskoe, Stavropol region, 356322 (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Fedorov, P.P., E-mail: ppfedorov@yandex.ru [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute RAS, 38 Vavilov Street, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-20

    Highlights: • Pb{sub 4}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} melt undergoes statistical undercooling. • Orthorhombic nonlinear optical crystal Pb{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} is the metastable γ-polymorph. • Temperature of metastable melting of γ-Pb{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} is equal to 530 °C. - Abstract: The study of lead borate melt crystallization by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray diffraction analysis has shown that, for Pb{sub 4}O(BO{sub 3}){sub 2} (or 4PbO·B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) stoichiometric compound, its well-known orthorhombic modification (non-centrosymmetric Aba2 space symmetry group (SSG), a = 15.472(1), b = 10.802(1), c = 9.9486(6) Å unit cell parameters) is metastable. It forms from the undercooled melt and has a melting point of 530 ± 5 °C.

  18. An efficient method for isolating antibody fragments against small peptides by antibody phage display

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Zhi; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    We generated monoclonal scFv (single chain variable fragment) antibodies from an antibody phage display library towards three small synthetic peptides derived from the sequence of s1-casein. Key difficulties for selection of scFv-phages against small peptides were addressed. Small peptides do....... The scFvs were sequenced and characterized, and specificity was characterized by ELISA. The methods developed in this study are universally applicable for antibody phage display to efficiently produce antibody fragments against small peptides....

  19. A SURVEY ON LEAD INTOXICATION IN LEAD MINERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Meshgi

    1972-12-01

    Full Text Available A survey on lead intoxication in lead mine workers was carried out among Khanehsorme, lead miners in NajafAabad and also in Ab-bagh lead miners in Shahreza, both located in district of Esfahan, Iran. The studies were carried out on 62 miners out of 82 employees in Khanehsorme, 25 miners out of 27 employees in Ab-bagh lead miners and 47 rural inhabitants in the surroundings of mines were selected as the Control group. Clinical examinations were done. Age and sex group, working hours, type of work, and duration of service and previous occupation of workers were questioned. The determination of lead in urine was done according to Truhaut et Boudene's method and the content of blood Hemoglobin was performed according to Sali method. Results obtained in lead miners in comparison with the control group showed the absorption of lead and consequently lead intoxication was observed some extent.

  20. Leading Your Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Wayne N.

    2008-01-01

    life is good. More often when an unbelievably difficult test fails, we are left with a very long discussion of why and what was wrong in the design or execution of the test. Make sure that the test is well defined. Even then, it is important to explain to your leaders what inherent accuracy (or error) the test conditions or equipment have and what the assumptions or initial conditions were for the test. Test results without a good understanding of the test's accuracy or the pedigree of the test assumptions are worth very little. Finally, there is flight test data. Always limited, never at the edge of the envelope, it still shows how the real hardware works in a combined environment. Flight experience is dangerous because it typically doesn't show how close to the edge of the cliff the equipment is operating, but it does demonstrate how the hardware really works. A flight test is the ultimate test, again taken with the knowledge that it is probably not the extreme but something more like the middle of the environmental and systems performance. Good understanding of a problem and its solution always relies on a combination of all these methods. Be sure to lead your leaders by using all the tools you have at your disposal. At the end of the day, decisions in space flight always come down to a risk trade. Our business is not remotely safe, not in the sense that the public, the media, or our legislators use the term. Everything we do has a risk, cost, schedule, or performance trade-off. For your leaders to make an appropriate decision, you need to educate them, lead them, talk with them, and engage them in the discussion until full understanding takes place. It's your job. *

  1. Drowning: a leading killer!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Domingos Garrido

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Drowning kills at least 372,000 people worldwide every year and is the 3rd leading cause of unintentional death, accounting for 7% of all deaths stemming from accidents (WHO, 2014. Conceptually, “drowning” is a complex and multi-faceted phenomenon, characterized as a chain of events (Bierens, 2006. Drowning is defined as the process of experiencing respiratory impairment from immersion or submersion in liquid. Research on drowning as a phenomenon presents several difficulties - most of all, that global data concerning the number of occurrences are not accurate. Nevertheless, detailed analysis of the registered incidents allows the identification of risk factors of drowning. An in-depth analysis of the risk factors is the basis for the creation of targeted and effective strategies to prevent drowning. Due to variability of situations which could lead to a drowning episode, experts suggest the adoption of a multi-layer prevention model, rather than opting for isolated measures, since no single measure can prevent all deaths and injuries caused by submersion. Among the preventive measures we would like to emphasize instruction in swimming and water safety. So, what does "knowing how to swim" really mean? Some authors define mastery of this competence as swimming a given distance, while others put the emphasis on how this/any given distance is swum (Stallman, Junge, & Blixt, 2008. It has long been realized that there is no contradiction between learning those competencies which make a person less susceptible to drowning and those competencies which prepare the path towards higher levels of performance and competition. Aquatic movement researchers and practitioners and drowning prevention researchers and practitioners, share in the responsibility for drowning prevention though they are often unaware of it. The question “What should be taught to children?” is too infrequently asked. There remains great variation in what is taught and programs

  2. The production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, V.; Lokman, C.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Punt, P.J.

    2003-01-01

    In this review we will focus on the current status and views concerning the production of antibody fragments and antibody fusion proteins by yeasts and filamentous fungi. We will focus on single-chain antibody fragment production (scFv and VHH) by these lower eukaryotes and the possible applications

  3. Structural basis for quinine-dependent antibody binding to platelet integrin αIIbβ3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianghai; Zhu, Jieqing; Bougie, Daniel W; Aster, Richard H; Springer, Timothy A

    2015-10-29

    Drug-induced immune thrombocytopenia (DITP) is caused by antibodies that react with specific platelet-membrane glycoproteins when the provoking drug is present. More than 100 drugs have been implicated as triggers for this condition, quinine being one of the most common. The cause of DITP in most cases appears to be a drug-induced antibody that binds to a platelet membrane glycoprotein only when the drug is present. How a soluble drug promotes binding of an otherwise nonreactive immunoglobulin to its target, leading to platelet destruction, is uncertain, in part because of the difficulties of working with polyclonal human antibodies usually available only in small quantities. Recently, quinine-dependent murine monoclonal antibodies were developed that recognize a defined epitope on the β-propeller domain of the platelet integrin αIIb subunit (GPIIb) only when the drug is present and closely mimic the behavior of antibodies found in human patients with quinine-induced thrombocytopenia in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate specific, high-affinity binding of quinine to the complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of these antibodies and define in crystal structures the changes induced in the CDR by this interaction. Because no detectable binding of quinine to the target integrin could be demonstrated in previous studies, the findings indicate that a hybrid paratope consisting of quinine and reconfigured antibody CDR plays a critical role in recognition of its target epitope by an antibody and suggest that, in this type of drug-induced immunologic injury, the primary reaction involves binding of the drug to antibody CDRs, causing it to acquire specificity for a site on a platelet integrin.

  4. Molecular imaging of rheumatoid arthritis by radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies: new imaging strategies to guide molecular therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malviya, G.; Dierckx, R.A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Conti, F. [Rheumatology Unit, I Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Chianelli, M. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Regina apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome (Italy); Scopinaro, F. [Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Signore, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen (Netherlands); Nuclear Medicine Department, Sapienza University of Rome, St. Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The closing of the last century opened a wide variety of approaches for inflammation imaging and treatment of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The introduction of biological therapies for the management of RA started a revolution in the therapeutic armamentarium with the development of several novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), which can be murine, chimeric, humanised and fully human antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies specifically bind to their target, which could be adhesion molecules, activation markers, antigens or receptors, to interfere with specific inflammation pathways at the molecular level, leading to immune-modulation of the underlying pathogenic process. These new generation of mAbs can also be radiolabelled by using direct or indirect method, with a variety of nuclides, depending upon the specific diagnostic application. For studying rheumatoid arthritis patients, several monoclonal antibodies and their fragments, including anti-TNF-{alpha}, anti-CD20, anti-CD3, anti-CD4 and anti-E-selectin antibody, have been radiolabelled mainly with {sup 99m}Tc or {sup 111}In. Scintigraphy with these radiolabelled antibodies may offer an exciting possibility for the study of RA patients and holds two types of information: (1) it allows better staging of the disease and diagnosis of the state of activity by early detection of inflamed joints that might be difficult to assess; (2) it might provide a possibility to perform 'evidence-based biological therapy' of arthritis with a view to assessing whether an antibody will localise in an inflamed joint before using the same unlabelled antibody therapeutically. This might prove particularly important for the selection of patients to be treated since biological therapies can be associated with severe side-effects and are considerably expensive. This article reviews the use of radiolabelled mAbs in the study of RA with particular emphasis on the use of different radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies for

  5. Suppressor T cells - a sensitive target of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambach, A.; Stiller-Winkler, R.; Oberbarnscheidt, J.; Ewers, J.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of chronic low level lead exposure on the regulatory functions of T cells in the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in mice. Female mice were exposed to lead (as lead acetate) in the diet at 545 (group 1) and 2180 ppm (group 2) for 10 weeks. Lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels (PbB) of about 50 ..mu..g/100 g (group 1) produced a substantial increase of the number of IgG antibodies secreting spleen cells on days 3 and 4 after challenge. At the higher exposure level (group 2; PbB 60-80 ..mu..g/100 g) a suppression of the number of IgG plaque forming cells was observed. The IgM response was much smaller than the IgG response. Although differences between the group means were small, the results indicate that there also is an enhancement of the IgM response in the lower dosage group on days 3 and 4. In a second experiment the effect of in vivo lead exposure on antigenic competition was examined. Lead substantially reduced the effect of antigenic competition. Results of both experiments suggest that suppressor T cells rather than helper T cells may represent the primary target for lead. Throughout this study serum complement C3 levels were determined. Complement C3 levels tended to be reduced in the lead exposed groups before as well as after inocculation with SRBC. (orig.*.

  6. Suppressor T cells - a sensitive target of lead toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hambach, A.; Stiller-Winkler, R.; Oberbarnscheidt, J.; Ewers, U.

    1983-01-01

    Studies were performed to investigate the effect of chronic low level lead exposure on the regulatory functions of T cells in the humoral immune response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in mice. Female mice were exposed to lead (as lead acetate) in the diet at 545 (group 1) and 2180 ppm (group 2) for 10 weeks. Lead exposure resulting in blood lead levels (PbB) of about 50 ..mu..g/100 g (group 1) produced a substantial increase of the number of IgG antibodies secreting spleen cells on days 3 and 4 after challenge. At the higher exposure level (group 2; PbB 60-80 ..mu..m/100 g) a suppression of the number of IgG plawue forming cells was observed. The IgM response was much smaller than the IgG response. Although differences between the group means were small, the results indicate that there also is an enhancement of the IgM response in the lower dosage group on days 3 and 4. In a second experiment the effect of in vivo lead exposure on antigenic competition was examined. Lead substantially reduced the effect of antigenic competition. Results of both experiments suggest that suppressor T cells rather than helper T cells may represent the primary target for lead. Throughout this study serum complement C3 levels were determined. Complement C3 levels tended to be reduced in the lead exposed groups before as well as after inocculation with SRBC.

  7. Antibodies to watch in 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Janice M

    Over 50 investigational monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics are currently undergoing evaluation in late-stage clinical studies, which is expected to drive a trend toward first marketing approvals of at least 6-9 mAbs per year in the near-term. In the United States (US), a total of 6 and 9 mAbs were granted first approvals during 2014 and 2015, respectively; all these products are also approved in the European Union (EU). As of December 1, 2016, 6 mAbs (atezolizumab, olaratumab, reslizumab, ixekizumab, bezlotoxumab, oblitoxaximab) had been granted first approvals during 2016 in either the EU or US. Brodalumab, was granted a first approval in Japan in July 2016. Regulatory actions on marketing applications for brodalumab in the EU and US are not expected until 2017. In 2017, first EU or US approvals may also be granted for at least nine mAbs (ocrelizumab, avelumab, Xilonix, inotuzumab ozogamicin, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, guselkumab, romosozumab) that are not yet approved in any country. Based on announcements of company plans for regulatory submissions and the estimated completion dates for late-stage clinical studies, and assuming the study results are positive, marketing applications for at least 6 antibody therapeutics (benralizumab, tildrakizumab, emicizumab, galcanezumab, ibalizumab, PRO-140) that are now being evaluated in late-stage clinical studies may be submitted during December 2016* or 2017. Other 'antibodies to watch' in 2017 include 20 mAbs are undergoing evaluation in pivotal studies that have estimated primary completion dates in late 2016 or during 2017. Of these, 5 mAbs are for cancer (durvalumab, JNJ-56022473, ublituximab, anetumab ravtansine, glembatumumab vedotin) and 15 mAbs are for non-cancer indications (caplacizumab, lanadelumab, roledumab, tralokinumab, risankizumab, SA237, emapalumab, suptavumab, erenumab, eptinezumab, fremanezumab, fasinumab, tanezumab, lampalizumab, brolucizumab). Positive results from these studies may

  8. 21 CFR 866.3290 - Gonococcal antibody test (GAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gonococcal antibody test (GAT). 866.3290 Section... antibody test (GAT). (a) Identification. A gonococcal antibody test (GAT) is an in vitro device that..., indirect fluorescent antibody, or radioimmunoassay, antibodies to Neisseria gonorrhoeae in sera...

  9. Monoclonal antibody therapy in the treatment of Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, S P; Broitman, S A

    1992-11-01

    A role for lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins, LPS) in 7 the pathogenesis of Reye's syndrome (RS) has previously been suggested. Impairment of hepatic LPS clearance can lead to systemic endotoxemia as previous studies by this and other laboratories have suggested for several hepatic disorders including RS. Systemic LPS may mediate many of the clinical findings associated with RS by eliciting monokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8. Monoclonal antibody therapy directed at LPS, and monokines may represent a novel approach to the treatment of RS.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen;

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine m......Ab-producing cell lines were cloned and their cross-reactivities characterised against a panel of airborne fungal spores representing genera commonly found in the same environment as Pst. Two specific mAbs were used to develop a competitive ELISA (Pst mAb4) and a subtractive inhibition ELISA (Pst mAb8). Standard...

  11. Current issues in human lead exposure and regulation of lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J M; Elias, R W; Grant, L D

    1993-01-01

    Concern about lead as a significant public health problem has increased as epidemiological and experimental evidence has mounted regarding adverse health effects at successively lower levels of lead exposure. This concern has led to downward revision of criteria for acceptable blood lead concentrations to the 10 micrograms/dL mark now designated by EPA as a target level for regulatory development and enforcement/clean-up purposes. Much progress has been made in reducing lead exposures during the past 10-15 years, with marked declines evident both in air lead and blood lead concentrations in parallel to the phase-down of lead in gasoline and notable decreases in food lead exposure due to elimination of lead soldered cans by U.S. food processors. With the lessening of exposure from these sources, the importance of other components of multimedia exposure pathways has grown and stimulated increasing regulatory attention and abatement efforts to reduce health risks associated with lead exposure from drinking water, from lead-based paint, and from household dust and soil contaminated by deteriorating paint, smelter emissions, or various other sources. Increasing attention is also being accorded to reduction of occupational lead exposures (including those related to lead abatement activities), with particular concern for protection of men and women during their reproductive years.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of resistance to the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Wheeler, Deric L

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Receptor activation upon ligand binding leads to down stream activation of the PI3K/AKT, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PLCγ/PKC pathways that influence cell proliferation, survival and the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Increased activation by gene amplification, protein overexpression or mutations of the EGFR has been identified as an etiological factor in a number of human epithelial cancers (e.g., NSCLC, CRC, glioblastoma and breast cancer). Therefore, targeting the EGFR has been intensely pursued as a cancer treatment strategy over the last two decades. To date, five EGFR inhibitors, including three small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and two monoclonal antibodies have gained FDA approval for use in oncology. Both approaches to targeting the EGFR have shown clinical promise and the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab is used to treat HNSCC and CRC. Despite clinical gains arising from use of cetuximab, both intrinsic resistance and the development of acquired resistance are now well recognized. In this review we focus on the biology of the EGFR, the role of EGFR in human cancer, the development of antibody-based anti-EGFR therapies and a summary of their clinical successes. Further, we provide an in depth discussion of described molecular mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab and potential strategies to circumvent this resistance.

  13. Dynamic force spectroscopy of parallel individual mucin1-antibody bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Langry, K; Lau, E; Albrecht, H; Ratto, T; DeNardo, S; Colvin, M E; Noy, A

    2005-05-02

    We used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to measure the binding forces between Mucin1 (MUC1) peptide and a single chain antibody fragment (scFv) selected from a scFv library screened against MUC1. This binding interaction is central to the design of the molecules for targeted delivery of radioimmunotherapeutic agents for prostate and breast cancer treatment. Our experiments separated the specific binding interaction from non-specific interactions by tethering the antibody and MUC1 molecules to the AFM tip and sample surface with flexible polymer spacers. Rupture force magnitude and elastic characteristics of the spacers allowed identification of the bond rupture events corresponding to different number of interacting proteins. We used dynamic force spectroscopy to estimate the intermolecular potential widths and equivalent thermodynamic off rates for mono-, bi-, and tri-valent interactions. Measured interaction potential parameters agree with the results of molecular docking simulation. Our results demonstrate that an increase of the interaction valency leads to a precipitous decline in the dissociation rate. Binding forces measured for mono and multivalent interactions match the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple uncorrelated bonds in parallel configuration. Our approach is promising for comparison of the specific effects of molecular modifications as well as for determination of the best configuration of antibody-based multivalent targeting agents.

  14. Membrane adsorbers as purification tools for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Cristiana

    2007-03-15

    Downstream purification processes for monoclonal antibody production typically involve multiple steps; some of them are conventionally performed by bead-based column chromatography. Affinity chromatography with Protein A is the most selective method for protein purification and is conventionally used for the initial capturing step to facilitate rapid volume reduction as well as separation of the antibody. However, conventional affinity chromatography has some limitations that are inherent with the method, it exhibits slow intraparticle diffusion and high pressure drop within the column. Membrane-based separation processes can be used in order to overcome these mass transfer limitations. The ligand is immobilized in the membrane pores and the convective flow brings the solute molecules very close to the ligand and hence minimizes the diffusional limitations associated with the beads. Nonetheless, the adoption of this technology has been slow because membrane chromatography has been limited by a lower binding capacity than that of conventional columns, even though the high flux advantages provided by membrane adsorbers would lead to higher productivity. This review considers the use of membrane adsorbers as an alternative technology for capture and polishing steps for the purification of monoclonal antibodies. Promising industrial applications as well as new trends in research will be addressed.

  15. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duval, A; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J B

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  17. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  18. Methods for Selecting Phage Display Antibody Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara-Acevedo, Ricardo; Diez, Paula; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Maria; Degano, Rosa Maria; Ibarrola, Nieves; Gongora, Rafael; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The selection process aims sequential enrichment of phage antibody display library in clones that recognize the target of interest or antigen as the library undergoes successive rounds of selection. In this review, selection methods most commonly used for phage display antibody libraries have been comprehensively described.

  19. Receptor antibodies as novel therapeutics for diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussar, Siegfried; Vienberg, Sara Gry; Kahn, C Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Antibodies to receptors can block or mimic hormone action. Taking advantage of receptor isoforms, co-receptors, and other receptor modulating proteins, antibodies and other designer ligands can enhance tissue specificity and provide new approaches to the therapy of diabetes and other diseases....

  20. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs.

  1. Photonic crystal fiber based antibody detection

    OpenAIRE

    Duval, A.; Lhoutellier, M; Jensen, J. B.; Hoiby, P E; Missier, V; Pedersen, L. H.; Hansen, Theis Peter; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Bang, Ole

    2004-01-01

    An original approach for detecting labeled antibodies based on strong penetration photonic crystal fibers is introduced. The target antibody is immobilized inside the air-holes of a photonic crystal fiber and the detection is realized by the means of evanescent-wave fluorescence spectroscopy and the use of a transversal illumination setup.

  2. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  3. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  4. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  5. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  6. Anti-miroestrol polyclonal antibodies: a comparison of immunogen preparations used to obtain desired antibody properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitisripanya, Tharita; Jutathis, Kamonthip; Inyai, Chadathorn; Komaikul, Jukrapun; Udomsin, Orapin; Yusakul, Gorawit; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2016-04-01

    Immunogen quality is one important factor that contributes to desirable antibody characteristics. Highly specific antibodies against miroestrol can be used to develop a quality control immunoassay for Pueraria candollei products. In this study, we investigated how various immunogen preparations affect antibody properties. The results show that immunogen prepared using the Mannich reaction provides antibodies with higher specificity and sensitivity against miroestrol than immunogen prepared with the periodate reaction. The results suggest the Mannich reaction maintains the original structure of miroestrol and generates useful antibodies for developing immunoassays.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  8. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, Paul Robert; Houen, Gunnar

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors...... such as structure, accessibility and amino acid composition are crucial. Since small peptides tend not to be immunogenic, it may be necessary to conjugate them to carrier proteins in order to enhance immune presentation. Several strategies for conjugation of peptide-carriers applied for immunization exist...

  9. Antiphospholipid antibody: laboratory, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ziglioli

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL represent a heterogeneous group of antibodies that recognize various antigenic targets including beta2 glycoprotein I (β2GPI, prothrombin (PT, activated protein C, tissue plasminogen activator, plasmin and annexin A2. The most commonly used tests to detect aPL are: lupus anticoagulant (LAC, a functional coagulation assay, anticardiolipin antibody (aCL and anti-β2GPI antibody (anti-β2GPI, which are enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA. Clinically aPL are associated with thrombosis and/or with pregnancy morbidity. Apparently aPL alone are unable to induce thrombotic manifestations, but they increase the risk of vascular events that can occur in the presence of another thrombophilic condition; on the other hand obstetrical manifestations were shown to be associated not only to thrombosis but mainly to a direct antibody effect on the trophoblast.

  10. Generation of a haptoglobin-hemoglobin complex-specific Fab antibody blocking the binding of the complex to CD163

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Ivo R; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Madsen, Mette

    2003-01-01

    During intravascular hemolysis hemoglobin (Hb) binds to haptoglobin (Hp) leading to endocytosis of the complex by the macrophage receptor, CD163. In the present study, we used a phage-display Fab antibody strategy to explore if the complex formation between Hp and Hb leads to exposure of antigenic...

  11. Antibody-based resistance to plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillberg, S; Zimmermann, S; Zhang, M Y; Fischer, R

    2001-01-01

    Plant diseases are a major threat to the world food supply, as up to 15% of production is lost to pathogens. In the past, disease control and the generation of resistant plant lines protected against viral, bacterial or fungal pathogens, was achieved using conventional breeding based on crossings, mutant screenings and backcrossing. Many approaches in this field have failed or the resistance obtained has been rapidly broken by the pathogens. Recent advances in molecular biotechnology have made it possible to obtain and to modify genes that are useful for generating disease resistant crops. Several strategies, including expression of pathogen-derived sequences or anti-pathogenic agents, have been developed to engineer improved pathogen resistance in transgenic plants. Antibody-based resistance is a novel strategy for generating transgenic plants resistant to pathogens. Decades ago it was shown that polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies can neutralize viruses, bacteria and selected fungi. This approach has been improved recently by the development of recombinant antibodies (rAbs). Crop resistance can be engineered by the expression of pathogen-specific antibodies, antibody fragments or antibody fusion proteins. The advantages of this approach are that rAbs can be engineered against almost any target molecule, and it has been demonstrated that expression of functional pathogen-specific rAbs in plants confers effective pathogen protection. The efficacy of antibody-based resistance was first shown for plant viruses and its application to other plant pathogens is becoming more established. However, successful use of antibodies to generate plant pathogen resistance relies on appropriate target selection, careful antibody design, efficient antibody expression, stability and targeting to appropriate cellular compartments.

  12. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  13. The germinal center antibody response in health and disease [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony L. DeFranco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The germinal center response is the delayed but sustained phase of the antibody response that is responsible for producing high-affinity antibodies of the IgG, IgA and/or IgE isotypes. B cells in the germinal center undergo re-iterative cycles of somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin gene variable regions, clonal expansion, and Darwinian selection for cells expressing higher-affinity antibody variants. Alternatively, selected B cells can terminally differentiate into long-lived plasma cells or into a broad diversity of mutated memory B cells; the former secrete the improved antibodies to fight an infection and to provide continuing protection from re-infection, whereas the latter may jumpstart immune responses to subsequent infections with related but distinct infecting agents. Our understanding of the molecules involved in the germinal center reaction has been informed by studies of human immunodeficiency patients with selective defects in the production of antibodies. Recent studies have begun to reveal how innate immune recognition via Toll-like receptors can enhance the magnitude and selective properties of the germinal center, leading to more effective control of infection by a subset of viruses. Just as early insights into the nature of the germinal center found application in the development of the highly successful conjugate vaccines, more recent insights may find application in the current efforts to develop new generations of vaccines, including vaccines that can induce broadly protective neutralizing antibodies against influenza virus or HIV-1.

  14. [Platelet allo-antibodies identification strategies for preventing and managing platelet refractoriness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basire, A; Picard, C

    2014-11-01

    Platelet refractoriness is a serious complication for patients receiving recurrent platelet transfusions, which can be explained by non-immune and immune causes. Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) allo-immunization, especially against HLA class I, is the major cause for immune platelet refractoriness. To a lesser extent, allo-antibodies against specific Human Platelet Antigen (HPA) are also involved. Pregnancy, transplantation and previous transfusions can lead to allo-immune reaction against platelet antigens. After transfusion, platelet count is decreased by accelerated platelet destruction related to antibodies fixation on incompatible platelet antigens. New laboratory tests for allo-antibodies identification were developed to improve sensibility and specificity, especially with the LUMINEX(®) technology. The good use and interpretation of these antibodies assays can improve strategies for platelet refractoriness prevention and management with a patient adapted response. Compatible platelets units can be selected according to their identity with recipient typing or immune compatibility regarding HLA or HPA antibodies or HLA epitope compatibility. Prospective studies are needed to further confirm the clinical benefit of new allo-antibodies identification methods and consensus strategies for immune platelet refractoriness management.

  15. VH-VL orientation prediction for antibody humanization candidate selection: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bujotzek, Alexander; Lipsmeier, Florian; Harris, Seth F; Benz, Jörg; Kuglstatter, Andreas; Georges, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Antibody humanization describes the procedure of grafting a non-human antibody's complementarity-determining regions, i.e., the variable loop regions that mediate specific interactions with the antigen, onto a β-sheet framework that is representative of the human variable region germline repertoire, thus reducing the number of potentially antigenic epitopes that might trigger an anti-antibody response. The selection criterion for the so-called acceptor frameworks (one for the heavy and one for the light chain variable region) is traditionally based on sequence similarity. Here, we propose a novel approach that selects acceptor frameworks such that the relative orientation of the 2 variable domains in 3D space, and thereby the geometry of the antigen-binding site, is conserved throughout the process of humanization. The methodology relies on a machine learning-based predictor of antibody variable domain orientation that has recently been shown to improve the quality of antibody homology models. Using data from 3 humanization campaigns, we demonstrate that preselecting humanization variants based on the predicted difference in variable domain orientation with regard to the original antibody leads to subsets of variants with a significant improvement in binding affinity.

  16. Simplifying complex sequence information: a PCP-consensus protein binds antibodies against all four Dengue serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, David M; Lewis, Jessica A; Lu, Wenzhe; Schein, Catherine H

    2012-09-14

    Designing proteins that reflect the natural variability of a pathogen is essential for developing novel vaccines and drugs. Flaviviruses, including Dengue (DENV) and West Nile (WNV), evolve rapidly and can "escape" neutralizing monoclonal antibodies by mutation. Designing antigens that represent many distinct strains is important for DENV, where infection with a strain from one of the four serotypes may lead to severe hemorrhagic disease on subsequent infection with a strain from another serotype. Here, a DENV physicochemical property (PCP)-consensus sequence was derived from 671 unique sequences from the Flavitrack database. PCP-consensus proteins for domain 3 of the envelope protein (EdomIII) were expressed from synthetic genes in Escherichia coli. The ability of the purified consensus proteins to bind polyclonal antibodies generated in response to infection with strains from each of the four DENV serotypes was determined. The initial consensus protein bound antibodies from DENV-1-3 in ELISA and Western blot assays. This sequence was altered in 3 steps to incorporate regions of maximum variability, identified as significant changes in the PCPs, characteristic of DENV-4 strains. The final protein was recognized by antibodies against all four serotypes. Two amino acids essential for efficient binding to all DENV antibodies are part of a discontinuous epitope previously defined for a neutralizing monoclonal antibody. The PCP-consensus method can significantly reduce the number of experiments required to define a multivalent antigen, which is particularly important when dealing with pathogens that must be tested at higher biosafety levels.

  17. Cloning single-chain antibody fragments (ScFv) from hyrbidoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toleikis, Lars; Frenzel, André

    2012-01-01

    Despite the rising impact of the generation of antibodies by phage display and other technologies, hybridoma technology still provides a valuable tool for the generation of high-affinity binders against different targets. But there exist several limitations of using hybridoma-derived antibodies. The source of the hybridoma clones are mostly rat or mouse B-lymphocytes. Therefore a human-anti-mouse or human-anti-rat antibody response may result in immunogenicity of these antibodies. This leads to the necessity of humanization of these antibodies where the knowledge of the amino acid sequence of the proteins is inalienable. Furthermore, additional in vitro modifications, e.g., affinity maturation or fusion to other proteins, are dependent on cloning of the antigen-binding domains.Here we describe the isolation of RNA from hybridoma cells and the primers that can be used for the amplification of VL and VH as well as the cloning of the antibody in scFv format and its expression in Escherichia coli.

  18. [Anti-NEP and anti-PLA2R antibodies in membranous nephropathy: an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdzik, A A; Debiec, H; I Brochériou; Husson, C; Rorive, S; Broeders, N; Le Moine, A; Ronco, P; Nortier, J

    2015-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is the most common cause for nephrotic syndrome in adults and occurs as an idiopathic (primary) or secondary disease. Since the early 2000's, substantial advances have been made in the understanding of the molecular bases of MN. The neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and the receptor for secretory phospholipase A2 (PLA2R) have been identified as target antigens for circulating and deposited antibodies in allo-immune neonatal and adult " idiopathic " MN, respectively. These antibodies recognize specific antigens of podocytes, precipitate as subepithelial immune complexes and activate complement leading to proteinuria. Anti-PLA2R antibodies are of particular clinical importance. Indeed, they are detected in approximately 70% of primary MN in adults, demonstrating that MN actually is an autoimmune condition specific to the kidney. In Europeans, genome-wide studies have shown an association between alleles of PLA2R1 and HLA DQA1 (class II genes of tissue histocompatibility complex) genes and idiopathic MN. Newly developed diagnostic tests detecting circulating anti-PLA2R antibody and PLA2R antigen in glomerular deposits have induced a change in paradigm in the diagnostic approach of idiopathic MN. Measurement of circulating anti-PLA2R antibody is also very useful for the monitoring of MN activity. However, the mechanisms responsible for the formation of anti-PLA2R antibodies as well as those involved in the progression of MN to end-stage renal disease remain to be defined.

  19. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythroid hypoplasia (EH is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy.

  20. Lead in School Drinking Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    Lead levels in school drinking water merit special concern because children are more at risk than adults from exposure to lead. This manual provides ways in which school officials can minimize this risk. It assists administrators by providing: (1) general information on the significance of lead in school drinking water and its effects on children;…

  1. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries.

  2. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection in the context of positive anticardiolipin antibodies and clinically undiagnosed systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisar, M K; Mya, T

    2011-11-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an extremely uncommon condition that can lead to fatal acute myocardial infarction. There have been very few case reports of SCAD in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and even fewer in association with antiphospholipid antibodies - mainly postpartum. This is the first reported case of SCAD in a patient who was confirmed to have SLE and tested positive for anticardiolipin antibody and lupus anticoagulant. This case demonstrates the importance of carefully considering the differential diagnoses of SCAD at presentation. It also highlights the need for further research to explore the link between SLE, antiphospholipid antibodies and SCAD.

  3. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Parodis

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204 or without (n = 294 LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous, before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes. Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8. Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all, but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are

  4. Combinatorial antibody libraries: new advances, new immunological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Immunochemists have become quite proficient in engineering existing antibody molecules to control their pharmacological properties. However, in terms of generating new antibodies, the combinatorial antibody library has become a central feature of modern immunochemistry. These libraries are essentially an immune system in a test tube and enable the selection of antibodies without the constraints of whole animal or cell-based systems. This Review provides an overview of how antibody libraries are constructed and discusses what can be learnt from these synthetic systems. In particular, the Review focuses on new biological insights from antibody libraries - such as the concept of 'SOS antibodies' - and the growing use of intracellular antibodies to perturb cellular functions.

  5. Production and purification of avian antibodies (IgYs from inclusion bodies of a recombinant protein central in NAD+ metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Moreno-González

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of hens for the production of polyclonal antibodies reduces animal intervention and moreover yields a higher quantity of antibodies than other animal models.  The phylogenetic distance between bird and mammal antigens, often leads to more specific avian antibodies than their mammalian counterparts.Since a large amount of antigen is required for avian antibody production, the use of recombinant proteins for this procedure has been growing faster over the last years. Nevertheless, recombinant protein production through heterologous systems frequently prompts the protein to precipitate, forming insoluble aggregates of limited utility (inclusion bodies. A methodology for the production of avian polyclonal antibodies, using recombinant protein from inclusion bodies is presented in this article.In order to produce the antigen, a recombinant Nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase from Giardia intestinalis (His-GiNMNAT was expressed in Escherichia coli.  The protein was purified through solubilization from inclusion bodies prior to its renaturalization.  Antibodies were purified from egg yolk of immunized hens by water dilution, followed by ammonium sulfate precipitation and thiophilic affinity chromatography.The purified antibodies were tested against His-GiNMNAT protein in Western blot essays. From one egg yolk, 14.4 mg of highly pure IgY were obtained; this antibody was able to detect 15ng of His-GiNMNAT.  IgY specificity was improved by means of antigen affinity purification, allowing its use for parasite protein recognition.

  6. Structure Based Antibody-Like Peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark I. Greene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biologics such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb and soluble receptors represent new classes of therapeutic agents for treatment of several diseases. High affinity and high specificity biologics can be utilized for variety of clinical purposes. Monoclonal antibodies have been used as diagnostic agents when coupled with radionuclide, immune modulatory agents or in the treatment of cancers. Among other limitations of using large molecules for therapy the actual cost of biologics has become an issue. There is an effort among chemists and biologists to reduce the size of biologics which includes monoclonal antibodies and receptors without a reduction of biological efficacy. Single chain antibody, camel antibodies, Fv fragments are examples of this type of deconstructive process. Small high-affinity peptides have been identified using phage screening. Our laboratory used a structure-based approach to develop small-size peptidomimetics from the three-dimensional structure of proteins with immunoglobulin folds as exemplified by CD4 and antibodies. Peptides derived either from the receptor or their cognate ligand mimics the functions of the parental macromolecule. These constrained peptides not only provide a platform for developing small molecule drugs, but also provide insight into the atomic features of protein-protein interactions. A general overview of the reduction of monoclonal antibodies to small exocyclic peptide and its prospects as a useful diagnostic and as a drug in the treatment of cancer are discussed.

  7. Glycosylation profiles of therapeutic antibody pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Christoph; Berger, Christoph N; Girard, Philippe; Meier, Roger

    2011-11-01

    Recombinant antibodies specific for human targets are often used as therapeutics and represent a major class of drug products. Their therapeutic efficacy depends on the formation of antibody complexes resulting in the elimination of a target molecule or the modulation of specific signalling pathways. The physiological effects of antibody therapeutics are known to depend on the structural characteristics of the antibody molecule, specifically on the glycosylation which is the result of posttranslational modifications. Hence, production of therapeutic antibodies with a defined and consistent glycoform profile is needed which still remains a considerable challenge to the biopharmaceutical industry. To provide an insight into the industries capability to control their manufacturing process and to provide antibodies of highest quality, we conducted a market surveillance study and compared major oligosaccharide profiles of a number of monoclonal antibody pharmaceuticals sampled on the Swiss market. Product lot-to-lot variability was found to be generally low, suggesting that a majority of manufacturers have implemented high quality standards in their production processes. However, proportions of G0, G1 and G2 core-fucosylated chains derived from different products varied considerably and showed a bias towards the immature agalactosidated G0 form. Interestingly, differences in glycosylation caused by the production cell type seem to be of less importance compared with process related parameters such as cell growth.

  8. Baculovirus display of functional antibody Fab fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Shinya; Ogawa, Takafumi; Matsui, Kazusa; Suzuki, Tasuku; Katsuda, Tomohisa; Yamaji, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    The generation of a recombinant baculovirus that displays antibody Fab fragments on the surface was investigated. A recombinant baculovirus was engineered so that the heavy chain (Hc; Fd fragment) of a mouse Fab fragment was expressed as a fusion to the N-terminus of baculovirus gp64, while the light chain of the Fab fragment was simultaneously expressed as a secretory protein. Following infection of Sf9 insect cells with the recombinant baculovirus, the culture supernatant was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using antigen-coated microplates and either an anti-mouse IgG or an anti-gp64 antibody. A relatively strong signal was obtained in each case, showing antigen-binding activity in the culture supernatant. In western blot analysis of the culture supernatant using the anti-gp64 antibody, specific protein bands were detected at an electrophoretic mobility that coincided with the molecular weight of the Hc-gp64 fusion protein as well as that of gp64. Flow cytometry using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated antibody specific to mouse IgG successfully detected the Fab fragments on the surface of the Sf9 cells. These results suggest that immunologically functional antibody Fab fragments can be displayed on the surface of baculovirus particles, and that a fluorescence-activated cell sorter with a fluorescence-labeled antigen can isolate baculoviruses displaying specific Fab fragments. This successful baculovirus display of antibody Fab fragments may offer a novel approach for the efficient selection of specific antibodies.

  9. Next generation of antibody therapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhenping Zhu; Li Yan

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a major class of therapeutic agents providing effective altematives to treating various human diseases. To date, 15 mAbs have been approved by regulatory agencies in the world for clinical use in oncology indications. The selectivity and specificity, the unique pharmacokinetics, and the ability to engage and activate the host immune system differentiate these biologics from traditional small molecule anticancer drugs. mAb-basod regimens have brought clinical benefits, including improvements in overall survival, to patients with a variety of cancers. Many challenges still remain, however, to fully realize the potential of these new medicines. With our further understanding of cancer biology, mechanism of antibody action, and advancement of antibody engineering technologies, many novel antibody formats or antibody-derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. Carefully designed and engineered, they retain the advantage of specificity and selectivity of original antibodies, but in the meantime acquire additional special features such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced anticancer efficacy. Promising clinical results are being generated with these newly improved antibody-based therapeutics.

  10. Lead exposure among lead-acid battery workers in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, T D; Figueroa, J P; Burr, G; Flesch, J P; Keenlyside, R A; Baker, E L

    1989-01-01

    To assess lead exposure in the Jamaican lead-acid battery industry, we surveyed three battery manufacturers (including 46 production workers) and 10 battery repair shops (including 23 battery repair workers). Engineering controls and respiratory protection were judged to be inadequate at battery manufacturers and battery repair shops. At manufacturers, 38 of 42 air samples for lead exceeded a work-shift time-weighted average concentration of 0.050 mg/m3 (range 0.030-5.3 mg/m3), and nine samples exceeded 0.50 mg/m3. Only one of seven air samples at repair shops exceeded 0.050 mg/m3 (range 0.003-0.066 mg/m3). Repair shop workers, however, had higher blood lead levels than manufacturing workers (65% vs. 28% with blood lead levels above 60 micrograms/dl, respectively). Manufacturing workers had a higher prevalence of safe hygienic practices and a recent interval of minimal production had occurred at one of the battery manufacturers. Workers with blood lead levels above 60 micrograms/dl tended to have higher prevalences of most symptoms of lead toxicity than did workers with lower blood lead levels, but this finding was not consistent or statistically significant. The relationship between zinc protoporphyrin concentrations and increasing blood lead concentrations was consistent with that described among workers in developed countries. The high risk of lead toxicity among Jamaican battery workers is consistent with studies of battery workers in other developing countries.

  11. Molluskan Hemocyanins Activate the Classical Pathway of the Human Complement System through Natural Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Sosoniuk-Roche, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; López, Mercedes N.; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; Valck, Carolina; Ferreira, Arturo; Becker, María Inés

    2017-01-01

    Molluskan hemocyanins are enormous oxygen-carrier glycoproteins that show remarkable immunostimulatory properties when inoculated in mammals, such as the generation of high levels of antibodies, a strong cellular reaction, and generation of non-specific antitumor immune responses in some types of cancer, particularly for superficial bladder cancer. These proteins have the ability to bias the immune response toward a Th1 phenotype. However, despite all their current uses with beneficial clinical outcomes, a clear mechanism explaining these properties is not available. Taking into account reports of natural antibodies against the hemocyanin of the gastropod Megathura crenulata [keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)] in humans as well as other vertebrate species, we report here for the first time, the presence, in sera from unimmunized healthy donors, of antibodies recognizing, in addition to KLH, two other hemocyanins from gastropods with documented immunomodulatory capacities: Fisurella latimarginata hemocyanin (FLH) and Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). Through an ELISA screening, we found IgM and IgG antibodies reactive with these hemocyanins. When the capacity of these antibodies to bind deglycosylated hemocyanins was studied, no decreased interaction was detected. Moreover, in the case of FLH, deglycosylation increased antibody binding. We evaluated through an in vitro complement deposition assay whether these antibodies activated the classical pathway of the human complement system. The results showed that all three hemocyanins and their deglycosylated counterparts elicited this activation, mediated by C1 binding to immunoglobulins. Thus, this work contributes to the understanding on how the complement system could participate in the immunostimulatory properties of hemocyanins, through natural, complement-activating antibodies reacting with these proteins. Although a role for carbohydrates cannot be completely ruled out, in our experimental setting

  12. Lead resistant bacteria: lead resistance mechanisms, their applications in lead bioremediation and biomonitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Milind Mohan; Dubey, Santosh Kumar

    2013-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is non-bioessential, persistent and hazardous heavy metal pollutant of environmental concern. Bioremediation has become a potential alternative to the existing technologies for the removal and/or recovery of toxic lead from waste waters before releasing it into natural water bodies for environmental safety. To our best knowledge, this is a first review presenting different mechanisms employed by lead resistant bacteria to resist high levels of lead and their applications in cost effective and eco-friendly ways of lead bioremediation and biomonitoring. Various lead resistant mechanisms employed by lead resistant bacteria includes efflux mechanism, extracellular sequestration, biosorption, precipitation, alteration in cell morphology, enhanced siderophore production and intracellular lead bioaccumulation.

  13. Studies on Purification of Methamidophos Monoclonal Antibodies and Comoarative Immunoactivity of Purified Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU-QING ZHAO; YUAN-MING SUN; CHUN-YAN ZHANG; XIAO-YU HUANG; HOU-RUI ZHANG; ZHEN-YU ZHU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To purify Methamidophos (Met) monoclonal antibodies with two methods andcompare immune activity of purified antibodies. Method Caprylic acid ammonium sulphateprecipition (CAASP) method and Sepharose protein-A (SPA) affinity chromatography method wereused to purify Met monoclonal antibodies, UV spectrum scanning was used to determine proteincontent and recovery of purified antibodies, sodium dodecylsulphate polyacrylamide gelelectrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was used to analyze the purity of purified antibodies, and enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to determine immune activity of purified antibodies.Results Antibody protein content and recovery rate with CAASP method were 7.62 mg/mL and8.05% respectively, antibody protein content and recovery rate with SPA method were 6.45 mg/mLand 5.52% respectively. Purity of antibodies purified by SPA method was higher than that by CAASPmethod. The half-maximal inhibition concentration (IC50) of antibodies purified by SPA to Met was181.26 μg/mL, and the linear working range and the limit of quantification (LOD) were 2.43-3896.01μg/mL and 1.03 μg/mL, respectively. The IC50 of antibodies purified by CAASP to Met was 352.82μg/mL, and the linear working range and LOD were 10.91-11412.29 ug/mL and 3.42 μg/mL,respectively. Conclusion Antibodies purified by SPA method are better than those by CAASPmethod, and Met monoclonal antibodies purified by SPA method can be used to prepare gold-labelledtesting paper for analyzing Met residue in vegetable and drink water.

  14. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  15. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  16. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  17. Immunocytochemical and Immunohistochemical Staining with Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friis, Tina; Pedersen, Klaus Boberg; Hougaard, David; Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies are particularly useful for immunocytochemistry (ICC) and immunohistochemistry (IHC), where antigens may denature due to fixation of tissues and cells. Peptide antibodies can be made to any defined sequence, including unknown putative proteins and posttranslationally modified sequences. Moreover, the availability of large amounts of the antigen (peptide) allows inhibition/adsorption controls, which are important in ICC/IHC, due to the many possibilities for false-positive reactions caused by immunoglobulin Fc receptors, nonspecific reactions, and cross-reactivity of primary and secondary antibodies with other antigens and endogenous immunoglobulins, respectively. Here, simple protocols for ICC and IHC are described together with recommendations for appropriate controls.

  18. Preparation, Characterization, and Application of Antiharpinxoo Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Min; LI Ming; PAN Xiao-mei; WANG Jin-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Polyclonal antiharpinxoo rabbit antibody has been prepared successfully using purified harpinxoo protein as an immunogen.The ELISA titer of the antiserum against harpinxoo was about 1:2 000. Western blot analysis showed that the antiserum could bind to the expression harpinxoo protein in particular. hrf1, encoding harpinxoo, is an expression in transgenic rice,detected by antiharpinxoo rabbit antibody. The rabbit antibody against harpinxoo can be used to study further about the biological function, harpinxoo localization, and hrf1 gene expression in other plants.

  19. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  20. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today.

  1. Lead levels of Culex mosquito larvae inhabiting lead utilizing factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kitvatanachai S; Apiwathnasorn C; Leemingsawat S; Wongwit W; Overgaard HJ

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine lead level primarily in Culex quinquefasciatus (Cx. quinquefasciatus), and Culex gelidus (Cx. gelidus) larvae inhabiting lead consuming factories, and to putatively estimate eco-toxicological impact of effluents from the firms. Methods: Third instars larvae were sampled by standard dipping method and lead concentrations in the larvae and their respective surrounding factory aquatic environments were determined through standard atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Results: Cx. quinquefasciatus was the most abundant species followed by Cx. gelidus. The levels of lead were higher in the Cx. quinquefasciatus (1.08-47.47 μg/g), than in the wastewaters surface (0.01-0.78 μg/mL) from the factories or closer areas around factories. Other species were not reaching the criteria for lead determination. Conclusions: The Cx.quinquefasciatus larvae can bio-accumulate the metal and can potentially serve as a biomarker of lead contamination, to complemente conventional techniques.

  2. Prevalence of lead disease among secondary lead smelter workers and biological indicators of lead exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilis, R. (City Univ. of New York); Fischbein, A.; Eisinger, J.

    1977-10-01

    The report concerns itself primarily with the assessment of medical and biochemical effects of chronic lead exposure and comparing the usefulness of various biological screening parameters. In addition it appraises the effects of chelation therapy to control blood lead levels in lead workers, which have recently attracted critical attention. It is of considerable importance to ascertain whether such a therapeutic approach may, under some circumstances, in fact contribute to the deleterious effects of undue lead exposure.

  3. Chronic lead poisoning in horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, H.D.; Burau, R.G.

    1973-05-01

    Chronic lead poisoning in horses was manifested as anorexia, loss of body weight, muscular weakness, anemia, laryngeal hemiplegia, and, terminally, inhalation pneumonia. Some deaths were sudden and unexplained. The lead content in liver specimens from 10 horses was greater than that considered indicative of lead intoxication; however, the lead content of blood was equivocal. The most conclusive laboratory finding was increased urine lead concentration after chelation therapy. The concentration of lead in a sample of vegetation considered to be representative of what a horse would eat if he was grazing in the area sampled was 325 ppM (oven-dry basis). It was determined that a 450-kg horse grazing grass of this lead content would consume 2.9 Gm of lead daily (6.4 mg/kg of body weight), an amount considered toxic for horses. Leaching lowered the calcium content of the forage but failed to reduce the lead concentration of the plants significantly, thus opening the possibility that winter rains might have influenced the onset of poisoning. Airborne fallout from a nearby lead smelter was proposed as the primary mode of pasture contamination.

  4. Complement in therapy and disease: Regulating the complement system with antibody-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Joost P M; Strumane, Kristin; Ruuls, Sigrid R; Beurskens, Frank J; Schuurman, Janine; Parren, Paul W H I

    2015-10-01

    Complement is recognized as a key player in a wide range of normal as well as disease-related immune, developmental and homeostatic processes. Knowledge of complement components, structures, interactions, and cross-talk with other biological systems continues to grow and this leads to novel treatments for cancer, infectious, autoimmune- or age-related diseases as well as for preventing transplantation rejection. Antibodies are superbly suited to be developed into therapeutics with appropriate complement stimulatory or inhibitory activity. Here we review the design, development and future of antibody-based drugs that enhance or dampen the complement system.

  5. Progress in the development of therapeutic antibodies targeting prion proteins and β-amyloid peptides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Prion diseases and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are characterized by protein misfolding, and can lead to dementia. However, prion diseases are infectious and transmissible, while AD is not. The similarities and differences between these diseases have led researchers to perform comparative studies. In the last 2 decades, progress has been made in immunotherapy using anti-prion protein and anti-β-amyloid antibodies. In this study, we review new ideas and strategies for therapeutic antibodies targeting prion diseases and AD through conformation dependence.

  6. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  7. Synthesis of bifunctional antibodies for immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, B S; Wilson, G S

    2000-09-01

    The synthesis of bifunctional antibodies using the principle of solid-phase synthesis is described. Two Fab' fragments were chemically linked together via a bismaleimide crosslinking reagent. The F(ab')(2) fragments from intact immunoglobulin G (IgG) were prepared using an immobilized pepsin column. Goat, mouse, and human antibodies were digested completely within 4 h. The F(ab')(2) fragments thus produced did not contain any IgG impurities. Fab' fragments were produced by reducing the heavy interchain disulfide bonds using 2-mercaptoethylamine. Use of the solid-phase reactor in the preparation of the bifunctional antibodies eliminated many of the time-consuming separation steps between the fragmentation and conjugation steps. This procedure facilitates the automation of bifunctional antibody preparation and the rapid optimization of reaction conditions.

  8. Solid phase synthesis of bifunctional antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSilva, B S; Wilson, G S

    1995-12-15

    Bifunctional antibodies were prepared using the principle of solid-phase synthesis. The two Fab' fragments were chemically linked together via a bismaleimide crosslinking reagent. The F(ab')2 fragments from intact IgG were prepared using an immobilized pepsin column. Goat, mouse and human antibodies were digested completely within 4 h. The F(ab')2 fragments thus produced did not contain any IgG impurities. The Fab' fragments were produced by reducing the inter-heavy chain disulfide bonds using 2-mercaptoethylamine. The use of the solid-phase reactor in the preparation of the bifunctional antibodies eliminated many of the time-consuming separation steps between the fragmentation and conjugation steps. This procedure facilitates the automation of the bifunctional antibody preparation and the rapid optimization of reaction conditions.

  9. Characterization of methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolate specific polyclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Nadia Muhammad Akram; Schulz, Alexander; Halkier, Barbara Ann

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies towards small molecules, like plant specialized metabolites, are valuable tools for developing quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques. Glucosinolates are the specialized metabolites characteristic of the Brassicales order. Here we describe the characterization of polyclonal...... rabbit antibodies raised against the 4-methylsulfinylbutyl glucosinolate, glucoraphanin that is one of the major glucosinolates in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana (hereafter Arabidopsis). Analysis of the cross-reactivity of the antibodies against a number of glucosinolates demonstrated...... that it was highly selective for methionine-derived aliphatic glucosinolates with a methyl-sulfinyl group in the side chain. Use of crude plant extracts from Arabidopsis mutants with different glucosinolate profiles showed that the antibodies recognized aliphatic glucosinolates in a plant extract and did not cross...

  10. Combined processing of lead concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubasov, V. L.; Paretskii, V. M.; Sidorin, G. N.; Travkin, V. F.

    2013-06-01

    A combined scheme of processing of lead concentrates with the production of pure metallic lead and the important components containing in these concentrates is considered. This scheme includes sulfating roasting of the lead concentrates and two-stage leaching of the formed cinder with the formation of a sulfate solution and lead sulfate. When transformed into a carbonate form, lead sulfate is used for the production of pure metallic lead. Silver, indium, copper, cadmium, nickel, cobalt, and other important components are separately extracted from a solution. At the last stage, zinc is extracted by either extraction followed by electrolytic extraction of a metal or the return of the forming solution of sulfuric acid to cinder leaching.

  11. Lead Levels in Utah Eagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Michelle

    2006-10-01

    Lead is a health hazard to most animals, causing adverse effects to the nervous and reproductive systems if in sufficient quantity. Found in most fishing jigs and sinkers, as well as some ammunition used in hunting, this metal can poison wildlife such as eagles. Eagles are raptors, or predatory birds, and their lead exposure would most likely comes from their food -- a fish which has swallowed a sinker or lead shot in carrion (dead animal matter). As part of an ongoing project to investigate the environment lead levels in Utah, the bone lead levels in the wing bones of eagles have been measured for eagle carcasses found throughout Utah. The noninvasive technique of x-ray fluorescence was used, consisting of a Cd-109 radioactive source to activate lead atoms and a HPGe detector with digital electronics to collect the gamma spectra. Preliminary results for the eagles measured to date will be presented.

  12. Undue Lead Absorption and Lead Poisoning in Children: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin-Fu, J. S.

    The toxic effects of lead, a useful metal ubiquitous in the human environment, have long been known. The occupational hazards of lead poisoning were well established by the early 19th century, but plumbism in children caused by paint ingestion was not reported until the turn of the century. Even in 1924, the child was said to live in a "lead…

  13. Taking the Lead : Gender, Social Context and Preference to Lead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, A.P.C.I.; Schaafsma, J.; van der Wijst, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that women tend to emerge as leaders less often than men. In the present study, we examined to what extent women's and men's preference to lead is influenced by social context. It was hypothesized that women have a less strong preference to lead than men in a compe

  14. Neutralizing antibodies to Haemophilus ducreyi cytotoxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagergård, T; Purvén, M

    1993-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies against cytotoxin produced by Haemophilus ducreyi bacteria were studied in rabbits by an assay employing HEp-2 cells and diluted crude cytotoxin preparations from the organism. Antisera to 12 different H. ducreyi strains were prepared by immunization of rabbits with bacterial sonicates combined with Freund's adjuvant. The antibody response during infection with H. ducreyi was studied in two groups of rabbits which were infected with five live strains by either single o...

  15. Mepanipyrim haptens and antibodies with nanomolar affinity

    OpenAIRE

    Esteve Turrillas, Francesc Albert; Mercader Badia, Josep Vicent; Agulló, Consuelo; Abad Somovilla, Antonio; Abad Fuentes, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Mepanipyrim is an anilinopyrimidine fungicide used worldwide for crop protection. With the aim of developing useful immunoreagents for mepanipyrim immunoanalysis, two new functionalized derivatives were prepared and antibodies were generated. Affinity and specificity were assessed by direct and indirect competitive ELISA using homologous and heterologous conjugates. Although all antibodies were selective for the target analyte, the immunizing hapten structure was revealed as a determinant for...

  16. Autoimmune encephalitis: Clinical diagnosis versus antibody confirmation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Caroline Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Autoimmune encephalitis is a heterogeneous disorder which is being diagnosed with increasing frequency. The diagnosis of these disorders is based on the detection of autoantibodies and characteristic clinical profiles. Aims: We aimed to study the antibody profile in encephalitis patients with suspected autoimmune etiology presenting to a tertiary care center. Settings and Design: The subjects were selected by screening all patients with clinical profile suggesting autoimmune encephalitis admitted in the neuromedical intensive care unit (ICU of a tertiary care center in South India. Materials and Methods: Patients who fulfilled modified Zuliani et al.′s, criteria for autoimmune encephalitis were identified during the period December 2009-June 2013. Blood samples from these subjects were screened for six neuronal antibodies. Statistical analysis used: Chi-square test was applied to compare the antibody positive and negative patients. Results: Out of 1,227 patients screened, 39 subjects (14 males: 25 females were identified with a mean age of 15.95 years and 19 cases were assessed in the acute and 20 in the convalescent phase of the illness. Seizure (87.8 % was the most common presenting symptom; status epilepticus occurred in 23 (60.5% patients during the course of the illness. Fourteen (35.9% patients were N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR antibody-positive and all were negative for the other antibodies tested. Conclusions: One-third of patients presenting with acute noninfective encephalitis would be positive for NMDAR antibodies with the remaining two-thirds with clinically suspected autoimmune encephalitis being antibody-negative. There are few markers in the clinical and investigative profiles to distinguish antibody-positive and -negative patients.

  17. Structure and specificity of lamprey monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Herrin, Brantley R.; Alder, Matthew N; Roux, Kenneth H.; Sina, Christina; Ehrhardt, Götz R. A.; Boydston, Jeremy A.; Turnbough, Charles L.; Cooper, Max D.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates (lamprey and hagfish) is mediated by lymphocytes that undergo combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments to create a diverse repertoire of variable lymphocyte receptor (VLR) genes. Immunization with particulate antigens induces VLR-B-bearing lymphocytes to secrete antigen-specific VLR-B antibodies. Here, we describe the production of recombinant VLR-B antibodies specific for BclA, a major coat protein of Bacillus anthracis spores...

  18. Archives of Atmospheric Lead Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dominik; Shotyk, William; Kempf, Oliver

    Environmental archives such as peat bogs, sediments, corals, trees, polar ice, plant material from herbarium collections, and human tissue material have greatly helped to assess both ancient and recent atmospheric lead deposition and its sources on a regional and global scale. In Europe detectable atmospheric lead pollution began as early as 6000years ago due to enhanced soil dust and agricultural activities, as studies of peat bogs reveal. Increased lead emissions during ancient Greek and Roman times have been recorded and identified in many long-term archives such as lake sediments in Sweden, ice cores in Greenland, and peat bogs in Spain, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands. For the period since the Industrial Revolution, other archives such as corals, trees, and herbarium collections provide similar chronologies of atmospheric lead pollution, with periods of enhanced lead deposition occurring at the turn of the century and since 1950. The main sources have been industry, including coal burning, ferrous and nonferrous smelting, and open waste incineration until c.1950 and leaded gasoline use since 1950. The greatest lead emissions to the atmosphere all over Europe occurred between 1950 and 1980 due to traffic exhaust. A marked drop in atmospheric lead fluxes found in most archives since the 1980s has been attributed to the phasing out of leaded gasoline. The isotope ratios of lead in the various archives show qualitatively similar temporal changes, for example, the immediate response to the introduction and phasing out of leaded gasoline. Isotope studies largely confirm source assessments based on lead emission inventories and allow the contributions of various anthropogenic sources to be calculated.

  19. Teratogen update: lead and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, David C

    2005-06-01

    This review focuses on the impacts of lead exposure on reproductive health and outcomes. High levels of paternal lead exposure (>40 microg/dl or >25 microg/dl for a period of years) appear to reduce fertility and to increase the risks of spontaneous abortion and reduced fetal growth (preterm delivery, low birth weight). Maternal blood lead levels of approximately 10 microg/dl have been linked to increased risks of pregnancy hypertension, spontaneous abortion, and reduced offspring neurobehavioral development. Somewhat higher maternal lead levels have been linked to reduced fetal growth. Some studies suggest a link between increased parental lead exposure and congenital malformations, although considerable uncertainty remains regarding the specific malformations and the dose-response relationships. Common methodological weaknesses of studies include potential exposure misclassifications due to the frequent unavailability of exposure biomarker measurements at biologically appropriate times and uncertainty regarding the best exposure biomarker(s) for the various outcomes. A special concern with regard to the pregnant woman is the possibility that a fetus might be exposed to lead mobilized from bone stores as a result of pregnancy-related metabolic changes, making fetal lead exposure the result of exposure to exogenous lead during pregnancy and exposure to endogenous lead accumulated by the woman prior to pregnancy. By reducing bone resorption, increased calcium intake during the second half of pregnancy might reduce the mobilization of lead from bone compartments, even at low blood lead levels. Subgroups of women who incurred substantial exposures to lead prior to pregnancy should be considered to be at increased risk.

  20. Therapeutic monoclonal antibody for Sporotrichosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro eAlmeida

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis that affects either humans or animals and occurs worldwide. This subcutaneous mycosis had been attributed to a single etiological agent, Sporothrix schenckii. S. schenckii exhibits a considerable genetic variability, where recently, was suggesting that this taxon consists of a complex of species. Sporotrichosis is caused by traumatic inoculation of the fungus, which is a ubiquitous environmental saprophyte that can be isolated from soil and plant debris. The infection is limited to the cutaneous forms but, recently, occurrences of more severe clinical forms of this mycosis were described, especially among immunocompromized individuals. The immunological mechanisms involved in prevention and control of sporotrichosis are still not very well understood. Some works suggest that cell-mediated immunity plays an important role in protecting the host against S. schenckii. In contrast, the role of the humoral immune response in protection against this fungus have not been studied in detail. In a previous study, we showed that antigens secreted by S. schenckii induce a specific humoral response in infected animals, mainly against the 70-kDa molecules, indicating a possible participation of specific antibodies to this molecule in infection control. In an other work of the our group, we produced a mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein of S. schenckii in order to better understand the effect of passive immunization of mice infected with S. schenckii. Results showed a significant reduction in the number of CFU in organs of mice when the mAb was injected before and during S. schenckii infection. Similar results were observed when T-cell deficient mice were used. Drugs of choice in the treatment of sporothrichosis require long periods and frequently relapses are observed, mainly in immunocompromized patients. The strong protection induced by mAb against a 70-kDa glycoprotein makes it a strong candidate for a

  1. Recovery of indium and lead from lead bullion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Lead and indium were recovered by electrolysis and nonequilibrium solvent extraction process from lead bullion.The effects of current density,electrolytic period and circle amnant of electrolyte on the electrochemical dissolution of lead and indium were investigated.The effects of extraction phase ratio and mixing time on solvent extraction of indium and striping phase ratio and stripping stage on the loaded organic phase stripping were also investigated.The experimental results indicate that under optimum conditions,the purity of lead deposited on cathode is 98.5% and the deposit rate of lead is 99.9%,the dissolution rate of indium is 94.28%,the extraction rate of indium is 98.69%,the stripping rate of indium is almost 100%,and the impurity elements,such as Zn,Fe and Sn can be removed.

  2. Safe Leads and Lead Changes in Competitive Team Sports

    CERN Document Server

    Clauset, A; Redner, S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of lead changes within individual games of competitive team sports. Exploiting ideas from the theory of random walks, the number of lead changes within a single game follows a Gaussian distribution. We show that the probability that the last lead change and the time of the largest lead size are governed by the same arcsine law, a bimodal distribution that diverges at the start and at the end of the game. We also determine the probability that a given lead is "safe" as a function of its size $L$ and game time $t$. Our predictions generally agree with comprehensive data on more than 1.25 million scoring events in roughly 40,000 games across four professional or semi-professional team sports, and are more accurate than popular heuristics currently used in sports analytics.

  3. Lead Poisoning in Wild Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Lesanna L.; Franson, J. Christian

    2009-01-01

    Lead in its various forms has been used for thousands of years, originally in cooking utensils and glazes and more recently in many industrial and commercial applications. However, lead is a potent, potentially deadly toxin that damages many organs in the body and can affect all animals, including humans. By the mid 1990s, lead had been removed from many products in the United States, such as paint and fuel, but it is still commonly used in ammunition for hunting upland game birds, small mammals, and large game animals, as well as in fishing tackle. Wild birds, such as mourning doves, bald eagles, California condors, and loons, can die from the ingestion of one lead shot, bullet fragment, or sinker. According to a recent study on loon mortality, nearly half of adult loons found sick or dead during the breeding season in New England were diagnosed with confirmed or suspected lead poisoning from ingestion of lead fishing weights. Recent regulations in some states have restricted the use of lead ammunition on certain upland game hunting areas, as well as lead fishing tackle in areas frequented by common loons and trumpeter swans. A variety of alternatives to lead are available for use in hunting, shooting sports, and fishing activities.

  4. High temperature superconductor current leads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  5. IMPORTANCE OF RESEARCH HLA ANTIBODIES CLASS I AND II, AND MICA ANTIBODIES IN KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sh. Khubutia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of HLA and MICA antibodies in patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation and their influence on the course of post-transplant period. Determination of HLA antibodies class I and II, and MICA antibodies was performed on a platform of Luminex (xMAP-tech- nology using sets LABScreen ONE LAMBDA (U.S.. A total of 156 patients from the waiting list for kidney transplantation. Revealed the presence of HLA and MICA antibodies in the serum of 31.4% of patients. Regraf- ted patients increased the content of antibodies to the antigens of HLA system was noted in 88.2% of cases, 47% met the combination of antibodies to the I, II classes and MICA. In patients awaiting first kidney transplantation, HLA and MICA antibodies were determined in 23.7% of cases. The presence of pretransplant HLA and MICA antibodies had a significant influence on the course of post-transplant period. Patients with the presence of HLA and MICA in 50% of cases delayed graft function. Sessions of plasmapheresis can reduce the concentration of HLA and MICA antibodies on average by 61.1%. 

  6. Construction of human antibody gene libraries and selection of antibodies by phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, André; Kügler, Jonas; Wilke, Sonja; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antibody phage display is the most commonly used in vitro selection technology and has yielded thousands of useful antibodies for research, diagnostics, and therapy.The prerequisite for successful generation and development of human recombinant antibodies using phage display is the construction of a high-quality antibody gene library. Here, we describe the methods for the construction of human immune and naive scFv gene libraries.The success also depends on the panning strategy for the selection of binders from these libraries. In this article, we describe a panning strategy that is high-throughput compatible and allows parallel selection in microtiter plates.

  7. Antibody-mediated resistance against plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarnejad, Mohammad Reza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Tabatabaei, Meisam; Tabatabaie, Meisam; Twyman, Richard M; Schillberg, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Plant diseases have a significant impact on the yield and quality of crops. Many strategies have been developed to combat plant diseases, including the transfer of resistance genes to crops by conventional breeding. However, resistance genes can only be introgressed from sexually-compatible species, so breeders need alternative measures to introduce resistance traits from more distant sources. In this context, genetic engineering provides an opportunity to exploit diverse and novel forms of resistance, e.g. the use of recombinant antibodies targeting plant pathogens. Native antibodies, as a part of the vertebrate adaptive immune system, can bind to foreign antigens and eliminate them from the body. The ectopic expression of antibodies in plants can also interfere with pathogen activity to confer disease resistance. With sufficient knowledge of the pathogen life cycle, it is possible to counter any disease by designing expression constructs so that pathogen-specific antibodies accumulate at high levels in appropriate sub-cellular compartments. Although first developed to tackle plant viruses and still used predominantly for this purpose, antibodies have been targeted against a diverse range of pathogens as well as proteins involved in plant-pathogen interactions. Here we comprehensively review the development and implementation of antibody-mediated disease resistance in plants.

  8. Standardization of anti-DNA antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, David S

    2013-07-01

    Antibodies to DNA (anti-DNA) are the serological hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus and represent important biomarkers for clinical and research purposes. These antibodies are part of a family of antibodies to nucleosomes and bind to conserved sites widely present on DNA. While the value of anti-DNA as a biomarker is well established, the assay for these antibodies has involved a variety of DNA sources and systems to detect DNA-anti-DNA interactions. The influence of these variations on antibody detection has complicated assay standardization. As an antigen, DNA has unique features since it is a highly charged polymer that has structural heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can affect antigenicity which can vary on the basis of DNA origin, size, conformation and mobility. In addition, as a polymer, DNA can promote patterns of antibody binding based on monogamous or bivalent interaction which require an extended polynucleotide structure. Understanding the nature of DNA as an antigen can facilitate interpretation of serological tests and underpin efforts at better standardization.

  9. Discovery of functional antibodies targeting ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I; Gardener, Matthew J; Williams, Wendy A

    2015-04-01

    Ion channels play critical roles in physiology and disease by modulation of cellular functions such as electrical excitability, secretion, cell migration, and gene transcription. Ion channels represent an important target class for drug discovery that has been largely addressed, to date, using small-molecule approaches. A significant opportunity exists to target these channels with antibodies and alternative formats of biologics. Antibodies display high specificity and affinity for their target antigen, and they have the potential to target ion channels very selectively. Nevertheless, isolating antibodies to this target class is challenging due to the difficulties in expression and purification of ion channels in a format suitable for antibody drug discovery in addition to the complexity of screening for function. In this article, we will review the current state of ion channel biologics discovery and the progress that has been made. We will also highlight the challenges in isolating functional antibodies to these targets and how these challenges may be addressed. Finally, we also illustrate successful approaches to isolating functional monoclonal antibodies targeting ion channels by way of a number of case studies drawn from recent publications.

  10. Small molecule mimetics of an HIV-1 gp41 fusion intermediate as vaccine leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Michael J; Dudkin, Vadim Y; Ottinger, Elizabeth A; Getty, Krista L; Zuck, Paul D; Kaufhold, Robin M; Hepler, Robert W; McGaughey, Georgia B; Citron, Michael; Hrin, Renee C; Wang, Ying-Jie; Miller, Michael D; Joyce, Joseph G

    2010-12-24

    We describe here a novel platform technology for the discovery of small molecule mimetics of conformational epitopes on protein antigens. As a model system, we selected mimetics of a conserved hydrophobic pocket within the N-heptad repeat region of the HIV-1 envelope protein, gp41. The human monoclonal antibody, D5, binds to this target and exhibits broadly neutralizing activity against HIV-1. We exploited the antigen-binding property of D5 to select complementary small molecules using a high throughput screen of a diverse chemical collection. The resulting small molecule leads were rendered immunogenic by linking them to a carrier protein and were shown to elicit N-heptad repeat-binding antibodies in a fraction of immunized mice. Plasma from HIV-1-infected subjects shown previously to contain broadly neutralizing antibodies was found to contain antibodies capable of binding to haptens represented in the benzylpiperidine leads identified as a result of the high throughput screen, further validating these molecules as vaccine leads. Our results suggest a new paradigm for vaccine discovery using a medicinal chemistry approach to identify lead molecules that, when optimized, could become vaccine candidates for infectious diseases that have been refractory to conventional vaccine development.

  11. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  12. Lead-free primary explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, My Hang V.

    2010-06-22

    Lead-free primary explosives of the formula (cat).sub.Y[M.sup.II(T).sub.X(H.sub.2O).sub.6-X].sub.Z, where T is 5-nitrotetrazolate, and syntheses thereof are described. Substantially stoichiometric equivalents of the reactants lead to high yields of pure compositions thereby avoiding dangerous purification steps.

  13. [Immunosuppressive treatment after kidney transplant: the frontier of chronic antibody-mediated rejection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancone, Luigi; Lavacca, Antonio; Beltramo, Silvia; Ariaudo, Claudia; Gallo, Ester; Segoloni, Giuseppe Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The recognition of antibody-mediated rejection as an important factor in the reduction of long-term renal graft survival represents a new challenge to the immunosuppressive strategies of recent years, which have been quite successful in reducing the acute rejection rates as well as the side effects of pharmacological immunosuppression. The search for an effective treatment of chronic anti-donor antibody disease has been pursued mostly through limited single-center experiences and therefore in a dispersed fashion, without leading to the definition of a consolidated approach. The most frequently used pharmacological approaches stem from the experience of antibody-mediated acute rejection. In this review we will critically analyze the results reported so far of various intervention strategies and we will discuss future pharmacological novelties targeting the humoral immune response.

  14. Structural basis of potent Zika-dengue virus antibody cross-neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Rouvinski, Alexander; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Medits, Iris; Sharma, Arvind; Simon-Lorière, Etienne; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Haouz, Ahmed; England, Patrick; Stiasny, Karin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Heinz, Franz X; Screaton, Gavin R; Rey, Félix A

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus is a member of the Flavivirus genus that had not been associated with severe disease in humans until the recent outbreaks, when it was linked to microcephaly in newborns in Brazil and to Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults in French Polynesia. Zika virus is related to dengue virus, and here we report that a subset of antibodies targeting a conformational epitope isolated from patients with dengue virus also potently neutralize Zika virus. The crystal structure of two of these antibodies in complex with the envelope protein of Zika virus reveals the details of a conserved epitope, which is also the site of interaction of the envelope protein dimer with the precursor membrane (prM) protein during virus maturation. Comparison of the Zika and dengue virus immunocomplexes provides a lead for rational, epitope-focused design of a universal vaccine capable of eliciting potent cross-neutralizing antibodies to protect simultaneously against both Zika and dengue virus infections.

  15. Echinococcus granulosus: the potential use of specific radiolabelled antibodies in diagnosis by immunoscintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogan, M.T.; Morris, D.L.; Pritchard, D.I.; Perkins, A.C. (Nottingham Univ. (UK))

    1990-05-01

    Diagnosis of hydatid disease in man is frequently dependent on the imaging of cysts in situ by techniques such as ultrasonography and CAT scans. Such methods are useful but are not specific and can lead to errors in diagnosis. The present work reports preliminary experiments on the development of a specific imaging technique for hydatid cysts using radiolabelled antibodies. A purified preparation of antigen B of hydatid fluid was used to raise polyclonal antisera in rabbits and the resulting affinity-purified IgG labelled with {sup 131}I. Gerbils with an established Echinococcus granulosus infection were injected intraperitoneally with the labelled antibody and imaged 48 h later with a gamma camera. Hydatid cysts could be identified within the peritoneal cavity and post-mortem assessment of activity showed the cysts to contain approximately four times as much activity as the surrounding organs thereby indicating successful targeting of the antibody to the cysts. (author).

  16. Detection of Bovine Leukaemia Virus Antibodies and Proviral DNA in Colostrum Replacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B; Finnegan, C; Phillips, A; Horigan, M; Pollard, T; Steinbach, F

    2015-10-01

    Great Britain has been bovine leukaemia virus (BLV) disease free since 1999. We recently reported three separate incidents of BLV seropositivity on farms with home-reared cattle due to the use of colostrum replacer rather than infection with BLV (Emerg. Infect. Dis., 19, 2013, 1027). These cases were all linked via the use of the same brand of colostrum replacer. Here, we investigate further by examining multiple brands of colostrum replacer for proviral DNA and BLV antibodies. BLV antibodies were detected in 7 of the colostrum replacers tested, with PCR concurring in two cases. Thus, the use of these BLV antibody-positive colostrum replacers may also lead to false-positive serological diagnostics.

  17. Antibodies against a surface protein of Streptococcus pyogenes promote a pathological inflammatory response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Kahn

    Full Text Available Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS caused by Streptococcus pyogenes is a clinical condition with a high mortality rate despite modern intensive care. A key feature of STSS is excessive plasma leakage leading to hypovolemic hypotension, disturbed microcirculation and multiorgan failure. Previous work has identified a virulence mechanism in STSS where M1 protein of S. pyogenes forms complexes with fibrinogen that activate neutrophils to release heparin-binding protein (HBP, an inducer of vascular leakage. Here, we report a marked inter-individual difference in the response to M1 protein-induced HBP release, a difference found to be related to IgG antibodies directed against the central region of the M1 protein. To elicit massive HBP release, such antibodies need to be part of the M1 protein-fibrinogen complexes. The data add a novel aspect to bacterial pathogenesis where antibodies contribute to the severity of disease by promoting a pathologic inflammatory response.

  18. Coming-of-Age of Antibodies in Cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyar, B Vijayalakshmi; Arora, Sushrut; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2016-12-01

    Antibody-based therapies have garnered considerable success in recent years. This is due to the availability of strategies to successfully engineer antibodies into humanized forms, better understanding of the biological processes involved in cancer development, the availability of novel recombinant antibody formats, better antibody selection platforms, and improved antibody conjugation methodologies. Such achievements have led to an explosion in the generation of antibodies and antibody-associated constructs for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. In this review, we critically assess recent trends in the development and applications of bispecific antibodies (bsAbs), antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), and immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) as cancer therapeutics. We also highlight recent US FDA approvals and clinical trials of antibody-based cancer therapies.

  19. [Advances in the study of natural small molecular antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Zhang, Da-peng

    2012-10-01

    Small molecule antibodies are naturally existed and well functioned but not structurally related to the conventional antibodies. They are only composed of heavy protein chains or light chains, much smaller than common antibody. The first small molecule antibody, called Nanobody was engineered from heavy-chain antibodies found in camelids. Cartilaginous fishes also have heavy-chain antibodies (IgNAR, "immunoglobulin new antigen receptor"), from which single-domain antibodies called Vnar fragments can be obtained. In addition, free light chain (FLC) antibodies in human bodies are being developed as therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Comparing to intact antibodies, common advantages of small molecule antibodies are with better solubility, tissue penetration, stability towards heat and enzymes, and comparatively low production costs. This article reviews the structural characteristics and mechanism of action of the Nanobody, IgNAR and FLC.

  20. Experience with intravascular lead extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jian; TANG Kai; WANG Fang-zheng; ZHANG Shu; HUANG Cong-xin

    2005-01-01

    @@ With the increase of clinical use of cardiac pacemaker, a certain kinds of severe leads-related complications (especially infection) have presented in a few patients who underwent pacemaker implantation. The best way to manage this problem is to remove the transvenous leads.1,2 The technique for percutaneous removal of transvenous leads have undergone considerable development in western countries over the past 2 decades. However, there was scarce data on the application of this technique in China. This article reports the results of transvenous extraction of 171 permanent pacemaker leads with the standard lead extraction devices and intravascular countertraction technique during the period from January 1996 to May 2005 in the Center of Arrhythmia Diagnosis and Treatment, Fu Wai Hospital, Beijing, China.

  1. Lead arthropathy: a cause of delayed onset lead poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peh, W.C.G. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong); Reinus, W.R. [Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology, Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1995-07-01

    Patients who suffer gun shot wounds often have retained bullet fragments within their bodies. These are usually of no clinical consequence. We describe three patients with retained bullets within their hip joints. One of these patients, who had extensive ground intra-articular bullet fragments and secondary osteoarthritis of the hip, presented with signs, symptoms, and laboratory data consistent with lead intoxication. The bullet und metallic fragments were removed surgically with good clinical response. Two patients whose bullets were implanted entirely within the femoral head and whose joints showed smaller degrees of lead fragmentation had no symptoms of lead intoxication. The degree of intra-articular fragmentation of the bullet and the surface area of lead exposed to synovial fluid are emphasized as decisive factors with respect to appropriate therapy. (orig.)

  2. Cross-reactive broadly neutralizing antibodies: timing is everything

    OpenAIRE

    Euler, Zelda; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2012-01-01

    The recent surge of research into new broadly neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1 infection has recharged the field of HIV-1 vaccinology. In this review we discuss the currently known broadly neutralizing antibodies and focus on factors that may shape these antibodies in natural infection. We further discuss the role of these antibodies in the clinical course of the infection and consider immunological obstacles in inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies with a vaccine.

  3. Cross-reactive broadly neutralizing antibodies: timing is everything.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euler, Zelda; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2012-01-01

    The recent surge of research into new broadly neutralizing antibodies in HIV-1 infection has recharged the field of HIV-1 vaccinology. In this review we discuss the currently known broadly neutralizing antibodies and focus on factors that may shape these antibodies in natural infection. We further discuss the role of these antibodies in the clinical course of the infection and consider immunological obstacles in inducing broadly neutralizing antibodies with a vaccine.

  4. Relevance of anti-myelin antibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies directed against myelin antigens have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although anti-myelin antibodies have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, it is unclear to what extent anti-myelin antibodies contribute to MS pathogenesis. In this dissertation, the role of antibodies in MS and in the animal model experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is addressed in eight chapters: Chapter 1: A review on antibodies, complement and Fc receptors in MS ...

  5. Comparative Analysis of Immune Repertoires between Bactrian Camel's Conventional and Heavy-Chain Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Changjiang; Fu, Longfei; Ren, Zhe; Wang, Changxi; Wu, Jinghua; Lu, Ruxue; Ye, Yanrui; He, Mengying; Nie, Chao; Yang, Naibo; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Liu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Compared to classical antibodies, camel heavy chain antibodies (HCAbs) are smaller in size due to lack of the light chain and the first constant domain of the heavy chain (CH1 region). The variable regions of HCAbs (VHHs) are more soluble and stable than that of conventional antibodies (VHs). Even with such simple structure, they are still functional in antigen binding. Although HCAbs have been extensively investigated over the past two decades, most efforts have been based upon low throughput sequence analysis, and there are only limited reports trying to analyze and describe the complete immune repertoire (IR) of camel HCAbs. Here we leveraged the high-throughput data generated by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) of the variable domains of the antibody heavy chains from three Bactrian camels to conduct in-depth comparative analyses of the immunoglobulin repertoire. These include analyses of the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) length and distribution, mutation rate, antibody characteristic amino acids, the distribution of the cysteine (Cys) codons, and the non-classical VHHs. We found that there is higher diversity in the CDR2 than in the other sub-regions, and there is a higher mutation rate in the VHHs than in the VHs (P VH and VHH clones, we also observed other substitutions at the positions NO.40/54/57/96/101 that could lead to additional structural alterations. We also found that VH-derived VHH clones, referred to as non-classical VHH clones in this study, accounted for about 8% of all clones. Further, only 5%-10% clones had the Trp > Arg AA substitution at the first position of framework 4 for all types of clones. We present, for the first time, a relatively complete picture of the Bactrian camel antibody immune repertoire, including conventional antibody (Ab) and HCAbs, using PCR and in silico analysis based on high-throughput NGS data. PMID:27588755

  6. SU-E-I-14: Comparison of Iodine-Labeled and Indium-Labeled Antibody Biodistributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, L [Retired from City of Hope Medical Center, Arcadia, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is often assumed that animal biodistributions of novel proteins are not dependent upon the radiolabel used in their determination. In units of percent injected dose per gram of tissue (%ID/g), organ uptake results (u) may be obtained using either iodine or metal as radioactive labels. Iodination is preferred as it is a one-step process whereas metal labeling requires two chemical procedures and therefore more protein material. It is important to test whether the radioactive tag leads to variation in the uptake value. Methods: Uptakes of 3antibodies to Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) were evaluated in a nude mouse model bearing 150 to 300 mg LS174T human colon cancer xenografts. Antibodies included diabody (56 kDa), minibody (80kDa) and intact M5A (150 kDa) anti-CEA cognates. Both radioiodine and indium-111 labels were used with uptakes evaluated at 7 time(t) points out to 96 h. Ratios (R) of u(iodine-label)/u(indium-label) were determined for liver, spleen, kidneys, lung and tumor. Results: Hepatic loss was rapid for diabody and minibody; by 24 h their R values were only 2%; i.e., uptake of iodine was 2% of that of indium for these 2 antibodies. By contrast, R for the intact cognate was 50% at that time point. Splenic results were similar. Tumor uptake ratios did not depend upon the antibody type and were 50% at 24 h. Conclusions: Relatively rapid loss of iodine relative to indium in liver and spleen was observed in lower mass antibodies. Tumor ratios were larger and independent of antibody type. Aside from tumor, the R ratio of uptakes depended on the antibody type. R values decreased monotonically with time in all tissues and for all cognates. Using this ratio, one can possibly correct iodine-based u (t) results so that they resemble radiometal-derived biodistributions.

  7. Lead levels of Culex mosquito larvae inhabiting lead utilizing factory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kitvatanachai; S; Apiwathnasorn; C; Leemingsawat; S; Wongwit; W; Overgaard; HJ

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To determine lead level primarily in Culex quinquefasciatus(Cx.quinquefasciatus), and Culex gelidus(Cx.gelidus) larvae inhabiting lead consuming factories,and to putatively estimate eco-toxicological impact of effluents from the firms.Methods:Third instars larvae were sampled by standard dipping method and lead concentrations in the larvae and their respective surrounding factory aquatic environments were determined through standard atomic absorption spectrophotometry(AAS).Results:Cx.quinquefasciatus was the most abundant species followed by Cx.gelidus.The levels of lead were higher in the Cx.quinquefasciatus(1.08-47.47μg/g),than in the wastewaters surface(0.01-0.78 μg/mL) from the factories or closer areas around factories. Other species were not reaching the.criteria for lead determination.Conclusions:The Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae can bio-accumulate the metal and can potentially serve as a biomarker of lead contamination,to complemente conventional techniques.

  8. Multi-epitope Models Explain How Pre-existing Antibodies Affect the Generation of Broadly Protective Responses to Influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika I Zarnitsyna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of next-generation influenza vaccines that elicit strain-transcendent immunity against both seasonal and pandemic viruses is a key public health goal. Targeting the evolutionarily conserved epitopes on the stem of influenza's major surface molecule, hemagglutinin, is an appealing prospect, and novel vaccine formulations show promising results in animal model systems. However, studies in humans indicate that natural infection and vaccination result in limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA, and the level of stem-specific antibody elicited is insufficient to provide broad strain-transcendent immunity. Here, we use mathematical models of the humoral immune response to explore how pre-existing immunity affects the ability of vaccines to boost antibodies to the head and stem of HA in humans, and, in particular, how it leads to the apparent lack of boosting of broadly cross-reactive antibodies to the stem epitopes. We consider hypotheses where binding of antibody to an epitope: (i results in more rapid clearance of the antigen; (ii leads to the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which inhibit B cell activation through Fcγ receptor-mediated mechanism; and (iii masks the epitope and prevents the stimulation and proliferation of specific B cells. We find that only epitope masking but not the former two mechanisms to be key in recapitulating patterns in data. We discuss the ramifications of our findings for the development of vaccines against both seasonal and pandemic influenza.

  9. {sup 68}Ga-labelled recombinant antibody variants for immuno-PET imaging of solid tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eder, Matthias; Eisenhut, Michael [German Cancer Research Center, Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Heidelberg (Germany); Knackmuss, Stefan; Gall, Fabrice Le; Reusch, Uwe; Little, Melvyn [Affimed Therapeutics AG, Heidelberg (Germany); Rybin, Vladimir [European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter [University of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-07-15

    Recombinant antibodies isolated from human antibody libraries have excellent affinities and high target specificity. As full-length IgGs are cleared inadequately slowly from the circulation, the aim of this work was to figure out which kind of recombinant antibody fragment proves to be appropriate for imaging epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-expressing tumours with the short-living radioisotope {sup 68}Ga. In order to combine the promising tumour targeting properties of antibodies with {sup 68}Ga, four antibody variants with the same specificity and origin only differing in molecular weight were constructed for comparison. Therefore, the binding domains of a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) isolated from a human naive antibody library were modified genetically to construct the respective full-length IgG, the tria- and diabody variants. These molecules were conjugated with the bifunctional chelating agent N,N{sup '}-bis[2-hydroxy-5-(carboxyethyl)benzyl]ethylenediamine-N,N{sup '}-diacetic acid (HBED-CC) to enable {sup 68}Ga labelling at ambient temperature and compared in biodistribution and immuno-PET imaging experiments. The antibody variants with identical specificity proved to have the correct molecular weight, high binding affinity and specificity to their antigen, EpCAM. Radiometal complexation was efficiently performed at room temperature leading to {sup 68}Ga-labelled antibodies with unchanged binding properties compared to the original antibody variants. The best targeting properties were obtained with the scFv and especially with the diabody. The triabody showed higher absolute tumour uptake but only moderate clearance from circulation. The antibody variants differed considerably in normal organ uptake, clearance from circulation and tumour accumulation. The data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging solid tumours with the {sup 68}Ga-labelled diabody format. This type of recombinant protein might be a promising carrier even for the

  10. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan [College of Life Sciences and Graduate School of Biotechnology, Korea University, 5-ga Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, MuHyeon, E-mail: choemh@korea.ac.kr [College of Life Sciences and Graduate School of Biotechnology, Korea University, 5-ga Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-24

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G{sub 4}S) between the Fab fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38]{sub 2}) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.

  11. Presence of non-maternal antibodies in newborns of mothers with antibody deficiencies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hahn-Zoric; B. Carlsson; J. Bjö rkander; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); L. Mellander; L.A. Hanson

    1992-01-01

    textabstractTo explain the mechanism for induction and production of specific antibodies found in the newborn already at birth, without previous known exposure to the antigen, we chose a model that presumably excluded the possibility of specific antibodies being transferred from the mother to the fe

  12. A recombinant, fully human monoclonal antibody with antitumor activity constructed from phage-displayed antibody fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huls, GA; Heijnen, IAFM; Cuomo, ME; Koningsberger, JC; Boel, E; de Vries, ARV; Loyson, SAJ; Helfrich, W; Henegouwen, GPV; van Meijer, M; de Kruif, J; Logtenberg, T

    1999-01-01

    A single-chain Fv antibody fragment specific for the tumor-associated Ep-CAM molecule was isolated from a semisynthetic phage display library and converted into an intact, fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody (huMab), The purified huMab had an affinity of 5 nM and effectively mediated tumor cell kil

  13. Discovery of diverse and functional antibodies from large human repertoire antibody libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwimmer, Lauren J; Huang, Betty; Giang, Hoa; Cotter, Robyn L; Chemla-Vogel, David S; Dy, Francis V; Tam, Eric M; Zhang, Fangjiu; Toy, Pamela; Bohmann, David J; Watson, Susan R; Beaber, John W; Reddy, Nithin; Kuan, Hua-Feng; Bedinger, Daniel H; Rondon, Isaac J

    2013-05-31

    Phage display antibody libraries have a proven track record for the discovery of therapeutic human antibodies, increasing the demand for large and diverse phage antibody libraries for the discovery of new therapeutics. We have constructed naïve antibody phage display libraries in both Fab and scFv formats, with each library having more than 250 billion clones that encompass the human antibody repertoire. These libraries show high fidelity in open reading frame and expression percentages, and their V-gene family distribution, VH-CDR3 length and amino acid usage mirror the natural diversity of human antibodies. Both the Fab and scFv libraries show robust sequence diversity in target-specific binders and differential V-gene usage for each target tested, supporting the use of libraries that utilize multiple display formats and V-gene utilization to maximize antibody-binding diversity. For each of the targets, clones with picomolar affinities were identified from at least one of the libraries and for the two targets assessed for activity, functional antibodies were identified from both libraries.

  14. A study on associations between antiprothrombin antibodies, antiplasminogen antibodies and thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simmelink, MJA; De Groot, PG; Derksen, RHWM

    2003-01-01

    Anti-prothrombin antibodies area frequent cause of lupus anticoagulant (LAC), a thrombotic risk factor. Prothrombin shares structural homology with plasminogen, a kringle protein with an important role in fibrinolysis. Cross-reactivity between antiprothrombin antibodies and plasminogen has been desc

  15. The antibody mining toolbox: an open source tool for the rapid analysis of antibody repertoires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Kiss, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput screening methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The high cost and the need for bioinformatics experts and powerful computer clusters, however, have limited the general use of deep sequencing in antibody selections. Here, we describe the AbMining ToolBox, an open source software package for the straightforward analysis of antibody libraries sequenced by the three main next generation sequencing platforms (454, Ion Torrent, MiSeq). The ToolBox is able to identify heavy chain CDR3s as effectively as more computationally intense software, and can be easily adapted to analyze other portions of antibody variable genes, as well as the selection outputs of libraries based on different scaffolds. The software runs on all common operating systems (Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), on standard personal computers, and sequence analysis of 1-2 million reads can be accomplished in 10-15 min, a fraction of the time of competing software. Use of the ToolBox will allow the average researcher to incorporate deep sequence analysis into routine selections from antibody display libraries.

  16. Dengue serotype cross-reactive, anti-E protein antibodies confound specific immune memory for one year after infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Xiu eToh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus has four serotypes and is endemic globally in tropical countries. Neither a specific treatment nor an approved vaccine is available, and correlates of protection are not established. The standard neutralization assay cannot differentiate between serotype-specific and serotype cross-reactive antibodies in patients early after infection, leading to an overestimation of the long-term serotype-specific protection of an antibody response. It is known that the cross-reactive response in patients is temporary but few studies have assessed kinetics and potential changes in serum antibody specificity over time. To better define the specificity of polyclonal antibodies during disease and after recovery, longitudinal samples from patients with primary or secondary DENV-2 infection were collected over a period of one year. We found that serotype cross-reactive antibodies peaked three weeks after infection and subsided within one year. Since secondary patients rapidly produced antibodies specific for the virus envelope (E protein, an E-specific ELISA was superior compared to a virus particle-specific ELISA to identify patients with secondary infections. Dengue infection triggered a massive activation and mobilization of both naïve and memory B cells possibly from lymphoid organs into the blood, providing an explanation for the surge of circulating plasmablasts and the increase in cross-reactive E protein-specific antibodies.

  17. Fas Ligand Has a Greater Impact than TNF-α on Apoptosis and Inflammation in Ischemic Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Furuichi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: Fas ligand (FasL and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α are major pro-apoptotic molecules and also induce inflammation through cytokine and chemokine production. Although precise intracellular mechanisms of action have been reported for each molecule, the differential impact of these molecules on kidney injury in vivo still requires clarification. Methods: We explored the differential impact of FasL and TNF-α upon apoptosis and inflammation in ischemic acute kidney injury using neutralizing anti-FasL antibodies and TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1-deficient mice. Results: TNFR1 deficiency was associated with a lesser anti-inflammatory effect upon leukocyte infiltration and tubular necrosis than treatment with anti-FasL antibody. Furthermore, the number of TUNEL-positive cells was significantly reduced in anti-FasL antibody-treated mice, whereas it was only partially diminished in TNFR1-deficient mice. In vitro studies confirmed these findings. FasL administration induced both apoptosis and cytokine/chemokine production from cultured tubular epithelial cells. However, TNF-α had a limited effect upon tubular epithelial cells. Conclusion: In ischemic acute kidney injury, FasL has a greater impact than TNF-α on the apoptosis and inflammatory reaction through cytokine/chemokine production from tubular epithelial cells.

  18. Antibody-membrane switch (AMS) technology for facile cell line development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Wages, John M; Larrick, James W

    2014-10-01

    Generation of high-productivity cell lines remains a major bottleneck in therapeutic antibody development. Conventional cell line development often depends on gene amplification methodologies using dihydrofolate reductase or glutamine synthetase. Higher productivity is associated with an increased gene copy number. However, lack of selection pressure under the conditions of large-scale manufacturing leads to clonal instability. We have developed a novel method for cell line development, antibody-membrane switch (AMS) technology, that does not rely on gene amplification. This fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based, high-throughput method is facilitated by cell-surface antibody expression to rapidly and efficiently isolate high-producing cells. The switch between membrane expression and secretion is achieved by alternative splicing and specific DNA recombination. The antibody of interest is initially displayed on the cell surface to facilitate FACS. Isolated high-producing cells are then seamlessly transformed into production cells after removing the membrane-anchoring domain sequence with a DNA recombinase. AMS technology has been applied in a number of antibody cell line development projects, which typically last 2-3 months. The top production cell lines exhibit very high specific productivity of 40-60 pg/cell/day resulting in production titers of 2-4 g/l in 10-day batch culture.

  19. [Clinical and pathogenetic significance of antibodies to antioxidative enzymes in patients with Raynaud's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, L N; Gontar', I P; Zborovskaia, I A; Novikova, O V; Emel'ianov, N N

    2010-01-01

    Patients presenting with systemic scleroderma were found to have antibodies to antioxidative enzymes the levels of which increased with activity of the disease. Taking into account the important role of immune disorders in the development of systemic sclerosis, it can be conjectured that antienzyme antibodies may cause dysregulation of enzymatic systems. Serum antibodies were detected by the original modification of indirect enzyme immunoassay using immobilized antigenic forms of enzymes. All patients with high antibody titers presented with class II-IV Raynaud"s syndrome (RS). Pathogenetic mechanisms of RS are complicated and poorly known, it is supposed to be a multifactor pathology associated with disturbances in neural, vascular, mediator, and immune systems. Reperfusion and free oxygen radicals may also contribute to the development of ischemia in RS. The antioxidative system is known to involve a number of enzymes that neutralize pathogenic effects of free oxygen species. Disturbance of equilibrium between aggressive and protective factors under pathological conditions leads to further aggravation of tissue lesions. The presence of antienzyme antibodies in the blood of patients with primary RS may be regarded as an unfavourable prognostic factor preceding a systemic disease of connective tissue.

  20. Effects of glutamine and asparagine on recombinant antibody production using CHO-GS cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping; Dai, Xiao-Ping; Graf, Erica; Martel, Richard; Russell, Reb

    2014-01-01

    A unique and nontraditional approach using glutamine and asparagine supplements for CHO-glutamine synthetase (GS) cell lines was studied. In our experiments, we found that a decrease in pH and an increase in cell death occurred in production phase of a GS cell line, leading to reduced antibody expression and lower antibody yields. The experimental results and the statistical analysis (ANOVA) indicated that additions of glutamine and asparagine in the basal and feed media were effective to buffer the cell culture pH, reduce lactate generation, maintain a higher cell viability profile, and improve antibody productivity. In bench-top bioreactors, glutamine and asparagine supplementation helped to prevent cell death, improve antibody yield, and reduce base usage. Glutamine is normally excluded from culture media for GS cell lines to prevent the bypass of selection pressure. In this study, however, the addition of glutamine did not affect cell population homogeneity, protein quality, or decrease antibody yield of two GS cell lines.

  1. Pentavalent single-domain antibodies reduce Campylobacter jejuni motility and colonization in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riazi

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the world, with symptoms ranging from acute diarrhea to severe neurological disorders. Contaminated poultry meat is a major source of C. jejuni infection, and therefore, strategies to reduce this organism in poultry, are expected to reduce the incidence of Campylobacter-associated diseases. We have investigated whether oral administration of C. jejuni-specific single-domain antibodies would reduce bacterial colonization levels in chickens. Llama single-domain antibodies specific for C. jejuni were isolated from a phage display library generated from the heavy chain IgG variable domain repertoire of a llama immunized with C. jejuni flagella. Two flagella-specific single-domain antibodies were pentamerized to yield high avidity antibodies capable of multivalent binding to the target antigen. When administered orally to C. jejuni-infected two-day old chicks, the pentabodies significantly reduced C. jejuni colonization in the ceca. In vitro, the motility of the bacteria was also reduced in the presence of the flagella-specific pentabodies, suggesting the mechanism of action is through either direct interference with flagellar motility or antibody-mediated aggregation. Fluorescent microscopy and Western blot analyses revealed specific binding of the anti-flagella pentabodies to the C. jejuni flagellin.

  2. Current Challenges and Limitations in Antibody-Based Detection of Citrullinated Histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeli, Indira; Radic, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Studies on NETosis demand reliable and convenient markers to monitor the progress of this form of cell death. Because a determining step in the release of nuclear chromatin NETs requires the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues in histones by peptidylarginine deiminase, citrullinated histones can provide such a marker. Here, we evaluate antibody reagents for the detection of citrulline residues in histones and observe alarming differences between commercial antisera and mouse and rabbit monoclonal antibodies in their ability to detect their nominal target residues. Differences between antibodies that are currently used to detect citrulline residues in histones could jeopardize efforts to reach a scientific consensus and instead lead to inconsistent and even conflicting conclusions regarding the regulation of histone deimination. Our results will assist others in planning their initial or ongoing studies on peptidylarginine deiminase activity with the use of currently available antibodies. Furthermore, we argue that, along with the careful attention to experimental conditions and calcium concentrations, validated antibody reagents are urgently needed to avoid possible setbacks in the research on NETosis. PMID:27933065

  3. Current Challenges and Limitations in Antibody-Based Detection of Citrullinated Histones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indira Neeli

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Studies on NETosis demand reliable and convenient markers to monitor the progress of this form of cell death. Because a determining step in the release of nuclear chromatin NETs requires the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues in histones by peptidylarginine deiminase, citrullinated histones can provide such a marker. Here, we evaluate antibody reagents for the detection of citrulline residues in histones and observe alarming differences between commercial antisera and mouse and rabbit monoclonal antibodies in their ability to detect their nominal target residues. Differences between antibodies that are currently used to detect citrulline residues in histones could jeopardize efforts to reach a scientific consensus and instead lead to inconsistent and even conflicting conclusions regarding the regulation of histone deimination. Our results will assist others in planning their initial or ongoing studies on peptidylarginine deiminase activity with the use of currently available antibodies. Further, we argue that, along with the careful attention to experimental conditions and calcium concentrations, validated antibody reagents are urgently needed to avoid possible setbacks in the research on NETosis.

  4. Hypogammaglobulinemia in BLT humanized mice--an animal model of primary antibody deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martinez-Torres

    Full Text Available Primary antibody deficiencies present clinically as reduced or absent plasma antibodies without another identified disorder that could explain the low immunoglobulin levels. Bone marrow-liver-thymus (BLT humanized mice also exhibit primary antibody deficiency or hypogammaglobulinemia. Comprehensive characterization of B cell development and differentiation in BLT mice revealed other key parallels with primary immunodeficiency patients. We found that B cell ontogeny was normal in the bone marrow of BLT mice but observed an absence of switched memory B cells in the periphery. PC-KLH immunizations led to the presence of switched memory B cells in immunized BLT mice although plasma cells producing PC- or KLH- specific IgG were not detected in tissues. Overall, we have identified the following parallels between the humoral immune systems of primary antibody deficiency patients and those in BLT mice that make this in vivo model a robust and translational experimental platform for gaining a greater understanding of this heterogeneous array of humoral immunodeficiency disorders in humans: (i hypogammaglobulinemia; (ii normal B cell ontogeny in bone marrow; and (iii poor antigen-specific IgG response to immunization. Furthermore, the development of strategies to overcome these humoral immune aberrations in BLT mice may in turn provide insights into the pathogenesis of some primary antibody deficiency patients which could lead to novel clinical interventions for improved humoral immune function.

  5. Characterization of a novel inhibitory human monoclonal antibody directed against Plasmodium falciparum Apical Membrane Antigen 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskus, Dominika J; Królik, Michał; Bethke, Susanne; Spiegel, Holger; Kapelski, Stephanie; Seidel, Melanie; Addai-Mensah, Otchere; Reimann, Andreas; Klockenbring, Torsten; Barth, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer; Fendel, Rolf

    2016-12-21

    Malaria remains a major challenge to global health causing extensive morbidity and mortality. Yet, there is no efficient vaccine and the immune response remains incompletely understood. Apical Membrane Antigen 1 (AMA1), a leading vaccine candidate, plays a key role during merozoite invasion into erythrocytes by interacting with Rhoptry Neck Protein 2 (RON2). We generated a human anti-AMA1-antibody (humAbAMA1) by EBV-transformation of sorted B-lymphocytes from a Ghanaian donor and subsequent rescue of antibody variable regions. The antibody was expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana and in HEK239-6E, characterized for binding specificity and epitope, and analyzed for its inhibitory effect on Plasmodium falciparum. The generated humAbAMA1 shows an affinity of 106-135 pM. It inhibits the parasite strain 3D7A growth in vitro with an expression system-independent IC50-value of 35 μg/ml (95% confidence interval: 33 μg/ml-37 μg/ml), which is three to eight times lower than the IC50-values of inhibitory antibodies 4G2 and 1F9. The epitope was mapped to the close proximity of the RON2-peptide binding groove. Competition for binding between the RON2-peptide and humAbAMA1 was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy measurements. The particularly advantageous inhibitory activity of this fully human antibody might provide a basis for future therapeutic applications.

  6. Pentavalent single-domain antibodies reduce Campylobacter jejuni motility and colonization in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazi, Ali; Strong, Philippa C R; Coleman, Russell; Chen, Wangxue; Hirama, Tomoko; van Faassen, Henk; Henry, Matthew; Logan, Susan M; Szymanski, Christine M; Mackenzie, Roger; Ghahroudi, Mehdi Arbabi

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the world, with symptoms ranging from acute diarrhea to severe neurological disorders. Contaminated poultry meat is a major source of C. jejuni infection, and therefore, strategies to reduce this organism in poultry, are expected to reduce the incidence of Campylobacter-associated diseases. We have investigated whether oral administration of C. jejuni-specific single-domain antibodies would reduce bacterial colonization levels in chickens. Llama single-domain antibodies specific for C. jejuni were isolated from a phage display library generated from the heavy chain IgG variable domain repertoire of a llama immunized with C. jejuni flagella. Two flagella-specific single-domain antibodies were pentamerized to yield high avidity antibodies capable of multivalent binding to the target antigen. When administered orally to C. jejuni-infected two-day old chicks, the pentabodies significantly reduced C. jejuni colonization in the ceca. In vitro, the motility of the bacteria was also reduced in the presence of the flagella-specific pentabodies, suggesting the mechanism of action is through either direct interference with flagellar motility or antibody-mediated aggregation. Fluorescent microscopy and Western blot analyses revealed specific binding of the anti-flagella pentabodies to the C. jejuni flagellin.

  7. Inhibition of HCV 3a genotype entry through Host CD81 and HCV E2 antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashfaq Usman A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HCV causes acute and chronic hepatitis which can eventually lead to permanent liver damage hepatocellular carcinoma and death. HCV glycoproteins play an important role in HCV entry by binding with CD81 receptors. Hence inhibition of virus at entry step is an important target to identify antiviral drugs against HCV. Methods and result The present study elaborated the role of CD81 and HCV glycoprotein E2 in HCV entry using retroviral pseudo-particles of 3a local genotype. Our results demonstrated that HCV specific antibody E2 and host antibody CD81 showed dose- dependent inhibition of HCV entry. HCV E2 antibody showed 50% reduction at a concentration of 1.5 ± 1 μg while CD81 exhibited 50% reduction at a concentration of 0.8 ± 1 μg. In addition, data obtained with HCVpp were also confirmed with the infection of whole virus of HCV genotype 3a in liver cells. Conclusion Our data suggest that HCV specific E2 and host CD81 antibodies reduce HCVpp entry and full length viral particle and combination of host and HCV specific antibodies showed synergistic effect in reducing the viral titer.

  8. Radioimmunoassay of serum antibodies with B-streptococcus specificity in pregnant women and infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, C.W.

    1980-01-01

    In a specific competitive radioimmunoassay of purified rabbit antibodies, labeled with iodine 125 against group- and type-antigens of streptococcus agalactiae (streptococci type B), we investigated the amount of serum anti-bodies providing specificity of streptococci type B in not preselected pregnant women, newborn and babies with colonies of streptococci type B or with diseases due to streptococci type B and in some of their mothers. These antibodies could be detected in 26 of 45 pregnant women and in 3 of 7 children with colonies of streptococci type B. 5 of 18 newborn with the ''early-onset'' type of infection and 6 of 7 of their mothers provided antibodies with specificity of streptococci type B as did one of two newborn with the ''late onset'' type of infection. Contrary to the supposition of Baker and Kasper and in accordance with the findings of Wilkinson, the ''risk group'' cannot be determined only by detecting the antibodies against streptococci type B. The risk group comprises those persons in whom the colonisation of streptococci agalactiae leads to the frequently life-threatening infecton of neonatals with streptococci type B.

  9. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  10. Metabolic engineering of monoclonal antibody carbohydrates for antibody-drug conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeley, Nicole M; Toki, Brian E; Zhang, Xinqun; Jeffrey, Scott C; Burke, Patrick J; Alley, Stephen C; Senter, Peter D

    2013-10-16

    The role that carbohydrates play in antibody function and pharmacokinetics has made them important targets for modification. The terminal fucose of the N-linked glycan structure, which has been shown to be involved in modulation of antibody-directed cellular cytotoxicity, is a particularly interesting location for potential modification through incorporation of alternative sugar structures. A library of fucose analogues was evaluated for their ability to incorporate into antibody carbohydrates in place of the native fucose. A number of efficiently incorporated molecules were identified, demonstrating the ability of fucosyltransferase VIII to utilize a variety of non-natural sugars as substrates. Among these structures was a thiolated analogue, 6-thiofucose, which was incorporated into the antibody carbohydrate with good efficiency. This unnatural thio-sugar could then be used for conjugation using maleimide chemistry to produce antibody-drug conjugates with pronounced cytotoxic activities and improved homogeneity compared to drug attachment through hinge disulfides.

  11. Antibody engineering using phage display with a coiled-coil heterodimeric Fv antibody fragment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Wang

    Full Text Available A Fab-like antibody binding unit, ccFv, in which a pair of heterodimeric coiled-coil domains was fused to V(H and V(L for Fv stabilization, was constructed for an anti-VEGF antibody. The anti-VEGF ccFv showed the same binding affinity as scFv but significantly improved stability and phage display level. Furthermore, phage display libraries in the ccFv format were constructed for humanization and affinity maturation of the anti-VEGF antibody. A panel of V(H frameworks and V(H-CDR3 variants, with a significant improvement in affinity and expressibility in both E. coli and yeast systems, was isolated from the ccFv phage libraries. These results demonstrate the potential application of the ccFv antibody format in antibody engineering.

  12. Antibody Fragments as Probe in Biosensor Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Muyldermans

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Today’s proteomic analyses are generating increasing numbers of biomarkers, making it essential to possess highly specific probes able to recognize those targets. Antibodies are considered to be the first choice as molecular recognition units due to their target specificity and affinity, which make them excellent probes in biosensor development. However several problems such as difficult directional immobilization, unstable behavior, loss of specificity and steric hindrance, may arise from using these large molecules. Luckily, protein engineering techniques offer designed antibody formats suitable for biomarker analysis. Minimization strategies of antibodies into Fab fragments, scFv or even single-domain antibody fragments like VH, VL or VHHs are reviewed. Not only the size of the probe but also other issues like choice of immobilization tag, type of solid support and probe stability are of critical importance in assay development for biosensing. In this respect, multiple approaches to specifically orient and couple antibody fragments in a generic one-step procedure directly on a biosensor substrate are discussed.

  13. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  14. Recombinant shark natural antibodies to thyroglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Samuel F; Jensen, Ingvill; Ramsland, Paul A; Marchalonis, John J

    2005-01-01

    As cartilaginous fish are the vertebrates most distal from man to produce antibodies, fundamental information regarding conservation and variation of the antigen binding site should be gained by comparing the properties of antibodies directed against the same antigen from the two species. Since monoclonal cell lines cannot be generated using shark B cells, we isolated antigen binding recombinant single chain Fv antibodies (scFv) comprising of the complete variable regions from shark light and heavy chains. Thyroglobulin was used as the selecting antigen as both sharks and humans express natural antibodies to mammalian thyroglobulin in the absence of purposeful immunization. We report that recombinant sandbar shark (Carcharhinus plumbeus) scFvs that bind bovine thyroglobulin consist of heavy chain variable regions (VH) homologous to those of the human VHIII subset and light chain variable regions (VL) homologous to those of the human Vlambda6 subgroup. The homology within the frameworks is sufficient to enable the building of three-dimensional models of the shark VH/VL structure using established human structures as templates. In natural antibodies of both species, the major variability lies in the third complementarity determining region (CDR3) of both VH and VL.

  15. A ssDNA Aptamer That Blocks the Function of the Anti-FLAG M2 Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda S. Lakamp

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Using SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment, we serendipitously discovered a ssDNA aptamer that binds selectively to the anti-FLAG M2 antibody. The aptamer consisted of two motifs (CCTTA and TGTCTWCC separated by 2-3 bases, and the elimination of one or the other motif abrogated binding. The DNA aptamer and FLAG peptide competed for binding to the antigen-binding pocket of the M2 antibody. In addition, the aptamer eluted FLAG-tagged proteins from the antibody, suggesting a commercial application in protein purification. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using SELEX to develop ssDNA aptamers that block the function of a specific antibody, a capability that could lead to the development of novel therapeutic modalities for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune diseases.

  16. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-07-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against DNA-binding tips of DNABII proteins disrupt biofilms in vitro and induce bacterial clearance in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Novotny

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of chronic and recurrent bacterial diseases are attributed to the presence of a recalcitrant biofilm that contributes significantly to pathogenesis. As such, these diseases will require an innovative therapeutic approach. We targeted DNABII proteins, an integral component of extracellular DNA (eDNA which is universally found as part of the pathogenic biofilm matrix to develop a biofilm disrupting therapeutic. We show that a cocktail of monoclonal antibodies directed against specific epitopes of a DNABII protein is highly effective to disrupt diverse biofilms in vitro as well as resolve experimental infection in vivo, in both a chinchilla and murine model. Combining this monoclonal antibody cocktail with a traditional antibiotic to kill bacteria newly released from the biofilm due to the action of the antibody cocktail was highly effective. Our results strongly support these monoclonal antibodies as attractive candidates for lead optimization as a therapeutic for resolution of bacterial biofilm diseases.

  18. Lead- induced genotoxicity in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Truta

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The changes induced in cytogenetic parameters from root meristems of Triticum aestivum cv. Maruca seedlings have been studied after treatment with lead acetate and lead nitrate solutions, at four concentrations (10, 25, 50, 100 μM containing 2.07, 5.18, 10.36, respectively 20.72 μg ml-1 Pb2+. Lead induced mitosis disturbances in root meristematic cells of wheat seedlings, expressed mainly in decrease of mitotic index and changes in preponderance of division phases. This heavy metal has genotoxic effects, expressed in the occurrence of many chromosomal aberrations in all Pb2+ treated variants. Pb2+ nitrate shows a more pronounced genotoxic potential than lead acetate trihydrate.

  19. Lead outside your comfort zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisina, M E

    2001-11-01

    Successful leaders use their passion, values, and personal mission to create and maintain influence. Learn to define and develop a context that allows you to successfully lead nursing and non-nursing departments.

  20. Sunitinib-associated pseudothrombocytopenia induced by IgM antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albersen, Arjan; Porcelijn, Leendert; Schilders, Joyce; Zuetenhorst, Hanneke; Njo, Tjin; Hamberg, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a well-documented adverse reaction of sunitinib. Thrombocytopenia was observed in a patient with metastatic renal clear-cell carcinoma undergoing sunitinib treatment. Platelet count in an ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) sample was 19 × 10(9)/l. To exclude pseudothrombocytopenia (PTCP), a platelet count in citrate-anticoagulated blood was performed, showing a platelet count of 6 × 10(9)/l. Due to the apparent thrombocytopenia, the patient received platelet concentrates. Subsequent analyses revealed PTCP whereby platelet clumping was most abundant in citrate - followed by EDTA- and heparin-anticoagulated blood samples. This effect was partially reversed after placing blood samples at 37°C. The IgM antiplatelet autoantibodies responsible for in vitro agglutination are temperature and multianticoagulant dependent and did not react to amikacin pre-supplementation. Remarkably, the antibody revealed specificity to platelet antigens other than GPIIb/IIIa, GPIb/IX, GPIa/IIa, GPIV, and GPV. After 16 days of discontinuing sunitinib, no PTCP and no platelet reactive antibodies could be detected. We report a case of PTCP with clear time-relation with sunitinib, strongly suggesting the mechanism to be sunitinib dependent. Since this finding has not been described before, non-recognition of PTCP during sunitinib treatment might lead to dose reduction or unwarranted therapy.

  1. Stepwise functionalization of SiN{sub x} surfaces for covalent immobilization of antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauphas, Stephanie [Universite de Rennes 1, UMR-CNRS 6226, Laboratoire des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Equipe catalyse et organometalliques, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Ababou-Girard, Soraya [Universite de Rennes 1, UMR-CNRS 6251, Institut de Physique de Rennes, Equipe Physique des surfaces et interfaces, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Girard, Aurelie; Le Bihan, France; Mohammed-Brahim, Tayeb [Universite de Rennes 1, UMR-CNRS 6164, Institut d' Electronique et Telecommunications de Rennes, Groupe de Microelectronique, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Vie, Veronique [Universite de Rennes 1, UMR-CNRS 6251, Institut de Physique de Rennes, Equipe Biophysique, Campus Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes (France); Corlu, Anne; Guguen-Guillouzo, Christiane [Universite de Rennes 1, INSERM U522, IFR 140, Campus de Villejean, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Lavastre, Olivier [Universite de Rennes 1, UMR-CNRS 6226, Laboratoire des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Equipe catalyse et organometalliques, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Geneste, Florence, E-mail: Florence.Geneste@univ-rennes1.f [Universite de Rennes 1, UMR-CNRS 6226, Laboratoire des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Equipe catalyse et organometalliques, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

    2009-09-01

    A stepwise functionalization of silicon nitride surfaces is followed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The first step involves a silanization reaction leading to the formation of a silane film with a thickness estimated by XPS of one or two molecular layers. A monoprotected homobifunctionalized linker is then used to avoid the formation of bridge structures on the surface. The linker reacts quantitatively with the amino groups of the surface as outlined by the absence of residual unreacted CNH{sub 2}/CNH{sub 3}{sup +} groups in XPS analyses. Deprotection of the ester groups of the immobilized linker and subsequent reaction with N-hydroxysuccinimid lead to N-hydroxysuccinimid activated surfaces able to react with biological species. These surfaces were then incubated with anti-transferrin antibodies. As seen by XPS and atomic force microscopy analyses, the concentration and incubation conditions of antibodies are important to obtain a compact layer of antibodies on the surface. All chemical steps of the procedure are compatible with microelectronic process on silicon. Moreover, antibodies introduced under native conditions at physiological pH, in the last step of the immobilization process, recognized specifically antigens, as shown by fluorescence competitive assay.

  2. Single-domain antibodies that compete with the natural ligand fibroblast growth factor block the internalization of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veggiani, Gianluca; Ossolengo, Giuseppe; Aliprandi, Marisa; Cavallaro, Ugo [IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milano (Italy); Marco, Ario de, E-mail: ario.demarco@ung.si [IFOM-IEO Campus, Via Adamello 16, 20139 Milano (Italy); Dept. Environmental Sciences, University of Nova Gorica (UNG), Vipavska 13, P.O. Box 301-SI-5000, Rozna Dolina, Nova Gorica (Slovenia)

    2011-05-20

    Highlights: {yields} Recombinant antibodies for FGFR1 were isolated from a llama naive library in VHH format. {yields} These antibodies compete with the natural ligand FGF-2 for the same epitope on FGFR1. {yields} The antibody competition inhibits the FGF-2-dependent internalization of FGFR1. -- Abstract: Single-domain antibodies in VHH format specific for fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) were isolated from a phage-display llama naive library. In particular, phage elution in the presence of the natural receptor ligand fibroblast growth factor (FGF) allowed for the identification of recombinant antibodies that compete with FGF for the same region on the receptor surface. These antibodies posses a relatively low affinity for FGFR1 and were never identified when unspecific elution conditions favoring highly affine binders were applied to panning procedures. Two populations of competitive antibodies were identified that labeled specifically the receptor-expressing cells in immunofluorescence and recognize distinct epitopes. Antibodies from both populations effectively prevented FGF-dependent internalization and nuclear accumulation of the receptor in cultured cells. This achievement indicates that these antibodies have a capacity to modulate the receptor physiology and, therefore, constitute powerful reagents for basic research and a potential lead for therapeutic applications.

  3. Determination of Lead by Electrochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE YuFeng; ZHANG Zhang; MA YongJun; KANG JingWan

    2001-01-01

    @@ Lead is one of the poisonous trace element for human body. It is important to find a way for measuring content of lead. Deternination of lead by electrochemistry is one of a method[1]. In this paper, lead is determined by single-sweep polarography. The absorption behavior of meso-tetra (4-sulfonylphenyl) porphyrin (H2TPPS4) complex with lead ion has also been studied.In Na2B4O7-NaOH solution with pH=l 0.5, the reduction peaks of the ligand are P1 (Ep1=-0.38V), P2 (Ep2=-1.04V), which potentials are obtained vs. S.C.E. When lead ion has been added into above solution. The peak current of P1 and P2 decrease, and a new reduction peak P3 (Ep3=-1.10 V) appears. It shows that the TPPS4-Pb(Ⅱ) complex forms,and this method can be applied to study the complex.

  4. Determination of Lead by Electrochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; YuFeng

    2001-01-01

    Lead is one of the poisonous trace element for human body. It is important to find a way for measuring content of lead. Deternination of lead by electrochemistry is one of a method[1]. In this paper, lead is determined by single-sweep polarography. The absorption behavior of meso-tetra (4-sulfonylphenyl) porphyrin (H2TPPS4) complex with lead ion has also been studied.In Na2B4O7-NaOH solution with pH=l 0.5, the reduction peaks of the ligand are P1 (Ep1=-0.38V), P2 (Ep2=-1.04V), which potentials are obtained vs. S.C.E. When lead ion has been added into above solution. The peak current of P1 and P2 decrease, and a new reduction peak P3 (Ep3=-1.10 V) appears. It shows that the TPPS4-Pb(Ⅱ) complex forms,and this method can be applied to study the complex.……

  5. DARPA Antibody Technology Program. Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 ScFv Antibody Produced by Illumina

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ECBC-TR-1395 DARPA ANTIBODY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM STANDARDIZED TEST BED FOR...Thompson James Carney RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE Candice Warner Melody Zacharko EXCET, INC. Springfield, VA 22151-2110...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE DARPA Antibody Technology Program Standardized Test Bed for Antibody Characterization: Characterization of an MS2 ScFv

  6. Combined use of anti-ErbB monoclonal antibodies and erlotinib enhances antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity of wild-type erlotinib-sensitive NSCLC cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavazzoni Andrea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is an established target for anti-cancer treatment in different tumour types. Two different strategies have been explored to inhibit this pivotal molecule in epithelial cancer development: small molecules TKIs and monoclonal antibodies. ErbB/HER-targeting by monoclonal antibodies such as cetuximab and trastuzumab or tyrosine-kinase inhibitors as gefitinib or erlotinib has been proven effective in the treatment of advanced NSCLC. Results In this study we explored the potential of combining either erlotinib with cetuximab or trastuzumab to improve the efficacy of EGFR targeted therapy in EGFR wild-type NSCLC cell lines. Erlotinib treatment was observed to increase EGFR and/or HER2 expression at the plasma membrane level only in NSCLC cell lines sensitive to the drug inducing protein stabilization. The combined treatment had marginal effect on cell proliferation but markedly increased antibody-dependent, NK mediated, cytotoxicity in vitro. Moreover, in the Calu-3 xenograft model, the combination significantly inhibited tumour growth when compared with erlotinib and cetuximab alone. Conclusion Our results indicate that erlotinib increases surface expression of EGFR and/or HER2 only in EGFR-TKI sensitive NSCLC cell lines and, in turns, leads to increased susceptibility to ADCC both in vitro and in a xenograft models. The combination of erlotinib with monoclonal antibodies represents a potential strategy to improve the treatment of wild-type EGFR NSCLC patients sensitive to erlotinib.

  7. Limbic encephalitis associated with elevated antithyroid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Joseph, Sonia; Kneen, Rachel; Eunson, Paul; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2014-06-01

    Immune-mediated limbic encephalitis affects both adults and children. Patients typically present with seizures, memory problems, and imaging changes in the medial temporal lobes. Both paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic forms have been described in which the antibody to the voltage-gated potassium channel-complex associated protein, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1, is most commonly reported. Elevated antithyroid antibodies have also been reported in a range of neurological syndromes with encephalopathy, such as limbic encephalitis, often collectively termed Hashimoto encephalopathy, a condition whereby corticosteroids responsiveness with a complete recovery is commonly observed. Here we describe 3 children presenting with limbic encephalitis with elevated thyroid antibodies that did not respond to corticosteroids alone and required more aggressive immunotherapy, mirroring the slower treatment response that is more frequently seen in other immune-mediated forms of limbic encephalitis.

  8. Origin and pathogenesis of antiphospholipid antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M. Celli

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL are a heterogeneous group of antibodies that are detected in the serum of patients with a variety of conditions, including autoimmune (systemic lupus erythematosus, infectious (syphilis, AIDS and lymphoproliferative disorders (paraproteinemia, myeloma, lymphocytic leukemias. Thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, recurrent fetal loss and other clinical complications are currently associated with a subgroup of aPL designating the antiphospholipid syndrome. In contrast, aPL from patients with infectious disorders are not associated with any clinical manifestation. These findings led to increased interest in the origin and pathogenesis of aPL. Here we present the clinical features of the antiphospholipid syndrome and review the origin of aPL, the characteristics of experimentally induced aPL and their historical background. Within this context, we discuss the most probable pathogenic mechanisms induced by these antibodies.

  9. Adsorption of monoclonal antibodies to glass microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehne, Matthew; Samuel, Fauna; Dong, Aichun; Wurth, Christine; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2011-01-01

    Microparticulate glass represents a potential contamination to protein formulations that may occur as a result of processing conditions or glass types. The effect of added microparticulate glass to formulations of three humanized antibodies was tested. Under the three formulation conditions tested, all three antibodies adsorbed irreversibly at near monolayer surface coverages to the glass microparticles. Analysis of the secondary structure of the adsorbed antibodies by infrared spectroscopy reveal only minor perturbations as a result of adsorption. Likewise, front-face fluorescence quenching measurements reflected minimal tertiary structural changes upon adsorption. In contrast to the minimal effects on protein structure, adsorption of protein to suspensions of glass microparticles induced significant colloidal destabilization and flocculation of the suspension.

  10. Imaging spectrum of primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Kwon Ha; Won, Jong Jin [Wonkwang University Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hyun Kwon; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Jeong Gon; Ki, Won Woo; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is recognized as one of the most important causes of hypercoagulability. It can be clinically diagnosed if patients have experienced unexplained recurrent venous or arterial thrombosis, recurrent fetal loss, or thrombocytopenia in the presence of circulating autoantibodies to phospholipids, such as anticardiolipin antibody or lupus anticoagulant. Approximately half of all patients with this syndrome do not have associated systemic disease, and their condition is described as primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (PAPS). In the remainder, the syndrome is accompanied by systemic lupus erythematosus or other connective tissue diseases, and is known as secondary antiphospholipid syndrome (1). The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the systemic manifestation of PAPS, focusing on the radiological findings of CT, MR and angiography in clinically proven patients. (author). 8 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite specificity. Unfortunately antibodies can often fail when immobilised on inorganic surfaces, and alternative biological recognition elements are needed. This article reviews the available non-antibody-binding proteins that have been successfully used in electrical and micro-mechanical biosensor platforms. PMID:27365032

  12. Sensitive neutralization test for rubella antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Albrecht, P; Krugman, S; Ennis, F A

    1979-01-01

    A modified rubella virus plaque neutralization test for measuring rubella antibody was developed based on the potentiation of the virus-antibody complex by heterologous anti-immunoglobulin. The test is highly sensitive, yielding titers on the average 50 to 100 times higher than the haemagglutination inhibition test or the conventional plaque neutralization test. The sensitivity of this enhanced neutralization test is somewhat limited by the existence of a prozone phenomenon which precludes testing of low-titered sera below a dilution of 1:16. No prozone effect was observed with cerebrospinal fluids. The specificity of the enhanced neutralization test was determined by seroconversion of individuals receiving rubella vaccine. Although the rubella hemagglutination inhibition test remains the test of choice in routine diagnostic and surveillance work, the enhanced rubella neutralization test is particularly useful in monitoring low-level antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with neurological disorders and in certain instances of vaccine failure. PMID:107192

  13. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T. [Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  14. Anti-DNA antibodies--quintessential biomarkers of SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisetsky, David S

    2016-02-01

    Antibodies that recognize and bind to DNA (anti-DNA antibodies) are serological hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and key markers for diagnosis and disease activity. In addition to common use in the clinic, anti-DNA antibody testing now also determines eligibility for clinical trials, raising important questions about the nature of the antibody-antigen interaction. At present, no 'gold standard' for serological assessment exists, and anti-DNA antibody binding can be measured with a variety of assay formats, which differ in the nature of the DNA substrates and in the conditions for binding and detection of antibodies. A mechanism called monogamous bivalency--in which high avidity results from simultaneous interaction of IgG Fab sites with a single polynucleotide chain--determines anti-DNA antibody binding; this mechanism might affect antibody detection in different assay formats. Although anti-DNA antibodies can promote pathogenesis by depositing in the kidney or driving cytokine production, they are not all alike, pathologically, and anti-DNA antibody expression does not necessarily correlate with active disease. Levels of anti-DNA antibodies in patients with SLE can vary over time, distinguishing anti-DNA antibodies from other pathogenic antinuclear antibodies. Elucidation of the binding specificities and the pathogenic roles of anti-DNA antibodies in SLE should enable improvements in the design of informative assays for both clinical and research purposes.

  15. Leading to distraction: Driver distraction, lead car, and road environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kountouriotis, G K; Merat, N

    2016-04-01

    Driver distraction is strongly associated with crashes and near-misses, and despite the attention this topic has received in recent years, the effect of different types of distracting task on driving performance remains unclear. In the case of non-visual distractions, such as talking on the phone or other engaging verbal tasks that do not require a visual input, a common finding is reduced lateral variability in steering and gaze patterns where participants concentrate their gaze towards the centre of the road and their steering control is less variable. In the experiments presented here, we examined whether this finding is more pronounced in the presence of a lead car (which may provide a focus point for gaze) and whether the behaviour of the lead car has any influence on the driver's steering control. In addition, both visual and non-visual distraction tasks were used, and their effect on different road environments (straight and curved roadways) was assessed. Visual distraction was found to increase variability in both gaze patterns and steering control, non-visual distraction reduced gaze and steering variability in conditions without a lead car; in the conditions where a lead car was present there was no significant difference from baseline. The lateral behaviour of the lead car did not have an effect on steering performance, a finding which indicates that a lead car may not necessarily be used as an information point. Finally, the effects of driver distraction were different for straight and curved roadways, indicating a stronger influence of the road environment in steering than previously thought.

  16. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  17. African trypanosomiasis and antibodies: implications for vaccination, therapy and diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magez, Stefan; Radwanska, Magdalena

    2009-10-01

    African trypanosomiasis causes devastating effects on human populations and livestock herds in large parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Control of the disease is hampered by the lack of any efficient vaccination results in a field setting, and the severe side effects of current drug therapies. In addition, with the exception of Trypanosoma brucei gambiense infections, the diagnosis of trypanosomiasis has to rely on microscopic analysis of blood samples, as other specific tools are nonexistent. However, new developments in biotechnology, which include loop-mediated isothermal amplification as an adaptation to conventional PCR, as well as the antibody engineering that has allowed the development of Nanobody technology, offer new perspectives in both the detection and treatment of trypanosomiasis. In addition, recent data on parasite-induced B-cell memory destruction offer new insights into mechanisms of vaccine failure, and should lead us towards new strategies to overcome trypanosome defenses operating against the host immune system.

  18. Lead extraction. Indications and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, C L; Schwartz, S J; Hedin, N

    1992-11-01

    Each of the extraction techniques and their ancillary tools was reported as used successfully; however, until now, no technique has been successful when used in more than a few isolated instances. The technique for intravascular countertraction and the associated tools described in this paper were devised and selected in an attempt to develop one technique to be used on all patients, with all types of leads, and with a very low complication rate. Its versatility permitted single or multiple lead extractions combined with the precision of selecting and extracting a specific lead. In our experience, as well as the experience of others, the techniques described in this paper have proved to be superior by minimizing the inherent risk and morbidity, allowing us to expand the indications for lead removal beyond septicemia and free-floating leads, to include infection, abandonment of pockets, and replacement of malfunctioning or fractured leads. Intravascular countertraction was a consistently safe and efficacious method of removing transvenous pacemaker leads regardless of the duration of the implant, thus permitting extractions in patients not considered candidates for a more extensive surgical procedure. Intravascular countertraction encompasses surgical and fluoroscopic techniques possessed by most physicians experienced in pacemaker and automatic implantable cardioverter defibrillator implants. However, there is a learning curve, predicating caution for the inexperienced physician. In addition, advanced surgical skills may be needed in handling associated conditions such as debridement and primary closure of chronically inflamed tissues, especially in submuscular pockets and sinus tracts in the neck. Although the potential for a cardiovascular complication is small, it does exist, and cardiovascular surgical backup is a recommended precaution.

  19. Analysis of antibody responses to Hymenolepis nana infection in mice by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A; Honey, R D; Scanlon, T; Lightowlers, M W; Rickard, M D

    1988-05-01

    Serum antibody responses in two strains of mice infected with embryonated eggs of Hymenolepis nana were analysed by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoprecipitation (IP) using sodium deoxycholate (DOC)-solubilized antigens prepared from embryonated eggs (eggs), mouse-derived cysticercoids (cysts) and adult tapeworms with immature segments only (adults). Highly susceptible dd mice, which harbour mature tapeworms for a long period (greater than 70 days), produced high levels of antibodies to all three different stages of H. nana. BALB/c mice, almost all of which expel adult tapeworms by 30 days after infection, produced high levels of antibody against egg antigens only. The high antibody titres to cyst and adult antigens in dd mice did not lead to expulsion of the worms. However, worms are rejected early in BALB/c mice when there is little or no detectable serum antibody. The antibody responses to eggs seen in BALB/c mice which had long since shed their adult worms were probably due to ingestion of eggs from faeces of other infected mice. Antibodies to eggs were not detected in BALB/c mice which were initially inoculated with eggs (day 0) and then treated with praziquantel on day 6 after the tissue phase of infection only. The different antibody responses to egg antigens and the other two antigens (cyst and adult) in BALB/c mice suggest a difference in antigen specificity between eggs and both cysts and adults. A major antigen component with Mr 32,000 appears to be specific to the egg (or oncosphere) stage of H. nana. Antibody to this major component of eggs was absorbed only with intact eggs, but not with intact cysts nor adults with immature segments only, so that the antigen appears to be on the surface of the oncosphere.

  20. Label free detection of white spot syndrome virus using lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate piezoelectric microcantilever sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Joseph A; Shih, Wei-Heng; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Lo, Grace Chu-Fang; Shih, Wan Y

    2010-11-15

    We have investigated rapid, label free detection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) using the first longitudinal extension resonance peak of five lead-magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) piezoelectric microcantilever sensors (PEMS) 1050-700 μm long and 850-485 μm wide constructed from 8 μm thick PMN-PT freestanding films. The PMN-PT PEMS were encapsulated with a 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) insulation layer and further coated with anti-VP28 and anti-VP664 antibodies to target the WSSV virions and nucleocapsids, respectively. By inserting the antibody coated PEMS in a flowing virion or nucleocapsid suspension, label free detection of the virions and nucleocapsids were respectively achieved by monitoring the PEMS resonance frequency shift. We showed that positive label free detection of both the virion and the nucleocapsid could be achieved at a concentration of 100virions(nucleocapsids)/ml or 10 virions(nucleocapsids)/100 μl, comparable to the detection sensitivity of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, in contrast to PCR, PEMS detection was label free, in situ and rapid (less than 30 min), potentially requiring minimal or no sample preparation.

  1. Investigation of Antiphosphatidyl-Serine Antibody and Antiphosphatidyl-Inositol Antibody in Ischemic Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Okuma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by arterial or venous thrombosis and the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL. We measured β2-GPI aCL, IgGaCL, LA, antiphosphatidyl-serine antibody (PS, and antiphosphatidyl-inositol antibody (PI in each patient at one month after the onset of stroke. In addition, carotid artery echography was performed in patients positive for PI or PS. Among the 250 patients, 13.6% (34/250 were positive for either PI or PS, and 6.8% (17/250 were positive for both. Carotid artery echography performed on these 34 patients showed that the frequencies of increased intimal-medial thickness (IMT of 1.1 mm or more, plaque, and carotid artery stenosis of 50% or more were all significantly higher in patients positive for antinuclear antibody than those negative for the antibody (P<.05. PI and PS are associated with antinuclear antibody and precipitation of atherosclerosis. Ischemic stroke patients with SLE frequently showed a variety of antiphospholipid-protein antibodies.

  2. Lead poisoning by contaminated flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershko, C; Eisenberg, A; Avni, A; Grauer, F; Acker, C; Hamdallah, M; Shahin, S; Moreb, J; Richter, E; Weissenberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Between October 1982 and June 1983, 43 patients were identified with symptomatic lead poisoning in three Arab villages of the Nablus district. Because of the clustering of clinical poisoning by household units, investigation was focussed on potential sources common to all members of the households. After excluding water, olive oil and a variety of foodstuff, lead in high concentrations was discovered in locally ground flour in all affected households. The source of poisoning was lead poured into the fissures between the metal housing and the driveshaft of the millstone. Significant lead contamination of freshly ground flour was demonstrated in 23% of the 146 community flour mills operating in West Bank villages. Since the completion of these studies, similar outbreaks of lead poisoning caused by contaminated flourmills have been identified in the Upper Galilee and in Spain. As the methods of milling in the Mediterranean area are similar, a coordinated international effort is needed in order to eliminate this health hazard from countries where similar community stone mills are still in use.

  3. Efficient and lightweight current leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, L.; Dietz, A. J.; Michael, P. C.; Gold, C.; Cheadle, M.

    2014-01-01

    Current leads generate substantial cryogenic heat loads in short length High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) distribution systems. Thermal conduction, as well as Joule losses (I2R) along the current leads, comprises the largest cryogenic loads for short distribution systems. Current leads with two temperature stages have been designed, constructed and tested, with the goal of minimizing the electrical power consumption, and to provide thermal margin for the cable. We present the design of a two-stage current lead system, operating at 140 K and 55 K. This design is very attractive when implemented with a turbo-Brayton cycle refrigerator (two-stage), with substantial power and weight reduction. A heat exchanger is used at each temperature station, with conduction-cooled stages in-between. Compact, efficient heat exchangers are challenging, because of the gaseous coolant. Design, optimization and performance of the heat exchangers used for the current leads will be presented. We have made extensive use of CFD models for optimizing hydraulic and thermal performance of the heat exchangers. The methodology and the results of the optimization process will be discussed. The use of demountable connections between the cable and the terminations allows for ease of assembly, but require means of aggressively cooling the region of the joint. We will also discuss the cooling of the joint. We have fabricated a 7 m, 5 kA cable with second generation HTS tapes. The performance of the system will be described.

  4. Mouse x pig chimeric antibodies expressed in Baculovirus retain the same properties of their parent antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jar, Ana M; Osorio, Fernando A; López, Osvaldo J

    2009-01-01

    The development of hybridoma and recombinant DNA technologies has made it possible to use antibodies against cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases in humans. These advances in therapy, as well as immunoprophylaxis, could also make it possible to use these technologies in agricultural species of economic importance such as pigs. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is an arterivirus causing very important economic losses to the industry. Passive transfer of antibodies obtained by biotechnology could be used in the future to complement or replace vaccination against this and other pig pathogens. To this end, we constructed and studied the properties of chimeric mouse x pig anti-PRRSV antibodies. We cloned the constant regions of gamma-1 and gamma-2 heavy chains and the lambda light chain of pig antibodies in frame with the variable regions of heavy and light chains of mouse monoclonal antibody ISU25C1, which has neutralizing activity against PRRSV. The coding regions for chimeric IgG1 and IgG2 were expressed in a baculovirus expression system. Both chimeric antibodies recognized PRRSV in ELISA as well as in a Western-blot format and, more importantly, were able to neutralize PRRSV in the same fashion as the parent mouse monoclonal antibody ISU25C1. In addition, we show that both pig IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies could bind complement component C1q, with IgG2 being more efficient than IgG1 in binding C1q. Expressing chimeric pig antibodies with protective capabilities offers a new alternative strategy for infectious disease control in domestic pigs.

  5. Mitochondrial Extrusion through the cytoplasmic vacuoles during cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Akihito; Kurihara, Hidetake; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Nakano, Hiroyasu

    2008-08-29

    Under various conditions, noxious stimuli damage mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial fragmentation; however, the mechanisms by which fragmented mitochondria are eliminated from the cells remain largely unknown. Here we show that cytoplasmic vacuoles originating from the plasma membrane engulfed fragmented mitochondria and subsequently extruded them into the extracellular spaces in undergoing acute tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced cell death in a caspase-dependent fashion. Notably, upon fusion of the membrane encapsulating mitochondria to the plasma membrane, naked mitochondria were released into the extracellular spaces in an exocytotic manner. Mitochondrial extrusion was specific to tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced cell death, because a genotoxic stress-inducing agent such as cisplatin did not elicit mitochondrial extrusion. Moreover, intact actin and tubulin cytoskeletons were required for mitochondrial extrusion as well as membrane blebbing. Furthermore, fragmented mitochondria were engulfed by cytoplasmic vacuoles and extruded from hepatocytes of mice injected with anti-Fas antibody, suggesting that mitochondrial extrusion can be observed in vivo under pathological conditions. Mitochondria are eliminated during erythrocyte maturation under physiological conditions, and anti-mitochondrial antibody is detected in some autoimmune diseases. Thus, elucidating the mechanism underlying mitochondrial extrusion will open a novel avenue leading to better understanding of various diseases caused by mitochondrial malfunction as well as mitochondrial biology.

  6. Chronic lead intoxication; Chronische Bleiintoxikation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieseler, B.; Leng, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene; Lenz, S.; Schultz, C. [Klinikum Remscheid GmbH, Remscheid (Germany); Wilhelm, M. [Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Hygiene, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin

    1999-02-01

    The case of a female 68 years old patient is described. Here, a chronic lead intoxication was diagnosed after a two year old medical history with increasing attacks of colic-like abdominal pain often described as life-threatening. After repeated hospitalizations and intensive search for the cause of the symptoms, porphyria and anemia was found to be a sign of a chronic lead poisoning. The blood lead concentrations were always about a level of 600 {mu}g/L. The source of exposure could not be found by now. Neither home inspection nor environmental investigations have shown a recent source of lead intake by the patient. However, a possible occupational source of lead exposure at a blast furnace was established by anamnesis for 1952 to 1962. Thus, osteoporosis induced lead mobilisation was suspected. Noticeable are the results of the six abdominal survey radiographies taken during hospitalization within one year; three radiographies were taken following clinical admission and three before discharge of the patient. In comparison, the course shows a chronic relapsing alimentary supply from metallic particles of unknown genesis. The patient was treated with the sodium salt of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propansulfonic acid (DMPS, Dimaval{sup TM}). She was free of complain afterwards. Following therapy, the blood lead concentrations fell under a level of 400 {mu}m/L, but after several weeks the lead level raised up to the original level of 600 {mu}g/L. (orig.) [Deutsch] Es wird eine 68jaehrige Patientin vorgestellt, bei der nach fast zweijaehriger Krankengeschichte, die gekennzeichnet war durch rezidivierende, teils als lebensbedrohlich geschilderte Bauchkoliken, eine chronische Bleiintoxikation diagnostiziert wurde. Erst nach wiederholten stationaeren Krankenhausaufenthalten mit intensiver Suche nach der Krankheitsursache wurden das Krankheitsbild und die Laborwerte durch Zusatzuntersuchungen ergaenzt, so dass sich in der festgestellten Porphyrie und Anaemie die Diagnose der

  7. OPAL 96 Blocks Lead Glass

    CERN Multimedia

    This array of 96 lead glass bricks formed part of the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. One half of the complete calorimeter is shown in the picture above. There were 9440 lead glass counters in the OPAL electromagnetic calorimeter. These are made of Schott type SF57 glass and each block weighs about 25 kg and consists of 76% PbO by weight. Each block has a Hamamatsu R2238 photomultiplier glued on to it. The complete detector was in the form of a cylinder 7m long and 6m in diameter. It was used to measure the energy of electrons and photons produced in LEP interactions.

  8. Development of next generation antivenoms based on mixtures of human antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Cecilie; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Harrison, Robert

    With an annual 150,000 deaths and countless amputations and disfigurements,snakebite envenoming is an ever-present threat in many parts of the rural tropicalworld. In sub-Saharan Africa, only 1-2% of victims are treated with antivenom,which is currently based on animal-derived antibodies. Due to ...... to their heterologousorigin, antivenoms often provoke serious side effects in human recipients, such asserum sickness and anaphylaxis, which in some cases leads to death....

  9. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presenting with hemichorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayalew, Yezenash; Khattak, Fazlihakim

    2012-01-01

    A 25-year-old Bangladeshi lady presented to neurology with a three-month history of involuntary movements of her right arm, associated with loss of power. There was progression to the right leg, and she subsequently developed episodes of slurred speech and blurred vision. At the time of presentation, she was 12 weeks pregnant and the symptoms were reported to have started at conception. Past medical history was unremarkable apart from one first trimester miscarriage and there was no significant family history suggestive of a hereditary neurological condition. MRI of the head revealed no abnormalities but serology showed positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) at a titre of 1/400. Further investigations revealed strongly positive anticardiolipin antibodies (>120) and positive lupus anticoagulant antibodies. The patient had a second miscarriage at 19 weeks gestation strengthening the possibility that the chorea was related to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and she was started on a reducing dose of Prednisolone 40 mg daily and aspirin 300 mg daily. Six months later, she had complete resolution of neurological symptoms. There are several reports of chorea as a feature of antiphospholipid syndrome, but no clear consensus on underlying pathophysiology.

  10. Pulmonary manifestations of the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, H James; Roubey, Robert A S

    2010-09-01

    A broad spectrum of pulmonary disease may occur in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. The most common pulmonary manifestations are pulmonary thromboembolism and pulmonary hypertension. In this article the authors review these manifestations, as well as less common findings including acute respiratory distress syndrome, alveolar hemorrhage, and pulmonary capillaritis.

  11. The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luma, Henry Namme; Doualla, Marie-Solange; Temfack, Elvis; Bagnaka, Servais Albert Fiacre Eloumou; Mankaa, Emmanuella Wankie; Fofung, Dobgima

    2012-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is defined by the presence of thromboembolic complications and/or pregnancy morbidity in the presence of persistently increased titers of antiphospholipid antibodies. Its clinical presentation can be diverse and any organ can be involved, with a current impact in most surgical and medical specialties. The authors present the case of a 43-year-old man who, over a 13-year period of follow-up, presented with thrombosis of the mesenteric vein, inferior vena cava, and axillary and subclavian veins in a setting where diagnostic and therapeutic options are limited and costly. Through this case report, the authors aim to describe the evolution of this complex pathology, which to date has not been described in the authors' milieu - probably because of its challenging diagnosis and the limited treatment options available. The authors conclude that clinicians need to have a high index of suspicion of APS in patients who present with a thrombotic episode - clinicians should investigate for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, as early diagnosis may influence the course of the disease. Furthermore, resources for the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies should be made readily available in resource-limited settings. Finally, patient education on the importance of drug compliance, periodic monitoring, and prevention of thrombosis is indispensable, especially as mortality could be associated with the effects of vascular thrombosis and/or the effects of bleeding due to anticoagulants.

  12. Pathophysiology of the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rohan; Pierangeli, Silvia S

    2011-11-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) are associated with the recurrent pregnancy loss and thrombosis that characterizes the antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS). Although the ontogeny of these pathogenic antibodies has not been fully elucidated, there is evidence that indicates the involvement of both genetic and environmental factors. The ability of aPL to induce a procoagulant phenotype in APS patients plays a central role in the development of arterial and venous thrombotic manifestations typical of the disease. Inflammation serves as a necessary link between this procoagulant phenotype and actual thrombus development and is an important mediator of the placental injury seen in APS patients with obstetric complications. Recent evidence has indicated a role for abnormal cellular proliferation and differentiation in the pathophysiology of APS, especially in those patients with pregnancy morbidity and other more atypical manifestations that have no identifiable thrombotic cause. The interplay of genetic and environmental factors responsible for aPL development and the mechanisms by which these antibodies produce disease in APS patients is the focus of this review.

  13. Antigen/Antibody Analyses in Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    antibodies in human sera with antigens of protozoan parasites . It was found that enzyme substrate reactions had distinct advantages over typical...autoradiographic procedures. Analyses of various sera identified a number of antigens of protozoan parasites which may be useful in discriminating infections

  14. Neutralizing antibodies in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirjam B Zeisel; Samira Fafi-Kremer; Isabel Fofana; Heidi Barth; Fran(c)oise Stoll-Keller; Michel Doffo(e)l; Thomas F Baumert

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis world-wide. The majority of infected individuals develop chronic hepatitis which can then progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous viral clearance occurs in about 20%-30% of acutely infected individuals and results in resolution of infection without sequaelae. Both viral and host factors appear to play an important role for resolution of acute infection. A large body of evidence suggests that a strong, multispecific and long-lasting cellular immune response appears to be important for control of viral infection in acute hepatitis C. Due too the lack of convenient neutralization assays,the impact of neutralizing responses for control of viral infection had been less defined. In recent years, the development of robust tissue culture model systems for HCV entry and infection has finally allowed study of antibody-mediated neutralization and to gain further insights into viral targets of host neutralizing responses.In addition, detailed analysis of antibody-mediated neutralization in individual patients as well as cohorts with well defined viral isolates has enabled the study of neutralizing responses in the course of HCV infection and characterization of the impact of neutralizing antibodies for control of viral infection. This review will summarize recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization and its impact for HCV pathogenesis.(C) 2007 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  15. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  16. Coronavirus antibodies in African bat species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Marcel A; Paweska, Janusz T; Leman, Patricia A; Drosten, Christian; Grywna, Klaus; Kemp, Alan; Braack, Leo; Sonnenberg, Karen; Niedrig, Matthias; Swanepoel, Robert

    2007-09-01

    Asian bats have been identified as potential reservoir hosts of coronaviruses associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS-CoV). We detected antibody reactive with SARS-CoV antigen in 47 (6.7%) of 705 bat serum specimens comprising 26 species collected in Africa; thus, African bats may harbor agents related to putative group 4 CoV.

  17. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies in juvenile chronic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, L; Horst, G; Limburg, P; deGraeffMeeder, ER; Kuis, W; Kallenberg, C

    1997-01-01

    Objective, To evaluate the diagnostic significance of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) by assessing the prevalence of ANCA in juvenile chronic arthritis (JCA) (n = 93) of either oligoarticular, polyarticular, or systemic onset. To investigate the prevalence of ANCA in other diseases of c

  18. Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Presenting with Hemichorea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yezenash Ayalew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old Bangladeshi lady presented to neurology with a three-month history of involuntary movements of her right arm, associated with loss of power. There was progression to the right leg, and she subsequently developed episodes of slurred speech and blurred vision. At the time of presentation, she was 12 weeks pregnant and the symptoms were reported to have started at conception. Past medical history was unremarkable apart from one first trimester miscarriage and there was no significant family history suggestive of a hereditary neurological condition. MRI of the head revealed no abnormalities but serology showed positive antinuclear antibodies (ANAs at a titre of 1/400. Further investigations revealed strongly positive anticardiolipin antibodies (>120 and positive lupus anticoagulant antibodies. The patient had a second miscarriage at 19 weeks gestation strengthening the possibility that the chorea was related to antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and she was started on a reducing dose of Prednisolone 40 mg daily and aspirin 300 mg daily. Six months later, she had complete resolution of neurological symptoms. There are several reports of chorea as a feature of antiphospholipid syndrome, but no clear consensus on underlying pathophysiology.

  19. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  20. IgA as therapeutic antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2015-01-01

    This review is focused on the promises of IgA as a new therapeutic antibody. For more than 30 years IgG molecules have been used in the clinic in the fields of oncology, hematology, auto immune diseases and infections. However, IgA might be a good alternative, since it recruits different effector ce

  1. Developing recombinant antibodies for biomarker detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Fischer, Christopher J.; Pefaur, Noah B.; Miller, Keith D.; Kagen, Jacob; Srivastava, Sudhir; Rodland, Karin D.

    2010-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have an essential role in biomarker validation and diagnostic assays. A barrier to pursuing these applications is the reliance on immunization and hybridomas to produce mAbs, which is time-consuming and may not yield the desired mAb. We recommend a process flow for affinity reagent production that utilizes combinatorial protein display systems (eg, yeast surface display or phage display) rather than hybridomas. These systems link a selectable phenotype-binding conferred by an antibody fragment-with a means for recovering the encoding gene. Recombinant libraries obtained from immunizations can produce high-affinity antibodies (<10 nM) more quickly than other methods. Non-immune libraries provide an alternate route when immunizations are not possible, or when suitable mAbs are not recovered from an immune library. Directed molecular evolution (DME) is an integral part of optimizing mAbs obtained from combinatorial protein display, but can also be used on hybridoma-derived mAbs. Variants can easily be obtained and screened to increase the affinity of the parent mAb (affinity maturation). We discuss examples where DME has been used to tailor affinity reagents to specific applications. Combinatorial protein display also provides an accessible method for identifying antibody pairs, which are necessary for sandwich-type diagnostic assays.

  2. Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate-dependent catalytic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatikova, Svetlana; Mouratou, Barbara; Stetefeld, Jörg; Mehta, Perdeep K; Christen, Philipp

    2002-11-01

    Strategies for expanding the catalytic scope of antibodies include the incorporation of inorganic or organic cofactors into their binding sites. An obvious choice is pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP), which is probably the most versatile organic cofactor of enzymes. Monoclonal antibodies against the hapten N(alpha)-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-lysine, a stable analog of the covalent coenzyme-substrate adducts were screened by a competition ELISA for binding of the PLP-amino acid Schiff base adduct. The Schiff base with its C4'-N alpha double bond is, in contrast to the hapten, a planar compound and is an obligatory intermediate in all PLP-dependent reactions of amino acids. This highly discriminating screening step eliminated all but 5 of 24 hapten-binding antibodies. The five remaining antibodies were tested for catalysis of the PLP-dependent alpha,beta-elimination reaction of beta-chloroalanine. Antibody 15A9 complied with this selection criterion and catalyzed in addition the cofactor-dependent transamination reaction of hydrophobic D-amino acids and oxo acids (k(cat)'=0.42 min(-1) with D-alanine at 25 degrees C). Homology modeling together with alanine scanning yielded a 3D model of Fab 15A9. The striking analogy between antibody 15A9 and PLP-dependent enzymes includes the following features: (1) The binding sites accommodate the planar coenzyme-amino acid adduct. (2) The bond at C alpha to be broken lies together with the C alpha-N bond in a plane orthogonal to the plane of coenzyme and imine bond. (3) The alpha-carboxylate group of the substrate is bound by an arginine residue. (4) The coenzyme-substrate adduct assumes a cisoid conformation. (5) PLP markedly contributes to catalytic efficiency, being a 10(4) times more efficient amino group acceptor than pyruvate. The protein moiety, however, ensures reaction as well as substrate specificity, and further accelerates the reaction (in 15A9 k(cat (Ab x PLP))'/k(cat (PLP))'=5 x 10(3)). The analogies of antibody 15A9 with

  3. Antibody-Mediated Rejection: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Jorge Carlos; Giusti, Sixto; Staffeld-Coit, Catherine; Bohorquez, Humberto; Cohen, Ari J.; Loss, George E.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic antibody injury is a serious threat to allograft outcomes and is therefore the center of active research. In the continuum of allograft rejection, the development of antibodies plays a critical role. In recent years, an increased recognition of molecular and histologic changes has provided a better understanding of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR), as well as potential therapeutic interventions. However, several pathways are still unknown, which accounts for the lack of efficacy of some of the currently available agents that are used to treat rejection. Methods: We review the current diagnostic criteria for AMR; AMR paradigms; and desensitization, treatment, and prevention strategies. Results: Chronic antibody-mediated endothelial injury results in transplant glomerulopathy, manifested as glomerular basement membrane duplication, double contouring, or splitting. Clinical manifestations of AMR include proteinuria and a rise in serum creatinine. Current strategies for the treatment of AMR include antibody depletion with plasmapheresis (PLEX), immunoadsorption (IA), immunomodulation with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), and T cell– or B cell–depleting agents. Some treatment benefits have been found in using PLEX and IA, and some small nonrandomized trials have identified some benefits in using rituximab and the proteasome inhibitor-based therapy bortezomib. More recent histologic follow-ups of patients treated with bortezomib have not shown significant benefits in terms of allograft outcomes. Furthermore, no specific treatment approaches have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Other agents used for more difficult rejections include bortezomib and eculizumab (an anti-C5 monoclonal antibody). Conclusion: AMR is a fascinating field with ample opportunities for research and progress in the future. Despite the use of advanced techniques for the detection of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) or non-HLA donor-specific antibodies

  4. No development of neutralizing antibodies against recombinant interferon-alpha in Ph-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms-a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocias, Lukas Frans; Lund Hansen, Dennis; Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas;

    2015-01-01

    neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) against the drug leading to treatment failure. Most data on type 1 IFN immunogenicity are available from studies of patients with multiple sclerosis treated with rIFN-beta, and patients with hepatitis C treated with rIFN-alpha. A few reports have demonstrated nAbs in MPN patients...

  5. OPAL Various Lead Glass Blocks

    CERN Multimedia

    These lead glass blocks were part of a CERN detector called OPAL (one of the four experiments at the LEP particle detector). OPAL uses some 12 000 blocks of glass like this to measure particle energies in the electromagnetic calorimeter. This detector measured the energy deposited when electrons and photons were slowed down and stopped.

  6. How to lead complex situations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Pingel

    2013-01-01

    The military leader is experiencing increasingly more complex situations, whether it is as leader in a foreign combat environment or in the home-based public administration. Complex situations like these call for a special set of managerial responses and a special way of leading organisations...

  7. Leading in a Technological Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadgir, Sheri A.

    2011-01-01

    Technology is advancing more rapidly than at any time in history since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. In fact, experts say that the world is leaving the Industrial Age of the 20th century and entering an Information Age that will lead into the future. These advances mean that important changes are being made in all areas of life--and…

  8. Electrokinetics removal of lead from lead-contaminated red soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘云国; 李欣; 曾光明; 黄宝荣; 张慧智

    2003-01-01

    Ex-situ electroremediation tests were conducted on the lead-contaminated red soils to find out the optimum condition for the most efficient removal of lead pollution from the red soil,and to examine the relation of the pH of the soil with the electroremediation efficiency.The results show that the electroremediation technology is efficient to remedy Pb contaminated red soils,and the removal efficiency can be enhanced by controlling pH value in the cathode reservoir with HNO3.The average removal efficiency of Pb is enhanced from 24.5% to 79.5%,and the energy consumption reaches 285kW·h per m3 red soil.

  9. The antiphospholipid antibody syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luma HN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Henry Namme Luma,1,2 Marie-Solange Doualla,1,2 Elvis Temfack,1 Servais Albert Fiacre Eloumou Bagnaka,1 Emmanuella Wankie Mankaa,3 Dobgima Fofung41Department of Internal Medicine, Douala General Hospital, Douala, Cameroon; 2Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 3Department of Radiology, Douala General Hospital Douala, Cameroon; 4Department of Abdominal Surgery, Daniel Muna Memorial Clinic, Douala, CameroonAbstract: Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome is defined by the presence of thromboembolic complications and/or pregnancy morbidity in the presence of persistently increased titers of antiphospholipid antibodies. Its clinical presentation can be diverse and any organ can be involved, with a current impact in most surgical and medical specialties. The authors present the case of a 43-year-old man who, over a 13-year period of follow-up, presented with thrombosis of the mesenteric vein, inferior vena cava, and axillary and subclavian veins in a setting where diagnostic and therapeutic options are limited and costly. Through this case report, the authors aim to describe the evolution of this complex pathology, which to date has not been described in the authors' milieu – probably because of its challenging diagnosis and the limited treatment options available. The authors conclude that clinicians need to have a high index of suspicion of APS in patients who present with a thrombotic episode – clinicians should investigate for the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies, as early diagnosis may influence the course of the disease. Furthermore, resources for the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies should be made readily available in resource-limited settings. Finally, patient education on the importance of drug compliance, periodic monitoring, and prevention of thrombosis is indispensable, especially as mortality could be associated with the effects of vascular thrombosis and/or the effects

  10. IMPORTANCE OF 15 LEAD ECG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargav

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Posterior wall myocardial infarction is not uncommon acute myocardial infarction and has got its own therapeutic and prognostic implications. Management of Posterior wall myocardial infarction differs from inferior wall myocardial infarction alone. The presence of posterior wall myocardial infarction is known to increase the incidence of cardiogenic shock, arrhythmias and conduction blocks in case of myocardial infarction. Hence the present study was taken up to find out the incidence, clinical profile and complications of posterior wall myocardial infarction in a rural hospital using simple non-invasive investigations like 15 lead electrocardiography and echocardiography. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted on 50 patients of inferior wall myocardial infarction out of 228 Acute Myocardial Infarction proved by ECG standard and posterior leads (v7, v8, v9 were taken at the time of admission and repeated as necessary. A detailed case history was taken and a detailed physical examination was done at the time of admission and during follow up. For recording ECG 12 lead (3 standard leads, 3 augmented limb leads, 6 precordial leads machine was used. The recordings were made at 25 mm/ sec. speed and 1mV=10mm. Posterior leads were taken by using 3 precordial leads fixing on the posterior axillary (v7, infrascapular (v8 and paraspinal (v9 regions all in a same line with the 5th ICS anteriorly. RESULTS: Out of 50 cases of inferior wall myocardial infarction (IWMI studied only 13 (26% had ST elevation in posterior leads indicating posterior wall myocardial infarction (PWMI. Our study showed that complications and mortality was higher in patients of IWMI with PWMI compared to IWMI without PWMI. Out of 50 patients 33 (66% were males indicating a male predominance. Syncope was present in 18% of PWMI and 14% in overall IWMI. Palpitation was seen in 53% of PWMI and 21% of IWMI without PWMI. Smoking history was present in 14% of

  11. Antibodies to poliovirus detected by immunoradiometric assay with a monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spitz, M.; Fossati, C.A.; Schild, G.C.; Spitz, L.; Brasher, M. (National Inst. for Biological Standards and Control, London (UK))

    1982-10-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the assay of antibodies to poliovirus antigens is described. Dilutions of the test sera or whole (finger prick) blood samples were incubated with the poliovirus antigen bound to a solid phase and the specific antibody was detected by the addition of a mouse anti-human IgG monoclonal antibody (McAb), which was itself revealed by iodinated sheep IgG antimouse F(ab). The authors have shown that this technique is suitable for the estimation of IgG anti-poliovirus antibodies induced in children following polio vaccine. The present study shows that SPRIA provides a simple and inexpensive method for serological studies with poliovirus particularly for use in large-scale surveys.

  12. Germinal centre hypoxia and regulation of antibody qualities by a hypoxia response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung Hoon; Raybuck, Ariel L; Stengel, Kristy; Wei, Mei; Beck, Thomas C; Volanakis, Emmanuel; Thomas, James W; Hiebert, Scott; Haase, Volker H; Boothby, Mark R

    2016-09-08

    Germinal centres (GCs) promote humoral immunity and vaccine efficacy. In GCs, antigen-activated B cells proliferate, express high-affinity antibodies, promote antibody class switching, and yield B cell memory. Whereas the cytokine milieu has long been known to regulate effector functions that include the choice of immunoglobulin class, both cell-autonomous and extrinsic metabolic programming have emerged as modulators of T-cell-mediated immunity. Here we show in mice that GC light zones are hypoxic, and that low oxygen tension () alters B cell physiology and function. In addition to reduced proliferation and increased B cell death, low impairs antibody class switching to the pro-inflammatory IgG2c antibody isotype by limiting the expression of activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID). Hypoxia induces HIF transcription factors by restricting the activity of prolyl hydroxyl dioxygenase enzymes, which hydroxylate HIF-1α and HIF-2α to destabilize HIF by binding the von Hippel-Landau tumour suppressor protein (pVHL). B-cell-specific depletion of pVHL leads to constitutive HIF stabilization, decreases antigen-specific GC B cells and undermines the generation of high-affinity IgG, switching to IgG2c, early memory B cells, and recall antibody responses. HIF induction can reprogram metabolic and growth factor gene expression. Sustained hypoxia or HIF induction by pVHL deficiency inhibits mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity in B lymphoblasts, and mTORC1-haploinsufficient B cells have reduced clonal expansion, AID expression, and capacities to yield IgG2c and high-affinity antibodies. Thus, the normal physiology of GCs involves regional variegation of hypoxia, and HIF-dependent oxygen sensing regulates vital functions of B cells. We propose that the restriction of oxygen in lymphoid organs, which can be altered in pathophysiological states, modulates humoral immunity.

  13. Plant pharming of a full-sized, tumour-targeting antibody using different expression strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villani, Maria Elena; Morgun, Bogdan; Brunetti, Patrizia; Marusic, Carla; Lombardi, Raffaele; Pisoni, Ivan; Bacci, Camilla; Desiderio, Angiola; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this work were to obtain a human antibody against the tumour-associated antigen tenascin-C (TNC) and to compare the yield and quality of plant-produced antibody in either stable transgenics or using a transient expression system. To this end, the characterization of a full-sized human immunoglobulin G (IgG) [monoclonal antibody H10 (mAb H10)], derived from a selected single-chain variable fragment (scFv) and produced in plants, is presented. The human mAb gene was engineered for plant expression, and Nicotiana tabacum transgenic lines expressing both heavy (HC) and light (LC) chain were obtained and evaluated for antibody expression levels, in vivo assembly and functionality. Affinity-purified H10 from transgenics (yield, 0.6-1.1 mg/kg fresh weight) revealed that more than 90% of HC was specifically degraded, leading to the formation of functional antigen-binding fragments (Fab). Consequently, H10 was transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants through an Agrobacterium-mediated gene-transfer system. Moreover, the use of the p19 silencing suppressor gene from artichoke mottled crinkle virus raised antibody expression levels by an order of magnitude (yields of purified H10, 50-100 mg/kg fresh weight). Approximately 75% of purified protein consisted of full-sized antibody functionally binding to TNC (K(D) = 14 nm), and immunohistochemical analysis on tumour tissues revealed specific accumulation around tumour blood vessels. The data indicate that the purification yields of mAb H10, using a transient expression system boosted by the p19 silencing suppressor, are exceptionally high when compared with the results reported previously, providing a technique for the over-expression of anticancer mAbs by a rapid, cost-effective, molecular farming approach.

  14. Isolation of highly active monoclonal antibodies against multiresistant gram-positive bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike S Rossmann

    Full Text Available Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA. At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium, a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030 and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials.

  15. Reviewing the pathogenesis of antibody-mediated rejection and renal graft pathology after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozumi, Kunio; Takeda, Asami; Otsuka, Yasuhiro; Horike, Keiji; Gotoh, Norihiko; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2016-07-01

    The clinicopathological context of rejection after kidney transplantation was well recognized. Banff conferences greatly contributed to elucidate the pathogenesis and to establish the pathologic criteria of rejection after kidney transplantation. The most important current problem of renal transplantation is de novo donor-specific antibody (DSA) production leading chronic rejection and graft loss. Microvascular inflammation is considered as a reliable pathological marker for antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in the presence of DSA. Electron microscopic study allowed us to evaluate early changes in peritubular capillaries in T-lymphocyte mediated rejection and transition to antibody-mediated rejection. Severe endothelial injuries with edema and activated lymphocyte invaded into subendothelial space with early multi-layering of peritubular capillary basement membrane suggest T-lymphocyte mediated rejection induce an unbounded chain of antibody-mediated rejection. The risk factors of AMR after ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation are important issues. Anti-ABO blood type antibody titre of IgG excess 32-fold before transplant operation is the only predictable factor for acute AMR. Characteristics of chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (CAAMR) are one of the most important problems. Light microscopic findings and C4d stain of peritubular capillary and glomerular capillary are useful diagnostic criteria of CAAMR. Microvascular inflammation, double contour of glomerular capillary and thickening of peritubular capillary basement are good predictive factors of the presence of de novo DSA. C4d stain of linear glomerular capillary is a more sensitive marker for CAAMR than positive C4d of peritubular capillary. Early and sensitive diagnostic attempts of diagnosing CAAMR are pivotal to prevent chronic graft failure.

  16. Antibodies against Marinobacter algicola and Salmonella typhimurium flagellins do not cross-neutralize TLR5 activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Terron-Exposito

    Full Text Available Flagellins evoke strong innate and adaptive immune responses. These proteins may play a key role as radioprotectors, exert antitumoral activity in certain types of tumor and reduce graft-versus-host disease in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Notwithstanding, flagellins are highly immunogenic, and repeated use leads to their neutralization by systemic antibodies. This neutralization is not prevented by using functional deleted flagellins. These observations led us to explore the possibility of preventing initial neutralization by means of another functional flagellin that does not belong to common pathogenic bacteria but that has the capacity to activate TLR5. Here we characterized the functional capacity of the two-phase Marinobacter algicola (MA-derived flagellins (F and FR as systemic and mucosal adjuvants and compared their performance with that of Salmonella typhimurium (STF flagellins (FljB and FliC. We also report for the first time on the in vitro and in vivo capacity of various flagellins to trigger TLR5 activation in the presence of species-specific anti-flagellin antibodies, the cross-neutralization mediated by these antibodies, and the sequential use of these flagellins for TLR5 activation. Our results showed that MA flagellins behave in a similar way to STF ones, inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL8, CCL20, CCL2 and evoking a strong in vivo antibody response against a model epitope. More importantly, MA flagellins were fully functional, in vitro or in vivo, in the presence of a high concentration of neutralizing anti-flagellin STF antibodies, and STF flagellin was not inhibited by neutralizing anti-flagellin MA antibodies. The use of active flagellins from distinct bacteria could be a useful approach to prevent systemic neutralization of this group of adjuvants and to facilitate the rational design of flagellin-based vaccines and/or other therapeutic treatments (against ischemia, acute renal failure

  17. Selection of peptide mimics of HIV-1 epitope recognized by neutralizing antibody VRC01.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton N Chikaev

    Full Text Available The ability to induce anti-HIV-1 antibodies that can neutralize a broad spectrum of viral isolates from different subtypes seems to be a key requirement for development of an effective HIV-1 vaccine. The epitopes recognized by the most potent broadly neutralizing antibodies that have been characterized are largely discontinuous. Mimetics of such conformational epitopes could be potentially used as components of a synthetic immunogen that can elicit neutralizing antibodies. Here we used phage display technology to identify peptide motifs that mimic the epitope recognized by monoclonal antibody VRC01, which is able to neutralize up to 91% of circulating primary isolates. Three rounds of biopanning were performed against 2 different phage peptide libraries for this purpose. The binding specificity of selected phage clones to monoclonal antibody VRC01 was estimated using dot blot analysis. The putative peptide mimics exposed on the surface of selected phages were analyzed for conformational and linear homology to the surface of HIV-1 gp120 fragment using computational analysis. Corresponding peptides were synthesized and checked for their ability to interfere with neutralization activity of VRC01 in a competitive inhibition assay. One of the most common peptides selected from 12-mer phage library was found to partially mimic a CD4-binding loop fragment, whereas none of the circular C7C-mer peptides was able to mimic any HIV-1 domains. However, peptides identified from both the 12-mer and C7C-mer peptide libraries showed rescue of HIV-1 infectivity in the competitive inhibition assay. The identification of epitope mimics may lead to novel immunogens capable of inducing broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies.

  18. Elicitation of broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 – the germline/maturation hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabakaran ePonraj

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We have previously observed that all known broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs against HIV-1 are highly divergent from their putative germline predecessors in contrast to bnAbs against henipaviruses and SARS coronavirus, which are much less divergent from their germline counterparts. We have hypothesized that because the germline antibodies are so different compared to the highly somatically mutated HIV-1 bnAbs they may not bind to the Env. This led us to the hypothesis that the immunogenicity of the highly conserved epitopes on the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs is reduced or eliminated by their very weak or absent interactions with germline antibodies. Thus immune responses leading to elicitation of bnAbs may not be initiated and/or sustained; even if they are, the maturation pathways are so complex that prolonged periods of time may be required for elicitation of such bnAbs. In support of the hypothesis, our initial experiments showed that germline-like precursors of several bnAbs do not bind to their epitopes. Recently, a number of research groups working in the HIV vaccine field have obtained data supporting and further expanding the germline/maturation hypothesis. Vaccine immunogens that could bind putative germline antibody predecessors of known bnAbs were successfully generated. However, guiding the immune system through the exceptionally complex antibody maturation pathways in order to elicit those bnAbs remains a major challenge. Here, we summarize developments in the HIV-1 vaccine field based on the germline/maturation hypothesis including our recent data demonstrating germline-like VRC01 antibodies in a human cord blood IgM library.

  19. Prevention of herpes simplex virus induced stromal keratitis by a glycoprotein B-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Krawczyk

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of acyclovir (ACV and multidrug-resistant strains in patients with corneal HSV-1 infections leading to Herpetic Stromal Keratitis (HSK is a major health problem in industrialized countries and often results in blindness. To overcome this obstacle, we have previously developed an HSV-gB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2c that proved to be highly protective in immunodeficient NOD/SCID-mice towards genital infections. In the present study, we examined the effectivity of mAb 2c in preventing the immunopathological disease HSK in the HSK BALB/c mouse model. Therefore, mice were inoculated with HSV-1 strain KOS on the scarified cornea to induce HSK and subsequently either systemically or topically treated with mAb 2c. Systemic treatment was performed by intravenous administration of mAb 2c 24 h prior to infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis or 24, 40, and 56 hours after infection (post-exposure immunotherapy. Topical treatment was performed by periodical inoculations (5 times per day of antibody-containing eye drops as control, starting at 24 h post infection. Systemic antibody treatment markedly reduced viral loads at the site of infection and completely protected mice from developing HSK. The administration of the antiviral antibody prior or post infection was equally effective. Topical treatment had no improving effect on the severity of HSK. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mAb 2c proved to be an excellent drug for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections and for prevention of HSK and blindness. Moreover, the humanized counterpart (mAb hu2c was equally effective in protecting mice from HSV-induced HSK when compared to the parental mouse antibody. These results warrant the future development of this antibody as a novel approach for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections in humans.

  20. Comparative analysis of antibodies to xCT (Slc7a11): Forewarned is forearmed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Liefferinge, Joeri; Bentea, Eduard; Demuyser, Thomas; Albertini, Giulia; Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Holmseth, Silvia; Merckx, Ellen; Sato, Hideyo; Aerts, Joeri L; Smolders, Ilse; Arckens, Lutgarde; Danbolt, Niels C; Massie, Ann

    2016-04-01

    The cystine/glutamate antiporter or system Xc- exchanges cystine for glutamate, thereby supporting intracellular glutathione synthesis and nonvesicular glutamate release. The role of system Xc- in neurological disorders can be dual and remains a matter of debate. One important reason for the contradictory findings that have been reported to date is the use of nonspecific anti-xCT (the specific subunit of system Xc-) antibodies. Often studies rely on the predicted molecular weight of 55.5 kDa to identify xCT on Western blots. However, using brain extracts from xCT knockout (xCT(-/-)) mice as negative controls, we show that xCT migrates as a 35-kDa protein. Misinterpretation of immunoblots leads to incorrect assessment of antibody specificity and thereby to erroneous data interpretation. Here we have verified the specificity of most commonly used commercial and some in-house-developed anti-xCT antibodies by comparing their immunoreactivity in brain tissue of xCT(+/+) and xCT(-/-) mice by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The Western blot screening results demonstrate that antibody specificity not only differs between batches produced by immunizing different rabbits with the same antigen but also between bleedings of the same rabbit. Moreover, distinct immunohistochemical protocols have been tested for all the anti-xCT antibodies that were specific on Western blots in order to obtain a specific immunolabeling. Only one of our in-house-developed antibodies could reveal specific xCT labeling and exclusively on acetone-postfixed cryosections. Using this approach, we observed xCT protein expression throughout the mouse forebrain, including cortex, striatum, hippocampus, midbrain, thalamus, and amygdala, with greatest expression in regions facing the cerebrospinal fluid and meninges.

  1. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  2. Lead time TTO: leading to better health state valuations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attema, Arthur E; Versteegh, Matthijs M; Oppe, Mark; Brouwer, Werner B F; Stolk, Elly A

    2013-04-01

    Preference elicitation tasks for better than dead (BTD) and worse than dead (WTD) health states vary in the conventional time trade-off (TTO) procedure, casting doubt on uniformity of scale. 'Lead time TTO' (LT-TTO) was recently introduced to overcome the problem. We tested different specifications of LT-TTO in comparison with TTO in a within-subject design. We elicited preferences for six health states and employed an intertemporal ranking task as a benchmark to test the validity of the two methods. We also tested constant proportional trade-offs (CPTO), while correcting for discounting, and the effect of extending the lead time if a health state is considered substantially WTD. LT-TTO produced lower values for BTD states and higher values for WTD states. The validity of CPTO varied across tasks, but it was higher for LT-TTO than for TTO. Results indicate that the ratio of lead time to disease time has a greater impact on results than the total duration of the time frame. The intertemporal ranking task could not discriminate between TTO and LT-TTO.

  3. Graves' Disease Associated with Cerebrovascular Disease and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Khochtali

    2010-01-01

    have increased risk for developing thromboembolic accidents, which are favoured by a simultaneous presence of antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome. in this paper, we describe the case of a patient with Graves' disease, who developed strokes with antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome.

  4. [An overview of antibody-based cancer therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Qing-fang; Shao, Rong-guang; Zhen, Yong-su

    2012-10-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for cancer therapy has achieved considerable success in recent years. Approximate 17 monoclonal antibodies have been approved as cancer therapeutics since 1997. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are powerful new treatment options for cancer, and naked antibodies have recently achieved remarkable success. The safety and effectiveness of therapeutic mAbs in oncology vary depending on the nature of the target antigen and the mechanisms of tumor cell killing. This review provides a summary of the current state of antibody-based cancer therapy, including the mechanisms of tumor cell killing by antibodies, tumor antigens as antibody targets, clinical effectiveness of antibodies in cancer patients and nanoparticles-based ADCs.

  5. Antibody Request - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  6. Generation of monoclonal antibodies to native active human glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    using monoclonal antibodies therefore provides an excellent strategy to analyze the glycosylation process in cells. A major drawback has been difficulties in generating antibodies to glycosyltransferases and validating their specificities. Here we describe a simple strategy for generating...

  7. Antibody-controlled actuation of DNA-based molecular circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Wouter; Meijer, Lenny H. H.; Somers, Bram; de Greef, Tom F. A.; Merkx, Maarten

    2017-02-01

    DNA-based molecular circuits allow autonomous signal processing, but their actuation has relied mostly on RNA/DNA-based inputs, limiting their application in synthetic biology, biomedicine and molecular diagnostics. Here we introduce a generic method to translate the presence of an antibody into a unique DNA strand, enabling the use of antibodies as specific inputs for DNA-based molecular computing. Our approach, antibody-templated strand exchange (ATSE), uses the characteristic bivalent architecture of antibodies to promote DNA-strand exchange reactions both thermodynamically and kinetically. Detailed characterization of the ATSE reaction allowed the establishment of a comprehensive model that describes the kinetics and thermodynamics of ATSE as a function of toehold length, antibody-epitope affinity and concentration. ATSE enables the introduction of complex signal processing in antibody-based diagnostics, as demonstrated here by constructing molecular circuits for multiplex antibody detection, integration of multiple antibody inputs using logic gates and actuation of enzymes and DNAzymes for signal amplification.

  8. Lead and Drinking Water from Private Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type="submit" value="Submit" /> Healthy Water Home Lead and Drinking Water from Private Wells Recommend on ... remove lead from my drinking water? What is lead? Lead is a naturally occurring bluish-gray metal ...

  9. Detection and Measurement of Antigen-Antibody Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-09-30

    kaolin . With low titer serum, much of the antibody also is removed, so that high titer antibody is made even more necessary. The use of immunodiffusion...increase the antibody titer significantly. In addition, a series of animals has been started on injections of bovine serum albumin with Freund’s... bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been obtained. With this available, a comparison can be made with normal antibody to the same antigen. Since the

  10. Assay for the specificity of monoclonal antibodies in crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, K; Schou, C; Koch, C

    1984-01-01

    A method is described based on crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a complex antigen mixture in agarose gel followed by incubation of the gel with the monoclonal antibody. The bound monoclonal antibody is detected by the use of a secondary enzyme-labelled antibody. Using this technique we have been...... I molecules. In other experiments using the same technique we demonstrated the reaction of a monoclonal antibody specific for chicken Ig light chains. Udgivelsesdato: 1984-Aug-3...

  11. Elicitation of structure-specific antibodies by epitope scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Elicitation of antibodies against targets that are immunorecessive, cryptic, or transient in their native context has been a challenge for vaccine design. Here we demonstrate the elicitation of structure-specific antibodies against the HIV-1 gp41 epitope of the broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5. This conformationally flexible region of gp41 assumes mostly helical conformations but adopts a kinked, extended structure when bound by antibody 2F5. Computational techniques were employed to transpl...

  12. Syngeneic anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to an anti-NeuGc-containing ganglioside monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, A M; Pérez, A; Hernández, A M; Macías, A; Alfonso, M; Bombino, G; Pérez, R

    1998-12-01

    An IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb), named P3, has the characteristic to react specifically with a broad battery of N-glycolyl containing-gangliosides and with antigens expressed on breast tumors. When this MAb was administered alone in syngeneic mice, an specific IgG anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab2) response was induced, this Ab2 response was increased when P3 MAb was injected coupled to a carrier protein and in the presence of Freund's adjuvant. Spleen cells from these mice were used in somatic-cell hybridization experiments, using the murine myeloma cell line P3-X63-Ag8.653 as fusion partner. Five Ab2 MAbs specific to P3 MAb were selected. These IgG1 Ab2 MAbs were able to block the binding of P3 MAb to GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside and to a human breast carcinoma cell line. Cross-blocking experiments demonstrated that these Ab2 MAbs are recognizing the same or very close sites on the Abl MAb. The five Ab2 MAbs were injected into syngeneic mice and four of them produced strong anti-anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab3) response. While these Ab2 MAbs were unable to generate Ab3 antibodies with the same antigenic specificity than P3 MAb, three of them induced antibodies bearing P3 MAb idiotopes (Ag-Id+ Ab3). These results demonstrated that these Ab2 MAbs are not "internal image" antibodies, but they could define "regulatory idiotopes."

  13. Development of syngeneic monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies to mouse monoclonal anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai M

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Anti-idiotype antibodies (Ab2 play an important role in the homeostasis of immune responses and are related to the development and the disease activity of certain autoimmune diseases. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is considered one of the target antigens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune chronic active hepatitis (AIH. We previously developed a mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 8D7 which recognizes rat and human ASGPR. In this study, to help investigate the anti-ASGPR antibody-anti-idiotype antibody network in patients with AIH, we developed a syngeneic mouse monoclonal Ab2 to the 8D7 anti-ASGPR antibody (Ab1. One clone, designated as 3C8, tested positive for specific reactivity to 8D7-Ab1 and did not bind to other irrelevant immunoglobulins. By competitive inhibition assays, the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to liver membrane extracts, i.e., the crude antigen preparation, was inhibited by 3C8-Ab2 in a dose-dependent manner, and the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to 3C8-Ab2 was inhibited by the liver membrane extracts. In the immunohistochemical analysis, 3C8-Ab2 blocked the specific staining of sinusoidal margins of rat hepatocytes by 8D7-Ab1. These results suggest that 3C8 anti-idiotype antibody recognizes the specific idiotypic determinants within the antigen-binding site of 8D7-Ab1.

  14. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-02

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  15. The antibody response of pregnant Cameroonian women to VAR2CSA ID1-ID2a, a small recombinant protein containing the CSA-binding site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babakhanyan, Anna; Leke, Rose G F; Salanti, Ali;

    2014-01-01

    antigens, malarial antigens, or microbes. Currently, ID1-ID2a is a leading vaccine candidate, since it binds to the CSA with the same affinity as the full-length molecule and elicits binding-inhibitory antibodies in animals. Further studies are needed to determine if the presence of naturally acquired...... cross-reactive antibodies in women living in malaria endemic countries will alter the response to ID1-ID2a following vaccination with ID1-ID2a....

  16. Antibody Based Surgical Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy for Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Esther

    2016-01-01

    In 1944 Albert Coons was the first to show that a fluorescent molecule could be conjugated directly to an antibody made against a target site of interest. This binding does not affect antibody specificity so that labeled antibodies can be used to visualize the location and distribution of the target

  17. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against mink leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W.S.; Pedersen, Mikael; Gram-Nielsen, S.;

    1997-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated against mink leukocytes. One antibody reacted with all T lymphocytes, one with all monocytes and one had platelet reactivity. Under reducing conditions, the T lymphocyte reactive antibody immunoprecipitated 18 kDa, 23 kDa, 25 kDa and 32-40 kDa pol...

  18. Immunobiology of Primary Antibody Deficiencies: Towards a new classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPrimary antibody deficiencies (PADs) are the most common primary immunodeficiencies. The hallmark of PADs is a defect in the production of normal amounts of antigen specific antibodies. These antibodies or immunoglobulins are indispensible for the adaptive immune response against a wide

  19. 42 CFR 493.865 - Standard; Antibody identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard; Antibody identification. 493.865 Section..., Or Any Combination of These Tests § 493.865 Standard; Antibody identification. (a) Failure to attain... proficiency testing event. (e) Failure to identify the same antibody in two consecutive or two out of...

  20. Stability of llama heavy chain antibody fragments under extreme conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolk, E.

    2004-01-01

    Camelids have next to their normal antibodies, a unique subset of antibodies lacking light chains. The resulting single binding domain, VHH, of these heavy chain antibodies consequently have unique properties. A high stability is one of these properties, which was investigated in this thesis. The a

  1. A Strategy for Screening Monoclonal Antibodies for Arabidopsis Flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qian; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Yingxiang; Ma, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The flower is one of the most complex structures of angiosperms and is essential for sexual reproduction. Current studies using molecular genetic tools have made great advances in understanding flower development. Due to the lack of available antibodies, studies investigating the localization of proteins required for flower development have been restricted to use commercial antibodies against known antigens such as GFP, YFP, and FLAG. Thus, knowledge about cellular structures in the floral organs is limited due to the scarcity of antibodies that can label cellular components. To generate monoclonal antibodies that can facilitate molecular studies of the flower, we constructed a library of monoclonal antibodies against antigenic proteins from Arabidopsis inflorescences and identified 61 monoclonal antibodies. Twenty-four of these monoclonal antibodies displayed a unique band in a western blot assay in at least one of the examined tissues. Distinct cellular distribution patterns of epitopes were detected by these 24 antibodies by immunofluorescence microscopy in a flower section. Subsequently, a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis identified potential targets for three of these antibodies. These results provide evidence for the generation of an antibody library using the total plant proteins as antigens. Using this method, the present study identified 61 monoclonal antibodies and 24 of them were efficiently detecting epitopes in both western blot experiments and immunofluorescence microscopy. These antibodies can be applied as informative cellular markers to study the biological mechanisms underlying floral development in plants. PMID:28293248

  2. Relevance of anti-myelin antibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breij, E.C.W.

    2005-01-01

    Antibodies directed against myelin antigens have been described in multiple sclerosis (MS). Although anti-myelin antibodies have been implicated in central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, it is unclear to what extent anti-myelin antibodies contribute to MS pathogenesis. In this dissertation,

  3. Characterization of antibodies against ferret immunoglobulins, cytokines and CD markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martel, Cyril Jean-Marie; Aasted, Bent

    2009-01-01

    immunoglobulins, we identified and characterized polyclonal antibodies towards ferret IgG, IgM and IgA. We also identified 22 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised mostly against human CD markers which cross-reacted with ferret leukocytes. These antibodies were originally specific against human CD8, CD9, CD14, CD18...

  4. Identification of antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies using high-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju; Li, Ruihua; Liu, Kun; Li, Liangliang; Zai, Xiaodong; Chi, Xiangyang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-22

    High-throughput sequencing of the antibody repertoire provides a large number of antibody variable region sequences that can be used to generate human monoclonal antibodies. However, current screening methods for identifying antigen-specific antibodies are inefficient. In the present study, we developed an antibody clone screening strategy based on clone dynamics and relative frequency, and used it to identify antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that at least 52% of putative positive immunoglobulin heavy chains composed antigen-specific antibodies. Combining information on dynamics and relative frequency improved identification of positive clones and elimination of negative clones. and increase the credibility of putative positive clones. Therefore the screening strategy could simplify the subsequent experimental screening and may facilitate the generation of antigen-specific antibodies.

  5. Leading Hadron Production at HERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buniatyan Armen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Data from the recent measurements of very forward baryon and photon production with the H1 and ZEUS detectors at electron-proton collider HERA are presented and compared to the theoretical calculations and Monte Carlo models. Results are presented of the production of leading protons, neutrons and photons in deep inelastic scattering (ep → e' pX, ep → e'nX, ep → e'γX as well as the leading neutron production in the photoproduction of dijets (ep → ejjXn. The forward baryon and photon results from the H1 and ZEUS Experiments are compared also with the models of the hadronic interactions of high energy Cosmic Rays. The sensitivity of the HERA data to the differences between the models is demonstrated.

  6. Liraglutide Treatment Is Associated with a Low Frequency and Magnitude of Antibody Formation with No Apparent Impact on Glycemic Response or Increased Frequency of Adverse Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buse, John B; Garber, Alan; Rosenstock, Julio

    2011-01-01

    included the proportion of patients positive for anti-liraglutide or anti-exenatide antibodies, a glucagon-like peptide-1 cross-reacting effect, and an in vitro liraglutide- or exenatide-neutralizing effect. Change in glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) by antibody status and magnitude [negative, positive...... reductions 1.1–1.3% in antibody-positive vs. 1.2% in antibody-negative patients). In LEAD-6, 113 of 185 extension patients (61%) had anti-exenatide antibodies at wk 26 (range 2.4–60.2%B/T). High levels of anti-exenatide antibodies were correlated with significantly smaller HbA1c reductions (P = 0.......0022). After switching from exenatide to liraglutide, anti-exenatide antibodies did not compromise a further glycemic response to liraglutide (additional 0.4% HbA1c reduction). Conclusions: Liraglutide was less immunogenic than exenatide; the frequency and levels of anti-liraglutide antibodies were low and did...

  7. The isolation of novel phage display-derived human recombinant antibodies against CCR5, the major co-receptor of HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-08-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest.

  8. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus-Like Particle Binding to Target Cells by Antiviral Antibodies in Acute and Chronic Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Daniel; Barth, Heidi; Gissler, Bettina; Schürmann, Peter; Adah, Mohammed I.; Gerlach, J. Tilman; Pape, Gerd R.; Depla, Erik; Jacobs, Dirk; Maertens, Geert; Patel, Arvind H.; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Liang, T. Jake; Blum, Hubert E.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a leading cause of chronic viral hepatitis worldwide. The study of antibody-mediated virus neutralization has been hampered by the lack of an efficient and high-throughput cell culture system for the study of virus neutralization. The HCV structural proteins have been shown to assemble into noninfectious HCV-like particles (HCV-LPs). Similar to serum-derived virions, HCV-LPs bind and enter human hepatocytes and hepatoma cell lines. In this study, we developed an HCV-LP-based model system for a systematic functional analysis of antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. We demonstrate that cellular HCV-LP binding was specifically inhibited by antiviral antibodies from patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C in a dose-dependent manner. Using a library of homologous overlapping envelope peptides covering the entire HCV envelope, we identified an epitope in the N-terminal E2 region (SQKIQLVNTNGSWHI; amino acid positions 408 to 422) as one target of human antiviral antibodies inhibiting cellular particle binding. Using a large panel of serum samples from patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C, we demonstrated that the presence of antibodies with inhibition of binding activity was not associated with viral clearance. In conclusion, antibody-mediated inhibition of cellular HCV-LP binding represents a convenient system for the functional characterization of human anti-HCV antibodies, allowing the mapping of envelope neutralization epitopes targeted by naturally occurring antiviral antibodies. PMID:15308699

  9. Leading Edge Device Aerodynamic Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Gabriel COJOCARU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Leading edge devices are conventionally used as aerodynamic devices that enhance performances during landing and in some cases during takeoff. The need to increase the efficiency of the aircrafts has brought the idea of maintaining as much as possible a laminar flow over the wings. This is possible only when the leading edge of the wings is free from contamination, therefore using the leading edge devices with the additional role of shielding during takeoff. Such a device based on the Krueger flap design is aerodynamically analyzed and optimized. The optimization comprises three steps: first, the positioning of the flap such that the shielding criterion is kept, second, the analysis of the flap size and third, the optimization of the flap shape. The first step is subject of a gradient based optimization process of the position described by two parameters, the position along the line and the deflection angle. For the third step the Adjoint method is used to gain insight on the shape of the Krueger flap that will extend the most the stall limit. All these steps have been numerically performed using Ansys Fluent and the results are presented for the optimized shape in comparison with the baseline configuration.

  10. Changes in Antibody Levels during and following an Episode of Acute Adenolymphangitis (ADL among Lymphedema Patients in Leogane, Haiti.

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    Katherine E Mues

    Full Text Available Episodes of acute adenolymphangitis (ADL are often the first clinical sign of lymphatic filariasis (LF. They are often accompanied by swelling of the affected limb, inflammation, fever, and general malaise and lead to the progression of lymphedema. Although ADL episodes have been studied for a century or more, questions still remain as to their etiology. We quantified antibody levels to pathogens that potentially contribute to ADL episodes during and after an episode among lymphedema patients in Léogâne, Haiti. We estimated the proportion of ADL episodes hypothesized to be attributed to specific pathogens.We measured antibody levels to specific pathogens during and following an ADL episode among 41 lymphedema patients enrolled in a cohort study in Léogâne, Haiti. We calculated the absolute and relative changes in antibody levels between the ADL and convalescent time points. We calculated the proportion of episodes that demonstrated a two-fold increase in antibody level for several bacterial, fungal, and filarial pathogens.Our results showed the greatest proportion of two-fold changes in antibody levels for the carbohydrate antigen Streptococcus group A, followed by IgG2 responses to a soluble filarial antigen (BpG2, Streptococcal Pyrogenic Exotoxin B, and an antigen for the fungal pathogen Candida. When comparing the median antibody level during the ADL episode to the median antibody level at the convalescent time point, only the antigens for Pseudomonas species (P-value = 0.0351 and Streptolysin O (P-value = 0.0074 showed a significant result.Although our results are limited by the lack of a control group and few antibody responses, they provide some evidence for infection with Streptococcus A as a potential contributing factor to ADL episodes. Our results add to the current evidence and illustrate the importance of determining the causal role of bacterial and fungal pathogens and immunological antifilarial response in ADL episodes.

  11. Anti-Lipid IgG Antibodies Are Produced via Germinal Centers in a Murine Model Resembling Human Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Reséndiz-Mora, Albany; Donis-Maturano, Luis; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Zárate-Neira, Luz; Yam-Puc, Juan Carlos; Calderón-Amador, Juana; Medina, Yolanda; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo

    2016-01-01

    Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are produced in some mycobacterial infections and in certain autoimmune diseases [such as anti-phospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)]. However, few studies have addressed the B cell responses underlying the production of these immunoglobulins. Anti-lipid IgG antibodies are consistently found in a murine model resembling human lupus induced by chlorpromazine-stabilized non-bilayer phospholipid arrangements (NPA). NPA are transitory lipid associations found in the membranes of most cells; when NPA are stabilized they can become immunogenic and induce specific IgG antibodies, which appear to be involved in the development of the mouse model of lupus. Of note, anti-NPA antibodies are also detected in patients with SLE and leprosy. We used this model of lupus to investigate in vivo the cellular mechanisms that lead to the production of anti-lipid, class-switched IgG antibodies. In this murine lupus model, we found plasma cells (Gr1−, CD19−, CD138+) producing NPA-specific IgGs in the draining lymph nodes, the spleen, and the bone marrow. We also found a significant number of germinal center B cells (IgD−, CD19+, PNA+) specific for NPA in the draining lymph nodes and the spleen, and we identified in situ the presence of NPA in these germinal centers. By contrast, very few NPA-specific, extrafollicular reaction B cells (B220+, Blimp1+) were found. Moreover, when assessing the anti-NPA IgG antibodies produced during the experimental protocol, we found that the affinity of these antibodies progressively increased over time. Altogether, our data indicate that, in this murine model resembling human lupus, B cells produce anti-NPA IgG antibodies mainly via germinal centers. PMID:27746783

  12. High throughput screening for antibody induced complement-dependent cytotoxicity in early antibody discovery using homogeneous macroconfocal fluorescence imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, Arnout F.; Bosch, Martijn; de Weers, Michel; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2010-01-01

    Complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) represents an important Fc-mediated effector function of antibodies and is a quality often sought in candidates for therapeutic antibody development in cancer. Antibodies inducing potent CDC are relatively rare as the ability to induce CDC is strongly dependen

  13. Molecular aspects of antibody-antigen interactions : size reduction of a herpes simplex virus neutralizing antibody and its antigen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, Gerardus Antonius

    1996-01-01

    Antibody molecules, produced as a response against foreign substances, interact with their antigen in a very specific manner. Antibodies with a predetermined specificity (monoclonal antibodies) can be produced and are widely used in medicine and science as indicator molecules. Genetic engineering of

  14. A MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN BETA-GLUCURONIDASE FOR APPLICATION IN ANTIBODY-DIRECTED ENZYME PRODRUG THERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, Hidde; VANMUIJEN, M; SCHEFFER, G; SCHEPER, RJ; PINEDO, HM; BOVEN, E

    1995-01-01

    The selectivity of anticancer agents may be improved by antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT), The immunogenicity of antibody-enzyme conjugates and the low tumor to normal tissue ratio calls for the use of a human enzyme and the development of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against that enzy

  15. Induction and characterization of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies reactive with idiotopes of canine parvovirus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. van Es (Johan); G.A. Drost; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies (Ab2) were generated against idiotypes (Id) of canine parvovirus (CPV) specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The binding of most of these anti-Id antibodies to their corresponding Id could be inhibited by antigen, thus classifying these an

  16. Noncovalent mass spectrometry for the characterization of antibody/antigen complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmanene, Cédric; Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Corvaïa, Nathalie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Beck, Alain; Sanglier-Cianférani, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have taken on an increasing importance for the treatment of various diseases including cancers, immunological disorders, and other pathologies. These large biomolecules display specific structural features, which affect their efficiency and need therefore to be extensively characterized using sensitive and orthogonal analytical techniques. Among them, mass spectrometry (MS) has become the method of choice to study mAb amino acid sequences as well as their posttranslational modifications with the aim of reducing their chemistry, manufacturing, and control liabilities. This chapter will provide the reader with a description of the general approach allowing antibody/antigen systems to be characterized by noncovalent MS. In the present chapter, we describe how recent noncovalent MS technologies are used to characterize immune complexes involving both murine and humanized mAb 6F4 directed against human JAM-A, a newly identified antigenic protein (Ag) over-expressed in tumor cells. We will detail experimental conditions (sample preparation, optimization of instrumental parameters, etc.) required for the detection of noncovalent antibody/antigen complexes by MS. We will then focus on the type and the reliability of the information that we get from noncovalent MS data, with emphasis on the determination of the stoichiometry of antibody/antigen systems. Noncovalent MS appears as an additional supporting technique for therapeutic mAbs lead characterization and development.

  17. B cells and antibodies in progressive multiple sclerosis: Contribution to neurodegeneration and progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraussen, Judith; de Bock, Laura; Somers, Veerle

    2016-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by demyelination, axonal degeneration and gliosis. The progressive form of MS is an important research topic as not much is known about its underlying mechanisms and no therapy is available. Although progressive MS is traditionally considered to be driven by neurodegeneration, compartmentalized CNS inflammation is currently accepted as one of the driving processes behind neurodegeneration and progression. In this review, the involvement of B cells and antibodies in progressive MS is discussed. The identification of meningeal ectopic B cell follicles in secondary progressive MS (SPMS) patients and the successful use of B cell-depleting therapy in primary progressive MS (PPMS) patients have underlined the importance of B cells in progressive MS. Proof is also available for the role of antibodies in neurodegeneration and progression in MS. Here, oligoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) production and autoreactive antibodies are described, with a focus on antibodies directed against sperm-associated antigen 16 (SPAG16). Further research into the role of B cells and autoantibodies in MS progression can lead to novel prognostic and theranostic opportunities.

  18. Peptides from the inside of the antibodies are active against infectious agents and tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciociola, Tecla; Giovati, Laura; Sperindè, Martina; Magliani, Walter; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Giorgio; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic peptides, representative of sequences related to the complementarity determining regions and constant region of antibodies, proved to exert in vitro, ex vivo and/or in vivo antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-tumour and/or immunomodulatory activities, conceivably mediated by different mechanisms of action and regardless of the specificity and isotype of the belonging immunoglobulin. Antibody-derived peptides can show intrinsic properties of self-aggregation in β structures, able to assemble on molecular targets and dissociate spontaneously, leading to the formation of hydrogels. Whilst the self-assembled state may provide protection against proteases and the slow kinetic of dissociation assures a release of the active form over time, the receptor affinity is responsible for targeted delivery. Peptides derived from single amino acid substitution of bioactive antibody fragments, adopted as surrogates of natural point mutations, displayed further differential biological activities. Overall, these observations allow to envisage that antibodies could represent an unlimited source of new anti-infective and anti-tumour peptides.

  19. Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and antibodies on tumours for targeted amplified delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, J. Justin; Villa, Carlos H.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Escorcia, Freddy E.; Casey, Emily; Scheinberg, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can deliver imaging agents or drugs to tumours and offer significant advantages over approaches based on antibodies or other nanomaterials. In particular, the nanotubes can carry a substantial amount of cargo (100 times more than a monoclonal antibody), but can still be rapidly eliminated from the circulation by renal filtration, like a small molecule, due to their high aspect ratio. Here we show that SWNTs can target tumours in a two-step approach in which nanotubes modified with morpholino oligonucleotide sequences bind to cancer cells that have been pretargeted with antibodies modified with oligonucleotide strands complementary to those on the nanotubes. The nanotubes can carry fluorophores or radioisotopes, and are shown to selectively bind to cancer cells in vitro and in tumour-bearing xenografted mice. The binding process is also found to lead to antigen capping and internalization of the antibody-nanotube complexes. The nanotube conjugates were labelled with both alpha-particle and gamma-ray emitting isotopes, at high specific activities. Conjugates labelled with alpha-particle-generating 225Ac were found to clear rapidly, thus mitigating radioisotope toxicity, and were shown to be therapeutically effective in vivo.

  20. Manipulation of immunodominant dengue virus E protein epitopes reduces potential antibody-dependent enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Holly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue viruses (DENV are the most important arboviruses of humans and cause significant disease. Infection with DENV elicits antibody responses to the envelope glycoprotein, predominantly against immunodominant, cross-reactive, weakly-neutralizing epitopes. These weakly-neutralizing antibodies are implicated in enhancing infection via Fcγ receptor bearing cells and can lead to increased viral loads that are associated with severe disease. Here we describe results from the development and testing of cross-reactivity reduced DENV-2 DNA vaccine candidates that contain substitutions in immunodominant B cell epitopes of the fusion peptide and domain III of the envelope protein. Results Cross-reactivity reduced and wild-type vaccine candidates were similarly immunogenic in outbred mice and elicited high levels of neutralizing antibody, however mice immunized with cross-reactivity reduced vaccines produced significantly reduced levels of immunodominant cross-reactive antibodies. Sera from mice immunized with wild-type, fusion peptide-, or domain III- substitution containing vaccines enhanced heterologous DENV infection in vitro, unlike sera from mice immunized with a vaccine containing a combination of both fusion peptide and domain III substitutions. Passive transfer of immune sera from mice immunized with fusion peptide and domain III substitutions also reduced the development of severe DENV disease in AG129 mice when compared to mice receiving wild type immune sera. Conclusions Reducing cross-reactivity in the envelope glycoprotein of DENV may be an approach to improve the quality of the anti-DENV immune response.

  1. Trans-splicing as a novel method to rapidly produce antibody fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwasaki, Ryohei; Kiuchi, Hiroki [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ihara, Masaki [Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Mori, Toshihiro; Kawakami, Masayuki [Lifescience Lab. R and D, Fujifilm Co., 577 Ushijima, Kaisei-machi, Ashigarakami-gun, Kanagawa 258-8577 (Japan); Ueda, Hiroshi, E-mail: hueda@chembio.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-07-03

    To cultivate the use of trans-splicing as a novel means to rapidly express various antibody fusion proteins, we tried to express antibody-reporter enzyme fusions in a COS-1 co-transfection model. When a vector designed to induce trans-splicing with IgH pre-mRNA was co-transfected with a vector encoding the mouse IgM locus, the expression of V{sub H}-secreted human placental alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as well as Fab-SEAP were successfully expressed both in mRNA and protein levels. Especially, the vectors encoding complementary sequence to S{mu} as a binding domain was accurate and efficient, producing trans-spliced mRNA of up to 2% of cis-spliced one. Since S{mu} sequence should exist in every IgH pre-mRNA, our finding will lead to the rapid production and analysis of various antibody-enzyme fusions suitable for enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) or antibody-dependent enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT).

  2. Antiplatelet antibody may cause delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torii Y

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Yoshitaro Torii1, Toshiki Shimizu1, Takashi Yokoi1, Hiroyuki Sugimoto1, Yuichi Katashiba1, Ryotaro Ozasa1, Shinya Fujita1, Yasushi Adachi2, Masahiko Maki3, Shosaku Nomura11The First Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, 2Department of Clinical Pathology, Toyooka Hospital, Hyogo, 3First Department of Pathology, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: A 61-year-old woman with lung cancer developed delayed transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI syndrome after transfusion of plasma- and leukoreduced red blood cells (RBCs for gastrointestinal bleeding due to intestinal metastasis. Acute lung injury (ALI recurred 31 days after the first ALI episode. Both ALI episodes occurred 48 hours after transfusion. Laboratory examinations revealed the presence of various antileukocyte antibodies including antiplatelet antibody in the recipient's serum but not in the donors' serum. The authors speculate that antiplatelet antibodies can have an inhibitory effect in the recipient, which can modulate the bona fide procedure of ALI and lead to a delay in the onset of ALI. This case illustrates the crucial role of a recipient's platelets in the development of TRALI.Keywords: delayed TRALI syndrome, recurrence, anti-platelet antibody

  3. Tetravalent neutralizing antibody response against four dengue serotypes by a single chimeric dengue envelope antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apt, Doris; Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Brinkman, Alice; Semyonov, Andrey; Yang, Shumin; Skinner, Craig; Diehl, Lori; Lyons, Richard; Porter, Kevin; Punnonen, Juha

    2006-01-16

    We employed DNA shuffling and screening technologies to develop a single recombinant dengue envelope (E) antigen capable of inducing neutralizing antibodies against all four antigenically distinct dengue serotypes. By DNA shuffling of codon-optimized dengue 1-4 E genes, we created a panel of novel chimeric clones expressing C-terminal truncated E antigens that combined epitopes from all four dengue serotypes. DNA vaccines encoding these novel chimeras induced multivalent T cell and neutralizing antibody responses against all four dengue serotypes in mice. By contrast, a mixture of four unshuffled, parental DNA vaccines failed to produce tetravalent neutralizing antibodies in mice. The neutralizing antibody titers for some of these antigens could be further improved by extending the sequences to express full-length pre-membrane and envelope proteins. The chimeric antigens also protected mice against a lethal dengue-2 virus challenge. These data demonstrate that DNA shuffling and associated screening can lead to the selection of multi-epitope antigens against closely related dengue virus serotypes and suggest a broad utility for these technologies in optimizing vaccine antigens.

  4. Production of Antibody Raised Against Lipopolysaccharide (LPS of Vibrio Cholerae Non-O1

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    H Shirzad

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cholera, an infectious disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, is primarily transmitted by ingestion of contaminated food or water. In severe cases, cholera may lead to severe dehydration, metabolic acidosis, and ultimately, hypovolemic shock and death. Methods: In this study V.cholerae non-O1 was cultured in suitable media. LPS was extracted from the surface of  bacteria by hot phenol-water method and then purified by high-speed centrifugation. For production of specific antibody against LPS, white newzeland rabbits were first immunized by whole cell bacteria and then immunized with highly purified LPS. The titre of the antiserum was determined by ELISA for each serogroup. Results: Results presented in this study indicate that serum anti-LPS antibodies raised against purified LPS of V.cholerae non-O1 can detect V.cholerae non-O1 .Conclusion: This antibody had low cross reactivity with V.cholerae O1, serotype Inaba or Ogawa. So, this antibody can be used for for detection of V. cholerae non-O1.

  5. Structural basis of hepatitis C virus neutralization by broadly neutralizing antibody HCV1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Robbins, Justin B.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun (Scripps)

    2012-10-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 2% of the global population and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver diseases. Circulating HCV is genetically diverse, and therefore a broadly effective vaccine must target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Human mAb HCV1 has broad neutralizing activity against HCV isolates from at least four major genotypes and protects in the chimpanzee model from primary HCV challenge. The antibody targets a conserved antigenic site (residues 412-423) on the virus E2 envelope glycoprotein. Two crystal structures of HCV1 Fab in complex with an epitope peptide at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution reveal that the epitope is a {beta}-hairpin displaying a hydrophilic face and a hydrophobic face on opposing sides of the hairpin. The antibody predominantly interacts with E2 residues Leu{sup 413} and Trp{sup 420} on the hydrophobic face of the epitope, thus providing an explanation for how HCV isolates bearing mutations at Asn{sup 415} on the same binding face escape neutralization by this antibody. The results provide structural information for a neutralizing epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein and should help guide rational design of HCV immunogens to elicit similar broadly neutralizing antibodies through vaccination.

  6. Prokaryotic expression of chicken infectious anemia apoptin protein and characterization of its polyclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Shikha; Kumar, Gandham Ravi; Singh, Prafull; Chaturvedi, Uttara; Saxena, Lovleen; Kumar, Rajiv; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad; Doley, Juwar; Rajmani; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Sudesh; Tiwari, Ashok K

    2012-05-01

    In the present study recombinant VP3 (rVP3) was expressed in E. coli BL21 (DE3) (pLysS) and its polyclonal antibodies were characterized. SDS-PAGE analysis revealed that the expression of recombinant protein was maximum when induced with 1.5 mM IPTG for 6 h at 37 degrees C. The 6xHis-tagged fusion protein was purified on Ni-NTA and confirmed by Western blot using CAV specific antiserum. Rabbits were immunized with purified rVP3 to raise anti-VP3 polyclonal antibodies. Polyclonal serum was tested for specificity and used for confirming expression of VP3 in HeLa cells transfected with pcDNA.cav.vp3 by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT), flow cytometry and Western blot. Available purified rVP3 and polyclonal antibodies against VP3 may be useful to understand its functions which may lead to application of VP3 in cancer therapeutics.

  7. Transferability of antibody pairs from ELISA to fiber optic surface plasmon resonance for infliximab detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Stappen, Thomas; Lu, Jiadi; Bloemen, Maarten; Geukens, Nick; Spasic, Dragana; Delport, Filip; Verbiest, Thierry; Lammertyn, Jeroen; Gils, Ann

    2015-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is a pleiotropic cytokine up-regulated in inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis. The introduction of anti-TNF drugs such as infliximab has revolutionized the treatment of these diseases. Recently, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of infliximab has been introduced in clinical decision making to increase cost-efficiency. Nowadays, TDM is performed using radio-immunoassays, homogeneous mobility shift assays or ELISA. Unfortunately, these assays do not allow for in situ treatment optimization, because of the required sample transportation to centralized laboratories and the subsequent assay execution time. In this perspective, we evaluated the potential of fiber optic-surface plasmon resonance (FO-SPR). To achieve this goal, a panel of 55 monoclonal anti-infliximab antibodies (MA-IFX) was developed and characterized in-house, leading to the identification of nine different clusters. Based on this high diversity, 22 antibody pairs were selected and tested for their reactivity towards IFX, using one MA-IFX as capture and one MA-IFX for detection, in a sandwich type ELISA and FO-SPR. This study showed that the reactivity towards IFX of each antibody pair in ELISA is highly similar to its reactivity on FO-SPR, indicating that antibody pairs are easily transferable between both platforms. Given the fact that FO-SPR shows the potential for miniaturization and fast assay time, it can be considered a highly promising platform for on-site infliximab monitoring.

  8. [Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with positive anti-RI antibodies and mediastinal seminoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, M; Bozzolo, E; Venissac, N; Delmont, E; Fredenrich, A; Thomas, P

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old man who was admitted for progressive behaviorial disorders with frontal elements. There was no sensorial nor motor deficiency. Clinical examination revealed android obesity, cutaneous and mucous paleness, pubic and axillary depilation and gynecomastia. Encephalic MRI found a lesion of the left amygdalian region with high T2 intensity and low T1 intensity associated with gadolinium-enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a lymphocytic meningitis. Panhypopituitarism was found on the endocrine investigations. Anti-RI antibodies were positive, leading to the diagnosis of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. The CT-scan showed a node of the lower part of the thymic area. Surgical resection revealed an ectopic mediastinal seminoma. The evolution consisted of paraneoplastic fever and crossed-syndrome with right hemiparesia and left common oculomotor nerve paralysis. Treatment was completed by two cycles of carboplatin, corticosteroids and substitutive opotherapy. Paraneoplastic fever disappeared, but behavioral disorders and palsy remain unchanged. The patient died two years later in a bedridden state. This case of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with positive anti-RI antibodies and mediastinal seminoma is exceptional and has not to our knowledge been described in the literature. Cancers usually associated with anti-RI antibody are breast and lung cancer. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is not the classical clinical presentation, which usually is brainstem encephalitis. Hypothalamic involvement, uncommon in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is mainly associated with positive antineuronal anti-Ma2 antibodies. Finally, the gadolinium enhancement on encephalic MRI is unusual in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

  9. A simple vector system to improve performance and utilisation of recombinant antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Karen J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolation of recombinant antibody fragments from antibody libraries is well established using technologies such as phage display. Phage display vectors are ideal for efficient display of antibody fragments on the surface of bacteriophage particles. However, they are often inefficient for expression of soluble antibody fragments, and sub-cloning of selected antibody populations into dedicated soluble antibody fragment expression vectors can enhance expression. Results We have developed a simple vector system for expression, dimerisation and detection of recombinant antibody fragments in the form of single chain Fvs (scFvs. Expression is driven by the T7 RNA polymerase promoter in conjunction with the inducible lysogen strain BL21 (DE3. The system is compatible with a simple auto-induction culture system for scFv production. As an alternative to periplasmic expression, expression directly in the cytoplasm of a mutant strain with a more oxidising cytoplasmic environment (Origami 2™ (DE3 was investigated and found to be inferior to periplasmic expression in BL21 (DE3 cells. The effect on yield and binding activity of fusing scFvs to the N terminus of maltose binding protein (a solubility enhancing partner, bacterial alkaline phosphatase (a naturally dimeric enzymatic reporter molecule, or the addition of a free C-terminal cysteine was determined. Fusion of scFvs to the N-terminus of maltose binding protein increased scFv yield but binding activity of the scFv was compromised. In contrast, fusion to the N-terminus of bacterial alkaline phosphatase led to an improved performance. Alkaline phosphatase provides a convenient tag allowing direct enzymatic detection of scFv fusions within crude extracts without the need for secondary reagents. Alkaline phosphatase also drives dimerisation of the scFv leading to an improvement in performance compared to monovalent constructs. This is illustrated by ELISA, western blot and

  10. [Biophysical Characterization of Biopharmaceuticals, Including Antibody Drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Biopharmaceuticals, including antibody drugs, are now popular because of their high specificity with low adverse effects, especially in the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases. However, because the active pharmaceutical ingredients of biopharmaceuticals are proteins, biophysical characterization of these therapeutic proteins should be required. In this manuscript, methods of chemical and physical characterization of therapeutic proteins are described. In terms of chemical characterization, analysis of chemical modifications of the constituent amino acids is explained. Physical characterization includes higher order structural analysis and assessment of protein aggregates. Quantification methods of aggregates with different sizes, recently encouraged by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are introduced. As for the stability of therapeutic proteins, the importance of chemical and physical stability is explained. Finally, the contribution of colloidal and structural stability to the production of an antibody drug less prone to aggregation is introduced.

  11. Hepatitis C Virus Antibodies and Vitiligo Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Jadali

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a common skin disorder, characterized by depigmented patches due to selective destruction of melanocytes. The etiology of this disease is unknown. A number of hypotheses including viral theory have been proposed to explain the etiology. To determine the prevalence of antibody to hepatitis C virus infection in vitiligo patients, the present study was performed. Third generation ELISA test was used for detection of antibodies to HCV in human sera. All normal controls were anti-HCV negative whereas only one patient was positive for anti-HCV and there was no significant difference in the prevalence of anti-HCV between patients and controls. These results indicate that hepatitis C virus has not a direct causal role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo, however, this does not rul out a "hit and run" virus induced disease.

  12. Functional antibodies produced by oncolytic clostridia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groot, Arjan J; Mengesha, Asferd; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Theys, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2007-12-28

    Hypoxia is a hallmark of solid cancer and characterized by regions of low oxygen and necrosis due to insufficient blood perfusion. Intratumoral hypoxia triggers the transcription of genes responsible for cell survival. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) is a key regulator of this response. HIF activation is associated with resistance to radio- and chemotherapy and poor clinical outcome, and may therefore provide an attractive therapeutic target. Clostridium-based oncolysis is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of hypoxic tumors where these microorganisms naturally home. Here, we report for the first time the isolation of transconjugants of two excellent tumor colonizing Clostridium strains, C. novyi-NT and C. sporogenes, expressing single chain antibodies specific for human HIF-1alpha. This is a first step towards Clostridium-directed antibody therapy (CDAT) that holds promise as a carrier of cancer therapeutics targeting the most resistant regions in human solid cancer.

  13. Antibody enhancement of free-flow electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohly, H. H. P.; Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    1988-01-01

    Specific T cell clones and antibodies (ABs) were developed to study the efficiency of purifying closely associated T cells using Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System. Enhanced separation is accomplished by tagging cells first with ABs directed against the antigenic determinants on the cell surface and then with ABs against the Fc portion of the first AB. This second AB protrudes sufficiently beyond the cell membrane and glycocalyx to become the major overall cell surface potential determinant and thus causes a reduction of electrophoretic mobility. This project was divided into three phases. Phase one included development of specific T cell clones and separation of these specific clones. Phase two extends these principles to the separation of T cells from spleen cells and immunized lymph node cells. Phase three applies this double antibody technique to the separation of T cytotoxic cells from bone marrow.

  14. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome presenting as transverse myelitis

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    Javvid M Dandroo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is characterized by arterial and/or venous thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity in the presence of anticardiolipin antibodies and/or lupus anticoagulant. APS can occur either as a primary disorder or secondary to a connective tissue disease, most frequently systemic lupus erythematosus. Central nervous system involvement is one of the most prominent clinical manifestations of APS, and includes arterial and venous thrombotic events, psychiatric features, and a variety of other nonthrombotic neurological syndromes. Although the mechanism of neurological involvement in patients with APS is thought to be thrombotic in origin and endothelial dysfunction associated with antiphospholipid antibodies. APS presenting as acute transverse myelitis is very rarely seen with a prevalence rate of 1%. We are describing a foreigner female presenting as acute transverse myelitis which on evaluation proved to be APS induced. So far, very few cases have been reported in literature with APS as etiology.

  15. Standardized Methods for Detection of Poliovirus Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Pallansch, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    Testing for neutralizing antibodies against polioviruses has been an established gold standard for assessing individual protection from disease, population immunity, vaccine efficacy studies, and other vaccine clinical trials. Detecting poliovirus specific IgM and IgA in sera and mucosal specimens has been proposed for evaluating the status of population mucosal immunity. More recently, there has been a renewed interest in using dried blood spot cards as a medium for sample collection to enhance surveillance of poliovirus immunity. Here, we describe the modified poliovirus microneutralization assay, poliovirus capture IgM and IgA ELISA assays, and dried blood spot polio serology procedures for the detection of antibodies against poliovirus serotypes 1, 2, and 3.

  16. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  17. Poliarterite nodosa due to anti elastase antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Defendenti

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The Authors related one case of polyarteritis nodosa occurred to a men forty eight years old.The clinical was characterized by mesenteric and femoral arteries occlusion and chronic cutaneous ulcers to legs. There were bioptical aspects of systemic vasculitis with necrotizing inflammation and a paucity of immune deposit. It was effective oral cyclophosphamide plus steroids. This disease was closely associated with antibodies anti elastase (HLE.The patient had not a history of cocaine abuse or LES disease but the nucleolar pattern ANA was positive >1:640 (anti-nDNA negative. Similar case ANA positive associated with the anti-elastase antibodies, was described by Nassberger (Lancet 1989 for 6/104 patients with LES, anti-nDNA negative. The patient with the highest anti-elastase concentration subsequentely died after very rapid development of severe brain and kidney involvement.

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies to Plant Growth Regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Joachim; Arnscheidt, Angelika; Klix, Dieter; Weiler, Elmar W.

    1986-01-01

    Four high affinity monoclonal antibodies, which recognize two plant growth regulators from the cytokinin group, namely trans-zeatin riboside and dihydrozeatin riboside and their derivatives are reported. Six hybridomas were produced from three independent fusions of Balb/c spleen cells with P3-NS1-Ag 4-1 (abbreviated NS1) or X63-Ag 8.653 (X63) myeloma cells. The mice had been hyperimmunized with zeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate or dihydrozeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate for 3 months. The hybridomas secrete antibodies of the IgG 1 or IgG 2b subclass and allow the detection of femtomole amounts of the free cytokinins, their ribosides, and ribotides in plant extracts. The use of these monoclonals in radio- and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is also discussed. PMID:16664848

  19. Anti-epitope antibody,a novel site-directed antibody against human acetylcholinesterase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-mei ZHANG; Gang LIU; Man-ji SUN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct synthetic antigens using the epitope of human brain acetylcholinesterase (hbAChE) for induction and detection of the specific antibody against the epitope, and to analyse the immunogenicity of the antibody.METHODS: The epitope (RTVLVSMNYR, amino acids 143-152) of hbAChE was chemically synthesized, coupled with the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to construct an artificial immunogen (KLH-epitope), and injected into rabbits to raise antibody. The epitope conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the detection antigen. The specificity of the antibody was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The immunoreaction between the anti-recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE)polyclonal antibody and the biotinylated-epitope was examined by indirect ELISA. RESULTS: The erythrocyte AChE, the hbAChE, rhBChE and the BSA-epitope all immunoreacted with the anti-epitope antibody against the epitope (143-152) of hbAChE, whereas the torpedo AChE did not. CONCLUSION: The hbAChE, the human erythrocyte AChE and hBChE share the conservative antigenic epitope RTVLVSMNYR, hence they can all immunoreact with the anti-epitope antibody. Since the epitope of hbAChE is less similar with the aligned amino acid sequences of AChE of Torpedo californica or Torpedo marmorata, there is not any immunoreactivity between them. The R, M, and N residues in the epitope seem to be necessary radicals for the conservation of antigenicity.

  20. Antissaliva Antibodies of Lutzomyia Longipalpis in area of Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Thiago Leite; Fernandes, Magda Freitas; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Levay, Ana Paula Silva; Almeida da Cunha, Elenice Brandão; França, Adriana de Oliveira; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Cavalheiros

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the presence of antissaliva antibodies of Lutzomyia longipalpis in human hosts living in area of visceral leishmaniasis, located in the Center-West region of Brazil. The presence of antissaliva antibodies of L. longipalpis exhibited a strong correlation with the protection and development of antibodies against Leishmania sp. Of the 492 children studied, elevated antissaliva antibodies of L. longipalpis were detected in 38.4% of the participants. There was a higher percentage of positivity (64.7%) among children who exhibited anti-Leishmania sp. antibodies and among those who were positive in the delayed hypersensitivity test (34.8%).