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Sample records for anti-egfr humanized monoclonal

  1. KIR Genes and Their Ligands Predict the Response to Anti-EGFR Monoclonal Antibodies in Solid Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Estevez, Cristina; De la Haba-Rodriguez, Juan; Manzanares-Martin, Barbara; Porras-Quintela, Ignacio; Rodriguez-Ariza, Antonio; Moreno-Vega, Alberto; Ortiz-Morales, Maria J; Gomez-España, Maria A; Cano-Osuna, Maria T; Lopez-Gonzalez, Javier; Chia-Delgado, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Rafael; Aranda-Aguilar, Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) regulate the killing function of natural killer cells, which play an important role in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity response exerted by therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, it is unknown whether the extensive genetic variability of KIR genes and/or their human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands might influence the response to these treatments. This study aimed to explore whether the variability in KIR/HLA genes may be associated with the variable response observed to mAbs based anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies. Thirty-nine patients treated with anti-EGFR mAbs (trastuzumab for advanced breast cancer, or cetuximab for advanced colorectal or advanced head and neck cancer) were included in the study. All the patients had progressed to mAbs therapy and were grouped into two categories taking into account time to treatment failure (TTF ≤6 and ≥10 months). KIR genotyping (16 genetic variability) was performed in genomic DNA from peripheral blood by PCR sequence-specific primer technique, and HLA ligand typing was performed for HLA-B and -C loci by reverse polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific oligonucleotide methodology. Subjects carrying the KIR/HLA ligand combinations KIR2DS1/HLAC2C2-C1C2 and KIR3DS1/HLABw4w4-w4w6 showed longer TTF than non-carriers counterparts (14.76 vs. 3.73 months, p  KIR/HLA ligand combinations predict better response of patients to anti-EGFR therapy. These findings increase the overall knowledge on the role of specific gene variants related to responsiveness to anti-EGFR treatment in solid tumors and highlight the importance of assessing gene polymorphisms related to cancer medications.

  2. MAXIMIZATION OF DNA DAMAGE TO MGMT(+ EGFR(+ GBM CELLS USING OPTIMAL COMBINATION OF TEMOZOLOMIDE-ANTI EGFR MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY NIMOTUZUMAB

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    M. A. M. Inggas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in adultswith dismal prognosis due to the unavailability of an effective therapy. Up to now, there had been no definitive studies published on EGFR inhibition therapy as a chemosensitizer for GBM therapy using Temozolomide (TMZ. This study aims to reveal the most effective method and timing to administer TMZ-anti EGFR targeted therapy which causes maximal DNA damage on GBM cells.Methods: Various regimens of anti EGFR monoclonal antibody Nimotuzumab (NMZ was administered in different combinations with TMZ, performed on U87MG MGMT(+ EGFR(+ cells. The effectiveness of the combinations were evaluated by measuring yH2AX levels which reflects the degree of DNA damage. One-way Anova and LSD tests were performed to determine the effects of each treatment with p<0.05. Results and discussion: the mean SD of yH2AX of each treatment was: 11,90±1,25 for the control group; 29.33±1.91 for NMZ alone; 28.13±1.58 for TMZ alone; 41.53±3.51 for concurrent use; 35.67 ±2.65 for NMZ after 24 hours TMZ; 31.87±2.94 for NMZ after 48 hours TMZ; 39.57±4.2 for TMZ after 24 hours NMZ; and 35.93 ±3.56 for TMZ after 48 hours NMZ. The administration of TMZ concurrent with or after 24 hours NMZ gives the highest amount of DNA damage to GBM cells. Conclusion: The administration of Nimotuzumab targeted therapy up to 24 hours before Temozolomide chemotherapy has been proven to be effective in maximizing the amount of DNA damage done to GBM cells in vitro. 

  3. Anti-EGFR therapy radiosensitizes human lung adenocarcinoma xenograft in nude mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hui; Li Tianran; Tian Jiahe; Qu Baolin; Zhu Hui

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Gefitinib on radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma xenograft in nude mouse. Methods: Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was used to establish nude mouse xenograft tumor model. The mice were derided into 4 groups: control, irradiation alone, Gefinitib alone and radiation combined with Genifitib. Radiation schedule was 3 fractions of 5 Gy, once daily. Gefitinib was daily administered by gavage at 100 mg/(kg·day -1 ) for 14 days. In the combination group, radiotherapy was performed 2 hours after Gefitinib administration. Tumor diameter was measured every other day. Percentage of tumor growth inhibition, growth delay time and regrowth delay time were evaluated. Results: For A549 xenografts in radiation alone, gefitinib alone and combination therapy groups, the percentage of tumor growth inhibition was 22.7%, 12.4% and 38.2%, respectively (F=25.75, P=0.000). Tumor growth delay time was 6.0, 7.8 and 21.6 days, respectively (F=70.49, P=0.000). Tumor regrowth delay time in combination therapy and irradiation alone groups was 23.4 and 10.2 days. (F=174.24, P= 0.000). Sensitizing enhancement ratio of combination group was 1.5 in growth and 1.7 in regrowth. Conclusions: Anti-EGFR therapy enhances the radiosensitivity of human lung adenocarcinoma xenograft in nude mouse. (authors)

  4. Systems approach for the selection of micro-RNAs as therapeutic biomarkers of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody treatment in colorectal cancer

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    Deyati, Avisek; Bagewadi, Shweta; Senger, Philipp; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Novac, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    miRNA plays an important role in tumourgenesis by regulating expression of oncogenes and tumour suppressors. Thus affects cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis, invasion and angiogenesis. miRNAs are potential biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and therapies of different forms of cancer. However, relationship between response of cancer patients towards targeted therapy and the resulting modifications of the miRNA transcriptome in the context of pathway regulation is poorly understood. With ever-increasing pathways and miRNA-mRNA interaction databases, freely available mRNA and miRNA expression data in multiple cancer therapy have produced an unprecedented opportunity to decipher the role of miRNAs in early prediction of therapeutic efficacy in diseases. Efficient translation of -omics data and accumulated knowledge to clinical decision-making are of paramount scientific and public health interest. Well-structured translational algorithms are needed to bridge the gap from databases to decisions. Herein, we present a novel SMARTmiR algorithm to prospectively predict the role of miRNA as therapeutic biomarker for an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody i.e. cetuximab treatment in colorectal cancer.

  5. First-in-human trial of multikinase VEGF inhibitor regorafenib and anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab in advanced cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Subbiah, Vivek; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; Hong, David S.; Amini, Behrang; Yungfang, Jiang; Liu, Hui; Johnson, Adrienne; Schrock, Alexa B.; Ali, Siraj M.; Sun, James X.; Fabrizio, David; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Naing, Aung

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The combination of multikinase VEGF inhibitor regorafenib and anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab overcomes intrinsic and acquired resistance in both EGFR-sensitive and EGFR-resistant preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC).

  6. First-in-human trial of multikinase VEGF inhibitor regorafenib and anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab in advanced cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; Hong, David S.; Amini, Behrang; Yungfang, Jiang; Liu, Hui; Johnson, Adrienne; Schrock, Alexa B.; Ali, Siraj M.; Sun, James X.; Fabrizio, David; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Naing, Aung; Janku, Filip; Karp, Daniel D.; Overman, Michael; Eng, Cathy; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Falchook, Gerald S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The combination of multikinase VEGF inhibitor regorafenib and anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab overcomes intrinsic and acquired resistance in both EGFR-sensitive and EGFR-resistant preclinical models of colorectal cancer (CRC). METHODS. Utilizing a standard 3+3 design, a phase I study was designed to determine safety, maximum tolerated dose (MTD), and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of the regorafenib plus cetuximab combination among patients with advanced cancer including CRC. Comprehensive genomic profiling was performed on the exceptional responder. RESULTS. Among the 27 patients enrolled the median age was 54 years. None of 19 patients treated at dose level 1 (cetuximab i.v. 200 mg/m2 followed by 150 mg/m2 weekly + regorafenib 80 mg daily) experienced a DLT, and 2 of 5 patients treated at dose level 2 (cetuximab i.v. 200 mg/m2 followed by 150 mg/m2 weekly + regorafenib 120 mg daily) experienced a DLT (grade 3 thrombocytopenia [n = 1] and grade 3 intra-abdominal bleed [n = 1]). Most common adverse events were grade 1 or 2 rash (20 patients). Of 24 evaluable patients, 11 (46%) patients had clinical benefit (stable disease > 6 cycles or partial response [PR]) (CRC n = 8, one patient each with head and neck cancer, carcinoma of unknown primary, and glioblastoma). A CRC patient, who progressed on anti-EGFR and regorafenib, achieved a PR (46% decrease per RECIST v1.1) lasting 15 months. Genomic profiling of an exceptional responder with response for over 27 cycles revealed hypermutated genotype with microsatellite instability (MSI). CONCLUSION. Regorafenib 80 mg daily plus cetuximab 200 mg/m2 loading dose, followed by 150 mg/m2 every week is the MTD/recommended phase II dose. The combination demonstrated early signals of activity in wild-type CRC, including 1 exceptional responder with MSI high. TRIAL REGISTRATION. clinicaltrials.gov NCT02095054 FUNDING. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center is supported by the NIH Cancer Center Support Grant CA

  7. Dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR]: molecular design, synthetic organic chemistry reactions, and antineoplastic cytotoxic potency against pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549).

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    Coyne, Cody P; Narayanan, Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Corticosteroids are effective in the management of a variety of disease states, such as several forms of neoplasia (leukemia and lymphoma), autoimmune conditions, and severe inflammatory responses. Molecular strategies that selectively "target" delivery of corticosteroids minimize or prevents large amounts of the pharmaceutical moiety from passively diffusing into normal healthy cell populations residing within tissues and organ systems. The covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was synthesized by reacting dexamethasone-21-monophosphate with a carbodiimide reagent to form a dexamethasone phosphate carbodiimide ester that was subsequently reacted with imidazole to create an amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate. Monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin was combined with the amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide) intermediate, resulting in the synthesis of the covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR]. Following spectrophotometric analysis and validation of retained epidermal growth factor receptor type 1 (EGFR)-binding avidity by cell-ELISA, the selective anti-neoplasic cytotoxic potency of dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was established by MTT-based vitality stain methodology using adherent monolayer populations of human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549) known to overexpress the tropic membrane receptors EGFR and insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1. The dexamethasone:IgG molar-incorporation-index for dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide)-[anti-EGFR] was 6.95:1 following exhaustive serial microfiltration. Cytotoxicity analysis: covalent bonding of dexamethasone to monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin did not significantly modify the ex vivo antineoplastic cytotoxicity of dexamethasone against pulmonary adenocarcinoma at and between the standardized dexamethasone equivalent concentrations of 10(-9) M and 10(-5) M. Rapid increases in

  8. Dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide-[anti-EGFR]: molecular design, synthetic organic chemistry reactions, and antineoplastic cytotoxic potency against pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyne CP

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cody P Coyne,1 Lakshmi Narayanan2 1Department of Basic Sciences, 2Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA Purpose: Corticosteroids are effective in the management of a variety of disease states, such as several forms of neoplasia (leukemia and lymphoma, autoimmune conditions, and severe inflammatory responses. Molecular strategies that selectively “target” delivery of corticosteroids minimize or prevents large amounts of the pharmaceutical moiety from passively diffusing into normal healthy cell populations residing within tissues and organ systems. Materials and methods: The covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide-[anti-EGFR] was synthesized by reacting dexamethasone-21-monophosphate with a carbodiimide reagent to form a dexamethasone phosphate carbodiimide ester that was subsequently reacted with imidazole to create an amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide intermediate. Monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin was combined with the amine-reactive dexamethasone-(C21-phosphorylimidazolide intermediate, resulting in the synthesis of the covalent immunopharmaceutical, dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide-[anti-EGFR]. Following spectrophotometric analysis and validation of retained epidermal growth factor receptor type 1 (EGFR-binding avidity by cell-ELISA, the selective anti-neoplasic cytotoxic potency of dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide-[anti-EGFR] was established by MTT-based vitality stain methodology using adherent monolayer populations of human pulmonary adenocarcinoma (A549 known to overexpress the tropic membrane receptors EGFR and insulin-like growth factor receptor type 1. Results: The dexamethasone:IgG molar-incorporation-index for dexamethasone-(C21-phosphoramide-[anti-EGFR] was 6.95:1 following exhaustive serial microfiltration. Cytotoxicity analysis: covalent bonding of dexamethasone to monoclonal anti-EGFR immunoglobulin

  9. antiEGFR conjugated gold nanoparticles for increasing radiosensitivity in lung cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha; Avasthi, Devesh K.

    2014-01-01

    One of the set back that lies in lung cancer treatment is the over expression of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR). EGFR is a transmembrane receptor that is highly expressed in lung cancer that leads to cell survival, proliferation and spread of the disease. Over the years, EGFR inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, are being used in combination with radiotherapy in lung cancer patients so as to achieve better results. In the recent time, application of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) in diagnosis and treatment of cancer has been extensively used in biomedical research. Among various applications, there is considerable use of AuNPs seen on the dose enhancement effect (radiosensitization) in radiation therapy of cancer. The conjugation of AuNP with monoclonal antibody antiEGFR (antiEGFR-AuNP) may provide excellent agent to sensitize the cells to heavy ion radiation. We synthesized AuNPs by citrate reduction method. Most of AuNPs were in the size range of 6-8 nm as studies by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). These AuNPs were found to be non toxic in A549 cells and thus biocompatible. Further, we conjugated AuNPs with antiEGFR (antiEGFR-AuNP). The conjugation was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. A549 cells were treated with antiEGFR-AuNP. TEM was carried out of ultrathin cross sections of antiEGFR-AuNP treated A549 cells to check the attachment internalization of AuNPs. We observed that the AuNPs are attached on the cell membrane as well as internalized in cytoplasm. Upon exposure of antiEGFR-AuNP treated cells to heavy ion 12 C beam, showed increase in radiosensitization as studied by survival assay and MTT assay. We will also explain the EGFR expression and cell cycle proliferation in A549 cells upon heavy ion beam irradiation of these. The study aims to overcome the current limitations of cancer-targeted therapies and improve the treatment modality of lung cancer. (author)

  10. Bio markers and Anti-EGFR therapies for Krads wild-type tumors in metastatic colorectal cancer patients; Biomarcadores y terapeutica ANTI-EGFR en el cancer colorrectal metastasico en pacientes con K-Ras no mutado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Rubio Garcia, E.

    2009-07-01

    The natural history of metastasis colorectal cancer has being clearly modified in terms of response rate, time to progression and overall survival, once the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (cetuximab and panitumumab) have emerged in combination with the standard cytotoxic chemotherapy (FOLFOX and FOLFIRI). However, the benefit from cetuximab and panitumumab is only confined to KRAS-wild type (KRAS-wt) colorectal tumors, while KRAS mutated tumors do not respond to these drugs. The 65 % of colorectal tumors are KRAS-wt tumors, but efficacy of antiEGFR therapies is detected only in 60-70 % of these KRAS-wt tumors. Other biomarkers and molecular pathways must be involved in the response of the antiEGFR therapies for the KRAS-wt colorectal tumors, such as the EGFR ligands, the EGFR-phosphorilated levels, the number of EGFR copies, the status of the KRAS effected B-RAF and the alternative intracellular signaling pathways PIK3CA/PTEN/AKT and JAK/STAT. A battery of these biomarkers is needed to select the most sensitive patients to the antiEGFR therapies. This pattern may represent a novel favorable cost-effectiveness tool to develop tailored treatments. A review of these biomarkers and molecular pathways, involved in the antiEGFR therapies response, is performed. (Author) 68 refs.

  11. Experimental Treatment of Bladder Cancer with Bi-213-anti-EGFR MAb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, Christof; Pfost, Birgit; Müller, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Therapy of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (carcinoma in situ) comprises transurethral resection of the tumour and subsequent instillation of the chemotherapeutic drug mitomycin C in order to eradicate remaining tumour cells. Yet 15 – 40% of treated patients relapse within 5 years. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies to combat tumour recurrence are needed. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides efficiently kill single tumour cells or small tumour cell clusters. Because the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed on bladder cancer cells, conjugates composed of the alpha-emitter Bi-213 and the anti-EGFR antibody matuzumab should provide a powerful drug to eliminate disseminated bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the aims of our study were (i) to analyse the cytotoxic effects of Bi-213-anti-EGFR radioimmunoconjugates at the cellular level, (ii) to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of intravesically applied Bi-213- anti-EGFR-Mab in a nude mouse model with intravesical human bladder cancer xenografts, (iii) to compare Bi- 213-anti-EGFR-Mab efficacy with chemotherapy using mitomycin C and (iv) to demonstrate that radioimmunotherapy is not toxic to cells of the bladder wall and of the kidneys

  12. Clinical application of antibody monoclonal humanized anti-EGFrnimotuzumab labeled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera Pintado, Alejandro; Peña Quián, Yamilé; Batista Cuéllar, Juan F.; Prats Capote, Anaís; Torres Aroche, Leonel A.; Casacó Santana, Caridad; Sánchez Mendosa, Elvia L.; Sánchez González, Yolaine; Romero Collado, Susana; Quesada Pozo, Rodobaldo; Valladares Oviedo, Lourdes; Masquida García, Elsa M.; Leyva Montaña, René; Casacó, Angel; Ramos Suzarte, Mayra; Crombet, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Most malignant tumors are of epithelial origin. These are characterized by overexpression of the receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR), which the neoplastic cells escape the regulatory mechanisms are allowed, so its high concentration of membrane is generally associated with a poor prognosis . By binding an antibody specifically to this receptor, preventing binding of EGF latter and activation mechanism tyrosine kinase inhibiting cell mitosis and apoptosis causing tumor cell. For this reason, the EGFr has been considered as an attractive target for anti-tumor therapy. The humanized monoclonal antibody anti-EGFr nimotuzumab was developed by the Center of Molecular Immunology (Havana, Cuba). Numerous clinical trials have been developed in the Department of Clinical Research Center Isotopes (Cuba), in which it has been applied this antibody, both labeled with 99mTc for immuno gammagraphic detection of tumors, as labeled with 188 Re for radioimmunotherapy of gliomas high degree of malignancy. The aim of this paper is to show the experience of the Department of Clinical Research of CENTIS in various clinical trials with marking for both immuno gammagraphics detection of tumors, such as for radioimmunotherapy nimotuzumab. (author)

  13. Impact of genetic profiles on the efficacy of anti-EGFR antibodies in metastatic colorectal cancer with KRAS mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishiki, Tomokazu; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Masaki, Tadahiko; Ohtsuka, Kouki; Ohkura, Yasuo; Furuse, Jyunji; Sugiyama, Masanori; Watanabe, Takashi

    2014-07-01

    Reports indicate that, even in KRAS-mutated colon cancer, there are subsets of patients who benefit from anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) treatment. The aim of the present study was to identify genetic profiles that contribute to the responsiveness of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) to anti-EGFR MoAb. We retrospectively evaluated the efficacy of anti-EGFR MoAb in mCRC patients with KRAS mutations according to KRAS mutational subtypes, BRAF and PIK3CA mutational status and PTEN and MET expression. Among 21 patients with KRAS-mutant tumors, 8 (38%) harbored p.G13D, 7 (33%) harbored p.G12V, 5 (24%) harbored p.G12D, and 1 (5%) harbored p.G12C mutation. Patients with the p.G13D mutation exhibited a significantly higher disease control rate than patients with other KRAS mutations (P=0.042), and tended to show a longer progression-free survival (PFS) than patients with other KRAS mutations with marginal significance (P=0.074). Patients with loss of PTEN had significantly shorter PFS than those with normal PTEN expression in patients with KRAS mutations (P=0.044). MET overexpression was significantly associated with shorter PFS compared to normal MET expression in patients with KRAS mutations (P=0.016). Our data demonstrated the potential utility of alterations in PTEN and MET expression as predictive markers for response to anti-EGFR MoAbs in mCRC patients with KRAS mutations. In addition, we confirmed the predictive value of the KRAS p.G13D mutation for better response to anti-EGFR therapies in comparison with other KRAS mutations.

  14. Anti-EGFR Antibody Reduces Lung Nodules by Inhibition of EGFR-Pathway in a Model of Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

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    Elena Lesma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available EGFR belongs to the HER/ErbB family of tyrosine kinase receptors and its activation in cancer cells has been linked with increased proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM is a rare, low-grade neoplasm that occurs sporadically or in association with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, a genetic, multisystem disorder characterized by hamartomas in several organs. From chylous of a LAM/TSC patient, we previously isolated smooth muscle-like LAM/TSC cells whose proliferation depends on EGF and monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies reduced proliferation and caused cell death. We demonstrated that the dependency from EGF was caused by the absence of tuberin. To study the role of EGFR pathway in vivo, we developed a mouse model by administration of LAM/TSC cells to female nude mice. LAM/TSC cells caused pulmonary airspace enlargement and, after 30 weeks, nodule formation which express EGFR. Anti-EGFR antibody decreased the number and dimension of lung nodules likely for the inhibition of Erk and S6 signaling, reversed the pulmonary alterations, and reduced lymphatic and blood vessels. Moreover, in pulmonary nodules anti-EGFR antibody reduced the positivity to estrogen and progesterone receptors which enhance survival of LAM cells and Snail expression. These results suggest that the inhibition of EGFR signalling has a potential in treatment of LAM/TSC lung alterations.

  15. A bi-paratopic anti-EGFR nanobody efficiently inhibits solid tumour growth

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    Roovers, Rob C.; Vosjan, Maria J.W.D.; Laeremans, Toon; el Khoulati, Rachid; de Bruin, Renée C.G.; Ferguson, Kathryn M.; Verkleij, Arie J.; van Dongen, Guus A.M.S.; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

    2014-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be a valid cancer target for antibody-based therapy. At present, several anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been successfully used, among which cetuximab and matuzumab. X-ray crystallography data show that these antibodies bind to different epitopes on the ecto-domain of EGFR, providing a rationale for the combined use of these two antibody specificities. We have previously reported on the successful isolation of antagonistic anti-EGFR nanobodies. In the present study, we aimed to improve on these molecules by combining nanobodies with specificities similar to both cetuximab and matuzumab into a single bi-paratopic molecule. Carefully designed phage nanobody selections resulted in two sets of nanobodies that specifically blocked the binding of either matuzumab or of cetuximab to EGFR and that did not compete for each others binding. A combination of nanobodies from both epitope groups into the bi-paratopic nanobody CONAN-1 was shown to block EGFR activation more efficiently than monovalent or bivalent (monospecific) nanobodies. In addition, this bi-paratopic nanobody potently inhibited EGF-dependent cell proliferation. Importantly, in an in vivo model of athymic mice bearing A431 xenografts, CONAN-1 inhibited tumour outgrowth with an almost similar potency as the whole mAb cetuximab, despite the fact that CONAN-1 is devoid of an Fc portion that could mediate immune effector functions. Compared to therapy using bivalent, mono-specific nanobodies, CONAN-1 was clearly more potent in tumour growth inhibition. These results show that the rational design of bi-paratopic nanobody-based anti-cancer therapeutics may yield potent lead molecules for further development. PMID:21520037

  16. Prediction of response to anti-EGFR antibody-based therapies by multigene sequencing in colorectal cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupini, Laura; Bassi, Cristian; Mlcochova, Jitka; Musa, Gentian; Russo, Marta; Vychytilova-Faltejskova, Petra; Svoboda, Marek; Sabbioni, Silvia; Nemecek, Radim; Slaby, Ondrej; Negrini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibodies (moAbs) cetuximab or panitumumab are administered to colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who harbor wild-type RAS proto-oncogenes. However, a percentage of patients do not respond to this treatment. In addition to mutations in the RAS genes, mutations in other genes, such as BRAF, PI3KCA, or PTEN, could be involved in the resistance to anti-EGFR moAb therapy. In order to develop a comprehensive approach for the detection of mutations and to eventually identify other genes responsible for resistance to anti-EGFR moAbs, we investigated a panel of 21 genes by parallel sequencing on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine platform. We sequenced 65 CRCs that were treated with cetuximab or panitumumab. Among these, 37 samples were responsive and 28 were resistant. We confirmed that mutations in EGFR-pathway genes (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PI3KCA) were relevant for conferring resistance to therapy and could predict response (p = 0.001). After exclusion of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PI3KCA combined mutations could still significantly associate to resistant phenotype (p = 0.045, by Fisher exact test). In addition, mutations in FBXW7 and SMAD4 were prevalent in cases that were non-responsive to anti-EGFR moAb. After we combined the mutations of all genes (excluding KRAS), the ability to predict response to therapy improved significantly (p = 0.002, by Fisher exact test). The combination of mutations at KRAS and at the five gene panel demonstrates the usefulness and feasibility of multigene sequencing to assess response to anti-EGFR moAbs. The application of parallel sequencing technology in clinical practice, in addition to its innate ability to simultaneously examine the genetic status of several cancer genes, proved to be more accurate and sensitive than the presently in use traditional approaches. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1752-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to human seminal plasma proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapková, Jana; Margaryan, Hasmik; Elzeinová, Fatima; Koubek, Pavel; Pěknicová, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 30, Supplement (2009), s. 60 ISSN 0196-3635. [9th International Congress of And rology. 07.03.2009-10.03.2009, Barcelona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : monoclonal antibodies * human seminal plasma proteins * clusterin * semenogelin I * SABP * enolase I Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  18. Plant virus-resembling optical nano-materials conjugated with anti-EGFR for targeted cancer imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sharad; Wilder, Hailey; Rao, A. L. N.; Vullev, V. I.; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    We recently reported the construction of a new type of optically active nano-particles composed of genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved chromophore . We refer to these constructs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since only the capsid protein (CP) subunits of BMV remain to encapsulate ICG. Herein, we covalently conjugated the surface of OVGs with anti-epidermal growth factor receptors (anti-EGFR) to target cancerous human bronchial epithelial cells (C-HBECs) in-vitro. Our preliminary results demonstrate the utility of conjugated OVGs for targeted imaging of cancer cells.

  19. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140?250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  20. Anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles containing IL12 and salmosin genes for targeted cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Seok; Kang, Seong Jae; Jeong, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Sang Il; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hong Sung; Kim, Keun Sik; Park, Yong Serk

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-directed gene delivery is of major interest in the field of cancer gene therapy. Varied functionalizations of non-viral vectors have been suggested to enhance tumor targetability. In the present study, we prepared two different types of anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) immunonanoparticles containing pDNA, neutrally charged liposomes and cationic lipoplexes, for tumor-directed transfection of cancer therapeutic genes. Even though both anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles had a high binding affinity to the EGFR-positive cancer cells, the anti-EGFR immunolipoplex formulation exhibited approximately 100-fold higher transfection to the target cells than anti-EGFR immunoliposomes. The lipoplex formulation also showed a higher transfection to SK-OV-3 tumor xenografts in mice. Thus, IL12 and/or salmosin genes were loaded in the anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes and intravenously administered to mice carrying SK-OV-3 tumors. Co-transfection of IL12 and salmosin genes using anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes significantly reduced tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Furthermore, combinatorial treatment with doxorubicin synergistically inhibited tumor growth. These results suggest that anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes containing pDNA encoding therapeutic genes could be utilized as a gene-transfer modality for cancer gene therapy.

  1. Radioimmunodetection of human melanoma tumor xenografts with human monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomibuchi, Makoto; Saxton, R.E.; Lake, R.R.; Katano, Mitsuo; Irie, R.F.

    1986-01-01

    A human IgM monoclonal antibody has been established that defines a tumor-associated membrane antigen expressed on human melanoma cells. The antigen has been identified as the ganglioside GD2. In this paper, the authors describe the potential usefulness of the human monoclonal antibody for radioimaging. Nude mice bearing tumors derived from a human melanoma cell line were used as a model. Antibody activity was degradated significantly after labeling with 131 I by the use of a modified chloramine-T method. After testing various concentrations, labeled antibody of a specific activity of 2.8μCi/μg produced the best results. Balb/c nude mice bearing a GD2-positive M14 melanoma cell line were injected with 10-30μg of labeled antibody, and its radiolocalization in different organs and in the whole body were evaluated. The best tumor image was obtained on Day 6. The labeled antibody uptake ratio between tumor and muscle was 9.2:1; the ratio between tumor and liver was 1.4:1. These studies represent the first report of experimental tumor imaging with human monoclonal antibody. Human monoclonals will probably prove to be superior reagents for tumor imaging in melanoma patients if the problem of anti-body radiolysis is resolved. (author)

  2. Anti-EGFR Therapy: Mechanism and Advances in Clinical Efficacy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Flynn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will focus on recent advances in the application of antiepidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR for the treatment of breast cancer. The choice of EGFR, a member of the ErbB tyrosine kinase receptor family, stems from evidence pinpointing its role in various anti-EGFR therapies. Therefore, an increase in our understanding of EGFR mechanism and signaling might reveal novel targets amenable to intervention in the clinic. This knowledge base might also improve existing medical treatment options and identify research gaps in the design of new therapeutic agents. While the approved use of drugs like the dual kinase inhibitor Lapatinib represents significant advances in the clinical management of breast cancer, confirmatory studies must be considered to foster the use of anti-EGFR therapies including safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy.

  3. Crossreactivity of boar sperm monoclonal antibodies with human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monoclonal antibodies against the head (H mabs) and tail (Tmabs) of boar spermatozoa were produced. Spermatozoa from boar, stallion, bull, human, ram, goat and rabbit were independently incubated with the monoclonal antibodies and later stained by immunofluorescence method. There were positive reactions of the ...

  4. SK3/TRPC1/Orai1 complex regulates SOCE-dependent colon cancer cell migration: a novel opportunity to modulate anti-EGFR mAb action by the alkyl-lipid Ohmline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguinou, Maxime; Harnois, Thomas; Crottes, David; Uguen, Arnaud; Deliot, Nadine; Gambade, Audrey; Chantôme, Aurélie; Haelters, Jean Pierre; Jaffrès, Paul Alain; Jourdan, Marie Lise; Weber, Günther; Soriani, Olivier; Bougnoux, Philippe; Mignen, Olivier; Bourmeyster, Nicolas; Constantin, Bruno; Lecomte, Thierry; Vandier, Christophe; Potier-Cartereau, Marie

    2016-06-14

    Barely 10-20% of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) receive a clinical benefit from the use of anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We hypothesized that this could depends on their efficiency to reduce Store Operated Calcium Entry (SOCE) that are known to enhance cancer cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that SOCE promotes migration of colon cancer cell following the formation of a lipid raft ion channel complex composed of TRPC1/Orai1 and SK3 channels. Formation of this complex is stimulated by the phosphorylation of the reticular protein STIM1 by EGF and activation of the Akt pathway. Our data show that, in a positive feedback loop SOCE activates both Akt pathway and SK3 channel activity which lead to SOCE amplification. This amplification occurs through the activation of Rac1/Calpain mediated by Akt. We also show that Anti-EGFR mAbs can modulate SOCE and cancer cell migration through the Akt pathway. Interestingly, the alkyl-lipid Ohmline, which we previously showed to be an inhibitor of SK3 channel, can dissociated the lipid raft ion channel complex through decreased phosphorylation of Akt and modulation of mAbs action. This study demonstrates that the inhibition of the SOCE-dependent colon cancer cell migration trough SK3/TRPC1/Orai1 channel complex by the alkyl-lipid Ohmline may be a novel strategy to modulate Anti-EGFR mAb action in mCRC.

  5. Concordance of KRAS/BRAF Mutation Status in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer before and after Anti-EGFR Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gattenlöhner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-EGFR targeted therapy is a potent strategy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC but activating mutations in the KRAS gene are associated with poor response to this treatment. Therefore, KRAS mutation analysis is employed in the selection of patients for EGFR-targeted therapy and various studies have shown a high concordance between the mutation status in primary CRC and corresponding metastases. However, although development of therapy related resistance occurs also in the context of novel drugs such as tyrosine kinase-inhibitors the effect of the anti-EGFR treatment on the KRAS/BRAF mutation status itself in recurrent mCRC has not yet been clarified. Therefore, we analyzed 21 mCRCs before/after anti-EGFR therapy and found a pre-/posttherapeutic concordance of the KRAS/BRAF mutation status in 20 of the 21 cases examined. In the one discordant case, further analyses revealed that a tumor mosaicism or multiple primary tumors were present, indicating that anti-EGFR therapy has no influence on KRAS/BRAF mutation status in mCRC. Moreover, as the preselection of patients with a KRASwt genotype for anti-EGFR therapy has become a standard procedure, sample sets such ours might be the basis for future studies addressing the identification of potential anti-EGFR therapy induced genetic alterations apart from KRAS/BRAF mutations.

  6. The involvement of Kras gene 3'-UTR polymorphisms in risk of cancer and influence on patient response to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying HQ

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hou-Qun Ying,1,2 Feng Wang,2 Bang-Shun He,2 Yu-Qin Pan,2 Tian-Yi Gao,2 Ye-Qiong Xu,2 Rui Li,2 Qi-Wen Deng,2 Hui-Lin Sun,2 Shu-Kui Wang21Medical College, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China; 2Central Laboratory, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Genetic variation of the Kras oncogene is a candidate factor for increasing susceptibility to carcinoma and modulating response of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC patients treated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody (anti-EGFR. However, results from an increasing number of studies concerning the association of Kras gene rs712 and rs61764370 polymorphisms with risk of cancer and treatment of mCRC using anti-EGFR remain equivocal.Methods: Risk associations were evaluated in 1,661 cases and 2,139 controls from six studies concerning rs712 and 14,796 cases and 14,985 controls from 29 studies concerning rs61764370. Response association was also examined in a subset of four studies pertaining to rs61764370 and anti-EGFR treatment in mCRC.Results: Results of a meta-analysis showed that allele T (P-value of heterogeneity test [PH] =0.08, odds ratio [OR] =1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.08–1.64 and genotype GT/TT (PH=0.14, OR =1.30, 95% CI: 1.10–1.55 in rs712 were strongly associated with cancer in Chinese subjects. No evidence of association was observed between rs712 and risk of cancer in the overall population or between rs61764370 and ovarian, breast, colorectal, or non-small-cell lung cancer risk in the Caucasian population. No significant association was found between rs61764370 and patient response to anti-EGFR therapy in mCRC.Conclusion: The findings not only provide further evidence that allele T of rs712 increases genetic predisposition to cancer in Chinese population, but also no significant association between rs61764370 and cancer risk in Caucasian population

  7. Upregulation of HLA Class I Expression on Tumor Cells by the Anti-EGFR Antibody Nimotuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Garrido

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Defining how epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR-targeting therapies influence the immune response is essential to increase their clinical efficacy. A growing emphasis is being placed on immune regulator genes that govern tumor – T cell interactions. Previous studies showed an increase in HLA class I cell surface expression in tumor cell lines treated with anti-EGFR agents. In particular, earlier studies of the anti-EGFR blocking antibody cetuximab, have suggested that increased tumor expression of HLA class I is associated with positive clinical response. We investigated the effect of another commercially available anti-EGFR antibody nimotuzumab on HLA class I expression in tumor cell lines. We observed, for the first time, that nimotuzumab increases HLA class I expression and its effect is associated with a coordinated increase in mRNA levels of the principal antigen processing and presentation components. Moreover, using 7A7 (a specific surrogate antibody against murine EGFR, we obtained results suggesting the importance of the increased MHC-I expression induced by EGFR-targeted therapies display higher in antitumor immune response. 7A7 therapy induced upregulation of tumor MHC-I expression in vivo and tumors treated with this antibody display higher susceptibility to CD8+ T cells-mediated lysis. Our results represent the first evidence suggesting the importance of the adaptive immunity in nimotuzumab-mediated antitumor activity. More experiments should be conducted in order to elucidate the relevance of this mechanism in cancer patients. This novel immune-related antitumor mechanism mediated by nimotuzumab opens new perspectives for its combination with various immunotherapeutic agents and cancer vaccines.

  8. Characterization and tissue specificity of a monoclonal antibody against human uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, W. H.; Allebes, W. A.; Jansen, P. L.; Poels, L. G.; Capel, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody against human liver uridine 5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferase (UDPGTase) was developed. Enzyme inhibition studies with this monoclonal antibody showed inhibition of human liver UDPGTase activity with bilirubin, 4-methylumbelliferone, and 4-nitrophenol as substrates.

  9. Evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness of 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL in a mouse model of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Ji, Yan-Hui; Li, Cheng-Xia; Liu, Zhong-Yun; Li, Ning; Fang, Lei; Chang, Jin; Tan, Jian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the biological effects of internal irradiation, and the therapeutic effectiveness was assessed of 131I-labeled anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) liposomes, derived from cetuximab, when used as a tumor-targeting carrier in a colorectal cancer mouse model. METHODS: We described the liposomes and characterized their EGFR-targeted binding and cellular uptake in EGFR-overexpressing LS180 colorectal cancer cells. After intra-tumor injections of 74 MBq (740 MBq/mL) 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL, we investigated the biological effects of internal irradiation and the therapeutic efficacy of 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL on colorectal cancer in a male BALB/c mouse model. Tumor size, body weight, histopathology, and SPECT imaging were monitored for 33 d post-therapy. RESULTS: The rapid radioiodine uptake of 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL and 131I-BSA-PCL reached maximum levels at 4 h after incubation, and the 131I uptake of 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL was higher than that of 131I-BSA-PCL in vitro. The 131I tissue distribution assay revealed that 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL was markedly taken up by the tumor. Furthermore, a tissue distribution assay revealed that 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL was markedly taken up by the tumor and reached its maximal uptake value of 21.0 ± 1.01 %ID/g (%ID/g is the percentage injected dose per gram of tissue) at 72 h following therapy; the drug concentration in the tumor was higher than that in the liver, heart, colon, or spleen. Tumor size measurements showed that tumor development was significantly inhibited by treatments with 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL and 131I-BSA-PCL. The volume of tumor increased, and treatment rate with 131I-antiEGFR-BSA-PCL was 124% ± 7%, lower than that with 131I-BSA-PCL (127% ± 9%), 131I (143% ± 7%), and normal saline (146% ± 10%). The percentage losses in original body weights were 39% ± 3%, 41% ± 4%, 49% ± 5%, and 55% ± 13%, respectively. The best survival and cure rates were obtained in the group treated with 131I-antiEGFR

  10. 99mTc labeled anti EGFR Nanobody pentamer for tumor radioimmunoimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhiling; Lan Xiaoli; Li Chongjiao; Pei Zhijun; Zhang Yongxue; Wang Lifei; Gao Bin

    2014-01-01

    Novel Nanobody has small molecular weight and lower affinity. Appropriate polymer would be more suitable for radioimmunoimaging. In this study, we labeled anti EGFR Nanobody pentamer with 99m Tc to prepare tumor targeting imaging agent and to investigate its binding characteristics of tumor cells and tissues in vitro and in vivo, and to explore the feasibility of 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody pentamer for tumor radioimmunoimaging compared with anti EGFR Nanobody monomer. EGFR Nanobody labeled with 99m Tc through tricarbonyl intermediate. The labeled compounds were purified by an ultra centrifugal filter; The labeling efficiency was determined by thin layer chromatography (TLC), and the radiochemical purity more than 95%. In vitro, 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody monomer and pentamer have the specific binding capability with EGFR overexpression A431 tumor cell. the binding rate of 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody monomer higher than that of pentamer (11.32% ± 2.73% vs 5.80% ± 0.92%, P < O.05). In A431 xenografted tumor was clearly displayed after intravenous injection of 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody pentamer at l.5 h, T/NT maximum was 2.9 (1.5 h), whereas, the tumor tissues was not obviously found using 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody monomer. The negative EGFR expression OCM-I xenografted tumor was not showed in both monomer and pentamer tracer. The experiment indicated that 99m Tc-EGFR Nanobody pentamer are appropriate for tumor radioimmunoimaging and has the potential value for the further study. (authors)

  11. PCR-based assays versus direct sequencing for evaluating the effect of KRAS status on anti-EGFR treatment response in colorectal cancer patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianfeng Shan

    Full Text Available The survival rate of colorectal cancer (CRC patients carrying wild-type KRAS is significantly increased by combining anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody (mAb with standard chemotherapy. However, conflicting data exist in both the wild-type KRAS and mutant KRAS groups, which strongly challenge CRC anti-EGFR treatment. Here we conducted a meta-analysis in an effort to provide more reliable information regarding anti-EGFR treatment in CRC patients.We searched full reports of randomized clinical trials using Medline, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO, and the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO. Two investigators independently screened the published literature according to our inclusive and exclusive criteria and the relative data were extracted. We used Review Manager 5.2 software to analyze the data.The addition of anti-EGFR mAb to standard chemotherapy significantly improved both progression-free survival (PFS and median overall survival (mOS in the wild-type KRAS group; hazard ratios (HRs for PFS and mOS were 0.70 [95% confidence interval (CI, 0.58-0.84] and 0.83 [95% CI, 0.75-0.91], respectively. In sub-analyses of the wild-type KRAS group, when PCR-based assays are employed, PFS and mOS notably increase: the HRs were 0.74 [95% CI, 0.62-0.88] and 0.87 [95% CI, 0.78-0.96], respectively. In sub-analyses of the mutant KRAS group, neither PCR-based assays nor direct sequencing enhance PFS or mOS.Our data suggest that PCR-based assays with high sensitivity and specificity allow accurate identification of patients with wild-type KRAS and thus increase PFS and mOS. Furthermore, such assays liberate patients with mutant KRAS from unnecessary drug side effects, and provide them an opportunity to receive appropriate treatment. Thus, establishing a precise standard reference test will substantially optimize CRC-targeted therapies.

  12. Radiolabeled anti-EGFR-antibody improves local tumor control after external beam radiotherapy and offers theragnostic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koi, Lydia; Bergmann, Ralf; Brüchner, Kerstin; Pietzsch, Jens; Pietzsch, Hans-Jürgen; Krause, Mechthild

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using the therapeutic radionuclide Y-90 bound to the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab combined with external beam irradiation (EBRT) (EBRIT) on permanent local tumor control in vivo was examined. Methods: Growth delay was evaluated in three human squamous cell carcinoma models after RIT with [ 90 Y]Y-(CHX-A′′-DTPA) 4 -cetuximab (Y-90-cetuximab). The EBRT dose required to cure 50% of the tumors (TCD 50 ) for EBRT alone or EBRIT was evaluated in one RIT-responder (FaDu) and one RIT-non-responder (UT-SCC-5). EGFR expression and microenvironmental parameters were evaluated in untreated tumors, bioavailability was visualized by PET using ([ 86 Y]Y-(CHX-A′′-DTPA) 4 -cetuximab (Y-86-cetuximab) and biodistribution using Y-90-cetuximab. Results: In UT-SCC-8 and FaDu but not in UT-SCC-5 radiolabeled cetuximab led to significant tumor growth delay. TCD 50 after EBRT was significantly decreased by EGFR-targeted RIT in FaDu but not in UT-SCC-5. In contrast to EGFR expression, parameters of the tumor micromilieu and in particular the Y-90-cetuximab biodistribution or Y-86-cetuximab visualization in PET correlated with the responsiveness to RIT or EBRIT. Conclusion: EGFR-targeted EBRIT can improve permanent local tumor control compared to EBRT alone. PET imaging of bioavailability of labeled cetuximab appears to be a suitable predictor for response to EBRIT. This theragnostic approach should be further explored for clinical translation

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to human chorionic gonadotropin and their application to two-site sandwich radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuchi, A.; Iio, M.; Miyachi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG). One monoclonal antibody recognized a conformational determinant expressed only on native HCG molecule and another monoclonal antibody had the specificity for the epitopes located on the β-subunit of HCG. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with different antigenic determinants on the HCG molecule were used to develop a simplified 2-site sandwich radioimmunoassay in which one monoclonal antibody was immobilized and another labeled with 125 iodine. This assay was highly specific for HCG and there was no cross-reactivity with α,β-subunit of HCG, luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. (Auth.)

  15. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  16. Molecular biomarkers of resistance to anti-EGFR treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer, from classical to innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, Riccardo; Scartozzi, Mario; Del Prete, Michela; Maccaroni, Elena; Bittoni, Alessandro; Faloppi, Luca; Bianconi, Maristella; Cecchini, Luca; Cascinu, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Systematic dissection of the EGFR pathway was considered as the best way to identify putative markers of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies. This kind of approach leaves other, less known but by no means less important, putative mechanisms of resistance. We tried to shed some light on these mechanisms of resistance. We performed a research through Pubmed database of all published articles highlighting mechanisms of resistance to Cetuximab and Panitumumab based therapies, published in 2000-2012 period. We reviewed the "classical" molecular factors, extensively analyzed as predictive factors for efficacy to anti-EGFR therapy, such as K-ras, B-raf, and PI3K-mTOR-Akt, focusing on their predictive or prognostic value and on the controversial aspects of the biomarker analysis for clinical practice. On the second part we will then move on to other less known molecular markers, for the future understanding of biological mechanisms underlying anti-EGFR therapy resistance, such as non-canonical heterodimer candidates, microRNA, IGF1-IGF1R, HGF-cMET and secondary mutations of EGFR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Study of anti-idiotype antibodies to human monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, R; Takahashi, N; Owaki, I; Kannagi, R; Endo, N; Morita, N; Inoue, M

    1992-02-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 (IgM, lambda), was generated, which reacted specifically with a major of glycolipid present in LS174T colon cancer cells. The glycolipid antigen which reacted with the ll-50 antibody was expected to four sugar residues from its TLC mobility, and it was ascertained that the glycolipid antigen which reacted with ll-50 antibody might be Lc4 antigen [Gal beta 1----3 GLcNAc beta 1----3 Gal beta 1----4 Glc beta 1----1 Cer] judging from TLC immunostaining and ELISA when the reactivity of ll-50 antibody was tested using various pure glycolipids in 3-5 sugar residues as an antigen. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated ll-50 antibody. The serum of the Lc4 antigen recognized by ll-50 antibody was significantly higher in patients with malignant disorders than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). Three mouse monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3 and C5 (all IgG1), were generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with ll-50 antibody. These anti-idiotype antibodies specifically bound to to human monoclonal antibody, ll-50 and had a significant inhibitory activity towards the binding of ll-50 antibody to the Lc4 antigen. This indicated that these anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5, were paratope-related anti-idiotype antibodies. G3, B3, and C5 were expected to define the nearest idiotope because they could mutually inhibit ll-50 antibody. Sera in patients with malignant disorders and healthy individuals were analyzed by Sandwich assay of immobilized and biotinylated anti-idiotype antibodies, G3, B3, and C5. As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by C5 (Id-C5+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher than that in healthy individuals (p less than 0.05). As to the ll-50 like antibodies defined by B3 (Id-B3+), the mean serum level in patients with malignant disorders was significantly higher

  18. Rapid Visualization of Human Tumor Xenografts through Optical Imaging with a Near-Infrared Fluorescent Anti–Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Nanobody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given that overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is found in many types of human epithelial cancers, noninvasive molecular imaging of this receptor is of great interest. A number of studies have employed monoclonal antibodies as probes; however, their characteristic long half-life in the bloodstream has encouraged the development of smaller probes. In this study, an anti-EGFR nanobody-based probe was developed and tested in comparison with cetuximab for application in optical molecular imaging. To this aim, the anti-EGFR nanobody 7D12 and cetuximab were conjugated to the near-infrared fluorophore IRDye800CW. 7D12-IR allowed the visualization of tumors as early as 30 minutes postinjection, whereas with cetuximab-IR, no signal above background was observed at the tumor site. Quantification of the IR-conjugated proteins in the tumors revealed ≈ 17% of injected dose per gram 2 hours after injection of 7D12-IR, which was significantly higher than the tumor uptake obtained 24 hours after injection of cetuximab-IR. This difference is associated with the superior penetration and distribution of 7D12-IR within the tumor. These results demonstrate that this anti-EGFR nanobody conjugated to the NIR fluorophore has excellent properties for rapid preclinical optical imaging, which holds promise for its future use as a complementary diagnostic tool in humans.

  19. Radiolabeled Humanized Anti-CD3 Monoclonal Antibody Visilizumab for Imaging Human T-Lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, Gaurav; D'Alessandria, Calogero; Bonanno, Elena; Vexler, Vladimir; Massari, Roberto; Trotta, Carlo; Scopinaro, Francesco; Dierckx, Rudi; Signore, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Visilizumab is an IgG(2) humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) characterized by non-Fc gamma R binding and specific to the CD3 antigen, expressed on more than 95% of circulating resting T-lymphocytes and on activated T-lymphocytes homing in inflamed tissues. We hypothesized that the use of a

  20. A perspective on anti-EGFR therapies targeting triple-negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Katsuya; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yamaguchi, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which lacks estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), accounts for about 15-20% of breast cancers and is the most aggressive breast cancer subtype. There are currently no effective therapies against metastatic TNBC. Compared with other breast cancer subtypes, EGFR is frequently overexpressed in TNBC and a potential therapeutic target for this disease. There are two types of EGFR inhibitors, small molecular tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and monoclonal antibody (mAb), for the treatment of cancers, such as non-small cell lung cancer and colorectal cancer. For breast cancer, however, the clinical trials of EGFR inhibitors have failed due to low response rates. Because a small portion of patients do demonstrate response to EGFR inhibitors, it may be necessary to stratify patients to enhance the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in TNBC and to develop the effective combination therapy for this patient population. In this review, we describe some of the molecular mechanisms underlying EGFR inhibitor sensitivity and further discuss the possible therapeutic strategies to increase the efficacy of EGFR inhibitors in TNBC. PMID:27648353

  1. Monoclonal antibody 6E4 against human GAPDHS protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dorosh, Andriy

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 3 (2011), s. 321-321 ISSN 1554-0014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Monoclonal antibody * GAPDHS Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.417, year: 2011

  2. Monoclonal antibody against human ovarian tumor-associated antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poels, L.G.; Peters, D.; van Megen, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies (OV-TL 3) were raised against human ovarian tumor-associated antigens for diagnostic purposes. A cloned hybridoma cell line was obtained by fusion of murine myeloma cells with spleen lymphocytes from BALB/c mice immunized with a tumor cell suspension prepared from an ovarian endometrioid carcinoma. The antibodies were initially screened for their ability to bind on frozen sections of human ovarian carcinoma tissue and a negative reaction on gastric carcinoma tissue by indirect immunofluorescence. The reactivity of the selected OV-TL 3 clone (IgG1 subclass) was studied on normal and neoplastic tissues as well as on a cell line derived from the original tumor cell suspension used for immunization. OV-TL 3 antibodies stained frozen sections of human ovarian carcinomas of the following histological types: serous, mucinous, endometrioid, and clear cell. No reaction was found with breast cancers or other nongynecological tumors. No differences in staining pattern were observed between primary and metastatic ovarian carcinomas. OV-TL 3 antibodies brightly stained ovarian carcinoma cell clusters in ascitic fluids and left unstained mesothelial cells and peripheral blood cells. The OV-TL 3-defined antigen also remained strongly expressed on a cell line derived from the endometrioid ovarian carcinoma originally used for generation of OV-TL 3 clone. Reactivity was weak and irregular in a few ovarian cysts, while traces of fluorescence were sometimes detected in epithelial cells lining the female genital tract. In only 3 specimens of 15 endometrium carcinomas was weak focal reactivity with OV-TL 3 antibodies observed. The results of the immunofluorescence study were confirmed by the more sensitive avidin-biotin method and by 125 I-labeled OV-TL 3 antibodies

  3. Specific MR imaging of human-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibody-guided dextran-magnetite particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulte, J. W. M.; Hoekstra, Y; Kamman, R. L.; Magin, R. L.; Webb, A. G.; Briggs, R. W.; Go, K. G.; Hulstaert, C. E.; Miltenyi, S.; The, T. Hauw; de Leij, L

    Human lymphocytes were labeled with biotinylated anti-lymphocyte-directed monoclonal antibodies, to which streptavidin and subsequently biotinylated dextran-magnetite particles were coupled. This labeling resulted in a strong and selective negative contrast enhancement of lymphocyte suspensions at

  4. Human monoclonal antibody as prophylaxis for SARS coronavirus infection in ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Meulen, Jan; Bakker, Alexander B. H.; van den Brink, Edward N.; Weverling, Gerrit J.; Martina, Byron E. E.; Haagmans, Bart L.; Kuiken, Thijs; de Kruif, John; Preiser, Wolfgang; Spaan, Willy; Gelderblom, Hans R.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2004-01-01

    SARS coronavirus continues to cause sporadic cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in China. No active or passive immunoprophylaxis for disease induced by SARS coronavirus is available. We investigated prophylaxis of SARS coronavirus infection with a neutralising human monoclonal

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Rudolph C.; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immunoextract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  6. Belimumab: anti-BLyS human monoclonal antibody, anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody, BmAb, human monoclonal antibody to B-lymphocyte stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Belimumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of B-lymphocyte stimulator, or BLyS. Belimumab is in phase III trials for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and has completed a phase II trial in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); the product may also have potential in the treatment of other autoimmune disorders. In May 2001, Cambridge Antibody Technology (now MedImmune) completed its discovery programme and Human Genome Sciences identified belimumab as a candidate for clinical development. More than 1000 distinct human antibodies specific to BLyS were characterized by the collaboration.B-lymphocyte stimulator is a naturally occurring protein discovered by Human Genome Sciences that stimulates B-lymphocytes to develop into mature B cells. Laboratory studies have indicated that higher than normal levels of B-lymphocyte stimulator may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, such as SLE and RA. Human Genome Sciences (HGS) and Cambridge Antibody Technology signed a collaborative agreement in August 1999 to study the B-lymphocyte stimulator as a human protein target. HGS is also developing other BLyS products. In March 2000, HGS and Cambridge Antibody Technology expanded their agreement into a 10-year collaboration and product development alliance, providing Human Genome Sciences with the right to use the antibody technology of Cambridge Antibody Technology to fully develop human antibodies for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. Cambridge Antibody Technology will receive royalty payments on product sales from HGS, as well as the development and milestone payments it has already received. Belimumab will be manufactured in Human Genome Sciences' manufacturing facility, located in Rockville, MD, USA. HGS holds commercial rights to the drug. In July 2005, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) exercised its co-development and co-promotion option to belimumab. In an agreement made in June 1996, HGS had

  7. Radioimmunodetection of human tumors with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douillard, J.Y.; Chatal, J.F.; Vignoud, J.; Fumoleau, P.; Le Mevel, B.P.; Saccavini, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    The present study reports the use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies prospectively as a diagnostic method in order to localize tumor sites in patients with a suspicion of recurrence or metastasis based on isolated elevation of serum tumor markers. Results of immunoscintigraphy are compared to data obtained with more conventional investigations including essentially ultra sonography and CT scan. (Auth.)

  8. Direct labeling of anti β-human chorionic gonadotropin monoclonal antibody with 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yan; An Ruifang; Yu Mingqi; Wang Shu; Xie Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective To label the anti-β-human chorionic gonadotropin monoclonal antibody with 99m Tc. Methods: It was direct labeled using SnCl 2 as a reduction agent. Results: The labeling procedure was finished within 1.5 hours. The labeling efficiency of the labeled anti-β-human chorionic gonadotropin monoclonal antibody was 88.1%-97.5%, 99m Tc colloidal was 0.96%-1.27%, 99m TcO 4 - was 1.1%-9.92%. And it retained its specific biological activation. Conclusion: This direct method is simple, rapid and stable, and it hope to be used as radioimmunodiagnosis for gestational trophoblastic tumour. (authors)

  9. Production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies against native and disassembled human catalase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiemer, E. A.; Ofman, R.; Middelkoop, E.; de Boer, M.; Wanders, R. J.; Tager, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Catalase isolated from human erythrocytes was used to immunise mice, in order to generate hybridomas producing specific monoclonal antibodies to the enzyme. Hybridomas secreting anti-(catalase) antibodies were identified by a modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using either

  10. 77 FR 5036 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ...-02], Australian patent application AU 2009228361 entitled ''Human Monoclonal Antibody Against... exclusive evaluation option license is being considered under the small business initiative launched on 1... the extent permitted by law, will not be released under the Freedom of Information Act, 5 U.S.C. 552...

  11. A human monoclonal antibody cocktail as a novel component of rabies postexposure prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kruif, John; Bakker, Alexander B. H.; Marissen, Wilfred E.; Kramer, R. Arjen; Throsby, Mark; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2007-01-01

    The currently recommended treatment for individuals exposed to rabies virus is the combined administration of rabies vaccine and rabies immune globulin (RIG). This review sets out the criteria used to guide development of a cocktail of human monoclonal antibodies as a replacement for RIG. Using this

  12. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-01-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of 3 H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes

  13. Monoclonal antibodies to antigens on human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemia blast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miterev, G.Yu.; Burova, G.F.; Puzhitskaya, M.S.; Danilevich, S.V.; Bulycheva, T.I.

    1987-11-01

    The authors describe the production of two mouse hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies to antigenic determinants of the surface membranes of human neutrophils, activated T lymphocytes, and acute leukemic blast cells. The degree of lymphocyte stimulation was estimated from incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine with parallel microculture. Monoclonal antibodies of supernatants of hybridoma cultures shown here reacted in both immunofluorescence test and cytotoxicity test with surface membrane antigens on the majority of neutrophils and PHA-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy subjects, but did not give positive reactions with unactivated lymphocytes, adherent monocytes, erythrocytes, and alloantigen-stimulated lymphocytes.

  14. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases

  15. Elastolytic activity of human blood monocytes characterized by a new monoclonal antibody against human leucocyte elastase. Relationship to rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H S; Christensen, L D

    1990-01-01

    The leucocyte elastase of human blood monocytes was investigated by applying a new monoclonal antibody which did not block the enzyme activity against elastin. In a fixed population of mononuclear cells (MNC) and using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), the human leucocyte elastase (HLE...

  16. Quantum-Dot-Based Theranostic Micelles Conjugated with an Anti-EGFR Nanobody for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuyuan; Wang, Yidan; Chen, Guojun; Li, Yitong; Xu, Wei; Gong, Shaoqin

    2017-09-13

    A quantum-dot (QD)-based micelle conjugated with an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobody (Nb) and loaded with an anticancer drug, aminoflavone (AF), has been engineered for EGFR-overexpressing cancer theranostics. The near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence of the indium phosphate core/zinc sulfide shell QDs (InP/ZnS QDs) allowed for in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution studies. The anti-EGFR nanobody 7D12 conjugation improved the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of the QD-based micelles in EGFR-overexpressing MDA-MB-468 triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. In comparison with the AF-encapsulated nontargeted (i.e., without Nb conjugation) micelles, the AF-encapsulated Nb-conjugated (i.e., targeted) micelles accumulated in tumors at higher concentrations, leading to more effective tumor regression in an orthotopic triple-negative breast cancer xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, there was no systemic toxicity observed with the treatments. Thus, this QD-based Nb-conjugated micelle may serve as an effective theranostic nanoplatform for EGFR-overexpressing cancers such as TNBCs.

  17. Optimization ofRAS/BRAFMutational Analysis Confirms Improvement in Patient Selection for Clinical Benefit to Anti-EGFR Treatment in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cristina; Azuara, Daniel; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocio; Alfonso, Pilar Garcia; Carrato, Alfredo; Elez, Mª Elena; Gomez, Auxiliadora; Losa, Ferran; Montagut, Clara; Massuti, Bartomeu; Navarro, Valenti; Varela, Mar; Lopez-Doriga, Adriana; Moreno, Victor; Valladares, Manuel; Manzano, Jose Luis; Vieitez, Jose Maria; Aranda, Enrique; Sanjuan, Xavier; Tabernero, Josep; Capella, Gabriel; Salazar, Ramon

    2017-09-01

    In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), recent studies have shown the importance to accurately quantify low-abundance mutations of the RAS pathway because anti-EGFR therapy may depend on certain mutation thresholds. We aimed to evaluate the added predictive value of an extended RAS panel testing using two commercial assays and a highly sensitive and quantitative digital PCR (dPCR). Tumor samples from 583 mCRC patients treated with anti-EGFR- ( n = 255) or bevacizumab- ( n = 328) based therapies from several clinical trials and retrospective series from the TTD/RTICC Spanish network were analyzed by cobas, therascreen , and dPCR. We evaluated concordance between techniques using the Cohen kappa index. Response rate, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were correlated to the mutational status and the mutant allele fraction (MAF). Concordance between techniques was high when analyzing RAS and BRAF (Cohen kappa index around 0.75). We observed an inverse correlation between MAF and response in the anti-EGFR cohort ( P < 0.001). Likelihood ratio analysis showed that a fraction of 1% or higher of any mutated alleles offered the best predictive value. PFS and OS were significantly longer in RAS / BRAF wild-type patients, independently of the technique. However, the predictability of both PFS and OS were higher when we considered a threshold of 1% in the RAS scenario (HR = 1.53; CI 95%, 1.12-2.09 for PFS, and HR = 1.9; CI 95%, 1.33-2.72 for OS). Although the rate of mutations observed among techniques is different, RAS and BRAF mutational analysis improved prediction of response to anti-EGFR therapy. Additionally, dPCR with a threshold of 1% outperformed the other platforms. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(9); 1999-2007. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with multiple epitopes on the human insulin receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Soos, M A; Siddle, K; Baron, M D; Heward, J M; Luzio, J P; Bellatin, J; Lennox, E S

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies for the human insulin receptor were produced following immunization of mice with IM-9 lymphocytes and/or purified placental receptor. Four separate fusions yielded 28 antibodies, all of which reacted with receptor from human placenta, liver and IM-9 cells. Some antibodies cross-reacted to varying degrees with receptor from rabbit, cow, pig and sheep, but none reacted with rat receptor. At least 10 distinct epitopes were recognized as indicated by species specificity and ...

  19. A new horizon in the treatment of head and neck cancer. Anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies as novel options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Makoto; Fujii, Masato

    2012-01-01

    Cetuximab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody, has been shown to have greater survival benefits as an adjunct to radiotherapy for locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (LA-SCCHN) as well as a combination with platinum-based chemotherapy for recurrent/metastatic SCCHN (R/M-SCCHN). Based on this conclusive evidence from phase II/III studies, its use for these indications has been approved in many countries and is recommended by the NCCN guideline 2012. Several other drugs in the same class, including panitumumab and nimotuzumab, are now under development for the treatment of SCCHN. Anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies are known to cause adverse reactions typically associated with EGFR blockade, against which effective countermeasures have been developed. How to identify likely responders and how to overcome resistance to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies are two important challenges for the future. (author)

  20. Anti-EGFR-iRGD recombinant protein conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticles for enhanced tumor targeting and antitumor efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bian X

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Xinyu Bian,* Puyuan Wu,* Huizi Sha, Hanqing Qian, Qing Wang, Lei Cheng, Yang Yang, Mi Yang, Baorui LiuComprehensive Cancer Center of Drum-Tower Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Clinical Cancer Institute of Nanjing University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: In this study, we report a novel kind of targeting with paclitaxel (PTX-loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles conjugated with iRGD–EGFR nanobody recombinant protein (anti-EGFR-iRGD. The new nanoparticles (called A-PTX-SF-NPs were prepared using the carbodiimide-mediated coupling procedure and their characteristics were evaluated. The cellular cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of A-PTX-SF-NPs were also investigated. The results in vivo suggested that NPs conjugated with the recombinant protein exhibited more targeting and anti-neoplastic property in cells with high EGFR expression. In the in vivo antitumor efficacy assay, the A-PTX-SF-NPs group showed slower tumor growth and smaller tumor volumes than PTX-SF-NPs in a HeLa xenograft mouse model. A real-time near-infrared fluorescence imaging study showed that A-PTX-SF-NPs could target the tumor more effectively. These results suggest that the anticancer activity and tumor targeting of A-PTX-SF-NPs were superior to those of PTX-SF-NPs and may have the potential to be used for targeted delivery for tumor therapies. Keywords: EGFR, nanobody, iRGD, recombinant protein, targeting drug carriers, antitumor efficiency

  1. Monoclonal antibodies to human mammary tumor-associated antigens and their use for radiolocalization of xenografts in athymic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colcher, D.; Schlom, J.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have utilized membrane-enriched extracts of human metastatic mammary tumor cells as immunogens to generate and characterize monoclonal antibodies reactive with determinants that would be maintained on metastatic, as well as primary, human mammary carcinoma cells. Multiple assays using tumor cells extracts, tissue sections, and live cells in culture have been employed to reveal the diversity of the monoclonal antibodies generated. Then the utility of these antibodies for radiolocalization studies was examined. (Auth.)

  2. Human Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody Inhibition of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Replication in the Common Marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhe; Bao, Linlin; Chen, Cong; Zou, Tingting; Xue, Ying; Li, Fengdi; Lv, Qi; Gu, Songzhi; Gao, Xiaopan; Cui, Sheng; Wang, Jianmin; Qin, Chuan; Jin, Qi

    2017-06-15

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infection in humans is highly lethal, with a fatality rate of 35%. New prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to combat human infections are urgently needed. We isolated a fully human neutralizing antibody, MCA1, from a human survivor. The antibody recognizes the receptor-binding domain of MERS-CoV S glycoprotein and interferes with the interaction between viral S and the human cellular receptor human dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4). To our knowledge, this study is the first to report a human neutralizing monoclonal antibody that completely inhibits MERS-CoV replication in common marmosets. Monotherapy with MCA1 represents a potential alternative treatment for human infections with MERS-CoV worthy of evaluation in clinical settings. © Crown copyright 2017.

  3. Reactivity of eleven anti-human leucocyte monoclonal antibodies with lymphocytes from several domestic animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete; Larsen, Else Bang

    1988-01-01

    Nine commercially available monoclonal antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies from The American Type Culture Collection, raised against various human leucocyte surface antigens, were tested on lymphocytes from cow, sheep, goat, swine, horse, cat, dog, mink, and rabbit as well as man. Four...... antibodies bound to lymphocytes from some of the animals. These were the antibodies against CD8 and CD4 antigen, the antibody to C3b-receptor, and the antibody to the HLA-DR antigen. The CD8 antigen-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink, cat, dog, and sheep, while the CD4 antigen......-reactive antibody reacted with lymphocytes from mink. The anti-C3b-R antibody reacted with lymphocytes from horse, swine, dog, and cat, and the anti-HLA-DR reacted with lymphocytes from cow, goat, sheep, horse, dog, cat, and mink....

  4. EGFR targeting monoclonal antibody combines with an mTOR inhibitor and potentiates tumor inhibition by acting on complementary signaling hubs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Roshan; Vishwakarma, Siddharth; Chivukula, Indira V; Basavaraj, Chetana; Melarkode, Ramakrishnan; Montero, Enrique; Nair, Pradip

    2012-01-01

    Nimotuzumab, an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) monoclonal antibody, has been used extensively in many solid tumors and confers significant survival advantage. The antibody has limited skin toxicity and is generally well tolerated. Similar to other anti-EGFR therapies, patients may relapse a few months after treatment. In this study we show for the first time, the use of Nimotuzumab along with Sirolimus has synergistic effect on tumor inhibition as compared with the drugs used individually, in Nimotuzumab responsive and nonresponsive cell lines. In vitro studies prove that while Sirolimus (25 nmol/L) affects the signal downstream to mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), Nimotuzumab (83 nmol/L) downregulates pTYR, pMAPK and pSTAT3 by 40%, 20% and 30%, respectively. The combination, targeting these two different signaling hubs, may be associated with the synergistic inhibition observed. In vivo, the use of half human therapeutic equivalent doses for both the drugs substantially reduces tumors established in nude as well as severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice by EGFR overexpressing A-431 cells. The drug combination reduces cell proliferation and the expression of signal transduction molecules. Treated tumors are better differentiated as compared with those established in the control mice. Tumor microarray demonstrates that Nimotuzumab and the combination groups segregate independently to the Sirolimus and the control treatment. The combination uniquely downregulated 55% of the altered tumor genes, extending beyond the typical pathways associated with Nimotuzumab and Sirolimus downstream pathways inhibition. These results would suggest that this nontoxic drug combination improves therapeutic benefit even in patients with low-EGFR expression and severely immunocompromised because of their current medication

  5. Clearance of 131I-labeled murine monoclonal antibody from patients' blood by intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.S.; Sivolapenko, G.B.; Hird, V.; Davies, K.A.; Walport, M.; Ritter, M.A.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    Five patients treated with intraperitoneal 131I-labeled mouse monoclonal antibody for ovarian cancer also received i.v. exogenous polyclonal human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. The pharmacokinetics of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in these patients were compared with those of 28 other patients receiving i.p.-radiolabeled monoclonal antibody for the first time without exogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin, and who had no preexisting endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Patients receiving i.v. human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody demonstrated a rapid clearance of 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody from their circulation. The (mean) maximum 131I blood content was 11.4% of the injected activity in patients receiving human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody compared to 23.3% in patients not given human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody. Intravenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody decreased the radiation dose to bone marrow (from 131I-labeled monoclonal antibody in the vascular compartment) 4-fold. Following the injection of human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody, 131I-monoclonal/human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody immune complexes were rapidly transported to the liver. Antibody dehalogenation in the liver was rapid, with 87% of the injected 131I excreted in 5 days. Despite the efficient hepatic uptake of immune complexes, dehalogenation of monoclonal antibody was so rapid that the radiation dose to liver parenchyma from circulating 131I was decreased 4-fold rather than increased. All patients developed endogenous human anti-murine immunoglobulin antibody 2 to 3 weeks after treatment

  6. Production and Characterization of a Murine Monoclonal Antibody Against Human Ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Yeganeh, Omid; Ghods, Roya; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ardekani, Reza Bahjati; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Haghighat-Noutash, Farzaneh; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    Background Ferritin is an iron storage protein, which plays a key role in iron metabolism. Measurement of ferritin level in serum is one of the most useful indicators of iron status and also a sensitive measurement of iron deficiency. Monoclonal antibodies may be useful as a tool in various aspects of ferritin investigations. In this paper, the production of a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human ferritin was reported. Methods Balb/c mice were immunized with purified human ferritin and splenocytes of hyper immunized mice were fused with Sp2/0 myeloma cells. After four times of cloning by limiting dilution, a positive hybridoma (clone: 2F9-C9) was selected by ELISA using human ferritin. Anti-ferritin mAb was purified from culture supernatants by affinity chromatography. Results Determination of the antibody affinity for ferritin by ELISA revealed a relatively high affinity (2.34×109 M -1) and the isotype was determined to be IgG2a. The anti-ferritin mAb 2F9-C9 reacted with 79.4% of Hela cells in flow cytometry. The antibody detected a band of 20 kDa in K562 cells, murine and human liver lysates, purified ferritin in Western blot and also ferritin in human serum. Conclusion This mAb can specifically recognize ferritin and may serve as a component of ferritin diagnostic kit if other requirements of the kit are met. PMID:24285995

  7. Development of broad-spectrum human monoclonal antibodies for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedictis, P. de; Minola, A.; Rota, E.; Aiello, R.; Zecchin, B.; Salomoni, A.; Foglierini, M.; Agatic, G.; Vanzetta, F.; Lavenir, R.; Lepelletier, A.; Bentley, E.; Weiss, R.; Cattoli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Currently available rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for use in humans includes equine or human rabies immunoglobulins (RIG). The replacement of RIG with an equally or more potent and safer product is strongly encouraged due to the high costs and limited availability of existing RIG. In this study, we identified two broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies that represent a valid and affordable alternative to RIG in rabies PEP. Memory B cells from four selected vaccinated donors were immortalized and monoclonal antibodies were tested for neutralizing activity and epitope specificity. Two antibodies, identified as RVC20 and RVC58 (binding to antigenic site I and III, respectively), were selected for their potency and broad-spectrum reactivity. In vitro, RVC20 and RVC58 were able to neutralize all 35 rabies virus (RABV) and 25 non-RABV lyssaviruses. They showed higher potency and breath compared to antibodies under clinical development (namely CR57, CR4098, and RAB1) and commercially available human RIG. In vivo, the RVC20–RVC58 cocktail protected Syrian hamsters from a lethal RABV challenge and did not affect the endogenous hamster post-vaccination antibody response. (author)

  8. Characterization of human sperm protein recognized by monoclonal antibody HS-8

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margaryan, Hasmik; Čapková, Jana; Pěknicová, Jana

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 67, Issue Supplement s1 (2012), s. 27-28 ISSN 1046-7408. [13th International Symposium for Immunology of reproduction "From the roots to the tops of Reproductive Immunology". 22.06.2012-24.06.2012, Varna] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA523/09/1793; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : monoclonal antibody * GAPDHS * human sperm proteins * mass spectrometry Subject RIV: EC - Immunology

  9. The predictive value of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN for anti-EGFR treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, Christina; Bergmann, Troels K; Henrichsen-Schnack, Tine

    2014-01-01

    -RAF-MAPK and PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathways in colorectal cancer is uncertain, which led us to systematically review the impact of alterations in KRAS (outside of exon 2), NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and PTEN in relation to the clinical benefit from anti-EGFR treatment. METHODS: In total, 22 studies that include 2395 patients...... formed the basis for a meta-analysis on alterations in KRAS exons 3 and 4, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA and PTEN and outcome of anti-EGFR treatment. Odds ratios for objective response rate (ORR) and hazard ratios (HR) for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated. RESULTS......: Mutations in KRAS exons 3 and 4, BRAF, PIK3CA and non-functional PTEN (mutations or loss of protein expression) significantly predicted poor ORR (OR = 0.26, OR = 0.29, OR = 0.39, and OR = 0.41, respectively). Significantly shorter PFS applied to mutations in KRAS exons 3 and 4 (HR = 2.19), NRAS (HR = 2...

  10. [Anti-EGFR Antibody Combination Chemotherapy Was Effective against Locally Advanced Ascending Colon Cancer as Well as a Recurrent Lesion - A Case Report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasufumi; Yokomizo, Hajime; Yano, Yuki; Okayama, Sachiyo; Satake, Masaya; Ida, Arika; Usui, Takebumi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Shiozawa, Shunichi; Yoshimatsu, Kazuhiko; Shimakawa, Takeshi; Katsube, Takao; Naritaka, Yoshihiko; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-01

    Here we report a case in which a locally advanced ascending colon cancer was successfully treated with anti-EGFR immunotherapy combined with chemotherapy and curative resection, and recurrent cancer was treated with the same chemotherapy. A 71-year-old man was diagnosed with ascending colon cancer in our department. No distant metastasis was observed, but curative resection was considered impossible because of extensive local cancer invasion. Because a genetic analysis revealed the presence of the wild-type KRAS gene, 6 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus cetuximab were administered. A cPR was obtained and curative resection was performed. The final diagnosis was ypT3N1M0, ypStage III a colon cancer, and chemotherapy improved the cancer stage to Grade 1b. Six courses of FOLFOX6 were then administered, followed by observation. After 2 years 6 months, a tumor of approximately 5 cm in size was noted in the right buttock using surveillance CT and was diagnosed as recurrent colon cancer. We considered further curative resection difficult and therefore 6 courses of mFOLFOX6 plus panitumumab were administered, a cPR was obtained, and right hip tumor extirpation surgery was performed. These results suggest that chemotherapy combined with anti-EGFR antibody immunotherapy is effective in treating recurrent colon cancer.

  11. Tumor-targeted Nanobullets: Anti-EGFR nanobody-liposomes loaded with anti-IGF-1R kinase inhibitor for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meel, Roy; Oliveira, Sabrina; Altintas, Isil; Haselberg, Rob; van der Veeken, Joris; Roovers, Rob C; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Kok, Robbert J

    2012-04-30

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target for anti-cancer therapy and several EGFR inhibitors are used in the clinic. Over the years, an increasing number of studies have reported on the crosstalk between EGFR and other receptors that can contribute to accelerated cancer development or even acquisition of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies. Combined targeting of EGFR and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a rational strategy to potentiate anti-cancer treatment and possibly retard resistance development. In the present study, we have pursued this by encapsulating the kinase inhibitor AG538 in anti-EGFR nanobody-liposomes. The thus developed dual-active nanobody-liposomes associated with EGFR-(over)expressing cells in an EGFR-specific manner and blocked both EGFR and IGF-1R activation, due to the presence of the EGFR-blocking nanobody EGa1 and the anti-IGF-1R kinase inhibitor AG538 respectively. AG538-loaded nanobody-liposomes induced a strong inhibition of tumor cell proliferation even upon short-term exposure followed by a drug-free wash-out period. Therefore, AG538-loaded nanobody-liposomes are a promising anti-cancer formulation due to efficient intracellular delivery of AG538 in combination with antagonistic and downregulating properties of the EGa1 nanobody-liposomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Prophylactic and therapeutic activity of fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against Influenza A M2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwerder Myriam

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza virus infection is a prevalent disease in humans. Antibodies against hemagglutinin have been shown to prevent infection and hence hemagglutinin is the major constituent of current vaccines. Antibodies directed against the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 have also been shown to mediate protection against Influenza A infection in various animal models. Active vaccination is generally considered the best approach to combat viral diseases. However, passive immunization is an attractive alternative, particularly in acutely exposed or immune compromized individuals, young children and the elderly. We recently described a novel method for the rapid isolation of natural human antibodies by mammalian cell display. Here we used this approach to isolate human monoclonal antibodies directed against the highly conserved extracellular domain of the Influenza A M2 protein. The identified antibodies bound M2 peptide with high affinities, recognized native cell-surface expressed M2 and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, therapeutic treatment up to 2 days after infection was effective, suggesting that M2-specific monoclonals have a great potential as immunotherapeutic agents against Influenza infection.

  13. Human immune response to anti-carcinoembryonic antigen murine monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losman, M J; DeJager, R L; Monestier, M; Sharkey, R M; Goldenberg, D M

    1990-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that patients with carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA]-producing neoplastic tumors, treated with murine monoclonal antibody to CEA, produced antibodies directed against the constant regions [human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA)] and the idiotypes [anti-Id] of these murine immunoglobulins. In this study, we describe a method for analyzing the presence of such antibodies in the sera of these patients. The HAMAs were measured by enzyme immunoassay and removed by immunoadsorption on Affi-Gel mouse IgG. The unabsorbed fraction contained the anti-Id antibodies; their presence was demonstrated by binding to the CEA monoclonal antibody (Ab1). The specificity of the binding was assessed by preincubating the sera with Ab1 and measuring the residual nonspecific binding. When specific binding was detected, the anti-Id antibodies were isolated by adsorption and elution on Affi-Gel Ab1. The anti-Id antibodies were fixed on enzyme immunoassay plates and incubated with a panel of mouse anti-human immunoglobulin to determine their isotypes. In a first series of 24 patients, HAMAs were found in 20 cases and anti-Id antibodies in 19 cases. The isolation of a specific IgG to Ab1 was achieved in 2 cases. In an ongoing series, the HAMA and anti-Id antibodies were detected in all five patients given injections of another monoclonal antibody to CEA. In two patients an IgG1 kappa anti-Id was isolated from the serum. The potential therapeutic effect of these antibodies is under investigation.

  14. Potent Human Monoclonal Antibodies against SARS CoV, Nipah and Hendra Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Zhongyu, Zhu; Xiao, Xiaodong; Biragyn, Arya; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Broder, Christopher C.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2009-01-01

    Polyclonal antibodies have a century-old history of being effective against some viruses; recently, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have also shown success. The humanized mAb Synagis (palivizumab) remains still the only mAb against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Recently, several potent human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) targeting the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Associated coronavirus (SARS CoV) S glycoproteins were developed quickly after the virus was identified in 2003. Among these antibodies, m396 and S230.15 exhibit exceptional potency and cross-reactivity as they neutralize isolates from the first and second outbreaks and from palm civets both in vitroand in mice. Similarly, the first fully hmAbs against two other paramyxoviruses, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV), which can cause up to 75% mortality, were recently developed; one of them, m102.4, shows exceptional cross-reactive potency against both NiV and HeV. Three-dimensional molecular structures of envelope glycoproteins from these viruses in complexes with antibodies and/or receptors were recently determined. Structural analyses along with other experiments have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of receptor recognition and antibody neutralization, and suggested that these antibodies alone or in combination could successfully fight the viruses’ heterogeneity and mutability which is a major problem in the development of effective therapeutic agents against viruses, including therapeutic antibodies. PMID:19216624

  15. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: Fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, W.E.; Kramer, R.A.; Rice, A.; Weldon, W.C.; Niezgoda, M.; Faber, M.; Slootstra, J.W.; Meloen, R.H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, M.; Visser, T.J.; Jongeneelen, M.; Thijsse, S.; Throsby, M.; Kruif, de J.; Rupprecht, C.E.; Dietzschold, B.; Goudsmit, J.; Bakker, A.B.H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We

  16. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, Wilfred E.; Kramer, R. Arjen; Rice, Amy; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Milosz; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Meloen, Rob H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; Visser, Therese J.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Thijsse, Sandra; Throsby, Mark; de Kruif, John; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Goudsmit, Jaap; Bakker, Alexander B. H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We

  17. The preparation, characterization, and application of environment-friendly monoclonal antibodies for human blood cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chenjie; Gao, Xuechao; He, Shixiang; Gao, Xiaoling; Zhuang, Jialin; Huang, Lirong; Guo, Hengchang

    2017-03-01

    Monoclonal anti-human blood group A (51A8) and B (63B6) antibody reagents were prepared using the serum-free technique. The aims of this research were to characterize the serum-free reagents and prove their reliabilities in routine use. Experiments including antigen-antibody agglutination testing, stability testing, SDS-PAGE, protein and IgM quantification, flow cytometry, and variable domain sequencing were performed to characterize the anti-A (51A8) and anti-B (63B6) reagents. Over 12 000 samples were tested using these reagents as routine blood grouping reagents. Serum-free anti-A (51A8) and anti-B (63B6) reagents were stable in longitudinal and accelerated testing, and their high purity was shown in SDS-PAGE and IgM quantification. These reagents have high specificity to red blood cells in serologic agglutination testing and flow cytometric analysis. A1 and A2 subgroup antigens can be distinguished clearly by patterns of flow cytometric histograms. No discrepancy was found in clinical trials of 12 000 samples. To reduce the risk of being affected by any animal additives, a serum-free culture system was applied to get mass-production of monoclonal anti-A/B antibodies. The high specificity and the high purity of the reagents were verified by the lab experiments. Lab research and clinical trial showed that serum-free monoclonal anti-A (51A8) and anti-B (63B6) reagents meet the requirements of routine blood grouping reagents. Moreover, these reagents featured ultra-high purity that is missing in other commercial counterparts, and therefore are recommended as more environment-friendly reagents.

  18. Monoclonal antibodies reacting with multiple epitopes on the human insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soos, M A; Siddle, K; Baron, M D; Heward, J M; Luzio, J P; Bellatin, J; Lennox, E S

    1986-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies for the human insulin receptor were produced following immunization of mice with IM-9 lymphocytes and/or purified placental receptor. Four separate fusions yielded 28 antibodies, all of which reacted with receptor from human placenta, liver and IM-9 cells. Some antibodies cross-reacted to varying degrees with receptor from rabbit, cow, pig and sheep, but none reacted with rat receptor. At least 10 distinct epitopes were recognized as indicated by species specificity and binding competition experiments. All of these epitopes appeared to be on extracellular domains of the receptor as shown by binding of antibodies to intact cells. In some cases the epitopes were further localized to alpha or beta subunits by immunoblotting. Several antibodies inhibited binding of 125I-insulin to the receptor, some had no effect on binding, and others enhanced the binding of 125I-insulin. It is concluded that these antibodies will be valuable probes of receptor structure and function.

  19. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xiao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  20. Solid phase inclusive immunoradiometric assay for human chorionic gonadotropin using monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrinda, P.C.; Paradkar, S.N.; Nagvekar, U.H.; Samuel, G.; Sivaprasad, N.

    2005-01-01

    A simple, one step, inclusive immunoradiometric assay for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) employing monoclonal antibodies is described. Commercially available monoclonal antibodies from various commercial sources were screened. Identified 'detection' antibody was radiolabeled with 125 I and the selected 'capture' antibody was chemically coupled to magnetizable cellulose to form a solid phase. In the procedure developed, standard/sample, radiolabeled antibody and capture antibody were incubated together for 3 hours at room temperature with shaking. After incubation, the bound complex was quantitated for the associated radioactivity. The analytical sensitivity observed was 1.0 mIU/ml with a wide concentration range up to 1000 mIU/ml of hCG. 'High dose hook' of the developed assay was observed beyond 2000 mIU/ml. Results showed that the developed assay had a good precision: intra-assay CV less than 8%, inter-assay CV less than 10% and good analytical recovery of 97-109%. The clinical samples analyzed by the developed procedure showed a good correlation with that of the commercial kit (r = 0.92; y = 0.99x+0.51). (author)

  1. Evaluation of tumor targeting with radiolabeled F(ab2 fragment of a humanized monoclonal antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Babaei MH

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Humanized monoclonal antibody U36 and its F(ab'2 fragment, radio labeled with 125I, were tested for tumor localization in nude mice bearing a squamous cell carcinoma xenograft line derived from a head and neck carcinoma. Monoclonal antibody IgG or F(ab'2 fragment were injected in parallel and at days 1, 2 and 3, mice were dissected for determination of isotope biodistribution. IgG as well as F(ab'2 showed highly specific localization in tumor tissue. The mean tumor uptake (n=3 is expressed as the percentage of the injected dose per gram of tumor tissue (%ID/g. %ID/g of IgG was 11.7% at day 1 and decreased to 10.9% at day 3 whereas %ID/g of F(ab'2 was 2.9% at day 1 and decreased on following days. Tumor to blood ratios (T/B at day 1 were 0.86 for IgG and 1.32 for F(ab'2 and reached a maximum at day 3 with values of 4.41 and 1.84 respectively. These findings suggest that the superior tumor to non-tumor ratios in the day of 1 render the F(ab'2 fragment more qualified for specific targeting radioisotopes to tumor xenografts in this exprimental setting.

  2. Characterisation of monoclonal antibodies for human luteinising hormone, and mapping of antigenic determinants on the hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soos, M.; Siddle, K.

    1983-01-01

    Twelve mouse monoclonal antibodies for human luteinising hormone were produced. The affinities varied from 4 X 10 7 to 1 X 10 10 l/mol. The specificity of each antibody was assessed by determining the relative reactivities with luteinising hormone, thyroid stimulating hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and chorionic gonadotrophin. Six antibodies bound to the α-subunit as shown by similar reactivity with all hormones, and the remainder to the β-subunit as shown by specificity for luteinising hormone. This latter group of antibodies cross-reacted only weakly with thyroid stimulating hormone (approximately 10%) and follicle stimulating hormone (approximately 3%). Three of these antibodies also showed low reactivity towards chorionic gonadotrophin (<10%), though the others did not (80-300%). The ability of different antibodies to bind simultaneously to luteinising hormone was examined and it was shown that several distinct antigenic determinants existed on both subunits. The characterisation of monoclonal binding sites is discussed in relation to the use of antibodies in two-site immunoradiometric assays. (Auth.)

  3. Development of novel mouse hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies specific to human and mouse nucleolar protein SURF-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzikov, Mikhail A; Kordyukova, Maria Yu; Zavalishina, Larisa E; Magoulas, Charalambos; Zatsepina, Olga V

    2012-02-01

    SURF-6 is an evolutionarily conserved nucleolar protein that is important for cell viability; however, its function in mammals still remains uncertain. The aim of this study is to generate monoclonal antibodies to human SURF-6 protein suitable for fundamental and biomedical research. The full-size human SURF-6 was expressed as a recombinant GST-fusion protein and used as an antigen to generate monoclonal antibodies, S79 and S148, specific for SURF-6. The monoclonal antibody produced by hybridoma clone S79 specifically recognizes endogenous SURF-6 by Western and immunofluorescence analyses in various cultured human cells, and by immunohistochemistry in paraffin-embedded sections of human breast cancer samples. Moreover, S79 immunoprecipitates protein complexes containing SURF-6 from HeLa cells extracts. The antibody S79 recognizes SURF-6 only in human cells; however, the antibody produced by hybridoma clone S148 can detect SURF-6 of human and mouse origin. Monoclonal antibodies to the nucleolar protein SURF-6 described in this work can be a useful tool for studies of ribosome biogenesis in normal and cancer cells.

  4. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against the Dimerization Domain of Human HER2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Human Epidermal Growth factor Receptor 2 (HER2, also known as ErbB2 is a 185 kDa protein belonging to the Human Epidermal Receptor (HER family of tyrosine kinase receptors overexpressed in 20% - 30% of patients with breast cancer. Similar to other members of the HER family, HER2 glycoprotein comprises of multiple domains including an extracellular ligand-binding domain, a single transmembrane domain and a cytoplasmic domain with tyrosine kinase activity. The extracellular domain of HER2 with 632 amino acids is composed of four subdomains (I - IV; subdomains I and III form a ligand binding site, and cysteine-rich subdomains II and IV play an important role in dimerization of the receptor. Objectives In this study we aimed to produce murine Monoclonal Antibodies (MAbs with the ability of specific recognition of the HER2 dimerization arm. Materials and Methods Primarily, BALB/c mice were immunized with a 30-aminoacid peptide as a part of the human HER2 subdomain II. Splenocytes from hyperimmunized mice were fused with myeloma cells (SP2/0, selected in hypoxanthine-aminopterin-thymidine (HAT medium, and screened by indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Secreted MAbs were characterized according to isotypes, reactions with the native HER2 in SKBR3 cells by western blotting, and in tissue sections from HER2 positive breast cancer specimens by Immunohistochemistry (IHC. Results Isotype of 1F1 clone was determined to be IgG1, which reacted with native protein in the western blot experiment and stained 20% of the membrane of neoplastic cells overexpressing HER2 with 3+ grade. However, 3L5 clone showed a low reaction (10% with native HER2 in immunohistochemistry. Conclusions The results of both western blotting and Immunohistochemistry showed that native HER2 can be detected with 1F1 monoclonal antibody.

  5. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N......- and O-linked carbohydrate epitopes (LeY, A1, and sialyl-Tn) were able to block infection by cell-free virus as well as inhibit syncytium formation. Inhibition of virus infectivity was independent of virus strain (HTLVIIIB or patient isolate SSI-002), the cell line used for virus propagation (H9 or MT4......), and the cell type used as the infection target (MT4, PMC, or selected T4 lymphocytes). Inhibition was observed when viruses were preincubated with MAbs but not when cells were preincubated with MAbs before inoculation, and the MAbs were shown to precipitate 125I-labeled gp120. The MAbs therefore define...

  6. Iodine 131 labeled GD2 monoclonal antibody in the diagnosis and therapy of human neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, N.K.V.; Miraldi, F.D.

    1988-01-01

    High dose marrow ablative therapy followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) has prolonged survival in patients with neuroblastoma. Total body and focal irradiation play an integral role in the overall treatment of this disease. The biological basis for radiation is the radiosensitivity and the lack of sublethal repair in neuroblastoma cells. However, radiation therapy has not by itself been adequate because of the usual widespread nature of neuroblastoma and the inability to achieve selective tumor versus normal tissue delivery, especially at multiple tumor sites. Monoclonal antibodies are agents selected for their specificity for human tumors. In vivo they have the ability of targeting selectively to occult metastases. This paper discusses how the availability of radioisotopes and the development of conjugation chemistries have greatly expanded the potentials of these antibodies

  7. Radioimmunoimaging using F(ab')2 fragment of monoclonal antibodies against human alpha-fetoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakahara, Harumi; Endo, Keigo; Nakashima, Tetsuo; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ohta, Hitoya; Torizuka, Kanji; Okada, Kenichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Nishi, Shinzo.

    1985-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies against human α-fetoprotein (AFP), radioiodinated F(ab') 2 fragments were compared with whole IgG as a radiotracer for radioimmunoimaging of cancer. F(ab') 2 fragments were obtained by pepsin digestion of whole IgG (IgGl). IgG and F(ab') 2 were labeled with 125 I or 131 I by the chloramine-T method with almost full retention of antibody activity. F(ab') 2 fragments were cleared more rapidly from the circulation in normal mice with a half life of 6.3 hours than whole IgG with a half life of 5.5 days. Radioactivity of F(ab') 2 in various organs also decreased faster than IgG. In nude mice transplanted with AFP-producing human testicular tumor, F(ab') 2 fragments demonstrated superior scintigrams to whole IgG at 2 days after the injection, because of the fast disappearance of background radioactivity. Although absolute accumulation of 131 I labeled F(ab') 2 in the tumor was less than that of 131 I labeled IgG, tumor to other organ ratios were much higher with F(ab') 2 than those of IgG. The tumor to blood ratio of 131 I labeled F(ab') 2 was 1.04 at day 2, whereas tumor to blood ratio of 131 I labeled IgG was 0.55 at day 2 and 0.92 at day 4, respectively. These results indicated that for the radiolabeling of monoclonal antibodies, F(ab') 2 fragments would be superior to whole IgG in the radioimmunoimaging of cancer. (author)

  8. First administration to humans of a monoclonal antibody cocktail against rabies virus: safety, tolerability, and neutralizing activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, A. B. H.; Python, C.; Kissling, C. J.; Pandya, P.; Marissen, W. E.; Brink, M. F.; Lagerwerf, F.; Worst, S.; van Corven, E.; Kostense, S.; Hartmann, K.; Weverling, G. J.; Uytdehaag, F.; Herzog, C.; Briggs, D. J.; Rupprecht, C. E.; Grimaldi, R.; Goudsmit, J.

    2008-01-01

    Immediate passive immune prophylaxis as part of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) often cannot be provided due to limited availability of human or equine rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG and ERIG, respectively). We report first clinical data from two phase I studies evaluating a monoclonal antibody

  9. A high-affinity human monoclonal IgM antibody reacting with multiple strains of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, SA; Birkelund, Svend; Borrebaeck, CA

    1990-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies were produced against Mycoplasma hominis by in vitro immunization of peripheral blood lymphocytes from a healthy seropositive donor using low amounts of antigen (5 ng/ml). The immune B lymphocytes were subsequently immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus transformation foll...

  10. Rheumatoid factor interference in immunogenicity assays for human monoclonal antibody therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarewicz, Suzanna; Miller, Jill M; Swanson, Steven J; Moxness, Michael S

    2010-05-31

    Rheumatoid factors (RFs) are endogenous human antibodies that bind to human gamma globulins. RFs demonstrate preferential binding to aggregated gamma globulins and are involved in the clearing mechanism of immune complexes. Immunoassays designed to measure human anti-human antibodies (HAHA) after administration of monoclonal antibody therapeutics are thus vulnerable to interference from RFs. When using a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) bridging immunoassay, samples from subjects with rheumatoid arthritis demonstrated much higher baseline reactivity than healthy subjects. Interference was found to be dependent on the aggregation state of the therapeutic antibody that had been conjugated with the detection reagent (ruthenium). Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) demonstrated that of the total integrated peaks, as little as 0.55% high molecular weight aggregates (>600kDa) were sufficient to cause increased reactivity. Stability studies of the ruthenium and biotin conjugated therapeutic antibody indicated that storage time, temperature and buffer formulation were critical in maintaining the integrity of the reagents. Through careful SE-HPLC monitoring we were able to choose appropriate storage and buffer conditions which led to a reduction in the false reactivity rate in therapeutic-naïve serum from a rheumatoid arthritis population.

  11. SYN023, a novel humanized monoclonal antibody cocktail, for post-exposure prophylaxis of rabies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Shiqi; Shen, Enyun; Moore, Susan; Zhang, Shou-feng; Chen, Li; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Tsao, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Rabies is a neglected zoonotic disease that is preventable in humans by appropriate post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). However, current PEP relies on polyclonal immune globulin products purified from pooled human (HRIG) or equine (ERIG) plasma that are either in chronic shortage or in association with safety concerns. Here, we present the development of an antibody cocktail, SYN023, made of two novel monoclonal antibodies (MAb) CTB011 and CTB012 that could serve as safer and more cost-effective alternatives to the current RIG products. Both CTB011 and CTB012 are humanized MAbs that bind to non-overlapping epitopes on the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) with sub-nanomolar affinities. Sequence analysis revealed that many of the critical residues in binding are highly conserved across different species of lyssaviruses. When combined at a 1:1 ratio, CTB011/CTB012 exhibited neutralization capabilities equivalent or superior to HRIG against 10 North American street RABV isolates in vitro and 15 prevalent Chinese RABV strains in animal models. Finally, SYN023, at a dosage of 0.03 mg/kg, was able to offer the same degree of protection as standard HRIG administration (20 IU/kg) in Syrian hamsters challenged with a highly virulent bat (Tadarida brasiliensis) RABV variant. Taken together, the high-potency and broad-spectrum neutralization demonstrated by SYN023 make it an effective candidate for human rabies PEP consideration. PMID:29261658

  12. Clinical usefulness of human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 for radioimmunoguided surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhito

    1999-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the clinical usefulness of radioimmunoguided surgery (RIGS) using the human-mouse chimeric Fab monoclonal antibody A7 (chA7Fab) for colorectal cancer patients. Whole murine monoclonal antibody A7 (whole A7) and chA7Fab were labelled with 125 I and 131 I, and their biodistributions were investigated experimentally and clinically. Radioactivities of the antibodies in the tissues were measured by a portable gamma detecting probe (GDP) purchased from Neoprobe Corp.. Of the four labelled antibodies used in a mouse model, 125 I-chA7Fab revealed the highest tumor/surrounding tissue ratio and all values were greater than 2.0. All tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 131 I-chA7Fab were greater than 1.5, but the values were lower than those of 125 I-chA7Fab. Due to the limited clinical use of 125 I in Japan, 131 I was used as a radio-tracer for chA7Fab in the clinical trial. RIGS using 131 I-chA7Fab was performed on ten colorectal cancer patients. Tumor localization was intraoperatively determined in four of ten patients using the GDP. Liver metastasis and lymph node metastasis were identified in two patients and one patient, respectively. The GDP revealed tumor/surrounding tissue ratios of 1.5 or greater in eight of the ten resected tumors. Although radioimmunoguided surgery using chA7Fab is a promising tool to intraoperatively determine the tumor localization of colorectal cancer, 125 I and not 131 I should be used as a tracer for radioimmunoguided surgery to increase the accuracy of chA7Fab. (author)

  13. Human cerebrospinal fluid monoclonal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor autoantibodies are sufficient for encephalitis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreye, Jakob; Wenke, Nina K; Chayka, Mariya; Leubner, Jonas; Murugan, Rajagopal; Maier, Nikolaus; Jurek, Betty; Ly, Lam-Thanh; Brandl, Doreen; Rost, Benjamin R; Stumpf, Alexander; Schulz, Paulina; Radbruch, Helena; Hauser, Anja E; Pache, Florence; Meisel, Andreas; Harms, Lutz; Paul, Friedemann; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Garner, Craig; Schmitz, Dietmar; Wardemann, Hedda; Prüss, Harald

    2016-10-01

    SEE ZEKERIDOU AND LENNON DOI101093/AWW213 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a recently discovered autoimmune syndrome associated with psychosis, dyskinesias, and seizures. Little is known about the cerebrospinal fluid autoantibody repertoire. Antibodies against the NR1 subunit of the NMDAR are thought to be pathogenic; however, direct proof is lacking as previous experiments could not distinguish the contribution of further anti-neuronal antibodies. Using single cell cloning of full-length immunoglobulin heavy and light chain genes, we generated a panel of recombinant monoclonal NR1 antibodies from cerebrospinal fluid memory B cells and antibody secreting cells of NMDAR encephalitis patients. Cells typically carried somatically mutated immunoglobulin genes and had undergone class-switching to immunoglobulin G, clonally expanded cells carried identical somatic hypermutation patterns. A fraction of NR1 antibodies were non-mutated, thus resembling 'naturally occurring antibodies' and indicating that tolerance induction against NMDAR was incomplete and somatic hypermutation not essential for functional antibodies. However, only a small percentage of cerebrospinal fluid-derived antibodies reacted against NR1. Instead, nearly all further antibodies bound specifically to diverse brain-expressed epitopes including neuronal surfaces, suggesting that a broad repertoire of antibody-secreting cells enrich in the central nervous system during encephalitis. Our functional data using primary hippocampal neurons indicate that human cerebrospinal fluid-derived monoclonal NR1 antibodies alone are sufficient to cause neuronal surface receptor downregulation and subsequent impairment of NMDAR-mediated currents, thus providing ultimate proof of antibody pathogenicity. The observed formation of immunological memory might be relevant for clinical relapses. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press on

  14. Immunohistochemical Examination of Novel Rat Monoclonal Antibodies against Mouse and Human Podoplanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaji, Chiaki; Tsujimoto, Yuta; Kato Kaneko, Mika; Kato, Yukinari; Sawa, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to develop new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse and human podoplanin. Rats were immunized with synthetic peptides, corresponding to amino acids 38–51 of mouse podoplanin or human podoplanin which is 100% homologous to the same site of monkey podoplanin; anti-mouse podoplanin mAb PMab-1 (IgG 2a ) and anti-human mAb NZ-1.2 (IgG 2a ) were established. In immunocytochemistry, the mouse melanoma B16-F10 and mouse podoplanin (mPDPN)-expressed CHO transfectant were stained by PMab-1; human lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) and human podoplanin (hPDPN)-expressed squamous cell carcinoma HSC3 transfectant, were stained by NZ-1.2. Western-blot analysis detected an about 40-kDa protein in CHO-mPDPN and B16-F10 by PMab-1, and in HSC3-hPDPN and LEC by NZ-1.2. In frozen sections, PMab-1 reacted with mouse kidney, pulmonary alveoli, pulmonary pleura, and salivary gland myoepithelial cells while NZ-1.2 reacted to the human salivary gland myoepithelial cells. The immunostaining of paraffin-embedded sections also showed the reaction of PMab-1 or NZ-1.2 to the mouse or monkey kidney glomerulus, pulmonary alveoli, and lung lymphatic vessels. These results indicate that the two novel rat mAbs to the mouse and human/monkey podoplanin are useful for Western-blot and immunostaining of somatic tissues on paraffin-embedded sections as well as frozen sections

  15. Breast cancer imaging with In-111 human IgM monoclonal antibodies: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, K P; Dillman, R O; DeNardo, S J; DeNardo, G L; Beauregard, J; Hagan, P L; Amox, D G; Clutter, M L; Burnett, K G; Rulot, C M

    1988-04-01

    Detection of specific tumor sites was studied with scintigraphy and radiolabeled human IgM monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). Ten patients with metastatic breast cancer received an infusion of one of three indium-111-labeled anti-breast carcinoma MoAbs. The time of infusion ranged from 30 minutes to 2 hours. Three patients received YBB-190 at total doses of 2, 4.25, or 11 mg, four patients received YBM-209 at total doses of 1 mg (n = 1) or 20 mg (n = 3), and three patients each received 22 mg of YBY-088. Imaging was performed immediately after infusion and at 4, 24, 48, 72, 120, and 144 hours. Many presumed sites of metastatic disease were imaged in three of the four patients who received 20 mg of YBM-209 and in two of the three patients who received YBY-088. Tumor was not detected in any of the patients who received YBB-190, in the patient who received a 1-mg dose of YBM-209, or in the patient who received YBY-088 and in whom a biopsy of tumor tissue failed to demonstrate target antigen. The authors conclude that In-111-labeled human IgM MoAbs can target human breast cancer, but antigen expression and antibody dose determine successful immunoscintigraphy.

  16. Human brain pyridoxal-5'-phosphate phosphatase: production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Won; Eum, Won Sik; Choi, Hee Soon; Kim, So Young; An, Jae Jin; Lee, Sun Hwa; Sohn, Eun Joung; Hwang, Seok-Il; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Won, Moo Ho; Cho, Sung-Woo; Lee, Kil Soo; Park, Jinseu; Choi, Soo Young

    2005-11-30

    We cloned and expressed human pyridoxal-5\\'-phosphate (PLP) phosphatase, the coenzymatically active form of vitamin B6, in Escherichia coli using pET15b vector. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were generated against purified human brain PLP phosphatase in mice, and four antibodies recognizing different epitopes were obtained, one of which inhibited PLP phosphatase. The binding affinities of these four mAbs to PLP phosphatase, as determined using biosensor technology, showed that they had similar binding affinities. Using the anti-PLP phosphatase antibodies as probes, we investigated their cross-reactivities in various mammalian and human tissues and cell lines. The immunoreactive bands obtained on Western blots had molecular masses of ca. 33 kDa. Similarly fractionated extracts of several mammalian cell lines all produced a single band of molecular mass 33 kDa. We believe that these PLP phosphatase mAbs could be used as valuable immunodiagnostic reagents for the detection, identification, and characterization of various neurological diseases related to vitamin B6 abnormalities.

  17. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Yunoki, Mikihiro [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kuhara, Motoki [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano 396-0002 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naomasa [Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ohu University, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan); Okuno, Yoshinobu [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa 768-0061 (Japan); Ikuta, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: ikuta@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  18. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki; Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji; Yunoki, Mikihiro; Kuhara, Motoki; Yamamoto, Naomasa; Okuno, Yoshinobu; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  19. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human CD34 Monoclonal Antibody in Ascetic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushan Sineh sepehr

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies or specific antibodies are now an essential tool of biomedical research and are of great commercial and medical value. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD34 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and purification of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Methods: For large scale production of monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD34 were injected into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. 5 ml ascitic fluid was harvested from each mouse in two times. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. The ascitic fluid was examined for class and subclasses by ELISA mouse mAb isotyping Kit. mAb was purified from ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography on Protein A-Sepharose. Purity of monoclonal antibody was monitored by SDS -PAGE and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD34 by hybridoma technology were prepared. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was kappa. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could be a useful tool for isolation, purification and characterization of human hematopoietic stem cells.

  20. Human anti-mouse antibody response induced by anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneff, G; Winkler, T; Kalden, J R; Emmrich, F; Burmester, G R

    1991-04-01

    The development of human anti-mouse monoclonal antibodies (HAMAs) was investigated in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who had undergone an experimental therapeutic trial with an anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody. In this patient group, the antibody 16H5 of the IgG1 isotype had been administered in a median total dosage of 140 mg per treatment cycle. Four patients took part in a second treatment regimen 6-8 weeks later. After the first treatment cycle, detectable HAMAs developed in 5 out of 10 patients. In 4 individuals undergoing a second course of therapy, increases of HAMAs were evident only in the 3 patients with previous HAMA responses. HAMAs were primarily of the IgG isotype, while the presence of rheumatoid factors usually interfered with the detectability of IgM HAMAs. However, using isolated F(ab)2 fragments of the monoclonal reagent used for therapy, HAMAs of the IgM isotype were also detectable. HAMAs of the IgG isotype did not exceed levels of 2.0 mg/liter after a single treatment cycle and 2.2 mg/liter after a repeated cycle. No IgE responses were detectable. Absorption experiments indicated that approximately 25% of the HAMA activity was directed against specific determinants of the 16H5 monoclonal antibody, presumably including anti-idiotypic reactivities. These data demonstrate that HAMAs developed only in a proportion of RA patients treated with the anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody 16H5. However, the amounts were rather low compared to other monoclonal reagents used in cancer patients and were therefore allowed for repeated applications without an apparent loss of efficacy.

  1. Development of human monoclonal antibodies against diseases caused by emerging and biodefense-related viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Dimitrov, Antony S; Chakraborti, Samitabh; Dimitrova, Dimana; Xiao, Xiaodong; Broder, Christopher C; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2006-02-01

    Polyclonal antibodies have a century-old history of being effective against some viruses; recently, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have also shown success. The humanized mAb Synagis (palivizumab), which is still the only mAb against a viral disease approved by the US FDA, has been widely used as a prophylactic measure against respiratory syncytial virus infections in neonates and immunocompromised individuals. The first fully human mAbs against two other paramyxoviruses, Hendra and Nipah virus, which can cause high (up to 75%) mortality, were recently developed; one of them, m101, showed exceptional potency against infectious virus. In an amazing pace of research, several potent human mAbs targeting the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus S glycoprotein that can affect infections in animal models have been developed months after the virus was identified in 2003. A potent humanized mAb with therapeutic potential was recently developed against the West Nile virus. The progress in developing neutralizing human mAbs against Ebola, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, vaccinia and other emerging and biodefense-related viruses is slow. A major problem in the development of effective therapeutic agents against viruses, including therapeutic antibodies, is the viruses' heterogeneity and mutability. A related problem is the low binding affinity of crossreactive antibodies able to neutralize a variety of primary isolates. Combinations of mAbs or mAbs with other drugs, and/or the identification of potent new mAbs and their derivatives that target highly conserved viral structures, which are critical for virus entry into cells, are some of the possible solutions to these problems, and will continue to be a major focus of antiviral research.

  2. LpMab-23: A Cancer-Specific Monoclonal Antibody Against Human Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shinji; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-04-01

    Human podoplanin (hPDPN), the ligand of C-type lectin-like receptor-2, is involved in cancer metastasis. Until now, many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been established against hPDPN. However, it is still difficult to develop a cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) against hPDPN because the protein sequence of hPDPN expressed in cancer cells is the same as that in normal cells. Herein, we report LpMab-23 of the mouse IgG 1 subclass, a novel CasMab against hPDPN. In an immunohistochemical analysis, LpMab-23 reacted with tumor cells of human oral cancer, but did not react with normal cells such as lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). In contrast, LpMab-17, another anti-hPDPN mAb, reacted with both tumor cells and LECs. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis revealed that LpMab-23 reacted with hPDPN-expressing cancer cell lines (LN319, RERF-LC-AI/hPDPN, Y-MESO-14/hPDPN, and HSC3/hPDPN) but showed little reaction with normal cells (LECs and HEK-293T), although another anti-hPDPN mAb, LpMab-7, reacted with both hPDPN-expressing cancer cells and normal cells, indicating that LpMab-23 is a CasMab against hPDPN.

  3. Strategies to Obtain Diverse and Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies From Transgenic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Marianne; Osborn, Michael J; Ma, Biao; Buelow, Roland

    2017-08-01

    Techniques to obtain large quantities of antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were first established in the 1970s when Georges Köhler and César Milstein immortalized antibody-producing mouse B-lymphocytes by fusion with myeloma cells (http://www.whatisbiotechnology.org/exhibitions/milstein). Combined with the expression of human antibodies in transgenic animals, this technique allowed upon immunization the generation of highly specific fully human mAbs for therapeutic applications. Apart from being extremely beneficial, mAbs are a huge success commercially. However, despite cell fusion generating many useful mAbs questions have been asked about which types of cells are prone to fuse and whether other methods may identify a wider range of binders. The discovery that expression libraries, using Escherichia coli or yeast, produced different specificities was intriguing and more recently Next-Generation Sequencing has identified wide-ranging usage with highly diverse and unique repertoires. Another strategy is the combination of flow cytometry sorting of antigen-binding B lymphocytes and single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by reexpression, which has identified many high-affinity mAbs.

  4. Purification of human seminal plasma no. 7 antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isojima, S; Koyama, K; Fujiwara, N

    1982-08-01

    Human seminal plasma (HSP) No. 7 antigen was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography on bound 1C4 monoclonal antibody (Moab) (Shigeta et al., 1980b). The pooled HSP protein was applied to a CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B column of bound 1C4 Moab gamma globulin and the antibody bound fraction (fr) eluted was further purified by rechromatography in the same way. The purified antigen in the antibody bound fr obtained by rechromatography gave a single band on SDS-PAGE in a position corresponding to a molecular weight of 15,000 daltons. This preparation was 196.2 times more effective than the original HSP protein in neutralizing the sperm immobilizing activity of 1C4 Moab. The purified HSP No. 7 antigen contained iron, but was different from lactoferrin and transferrin. It did not show any enzymatic activities, such as those of acid phosphatase, LDH or trypsin inhibitor, and shared antigenicity with human milk protein. It was present in seminal plasma as a molecule with a higher molecular weight but seemed to be cleaved to a monomer of 15,000 daltons during purification procedures. This antigen is present on spermatozoa as sperm-coating antigen and the corresponding antibody can immobilize spermatozoa with complement.

  5. Differences in human skin between the epidermal growth factor receptor distribution detected by EGF binding and monoclonal antibody recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, M R; Couchman, J R

    1985-01-01

    Two methods have been used to examine epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor distribution in human scalp and foreskin. The first employed [125I]EGF viable explants and autoradiography to determine the EGF binding pattern while the second used a monoclonal antibody to the human EGF receptor to map...... the distribution on frozen skin sections of an extracellular epitope on the EGF receptor. The [125I]EGF binding experiments showed accessible, unoccupied EGF receptors to be present on the epidermal basal cells (with reduced binding to spinous cells), the basal cells of the hair shaft and sebaceous gland......, the eccrine sweat glands, capillary system, and the hair follicle outer root sheath, generally similar in pattern to that previously reported for full-thickness rat skin and human epidermis. The same areas also bound EGF-R1 but in addition the monoclonal antibody recognized a cone of melanin containing...

  6. KIR Genes and their Ligands Predict the Response to Anti-2 EGFR Monoclonal Antibodies in Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Morales-Estevez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs regulate the killing function of NK cells, which play an important role in the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC response exerted by therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. However, it is unknown whether the extensive genetic variability of KIR genes and/or their HLA ligands might influence the response to these treatments. This study aimed to explore whether the variability in KIR/HLA genes may be associated to the variable response observed to mAbs-based anti-EGFR therapies. Thirty-nine patients treated with anti-EGFR mAbs (trastuzumab for advanced breast cancer, or cetuximab for advanced colorectal or advanced head and neck cancer, were included in the study. All the patients had progressed to mAbs therapy and were grouped into two categories taking into account time to treatment failure (TTF ≤6 months and TTF ≥10 months. KIR genotyping (16 genetic variability was performed in genomic DNA from peripheral blood by PCR sequence-specific primer technique and HLA ligand typing was performed for HLA-B & -C loci by reverse PCR-SSO methodology. Subjects carrying the KIR/HLA ligand combinations KIR2DS1/HLAC2C2-C1C2 and KIR3DS1/HLABw4w4-w4w6 showed longer TTF than non-carriers counterparts (14,76 m vs 3,73 m, p<0.001, and 14,93 m vs 4,6 m, p=0.005 respectively. No other significant differences were observed. Two activating KIR/HLA ligand combinations predict better response of patients to anti-EGFR therapy. These findings increase the overall knowledge on the role of specific gene variants related with responsivenessto anti-EGFR treatment in solid tumours and highlight the importance of assessing gene polymorphisms related with cancer medications.

  7. A neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects African Green monkeys from Hendra virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Katharine N.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Feldmann, Heinz; Zhu, Zhongyu; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B.; Yan, Lianying; Feng, Yan-Ru; Brining, Doug; Scott, Dana; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Callison, Julie; Chan, Yee-Peng; Hickey, Andrew C.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Broder, Christopher C.; Rockx, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a recently emerged zoonotic paramyxovirus that can cause a severe and often fatal disease in horses and humans. HeV is categorized as a biosafety level 4 agent, which has made the development of animal models and testing of potential therapeutics and vaccines challenging. Infection of African Green monkeys (AGMs) with HeV was recently demonstrated and disease mirrored fatal HeV infection in humans, manifesting as a multisystemic vasculitis with widespread virus replication in vascular tissues and severe pathologic manifestations in the lung, spleen and brain. Here, we demonstrate that m102.4, a potent HeV neutralizing human monoclonal antibody (hmAb), can protect AGMs from disease post infection (p.i.) with HeV. Fourteen AGMs were challenged intratracheally with a lethal dose of HeV and twelve subjects were infused twice with a 100 mg dose of m102.4 beginning at either 10 hr, 24 hr or 72 hr p.i. and again approximately 48 hrs later. The presence of viral RNA, infectious virus and HeV-specific immune responses demonstrated that all subjects were infected following challenge. All twelve AGMs that received m102.4 survived infection; whereas the untreated control subjects succumbed to disease on day 8 p.i.. Animals in the 72 hr treatment group exhibited neurological signs of disease but all animals started to recover by day 16 p.i.. These results represent successful post-exposure in vivo efficacy by an investigational drug against HeV and highlight the potential impact a hmAb can have on human disease. PMID:22013123

  8. Humanization and characterization of an anti-ricin neutralization monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Gang Hu

    Full Text Available Ricin is regarded as a high terrorist risk for the public due to its high toxicity and ease of production. Currently, there is no therapeutic or vaccine available against ricin. D9, a murine monoclonal antibody developed previously in our laboratory, can strongly neutralize ricin and is therefore a good candidate for humanization. Humanization of D9 variable regions was achieved by a complementarity-determining region grafting approach. The humanized D9 (hD9 variable regions were further grafted onto human heavy and light chain constant regions to assemble the complete antibody gene. A foot-and-mouth-disease virus-derived 2A self-processing sequence was introduced between heavy and light chain DNA sequences to cleave the recombinant protein into a functional full-length antibody molecule from a single open reading frame driven by a single promoter in an adenoviral vector. After expression in mammalian cells and purification, the hD9 was demonstrated to have equimolar expression of the full-length antibody heavy and light chains. More importantly, the hD9 exhibited high affinity to ricin with K(D of 1.63 nM, comparable to its parental murine D9 (2.55 nM. In a mouse model, intraperitoneal (i.p. administration of hD9, at a low dose of 5 µg per mouse, 4 hours after the i.p. challenge with 5×LD50 ricin was found to rescue 100% of the mice. In addition, administered 6 hours post-challenge, hD9 could still rescue 50% of the mice. The hD9 has the potential to be used for prophylactic or therapeutic purposes against ricin poisoning.

  9. A novel human monoclonal antibody, TONO-1, reactive with T-lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numasaki, M; Fukuoka, Y; Kudo, T; Saeki, H; Tachibana, T; Motomiya, M; Nukiwa, T

    1995-07-04

    Mononuclear cells from the peripheral blood of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were transformed with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and the resultant polyclonal B-lymphoblastoid cell lines were tested for antibody activity to membrane antigens of certain T-cell lines. B lymphoblastoid cell lines secreting specific antibodies were fused with (mouse x human) heteromyeloma SHM-D33 cells. Among the large number of hybridomas generated, one which produced a human monoclonal antibody (MAb) TONO-1 (IgM, lambda) was selected. MAb TONO-1 proved to be reactive with 4 human T-cell lines, HPB-MLT, L-MAT, MOLT-3 and MOLT-4F, but not with B-leukemia, Burkitt's lymphoma, myelomonocytic leukemia, erythroleukemia or non-hematopoietic malignant cell lines. MAb TONO-1 reacted positively with fresh leukemia cells from 2 of 7 patients with acute T-lymphocytic leukemia, but no reaction was observed in non-T-cell leukemia cases. Normal lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, red blood cells and platelets in the peripheral blood did not demonstrate remarkable binding. Neither thymocytes nor bone-marrow cells from healthy volunteers were reactive. The antigens defined by MAb TONO-1 were polypeptides of 57 kDa and 68 kDa. Immunohistological studies revealed no staining of thymocytes in the thymus of a 6-month-old child, but showed epithelial reticular cells and Hassall's corpuscles to stain positively. These results suggest that MAb TONO-1 is directed to T-leukemic cells and some components of thymus tissue.

  10. Human Cell Line-Derived Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Hart

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IgA antibodies have great potential to improve the functional diversity of current IgG antibody-based cancer immunotherapy options. However, IgA production and purification is not well established, which can at least in part be attributed to the more complex glycosylation as compared to IgG antibodies. IgA antibodies possess up to five N-glycosylation sites within their constant region of the heavy chain as compared to one site for IgG antibodies. The human GlycoExpress expression system was developed to produce biotherapeutics with optimized glycosylation and used here to generate a panel of IgA isotype antibodies directed against targets for solid (TA-mucin 1, Her2, EGFR, Thomsen–Friedenreich and hematological (CD20 cancer indications. The feasibility of good manufacturing practice was shown by the production of 11 g IgA within 35 days in a one liter perfusion bioreactor, and IgA antibodies in high purity were obtained after purification. The monoclonal IgA antibodies possessed a high sialylation degree, and no non-human glycan structures were detected. Kinetic analysis revealed increased avidity antigen binding for IgA dimers as compared to monomeric antibodies. The IgA antibodies exhibited potent Fab- and Fc-mediated functionalities against cancer cell lines, whereby especially granulocytes are recruited. Therefore, for patients who do not sufficiently benefit from therapeutic IgG antibodies, IgA antibodies may complement current regiment options and represent a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. In conclusion, a panel of novel biofunctional IgA antibodies with human glycosylation was successfully generated.

  11. Reliable identification of human albumin in ancient bone using ELISA and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, C; Gelsthorpe, K; Phillips, P; Sokol, R J

    1992-03-01

    In order to help reconstruct ancient dietary, domestic, and ritual behaviour, a method was developed to identify the blood protein albumin in ancient skeletal material. This was an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a monoclonal antibody of IgG class against human albumin. With fresh material, the technique gave consistent and specific results and could detect as little as 10 ng of albumin. Extracts of bone from the English Civil War (A.D. 1644), Mediaeval (A.D. 1100-1400), Early Saxon (A.D. 450-600), Roman (A.D. 100-200), Iron Age (ca 400 B.C.) and Bronze Age (2200-1700 B.C. cal.) periods were then tested, samples of fresh human and animal bone being included as positive and negative controls, respectively. Albumin was demonstrated in human bone from all periods; there was no evidence of cross-reactivity with animal material. Detection seemed to depend largely on amount of sample and chronological age; other factors, such as physical integrity of the specimen and soil characteristics, appeared to be less important. Preliminary studies of other ancient skeletal remains showed that animal species could be readily identified and that albumin was probably still detectable in cremated material. It is concluded that our method provides a tool specific and sensitive enough for the reliable identification of the species-origin of small fragments of bone (and possibly of blood stains) and will thus allow insight into past behaviour patterns. ELISA may also be suitable for identifying other molecules (such as HLA and ABO) which would help determine racial affiliation and disease predisposition among ancient populations.

  12. Identification of a human monoclonal antibody to replace equine diphtheria antitoxin for treatment of diphtheria intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Leila M; Booth, Brian J; Rowley, Kirk J; Leav, Brett A; Cheslock, Peter S; Garrity, Kerry A; Sloan, Susan E; Thomas, William; Babcock, Gregory J; Wang, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) has been the cornerstone of the treatment of Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection for more than 100 years. Although the global incidence of diphtheria has declined steadily over the last quarter of the 20th century, the disease remains endemic in many parts of the world, and significant outbreaks still occur. DAT is an equine polyclonal antibody that is not commercially available in the United States and is in short supply globally. A safer, more readily available alternative to DAT would be desirable. In the current study, we obtained human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) directly from antibody-secreting cells in the circulation of immunized human volunteers. We isolated a panel of diverse hMAbs that recognized diphtheria toxoid, as well as a variety of recombinant protein fragments of diphtheria toxin. Forty-five unique hMAbs were tested for neutralization of diphtheria toxin in in vitro cytotoxicity assays with a 50% effective concentration of 0.65 ng/ml for the lead candidate hMAb, 315C4. In addition, 25 μg of 315C4 completely protected guinea pigs from intoxication in an in vivo lethality model, yielding an estimated relative potency of 64 IU/mg. In comparison, 1.6 IU of DAT was necessary for full protection from morbidity and mortality in this model. We further established that our lead candidate hMAb binds to the receptor-binding domain of diphtheria toxin and physically blocks the toxin from binding to the putative receptor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor. The discovery of a specific and potent human neutralizing antibody against diphtheria toxin holds promise as a potential therapeutic.

  13. Utilisation of tracer monoclonal antibodies for the immunoscintigraphic detection of human colorectal cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatal, J.F.; Douillard, J.Y.; Kremer, M.; Curtet, C.; Le Mevel, B.; Fumoleau, P.; Bourdoiseau, M.

    1983-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies, 17-1A and 19-9, with recognized human gastrointestinal cancers in cell cultures, were labeled with iodine 131 for immunoscintigraphic application. With the intact 131 I-17-1A antibody, 21 out of 35 (60%) primary or secondary colorectal cancer sites were visualized, whereas all 21 nonepitheliomatous colic cancer sites or noncolic cancer sites were negative. With F(ab') 2 fragments of the 19-9 antibody, 18 out of 27 (67%) colorectal cancer sites were positive. With both radioantibodies, the bestly contrasted tumor images were late, 4 to 5 days after injection. A study with paired-label technique, associating a specific iodine-131-labeled antibody with a non-specific iodine-125-labeled immunoglobulin, demonstrated, that tumor uptake was indeed specific for the 17-1A or 19-9 antibody in tumor and normal colon fragments obtained during operations on 4 patients. A preliminary prospective study showed that only immunoscintigraphy was able to confirm and localize a recurrence of rectal cancer in one patient. A larger series will be necessary to validate the clinical benefit of the technique, as compared with the results of other diagnostic techniques, before immunoscintigraphy can be proposed for routine clinical use [fr

  14. Monoclonal antibodies from rats immunized with fragment D of human fibrinogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN); Chen, J.P.; Lankford, P.K.; Foote, L.J.

    1981-01-01

    Fischer rats were immunized with fragment D (Fg-D) of human fibrinogen (Fg) to obtain antibody specific for neoantigens unique to this molecule. Absorption of serum with whole Fg indicated that some of the antibody produced reacted preferentially with Fg-D. Hybridoma cultures were prepared by fusion of immune rat spleen cells with mouse myeloma P3-X63-Ag8. Monoclonal antibodies obtained from these cultures fell into two classes: (a) Those reacting equally well with Fg and Fg-D. (b) Those reacting preferentially but not absolutely wth Fg-D. Antibody from hybridoma 104-14, a member of the first group had an affinity for Fg-D of 1.5 x 10/sup 9/ M/sup -1/ while antibodies from 106-59 and 106-71 (group 2) demonstrated much lower affinities of 1.0 x 10/sup 7/ and 4.7 x 10/sup 6/ M/sup -1/, respectively. The cross reactivity of antibodies in the second group indicated that they react with protein conformations that are altered during production of Fg-D from Fg.

  15. Mouse and Human Monoclonal Antibodies Protect against Infection by Multiple Genotypes of Japanese Encephalitis Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefania Fernandez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV remains a leading cause of viral encephalitis worldwide. Although JEV-specific antibodies have been described, an assessment of their ability to neutralize multiple genotypes of JEV has been limited. Here, we describe the development of a panel of mouse and human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs that inhibit infection in cell culture of four different JEV genotypes tested. Mechanism-of-action studies showed that many of these MAbs inhibited infection at a postattachment step, including blockade of virus fusion. Mapping studies using site-directed mutagenesis and hydrogen-deuterium exchange with mass spectrometry revealed that the lateral ridge on domain III of the envelope protein was a primary recognition epitope for our panel of strongly neutralizing MAbs. Therapeutic studies in mice demonstrated protection against lethality caused by genotype I and III strains when MAbs were administered as a single dose even 5 days after infection. This information may inform the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies as emerging strains and genotypic shifts become more prevalent.

  16. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against human CD34 antigens do not cross-react with ovine umbilical cord blood cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dattena

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available CD34 is a cell surface glycoprotein expressed by hematopoietic progenitors and endothelial cells. It is widely used in the clinic for isolation of human hematopoietic stem cells. In recent years large animals are gaining increasing importance in biomedical research for the study and therapy of human diseases. Sheep has proved to be an useful experimental model for preclinical trials in transplantation procedures. Unfortunately, the lack of specie-specific monoclonal antibodies (MABS recognizing hemopoietic progenitor cells hampers the use of this animal in experimental hematology. The aim of this paper was to determine whether commercial monoclonal antibodies specific for human CD34 molecule could cross-react with hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC present in sheep umbilical cord blood (UCB. Six antihuman CD34 MABS, recognizing the three different epitope classes, were tested in flow cytometry on purified mononuclear cells (MNC isolated from cord blood of both species. None of the MABS used in this trial seemed to be able to identify HPC from sheep UCB. These data suggest that the panel of monoclonal antibodies used for cross reactivity detection has to be expanded with recently produced reagents. Further studies should be directed towards the production of ovine specific anti CD34 MABS.

  18. Safety testing of monoclonal antibodies in non-human primates: Case studies highlighting their impact on human risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Frank R; Cavagnaro, Joy; McKeever, Kathleen; Ryan, Patricia C; Schutten, Melissa M; Vahle, John; Weinbauer, Gerhard F; Marrer-Berger, Estelle; Black, Lauren E

    2018-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are improving the quality of life for patients suffering from serious diseases due to their high specificity for their target and low potential for off-target toxicity. The toxicity of mAbs is primarily driven by their pharmacological activity, and therefore safety testing of these drugs prior to clinical testing is performed in species in which the mAb binds and engages the target to a similar extent to that anticipated in humans. For highly human-specific mAbs, this testing often requires the use of non-human primates (NHPs) as relevant species. It has been argued that the value of these NHP studies is limited because most of the adverse events can be predicted from the knowledge of the target, data from transgenic rodents or target-deficient humans, and other sources. However, many of the mAbs currently in development target novel pathways and may comprise novel scaffolds with multi-functional domains; hence, the pharmacological effects and potential safety risks are less predictable. Here, we present a total of 18 case studies, including some of these novel mAbs, with the aim of interrogating the value of NHP safety studies in human risk assessment. These studies have identified mAb candidate molecules and pharmacological pathways with severe safety risks, leading to candidate or target program termination, as well as highlighting that some pathways with theoretical safety concerns are amenable to safe modulation by mAbs. NHP studies have also informed the rational design of safer drug candidates suitable for human testing and informed human clinical trial design (route, dose and regimen, patient inclusion and exclusion criteria and safety monitoring), further protecting the safety of clinical trial participants.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies recognize gly-leu-phe-gly repeat of nucleoporin nup98 of tetrahymena, yeasts, and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Ohtsuki, Chizuru; Osakada, Hiroko; Koujin, Takako; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2013-04-01

    Nucleoporin Nup98, an essential component of the nuclear pore complex, has multifunctional roles in nuclear functions including transcriptional regulation and nucleocytoplasmic transport. These functions mostly depend on a Gly-Leu-Phe-Gly (GLFG) sequence appearing repetitively in the N-terminal region of Nup98. As the GLFG sequence is well conserved among Nup98s from a wide variety of species including humans, yeasts, and ciliates such as Tetrahymena thermophila, a specific antibody that recognizes the GLFG sequence is expected to detect various Nup98s from a wide-range of species. To generate monoclonal antibodies specific to the GLFG repeat of Nup98, we used two synthetic polypeptides derived from the macronuclear Nup98 of T. thermophila as an antigen. We obtained two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), 13C2 and 21A10, that recognize Nup98s in indirect immunofluorescence staining and Western blot analysis of T. thermophila. Peptide array analysis of these monoclonal antibodies located the position of their epitopes at or near GLFG residues: the epitope recognized by the 13C2 MAb is FGxxN (x being any amino acid), and the epitope recognized by the 21A10 MAb is GLF. As expected by their epitopes, these monoclonal antibodies also recognize Nup98 homologs expressed by human cells and the yeasts Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating that 13C2 and 21A10 MAbs recognize Nup98 epitopes common to phylogenetically distinct organisms. Thus, these MAbs are useful in studying a wide variety of biological phenomena that involve Nup98, ranging from ciliate nuclear dimorphism to NUP98-related human leukemia.

  20. Combined assessment of epidermal [corrected] growth factor receptor dual color in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry with downstream gene mutations in prediction of response to the anti-EGFR therapy for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Naoki; Yamada, Yasuhide; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Honma, Yoshitaka; Iwasa, Satoru; Kato, Ken; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2014-07-01

    Biomarkers associated with anti-EGFR antibodies therapy have been investigated in metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). We conducted this study to evaluate the clinical utility of a combined assessment of EGFR status and genomic mutations of the EGFR downstream signal pathway in predicting the efficacy of anti-EGFR antibody treatment. We collected formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissues and evaluated the EGFR status by immunohistochemistry (IHC), dual color in situ hybridization (DISH) and genomic analyses of KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA and NRAS by direct sequencing. A total of 129 patients were evaluated in our study. Among KRAS wild-type patients, EGFR DISH positivity was associated with a higher response rate than DISH negativity (56.3 vs. 21.1%, p = 0.011). A subgroup with EGFR DISH positivity plus IHC3+ and wild-type of EGFR downstream gene mutations achieved higher response rate and disease control rate. EGFR DISH positivity, KRAS codon 146 mutation and NRAS codon 61 mutation were prognostic factors in both progression-free survival and overall survival by multivariate analyses. Combined assessment of DISH plus IHC and EGFR downstream gene mutations was useful to predict the response to anti-EGFR antibodies treatment in metastatic colorectal cancer patients in our study. Copyright © 2014 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human Monoclonal antibodies - A dual advantaged weapon to tackle cancer and viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurosawa G

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are powerful tools as pharmaceutical agents to tackle cancer and infectious diseases. Antibodies (Abs are present in blood at the concentration of 10 mg/ml and play a vital role in humoral immunity. Many therapeutic Abs have been reported since early 1980s. Human mAb technology was not available at that time and only the hybridoma technology for making mouse mAbs had been well established. In order to avoid various potential problems associated with use of mouse proteins, two different technologies to make human/mouse chimeric Ab as well as humanized Ab were developed crossing the various hurdles for almost twenty years and mAb based drugs such as rituximab, anti-CD20 Ab, and trastuzumab, anti-HER2 Ab, have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer in 1997 and 1998, respectively. These drugs are well recognized and accepted by clinicians for treatment of patients. The clinical outcome of the treatment with mAb has strongly encouraged the researchers to develop much more refined mAbs. In addition to chimeric Ab and humanized Ab, now human mAbs can be produced by two technologies. The first is transgenic mice that produce human Abs and the second is human Ab libraries using phage-display system. Until now, several hundreds of mAbs against several tens of antigens (Ags have been developed and subjected to clinical examinations. While many Abs have been approved as therapeutic agents against hematological malignancies, the successful mAbs against solid tumors are still limited. However, many researchers have suggested that developing potential mAbs agents should be possible and incurable cancers may become curable within another decade. Though it is hard to say explicitly that this prediction is correct, a passion for this development should be worth supporting to lead to a successful outcome which will lead to patient benefits. Our institute

  2. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey) by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Hugo Amorim dos Santos; Costa-Correa, Edmar Henrique; Bianco-Junior, Cesare; Andrade, Márcia Cristina Ribeiro; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas

    2017-01-01

    Non-human primates (NHP) are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα)—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model. PMID:29312325

  3. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Amorim dos Santos de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-human primates (NHP are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to the reactive centre loop (RCL) of human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) can protect against proteolytic cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Elder, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binds most of the cortisol in circulation and is a non-functional member of the family of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) with an exposed elastase sensitive reactive centre loop (RCL). The RCL can be cleaved by human neutrophil elastase, released from activated neutrophils, and can also be cleaved at nearby site(s) by elastase released by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and at two further sites, also within the RCL, by bovine chymotrypsin. Cleavage of the RCL results in a conformational change accompanied by a marked decrease in affinity for cortisol and hence its release at the site of proteolysis. These cleavages are irreversible and the similar half-lives of cleaved and intact CBG could mean that there may be some advantage in slowing the rate of CBG cleavage in acute inflammation thereby increasing the proportion of intact CBG in circulation. Here we show, for the first time, that pre-incubation of tethered human CBG with two monoclonal antibodies to the RCL of CBG protects against cleavage by all three enzymes. Furthermore, in plasma, pre-incubation with both RCL monoclonal antibodies delays neutrophil elastase cleavage of the RCL and one of these RCL monoclonal antibodies also delays bovine chymotrypsin cleavage of the RCL. These findings may provide a basis and rationale for the concept of the use of RCL antibodies as therapeutic agents to effectively increase the proportion of intact CBG in circulation which may be of benefit in acute inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunohistochemical Analysis of Inflammatory Rheumatoid Synovial Tissues Using Anti-Human Podoplanin Monoclonal Antibody Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tomoto; Takakubo, Yuya; Oki, Hiroharu; Liu, Xing; Honma, Ryusuke; Naganuma, Yasushi; Goodman, Stuart B; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari; Takagi, Michiaki

    2018-02-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) is a transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, which is expressed in several normal tissues and malignant tumors. Although PDPN expression in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been reported, the role of PDPN in RA and other arthritic conditions has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we examined PDPN expression in inflammatory synovial tissues using an anti-human PDPN (hPDPN) monoclonal antibody (mAb) panel to select the most useful one for evaluation of synovitis. Synovial tissue samples were obtained from 11 RA patients and 9 osteoarthritis (OA) patients undergoing joint surgery. PDPN-positive cells were immunostained by a panel of PDPN mAbs (NZ-1, LpMab-3, LpMab-7, LpMab-10, LpMab-12, LpMab-13, and LpMab-17), followed by cell grading of inflammation and cell counting of PDPN-positivity by a quantitative analyzer. Immunohistochemistry showed that PDPN was markedly expressed in both macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B lining cells of the hyperplastic synovial lining cell layer, and macrophages and fibroblasts in the stroma of RA. Among anti-PDPN mAbs, LpMab-12 showed the highest score. In inflammatory OA synovium, PDPN expression was also detectable. Although LpMab-12 also showed the highest score in OA, the difference was not statistically significant. The inflammatory synovitis score of RA was significantly higher than that of OA. PDPN was expressed in inflammatory lining cells and sublining stroma of RA and OA synovium. In the seven anti-hPDPN antibodies examined, LpMab-12 was the most stainable antibody for PDPN in RA synovitis. Thus, LpMab-12 for PDPN has a possible and promising specific biomarker for evaluating synovitis in RA and inflammatory OA.

  6. Determining the binding affinity of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies towards their native unpurified antigens in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Christine; Abdiche, Yasmina N; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a growing segment of therapeutics, yet their in vitro characterization remains challenging. While it is essential that a therapeutic mAb recognizes the native, physiologically occurring epitope, the generation and selection of mAbs often rely on the use of purified recombinant versions of the antigen that may display non-native epitopes. Here, we present a method to measure both, the binding affinity of a therapeutic mAb towards its native unpurified antigen in human serum, and the antigen's endogenous concentration, by combining the kinetic exclusion assay and Biacore's calibration free concentration analysis. To illustrate the broad utility of our method, we studied a panel of mAbs raised against three disparate soluble antigens that are abundant in the serum of healthy donors: proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), progranulin (PGRN), and fatty acid binding protein (FABP4). We also determined the affinity of each mAb towards its purified recombinant antigen and assessed whether the interactions were pH-dependent. Of the six mAbs studied, three did not appear to discriminate between the serum and recombinant forms of the antigen; one mAb bound serum antigen with a higher affinity than recombinant antigen; and two mAbs displayed a different affinity for serum antigen that could be explained by a pH-dependent interaction. Our results highlight the importance of taking pH into account when measuring the affinities of mAbs towards their serum antigens, since the pH of serum samples becomes increasingly alkaline upon aerobic handling.

  7. Radioimaging of human mammary carcinoma xenografts in nude mice with a new monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senekowitsch, R.; Bode, W.; Kriegel, H.; Reidel, G.; Pabst, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    A female Wistar rat aged 33 days was immunized by repeated intraperitoneal injections of a cell suspension of mammary carcinoma for eight months. Spleen cells of the immunized rat were then fused with X63-Ag8.653, a mouse myeloma line. Hybridoma supernatants were screened by ELISA using cells of mammary carcinoma (MaCa) as target cells. Initially 72 hybridomas showed positive response with MaCa cells, but no cross-reaction with normal mammary tissue was seen. Clone Ma 10-11 was chosen for its stable growth in vitro and in ascitic fluid. Monoclonal antibody obtained from ascitic fluid induced by intraperitoneal injection of 10 7 hybridoma cell into BALB/c-nu/nu mice was separated from albumin and transferrin. After separation only one band positioned at 155000 MW on SDS-PAGE slabs was detected. Radiolabeling with 131 I was achieved with the Iodogen method, the efficiency of labeling was 88%. 1.85 MBq of the intact labeled rat antibody were injected into nude mice xenografted with human mammary carcinoma and scintigrams were obtained every 48 hours p.i. up to 15 days. Scintigraphic images permitted tumor detection at 3 days p.i., but good tumor localization needed 8 days p.i.. The tumor-to-blood ratios calculated after dissection of tumor-bearing mice in groups of 3 increased from 0.97 at day 3 to 3 at day 15 p.i.. No uptake of the antibody in other organs was found. The half-life of the whole body clearance of the rat immunoglobulin was 36 h. This is significantly shorter than the half-life found for mouse immunoglobulin in nude mice. (Author)

  8. A human monoclonal antibody with neutralizing activity against highly divergent influenza subtypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Clementi

    Full Text Available The interest in broad-range anti-influenza A monoclonal antibodies (mAbs has recently been strengthened by the identification of anti-hemagglutinin (HA mAbs endowed with heterosubtypic neutralizing activity to be used in the design of "universal" prophylactic or therapeutic tools. However, the majority of the single mAbs described to date do not bind and neutralize viral isolates belonging to highly divergent subtypes clustering into the two different HA-based influenza phylogenetic groups: the group 1 including, among others, subtypes H1, H2, H5 and H9 and the group 2 including, among others, H3 subtype. Here, we describe a human mAb, named PN-SIA28, capable of binding and neutralizing all tested isolates belonging to phylogenetic group 1, including H1N1, H2N2, H5N1 and H9N2 subtypes and several isolates belonging to group 2, including H3N2 isolates from the first period of the 1968 pandemic. Therefore, PN-SIA28 is capable of neutralizing isolates belonging to subtypes responsible of all the reported pandemics, as well as other subtypes with pandemic potential. The region recognized by PN-SIA28 has been identified on the stem region of HA and includes residues highly conserved among the different influenza subtypes. A deep characterization of PN-SIA28 features may represent a useful help in the improvement of available anti-influenza therapeutic strategies and can provide new tools for the development of universal vaccinal strategies.

  9. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinaa, L; Wulff, A M; Saermark, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide (aa 138-152) from HIV-1 Nef protein were produced and characterized. Three hybridoma lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the synthetic peptide were generated by fusion between P3-X63 Ag8.653 myeloma cells and BALB/c splenocytes from...... mice immunized with the synthetic peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The hybridomas were screened and selected by ELISA with the peptide coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) immobilized to the polystyrene surface and specificity for the peptide was confirmed by competitive ELISA...

  11. Human breast tumor imaging using 111In labeled monoclonal antibody: Anthymic mouse model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ban An Khaw; Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Bailes, J.S.; Schneider, S.L.; Lancaster, J.; Lasher, J.C.; McGuire, W.L.; Powers, J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1988-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MoAb) 323/A3, an IgG1, was raised against the human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 and recognized a 43 Kd membrane associated glycoprotein. Histochemical studies with the antibody detected 75% of metastatic lymph nodes, 59% of primary breast tumors, and showed some staining in 20% of benign breast lesions. For radionuclide imaging, the MoAb 323/A3 was labeled with both 125 I and 111 In, via covalently coupled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) by the mixed anhydride method. The antibody activity of the DTPA modified 323/A3 was assessed by an immunoassay using viable and fixed MCF-7 target cells. Male athymic nude mice bearing BT-20 human mammary tumors were injected with dual 125 I/ 111 In labeled DTPA 323/A3 via the tail veins. The animals were imaged with a gamma camera equipped with a pinhole collimator at 1-3 h, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 days after the tracer administration. On day 5 or 6, the animals were killed, and the biodistribution of the radiotracers was determined for the blood, thyroid, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, kidneys, gastro-intestinal tract and tumor. Target to blood ratio at 6 days for the 111 In tracer was 24:1 in the group with a mean tumor weight of 0.492 g, and 13:1 in another group with a mean tumor weight of 0.1906 g (day 5). However, the 125 I activity showed only 3.6:1 and 5.4:1 target to blood ratios in the corresponding groups. The larger tumors localized less 111 I tracer (27.13%±7.57% injected dose/g, Mean±SD) than the smaller tumors (52.75%±22.25% ID/g). Analysis of the gamma images showed that the maximum tracer concentration occurred in the tumors at about 2 to 3 days after intravenous tracer administration. The excellent tumor resolution observed with BT-20 tumors may be due to increased 43 Kd glycoprotein antigen density in this tumor cell line. (orig.)

  12. Regulatory approval and a first-in-human phase I clinical trial of a monoclonal antibody produced in transgenic tobacco plants

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, J.K.-C.; Drossard, J.; Lewis, D.; Altmann, F.; Boyle, J.; Christou, P.; Cole, T.; Dale, P.; van Dolleweerd, C.J.; Isitt, V.; Katinger, D.; Lobedan, M.; Mertens, H.; Paul, M.J.; Rademacher, T.

    2015-01-01

    Although plant biotechnology has been widely investigated for the production of clinical-grade monoclonal antibodies, no antibody products derived from transgenic plants have yet been approved by pharmaceutical regulators for clinical testing. In the Pharma-Planta project, the HIV-neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2G12 was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The scientific, technical and regulatory demands of good manufacturing practice (GMP) were addressed by comprehens...

  13. Rational methods for predicting human monoclonal antibodies retention in protein A affinity chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. Structure-based chromatography design for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Kadoya, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Hideaki; Tamada, Taro; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2005-11-04

    Rational methods for predicting the chromatographic behavior of human monoclonal antibodies (hMabs) in protein A affinity chromatography and cation exchange chromatography from the amino acid sequences information were proposed. We investigated the relation between the structures of 28 hMabs and their chromatographic behavior in protein A affinity chromatography and cation exchange chromatography using linear gradient elution experiments. In protein A affinity chromatography, the elution pH of the hMabs was correlated with not only the structure of the Fc region (subclass), but also that of the variable region. The elution pH of hMabs that have LYLQMNSL sequences in between the CDR2 and CDR3 regions of the heavy chain became lower among the same subclass of hMabs. In cation exchange chromatography, the peak salt concentrations IR of hMabs that have the same sequences of variable regions (or that have a structural difference in their Fc region, which puts them into a subclass) were similar. The IR values of hMabs were well correlated with the equilibrium association constant Ke, and also with the surface positive charge distribution of the variable region of the heavy chain (corrected surface net positive charge (cN) of the VH region). Based on these findings, we developed rational methods for predicting the retention behavior, which were also tested with eight additional hMabs. By considering the information on the number of binding sites associated with protein adsorption as determined experimentally, and the surface positive charge distribution from the three-dimensional structure of Mab A, we hypothesized that hMabs is separated by cation exchange chromatography as the surface positive charge distribution of the VH region is recognized.

  14. Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Serum as a Model for Clinical Monoclonal Gammopathy by Use of 21 Tesla FT-ICR Top-Down and Middle-Down MS/MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lidong; Anderson, Lissa C.; Barnidge, David R.; Murray, David L.; Hendrickson, Christopher L.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2017-05-01

    With the rapid growth of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), stringent quality control is needed to ensure clinical safety and efficacy. Monoclonal antibody primary sequence and post-translational modifications (PTM) are conventionally analyzed with labor-intensive, bottom-up tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), which is limited by incomplete peptide sequence coverage and introduction of artifacts during the lengthy analysis procedure. Here, we describe top-down and middle-down approaches with the advantages of fast sample preparation with minimal artifacts, ultrahigh mass accuracy, and extensive residue cleavages by use of 21 tesla FT-ICR MS/MS. The ultrahigh mass accuracy yields an RMS error of 0.2-0.4 ppm for antibody light chain, heavy chain, heavy chain Fc/2, and Fd subunits. The corresponding sequence coverages are 81%, 38%, 72%, and 65% with MS/MS RMS error 4 ppm. Extension to a monoclonal antibody in human serum as a monoclonal gammopathy model yielded 53% sequence coverage from two nano-LC MS/MS runs. A blind analysis of five therapeutic monoclonal antibodies at clinically relevant concentrations in human serum resulted in correct identification of all five antibodies. Nano-LC 21 T FT-ICR MS/MS provides nonpareil mass resolution, mass accuracy, and sequence coverage for mAbs, and sets a benchmark for MS/MS analysis of multiple mAbs in serum. This is the first time that extensive cleavages for both variable and constant regions have been achieved for mAbs in a human serum background.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  16. Critical epitopes in the nucleocapsid protein of SFTS virus recognized by a panel of SFTS patients derived human monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SFTS virus (SFTSV is a newly discovered pathogen to cause severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS in human. Successful control of SFTSV epidemic requires better understanding of the antigen target in humoral immune responses to the new bunyavirus infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have generated a combinatorial Fab antibody phage library from two SFTS patients recovered from SFTSV infection. To date, 94 unique human antibodies have been generated and characterized from over 1200 Fab antibody clones obtained by screening the library with SFTS purified virions. All those monoclonal antibodies (MAbs recognized the nucleocapsid (N protein of SFTSV while none of them were reactive to the viral glycoproteins Gn or Gc. Furthermore, over screening 1000 mouse monoclonal antibody clones derived from SFTSV virions immunization, 462 clones reacted with N protein, while only 16 clones were reactive to glycoprotein. Furthermore, epitope mapping of SFTSV N protein was performed through molecular simulation, site mutation and competitive ELISA, and we found that at least 4 distinct antigenic epitopes within N protein were recognized by those human and mouse MAbs, in particular mutation of Glu10 to Ala10 abolished or significantly reduced the binding activity of nearly most SFTS patients derived MAbs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The large number of human recombinant MAbs derived from SFTS patients recognized the viral N protein indicated the important role of the N protein in humoral responses to SFTSV infection, and the critical epitopes we defined in this study provided molecular basis for detection and diagnosis of SFTSV infection.

  17. A neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects against lethal disease in a new ferret model of acute nipah virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine N Bossart

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nipah virus is a broadly tropic and highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus whose natural reservoirs are several species of Pteropus fruit bats. Nipah virus has repeatedly caused outbreaks over the past decade associated with a severe and often fatal disease in humans and animals. Here, a new ferret model of Nipah virus pathogenesis is described where both respiratory and neurological disease are present in infected animals. Severe disease occurs with viral doses as low as 500 TCID(50 within 6 to 10 days following infection. The underlying pathology seen in the ferret closely resembles that seen in Nipah virus infected humans, characterized as a widespread multisystemic vasculitis, with virus replicating in highly vascular tissues including lung, spleen and brain, with recoverable virus from a variety of tissues. Using this ferret model a cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody, m102.4, targeting the henipavirus G glycoprotein was evaluated in vivo as a potential therapeutic agent. All ferrets that received m102.4 ten hours following a high dose oral-nasal Nipah virus challenge were protected from disease while all controls died. This study is the first successful post-exposure passive antibody therapy for Nipah virus using a human monoclonal antibody.

  18. Adsorption behavior of a human monoclonal antibody at hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couston, Ruairidh G.; Skoda, Maximilian W.; Uddin, Shahid; van der Walle, Christopher F.

    2013-01-01

    One aspiration for the formulation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAb) is to reach high solution concentrations without compromising stability. Protein surface activity leading to instability is well known, but our understanding of mAb adsorption to the solid-liquid interface in relevant pH and surfactant conditions is incomplete. To investigate these conditions, we used total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) and neutron reflectometry (NR). The mAb tested (“mAb-1”) showed highest surface loading to silica at pH 7.4 (~12 mg/m2), with lower surface loading at pH 5.5 (~5.5 mg/m2, further from its pI of 8.99) and to hydrophobized silica (~2 mg/m2). The extent of desorption of mAb-1 from silica or hydrophobized silica was related to the relative affinity of polysorbate 20 or 80 for the same surface. mAb-1 adsorbed to silica on co-injection with polysorbate (above its critical micelle concentration) and also to silica pre-coated with polysorbate. A bilayer model was developed from NR data for mAb-1 at concentrations of 50–5000 mg/L, pH 5.5, and 50–2000 mg/L, pH 7.4. The inner mAb-1 layer was adsorbed to the SiO2 surface at near saturation with an end-on” orientation, while the outer mAb-1 layer was sparse and molecules had a “side-on” orientation. A non-uniform triple layer was observed at 5000 mg/L, pH 7.4, suggesting mAb-1 adsorbed to the SiO2 surface as oligomers at this concentration and pH. mAb-1 adsorbed as a sparse monolayer to hydrophobized silica, with a layer thickness increasing with bulk concentration - suggesting a near end-on orientation without observable relaxation-unfolding. PMID:23196810

  19. Microdistribution of specific rat monoclonal antibodies to mouse tissues and human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennel, S.J.; Falcioni, R.; Wesley, J.W. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (USA))

    1991-03-01

    Detailed evaluations of the microdistribution of 125I-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to normal tissue antigens were conducted in BALB/c mice. MoAb 273-34A, which binds to a target molecule on the lumenal surface of lung endothelial cells, localizes quickly and efficiently throughout the lung vasculature. MoAb 133-13A, which binds to an antigen on macrophage-like cells expressed in nearly equal amounts in lung, liver, and spleen, localizes most efficiently to spleen and less well to liver and lung. The microdistribution of MoAb 133-13A in liver and spleen is consistent with the antigen distribution in these organs, but in the lung a more diffuse microdistribution is observed, indicating poor access of MoAb to the antigen-positive alveolar macrophages. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that tight endothelium (lung) represents a significant barrier to extravasation of MoAb into tissue while fenestrated (spleen) and sinusoidal (liver) endothelium are more easily penetrated. In human tumor bearing nu/nu mice, the microdistribution of MoAb to the beta 4 and alpha 6 subunits of integrin was studied. These MoAbs do not cross-react with murine integrins and thus are tumor-specific in the nu/nu mouse model. Localization of 125I-labeled MoAb 450-11A, which reacts with an intercellular domain of beta 4 integrin, is very weak and diffuse. All MoAbs to extracellular domains localize well to the tumor. Microdistribution of these MoAbs in the 3 different tumors is nonuniform with heavy distribution near the blood vessels, whereas antigen distribution as determined by immunoperoxidase shows a much more uniform pattern throughout the tumors. In experiments with 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B F(ab')2, the nonuniform pattern of distribution was not changed. Gross and microdistribution of different doses of 125I-labeled MoAb 439-9B were studied.

  20. Myostatin blockade with a fully human monoclonal antibody induces muscle hypertrophy and reverses muscle atrophy in young and aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latres, Esther; Pangilinan, Jeffrey; Miloscio, Lawrence; Bauerlein, Roy; Na, Erqian; Potocky, Terra B; Huang, Ying; Eckersdorff, Mark; Rafique, Ashique; Mastaitis, Jason; Lin, Calvin; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Gromada, Jesper; Stitt, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Loss of skeletal muscle mass and function in humans is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The role of myostatin as a key negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass and function has supported the concept that inactivation of myostatin could be a useful approach for treating muscle wasting diseases. We generated a myostatin monoclonal blocking antibody (REGN1033) and characterized its effects in vitro using surface plasmon resonance biacore and cell-based Smad2/3 signaling assays. REGN1033 was tested in mice for the ability to induce skeletal muscle hypertrophy and prevent atrophy induced by immobilization, hindlimb suspension, or dexamethasone. The effect of REGN1033 on exercise training was tested in aged mice. Messenger RNA sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and ex vivo force measurements were performed on skeletal muscle samples from REGN1033-treated mice. The human monoclonal antibody REGN1033 is a specific and potent myostatin antagonist. Chronic treatment of mice with REGN1033 increased muscle fiber size, muscle mass, and force production. REGN1033 prevented the loss of muscle mass induced by immobilization, glucocorticoid treatment, or hindlimb unweighting and increased the gain of muscle mass during recovery from pre-existing atrophy. In aged mice, REGN1033 increased muscle mass and strength and improved physical performance during treadmill exercise. We show that specific myostatin antagonism with the human antibody REGN1033 enhanced muscle mass and function in young and aged mice and had beneficial effects in models of skeletal muscle atrophy.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinaa, L; Wulff, A M; Saermark, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide (aa 138-152) from HIV-1 Nef protein were produced and characterized. Three hybridoma lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the synthetic peptide were generated by fusion between P3-X63 Ag8.653 myeloma cells and BALB/c splenocytes from...... mice immunized with the synthetic peptide coupled to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). The hybridomas were screened and selected by ELISA with the peptide coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) immobilized to the polystyrene surface and specificity for the peptide was confirmed by competitive ELISA...... with the peptide free in solution. The reactions of the MAbs with a 5-aa motif (WCYKL) included in the sequence were examined with synthetic peptides and two of the MAbs reacted with the motif. The recognitions of recombinant full-length Nef protein were also tested. One MAb reacted with the protein in both ELISA...

  2. Novel Monoclonal Antibodies Recognizing Human Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) as Research and Theranostic Tools

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Zora; Foss, C. A.; Copeland, B. T.; Morath, V.; Baranová, Petra; Havlínová, Barbora; Skerra, A.; Pomper, M.G.; Bařinka, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 7 (2017), s. 749-764 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP301/12/1513; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1604; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : monoclonal antibody * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * NAALADase Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition OBOR OECD: Endocrinology and metabolism (including diabetes, hormones) Impact factor: 3.820, year: 2016

  3. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes are coexpr......In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...... are coexpressed. By the coexpression of Env glycoproteins that either can or cannot bind a neutralizing MAb in an env transcomplementation assay, virions were generated in which the proportion of MAb binding sites could be regulated. As the proportion of MAb binding sites in Env chimeric virus increased, MAb...... neutralization gradually increased. Virus neutralization by virion aggregation was minimal, as MAb binding to HIV-1 Env did not interfere with an AMLV Env-mediated infection by HIV-1(AMLV/HIV-1) pseudotypes of CD4(-) HEK293 cells. MAb neutralization of chimeric virions could be described as a third...

  4. Recent achievements in the development of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for diagnosis, therapy and biologic characterization of human tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, S.M.; Macapinlac, H.A.; Scott, A.M.; Divgi, C.R.

    1993-01-01

    Human tumors express antigenic sites that can serve as targets for radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for diagnosis, therapy and biologic characterization of human tumors in vivo. Over the last decade, nearly 200 clinical trials have been performed which demonstrate that tumors can be detected with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Tumors which are otherwise occult, particularly for colorectal (anti-CEA and anti-TAG-72 antibodies) and ovarian cancer (anti-TAG-72 and anti-HMFG), are detected in a significant fraction of problem patients. Therapy using radiolabeled antibodies has been effective in lymphomas, leukemias and neuroblastomas, and is beginning to show promise in other solid tumors. Biologic characterization of tumors is likely to become more and more important in the future as monoclonal antibodies against oncogene products, such as her-2-neu, are developed. Development of new antibody forms through genetic engineering techniques, and the continual evolution toward higher resolution imaging instruments, such as PET and SPECT, will lead to further clinical improvements in cancer detection. (orig.)

  5. A monoclonal antibody recognizes undifferentiation-specific carbohydrate moieties expressed on cell surface of the human dental pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Jung; Ko, Seon-Yle; Ryu, Chun-Jeih; Jang, Young-Joo

    2017-05-01

    Human dental pulp cells are obtained from dental pulp tissue, and have the ability to form dentin and a pulp-like complex. Although adult stem cells have been identified from the primary culture by using specific cell surface markers, the identity of surface markers for the purification of stem cells within the dental pulp population are still unclear. Previously, we had constructed monoclonal antibodies against the undifferentiated cell-specific surface markers of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) by performing decoy immunization. Among them, a monoclonal antibody against the cell surface antigen of the undifferentiated hDPCs (named UPSA-1) was purified and its heavy and light chain consensus regions were analyzed. The cell surface binding affinity of UPSA-1 mAb on the undifferentiated hDPCs was stronger than that on the differentiated cells. When tunicamycin was applied to hDPSCs during culture, the cell surface binding affinity of the antibody was dramatically decreased, and dentinogenic differentiation was reduced. The purified UPSA-1 antigen band resulting from immunoprecipitation disappeared or shifted down on the SDS-PAGE by deglycosylation. These data suggested that glycosylation on the cell surface might be a marker of an undifferentiated state, and that UPSA-1 mAb might be useful for identifying the carbohydrate moiety on the cell surface of undifferentiated pulp cells. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Transient human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) interference in CA 125 measurements during monitoring of ovarian cancer patients treated with murine monoclonal antibody.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, A.L.M.; Sweep, F.C.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Olthaar, A.J.; Thomas, C.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) on serial CA 125 measurements in serum of patients with epithelial ovarian cancer following single intraperitoneal (IP) therapy with Yttrium-90-labeled human milk fat globule 1 murine monoclonal antibody ((90)Y-muHMFG1) as

  7. Immunologic analysis of human breast cancer progesterone receptors. 1. Immunonaffinity purification of transformed receptors and production of monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, P.A.; Suba, E.J.; Lawler-Heavner, J.; Elashry-Stowers, D.; Wei, L.L.; Toft, D.O.; Sullivan, W.P.; Horwitz, K.B.; Edwards, D.P.

    1987-09-22

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb), designated PR-6, produced against chick oviduct progesterone receptors cross-reacts with the M/sub r/ 120,000 human B receptors. An immunomatrix prepared with PR-6 was used to purify progesterone receptors (PR) from T47D human breast cancer cells. Single-step immunoaffinity chromatography results in enrichment of B receptors (identified by immunoblot with PR-6 and by photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 3/H)promegestone) to a specific activity of 1915 pmol/mg of protein (or 23% purity) and with 27% yield. Purity and yields as judged by gel electrophoresis and densitometric scanning of the B protein were approximately 1.7-fold higher due to partial loss in hormone binding activity at the elution step. B receptors purified under these conditions are transformed and biologically active. They were maintained as undergraded 120-kDa doublets and retained both hormone and DNA binding activities. These purified B receptors were used as immunogen for production of four monoclonal antibodies against human PR. Three of the MAbs, designated as B-30 (IgG/sub 1/), B-64 (IgG/sub 1/), and B-11 (IgM), are specific for B receptors. The fourth MAb, A/B-52 (IgG/sub 1/), reacts with both A and B receptors. The IgG MAbs are monospecific for human PR since they recognize and absorb native receptor-hormone complexes, displace the sedimentation of 4S receptors on salt containing sucrose gradients, and, by immunoblot assay of crude T47D cytosol, react only with receptor polypeptides. Although mice were injected with B receptors only, production of A/B-52 which recognized both A and B receptors provides evidence that these two proteins share regions of structural homology.

  8. Effects of nutrient levels and average culture pH on the glycosylation pattern of camelid-humanized monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamohseni, Hengameh; Ohadi, Kaveh; Spearman, Maureen; Krahn, Natalie; Moo-Young, Murray; Scharer, Jeno M; Butler, Mike; Budman, Hector M

    2014-09-30

    The impact of operating conditions on the glycosylation pattern of humanized camelid monoclonal antibody, EG2-hFc produced by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been evaluated by a combination of experiments and modeling. Cells were cultivated under different levels of glucose and glutamine concentrations with the goal of investigating the effect of nutrient depletion levels and ammonia build up on the cell growth and the glycoprofiles of the monoclonal antibody (Mab). The effect of average pH reduction on glycosylation level during the entire culture time or during a specific time span was also investigated. The relative abundance of glycan structures was quantified by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) and the galactosylation index (GI) and the sialylation index (SI) were determined. Lower initial concentrations of glutamine resulted in lower glucose consumption and lower cell yield but increased GI and SI levels when compared to cultures started with higher initial glutamine levels. Similarly, reducing the average pH of culture resulted in lower growth but higher SI and GI levels. These findings indicate that there is a tradeoff between cell growth, resulting Mab productivity and the achievement of desirable higher glycosylation levels. A dynamic model, based on a metabolic flux analysis (MFA), is proposed to describe the metabolism of nutrients, cell growth and Mab productivity. Finally, existing software (GLYCOVIS) that describes the glycosylation pathways was used to illustrate the impact of extracellular species on the glycoprofiles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A human monoclonal antibody prevents malaria infection by targeting a new site of vulnerability on the parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisalu, Neville K; Idris, Azza H; Weidle, Connor; Flores-Garcia, Yevel; Flynn, Barbara J; Sack, Brandon K; Murphy, Sean; Scho N, Arne; Freire, Ernesto; Francica, Joseph R; Miller, Alex B; Gregory, Jason; March, Sandra; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Wiehe, Kevin; Trama, Ashley M; Saunders, Kevin O; Gladden, Morgan A; Monroe, Anthony; Bonsignori, Mattia; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Wheatley, Adam K; McDermott, Adrian B; Farney, S Katie; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Zhang, Baoshan; Kc, Natasha; Chakravarty, Sumana; Kwong, Peter D; Sinnis, Photini; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L; Zavala, Fidel; Pancera, Marie; Seder, Robert A

    2018-03-19

    Development of a highly effective vaccine or antibodies for the prevention and ultimately elimination of malaria is urgently needed. Here we report the isolation of a number of human monoclonal antibodies directed against the Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP) from several subjects immunized with an attenuated Pf whole-sporozoite (SPZ) vaccine (Sanaria PfSPZ Vaccine). Passive transfer of one of these antibodies, monoclonal antibody CIS43, conferred high-level, sterile protection in two different mouse models of malaria infection. The affinity and stoichiometry of CIS43 binding to PfCSP indicate that there are two sequential multivalent binding events encompassing the repeat domain. The first binding event is to a unique 'junctional' epitope positioned between the N terminus and the central repeat domain of PfCSP. Moreover, CIS43 prevented proteolytic cleavage of PfCSP on PfSPZ. Analysis of crystal structures of the CIS43 antigen-binding fragment in complex with the junctional epitope determined the molecular interactions of binding, revealed the epitope's conformational flexibility and defined Asn-Pro-Asn (NPN) as the structural repeat motif. The demonstration that CIS43 is highly effective for passive prevention of malaria has potential application for use in travelers, military personnel and elimination campaigns and identifies a new and conserved site of vulnerability on PfCSP for next-generation rational vaccine design.

  10. A Unique Report: Development of Super Anti-Human IgG Monoclone with Optical Density Over Than 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Aghebati Maleki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies and related conjugates are key reagents used in biomedical researches as well as, in treatment, purification and diagnosis of infectious and non- infectious diseases. Methods: Balb/c mice were immunized with purified human IgG. Spleen cells of the most immune mouse were fused with SP2/0 in the presence of Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG. Supernatant of hybridoma cells was screened for detection of antibody by ELISA. Then, the sample was assessed for cross-reactivity with IgM & IgA by ELISA and confirmed by immunoblotting. The subclasses of the selected mAbs were determined. The best clone was injected intraperitoneally to some pristane-injected mice. Anti-IgG mAb was purified from the animals' ascitic fluid by Ion exchange chromatography and then, mAb was conjugated with HRP. Results: In the present study, over than 50 clones were obtained that 1 clone had optical density over than 3. We named this clone as supermonoclone which was selected for limiting dilution. The result of the immunoblotting, showed sharp band in IgG position and did not show any band in IgM&IgA position. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, the conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis of infectious diseases like Toxoplasmosis, Rubella and IgG class of other infectious and non- infectious diseases.

  11. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against α-globin chain-containing human hemoglobins for detecting α-thalassemia disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdeepak, Kanet; Pata, Supansa; Chiampanichayakul, Sawitree; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Tatu, Thanusak

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against α-globin containing human Hbs, named AMS-Alpha1 and AMS-Alpha 2, were produced by the hybridoma technique using spleen cells enriched by the newly developed B lymphocyte enrichment protocol. These two monoclonal antibodies were of IgM class, reacting to only intact form of human Hbs A, A2, E, and F, which contain α-globin chain. By the indirect ELISA, the AMS-Alpha1 and AMS-Alpha 2 quantified less amount of α-globin chain containing hemoglobins in HbH disease than the SEA-α thalassemia 1 carriers and normal individuals. It was thus anticipated that these monoclonal antibodies can be used for detecting Hb Bart's hydrops fetalis in which no α-globin chain is produced.

  12. An ultra-sensitive monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosobent assay for dibutyl phthalate in human urinary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lifang [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Lei, Yajing [Hangzhou EPIE Bio-detection Technology Limited, Hangzhou 310051 (China); Zhang, Dai; Ahmed, Shabbir [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Chen, Shuqing, E-mail: chenshuqing@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Biochemical Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) has been extensively used as a plasticizer in many daily products, which is highly toxic to human, notably affecting the reproductive and developmental function. As the previous method is expensive, time-consuming, low sensitivity and just focused on the environment. Present study was aimed to establish an ultra-sensitive and simple method based on good quality monoclonal antibody, applying to evaluate excretion level of DBP in urine samples of Chinese population directly. A monoclonal antibody was generated and characterized after fusion of myeloma cells with spleen cells isolated from BALB/c mouse. The mouse was previously immunized using a specially designed amino derivative of DBP conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) as immunogen. Cross-reactivity values of the monoclonal antibody against DBP, di-isobutyl phthalate (DIBP) were observed 100% and 1.25%, while for dimethyl phthalate (DMP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP) and didecyl phthalate (DDP) the values were < 0.06%. The standard curve was constructed at 0–50 ng mL{sup −1} and good linearity (R{sup 2} = 0.994) was achieved. The observed IC{sub 50} (7.34 ng mL{sup −1}) and LOD (0.06 ng mL{sup −1}) values was improved 1000-fold to polyclonal antibody and 5-fold to other monoclonal antibodies. A total 1246 urine samples were analyzed and the detection frequency of DBP was observed 72.87% by ic-ELISA. The 95th percentile and mean concentration of DBP were 12.07 and 3.00 ng mL{sup −1}. Acceptable recovery rates of DBP were 97.8–114.3% and coefficients variation 5.93–11.09%. The concentrations of DBP in females were found significantly higher (p < 0.05) than males. Similarly, the DBP in middle aged and low educated individuals was found higher (p < 0.001) than the others. Considering the adverse health effects, DBP internal exposure in the Chinese population should be reduced. The ic-ELISA method has been proved as a cost effective, specific, and highly sensitive screening

  13. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...... neutralization gradually increased. Virus neutralization by virion aggregation was minimal, as MAb binding to HIV-1 Env did not interfere with an AMLV Env-mediated infection by HIV-1(AMLV/HIV-1) pseudotypes of CD4(-) HEK293 cells. MAb neutralization of chimeric virions could be described as a third...... neutralization of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1 is incremental rather than all or none and that each MAb binding an Env oligomer reduces the likelihood of infection....

  14. Generation of human monoclonal antibodies against ganglioside antigens and their applications in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonso, M. [Dept. of Tumor Cell Biology, Div. of Cancer Biology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark)]|[Dept. of Research and Development, Center of Molecular Immunology, Havana (Cuba); Zeuthen, J. [Dept. of Tumor Cell Biology, Div. of Cancer Biology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    1996-10-01

    Different approaches to generating human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against tumor-associated ganglioside antigens have been carried out in several laboratories. A specific goal addressed by our laboratory is to produce human MAbs to several ganglioside antigens of relevance as therapeutic targets, such as the GM2, GD2, GD3 and GM3 gangliosides in melanoma. In vitro immunization of human B lymphocytes from normal donors was performed using liposomes containing gangliosides as the immunizing antigen combined with either complete tetanus toxoid or a synthetic peptide corresponding to a T helper epitope to stimulate in vitro immunization. Specific human anti-ganglioside antibodies were obtained, indicating that the antibdoy response found in vitro was antigen-driven. To overcome the widely reported problems concerning stability of immunoglobulin production by the antibody-secreting cell lines, a method of positive selection using GM3-coated magnetic beads has been developed in order to rescue unstable clones. Development of new methods to reproducibly generate ganglioside-specific human MAbs will amplify the possibilities for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. (orig.).

  15. Generation of human monoclonal antibodies against ganglioside antigens and their applications in the diagnosis and therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfonso, M.; Zeuthen, J.

    1996-01-01

    Different approaches to generating human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against tumor-associated ganglioside antigens have been carried out in several laboratories. A specific goal addressed by our laboratory is to produce human MAbs to several ganglioside antigens of relevance as therapeutic targets, such as the GM2, GD2, GD3 and GM3 gangliosides in melanoma. In vitro immunization of human B lymphocytes from normal donors was performed using liposomes containing gangliosides as the immunizing antigen combined with either complete tetanus toxoid or a synthetic peptide corresponding to a T helper epitope to stimulate in vitro immunization. Specific human anti-ganglioside antibodies were obtained, indicating that the antibdoy response found in vitro was antigen-driven. To overcome the widely reported problems concerning stability of immunoglobulin production by the antibody-secreting cell lines, a method of positive selection using GM3-coated magnetic beads has been developed in order to rescue unstable clones. Development of new methods to reproducibly generate ganglioside-specific human MAbs will amplify the possibilities for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. (orig.)

  16. Secukinumab, a human anti-interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, in patients with psoriatic arthritis (FUTURE 2): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McInnes, Iain B.; Mease, Philip J.; Kirkham, Bruce; Kavanaugh, Arthur; Ritchlin, Christopher T.; Rahman, Proton; van der Heijde, Désirée; Landewé, Robert; Conaghan, Philip G.; Gottlieb, Alice B.; Richards, Hanno; Pricop, Luminita; Ligozio, Gregory; Patekar, Manmath; Mpofu, Shephard; Bird, Paul; Hall, Stephen; Nash, Peter; Zochling, Jane; de Vlam, Kurt; Langenaken, Christine; Geusens, Piet; Beaulieu, Andre; Tremblay, Jean-Luc; McCarthy, Tim; Papp, Kim; Poulin, Yves; Cohen, Martin; Galatikova, Dagmar; Dokoupilova, Eva; Dvorak, Zdenek; Mann, Herman; Sieper, Joachim; Spieler, Wolfgang; Kurthen, Reiner; Braun, Juergen; Wollenhaupt, Juergen; Tony, Hans-Peter; Schuch, Florian; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Rech, Juergen; Leszczynski, Piotr; Adamski, Zygmunt; Szepietowski, Jacek; Tlustochowicz, Witold; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Szymanska, Malgorzata; Stanislav, Marina; Nesmeyanova, Olga; Vezikova, Natalia; Ershova, Olga; Izmozherova, Nadezda; Zotkin, Eugeny; Petrova, Marianna; Kastanayan, Alexander; Yakupova, Svetlana; Agafina, Alina; Asavatanabodee, Paijit; Suwannalai, Parawee; Kerrane, Jerome; Tahir, Hasan; McInnes, Iain; Edwards, Christopher; Chinoy, Hector; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Kaul, Arvind; Sheeran, Thomas; Clunie, Gavin; Schechtman, Joy; Gaylis, Norman; Kaine, Jeffrey; Lawson, Jeffrey; El-Kadi, Hisham; Flint, Kathleen; Kivitz, Alan; Churchhill, Melvin; Sikes, David; Lowenstein, Mitchell; Halpert, Elias; Abdulky, Mary; Palmer, William; Codding, Christine; Legerton, Clarence; Singhal, Atul; Sunkureddi, Prashanth; Gough, William; Forman, Seth; Box, Jane; Khan, Mohamed; Barranco, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Interleukin 17A is a proinflammatory cytokine that is implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriatic arthritis. We assessed the efficacy and safety of subcutaneous secukinumab, a human anti-interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody, in patients with psoriatic arthritis. Methods In this phase 3,

  17. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant human granzymes A and B and showing cross reactions with the natural proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kummer, J. Alain; Kamp, Angela M.; van Katwijk, Marcel; Brakenhoff, Just P.J.; Radosevic, Katarina; Radosevic, K.; van Leeuwen, Anne Marie; Borst, Jannie; Verweij, Cornelis L.; Hack, C. Erik

    1993-01-01

    The human serine proteases granzymes A and B are expressed in cytotoplasmic granules of activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells. Recombinant granzyme A and granzyme B proteins were produced in bacteria, purified and then used to raise specific mouse monoclonal antibodies. Seven

  18. Breadth of neutralization and synergy of clinically relevant human monoclonal antibodies against HCV genotypes 1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas H R; Pedersen, Jannie; Prentoe, Jannick C

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) with neutralizing capabilities constitute potential immune-based treatments or prophylaxis against hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, lack of cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) harboring authentic envelope proteins (E1/E2) has hindered neutralization...... synergism obtained when pooling the most potent HMAbs could have significant implications for developing novel strategies to treat and control HCV....

  19. Activation of the contact system of coagulation by a monoclonal antibody directed against a neodeterminant in the heavy chain region of human coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuijens, J. H.; Huijbregts, C. C.; Eerenberg-Belmer, A. J.; Meijers, J. C.; Bouma, B. N.; Hack, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    We studied the characteristics of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), F1 and F3, against human coagulation factor XII (Hageman factor). Experiments with trypsin-digested 125I-factor XII revealed that the epitope for mAb F1 is located in the NH2-terminal Mr 40,100 portion of factor XII, whereas that

  20. Modified cytokeratins expressed on the surface of carcinoma cells undergo endocytosis upon binding of human monoclonal antibody and its recombinant Fab fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, H J; Garrigues, U; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Previously, we have reported on successful imaging of colon, rectal, and pancreatic carcinomas in patients by using a radiolabeled all-human monoclonal antibody, COU-1, directed against modified cytokeratin. To further develop this antibody for use as an immunoconjugate, COU-1 was cloned by phage...

  1. Safety, Pharmacokinetics, Immunogenicity, and Biodistribution of (186)Re-Labeled Humanized Monoclonal Antibody BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab( in Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppe, M.; Schaijk, F. van; Roos, J.C.; Leeuwen, P.; Heider, K.H.; Kuthan, H.; Bleichrodt, R.P.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and biodistribution of (186)Re-labeled humanized anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody (MAb( BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab( in 9 patients with early-stage breast cancer. Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS( was performed within

  2. An IgE epitope of Bet v 1 and fagales PR10 proteins as defined by a human monoclonal IgE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, J.; Diethers, A.; Schulz, D.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analyses of the molecular basis underlying allergenicity and allergen cross-reactivity, as well as improvement of allergy diagnostics and therapeutics, are hampered by the lack of human monoclonal IgE antibodies and knowledge about their epitopes. Here, we addressed the consecutive ge...

  3. Crystal structure of the Hendra virus attachment G glycoprotein bound to a potent cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Rockx, Barry; Xie, Yihu; DeBuysscher, Blair L; Fusco, Deborah L; Zhu, Zhongyu; Chan, Yee-Peng; Xu, Yan; Luu, Truong; Cer, Regina Z; Feldmann, Heinz; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Broder, Christopher C; Nikolov, Dimitar B

    2013-01-01

    The henipaviruses, represented by Hendra (HeV) and Nipah (NiV) viruses are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses with uniquely broad host tropisms responsible for repeated outbreaks in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. The high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infection and lack of licensed antiviral therapies make the henipaviruses a potential biological threat to humans and livestock. Henipavirus entry is initiated by the attachment of the G envelope glycoprotein to host cell membrane receptors. Previously, henipavirus-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (hmAb) have been isolated using the HeV-G glycoprotein and a human naïve antibody library. One cross-reactive and receptor-blocking hmAb (m102.4) was recently demonstrated to be an effective post-exposure therapy in two animal models of NiV and HeV infection, has been used in several people on a compassionate use basis, and is currently in development for use in humans. Here, we report the crystal structure of the complex of HeV-G with m102.3, an m102.4 derivative, and describe NiV and HeV escape mutants. This structure provides detailed insight into the mechanism of HeV and NiV neutralization by m102.4, and serves as a blueprint for further optimization of m102.4 as a therapeutic agent and for the development of entry inhibitors and vaccines.

  4. Crystal structure of the Hendra virus attachment G glycoprotein bound to a potent cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xu

    Full Text Available The henipaviruses, represented by Hendra (HeV and Nipah (NiV viruses are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses with uniquely broad host tropisms responsible for repeated outbreaks in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. The high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infection and lack of licensed antiviral therapies make the henipaviruses a potential biological threat to humans and livestock. Henipavirus entry is initiated by the attachment of the G envelope glycoprotein to host cell membrane receptors. Previously, henipavirus-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (hmAb have been isolated using the HeV-G glycoprotein and a human naïve antibody library. One cross-reactive and receptor-blocking hmAb (m102.4 was recently demonstrated to be an effective post-exposure therapy in two animal models of NiV and HeV infection, has been used in several people on a compassionate use basis, and is currently in development for use in humans. Here, we report the crystal structure of the complex of HeV-G with m102.3, an m102.4 derivative, and describe NiV and HeV escape mutants. This structure provides detailed insight into the mechanism of HeV and NiV neutralization by m102.4, and serves as a blueprint for further optimization of m102.4 as a therapeutic agent and for the development of entry inhibitors and vaccines.

  5. The transcriptional profiling of human in vivo-generated plasma cells identifies selective imbalances in monoclonal gammopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Valor

    Full Text Available Plasma cells (PC represent the heterogeneous final stage of the B cells (BC differentiation process. To characterize the transition of BC into PC, transcriptomes from human naïve BC were compared to those of three functionally-different subsets of human in vivo-generated PC: i tonsil PC, mainly consisting of early PC; ii PC released to the blood after a potent booster-immunization (mostly cycling plasmablasts; and, iii bone marrow CD138+ PC that represent highly mature PC and include the long-lived PC compartment. This transcriptional transition involves subsets of genes related to key processes for PC maturation: the already known protein processing, apoptosis and homeostasis, and of new discovery including histones, macromolecule assembly, zinc-finger transcription factors and neuromodulation. This human PC signature is partially reproduced in vitro and is conserved in mouse. Moreover, the present study identifies genes that define PC subtypes (e.g., proliferation-associated genes for circulating PC and transcriptional-related genes for tonsil and bone marrow PC and proposes some putative transcriptional regulators of the human PC signatures (e.g., OCT/POU, XBP1/CREB, E2F, among others. Finally, we also identified a restricted imbalance of the present PC transcriptional program in monoclonal gammopathies that correlated with PC malignancy.

  6. Immunoradiometric assay and radioimmunodetection using monoclonal human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) antibodies recognizing only native hCG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyachi, Y.; Mizuchi, A.; Iio, M.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), which recognize conformational determinants of native hCG molecules, were used for two-site immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) and radioimmunodetection (RID) of hCG-producing tumours in nude mice. Several monoclonal hCG antibodies were produced against hCG, one of which (21-D-6) reacted with only native hCG with a high Ksub(a) value of 8.8x10 9 L/mol; another antibody (3-D-1) had a specificity for the epitopes located on the β-subunit of hCG. The antibodies 3-A-3, 12-A-5 and 24-B-6 cross-reacted substantially with LH. The antibodies 21-D-6 and 3-D-1, reacting with different antigenic sites, were used in a two-site IRMA in which 3-D-1 was immobilized and 21-D-6 was labelled with 125 I. This two-site IRMA was highly specific for hCG and there was no cross-reaction with hCG-α and hCG-β; the sensitivity of this IRMA was comparable with that of hCG radioiummunoassay (RIA) using polyclonal hCG antibodies. The hCG values in amniotic fluids were determined by IRMA and routine RIA, using SB-6 as hCG antiserum. Both values were significantly correlated (r=0.85, p 2 fractions prepared from 21-D-6 were iodinated by the lactoperoxidase method and used to detect hCG-containing tumours in nude mice by whole-body photoscans with a gamma scintillation camera. Positive RID results were obtained for all three tumour sites, at 144 h and 240 h after 131 I-IgG injection with a slightly higher background activity, and at 48 h after 131 I-F(ab prime) 2 administration with essentially no background activity. These results indicate that monoclonal anti-hCG and its radiolabelled fragment, which recognizes the conformation of the native hCG but not that of the subunit, are preferable for two-site IRMA and for RID of hCG-producing tumours. (author)

  7. Patterns of evolution of myocyte damage after human heart transplantation detected by indium-111 monoclonal antimyosin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballester-Rodes, M.; Carrio-Gasset, I.; Abadal-Berini, L.; Obrador-Mayol, D.; Berna-Roqueta, L.; Caralps-Riera, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The indium-111 labeled Fab fragment of antimyosin monoclonal antibody was used to study cardiac rejection and the time course of myocyte damage after transplantation. Fifty-three studies were performed in 21 patients, 17 men and 4 women, aged 19 to 54 years (mean 37 +/- 8), from 7 to 40 months after transplantation. Repeat studies were available in 8, and 10 were studied after the first year of transplantation. A heart-to-lung ratio was used for quantitation of uptake (normal 1.46 +/- 0.04). Differences between absent (1.69 +/- 0.29) and moderate (1.90 +/- 0.36) rejection were significant (p less than 0.03). Antimyosin ratio at 1 to 3 months (1.89 +/- 0.35) differed from that at greater than 12 months (1.65 +/- 0.2) (p less than 0.01). Repeat studies revealed a decrease in antimyosin ratio in 5 patients with uneventful clinical course; 2 had persistent activity after transplantation and suffered heart failure from rejection. After 1 year of transplantation uptake was within normal limits in 7 of 10 patients, and high uptake was associated with vascular rejection in 1. Because they can define evolving patterns of myocardial lesion activity, antimyosin studies could be useful both in patient management and in concentrating resources for those patients who most require them. The heart-to-lung ratio is suggested to monitor sequentially the degree of myocyte damage after transplantation

  8. In vivo SPECT/CT imaging of human orthotopic ovarian carcinoma xenografts with {sup 111}In-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huhtala, Tuulia [Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 (Finland); Laakkonen, Pirjo [Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 (Finland); Molecular Cancer Biology Research Program and Institute of Biomedicine, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Sallinen, Hanna [Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 (Finland); Ylae-Herttuala, Seppo [Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 (Finland); Biocenter Kuopio, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland); Naervaenen, Ale, E-mail: ale.narvanen@uku.f [Department of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 (Finland); Biocenter Kuopio, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 1627, FIN-70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2010-11-15

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3) are expressed in the tumor area during the progression of ovarian carcinoma. Monoclonal antibodies developed against these receptors are potential diagnostic molecules for in vivo imaging of ovarian carcinoma. Methods: Biodistribution of the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab against EGFR and mF4-31C1 against VEGFR-3 was studied in nude mice with orthotopic SKOV-3m human ovarian carcinoma xenografts. The biodistribution of {sup 111}Indium-labeled antibodies was followed up to 48 h postinjection using combined SPECT and CT imaging modality. Organ samples were collected postmortem and specific organ activity was measured. Accumulation of the intravenously injected antibodies in the tumor tissue and lymph nodes was verified using immunohistology. Results: Imaging studies with SPECT/CT showed clear accumulation of both antibodies into tumor area. The tumor uptake was 8.78{+-}0.74 %ID/g for cetuximab and 5.77{+-}0.62 %ID/g for mF4-31C1 after 48 h postinjection. Cetuximab had lower liver tropism and faster tumor homing rate. In addition, after 48 h two of five tumor-bearing mice showed a clear accumulation of the In-labeled mF4-31C1 at the left axillary area. Both intravenously administered antibodies could also be detected from the tumor sections by immunohistological staining but only mF4-31C1 forms in the lymph nodes. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the accumulation of EGFR- and VEGFR-3-specific antibodies in orthotopic ovarian carcinoma tumors. Systemically administered they had slow pharmacokinetics which is typical for antibodies. Accumulation of mF4-31C1 antibody in the lymph nodes suggests the remote activation of VEGFR-3 by the primary tumor.

  9. In vivo SPECT/CT imaging of human orthotopic ovarian carcinoma xenografts with 111In-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huhtala, Tuulia; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Sallinen, Hanna; Ylae-Herttuala, Seppo; Naervaenen, Ale

    2010-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 3 (VEGFR-3) are expressed in the tumor area during the progression of ovarian carcinoma. Monoclonal antibodies developed against these receptors are potential diagnostic molecules for in vivo imaging of ovarian carcinoma. Methods: Biodistribution of the monoclonal antibodies cetuximab against EGFR and mF4-31C1 against VEGFR-3 was studied in nude mice with orthotopic SKOV-3m human ovarian carcinoma xenografts. The biodistribution of 111 Indium-labeled antibodies was followed up to 48 h postinjection using combined SPECT and CT imaging modality. Organ samples were collected postmortem and specific organ activity was measured. Accumulation of the intravenously injected antibodies in the tumor tissue and lymph nodes was verified using immunohistology. Results: Imaging studies with SPECT/CT showed clear accumulation of both antibodies into tumor area. The tumor uptake was 8.78±0.74 %ID/g for cetuximab and 5.77±0.62 %ID/g for mF4-31C1 after 48 h postinjection. Cetuximab had lower liver tropism and faster tumor homing rate. In addition, after 48 h two of five tumor-bearing mice showed a clear accumulation of the In-labeled mF4-31C1 at the left axillary area. Both intravenously administered antibodies could also be detected from the tumor sections by immunohistological staining but only mF4-31C1 forms in the lymph nodes. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the accumulation of EGFR- and VEGFR-3-specific antibodies in orthotopic ovarian carcinoma tumors. Systemically administered they had slow pharmacokinetics which is typical for antibodies. Accumulation of mF4-31C1 antibody in the lymph nodes suggests the remote activation of VEGFR-3 by the primary tumor.

  10. Pseudovirion particles bearing native HIV envelope trimers facilitate a novel method for generating human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Briney, Bryan; Hammonds, Jason; Wang, Jaang-Jiun; Kalams, Spyros; Spearman, Paul W; Crowe, James E

    2010-07-01

    Monomeric HIV envelope vaccines fail to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies or to protect against infection. Neutralizing antibodies against HIV bind to native functionally active Env trimers on the virion surface. Gag-Env pseudovirions recapitulate the native trimer and could serve as an effective epitope presentation platform for study of the neutralizing antibody response in HIV-infected individuals. To address if pseudovirions can recapitulate native HIV virion epitope structures, we carefully characterized these particles, concentrating on the antigenic structure of the coreceptor binding site. By blue native gel shift assays, Gag-Env pseudovirions were shown to contain native trimers that were competent for binding to neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. In enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, pseudovirions exhibited increased binding of known CD4-induced antibodies after addition of CD4. Using flow cytometric analysis, fluorescently labeled pseudovirions specifically identified a subset of antigen-specific B cells in HIV-infected subjects. Interestingly, the sequence of one of these novel human antibodies, identified during cloning of single HIV-specific B cells and designated 2C6, exhibited homology to mAb 47e, a known anti-CD4-induced coreceptor binding site antibody. The secreted monoclonal antibody 2C6 did not bind monomeric gp120, but specifically bound envelope on pseudovirions. A recombinant form of the antibody 2C6 acted as a CD4-induced epitope-specific antibody in neutralization assays, yet did not bind monomeric gp120. These findings imply specificity against a quaternary epitope presented on the pseudovirion envelope spike. These data demonstrate that Gag-Env pseudovirions recapitulate CD4 and coreceptor binding pocket antigenic structures and can facilitate identification of B-cell clones that secrete neutralizing antibodies.

  11. High-yield production of a human monoclonal IgG by rhizosecretion in hydroponic tobacco cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Luisa M; Szeto, Tim H; Henquet, Maurice; Raven, Nicole; Runions, John; Huddleston, Jon; Garrard, Ian; Drake, Pascal M W; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-02-01

    Rhizosecretion of recombinant pharmaceuticals from in vitro hydroponic transgenic plant cultures is a simple, low cost, reproducible and controllable production method. Here, we demonstrate the application and adaptation of this manufacturing platform to a human antivitronectin IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) called M12. The rationale for specific growth medium additives was established by phenotypic analysis of root structure and by LC-ESI-MS/MS profiling of the total protein content profile of the hydroponic medium. Through a combination of optimization approaches, mAb yields in hydroponic medium reached 46 μg/mL in 1 week, the highest figure reported for a recombinant mAb in a plant secretion-based system to date. The rhizosecretome was determined to contain 104 proteins, with the mAb heavy and light chains the most abundant. This enabled evaluation of a simple, scalable extraction and purification protocol and demonstration that only minimal processing was necessary prior to protein A affinity chromatography. MALDI-TOF MS revealed that purified mAb contained predominantly complex-type plant N-glycans, in three major glycoforms. The binding of M12 purified from hydroponic medium to vitronectin was comparable to its Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-derived counterpart. This study demonstrates that in vitro hydroponic cultivation coupled with recombinant protein rhizosecretion can be a practical, low-cost production platform for monoclonal antibodies. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. In vivo localization of labeled anti-AFP variant monoclonal antibody VG5 against human hepatic cancer in tumor-bearing nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Baihe

    1991-01-01

    VG5 is one of the murine monoclonal antibodies against human AFP-R-LCA and had a high specific binding capacity with human hepatic cancer tissues and cell lines in vitro study. Present study investigated the in vivo distribution and image in nude mice bearing human hepatoma cell line SMMC-LINM with 131 I-VG5, and use 125 I-IgG as contral group. The tumor/liver and tumor/spleen ratios were 5.27 and 5.16 respectively. The localization index of tumor was 5.16 at 96 hr. The radio activity of 125 I-NMIgG in tumor was much lower than that of 131 I-VG5 and tended to decrease with tumor. The results showed that monoclonal antibody VG5 could be used in localization and may be also beneficial to the treatment of human hepatic cancer

  13. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, G R; Bradt, B M; Denardo, S J; Denardo, G L

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ((90)yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ((131)I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) anti-CD20 MAbs for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, assays were developed to determine HAGA (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to ''humanize'' MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  14. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L.

    2004-01-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ( 9 0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ( 1 31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades

  15. A review of human anti-globulin antibody (HAGA, HAMA, HACA, HAHA) responses to monoclonal antibodies. Not four letter words

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirick, G. R.; Bradt, B. M.; Denardo, S. J.; Denardo, G. L. [Calfornia Univ., Sacramento (United States). Davis Medical Center

    2004-12-01

    The United States Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) has approved unconjugated monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for immunotherapy (IT) of B-cell lymphoma, breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia. More recently, approval has been given for conjugated ZevalinTM ({sup 9}0yttrium ibritumomab tiuxetan, IDEC-Y2B8, Biogen Idec, Cambridge, MA) and BexxarTM ({sup 1}31I-tositumomab, Corixa, Corp., Seattle, WA and GlaxoSmithKline, Philadelphia, PA) antiCD20 MAns for use in radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of non-Hodgikin's lymphoma (NHL), thus redefining the standard care of cancer patients. Because of, and despite a lack of basis for concern about allergic reactions due to human antibody responses to these foreign proteins, essays were developed to determine HAGE (human anti-globulin antibody) levels that developed in patient sera following treatment with MAbs. Strategies were also devised to humanize MAbs and to temporarily block patient immune function with drugs in order to decrease the seroconversion rates, with considerable success. On the other hand, a survival advantage has been observed in some patients who developed a HAGA following treatment. This correlates with development of an anti-idiotype antibody cascade directed toward the MAbs used to treat these patients. What follows is a selective review of HAGA and its effect on cancer treatment over the past 2 decades.

  16. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Ye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3 of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2, the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection.

  17. Computational study on the interactions and orientation of monoclonal human immunoglobulin G on a polystyrene surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javkhlantugs N

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Namsrai Javkhlantugs,1,2 Hexig Bayar,3 Chimed Ganzorig,1 Kazuyoshi Ueda2 1Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Department of Chemical Technology, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, National University of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia; 2Department of Advanced Materials Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Yokohama, Japan; 3The Key Laboratory of Mammalian Reproductive Biology and Biotechnology of the Ministry of Education, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, People's Republic of China Abstract: Having a theoretical understanding of the orientation of immunoglobulin on an immobilized solid surface is important in biomedical pathogen-detecting systems and cellular analysis. Despite the stable adsorption of immunoglobulin on a polystyrene (PS surface that has been applied in many kinds of immunoassays, there are many uncertainties in antibody-based clinical and biological experimental methods. To understand the binding mechanism and physicochemical interactions between immunoglobulin and the PS surface at the atomic level, we investigated the binding behavior and interactions of the monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG on the PS surface using the computational method. In our docking simulation with the different arrangement of translational and rotational orientation of IgG onto the PS surface, three typical orientation patterns of the immunoglobulin G on the PS surface were found. We precisely analyzed these orientation patterns and clarified how the immunoglobulin G interacts with the PS surface at atomic scale in the beginning of the adsorption process. Major driving forces for the adsorption of IgG onto the PS surface come from serine (Ser, aspartic acid (Asp, and glutamic acid (Glu residues. Keywords: bionano interface, immunoassay, polystyrene, IgG, physical adsorption, simulation

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against human angiotensinogen, their characterization and use in an angiotensionogen enzyme linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Inger; Lykkegård, Stig; Agerlin Olsen, Arne

    1988-01-01

    Angiotensinogen, målemetode, monoklont antistof, elisa, ria, normal humant serum, gravid human serum......Angiotensinogen, målemetode, monoklont antistof, elisa, ria, normal humant serum, gravid human serum...

  19. Method and cell lines for the production of monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigbee, W.L.; Fong, S.S.N.; Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A. These antibodies have potential application as human blood group reagents, as markers for terminally differentiated erythroid cells and as immunofluorescent labels of somatically variant human erythrocytes.

  20. Cell lines for the production of monoclonal antibodies to human glycophorin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigbee, William L.; Fong, Stella S. N.; Jensen, Ronald H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Langlois, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    Cloned mouse hybridoma cell lines have been established which continuously produce antibodies that differentiate between the M and N forms of human glycophorin A. These antibodies have potential application as human blood group reagents, as markers for terminally differentiated erythroid cells and as immunofluorescent labels of somatically variant human erythrocytes.

  1. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Inconsistency by Immunohistochemistry Method Using Different Monoclonal Antibodies in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chi-Chen; Wang, Tao-Yeuan; Kung, Chien-Min

    2015-01-01

    Targeted therapy is typically used to treat colorectal cancer (CRC). The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was recognized as a potential therapeutic target. Does the EGFR protein express consistently using different monoclonal antibodies in clinics? One hundred and sixty-four patients (mean age 61.80 ± 12.78 years) who suffered from CRC were selected at Mackay Memorial Hospital in Taiwan. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections from all patients were tested simultaneously using two commercial antibodies, Dako-EGFR (mouse monoclonal anti-EGFR clone 2-18C9, pharmDx) and NCL-EGFR (NCL-EGFR-384, Novocastra) monoclonal antibodies, to study the commutability or equality of the qualities of EGFR expression by standard immunohistochemistry (IHC) procedures. The EGFR expressions that were obtained by IHC staining using different monoclonal antibodies with Dako-EGFR (46.95%) and NCL-EGFR (32.32%) were fairly concordant. Although IHC is a convenient and feasible method for detecting the expression of EGFR, it yields controversial staining results concerning EGFR expression using various commercial antibodies in a CRC tumor section.

  2. Both Neutralizing and Non-Neutralizing Human H7N9 Influenza Vaccine-Induced Monoclonal Antibodies Confer Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Dunand, Carole J; Leon, Paul E; Huang, Min; Choi, Angela; Chromikova, Veronika; Ho, Irvin Y; Tan, Gene S; Cruz, John; Hirsh, Ariana; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Ennis, Francis A; Terajima, Masanori; Treanor, John J; Topham, David J; Subbarao, Kanta; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian; Wilson, Patrick C

    2016-06-08

    Pathogenic H7N9 avian influenza viruses continue to represent a public health concern, and several candidate vaccines are currently being developed. It is vital to assess if protective antibodies are induced following vaccination and to characterize the diversity of epitopes targeted. Here we characterized the binding and functional properties of twelve H7-reactive human antibodies induced by a candidate A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) vaccine. Both neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies protected mice in vivo during passive transfer challenge experiments. Mapping the H7 hemagglutinin antigenic sites by generating escape mutant variants against the neutralizing antibodies identified unique epitopes on the head and stalk domains. Further, the broadly cross-reactive non-neutralizing antibodies generated in this study were protective through Fc-mediated effector cell recruitment. These findings reveal important properties of vaccine-induced antibodies and provide a better understanding of the human monoclonal antibody response to influenza in the context of vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enavatuzumab, a Humanized Anti-TWEAK Receptor Monoclonal Antibody, Exerts Antitumor Activity through Attracting and Activating Innate Immune Effector Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiming Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enavatuzumab is a humanized IgG1 anti-TWEAK receptor monoclonal antibody that was evaluated in a phase I clinical study for the treatment of solid malignancies. The current study was to determine whether and how myeloid effector cells were involved in postulated mechanisms for its potent antitumor activity in xenograft models. The initial evidence for a role of effector cells was obtained in a subset of tumor xenograft mouse models whose response to enavatuzumab relied on the binding of Fc of the antibody to Fcγ receptor. The involvement of effector cells was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, which revealed strong infiltration of CD45+ effector cells into tumor xenografts in responding models, but minimal infiltration in nonresponders. Consistent with the xenograft studies, human effector cells preferentially migrated toward in vivo-responsive tumor cells treated by enavatuzumab in vitro, with the majority of migratory cells being monocytes. Conditioned media from enavatuzumab-treated tumor cells contained elevated levels of chemokines, which might be responsible for enavatuzumab-triggered effector cell migration. These preclinical studies demonstrate that enavatuzumab can exert its potent antitumor activity by actively recruiting and activating myeloid effectors to kill tumor cells. Enavatuzumab-induced chemokines warrant further evaluation in clinical studies as potential biomarkers for such activity.

  4. Sidedness and TP53 mutations impact OS in anti-EGFR but not anti-VEGF treated mCRC - an analysis of the KRAS registry of the AGMT (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Medikamentöse Tumortherapie).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huemer, Florian; Thaler, Josef; Piringer, Gudrun; Hackl, Hubert; Pleyer, Lisa; Hufnagl, Clemens; Weiss, Lukas; Greil, Richard

    2018-01-03

    In metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), the localization of the primary tumour has been shown to be of prognostic as well as predictive relevance. With the aim to investigate clinical and molecular disease characteristics with respect to sidedness in a real-world cohort, we analyzed 161 mCRC patients included in the KRAS Registry of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Medikamentöse Tumortherapie (AGMT) between January 2006 and October 2013. Right-sided mCRC displayed a worse median overall survival (OS) in comparison to left-sided disease (18.1 months [95%-CI: 14.3-40.7] versus 32.3 months [95%-CI: 25.5-38.6]; HR: 1.63 [95%-CI: 1.13-2.84]; p = 0.013). The choice of the biological agent in front-line therapy had a statistically significant impact on median OS in patients with right-sided tumours (anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR): 10.6 months [95%-CI: 5.2-NA]; anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF): 26.2 months [95%-CI: 17.9-NA]; HR: 2.69 [95%-CI: 1.30-12.28]; p = 0.015) but not in patients with left-sided tumours (anti-EGFR: 37.0 months [95%-CI: 20.2-56.6]; anti-VEGF: 32.3 months [95%-CI: 23.6-41.1]; HR: 0.97 [95%-CI: 0.56-1.66]; p = 0.905). When evaluating molecular characteristics of tumour samples, we found a clinically meaningful trend towards an inferior OS in TP53 mutant mCRC treated with anti-EGFR based therapy compared to anti-VEGF based therapy (17.1 months [95%-CI: 8.7-NA] versus 38.3 months [95%-CI: 23.6-48.0], HR = 1.95 [95%-CI: 0.95-5.88]; p = 0.066), which was not significantly dependent on sidedness. This was not the case in patients with TP53 wild-type tumours. Therefore we evaluated the combined impact of sidedness and TP53 mutation status in the anti-EGFR treated cohort and patients with left-sided/TP53 wild-type mCRC showed the longest median OS (38.9 months) of all groups (right-sided/TP53 mutant: 12.1 months; right-sided/TP53 wild-type: 8.9 months; left-sided/TP53 mutant: 18.4 months; p = 0.020). TP53

  5. Comparative assessment of the recognition of domain-specific CD163 monoclonal antibodies in human monocytes explains wide discrepancy in reported levels of cellular surface CD163 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Etzerodt, Anders; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2011-01-01

    . Materials and Methods The cellular distribution of CD163 on human peripheral blood monocytes in freshly drawn blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from buffy-coats was investigated by flow cytometry using CD163 monoclonal antibodies recognizing scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) domain......Background CD163 is expressed exclusively on cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage and is widely used as a marker of human macrophages. Further, it has been suggested as a diagnostic marker of monocyte/macrophage activity in inflammatory conditions and as a therapeutic target. However, studies...... 1 (MAC2-158), domain 4 (R-20), domain 7 (GHI/61), and domain 9 (RM3/1). The CD163 monoclonal antibodies were characterized in binding and endocytosis experiments in human macrophages and CD163-transfected Flp-In CHO cells. Calcium-dependent ligand binding was assessed using surface plasmon resonance...

  6. Human monoclonal antibodies in single chain fragment variable format with potent neutralization activity against influenza virus H5N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Alessandro; Capecchi, Barbara; Campitelli, Laura; Imperiale, Valentina; Flego, Michela; Zamboni, Silvia; Gellini, Mara; Alberini, Isabella; Pittiglio, Eliana; Donatelli, Isabella; Temperton, Nigel J; Cianfriglia, Maurizio

    2009-09-01

    Effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies are needed to control and combat the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H5N1. To this end, we developed human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in single chain fragment variable (scFv) format towards the H5N1 avian influenza virus to gain new insights for the development of immunotherapy against human cases of H5N1. Using a biopanning based approach a large array of scFvs against H5N1 virus were isolated from the human semi-synthetic ETH-2 phage antibody library. H5N1 ELISA-positive scFvs with unique variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) chain gene sequences showed different biochemical properties and neutralization activity across H5N1 viral strains. In particular, the scFv clones AV.D1 and AV.C4 exerted a significant inhibition of the H5N1 A/Vietnam/1194/2004 virus infection in a pseudotype-based neutralization assay. Interestingly, these two scFvs displayed a cross-clade neutralizing activity versus A/whooping swan/Mongolia/244/2005 and A/Indonesia/5/2005 strains. These studies provide proof of the concept that human mAbs in scFv format with well-defined H5N1 recognition patterns and in vitro neutralizing activity can be easily and rapidly isolated by biopanning selection of an entirely artificial antibody repertoire using inactivated H5N1 virus as a bait.

  7. A murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody detects a common idiotope on human, mouse and rabbit antibodies to allergen Lol p IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, E M; Dzuba-Fischer, J M; Rector, E S; Sehon, A H; Kisil, F T

    1991-09-01

    A syngeneic mouse monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id), designated as B1/1, was generated against a monoclonal antibody (MoAb 91) specific for Ryegrass pollen allergen Lol p IV. This anti-Id recognized an idiotope (Id) that was also present on other monoclonal antibodies with the same specificity as MoAb 91. Observations that (i) the anti-Id inhibited the binding of MoAb 91 to Lol p IV and (ii) the Id-anti-Id interaction could be inhibited by Lol p IV indicated that the Id was located within or near the antigen combining site. These properties served to characterize B1/1 as an internal image anti-Id. Evidence that an immune response in different species to Lol p IV elicits the formation of antibodies which express a common Id was provided by the observations that (i) the Id-anti-Id interactions could be inhibited by mouse, human and rabbit antisera to Lol p IV and (ii) the binding of these antisera to Lol p IV could be inhibited by the anti-Id. Interestingly, the internal image anti-Id B1/1 also recognized an Id on a monoclonal antibody which was directed to an epitope of Lol p IV, different from that recognized by MoAb 91.

  8. Treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal IgG antibody against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis-prone pigs reduces cathepsin S in coronary lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bo; Al-Mashhadi, Ahmed Ludvigsen; Von Wachenfeldt, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunization with oxidized LDL (oxLDL) reduces atherosclerosis in rodents. We tested the hypothesis that treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal antibody against oxLDL will reduce the burden or composition of atherosclerotic lesions in hypercholesterolemic minipigs. Methods...... and results Thirty-eight hypercholesterolemic minipigs with defective LDL receptors were injected with an oxLDL antibody or placebo weekly for 12 weeks. An 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scan (n = 9) was performed before inclusion and after 3 months of treatment. Blood samples.......03) with no difference in CD68 or CD163 positivity. Conclusions In hypercholesterolemic minipigs, treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal antibody against oxLDL reduced cathepsin S in coronary lesions without any effect on the burden of atherosclerosis or aortic FDG-PET signal....

  9. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a human monoclonal antibody TONO-1 with cytotoxic potential for T-leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numasaki, M; Nakamura, K; Fukuoka, Y; Saeki, H; Hanai, N; Kudo, T

    2001-01-15

    A human monoclonal antibody (HuMab) TONO-1 (IgM, lambda) recognizes cell surface antigens associated primarily with human T-leukemia/lymphoma cells. In this study, we investigated the reactivity against T-leukemia/lymphoma cells in detail, cytotoxic potential and primary nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of the rearranged heavy and light chains of the HuMab TONO-1. Expression of the molecules (TONO-1 Ags) detected by a HuMab TONO-1 was significantly heterogeneous even in the same T-leukemia/lymphoma cell lines HPB-MLT and MOLT-4F. The flow cytometric curves showed an unusual broad-based spread of fluorescence intensity. HuMab TONO-1 was shown to have the ability to kill the T-leukernia/lymphoma cells efficiently in the presence of rabbit complements. However, HuMab TONO-1 did not demonstrate significant antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, HuMab TONO-1 heavy and light chain variable regions were cloned, sequenced and analyzed. HuMab TONO-1 uses a V(H) gene member of the V(H)IV gene family V(H)71-4, and is productively rearranged with the germ line D(H) gene D(XP')1, and the germ line J(H)5 gene with multiple somatic mutations. HuMab TONO-1 Vlambda belongs to the lambda light chain variable subgroup I family and is derived from the Vlambdalc germ line gene Humlv1042, and germ line gene Jlambda1 without somatic mutations. The results reveal that the production of HuMab TONO-1, with cytotoxic potential for human T-leukemia/lymphoma cells, is achieved by rearrangement of the V(H)71-4/Humlv1042 germ line variable region gene combination, that is associated with the autoimmune repertoire.

  10. Immunoscintigraphy of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice with I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments of monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senekowitsch, R.; Maul, F.D.; Wenisch, H.J.C.; Kriegel, H.; Hor, G.

    1985-01-01

    In the present study radioiodinated F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments of CA19-9 and antibody that reacts specifically with human gastrointestinal cancer were examined for their ability to detect human pancreatic carcinoma hosted in nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 80μCi of I-131-F(ab')/sub 2/ with a specific activity of 1.8μCi/μg. All mice were imaged after the injection and every 24hr up to 6 days. The retained radioactivity was also registered with a whole-body counter immediately after imaging. As a control F(ab's)/sub 2/ of a nonspecific antibody were administered in parallel to another group of animals bearing the same tumor. Three animals of each group were killed at 1,2,4 and 8 days for determination of the distribution of both labeled antibody-fragments. On scintigraphic images obtained with the CA19-9-F(ab')/sub 2/ the tumors could be visualized 24hr after injection, the best dilineation however was achieved 96hr p.i.. The biodistribution data exhibited a more rapid blood clearance for the specific fragments compared to that for the unspecific ones. Tumors showed an increase in uptake up to 48hr reaching 1.7% of the injected dose per gram, declining to values of 0.08%/g at day 6 p.i.. The highest tumor-to-blood ratios were found after 96h. They were 7 for the CA19-9-fragments compared to 1.5 for the unspecific fragments. The whole body counting revealed a more rapid excretion for the fragments of the specific monoclonal antibodies than for the unspecific ones. In summary the authors were able to show that CA19-9-F(ab')/sub 2/-fragments can be used for immunodetection of human pancreatic carcinoma hosted in nude mice

  11. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  12. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human...... class II-positive monocytic (I937) and T leukemic (HUT78) tumor cell lines and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed B-lymphoid cell lines (EBV-LCL). Class II-negative cell lines (U-937 and the EBV-LCL mutant line 616) were not induced to aggregate. An HLA-G-transfected EBV-LCL, 221-AGN......, but not the class I-negative parental line, 221, showed homotypic aggregation in response to an HLA-G specific mAb (87G) and a broad reacting class I-specific mAb (IOT2). Both cell lines responded with aggregation to anti-class II mAb (TU35). The anti-class I mAb, W6/32, had no effect on all cell lines tested...

  13. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human......, but not the class I-negative parental line, 221, showed homotypic aggregation in response to an HLA-G specific mAb (87G) and a broad reacting class I-specific mAb (IOT2). Both cell lines responded with aggregation to anti-class II mAb (TU35). The anti-class I mAb, W6/32, had no effect on all cell lines tested...... and two anti-beta 2-microglobulin mAb had variable, weak effects. The aggregation response was an active, temperature-sensitive process which was almost totally abrogated by azide and by cytochalasins B and E, but unaffected by colchicine, EDTA, aphidicolin, actinomycin D and protein tyrosine kinase...

  14. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of “preneoplastic antigen”-like molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Hongying [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Yoshimura, Kazunori [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan); Sawada, Jun-ichi; Saito, Yoshiro [Division of Biochemistry and Immunochemistry, National Institute of Health Sciences, Kamiyoga 1-18-1, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158-8501 (Japan); Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D. [Department of Entomology and Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8584 (United States); Akatsuka, Toshitaka, E-mail: akatsuka@saitama-med.ac.jp [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Saitama Medical University, Moroyama-cho, Iruma-gun, Saitama 350-0495 (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. -- Highlights: ► Monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH were developed. ► They discriminate between the membrane-bound and the linearized forms of mEH. ► We analyze the antigenic structure of the altered form of mEH in tumor cells. ► Preneoplastic antigen is a multimolecular complex of mEH with

  15. Development of monoclonal antibodies to human microsomal epoxide hydrolase and analysis of “preneoplastic antigen”-like molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan, Hongying; Yoshimura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Nobuharu; Sugiyama, Kazuo; Sawada, Jun-ichi; Saito, Yoshiro; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Akatsuka, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a drug metabolizing enzyme which resides on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and catalyzes the hydration of reactive epoxide intermediates that are formed by cytochrome P450s. mEH is also thought to have a role in bile acid transport on the plasma membrane of hepatocytes. It is speculated that efficient execution of such multiple functions is secured by its orientation and association with cytochrome P450 enzymes on the ER membrane and formation of a multiple transport system on the plasma membrane. In certain disease status, mEH loses its association with the membrane and can be detected as distinct antigens in the cytosol of preneoplastic foci of liver (preneoplastic antigen), in the serum in association with hepatitis C virus infection (AN antigen), or in some brain tumors. To analyze the antigenic structures of mEH in physiological and pathological conditions, we developed monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH. Five different kinds of antibodies were obtained: three, anti-N-terminal portions; one anti-C-terminal; and one, anti-conformational epitope. By combining these antibodies, we developed antigen detection methods which are specific to either the membrane-bound form or the linearized form of mEH. These methods detected mEH in the culture medium released from a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line and a glioblastoma cell line, which was found to be a multimolecular complex with a unique antigenic structure different from that of the membrane-bound form of mEH. These antibodies and antigen detection methods may be useful to study pathological changes of mEH in various human diseases. -- Highlights: ► Monoclonal antibodies against different portions of mEH were developed. ► They discriminate between the membrane-bound and the linearized forms of mEH. ► We analyze the antigenic structure of the altered form of mEH in tumor cells. ► Preneoplastic antigen is a multimolecular complex of mEH with

  16. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events.

  17. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... the frequency of antibody phage particles of interest in the library and allow for efficient isolation monoclonal antibodies with the predefined specificity....

  18. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of colorectal carcinoma using technetium-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, S A; Serafini, A N; Moffat, F L; Vargas-Cuba, R D; Sfakianakis, G N; Franceschi, D; Crichton, V Z; Subramanian, R; Klein, J L; De Jager, R L

    1995-12-01

    Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) using human monoclonal antibodies offers the important clinical advantage of repeated imaging over murine monoclonal antibodies by eliminating the cross-species antibody response. This article reports a Phase I-II clinical trial with Tc-99m-labeled, totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 in patients with colorectal carcinoma. The study population consisted of 34 patients with colorectal cancer (20 men and 14 women; age range, 44-81 years). Patients were administered 5-10 mg antibody labeled with 21-41 mCi Tc-99m by the i.v. route and imaged at 3-10 and 16-24 h after infusion using planar and single-photon emission computed tomographic (CT) techniques. Pathological confirmation was obtained in 25 patients who underwent surgery. Human antihuman antibody (HAHA) titers were checked prior to and 1 and 3 months after the infusion. RIS with Tc-99m-labeled 88BV59H21-2 revealed a better detection rate in the abdomen-pelvis region compared with axial CT. The combined use of both modalities increased the sensitivity in both the liver and abdomen-pelvis regions. Ten patients developed mild adverse reactions (chills and fever). No HAHA response was detected in this series. Tc-99m-labeled human monoclonal antibody 88BV59H21-2 RIS shows promise as a useful diagnostic modality in patients with colorectal cancer. RIS alone or in combination with CT is more sensitive than CT in detecting tumor within the abdomen and pelvis. Repeated RIS studies may be possible, due to the lack of a HAHA response.

  19. Radioimmunoimaging of human breast carcinoma xenografts in nude mouse model with 111In-labeled new monoclonal antibody EBA-1 and F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yemul, Shrishailam; Leon, J.A.; Pozniakoff, Ted; Esser, P.D.; Estabrook, Alison; Met-Path Inc., Teterboro, NJ

    1993-01-01

    Radioimmunoimaging characteristics of a new monoclonal antibody EBA-1 and its F(ab') 2 fragments utilizing nu/nu mice bearing human breast carcinoma xenografts are described. 111 In-DPTA conjugates of EBA-1 localized with tumor/blood ratios of 0.99 ± 0.10 (P 2 radioconjugates at 48 h. These results suggest that EBA-1 and its F(ab') 2 might be useful reagents in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy. (author)

  20. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies: peripheral glycosylation of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 may be a target for virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N...... carbohydrate structures expressed by the viral envelope glycoprotein gp120, indicating that glycans of the viral envelope are possible targets for immunotherapy or vaccine development or both....

  1. A Protein-Conjugate Approach to Develop a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Antigen Detection Test for the Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Kailash P.; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L.; Rolán, Hortensia G.; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsolis, Renee M.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize a monoclonal antibody-based assay to detect Brucella melitensis lipopolysaccharide in blood by conjugating B. melitensis LPS to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an immunogenic protein carrier to maximize IgG affinity of monoclonal antibodies. A panel of specific of monoclonal antibodies was obtained that recognized both B. melitensis and B. abortus lipopolysaccharide epitopes. An antigen capture assay was developed that detected B. melitensis in the blood of experimentally infected mice and, in a pilot study, in naturally infected Peruvian subjects. As a proof of principle, a majority (7/10) of the patients with positive blood cultures had B. melitensis lipopolysaccharide detected in the initial blood specimen obtained. One of 10 patients with relapsed brucellosis and negative blood culture had a positive serum antigen test. No seronegative/blood culture negative patients had a positive serum antigen test. Analysis of the pair of monoclonal antibodies (2D1, 2E8) used in the capture ELISA for potential cross-reactivity in the detection of lipopolysaccharides of E. coli O157:H7 and Yersinia enterocolitica O9 showed specificity for Brucella lipopolysaccharide. This new approach to develop antigen-detection monoclonal antibodies against a T cell-independent polysaccharide antigen based on immunogenic protein conjugation may lead to the production of improved rapid point-of-care-deployable assays for the diagnosis of brucellosis and other infectious diseases. PMID:24901521

  2. Human immunological response to mouse monoclonal antibodies in the treatment or diagnosis of malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kroonenburgh, M J; Pauwels, E K

    1988-11-01

    An overview of the literature is presented concerning the formation, detection, incidence and effect of the human immunoglobulin response on immunoscintigraphy. The following conclusions are drawn. The production of human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMAs) is associated with a diminished therapeutic response; adequate prevention of HAMA production is not yet possible; high HAMA titres give rise to rapid clearance of MoAb into the liver and marked reduction of tumour uptake which results in reduced image quality on immunoscintigraphy; alteration of antibody biodistribution is likely to be related to the in vivo formation of antibody-antibody complexes which could interfere with image quality when sequential imaging is carried out.

  3. Development of novel monoclonal antibodies that define differentiation stages of human stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte Caroline; Kortesidis, Angela; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2011-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are currently being introduced for cell therapy, yet, antibodies specific for native and differentiated MSCs are required for their identification prior to clinical use. Herein, high quality antibodies against MSC surface proteins were developed by immunizing...

  4. The value of non-human primates in the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meer, P.J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34153790X; Kooijman, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322905788; Van Der Laan, J.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374879966; Moors, E.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/20241664X; Schellekens, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is increasingly focusing on the development of biological therapeutics. These molecules generally cause no off-target toxicity and are highly species specific. Therefore, non-human primates (NHPs) are often the only relevant species in which to conduct regulatory safety

  5. Utility of a human FcRn transgenic mouse model in drug discovery for early assessment and prediction of human pharmacokinetics of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Lindsay B.; Wang, Mengmeng; Kavosi, Mania S.; Joyce, Alison; Kurz, Jeffrey C.; Fan, Yao-Yun; Dowty, Martin E.; Zhang, Minlei; Zhang, Yiqun; Cheng, Aili; Hua, Fei; Jones, Hannah M.; Neubert, Hendrik; Polzer, Robert J.; O'Hara, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Therapeutic antibodies continue to develop as an emerging drug class, with a need for preclinical tools to better predict in vivo characteristics. Transgenic mice expressing human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn) have potential as a preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) model to project human PK of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Using a panel of 27 mAbs with a broad PK range, we sought to characterize and establish utility of this preclinical animal model and provide guidance for its application in drug development of mAbs. This set of mAbs was administered to both hemizygous and homozygous hFcRn transgenic mice (Tg32) at a single intravenous dose, and PK parameters were derived. Higher hFcRn protein tissue expression was confirmed by liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry in Tg32 homozygous versus hemizygous mice. Clearance (CL) was calculated using non-compartmental analysis and correlations were assessed to historical data in wild-type mouse, non-human primate (NHP), and human. Results show that mAb CL in hFcRn Tg32 homozygous mouse correlate with human (r2 = 0.83, r = 0.91, p PK studies, enhancement of the early selection of lead molecules, and ultimately a decrease in the time for a drug candidate to reach the clinic. PMID:27232760

  6. Human polyomavirus JC reactivation and pathogenetic mechanisms of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy and cancer in the era of monoclonal antibody therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellizzi, A; Nardis, C; Anzivino, E; Rodìo, D M; Fioriti, D; Mischitelli, M; Chiarini, F; Pietropaolo, V

    2012-02-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the neurotropic human polyomavirus JC (JCV) lytic infection of oligodendrocytes. PML was first described as a complication of lymphoproliferative disorders more than 50 years ago and emerged as a major complication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the 1980s. Despite the ubiquity of this virus, PML is rare and always seen in association with underlying immunosuppressive condition, such as HIV infection, autoimmune diseases, cancer, and organ transplantation. JCV remains quiescent in the kidneys, where it displays a stable archetypal non-coding control region (NCCR). Conversely, rearranged JCV NCCR, including tandem repeat patterns found in the brain of PML patients, have been associated with neurovirulence. The specific site and mechanism of JCV NCCR transformation is unknown. According to one model, during the course of immunosuppression, JCV departs from its latent state and after entering the brain, productively infects and destroys oligodendrocytes. Although the majority of PML cases occur in severely immunesuppressed individuals, PML has been increasingly diagnosed in patients treated with biological therapies such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that modulate immune system functions: in fact, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphopenia, resulting from this immunomodulatory therapy, are the primary risk factor. Furthermore, JCV reactivation in nonpermissive cells after treatment with mAbs, such as intestinal epithelial cells in Crohn's disease patients, in association with other host tumor-inducing factors, could provide valid information on the role of JCV in several malignancies, such as colorectal cancer.

  7. Chimpanzee-Human Monoclonal Antibodies for Treatment of Chronic Poliovirus Excretors and Emergency Postexposure Prophylaxis▿‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhaochun; Chumakov, Konstantin; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Kouiavskaia, Diana; Makiya, Michelle; Neverov, Alexander; Rezapkin, Gennady; Sebrell, Andrew; Purcell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Six poliovirus-neutralizing Fabs were recovered from a combinatorial Fab phage display library constructed from bone marrow-derived lymphocytes of immunized chimpanzees. The chimeric chimpanzee-human full-length IgGs (hereinafter called monoclonal antibodies [MAbs]) were generated by combining a chimpanzee IgG light chain and a variable domain of heavy chain with a human constant Fc region. The six MAbs neutralized vaccine strains and virulent strains of poliovirus. Five MAbs were serotype specific, while one MAb cross-neutralized serotypes 1 and 2. Epitope mapping performed by selecting and sequencing antibody-resistant viral variants indicated that the cross-neutralizing MAb bound between antigenic sites 1 and 2, thereby covering the canyon region containing the receptor-binding site. Another serotype 1-specific MAb recognized a region located between antigenic sites 2 and 3 that included parts of capsid proteins VP1 and VP3. Both serotype 2-specific antibodies recognized antigenic site 1. No escape mutants to serotype 3-specific MAbs could be generated. The administration of a serotype 1-specific MAb to transgenic mice susceptible to poliovirus at a dose of 5 μg/mouse completely protected them from paralysis after challenge with a lethal dose of wild-type poliovirus. Moreover, MAb injection 6 or 12 h after virus infection provided significant protection. The MAbs described here could be tested in clinical trials to determine whether they might be useful for treatment of immunocompromised chronic virus excretors and for emergency protection of contacts of a paralytic poliomyelitis case. PMID:21345966

  8. High affinity anti-TIM-3 and anti-KIR monoclonal antibodies cloned from healthy human individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Ryser

    Full Text Available We report here the cloning of native high affinity anti-TIM-3 and anti-KIR IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of healthy human donors. The cells that express these mAbs are rare, present at a frequency of less than one per 105 memory B-cells. Using our proprietary multiplexed screening and cloning technology CellSpot™ we assessed the presence of memory B-cells reactive to foreign and endogenous disease-associated antigens within the same individual. When comparing the frequencies of antigen-specific memory B-cells analyzed in over 20 screening campaigns, we found a strong correlation of the presence of anti-TIM-3 memory B-cells with memory B-cells expressing mAbs against three disease-associated antigens: (i bacterial DNABII proteins that are a marker for Gram negative and Gram positive bacterial infections, (ii hemagglutinin (HA of influenza virus and (iii the extracellular domain of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK. One of the native anti-KIR mAbs has similar characteristics as lirilumab, an anti-KIR mAb derived from immunization of humanized transgenic mice that is in ongoing clinical trials. It is interesting to speculate that these native anti-TIM-3 and anti-KIR antibodies may function as natural regulatory antibodies, analogous to the pharmacological use in cancer treatment of engineered antibodies against the same targets. Further characterization studies are needed to define the mechanisms through which these native antibodies may function in healthy and disease conditions.

  9. Characterisation of new monoclonal antibodies reacting with prions from both human and animal brain tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Henriette Cordes; Bergström, Ann-Louise; Ohm, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    -type mice and used for western blotting and immunohistochemistry to detect several types of human prion-disease associated PrPSc, including sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) (subtypes MM1 and V"), familial CJD and Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) disease PrPSc as well as PrPSc of bovine......Post-mortem diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopaties (prion diseases) is primarily based on the detection of a protease resistant, misfolded disease associated isoform (PrPSc) of the prion protein (PrPc) on neuronal cells. These methods depend on antibodies directed aganinst Pr...

  10. Amphipathic variable region heavy chain peptides derived from monoclonal human Wegener's anti-PR3 antibodies stimulate lymphocytes from patients with Wegener's granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peen, E; Malone, C; Myers, C; Williams, R C; Peck, A B; Csernok, E; Gross, W L; Staud, R

    2001-01-01

    Amphipathic variable-region heavy chain 11-mer peptides from monoclonal human IgM antiproteinase-3 antibodies were studied for peripheral blood lymphocyte stimulation in 21 patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) or microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), connective tissue disease controls and normal control subjects. Positive T-cell activation was observed in most experiments with WG patients' lymphocytes using amphipathic VH-region peptides from four different human monoclonal anti-PR3 antibodies. Control peptides of the same length but without amphipathic characteristics along with other amphipathic peptides not derived from monoclonal anti-PR3 sequence were employed as controls. No significant lymphocyte stimulation was observed with normal controls, but positive stimulation with amphipathic VH peptides was also recorded in other connective tissue disease controls mainly patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Amphipathic peptides not derived from anti-PR3 sequence did not stimulate WG lymphocytes. Our findings indicate that lymphocyte reactivity as an element of cell-mediated immunity may be activated by amphipathic VH-region amino acid sequences of autoantibodies which are themselves associated with diseases such as WG. PMID:11529926

  11. MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, in the treatment of patients with moderate rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Frank; Tak, Paul P; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the safety, tolerability and signs of efficacy of MOR103, a human monoclonal antibody to granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Patients with active, moderate RA were enrolled in a randomised...... placebo and MOR103 0.3, 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg, respectively). Treatment emergent adverse events (AEs) in the MOR103 groups were mild or moderate in intensity and generally reported at frequencies similar to those in the placebo group. The most common AE was nasopharyngitis. In two cases, AEs were classified...... with active RA. The data support further investigation of this monoclonal antibody to GM-CSF in RA patients and potentially in those with other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT01023256....

  12. Characterization of sporozoite surface antigens of Plasmodium falciparum, using monoclonal antibodies. Part of a coordinated programme on the preparation of irradiated vaccines against some human diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, M.

    1982-10-01

    Sporozoites are considered as a source of potential vaccine. Characterization of their antigens is therefore important and can be achieved by monoclonal antibodies. The purpose of this project is to study the production of monoclonal antibodies against sporozoites of P. falciparum. Various infections of mosquitoes were carried out during the period 1981-1982 to obtain antigens for the production of hybridomas. Hybridomas were produced from mice immunized through the bites of infected mosquitoes and by intravenous inoculation. The anti-sporozoite activity of the hybridomas was tested by an immunofluorescent antibody test using P. falciparum sporozoites as antigens. Positive immunofluorescence was seen in hybridoma cell lines tested with P. falciparum, whereas negative results were obtained when the cell lines were cross-reacted with other human species (P. vivax) and with a rodent malaria parasite (P. berghei)

  13. Cross-Reactive Human IgM-Derived Monoclonal Antibodies that Bind to HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barton F. Haynes

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Elicitation of antibodies with potent and broad neutralizing activity against HIV by immunization remains a challenge. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs isolated from humans with HIV-1 infection exhibit such activity but vaccine immunogens based on structures containing their epitopes have not been successful for their elicitation. All known broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs are immunoglobulin (Ig Gs (IgGs and highly somatically hypermutated which could impede their elicitation. Ig Ms (IgMs are on average significantly less divergent from germline antibodies and are relevant for the development of vaccine immunogens but are underexplored compared to IgGs. Here we describe the identification and characterization of several human IgM-derived mAbs against HIV-1 which were selected from a large phage-displayed naive human antibody library constructed from blood, lymph nodes and spleens of 59 healthy donors. These antibodies bound with high affinity to recombinant envelope glycoproteins (gp140s, Envs of HIV-1 isolates from different clades. They enhanced or did not neutralize infection by some of the HIV-1 primary isolates using CCR5 as a coreceptor but neutralized all CXCR4 isolates tested although weakly. One of these antibodies with relatively low degree of somatic hypermutation was more extensively characterized. It bound to a highly conserved region partially overlapping with the coreceptor binding site and close to but not overlapping with the CD4 binding site. These results suggest the existence of conserved structures that could direct the immune response to non-neutralizing or even enhancing antibodies which may represent a strategy used by the virus to escape neutralizing immune responses. Further studies will show whether such a strategy plays a role in HIV infection of humans, how important that role could be, and what the mechanisms of infection enhancement are. The newly identified mAbs could be used as reagents to further

  14. Functional Transplant of a Dengue Virus Serotype 3 (DENV3)-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibody Epitope into DENV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, William B; Yount, Boyd L; Royal, Scott R; de Alwis, Ruklanthi; Widman, Douglas G; Smith, Scott A; Crowe, James E; Pfaff, Jennifer M; Kahle, Kristen M; Doranz, Benjamin J; Ibarra, Kristie D; Harris, Eva; de Silva, Aravinda M; Baric, Ralph S

    2016-05-15

    The four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes, DENV1 through 4, are endemic throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. While first infection confers long-term protective immunity against viruses of the infecting serotype, a second infection with virus of a different serotype carries a greater risk of severe dengue disease, including dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Recent studies demonstrate that humans exposed to DENV infections develop neutralizing antibodies that bind to quaternary epitopes formed by the viral envelope (E) protein dimers or higher-order assemblies required for the formation of the icosahedral viral envelope. Here we show that the quaternary epitope target of the human DENV3-specific neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5J7 can be partially transplanted into a DENV1 strain by changing the core residues of the epitope contained within a single monomeric E molecule. MAb 5J7 neutralized the recombinant DENV1/3 strain in cell culture and was protective in a mouse model of infection with the DENV1/3 strain. However, the 5J7 epitope was only partially recreated by transplantation of the core residues because MAb 5J7 bound and neutralized wild-type (WT) DENV3 better than the DENV1/3 recombinant. Our studies demonstrate that it is possible to transplant a large number of discontinuous residues between DENV serotypes and partially recreate a complex antibody epitope, while retaining virus viability. Further refinement of this approach may lead to new tools for measuring epitope-specific antibody responses and new vaccine platforms. Dengue virus is the most important mosquito-borne pathogen of humans worldwide, with approximately one-half the world's population living in regions where dengue is endemic. Dengue immunity following infection is robust and thought to be conferred by antibodies raised against the infecting virus. However, the specific viral components that these antibodies recognize and how they neutralize the virus

  15. Regulatory approval and a first-in-human phase I clinical trial of a monoclonal antibody produced in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Julian K-C; Drossard, Jürgen; Lewis, David; Altmann, Friedrich; Boyle, Julia; Christou, Paul; Cole, Tom; Dale, Philip; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Isitt, Valerie; Katinger, Dietmar; Lobedan, Martin; Mertens, Hubert; Paul, Mathew J; Rademacher, Thomas; Sack, Markus; Hundleby, Penelope A C; Stiegler, Gabriela; Stoger, Eva; Twyman, Richard M; Vcelar, Brigitta; Fischer, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Although plant biotechnology has been widely investigated for the production of clinical-grade monoclonal antibodies, no antibody products derived from transgenic plants have yet been approved by pharmaceutical regulators for clinical testing. In the Pharma-Planta project, the HIV-neutralizing human monoclonal antibody 2G12 was expressed in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). The scientific, technical and regulatory demands of good manufacturing practice (GMP) were addressed by comprehensive molecular characterization of the transgene locus, confirmation of genetic and phenotypic stability over several generations of transgenic plants, and by establishing standard operating procedures for the creation of a master seed bank, plant cultivation, harvest, initial processing, downstream processing and purification. The project developed specifications for the plant-derived antibody (P2G12) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) based on (i) the guidelines for the manufacture of monoclonal antibodies in cell culture systems; (ii) the draft European Medicines Agency Points to Consider document on quality requirements for APIs produced in transgenic plants; and (iii) de novo guidelines developed with European national regulators. From the resulting process, a GMP manufacturing authorization was issued by the competent authority in Germany for transgenic plant-derived monoclonal antibodies for use in a phase I clinical evaluation. Following preclinical evaluation and ethical approval, a clinical trial application was accepted by the UK national pharmaceutical regulator. A first-in-human, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, dose-escalation phase I safety study of a single vaginal administration of P2G12 was carried out in healthy female subjects. The successful completion of the clinical trial marks a significant milestone in the commercial development of plant-derived pharmaceutical proteins. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of

  16. Population PK and IgE pharmacodynamic analysis of a fully human monoclonal antibody against IL4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkar, Tarundeep; Sung, Cynthia; Gibiansky, Leonid; Vu, Thuy; Narayanan, Adimoolam; Lin, Shao-Lee; Vincent, Michael; Banfield, Christopher; Colbert, Alex; Hoofring, Sarah; Starcevic, Marta; Ma, Peiming

    2011-10-01

    For AMG 317, a fully human monoclonal antibody to interleukin receptor IL-4Rα, we developed a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model by fitting data from four early phase clinical trials of intravenous and subcutaneous (SC) routes simultaneously, investigated important PK covariates, and explored the relationship between exposure and IgE response. Data for 294 subjects and 2183 AMG 317 plasma concentrations from three Phase 1 and 1 Phase 2 studies were analyzed by nonlinear mixed effects modeling using first-order conditional estimation with interaction. The relationship of IgE response with post hoc estimates of exposure generated from the final PK model was explored based on data from asthmatic patients. The best structural model was a two-compartment quasi-steady-state target-mediated drug disposition model with linear and non-linear clearances. For a typical 80-kg, 40-year subject, linear clearance was 35.0 mL/hr, central and peripheral volumes of distribution were 1.78 and 5.03 L, respectively, and SC bioavailability was 24.3%. Body weight was an important covariate on linear clearance and central volume; age influenced absorption rate. A significant treatment effect was observable between the cumulative AUC and IgE response measured. The population PK model adequately described AMG 317 PK from IV and SC routes over a 60-fold range of doses with two dosing strengths across multiple studies covering healthy volunteers and patients with mild to severe asthma. IgE response across a range of doses and over the sampling time points was found to be related to cumulative AMG 317 exposure.

  17. A mathematical model of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody's effects on cocaine pharmacokinetics in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Hanna N; Zhang, Tongli; Norman, Andrew B

    2017-09-01

    A recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (mAb), h2E2, is at an advanced stage of pre-clinical development as an immunotherapy for cocaine abuse. It is hypothesized that h2E2 binds to and sequesters cocaine in the blood. A three-compartment model of the effects of h2E2 on cocaine's distribution was constructed. The model assumes that h2E2 binds to cocaine and that the h2E2-cocaine complex does not enter the brain but distributes between the central and peripheral compartments. Free cocaine is eliminated from both the central and peripheral compartments, and h2E2 and the h2E2-cocaine complex are eliminated from the central compartment only. This model was tested against a new dataset measuring cocaine concentrations in the brain and plasma over 1h in the presence and absence of h2E2. The mAb significantly increased plasma cocaine concentrations with a concomitant significant decrease in brain concentration. Plasma concentrations declined over the 1-hour sampling period in both groups. With a set of parameters within reasonable physiological ranges, the three-compartment model was able to qualitatively and quantitatively simulate the increased plasma concentration in the presence of the antibody and the decreased peak brain concentration in the presence of antibody. Importantly, the model explained the decline in plasma concentrations over time as distribution of the cocaine-h2E2 complex into a peripheral compartment. This model will facilitate the targeting of ideal mAb PK/PD properties thus accelerating the identification of lead candidate anti-drug mAbs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A model-based meta-analysis of monoclonal antibody pharmacokinetics to guide optimal first-in-human study design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davda, Jasmine P; Dodds, Michael G; Gibbs, Megan A; Wisdom, Wendy; Gibbs, John P

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective analysis were (1) to characterize the population pharmacokinetics (popPK) of four different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in a combined analysis of individual data collected during first-in-human (FIH) studies and (2) to provide a scientific rationale for prospective design of FIH studies with mAbs. The data set was composed of 171 subjects contributing a total of 2716 mAb serum concentrations, following intravenous (IV) and subcutaneous (SC) doses. mAb PK was described by an open 2-compartment model with first-order elimination from the central compartment and a depot compartment with first-order absorption. Parameter values obtained from the popPK model were further used to generate optimal sampling times for a single dose study. A robust fit to the combined data from four mAbs was obtained using the 2-compartment model. Population parameter estimates for systemic clearance and central volume of distribution were 0.20 L/day and 3.6 L with intersubject variability of 31% and 34%, respectively. The random residual error was 14%. Differences (> 2-fold) in PK parameters were not apparent across mAbs. Rich designs (22 samples/subject), minimal designs for popPK (5 samples/subject), and optimal designs for non-compartmental analysis (NCA) and popPK (10 samples/subject) were examined by stochastic simulation and estimation. Single-dose PK studies for linear mAbs executed using the optimal designs are expected to yield high-quality model estimates, and accurate capture of NCA estimations. This model-based meta-analysis has determined typical popPK values for four mAbs with linear elimination and enabled prospective optimization of FIH study designs, potentially improving the efficiency of FIH studies for this class of therapeutics. PMID:24837591

  19. Development of a multi-product leached protein A assay for bioprocess samples containing recombinant human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Diya; Darlucio, Maria R; Chou, Judy H

    2011-03-07

    The detection of low level of protein A leached from monoclonal antibody downstream purification process is often interfered by the presence of excess amount of product antibody. In order to prevent this interference, we developed a new multi-product leached protein A assay that used acidification to completely dissociate the IgG-ProteinA complex, followed by neutralization under selected condition to prevent re-formation of the IgG-ProteinA complex. The amount of protein A was then determined by a sandwich immunoassay using Meso Scale Discovery technology. The assay takes approximately 3h to complete for one 96-well plate of samples, and this has been successfully applied to samples containing different monoclonal antibody products examined so far. The data demonstrates that this assay is robust and efficient in determining leached protein A contamination during purification of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Neutralization of botulinum neurotoxin by a human monoclonal antibody specific for the catalytic light chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad P Adekar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT are a family of category A select bioterror agents and the most potent biological toxins known. Cloned antibody therapeutics hold considerable promise as BoNT therapeutics, but the therapeutic utility of antibodies that bind the BoNT light chain domain (LC, a metalloprotease that functions in the cytosol of cholinergic neurons, has not been thoroughly explored.We used an optimized hybridoma method to clone a fully human antibody specific for the LC of serotype A BoNT (BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody demonstrated potent in vivo neutralization when administered alone and collaborated with an antibody specific for the HC. In Neuro-2a neuroblastoma cells, the 4LCA antibody prevented the cleavage of the BoNT/A proteolytic target, SNAP-25. Unlike an antibody specific for the HC, the 4LCA antibody did not block entry of BoNT/A into cultured cells. Instead, it was taken up into synaptic vesicles along with BoNT/A. The 4LCA antibody also directly inhibited BoNT/A catalytic activity in vitro.An antibody specific for the BoNT/A LC can potently inhibit BoNT/A in vivo and in vitro, using mechanisms not previously associated with BoNT-neutralizing antibodies. Antibodies specific for BoNT LC may be valuable components of an antibody antidote for BoNT exposure.

  1. In Vivo Efficacy of a Cocktail of Human Monoclonal Antibodies (CL184 Against Diverse North American Bat Rabies Virus Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Franka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Following rabies virus (RABV exposure, a combination of thorough wound washing, multiple-dose vaccine administration and the local infiltration of rabies immune globulin (RIG are essential components of modern post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP. Although modern cell-culture-based rabies vaccines are increasingly used in many countries, RIG is much less available. The prohibitive cost of polyclonal serum RIG products has prompted a search for alternatives and design of anti-RABV monoclonal antibodies (MAbs that can be manufactured on a large scale with a consistent potency and lower production costs. Robust in vitro neutralization activity has been demonstrated for the CL184 MAb cocktail, a 1:1 protein mixture of two human anti-RABV MAbs (CR57/CR4098, against a large panel of RABV isolates. In this study, we used a hamster model to evaluate the efficacy of experimental PEP against a lethal challenge. Various doses of CL184 and commercial rabies vaccine were assessed for the ability to protect against lethal infection with representatives of four distinct bat RABV lineages of public health relevance: silver-haired bat (Ln RABV; western canyon bat (Ph RABV; big brown bat (Ef-w1 RABV and Mexican free-tailed bat RABV (Tb RABV. 42–100% of animals survived bat RABV infection when CL184 (in combination with the vaccine was administered. A dose-response relationship was observed with decreasing doses of CL184 resulting in increasing mortality. Importantly, CL184 was highly effective in neutralizing and clearing Ph RABV in vivo, even though CR4098 does not neutralize this virus in vitro. By comparison, 19–95% survivorship was observed if human RIG (20 IU/kg and vaccine were used following challenge with different bat viruses. Based on our results, CL184 represents an efficacious alternative for RIG. Both large-scale and lower cost production could ensure better availability and affordability of this critical life-saving biologic in rabies enzootic

  2. Recognition of N-glycoforms in human chorionic gonadotropin by monoclonal antibodies and their interaction motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Daoyuan; Zhang, Ping; Li, Fei; Chi, Lequan; Zhu, Deyu; Zhang, Qunye; Chi, Lianli

    2015-09-11

    The glycosylation of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) plays an important role in reproductive tumors. Detecting hCG N-glycosylation alteration may significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of related cancers. However, developing an immunoassay directly against the N-linked oligosaccharides is unlikely because of the heterogeneity and low immunogenicity of carbohydrates. Here, we report a hydrogen/deuterium exchange and MS approach to investigate the effect of N-glycosylation on the binding of antibodies against different hCG glycoforms. Hyperglycosylated hCG was purified from the urine of invasive mole patients, and the structure of its N-linked oligosaccharides was confirmed to be more branched by MS. The binding kinetics of the anti-hCG antibodies MCA329 and MCA1024 against hCG and hyperglycosylated hCG were compared using biolayer interferometry. The binding affinity of MCA1024 changed significantly in response to the alteration of hCG N-linked oligosaccharides. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange-MS reveals that the peptide β65-83 of the hCG β subunit is the epitope for MCA1024. Site-specific N-glycosylation analysis suggests that N-linked oligosaccharides at Asn-13 and Asn-30 on the β subunit affect the binding affinity of MCA1024. These results prove that some antibodies are sensitive to the structural change of N-linked oligosaccharides, whereas others are not affected by N-glycosylation. It is promising to improve glycoprotein biomarker-based cancer diagnostics by developing combined immunoassays that can determine the level of protein and measure the degree of N-glycosylation simultaneously. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Semi-high-throughput isolation and N-glycan analysis of human fibrinogen using monolithic supports bearing monoclonal anti-human fibrinogen antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidic, Urška; Trbojević-Akmačić, Irena; Černigoj, Urh; Albers, Malena; Gašperšič, Jernej; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Vidič, Jana; Štrancar, Aleš; Lauc, Gordan

    2017-11-01

    Fibrinogen (FIB) is a secretory glycoprotein synthesized by hepatocytes that has a key role in blood clotting. Its glycosylation has not been studied in detail and little is known about the biological variability of FIB N-glycosylation, mainly due to the lack of fast, simple, and robust approaches to purify FIB from blood plasma samples. In recent years, customised chromatographic monoliths have been used for a variety of biological applications due to their unique characteristics. Here we describe development and optimisation of monolithic supports bearing monoclonal anti-human fibrinogen antibodies in a single column as well as in multi-well plate formats with high FIB specificity and binding capacity for fast immunoaffinity purification of FIB from human blood samples. The developed semi-high-throughput workflow has been successfully applied for FIB immunoaffinity isolation and subsequent ultra performance liquid chromatography N-glycosylation analysis in ten healthy human individuals, demonstrating the potential of monolithic supports in glycomics studies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. HCMV Infection of Human Trophoblast Progenitor Cells of the Placenta Is Neutralized by a Human Monoclonal Antibody to Glycoprotein B and Not by Antibodies to the Pentamer Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Zydek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is the major viral cause of congenital infection and birth defects. Primary maternal infection often results in virus transmission, and symptomatic babies can have permanent neurological deficiencies and deafness. Congenital infection can also lead to intrauterine growth restriction, a defect in placental transport. HCMV replicates in primary cytotrophoblasts (CTBs, the specialized cells of the placenta, and inhibits differentiation/invasion. Human trophoblast progenitor cells (TBPCs give rise to the mature cell types of the chorionic villi, CTBs and multi-nucleated syncytiotrophoblasts (STBs. Here we report that TBPCs are fully permissive for pathogenic and attenuated HCMV strains. Studies with a mutant virus lacking a functional pentamer complex (gH/gL/pUL128-131A showed that virion entry into TBPCs is independent of the pentamer. In addition, infection is blocked by a potent human neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb, TRL345, reactive with glycoprotein B (gB, but not mAbs to the pentamer proteins pUL130/pUL131A. Functional studies revealed that neutralization of infection preserved the capacity of TBPCs to differentiate and assemble into trophospheres composed of CTBs and STBs in vitro. Our results indicate that mAbs to gB protect trophoblast progenitors of the placenta and could be included in antibody treatments developed to suppress congenital infection and prevent disease.

  5. A human monoclonal autoantibody to breast cancer identifies the PDZ domain containing protein GIPC1 as a novel breast cancer-associated antigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudchenko, Sergei; Trakht, Ilya; Scanlan, Matthew; Kalantarov, Gavreel; Yavelsky, Victoria; Levy, Chen; Estabrook, Alison; Old, Lloyd; Chan, Gerald L; Lobel, Leslie

    2008-01-01

    We have been studying the native autoimmune response to cancer through the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that are cancer specific from cancer patients. To facilitate this work we previously developed a fusion partner cell line for human lymphocytes, MFP-2, that fuses efficiently with both human lymph node lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Using this unique trioma fusion partner cell line we isolated a panel of autologous human monoclonal antibodies, from both peripheral blood and lymph node lymphocytes, which are representative of the native repertoire of anti-cancer specific antibodies from breast cancer patients. The current study employs immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis as well as Northern blots, Scatchard binding studies and finally SEREX analysis for target antigen identification. By application of an expression cloning technique known as SEREX, we determined that the target antigen for two monoclonal antibodies, 27.B1 and 27.F7, derived from lymph node B-cells of a breast cancer patient, is the PDZ domain-containing protein known as GIPC1. This protein is highly expressed not only in cultured human breast cancer cells, but also in primary and metastatic tumor tissues and its overexpression appears to be cancer cell specific. Confocal microscopy revealed cell membrane and cytoplasmic localization of the target protein, which is consistent with previous studies of this protein. We have determined that GIPC1 is a novel breast cancer-associated immunogenic antigen that is overexpressed in breast cancer. Its role, however, in the initiation and/or progression of breast cancer remains unclear and needs further clarification

  6. Antitumour effects of single or combined monoclonal antibodies directed against membrane antigens expressed by human B cells leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosinski Marek

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing availability of different monoclonal antibodies (mAbs opens the way to more specific biologic therapy of cancer patients. However, despite the significant success of therapy in breast and ovarian carcinomas with anti-HER2 mAbs as well as in non-Hodkin B cell lymphomas with anti-CD20 mAbs, certain B cell malignancies such as B chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL respond poorly to anti-CD20 mAb, due to the low surface expression of this molecule. Thus, new mAbs adapted to each types of tumour will help to develop personalised mAb treatment. To this aim, we analyse the biological and therapeutic properties of three mAbs directed against the CD5, CD71 or HLA-DR molecules highly expressed on B-CLL cells. Results The three mAbs, after purification and radiolabelling demonstrated high and specific binding capacity to various human leukaemia target cells. Further in vitro analysis showed that mAb anti-CD5 induced neither growth inhibition nor apoptosis, mAb anti-CD71 induced proliferation inhibition with no early sign of cell death and mAb anti-HLA-DR induced specific cell aggregation, but without evidence of apoptosis. All three mAbs induced various degrees of ADCC by NK cells, as well as phagocytosis by macrophages. Only the anti-HLA-DR mAb induced complement mediated lysis. Coincubation of different pairs of mAbs did not significantly modify the in vitro results. In contrast with these discrete and heterogeneous in vitro effects, in vivo the three mAbs demonstrated marked anti-tumour efficacy and prolongation of mice survival in two models of SCID mice, grafted either intraperitoneally or intravenously with the CD5 transfected JOK1-5.3 cells. This cell line was derived from a human hairy cell leukaemia, a type of malignancy known to have very similar biological properties as the B-CLL, whose cells constitutively express CD5. Interestingly, the combined injection of anti-CD5 with anti-HLA-DR or with anti-CD71 led to

  7. Biological Validation of Plant-derived Anti-human Colorectal Cancer Monoclonal Antibody CO17-1A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamal, Arshad; Ahn, Mi-Hyun; Song, Mira; Oh, Eun-Yi; Hong, Juyeon; Choo, Young-Kug; Ko, Kinarm; Han, Yeon Soo; Oh, Seung Han; Van Der Linden, Joke; Leusen, Jeanette H. W.; Ko, Kisung

    We validated expression and biological activities of plant-derived monoclonal antibody (MAb(P)) CO17-1A for its efficacy in cancer immunotherapy. PCR and immunoblot analyses demonstrated insertion and expression of heavy and light chains of MAb CO17-1A in transgenic plants, respectively. Confocal

  8. Development of a monoclonal antibody that specifically detects tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-4 (TIMP-4) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donover, P Scott; Wojciechowski, Brian S; Thirumaran, Rajesh; Zemba-Palko, Vlasta; Prendergast, George C; Wallon, U Margaretha

    2010-08-01

    Overexpression of the extracellular metalloproteinase inhibitor TIMP-4 in estrogen receptor-negative breast cancers was found recently to be associated with a poor prognosis for survival. To pursue exploration of the theranostic applications of TIMP-4, specific antibodies with favorable properties for immunohistochemical use and other clinical assays are needed. Here we report the characterization of a monoclonal antibody (clone 9:4-7) specific for full-length human TIMP-4 with suitable qualities. The antibody was determined to be an IgG(2b) immunoglobulin. In enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting assays, it did not exhibit any detectable crossreactivity with recombinant forms of the other human TIMPs 1, 2, and 3. In contrast, the antibody displayed high specificity and sensitivity for TIMP-4 including in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded specimens of human breast specimens. An analysis of tissue microarrays of human cancer and corresponding normal tissues revealed specific staining patterns with excellent signal-to-noise ratios. This study documents TIMP-4 monoclonal antibody clone 9:4-7 as an effective tool for preclinical and clinical investigations. Published 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody 15 and its fragments for localization and imaging of xenografts of human lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Kamma, H.; Ogata, T.

    1988-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 15 and its F(ab')2 and Fab fragments were radioiodinated, and their biodistribution and imaging were compared in BALB/c nude mice bearing a xenograft of a human lung cancer (TKB-2). Association constants for 125I-labeled MAb 15 IgG, F(ab')2, and Fab were 1.9 X 10(9), 1.8 X 10(9), and 3.7 X 10(8) M-1, respectively. Immunoreactive fractions ranged from 0.59 to 0.50. Cultured TKB-2 cells expressed 1.1 X 10(4) binding sites/cell for MAb 15 IgG in vitro. The binding of a control antibody and the binding of its fragments to TKB-2 cells were less than 3% of the input doses. The mice with the TKB-2 tumors were given simultaneous injections of 10 microCi of 131I-labeled MAb 15 or its fragments and 10 microCi of 125I-labeled control IgG or its fragments. With MAb 15 IgG, the percentage of the injected dose bound per gram of tissue (ID/g) of the tumor was 3.68% at day 7, when the localization index (LI) was 4.38. At day 2 after MAb 15 F(ab')2 injection, 1.12% of the ID/g was localized in the tumor and the LI was 3.04. After MAb 15 Fab injection, the percentage of the ID/g of the tumor was 0.31% and the LI was 2.58 at day 1. MAb 15 IgG, F(ab')2, and Fab cleared from the blood early, with a half-life of 33, 16, and 9 hours, respectively. The distributions of MAb 15 and its fragments in the normal organs did not differ from those of the control. Radioimaging with 100 microCi of 131I-labeled MAb 15 and its fragments showed that 42%, 44%, and 32% of the total-body count were localized in the tumor with IgG at day 7, F(ab')2 at day 2, or Fab at day 1, respectively. Because the radioactivity remaining in the tumor with Fab was low, the image was insufficient. Throughout the period, less than 10% of the control IgG and its fragments remained in the tumor. Microautoradiography confirmed the binding of MAb 15 and its fragments to the tumor cells

  10. Nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab, an anti-GMCSF receptor alpha monoclonal antibody, in cynomolgus monkeys: Relevance for human safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, Patricia C., E-mail: ryanp@medimmune.com [MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Sleeman, Matthew A. [MedImmune, LLC, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Rebelatto, Marlon [MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Wang, Bing; Lu, Hong [MedImmune, LLC, Moutain View, CA (United States); Chen, Xiaomin [Novartis, East Hanover, NJ (United States); Wu, Chi-Yuan [MedImmune, LLC, Moutain View, CA (United States); Hinrichs, Mary Jane; Roskos, Lorin [MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Towers, Heidi [MedImmune, LLC, Cambridge (United Kingdom); McKeever, Kathleen; Dixit, Rakesh [MedImmune, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Mavrilimumab (CAM-3001) is an investigational human IgG4 monoclonal antibody (MAb) targeting GM-CSF receptor alpha which is currently being developed for the treatment of RA. GM-CSF plays a central role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) through the activation, differentiation, and survival of macrophages and neutrophils. To support clinical development, the nonclinical safety of mavrilimumab was evaluated in several studies with cynomolgus monkeys as the pharmacologically relevant species. Comprehensive toxicity parameters were assessed in each study, and treatment duration ranged from 4 to 26 weeks. Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in monkeys with no changes in any parameters other than microscopic findings in lung. In several studies, minimal accumulation of foamy alveolar macrophages was observed. This finding was only seen in studies of at least 11 weeks duration, was reversible following a dose-free recovery period and was considered non-adverse. At higher dose levels (≥ 30 mg/kg/week), in a 26-week repeat-IV dose study, the presence of lung foreign material, cholesterol clefts, and granulomatous inflammation was also observed in a few animals and was considered adverse. The dose- and time-related accumulation of foamy macrophages in lung following exposure to mavrilimumab observed in several NHP studies was expected based upon the known role of GM-CSFRα signaling in the function of alveolar macrophages. Overall, a clean no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) without any effects in lung was established and provided adequate clinical safety margins. In clinical studies in RA patients, mavrilimumab has demonstrated good clinical activity with adequate safety to support further clinical development. A Phase 2b study of mavrilimumab in subjects with RA is in progress. - Highlights: • Mavrilimumab is a MAB targeting GM-CSFRα being developed for RA therapy. • Mavrilimumab has an acceptable safety profile in cynomolgus monkeys.

  11. Comparison of an anti-rabies human monoclonal antibody combination with human polyclonal anti-rabies immune globulin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, Jaap; Marissen, Wilfred E.; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Hanlon, Cathleen A.; Rice, Amy B.; Kruif, John de; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Bakker, Alexander B. H.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimates human mortality from endemic canine rabies to be 55,000 deaths/year. Limited supply hampers the accessibility of appropriate lifesaving treatment, particularly in areas where rabies is endemic. Anti-rabies antibodies are key to protection against lethal

  12. Human monoclonal antibodies to a novel cluster of conformational epitopes on HCV E2 with resistance to neutralization escape in a genotype 2a isolate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keck, Zhen-yong; Xia, Jinming; Wang, Yong

    2012-01-01

    regions that will be relevant for vaccine design, we employed yeast surface display of antibodies that bound to genotype 1a H77C E2 mutant proteins containing a substitution either at Y632A (to avoid selecting non-neutralizing antibodies) or D535A. A panel of nine human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs......, when HCVcc were passaged in the presence of each of these antibodies, virus escape was not observed. Thus, the cluster of HC-84 epitopes, designated as antigenic domain D, is relevant for vaccine design for this highly diverse virus....

  13. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies: peripheral glycosylation of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 may be a target for virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N......), and the cell type used as the infection target (MT4, PMC, or selected T4 lymphocytes). Inhibition was observed when viruses were preincubated with MAbs but not when cells were preincubated with MAbs before inoculation, and the MAbs were shown to precipitate 125I-labeled gp120. The MAbs therefore define...

  14. Phage display derived human monoclonal antibodies isolated by binding to the surface of live primary breast cancer cells recognize GRP78

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Charlotte G; Rasmussen, Nicolaj; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2007-01-01

    Clinical trials using monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against cell-surface markers have yielded encouraging therapeutic results in several cancer types. Generally, however, anticancer antibodies are only efficient against a subpopulation of cancers, and there is a strong need for identification of no...... therapies including mAb-based immunotherapy. Our results suggest that the human antibody Ab39 may be a useful starting point for further genetic optimization that could render it a useful diagnostic and therapeutic reagent for a variety of cancers...

  15. New immunoassay for the mapping of neurofibrillary degeneration in Alzheimer's disease using two monoclonal antibodies against human paired helical filament tau proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condamines, O; Buée-Scherrer, V; Boissier, L; Wattez, A; Delacourte, A; Pau, B; Mourton-Gilles, C

    1995-06-09

    Monoclonal antibodies against human paired helical filament tau (PHF-tau) proteins were produced. Two of these antibodies, AD1 and AD2, were shown by immunoblot to be directed against distinct hyperphosphorylated epitopes of the PHF-tau proteins. Using AD1 and AD2, an antigen-capture ELISA specific for PHF-tau proteins was developed and used to map the neurofibrillary degeneration of several Broadmann areas from an Alzheimer's disease patient. The results confirm that the neurofibrillary degeneration predominates in parietal and temporal lobes.

  16. Selective modification of NMR relaxation time in human colorectal carcinoma by using gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated with monoclonal antibody 19-9.

    OpenAIRE

    Curtet, C; Tellier, C; Bohy, J; Conti, M L; Saccavini, J C; Thedrez, P; Douillard, J Y; Chatal, J F; Koprowski, H

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 19-9 (mAb 19-9) against human colon adenocarcinoma was conjugated with gadolinium X diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd X DTPA) and used as a contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in an effort to improve tumor target selectivity in nude mice. The data indicate that Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 in solution decreased the T1 relaxation of water protons at 90 MHz in direct proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and this effect was greater than in Gd X DTPA solutions...

  17. Tumour localization and pharmacokinetics of iodine-125 human monoclonal IgM antibody (COU-1) and its monomeric and half-monomeric fragments analysed in nude mice grafted with human tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ditzel, H.; Erb, K.; Rasmussen, J.W.; Jensenius, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Human monoclonal IgM antibodies reactive with cancer-associated antigens may not have the optimal imaging capability due to their large size. Fragmentation of human IgM is less than straight-forward due to the loss of immunoreactivity. From the human monoclonal IgM antibody COU-1 we have prepared monomeric and half-monomeric fragments, which retain the ability to bind to colon cancer cells in vitro. The pharmacokinetics and tumour localization were evaluated in nude mice bearing human colon adenocarcinoma and human melanoma grafts. Faster clearance from the circulation was seen for the smaller half-monomeric fragment with a half-life (rapid phase/slow phase) of 2 h/16 h compared with the intact antibody, 4 h/25 h, and the monomeric fragment, 3 h/27 h. Intact COU-1 as well as the fragments accumulated in the colon tumour graft. Higher amounts of radioactivity were found in the colon tumour as compared to normal organs for intact COU-1 at days 4 and 6, for the monomeric fragment at day 4, and for the half-monomeric fragment at day 2 after injection. This investigation demonstrates the favourable biodistribution of the half monomeric COU-1 fragment. The fast clearance of this fragment resulted in a tumour-to-muscle ratio as high as 22 on day 2 after injection. Also, only this fragment gave a positive tumour-to-blood ratio. Normal IgM and its fragments were used as controls. Radioimmunoscintigraphy demonstrated the colon tumour discriminatory properties of each of the three iodine-labelled antibody preparations. The results compare favourably with previously reported investigations of the localization of human monoclonal antibodies and suggest that fragments of human monoclonal IgM antibodies may be useful tools for the immunodetection of cancer in patients. (orig.)

  18. Characterization and cancer cell targeted imaging properties of human antivascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody conjugated CdTe/ZnS quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Lili; Xu, Jian; Shu, Chang; Guo, Jin; Ma, Xiaona; Liu, Yu; Zhong, Wenying

    2014-12-01

    High luminescence quantum yield water-soluble CdTe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) stabilized with thioglycolic acid were synthesized. QDs were chemically coupled to fully humanized antivascular endothelial growth factor165 monoclonal antibodies to produce fluorescent probes. These probes can be used to assay the biological affinity of the antibody. The properties of QDs conjugated to an antibody were characterized by ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry, fluorescent spectrophotometry, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Cell-targeted imaging was performed in human breast cancer cell lines. The cytotoxicity of bare QDs and fluorescent probes was evaluated in the MCF-7 cells with an MTT viability assay. The results proved that CdTe/ZnS QD-monoclonal antibody nanoprobes had been successfully prepared with excellent spectral properties in target detections. Surface modification by ZnS shell could mitigate the cytotoxicity of cadmium-based QDs. The therapeutic effects of antivascular endothelial growth factor antibodies towards cultured human cancer cells were confirmed by MTT assay. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, B J; Baum, R P; Staib-Sebler, E; Lorenz, M; Niesen, A; Hör, G

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99mTc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%.

  20. Human monoclonal antibody {sup 99m}Tc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, B.J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Baum, R.P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Staib-Sebler, E. [Department of General and Abdominal Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Lorenz, M. [Department of General and Abdominal Surgery, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Niesen, A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Hoer, G. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Medical Center, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of {sup 99m}Tc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Human monoclonal antibody 99mTc-88BV59: detection of colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease and immunogenicity assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, B.J.; Baum, R.P.; Staib-Sebler, E.; Lorenz, M.; Niesen, A.; Hoer, G.

    1997-01-01

    This study presents immunoscintigraphic results in 24 patients suffering from primary colorectal cancer, recurrent or metastatic disease after the injection of 1197-1351 MBq technetium-99m labelled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59. Labelling efficacy of 99m Tc-88BV59 ranged from 97% to 99%. Immunoscintigraphy was performed 18-20 h after injection. Scintigraphic findings were compared with those of computed tomography (CT). Patients underwent surgery in order to evaluate immunoscintigraphic findings histologically. Sera of the patients (before injection and 1 and 3 months post infusion) were analysed for the presence of human anti-human antibodies (HAHA). None of the patients showed a HAHA response as assessed by a solid-phase ELISA assay. The antibody scan detected about 25% more lesions than CT. In the detection of extrahepatic disease, the sensitivity of the antibody scan proved to be 68%, whereas the sensitivity of CT was 41%. (orig.). With 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Generation and activity of a humanized monoclonal antibody that selectively neutralizes the epidermal growth factor receptor ligands transforming growth factor-α and epiregulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidler, Catherine B; Petrovan, Ramona J; Conner, Elaine M; Boyles, Jeffrey S; Yang, Derek D; Harlan, Shannon M; Chu, Shaoyou; Ellis, Bernice; Datta-Mannan, Amita; Johnson, Robert L; Stauber, Anja; Witcher, Derrick R; Breyer, Matthew D; Heuer, Josef G

    2014-05-01

    At least seven distinct epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligands bind to and activate the EGF receptor (EGFR). This activation plays an important role in the embryo and in the maintenance of adult tissues. Importantly, pharmacologic EGFR inhibition also plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of diverse disease states, especially cancer. The roles of specific EGFR ligands are poorly defined in these disease states. Accumulating evidence suggests a role for transforming growth factor α (TGFα) in skin, lung, and kidney disease. To explore the role of Tgfa, we generated a monoclonal antibody (mAb41) that binds to and neutralizes human Tgfa with high affinity (KD = 36.5 pM). The antibody also binds human epiregulin (Ereg) (KD = 346.6 pM) and inhibits ligand induced myofibroblast cell proliferation (IC50 values of 0.52 and 1.12 nM for human Tgfa and Ereg, respectively). In vivo, a single administration of the antibody to pregnant mice (30 mg/kg s.c. at day 14 after plug) or weekly administration to neonate mice (20 mg/kg s.c. for 4 weeks) phenocopy Tgfa knockout mice with curly whiskers, stunted growth, and expansion of the hypertrophic zone of growth plate cartilage. Humanization of this monoclonal antibody to a human IgG4 antibody (LY3016859) enables clinical development. Importantly, administration of the humanized antibody to cynomolgus monkeys is absent of the skin toxicity observed with current EGFR inhibitors used clinically and no other pathologies were noted, indicating that neutralization of Tgfa could provide a relatively safe profile as it advances in clinical development.

  3. Binding Affinity, Specificity and Comparative Biodistribution of the Parental Murine Monoclonal Antibody MX35 (Anti-NaPi2b) and Its Humanized Version Rebmab200

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, Sture; Andrade, Luciana N S; Bäck, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovar...... be used for single-photon emission computed tomography of subcutaneous ovarian carcinomas in tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, our data support the further development of Rebmab200 for radioimmunotherapy and diagnostics.......The aim of this preclinical study was to evaluate the characteristics of the monoclonal antibody Rebmab200, which is a humanized version of the ovarian-specific murine antibody MX35. This investigation contributes to the foundation for future clinical α-radioimmunotherapy of minimal residual...... ovarian cancer with 211At-Rebmab200. Here, the biodistribution of 211At-Rebmab200 was evaluated, as was the utility of 99mTc-Rebmab200 for bioimaging. Rebmab200 was directly compared with its murine counterpart MX35 in terms of its in-vitro capacity for binding the immobilized NaPi2B epitope and live...

  4. Generation of human monoclonal antibodies against HIV-1 proteins; electrofusion and Epstein-Barr virus transformation for peripheral blood lymphocyte immortalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchacher, A; Predl, R; Strutzenberger, K; Steinfellner, W; Trkola, A; Purtscher, M; Gruber, G; Tauer, C; Steindl, F; Jungbauer, A

    1994-04-01

    Electrofusion and EBV transformation were studied by immortalizing human PBLs from blood of HIV-1-positive volunteers. A panel of 33 cell lines producing human monoclonal antibodies (Hu-MAbs) against HIV-1 was established by cell fusion or EBV transformation. For the first fusion experiments the source of B lymphocytes was peripheral blood of HIV-1-infected donors in CDC stages II or III with CD4 cell counts higher than 500/mm3. Later on, from these patients only, those with high anti-HIV titers were chosen as blood donors. By that means the yield of stable specific hybridomas was increased twofold. In our experiments electrofusion turned out to be a more efficient immortalization method than EBV transformation, due to a high and constant immortalization rate. The hybridomas were stable after intensive subcloning and could be cultivated over a period of 8 months without loss in monoclonal antibody production. Immunoglobulin class, subtype, reactivity against HIV-1 proteins, Western blot patterns, immunofluorescence, and epitopes were characterized. The subtype of all antibodies was IgG1 or IgG3. The light chain was predominantly kappa. All antibodies showed reactivity against HIV-1 envelope or core protein. All hybridomas were stable and suited for mass production. Several Hu-MAbs are becoming an important tool in the field of diagnosis, research, and immunotherapy.

  5. Anti-Neoplastic Cytotoxicity of Gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] in Dual-combination with Epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] against Chemotherapeutic-Resistant Mammary Adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) and the Complementary Effect of Mebendazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, CP; Jones, Toni; Bear, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Aims Delineate the feasibility of simultaneous, dual selective “targeted” chemotherapeutic delivery and determine if this molecular strategy can promote higher levels anti-neoplastic cytotoxicity than if only one covalent immunochemotherapeutic is selectively “targeted” for delivery at a single membrane associated receptor over-expressed by chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma. Methodology Gemcitabine and epirubicin were covalently bond to anti-EGFR and anti-HER2/neu utilizing a rapid multi-phase synthetic organic chemistry reaction scheme. Determination that 96% or greater gemcitabine or epirubicin content was covalently bond to immunoglobulin fractions following size separation by micro-scale column chromatography was established by methanol precipitation analysis. Residual binding-avidity of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EG-FR] applied in dual-combination with epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] was determined by cell-ELIZA utilizing chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) populations. Lack of fragmentation or polymerization was validated by SDS-PAGE/immunodetection/chemiluminescent autoradiography. Anti-neoplastic cytotoxic potency was determined by vitality stain analysis of chemotherapeutic-resistant mammary adenocarcinoma (SKBr-3) monolayers known to uniquely over-express EGFR (2 × 105/cell) and HER2/neu (1 × 106/cell) receptor complexes. The covalent immunochemotherapeutics gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] and epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu] were applied simultaneously in dual-combination to determine their capacity to collectively evoke elevated levels of anti-neoplastic cytotoxicity. Lastly, the tubulin/microtubule inhibitor mebendazole evaluated to determine if it’s potential to complemented the anti-neoplastic cytotoxic properties of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] in dual-combination with epirubicin-(C3-amide)-[anti-HER2/neu]. Results Dual-combination of gemcitabine-(C4-amide)-[anti-EGFR] with

  6. Phage Display Approaches for the Isolation of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Dengue Virus Envelope Domain III from Human and Mouse Derived Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash G. Vasudevan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Domain III of the dengue virus envelope protein (EDIII, aa295-395 has an immunoglobulin fold and is the proposed receptor-binding domain of the virus. Previous studies have shown that monoclonal antibodies against EDIII can be neutralizing and have therapeutic potential. Here, cloned Fab-phage libraries of human and mouse origin were screened for DENV specific antibodies. Firstly, bacterially expressed EDIII or whole virus particles were used as bait in biopanning against a large naïve human Fab-phage library ( > 10 billion independent clones. Multiple panning strategies were employed, and in excess of 1000 clones were screened, but all of the antibodies identified bound the envelope in regions outside EDIII suggesting EDIII antibodies are virtually absent from the naïve human repertoire. Next, a chimeric Fab-phage library was constructed from a panel of EDIII specific mouse hybridomas by pooling the VH and VL chain sequences from the hybridomas and cloning these into the pComb3X phagemid vector with human CH and CL encoding sequences. Biopanning against EDIII identified a unique antibody (C9 that cross-reacts with EDIII from DENV1-3 and, in the IgG format, binds and neutralizes DENV2 in cell-based assays. Sequence analysis and saturation mutagenesis of complementary determining regions (CDR in the C9 light chain suggest an antigen recognition model in which the LCDR3 is a key determinant of EDIII specificity, while modifications in LCDR1 and LCDR2 affect DENV serotype cross-reactivity. Overall, this study supports the current prevailing opinion that neutralizing anti-EDIII monoclonal antibodies can be readily generated in murine systems, but in humans the anti-DENV immune response is directed away from domain III.

  7. A novel monoclonal antibody of human stem cell factor inhibits umbilical cord blood stem cell ex vivo expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell factor (SCF activates hematopoietic stem cell (HSC self-renewal and is being used to stimulate the ex vivo expansion of HSCs. The mechanism by which SCF supports expansion of HSCs remains poorly understood. In cord blood ex vivo expansion assays, a newly produced anti-SCF monoclonal antibody (clone 23C8 was found to significantly inhibit the expansion of CD34+ cells. This antibody appears to bind directly to a part of SCF that is critical for biological activity toward expansion of CD34+ cells, which is located in the first 104 amino acids from the NH2-terminus.

  8. Expression of blood group I and i active carbohydrate sequences on cultured human and animal cell lines assessed by radioimmunoassays with monoclonal cold agglutinins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, R.A.; Kapadia, A.; Feizi, T.

    1980-01-01

    Human monoclonal anti-I and anti-i, reactive with known carbohydrate sequences, have been used as reagents to quantitate (by radioimmunoassay) and visualize (by immunofluorescence) the expression of the various blood group I and i antigenic determinants in a variety of cultured cell lines commonly used in laboratory investigations. It has been shown that the antigens they recognize are widely distributed on the surface of human and animal cell lines, expressed in varying amounts in different cell lines and on individual cells within a given cell line. In two cell lines, a transformation-associated increase in the expression of I antigen was observed. Because of their precise specificity for defined carbohydrate chain domains, these autoantibodies have become valuable reagents in biological chemistry. (orig.) [de

  9. Enhancement of retroviral infection in vitro by anti-Le(y) IgG: reversal by humanization of monoclonal mouse antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Sørensen, A M; Arendrup, M

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal mouse IgG3 antibody (ABL 364) against the carbohydrate Le(y) antigen enhanced infection in vitro with HTLV-1 and with HIV-1 when propagated in both transformed and normal lymphocytes. Enhancement was independent of complement, occurred with both lymphocytes and monocytes as target cells......, and did not use either L(ey) epitopes on target cells for cross-linkage of virus to the cell or the Fc part of the antibody as a ligand for any cellular receptor. For enhancement to occur, binding of anti-Le(y) antibody to virus was required to take place before virus binding to its specific receptor...... also enhanced infection, a human/mouse chimeric antibody and a fully humanized antibody had no enhancing effect on free virus infection. We suggest that binding of anti-Le(y) ABL 364 or its F(ab)2 fragment induced a conformational change in the gp120 oligomers facilitating the process of infection...

  10. Influenza human monoclonal antibody 1F1 interacts with three major antigenic sites and residues mediating human receptor specificity in H1N1 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tshidi Tsibane

    Full Text Available Most monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA head domain exhibit very limited breadth of inhibitory activity due to antigenic drift in field strains. However, mAb 1F1, isolated from a 1918 influenza pandemic survivor, inhibits select human H1 viruses (1918, 1943, 1947, and 1977 isolates. The crystal structure of 1F1 in complex with the 1918 HA shows that 1F1 contacts residues that are classically defined as belonging to three distinct antigenic sites, Sa, Sb and Ca(2. The 1F1 heavy chain also reaches into the receptor binding site (RBS and interacts with residues that contact sialoglycan receptors and determine HA receptor specificity. The 1F1 epitope is remarkably similar to the previously described murine HC63 H3 epitope, despite significant sequence differences between H1 and H3 HAs. Both antibodies potently inhibit receptor binding, but only HC63 can block the pH-induced conformational changes in HA that drive membrane fusion. Contacts within the RBS suggested that 1F1 may be sensitive to changes that alter HA receptor binding activity. Affinity assays confirmed that sequence changes that switch the HA to avian receptor specificity affect binding of 1F1 and a mAb possessing a closely related heavy chain, 1I20. To characterize 1F1 cross-reactivity, additional escape mutant selection and site-directed mutagenesis were performed. Residues 190 and 227 in the 1F1 epitope were found to be critical for 1F1 reactivity towards 1918, 1943 and 1977 HAs, as well as for 1I20 reactivity towards the 1918 HA. Therefore, 1F1 heavy-chain interactions with conserved RBS residues likely contribute to its ability to inhibit divergent HAs.

  11. Effective therapy for a murine model of adult T-cell leukemia with the humanized anti-CD2 monoclonal antibody, MEDI-507.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Meili; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Goldman, Carolyn; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2003-07-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) develops in a small proportion of individuals infected with the retrovirus human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1). We evaluated the efficacy of MEDI-507 (a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against CD2) alone and in combination with humanized anti-Tac (HAT) directed toward CD25, the interleukin-2 receptor alpha (IL-2Ralpha) using a human adult T-cell leukemia xenograft model. Weekly treatments (4) with HAT significantly prolonged the survival of the ATL-bearing mice when compared with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-treated controls (P MEDI-507 (100 microg/wk for 4 weeks) survived longer than those treated with HAT (P MEDI-507 significantly improved the outcome when compared with a short course (4 weeks) of therapy (P MEDI-507 for 6 months led to a prolonged survival of the ATL-bearing mice that was comparable with the survival observed in the control group of mice that did not receive a tumor or therapeutic agent. We also found that the expression of Fcgamma receptors (FcRgamma) on polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes was required for MEDI-507-mediated tumor killing in vivo. Thus, the tumor-killing mechanism with MEDI-507 in vivo required the expression of the receptor FcRgammaIII on polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes, suggesting that it is mediated by a form of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate that MEDI-507 has therapeutic efficacy on ATL in vivo and provides support for a clinical trial involving this monoclonal antibody in the treatment of patients with CD2-expressing leukemias and lymphomas.

  12. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga; Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C.; Calder, Lesley J.; Melero, José A.

    2014-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV F occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV F , we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV F at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy

  13. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weibin; Chen, Aizhong; Miao, Yi; Xia, Shengli; Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan; Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling; Shu, Yuelong; Ma, Xiaowei; Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Xiaojun; Bian, Chao; Sun, Bing

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies specific for the six-helix bundle of the human respiratory syncytial virus fusion glycoprotein as probes of the protein post-fusion conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomo, Concepción; Mas, Vicente; Vázquez, Mónica; Cano, Olga [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Luque, Daniel; Terrón, María C. [Unidad de Microscopía Electrónica y Confocal, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain); Calder, Lesley J. [National Institute for Medical Research, MRC, Mill Hill, London NW7 1AA (United Kingdom); Melero, José A., E-mail: jmelero@isciii.es [Unidad de Biología Viral, Centro Nacional de Microbiología, Madrid (Spain); CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Majadahonda, 28220 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) has two major surface glycoproteins (G and F) anchored in the lipid envelope. Membrane fusion promoted by hRSV{sub F} occurs via refolding from a pre-fusion form to a highly stable post-fusion state involving large conformational changes of the F trimer. One of these changes results in assembly of two heptad repeat sequences (HRA and HRB) into a six-helix bundle (6HB) motif. To assist in distinguishing pre- and post-fusion conformations of hRSV{sub F}, we have prepared polyclonal (α-6HB) and monoclonal (R145) rabbit antibodies specific for the 6HB. Among other applications, these antibodies were used to explore the requirements of 6HB formation by isolated protein segments or peptides and by truncated mutants of the F protein. Site-directed mutagenesis and electron microscopy located the R145 epitope in the post-fusion hRSV{sub F} at a site distantly located from previously mapped epitopes, extending the repertoire of antibodies that can decorate the F molecule. - Highlights: • Antibodies specific for post-fusion respiratory syncytial virus fusion protein are described. • Polyclonal antibodies were obtained in rabbit inoculated with chimeric heptad repeats. • Antibody binding required assembly of a six-helix bundle in the post-fusion protein. • A monoclonal antibody with similar structural requirements is also described. • Binding of this antibody to the post-fusion protein was visualized by electron microscopy.

  15. Itolizumab – a humanized anti-CD6 monoclonal antibody with better side effects profile for the treatment of psoriasis [Corrigendum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon R

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Menon R, David BG. Clinical, Cosmetic and Investigational Dermatology. 2015;8:215–22.On page 215, please note correspondence should have been listed as:   Roshni Menon, D II/17,JIPMER Campus, Dhanvanthri Nagar,Pondicherry, India 605006Tel +91 944 320 8140Email roshnijagdish@gmail.com.On page 215, the first sentence of the Introduction was “Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin characterized by exacerbations and remissions affecting 1%–3% of the world’s population, and approximately 20% of patients have moderate to severe disease.1,2” however should have been “Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the skin characterized by exacerbations and remissions affecting 1%–3% of the world’s population. Approximately 20% of patients have moderate to severe disease.1,2”On page 217, 219, and 221 the running header was “Itolizumab – aCD6 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of psoriasis” however should have been “Itolizumab – a humanized anti CD6 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of psoriasis”.On page 218, Table 1, the second column heading was listed as “Anand et al25 n=40 (moderate–severe psoriasis” however should have been “Anand et al25 n=40/32 weeks (moderate–severe psoriasis”.Read the original article 

  16. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Weibin; Chen, Aizhong; Miao, Yi; Xia, Shengli; Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan; Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling; Shu, Yuelong; Ma, Xiaowei; Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Xiaojun; Bian, Chao; Sun, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  17. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  18. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  19. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yang [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, Yuji [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Akifumi; Ramadhany, Ririn; Arai, Yasuha [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Du, Anariwa [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Ibrahim, Madiha S. [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Damanhour University, Damanhour (Egypt); and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. • Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. • The antibodies predominantly recognized α-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). • The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. • The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses.

  20. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yang; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Inoue, Yuji; Yasugi, Mayo; Yamashita, Akifumi; Ramadhany, Ririn; Arai, Yasuha; Du, Anariwa; Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Ibrahim, Madiha S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. • Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. • The antibodies predominantly recognized α-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). • The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. • The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses

  1. Production of human monoclonal anti-Jk3, recognising an epitope including the Jk(a) /Jk(b) polymorphic site of the Kidd glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, C; Suzuki, Y; Tsuneyama, H; Onodera, T; Masuno, A; Yabe, R; Ogasawara, K; Okuda, M; Nakajima, K; Uchikawa, M

    2014-10-01

    The Kidd blood group system consists of polymorphic antigens, Jk(a) (JK1) and Jk(b) (JK2), and a high-incidence antigen, Jk3. Anti-Jk3 is often observed in immunised Jk(a-b-) individuals. In this study, we aimed to establish a human hybridoma cell line secreting monoclonal anti-Jk3 (HIRO-294). Peripheral blood lymphocytes of a Filipino woman with the Jk(a-b-) phenotype having anti-Jk3 were transformed with Epstein-Barr virus and then hybridised with the myeloma cell line JMS-3 using the polyethylene glycol (PEG) method. The reactivity and specificity of the anti-Jk3 were examined by serology and flow cytometry. Four hybridoma clones secreting anti-Jk3 were established and the antibody from one of these clones, HIRO-294, was examined. The reactivity of HIRO-294 was positive with 227 Jk(a+b-) red blood cells (RBCs), 298 Jk(a-b+) RBCs, and 1043 Jk(a+b+) RBCs, but was negative with 21 Jk(a-b-) RBCs. Eluates from Jk(a+b-) RBCs and Jk(a-b+) RBCs sensitised with the anti-Jk3 were cross-reacted with Jk(a-b+) RBCs and Jk(a+b-) RBCs, respectively. The reactivity of HIRO-294 was enhanced by the treatment of RBCs with ficin, trypsin, pronase and α-chymotrypsin, but was not changed by their treatment with neuraminidase, dithiothreitol and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) glycine acid (GA). The RBCs sensitised by the anti-Jk3 were not agglutinated with the commercial reagents of anti-Jk(a) and anti-Jk(b) by saline test, whereas the nonsensitised RBCs or those sensitised by monoclonal anti-D [HIRO-3, immunoglobulin G (IgG) class] were agglutinated with those reagents. We established a human hybridoma cell line secreting monoclonal anti-Jk3 (HIRO-294). This antibody had unique specificity, recognising the Kidd glycoprotein including the Jk(a) /Jk(b) polymorphic site. © 2014 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  2. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in vitro by anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies: peripheral glycosylation of HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 may be a target for virus neutralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Clausen, H; Nielsen, C

    1990-01-01

    Carbohydrate structures are often involved in the initial adhesion of pathogens to target cells. In the present study, a panel of anticarbohydrate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was tested for their ability to inhibit in vitro human immunodeficiency virus infectivity. MAbs against three different N......- and O-linked carbohydrate epitopes (LeY, A1, and sialyl-Tn) were able to block infection by cell-free virus as well as inhibit syncytium formation. Inhibition of virus infectivity was independent of virus strain (HTLVIIIB or patient isolate SSI-002), the cell line used for virus propagation (H9 or MT4......), and the cell type used as the infection target (MT4, PMC, or selected T4 lymphocytes). Inhibition was observed when viruses were preincubated with MAbs but not when cells were preincubated with MAbs before inoculation, and the MAbs were shown to precipitate 125I-labeled gp120. The MAbs therefore define...

  3. Radioimmunoimaging of human colon carcinoma grafted into nudemice using 131I-labeled monoclonal anticea antibody and its F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guangda

    1988-01-01

    131 I-labeled monoclonal anti-CEA antibody and its F(ab') 2 fragments were injected into nude mice bearing human colon carcinoma xenografts for tumor localization and radioimmunoimaging studies. Transplanted tumors were visualized in 12 hours after injection of the labeled anti-CEA or its F(ab') 2 by gamma camera. Biodistribution data indicated that F(ab') 2 fragments were cleared more rapidly from blood (T 1/2 = 13.3 h for F(ab') 2 , T 1/2 = 21.1 h for intact antibody) over 6-24 h and had higher tumor blood ratios. The intact antibody was concentrated in the tumor better than F(ab') 2 . In double-label experiments, a nonspecific localization of the control ( 125 I-labeled anti-HCG) in the tumor was also observed

  4. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:25258549

  5. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manetta, Joseph; Bina, Holly; Ryan, Paul; Fox, Niles; Witcher, Derrick R; Kikly, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect.

  6. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Koksunan, Sarawut [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya [National Institute of Health, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Prachasupap, Apichai [Medical Life Sciences Institute, Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Ono, Ken-ichiro [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency/Japan International Cooperation Agency, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (JST/JICA, SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Arai, Yasuha [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); and others

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses.

  7. A human monoclonal antibody derived from a vaccinated volunteer recognizes heterosubtypically a novel epitope on the hemagglutinin globular head of H1 and H9 influenza A viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan; Panthong, Sumolrat; Koksunan, Sarawut; Chittaganpitch, Malinee; Phuygun, Siripaporn; Waicharoen, Sunthareeya; Prachasupap, Apichai; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Yasugi, Mayo; Ono, Ken-ichiro; Arai, Yasuha

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A human monoclonal antibody against influenza virus was produced from a volunteer. • The antibody was generated from the PBMCs of the volunteer using the fusion method. • The antibody neutralized heterosubtypically group 1 influenza A viruses (H1 and H9). • The antibody targeted a novel epitope in globular head region of the hemagglutinin. • Sequences of the identified epitope are highly conserved among H1 and H9 subtypes. - Abstract: Most neutralizing antibodies elicited during influenza virus infection or by vaccination have a narrow spectrum because they usually target variable epitopes in the globular head region of hemagglutinin (HA). In this study, we describe a human monoclonal antibody (HuMAb), 5D7, that was prepared from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of a vaccinated volunteer using the fusion method. The HuMAb heterosubtypically neutralizes group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H9N2, with a strong hemagglutinin inhibition activity. Selection of an escape mutant showed that the HuMAb targets a novel conformational epitope that is located in the HA head region but is distinct from the receptor binding site. Furthermore, Phe114Ile substitution in the epitope made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAb. Amino acid residues in the predicted epitope region are also highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1 and H9N2. The HuMAb reported here may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic/prophylactic antibodies against H1 and H9 influenza viruses

  8. Early fetal acquisition of the chromaffin and neuronal immunophenotype by human adrenal medullary cells. An immunohistological study using monoclonal antibodies to chromogranin A, synaptophysin, tyrosine hydroxylase, and neuronal cytoskeletal proteins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, W M; Lee, V M; Trojanowski, J Q

    1990-01-01

    The development of chromaffin and neuronal features in the adrenal medulla was studied in normal human fetuses with gestational ages (GAs) of 6-34 weeks. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and tyrosine hydroxylase; for different subunits and phosphoisoforms of

  9. Safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a fully human monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a phase 1-2 study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coiffier, Bertrand; Lepretre, Stéphane; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Gadeberg, Ole; Fredriksen, Henrik; van Oers, Marinus H. J.; Wooldridge, James; Kloczko, Janusz; Holowiecki, Jerzy; Hellmann, Andrzej; Walewski, Jan; Flensburg, Mimi; Petersen, Jørgen; Robak, Tadeusz

    2008-01-01

    Safety and efficacy of the fully human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, ofatumumab, was analyzed in a multicenter dose-escalating study including 33 patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Three cohorts of 3 (A), 3 (B), and 27 (C) patients received 4, once weekly, infusions

  10. Development of a cell-based assay measuring the activation of FcγRIIa for the characterization of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Tada

    Full Text Available Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC is one of the important mechanisms of action of the targeting of tumor cells by therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Among the human Fcγ receptors (FcγRs, FcγRIIIa is well known as the only receptor expressed in natural killer (NK cells, and it plays a pivotal role in ADCC by IgG1-subclass mAbs. In addition, the contributions of FcγRIIa to mAb-mediated cytotoxicity have been reported. FcγRIIa is expressed in myeloid effector cells including neutrophils and macrophages, and it is involved in the activation of these effector cells. However, the measurement of the cytotoxicity via FcγRIIa-expressing effector cells is complicated and inconvenient for the characterization of therapeutic mAbs. Here we report the development of a cell-based assay using a human FcγRIIa-expressing reporter cell line. The FcγRIIa reporter cell assay was able to estimate the activation of FcγRIIa by antigen-bound mAbs by a very simple method in vitro. The usefulness of this assay for evaluating the activity of mAbs with different abilities to activate FcγRIIa was confirmed by the examples including the comparison of the activity of the anti-CD20 mAb rituximab and its Fc-engineered variants, and two anti-EGFR mAbs with different IgG subclasses, cetuximab (IgG1 and panitumumab (IgG2. We also applied this assay to the characterization of a force-oxidized mAb, and we observed that oxidation significantly decreased the FcγRIIa activation by EGFR-bound cetuximab. These results suggest that our FcγRIIa reporter assay is a promising tool for the characterization of therapeutic mAbs, including Fc-engineered mAbs, IgG2-subclass mAbs, and their product-related variants.

  11. Antiglycopeptide Mouse Monoclonal Antibody LpMab-21 Exerts Antitumor Activity Against Human Podoplanin Through Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity and Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yukinari; Kunita, Akiko; Fukayama, Masashi; Abe, Shinji; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Uchida, Hiroaki; Tahara, Hideaki; Yamada, Shinji; Yanaka, Miyuki; Nakamura, Takuro; Saidoh, Noriko; Yoshida, Kanae; Fujii, Yuki; Honma, Ryusuke; Takagi, Michiaki; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Murata, Takeshi; Kaneko, Mika K

    2017-02-01

    The interaction between podoplanin (PDPN) and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) is involved in tumor malignancy. We have established many monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human podoplanin using the cancer-specific mAb (CasMab) technology. LpMab-21, one of the mouse antipodoplanin mAbs, is of the IgG 2a subclass, and its minimum epitope was determined to be Thr76-Arg79 of the human podoplanin. Importantly, sialic acid is linked to Thr76; therefore, LpMab-21 is an antiglycopeptide mAb (GpMab). In this study, we investigated whether LpMab-21 shows antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) against human podoplanin-expressing cancer cell lines in vitro and also studied its antitumor activities using a xenograft model. LpMab-21 showed high ADCC and CDC activities against not only podoplanin-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells but also LN319 glioblastoma cells and PC-10 lung cancer cells, both of which endogenously express podoplanin. Furthermore, LpMab-21 decreased tumor growth in vivo, indicating that LpMab-21 could be useful for antibody therapy against human podoplanin-expressing cancers.

  12. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Christian [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Madshus, Inger Helene [Institute of Pathology, University of Oslo, Rikshospitalet, 0027 Oslo (Norway); Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway); Stang, Espen, E-mail: espsta@rr-research.no [Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Post box 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo (Norway)

    2012-12-10

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  13. Cetuximab in combination with anti-human IgG antibodies efficiently down-regulates the EGF receptor by macropinocytosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Christian; Madshus, Inger Helene; Stang, Espen

    2012-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody C225 (Cetuximab) blocks binding of ligand to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In addition, it is known that incubation with C225 induces endocytosis of the EGFR. This endocytosis has previously been shown to be increased when C225 is combined with an additional monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody. However, the effects of antibody combinations on EGFR activation, endocytosis, trafficking and degradation have been unclear. By binding a secondary antibody to the C225-EGFR complex, we here demonstrate that a combination of antibodies can efficiently internalize and degrade the EGFR. Although the combination of antibodies activated the EGFR kinase and induced ubiquitination of the EGFR, the kinase activity was not required for internalization of the EGFR. In contrast to EGF-induced EGFR down-regulation, the antibody combination efficiently degraded the EGFR without initiating downstream proliferative signaling. The antibody-induced internalization of EGFR was found not to depend on clathrin and/or dynamin, but depended on actin polymerization, suggesting induction of macropinocytosis. Macropinocytosis may cause internalization of large membrane areas, and this could explain the highly efficient internalization of the EGFR induced by combination of antibodies. -- Highlight: ► Cetuximab induced endocytosis of EGFR increases upon combination with anti-human IgG. ► Antibody combination causes internalization of EGFR by macropinocytosis. ► Antibody-induced internalization of EGFR is independent of EGFR kinase activity. ► Antibody combination may have a zipper effect and cross-link EGFRs on neighboring cells.

  14. Rabbit monoclonal antibodies directed at the T3SS effector protein YopM identify human pathogenic Yersinia isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüter, Christian; Silva, Mariana Ruiz; Grabowski, Benjamin; Lubos, Marie-Luise; Scharnert, Julia; Poceva, Marija; von Tils, Dominik; Flieger, Antje; Heesemann, Jürgen; Bliska, James B; Schmidt, M Alexander

    2014-05-01

    The Yersinia outer protein M (YopM) is a type 3 secretion system (T3SS)-dependent effector protein of Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. Although YopM is indispensable for full virulence, its molecular functions still remain largely elusive. Recently, we could identify the recombinant YopM (rYopM) protein derived from the Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 (JB580) as a cell-penetrating protein, which down-regulates the expression of various pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNFα. In this study, we have generated rabbit monoclonal anti-YopM antibodies (RabMabs). RabMabs were characterized by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting using various truncated versions of rYopM to identify epitope-containing domains. RabMabs recognizing either the N- or C-terminus of YopM were characterized further and validated using a collection of 61 pathogenic and non-pathogenic Yersinia strains as well as exemplary strains of major intestinal bacterial pathogens such as Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica, Shigella flexneri and intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli. RabMab 41.3 directed at the N-terminus of YopM of Y. enterocolitica strain 8081 recognized all YopM-expressing pathogenic Yersinia strains analyzed in this study but failed to recognize non-pathogenic isolates. Thus, RabMab 41.3 might be applicable for the detection of pathogenic Yersinia strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Increased half-life and enhanced potency of Fc-modified human PCSK9 monoclonal antibodies in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijun Shen

    Full Text Available Blocking proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9 binding to low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR can profoundly lower plasma LDL levels. Two anti-PCKS9 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, alirocumab and evolocumab, were approved by the FDA in 2015. The recommended dose is 75 mg to 150 mg every two weeks for alirocumab and 140mg every two weeks or 420 mg once a month for evolocumab. This study attempted to improve the pharmacokinetic properties of F0016A, an IgG1 anti-PCKS9 mAb, to generate biologically superior molecules. We engineered several variants with two or three amino acid substitutions in the Fc fragment based on prior knowledge. The Fc-modified mAbs exhibited increased binding to FcRn, resulting in prolonged serum half-life and enhanced efficacy in vivo. These results demonstrate that Fc-modified anti-PCKS9 antibodies may enable less frequent or lower dosing of antibodies by improved recycling into the blood.

  16. Characterization and expression of the human T cell receptor-T3 complex by monoclonal antibody F101.01

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Plesner, T; Pallesen, G

    1988-01-01

    A murine monoclonal antibody (MoAb) F101.01 reacting with the T cell receptor (TCR)-T3 complex is presented. Immunohistological studies showed that F101.01 specifically stains T-zone lymphocytes in lymph nodes, tonsils, and splenic tissue. Two-colour immunofluorescence and flow cytometry...... demonstrated co-expression of the antigen defined by F101.01 and the pan-T cell antigens defined by CD2, CD3, CD5, and CD7 antibodies. Cells stained with CD4 and CD8 antibodies were both included in the F101.01-positive population, whereas CD16-positive natural killer cells (NK), B cells (CD19 and CD20......), and myeloid cells (CD13 and CD33) were excluded. The target antigen of F101.01 co-modulated with the CD3-defined antigen (T3) and the TCR recognized by the MoAb WT-31. CD3 antibody and WT-31 both blocked binding of F101.01. F101.01 precipitated the TCR-T3 complex from lysates of 125I-labelled peripheral blood...

  17. Evaluation of an automated assay based on monoclonal anti-human serum amyloid A (SAA) antibodies for measurement of canine, feline, and equine SAA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, M; Jacobsen, S; Ichiyanagi, T; Kjelgaard-Hansen, M

    2012-12-01

    Major acute phase proteins (APPs) have proven diagnostically useful in dogs, cats and horses with routine use facilitated by commercially available automated heterologous assays. An automated assay applicable across all three species would highly facilitate further dissemination of routine use, and the aim of this study was to validate an automated latex agglutination turbidimetric immunoassay based on monoclonal anti-human serum amyloid A (SAA) antibodies for measurement of canine, feline and equine SAA. Serum samples from 60 dogs, 40 cats and 40 horses were included. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision, linearity and detection limit (DL) were determined to assess analytical performance. To assess clinical performance, equine and feline SAA measurements were compared with parallel measurements using a previously validated automated SAA assay in a method comparison setting, and by assessing overlap performance of canine SAA in healthy dogs and diseased dogs with and without systemic inflammation. Intra- and inter-assay CVs ranged between 1.9-4.6% and between 3.0-14.5%, respectively. Acceptable linearity within a clinically relevant range of SAA concentrations was observed for all three species. The DL was 1.06 mg/L. Method comparison revealed acceptable agreement of the two assays measuring feline and equine SAA, and the overlap performance of canine SAA was acceptable. The tested assay measured SAA in canine, feline and equine serum with analytical and overlap performance acceptable for clinical purposes so improving practical aspects of clinical APP application. The monoclonal nature of the antibodies suggests strong, long-term inter-batch performance stability. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Itolizumab – a humanized anti-CD6 monoclonal antibody with a better side effects profile for the treatment of psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon R

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Roshni Menon, Brinda G David Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprosy, Sri Venkateshwaraa Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Ariyur, Pondicherry, India Abstract: Management of psoriasis is a challenge to the treating physician. The chronic inflammatory state of psoriasis with exacerbations and remissions necessitate “on-and-off” treatment schedules. The safety profiles of drugs and tolerability issues for patients are important factors to be considered during treatment. Various biological agents targeting T-cells and the inflammatory cytokines are available for systemic treatment of psoriasis. However, major causes of concern while using these drugs are risk of susceptibility to infection and development of anti-drug antibodies, which will affect the pharmacokinetic properties, efficacy, and safety profile of the drug. Itolizumab, a humanized anti-CD6 monoclonal antibody, is a new molecule that acts by immunomodulating the CD6 molecule. CD6 is a co-stimulatory molecule required for optimal T-cell stimulation by the antigen-presenting cells. This step is crucial in T-cell proliferation to form Th1 and Th17 cells, which play a major role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. This article deals with the properties of Itolizumab and its role in the treatment of psoriasis. Based on the available published data, Itolizumab seems to have a better adverse effects profile and at the same time comparatively less efficacy when compared to other biological agents available for treating psoriasis. Larger studies with longer duration are required to clearly depict the long-term side effects profile. Keywords: Itolizumab, CD6, psoriasis, monoclonal antibody, biologicals 

  19. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fc Receptor-Mediated Activities of Env-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Generated from Volunteers Receiving the DNA Prime-Protein Boost HIV Vaccine DP6-001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Matthew R; Pollara, Justin; Edwards, Regina Whitney; Seaman, Michael S; Gorny, Miroslaw K; Montefiori, David C; Liao, Hua-Xin; Ferrari, Guido; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 is able to elicit broadly potent neutralizing antibodies in a very small subset of individuals only after several years of infection, and therefore, vaccines that elicit these types of antibodies have been difficult to design. The RV144 trial showed that moderate protection is possible and that this protection may correlate with antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. Our previous studies demonstrated that in an HIV vaccine phase I trial, the DP6-001 trial, a polyvalent Env DNA prime-protein boost formulation could elicit potent and broadly reactive, gp120-specific antibodies with positive neutralization activities. Here we report on the production and analysis of HIV-1 Env-specific human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) isolated from vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial. For this initial report, 13 hMAbs from four vaccinees in the DP6-001 trial showed broad binding to gp120 proteins of diverse subtypes both autologous and heterologous to vaccine immunogens. Equally cross-reactive Fc receptor-mediated functional activities, including ADCC and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) activities, were present with both immune sera and isolated MAbs, confirming the induction of nonneutralizing functional hMAbs by the DNA prime-protein boost vaccination. Elicitation of broadly reactive hMAbs by vaccination in healthy human volunteers confirms the value of the polyvalent formulation in this HIV vaccine design. The roles of Fc receptor-mediated protective antibody responses are gaining more attention due to their potential contribution to the low-level protection against HIV-1 infection that they provided in the RV144 trial. At the same time, information about hMabs from other human HIV vaccine studies is very limited. In the current study, both immune sera and monoclonal antibodies from vaccinated humans showed not only high-level ADCC and ADCP activities but also cross-subtype ADCC and ADCP activities when a polyvalent DNA prime-protein boost

  1. Characterization of a Novel Anti-Human HB-EGF Monoclonal Antibody Applicable for Paraffin-Embedded Tissues and Diagnosis of HB-EGF-Related Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Ryo; Takagi, Mika; Akatsuka, Jun-Ichi; Ono, Ken-Ichiro; Kishi, Yoshiro; Mekada, Eisuke

    2016-04-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a member of the EGF family of growth factors that bind to and activate the EGF receptor (EGFR/ErbB1) and ErbB4. HB-EGF plays pivotal roles in pathophysiological processes, including cancer. Thus, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for HB-EGF detection could be an important tool in the therapeutic diagnosis of HB-EGF-related cancers and other diseases. However, few mAbs, especially those applicable for immunohistochemistry (IHC), have been established to date. In this study, we generated a clone of hybridoma-derived mAb 2-108 by immunizing mice with recombinant human HB-EGF protein expressed by human cells. The mAb 2-108 specifically bound to human HB-EGF but not to mouse HB-EGF and was successful in immunoblotting, even under reducing conditions, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence for unfixed as well as paraformaldehyde-fixed cells. Notably, this mAb was effective in IHC of paraffin-embedded tumor specimens. Epitope mapping analysis showed that mAb 2-108 recognized the N-terminal prodomain in HB-EGF. These results indicate that this new anti-HB-EGF mAb 2-108 would be useful in the diagnosis of HB-EGF-related cancers and would be a strong tool in both basic and clinical research on HB-EGF.

  2. Biodistribution of 99mTc-labeled anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody h-R3 in a xenograft model of human lung adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Morales, Alejo; Duconge, Jorge; Caballero-Torres, Idania; Nunez-Gandolff, Gilda; Fernandez, Eduardo; Iznaga-Escobar, Normando

    1999-01-01

    The anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) humanized monoclonal antibody (MAb) h-R3 is an (IgG 1 ), which binds to an extracellular domain of EGF-R. It was used to evaluate the biodistribution on nude mice xenografted with H-125 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Results were compared with its murine version of the MAb ior-egf/r3. Twenty-one athymic female 4NMRI nu/nu mice were injected intraperitoneally with 10 μg/100 μCi of 99m Tc-labeled MAbs. Immunoreactivity of 99m Tc-labeled MAbs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on H-125 cell line and the immunoreactive fractions was determined by the Lindmo method. Among all organs, significant accumulation was found in serum (27.05 ± 2.08 %ID/g) and tumor (3.903 ± 0.89 %ID/g) at 4 h after injection. These values decreased to 5.03 ± 0.50 %ID/g and 2.19 ± 0.56 %ID/g for serum and tumor, respectively. The immunoreactive fraction was found to be 0.70, with a correlation coefficient r=0.9984. With the good biodistribution and tumor uptake of the 99m Tc-labeled humanized antibody h-R3, a phase I diagnostic clinical trial of tumor with epithelial origin should be pursued

  3. Pharmacokinetics and immunogenicity investigation of a human anti-interleukin-17 monoclonal antibody in non-naïve cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chao; Gunn, George R; Marini, Joseph C; Shankar, Gopi; Han Hsu, Helen; Davis, Hugh M

    2015-05-01

    The pharmacokinetics (PK) of biologic therapeutics, especially monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), in monkeys generally presents the most relevant predictive PK information for humans. However, human mAbs, xenogeneic proteins to monkeys, are likely to be immunogenic. Monkeys previously treated with a human mAb (non-naïve) may have developed antidrug antibodies (ADAs) that cross-react with another test mAb in subsequent studies. Unlike PK studies for small-molecule therapeutics, in which animals may be reused, naïve monkeys have been used almost exclusively for preclinical PK studies of biologic therapeutics to avoid potential pre-existing immunologic cross-reactivity issues. The propensity and extent of pre-existing ADAs have not been systematically investigated to date. In this study, the PK and immunogenicity of mAb A, a human anti-human interkeukin-17 mAb, were investigated in a colony of 31 cynomolgus monkeys previously exposed to other human mAbs against different targets. We screened the monkeys for pre-existing antibodies to mAb A prior to the PK study and showed that 44% of the monkeys had pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies to mAb A, which could affect the PK characterization of the antibody. In the subcolony of monkeys without measurable pre-existing ADAs, PK and immunogenicity of mAb A were successfully characterized. The impact of ADAs on mAb A PK was also demonstrated in the monkeys with pre-existing ADAs. Here we report the results and propose a pragmatic approach for the use of non-naïve monkeys when conducting PK studies of biologic therapeutics. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  4. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manetta J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Manetta, Holly Bina, Paul Ryan, Niles Fox, Derrick R Witcher, Kristine Kikly Biotechnology Discovery Research, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: B-cell activating factor (BAFF is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. Keywords: autoimmunity, B-cell malignancies, B-cell survival factor, BAFF

  5. In vitro and in vivo properties of a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that combats multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ADAWI, AZMI; BISIGNANO, CARLO; GENOVESE, TIZIANA; FILOCAMO, ANGELA; KHOURI-ASSI, CAMELLIA; NEVILLE, ANAT; FEUERSTEIN, GIORA Z.; CUZZOCREA, SALVATORE; NEVILLE, LEWIS F.

    2012-01-01

    The development of an anti-bacterial drug in the form of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting an exposed virulence factor, represents an innovative therapeutic strategy. Consequently, a fully human IgG1 mAb (LST-007) targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) flagellin type b was recombinantly expressed and characterized in vitro and in an infection model driven by a multidrug resistant (MDR) PA strain. LST-007 demonstrated a highly specific binding towards whole PA bacteria harboring flagellin type b and its recombinant counterpart, with a KD of 7.4×10−10 M. In bioactivity assays, LST-007 or titers of Cmax sera derived from pharmacokinetic studies, markedly attenuated PA motility in an equipotent manner. In vivo, parenteral LST-007 (20 mg/kg) given as a single or double-dosing paradigm post-infection, afforded survival (up to 75% at Day 7) in a lethal model of pneumonia driven by the intratracheal (i.t.) instillation of an LD80 of the MDR PA isolate. This protective effect was markedly superior to that of imipenem (30% survival at Day 7) and totally devoid with an irrelevant, human isotype mAb. These data lay credence that LST-007 may be a valuable adjunct to the limited list of anti-bacterials that can tackle MDR PA strains, thereby warranting its continued development for eventual clinical evaluation. PMID:22735858

  6. Application of four anti-human interferon-alpha monoclonal antibodies for immunoassay and comparative analysis of natural interferon-alpha mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, G.; Lundgren, E.; Ekre, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    Four different mouse monoclonal antibodies to human interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) were evaluated for application in quantitative and comparative analysis of natural IFN-alpha mixtures. Binding to IFN-alpha subtypes in solution revealed individual reactivity patterns. These patterns changed if the IFN-alpha molecules were immobilized either passively to a surface or bound by another antibody. Also, substitution of a single amino acid in IFN-alpha 2 affected the binding, apparently by altering the conformation. Isoelectric focusing of three natural IFN-alpha preparations from different sources, followed by immunoblotting, resulted in individual patterns with each of the four mAbs and also demonstrated variation in the composition of the IFN-alpha preparations. None of the mAbs was subtype specific, but by combining the different mAbs, and also applying polyclonal anti-human IFN-alpha antibodies, it was possible to design sensitive sandwich ELISAs with broad or more limited IFN-alpha subtype specificity

  7. Strategies to overcome resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo-Jeong; Cha, Pu-Hyeon; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2014-08-07

    Administration of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) such as cetuximab and panitumumab in combination with conventional chemotherapy substantially prolongs survival of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). However, the efficacy of these mAbs is limited due to genetic variation among patients, in particular K-ras mutations. The discovery of K-ras mutation as a predictor of non-responsiveness to EGFR mAb therapy has caused a major change in the treatment of mCRC. Drugs that inhibit transformation caused by oncogenic alterations of Ras and its downstream components such as BRAF, MEK and AKT seem to be promising cancer therapeutics as single agents or when given with EGFR inhibitors. Although multiple therapeutic strategies to overcome EGFR mAb-resistance are under investigation, our understanding of their mode of action is limited. Rational drug development based on stringent preclinical data, biomarker validation, and proper selection of patients is of paramount importance in the treatment of mCRC. In this review, we will discuss diverse approaches to overcome the problem of resistance to existing anti-EGFR therapies and potential future directions for cancer therapies related to the mutational status of genes associated with EGFR-Ras-ERK and PI3K signalings.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies against the human mannose receptor as a specific marker in flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry for macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noorman, F.; Braat, E.A.M.; Barrett-Bergshoeff, M.M.; Barbé, E.; Leeuwen, A. van; Lindeman, J.; Rijken, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Recently we developed mouse monocloual antibodies (mAb) against the isolated human 175-kDa mannose receptor. In the present study we tested whether these mAb are suitable for the detection of the mannose receptor on cultured macrophages using flow cytometry and on cells in human tissues using

  9. Open-label, dose escalation phase I study in healthy volunteers to evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetics of a human monoclonal antibody to Clostridium difficile toxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Claribel P; Tummala, Sanjeev; Molrine, Deborah; Davidson, Lisa; Farrell, Richard J; Lembo, Anthony; Hibberd, Patricia L; Lowy, Israel; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2008-06-25

    Recent data suggest that Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea is becoming more severe and difficult to treat. Antibody responses to C. difficile toxin A are protective against symptomatic disease and recurrence. We examined the safety and pharmacokinetics (pk) of a novel neutralizing human monoclonal antibody against C. difficile toxin A (CDA1) in healthy adults. Five cohorts with 6 subjects each received a single intravenous infusion of CDA1 at escalating doses of 0.3, 1, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg. Safety evaluations took place on days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 post-infusion. Samples for pk analysis were obtained before and after infusion, and at each safety evaluation. Serum CDA1 antibody concentrations and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) titers were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. A noncompartmental model was used for pk analysis. Thirty subjects were enrolled. The median age was 27.5 yrs. There were no serious adverse events (AE) related to CDA1. Twenty-one of the 48 reported non-serious adverse events were possibly related to CDA1, and included transient blood pressure changes requiring no treatment, nasal congestion, headache, abdominal cramps, nausea, and self-limited diarrhea. Serum CDA1 concentrations increased with escalating doses: mean C(max) ranged from 6.82 microg/ml for the 0.3 mg/kg cohort to 511 microg/ml for the 20 mg/kg cohort. The geometric mean values of the half-life of CDA1 ranged between 25.3 and 31.8 days, and the volume of distribution approximated serum. No subject formed detectable HAHA titers. Administration of CDA1 as a single intravenous infusion was safe and well tolerated. C(max) increased proportionally with increasing doses. A randomized study of CDA1 in patients with C. difficile associated diarrhea is underway.

  10. Safety, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and biodistribution of (186)Re-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab) in patients with early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppe, Manuel; Schaijk, Frank van; Roos, Jan; Leeuwen, Paul van; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Kuthan, Hartmut; Bleichrodt, Robert

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, immunogenicity, and biodistribution of (186)Re-labeled humanized anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibody (MAb( BIWA 4 (Bivatuzumab( in 9 patients with early-stage breast cancer. Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS( was performed within 1, 24, and 72 hours after administration. BIWA 4 concentration in plasma (ELISA and radioactivity measurements( and the development of human antihuman antibody (HAHA( responses was determined. The biodistribution of (186)Re-BIWA 4 was determined by radioactivity measurements in tumor and normal tissue biopsies obtained during surgery 1 week after administration. Administration of (186)Re-BIWA 4 was well tolerated by all patients and no HAHA responses were observed. The mean t(1/2) in plasma of BIWA 4 (ELISA( was 81 hours (range, 67-97(, whereas the mean radioactivity t(1/2) tended to be longer, at 105 hours (range, 90-114(. RIS unmistakably showed the tumor in 3 patients. Less clear identifications were established in 3 additional patients. In 2 patients, the tumor was wrongly identified in the contralateral breast. Median tumor CD44v6 expression, as determined by immunohistochemistry, was 70% (range, 10-90%). Mean tumor uptake was 2.96% ID/kg (range, 0.92-6.27(, with no apparent correlation with either tumor CD44v6 expression, tumor-cell cellularity, or tumor diameter. Tumor-to-nontumor ratios were unfavorable for blood, bone marrow, mammary gland tissue, and skin. The (186)Re-labeled humanized MAb BIWA 4 can safely be administered to patients with early-stage breast cancer. Tumorto- nontumor ratios were unfavorable, with no apparent correlation with CD44v6 expression, tumor-cell cellularity, or tumor diameter. BIWA 4, therefore, appears to have limitations as a vehicle for radioimmunotherapy in patients with breast cancer.

  11. Five birds, one stone: neutralization of α-hemolysin and 4 bi-component leukocidins of Staphylococcus aureus with a single human monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouha, Harald; Badarau, Adriana; Visram, Zehra C; Battles, Michael B; Prinz, Bianka; Magyarics, Zoltán; Nagy, Gábor; Mirkina, Irina; Stulik, Lukas; Zerbs, Manuel; Jägerhofer, Michaela; Maierhofer, Barbara; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Dolezilkova, Ivana; Gross, Karin; Banerjee, Srijib; Zauner, Gerhild; Malafa, Stefan; Zmajkovic, Jakub; Maier, Sabine; Mabry, Robert; Krauland, Eric; Wittrup, K Dane; Gerngross, Tillman U; Nagy, Eszter

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen associated with high mortality. The emergence of antibiotic resistance and the inability of antibiotics to counteract bacterial cytotoxins involved in the pathogenesis of S. aureus call for novel therapeutic approaches, such as passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The complexity of staphylococcal pathogenesis and past failures with single mAb products represent considerable barriers for antibody-based therapeutics. Over the past few years, efforts have focused on neutralizing α-hemolysin. Recent findings suggest that the concerted actions of several cytotoxins, including the bi-component leukocidins play important roles in staphylococcal pathogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to isolate mAbs that bind to multiple cytolysins by employing high diversity human IgG1 libraries presented on the surface of yeast cells. Here we describe cross-reactive antibodies with picomolar affinity for α-hemolysin and 4 different bi-component leukocidins that share only ∼26% overall amino acid sequence identity. The molecular basis of cross-reactivity is the recognition of a conformational epitope shared by α-hemolysin and F-components of gamma-hemolysin (HlgAB and HlgCB), LukED and LukSF (Panton-Valentine Leukocidin). The amino acids predicted to form the epitope are conserved and known to be important for cytotoxic activity. We found that a single cross-reactive antibody prevented lysis of human phagocytes, epithelial and red blood cells induced by α-hemolysin and leukocidins in vitro, and therefore had superior effectiveness compared to α-hemolysin specific antibodies to protect from the combined cytolytic effect of secreted S. aureus toxins. Such mAb afforded high levels of protection in murine models of pneumonia and sepsis.

  12. Generation of glyco-engineered Nicotiana benthamiana for the production of monoclonal antibodies with a homogeneous human-like N-glycan structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Richard; Stadlmann, Johannes; Schähs, Matthias; Stiegler, Gabriela; Quendler, Heribert; Mach, Lukas; Glössl, Josef; Weterings, Koen; Pabst, Martin; Steinkellner, Herta

    2008-05-01

    A common argument against using plants as a production system for therapeutic proteins is their inability to perform authentic human N-glycosylation (i.e. the presence of beta1,2-xylosylation and core alpha1,3-fucosylation). In this study, RNA interference (RNAi) technology was used to obtain a targeted down-regulation of the endogenous beta1,2-xylosyltransferase (XylT) and alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase (FucT) genes in Nicotiana benthamiana, a tobacco-related plant species widely used for recombinant protein expression. Three glyco-engineered lines with significantly reduced xylosylated and/or core alpha1,3-fucosylated glycan structures were generated. The human anti HIV monoclonal antibody 2G12 was transiently expressed in these glycosylation mutants as well as in wild-type plants. Four glycoforms of 2G12 differing in the presence/absence of xylose and core alpha1,3-fucose residues in their N-glycans were produced. Notably, 2G12 produced in XylT/FucT-RNAi plants was found to contain an almost homogeneous N-glycan species without detectable xylose and alpha1,3-fucose residues. Plant-derived glycoforms were indistinguishable from Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-derived 2G12 with respect to electrophoretic properties, and exhibited functional properties (i.e. antigen binding and HIV neutralization activity) at least equivalent to those of the CHO counterpart. The generated RNAi lines were stable, viable and did not show any obvious phenotype, thus providing a robust tool for the production of therapeutically relevant glycoproteins in plants with a humanized N-glycan structure.

  13. Applying antibody-sensitive hypervariable region 1-deleted hepatitis C virus to the study of escape pathways of neutralizing human monoclonal antibody AR5A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velazquez-Moctezuma, Rodrigo; Law, Mansun; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    isolates with high antibody resistance, or antibodies with moderate potency, it remains challenging to induce escape mutations in vitro. Here, as proof-of-concept, we used antibody-sensitive HVR1-deleted (ΔHVR1) viruses to generate escape mutants for a human monoclonal antibody, AR5A, targeting a rare...... effect but sensitized the virus to AR5A. Of note, H77/JFH1L665S was non-viable. The resistance mutations did not affect cell-to-cell spread or E1/E2 interactions. Finally, introducing L665W, identified in genotype 1, into genotypes 2–6 parental and HVR1-deleted variants (not available for genotype 4a) we...... observed diverse effects on viral fitness and a universally pronounced reduction in AR5A sensitivity. Thus, we were able to take advantage of the neutralization-sensitive HVR1-deleted viruses to rapidly generate escape viruses aiding our understanding of the divergent escape pathways used by HCV to evade...

  14. Radioimmunoscintigraphy of recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer with technetium 99m-labeled totally human monoclonal antibody 88BV59: results of pivotal, phase III multicenter studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, A N; Klein, J L; Wolff, B G; Baum, R; Chetanneau, A; Pecking, A; Fischman, A J; Hoover, H C; Wynant, G E; Subramanian, R; Goroff, D K; Hanna, M G

    1998-05-01

    To assess the performance and potential clinical impact of a totally human monoclonal antibody, 88BV59 (HumaSPECT) (INTRACEL, Corp, Rockville, MD), in 202 assessable presurgical patients with recurrent, metastatic, or occult colorectal cancer. 88BV59, labeled with technetium Tc 99m (99mTc) (HumaSPECT-Tc), was injected intravenously, and planar and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) images were obtained 14 to 20 hours postinjection. Surgical and pathologic verification of tumor were used as the standard against which the performance of HumaSPECT-Tc imaging and computed tomography (CT) analysis were evaluated. All patients entered onto the recurrent disease study had at least one tumor site defined on CT. The sensitivity of HumaSPECT-Tc in those CT-positive patients was 87%. The specificity of HumaSPECT-Tc was 57% compared with 17% for CT and the difference was statistically significant (P HAHA) response (90 ng/mL) at 9 weeks postinfusion was observed. HumaSPECT-Tc can provide important and accurate information about the presence and location of disease in patients with a high clinical suspicion of metastatic or recurrent colorectal cancer and either positive (known disease) or negative (occult disease) CT scans.

  15. Monoclonal antibody-based dipstick assay: a reliable field applicable technique for diagnosis of Schistosoma mansoni infection using human serum and urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demerdash, Zeinab; Mohamed, Salwa; Hendawy, Mohamed; Rabia, Ibrahim; Attia, Mohy; Shaker, Zeinab; Diab, Tarek M

    2013-02-01

    A field applicable diagnostic technique, the dipstick assay, was evaluated for its sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing human Schistosoma mansoni infection. A monoclonal antibody (mAb) against S. mansoni adult worm tegumental antigen (AWTA) was employed in dipstick and sandwich ELISA for detection of circulating schistosome antigen (CSA) in both serum and urine samples. Based on clinical and parasitological examinations, 60 S. mansoni-infected patients, 30 patients infected with parasites other than schistosomiasis, and 30 uninfected healthy individuals were selected. The sensitivity and specificity of dipstick assay in urine samples were 86.7% and 90.0%, respectively, compared to 90.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity of sandwich ELISA. In serum samples, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.3% and 91.7% for dipstick assay vs. 91.7% and 95.0% for sandwich ELISA, respectively. The diagnostic efficacy of dipstick assay in urine and serum samples was 88.3% and 90.0%, while it was 90.8% and 93.3% for sandwich ELISA, respectively. The diagnostic indices of dipstick assay and ELISA either in serum or in urine were statistically comparable (P>0.05). In conclusion, the dipstick assay offers an alternative simple, rapid, non-invasive technique in detecting CSA or complement to stool examinations especially in field studies.

  16. Frequent Use of the IgA Isotype in Human B Cells Encoding Potent Norovirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies That Block HBGA Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Sapparapu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Noroviruses (NoV are the most common cause of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis and cause local outbreaks of illness, especially in confined situations. Despite being identified four decades ago, the correlates of protection against norovirus gastroenteritis are still being elucidated. Recent studies have shown an association of protection with NoV-specific serum histo-blood group antigen-blocking antibody and with serum IgA in patients vaccinated with NoV VLPs. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of human monoclonal IgG and IgA antibodies against a GI.I NoV, Norwalk virus (NV. A higher proportion of the IgA antibodies blocked NV VLP binding to glycans than did IgG antibodies. We generated isotype-switched variants of IgG and IgA antibodies to study the effects of the constant domain on blocking and binding activities. The IgA form of antibodies appears to be more potent than the IgG form in blocking norovirus binding to histo-blood group antigens. These studies suggest a unique role for IgA antibodies in protection from NoV infections by blocking attachment to cell receptors.

  17. Biokinetic studies and scintigraphic imaging of human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts with iodine 131-labeled F(ab')2-fragments of monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senekowitsch, R.; Moellenstaedt, S.; Kriegel, H.; Baum, R.P.; Maul, F.D.; Hoer, G.; Wenisch, H.J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Biodistribution and tumor uptake of I-131 labeled F(ab') 2 -fragments of monoclonal antibodies to CA 125, CA 19-9 and CEA were investigated in nuce mice with human pancreatic carcinoma xenografts. To assess the immunological specificity of these antibody fragments their tumor uptake was compared with that of unspecific IgG F(ab') 2 . Additionally serum levels of CA 125 and CA 19-9 were determined in tumor bearing mice by radioimmunoassay and the expression of CA 125 and CA 19-9 in pancreatic carcinoma was demonstrated by immunhistochemicals studies. The rapid blood clearance of the antibody fragments leads to increasing tumor-to-blood ratios with time after injection for all antibody fragments. The highest ratios were found for OC 125 at all time points p.i., with mean values of 9.6 at 48 h p.i. and 11.8 at 96 h p.i. On scintigraphic images tumors with a weight of 100 mg could be localized between 24 and 48 h after injection of iodinated OC 125 F(ab') 2 . The serum levels of CA 125 and CA 19-9 were elevated only in some animals and no correlation between the antigen serum levels and the antigen expression in the tumor shown by immunhistochemical staining could be determined. (orig.) [de

  18. Safety, pharmacokinetic, and functional effects of the nogo-a monoclonal antibody in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a randomized, first-in-human clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Meininger

    Full Text Available The neurite outgrowth inhibitor, Nogo-A, has been shown to be overexpressed in skeletal muscle in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; it is both a potential biomarker and therapeutic target. We performed a double-blind, two-part, dose-escalation study, in subjects with ALS, assessing safety, pharmacokinetics (PK and functional effects of ozanezumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Nogo-A. In Part 1, 40 subjects were randomized (3∶1 to receive single dose intravenous ozanezumab (0.01, 0.1, 1, 5, or 15 mg/kg or placebo. In Part 2, 36 subjects were randomized (3∶1 to receive two repeat doses of intravenous ozanezumab (0.5, 2.5, or 15 mg/kg or placebo, approximately 4 weeks apart. The primary endpoints were safety and tolerability (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, electrocardiogram (ECG, and clinical laboratory tests. Secondary endpoints included PK, immunogenicity, functional endpoints (clinical and electrophysiological, and biomarker parameters. Overall, ozanezumab treatment (0.01-15 mg/kg was well tolerated. The overall incidence of AEs in the repeat dose 2.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg ozanezumab groups was higher than in the repeat dose placebo group and repeat dose 0.5 mg/kg ozanezumab group. The majority were considered not related to study drug by the investigators. Six serious AEs were reported in three subjects receiving ozanezumab; none were considered related to study drug. No study drug-related patterns were identified for ECG, laboratory, or vital signs parameters. One subject (repeat dose 15 mg/kg ozanezumab showed a weak, positive anti-ozanezumab-antibody result. PK results were generally consistent with monoclonal antibody treatments. No apparent treatment effects were observed for functional endpoints or muscle biomarkers. Immunohistochemical staining showed dose-dependent co-localization of ozanezumab with Nogo-A in skeletal muscle. In conclusion, single and repeat dose ozanezumab treatment was well tolerated and demonstrated

  19. Development of a method to measure kinetics of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in human tumour with applications to microdosimetry: positron emission tomography studies of iodine-124 labelled 3F8 monoclonal antibody in glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daghighian, F.; Pentlow, K.S.; Graham, M.C.; Finn, R.D.; Larson, S.M.; Yeh, S.D.J.; Macapinlac, H.; DiResta, G.R.; Arbit, E.; Cheung, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    We present a method to assess quantitatively the immuhological characteristics of tumours using radiolabelled monoclonal antibody and positron emission tomography (PET) to improve dosimetry for radioimmunotherapy. This method is illustrated with a glioma patient who injected with 96.2 MPq of iodine-124 labelled 3FB, a murine antibody (IgG3) specific against the ganglioside G D2 . Serial PET scans and plasma samples were taken over 11 days. A three-compartment model was used to estimate the plasma to tumour transfer constant (K 1 ), the tumour to plasma transfer constant k 2 , the association and dissociation constants (k 3 , k 4 ) of antibody binding, and the binding potential. Tumour radioactivity peaked at 18 h at 0.0045% ID/g. The kinetic parameters were estimated to be: K 1 =0.048 ml h -1 g -1 , k 2 =0.16 h -1 , k 3 =0.03 h -1 , k 4 =0.015 h -1 and BP=2.25. Based on these kinetic parameters, the amount of tumour-bound radiolabelled monoclonal antibody was calculated. This method permits estimates of both macrodosimetry and microdosimetry at the cellular level based on in vivo non-invasive measurement. (orig.)

  20. ON THE NOTION OF SYNERGY OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AS DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sela

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available History of developing synergy between monoclonal antibodies, anti-tumor activity of monoclonal antibodies against tyrosine-kinases receptors EGFR/ErbB-1 and HER2/ErbB-2 as well as growth factor VEGF in various combinations are considered in the article. There were proposed hypotheses about potential molecular mechanisms underlay synergy between monoclonal antibodies (for homo- and hetero combinations of antibodies appropriately specific for antigenic determinants on the same or different receptors. Future trends in researches necessary to deeper understanding causes of this phenomenon and perspectives for practical application of monoclonal antibodies acted synergistically as immunotherapeutic drugs for human tumors treatment are reviewed.

  1. Generation and characterization of human monoclonal antibody HMD4 against ovarian carcinoma and the study of radioimmunoimaging in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, H.N.; Cui, H.; Feng, J.; Fu, T.Y.; Wei, P.; Fu, Z.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Lymphocytes from regional lymph nodes of patients with ovarian carcinoma were immortalized by fusing them with a nonsecreting cell line of murine myeloma (Sp2/0-Ag14). By early cloning and recloning a hybrid cell line, named HMD4, was established. It has secreted human IgG for more than 15 months stably. Chromosome analysis corresponded with the characterization of human-mouse hybridoma. Large quantities of ascites were obtained after hybrid cells injection into the primed nude mice. Human IgG of light chain was detected and purified from the ascites. Twenty-six of 43 (60.5%) epithelial ovarian cancers were positively stained with HMD4 by ABC immunoperoxidase methods while nonepithelial ovarian cancers and almost all benign tumors and normal tissues were negative. The molecular weight of the antigen recognized by HMD4 was 55KDa determined by Western blotting. 131I labeled HMD4 was administered intraperitoneally to nude mice bearing human ovarian epithelial adenocarcinoma; 131I labeled normal human IgG and normal murine IgG were used as controls. Measurements of T/NT and T/B ratios of 131I-HMD4 were done. Radioimaging showed HMD4 clearly localized on tumor regions at 48 and 72 hours and the biodistribution and metabolism of the labeled HMD4 corresponded with the images. The above results indicate that HMD4 was specific to ovarian carcinoma, a hopeful clue for clinical applications

  2. Regulation by anti-CD2 monoclonal antibody of the activation of a human T cell clone induced by anti-CD3 or anti-T cell receptor antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yssel, H.; Aubry, J. P.; de Waal Malefijt, R.; de Vries, J. E.; Spits, H.

    1987-01-01

    In this study the effect of anti-cluster designation (CD) 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) on the activation of a cloned human T cell line, HY837, after triggering the CD3/T cell receptor (TcR) complex by anti-CD3 or anti-TcR mAb is described. HY837, which reacts with a series of mAb directed at

  3. The human CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab shows antitumor activity and hampers leukemia-microenvironment interactions in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matas-Céspedes, Alba; Vidal-Crespo, Anna; Rodriguez, Vanina

    2017-01-01

    mononuclear cells to analyze antibodydependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), murine and human macrophages to study antibody-dependent cell phagocytosis (ADCP), or human serum to analyze complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The effect of daratumumab on CLL cell migration and adhesion to extracellular matrix...... was characterized. Daratumumab activity was validated in two in vivo models. Results: Daratumumab demonstrated efficient lysis of patientderived CLL cells and cell lines by ADCC in vitro and ADCP both in vitro and in vivo whereas exhibited negligible CDC in these cells. To demonstrate the therapeutic effect...

  4. Immunoglobulin variable region sequences of two human monoclonal antibodies directed to an onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen, lactotetraosylceramide (LcOse4Cer).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yago, K; Zenita, K; Ohwaki, I; Harada, R; Nozawa, S; Tsukazaki, K; Iwamori, M; Endo, N; Yasuda, N; Okuma, M

    1993-11-01

    A human monoclonal antibody, 11-50, was generated and was shown to recognize an onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen, LcOse4Cer. The isotype of this antibody was IgM, lambda, similar to the previously known human anti-LcOse4 antibodies, such as IgMWOO and HMST-1. We raised a murine anti-idiotypic antibody G3 (IgG1, kappa) against 11-50, and tested its reactivity towards the affinity purified human polyclonal anti-LcOse4 antibodies prepared from pooled human sera using a Gal beta 1-->3GlcNAc beta-immobilized column. The results indicated that at least a part of the human polyclonal anti-LcOse4 antibodies shared the G3 idiotype with 11-50. We further analyzed the sequence of variable regions of the two anti-LcOse4 antibodies, 11-50 and HMST-1. Sequence analysis of the heavy chain variable regions indicated that the VH regions of these two antibodies were highly homologous to each other (93.5% at the nucleic acid level), and these antibodies utilized the germline genes VH1.9III and hv3005f3 as the VH segments, which are closely related germline genes of the VHIII family. It was noted that these germline VH genes are frequently utilized in fetal B cells. The JH region of both antibodies was encoded by the JH4 gene. For the light chain, the V lambda segments of the two antibodies were 96.3% homologous to each other at the nucleic acid level. The V lambda segments of both antibodies showed the highest homology to the rearranged V lambda gene called V lambda II.DS among reported V lambda genes, while the exact germline V lambda genes encoding the two antibodies were not yet registered in available sequence databanks. The amino acid sequences of the J lambda segments of both antibodies were identical. These results indicate that the two human antibodies recognizing the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigen Lc4 are encoded by the same or very homologous germline genes.

  5. High-yield production of a human monoclonal IgG by rhizosecretion in hydroponic tobacco cultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madeira, L.M.; Szeto, T.H.; Henquet, Maurice; Raven, Nicole; Runions, John; Huddleston, Jon; Garrard, Ian; Drake, P.M.W.; Ma, Julian K.C.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizosecretion of recombinant pharmaceuticals from in vitro hydroponic transgenic plant cultures is a simple, low cost, reproducible and controllable production method. Here, we demonstrate the application and adaptation of this manufacturing platform to a human antivitronectin IgG1

  6. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  7. Development and characterization of anti-glycopeptide monoclonal antibodies against human podoplanin, using glycan-deficient cell lines generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Mika K; Nakamura, Takuro; Honma, Ryusuke; Ogasawara, Satoshi; Fujii, Yuki; Abe, Shinji; Takagi, Michiaki; Harada, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-02-01

    Human podoplanin (hPDPN), which binds to C-type lectin-like receptor-2 (CLEC-2), is involved in platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis. The expression of hPDPN in cancer cells or cancer-associated fibroblasts indicates poor prognosis. Human lymphatic endothelial cells, lung-type I alveolar cells, and renal glomerular epithelial cells express hPDPN. Although numerous monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against hPDPN are available, they recognize peptide epitopes of hPDPN. Here, we generated a novel anti-hPDPN mAb, LpMab-21. To characterize the hPDPN epitope recognized by the LpMab-21, we established glycan-deficient CHO-S and HEK-293T cell lines, using the CRISPR/Cas9 or TALEN. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the minimum hPDPN epitope, in which sialic acid is linked to Thr76, recognized by LpMab-21 is Thr76-Arg79. LpMab-21 detected hPDPN expression in glioblastoma, oral squamous carcinoma, and seminoma cells as well as in normal lymphatic endothelial cells. However, LpMab-21 did not react with renal glomerular epithelial cells or lung type I alveolar cells, indicating that sialylation of hPDPN Thr76 is cell-type-specific. LpMab-21 combined with other anti-hPDPN antibodies that recognize different epitopes may therefore be useful for determining the physiological function of sialylated hPDPN. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Accelerating Influenza Research: Vaccines, Antivirals, Immunomodulators and Monoclonal Antibodies. The Manufacture of a New Wild-Type H3N2 Virus for the Human Viral Challenge Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Fullen

    Full Text Available Influenza and its associated diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age. The failure of the flu vaccine in 2014-2015 demonstrates the need for a model that allows the rapid development of novel antivirals, universal/intra-seasonal vaccines, immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies and other novel treatments. To this end we manufactured a new H3N2 influenza virus in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice for use in the Human Viral Challenge Model.We chose an H3N2 influenza subtype, rather than H1N1, given that this strain has the most substantial impact in terms of morbidity or mortality annually as described by the Centre for Disease Control. We first subjected the virus batch to rigorous adventitious agent testing, confirmed the virus to be wild-type by Sanger sequencing and determined the virus titres appropriate for human use via the established ferret model. We built on our previous experience with other H3N2 and H1N1 viruses to develop this unique model.We conducted an initial safety and characterisation study in healthy adult volunteers, utilising our unique clinical quarantine facility in London, UK. In this study we demonstrated this new influenza (H3N2 challenge virus to be both safe and pathogenic with an appropriate level of disease in volunteers. Furthermore, by inoculating volunteers with a range of different inoculum titres, we established the minimum infectious titre required to achieve reproducible disease whilst ensuring a sensitive model that can be translated to design of subsequent field based studies.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02525055.

  9. The chimeric monoclonal antibody MHCSZ-123 against human von Willebrand factor A3 domain inhibits high-shear arterial thrombosis in a Rhesus monkey model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Shundong; Jiang, Miao; Yan, Bin; Shen, Fei; He, Yang; Wan, Aini; Xia, Lijun; Ruan, Changgeng; Zhao, Yiming

    2017-05-19

    SZ-123, a murine monoclonal antibody that targets the human von Willebrand factor (VWF) A3 domain and blocks the binding of collagen, is a powerful antithrombotic. In a Rhesus monkey model of thrombosis, SZ-123 had no side effects, such as bleeding or thrombocytopenia. The mouse/human chimeric version of SZ-123, MHCSZ-123, was developed and maintained inhibitory capacities in vitro and ex vivo after injection into monkeys. CHO-S cells were selected for stable expression of MHCSZ-123. Cell clones with high levels of MHCSZ-123 expression were screened with G418 then adapted to serum-free suspension culture. The antithrombotic effect of MHCSZ-123 on acute platelet-mediated thrombosis was studied in monkeys where thrombus formation was induced by injury and stenosis of the femoral artery, which allowed for cyclic flow reductions (CFRs). CFRs were measured in the femoral artery of anesthetized Rhesus monkeys before and after intravenous administration of MHCSZ-123. Ex vivo VWF binding to collagen, platelet aggregation, platelet counts, and template bleeding time were used as measurements of antithrombotic activity. In addition, plasma VWF and VWF occupancy were measured by ELISA. Injection of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mg/kg MHCSZ-123 significantly reduced CFRs by 29.4%, 57.9%, and 73.1%, respectively. When 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg MHCSZ-123 were administered, 46.6%-65.8% inhibition of ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation was observed between 15 and 30 min after injection. We observed minimal effects on bleeding time, minimal blood loss, and no spontaneous bleeding or thrombocytopenia. The VWF-A3 inhibitor MHCSZ-123 significantly reduced thrombosis in Rhesus monkeys and appeared to be safe and well tolerated.

  10. Emerging antigenic variants at the antigenic site Sb in pandemic A(H1N12009 influenza virus in Japan detected by a human monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayo Yasugi

    Full Text Available The swine-origin pandemic A(H1N12009 virus, A(H1N1pdm09, is still circulating in parts of the human population. To monitor variants that may escape from vaccination specificity, antigenic characterization of circulating viruses is important. In this study, a hybridoma clone producing human monoclonal antibody against A(H1N1pdm09, designated 5E4, was prepared using peripheral lymphocytes from a vaccinated volunteer. The 5E4 showed viral neutralization activity and inhibited hemagglutination. 5E4 escape mutants harbored amino acid substitutions (A189T and D190E in the hemagglutinin (HA protein, suggesting that 5E4 recognized the antigenic site Sb in the HA protein. To study the diversity of Sb in A(H1N1pdm09, 58 viral isolates were obtained during the 2009/10 and 2010/11 winter seasons in Osaka, Japan. Hemagglutination-inhibition titers were significantly reduced against 5E4 in the 2010/11 compared with the 2009/10 samples. Viral neutralizing titers were also significantly decreased in the 2010/11 samples. By contrast, isolated samples reacted well to ferret anti-A(H1N1pdm09 serum from both seasons. Nonsynonymous substitution rates revealed that the variant Sb and Ca2 sequences were being positively selected between 2009/10 and 2010/11. In 7,415 HA protein sequences derived from GenBank, variants in the antigenic sites Sa and Sb increased significantly worldwide from 2009 to 2013. These results indicate that the antigenic variants in Sb are likely to be in global circulation currently.

  11. Potency of a human monoclonal antibody to diphtheria toxin relative to equine diphtheria anti-toxin in a guinea pig intoxication model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Heidi L; Cheslock, Peter; Leney, Mark; Barton, Bruce; Molrine, Deborah C

    2016-08-17

    Prompt administration of anti-toxin reduces mortality following Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection. Current treatment relies upon equine diphtheria anti-toxin (DAT), with a 10% risk of serum sickness and rarely anaphylaxis. The global DAT supply is extremely limited; most manufacturers have ceased production. S315 is a neutralizing human IgG1 monoclonal antibody to diphtheria toxin that may provide a safe and effective alternative to equine DAT and address critical supply issues. To guide dose selection for IND-enabling pharmacology and toxicology studies, we dose-ranged S315 and DAT in a guinea pig model of diphtheria intoxication based on the NIH Minimum Requirements potency assay. Animals received a single injection of antibody premixed with toxin, were monitored for 30 days, and assigned a numeric score for clinical signs of disease. Animals receiving ≥ 27.5 µg of S315 or ≥ 1.75 IU of DAT survived whereas animals receiving ≤ 22.5 µg of S315 or ≤ 1.25 IU of DAT died, yielding a potency estimate of 17 µg S315/IU DAT (95% CI 16-21) for an endpoint of survival. Because some surviving animals exhibited transient limb weakness, likely a systemic sign of toxicity, DAT and S315 doses required to prevent hind limb paralysis were also determined, yielding a relative potency of 48 µg/IU (95% CI 38-59) for this alternate endpoint. To support advancement of S315 into clinical trials, potency estimates will be used to evaluate the efficacy of S315 versus DAT in an animal model with antibody administration after toxin exposure, more closely modeling anti-toxin therapy in humans.

  12. The chimeric monoclonal antibody MHCSZ-123 against human von Willebrand factor A3 domain inhibits high-shear arterial thrombosis in a Rhesus monkey model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shundong Ji

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SZ-123, a murine monoclonal antibody that targets the human von Willebrand factor (VWF A3 domain and blocks the binding of collagen, is a powerful antithrombotic. In a Rhesus monkey model of thrombosis, SZ-123 had no side effects, such as bleeding or thrombocytopenia. Methods The mouse/human chimeric version of SZ-123, MHCSZ-123, was developed and maintained inhibitory capacities in vitro and ex vivo after injection into monkeys. CHO-S cells were selected for stable expression of MHCSZ-123. Cell clones with high levels of MHCSZ-123 expression were screened with G418 then adapted to serum-free suspension culture. The antithrombotic effect of MHCSZ-123 on acute platelet-mediated thrombosis was studied in monkeys where thrombus formation was induced by injury and stenosis of the femoral artery, which allowed for cyclic flow reductions (CFRs. CFRs were measured in the femoral artery of anesthetized Rhesus monkeys before and after intravenous administration of MHCSZ-123. Ex vivo VWF binding to collagen, platelet aggregation, platelet counts, and template bleeding time were used as measurements of antithrombotic activity. In addition, plasma VWF and VWF occupancy were measured by ELISA. Results Injection of 0.1, 0.3, and 0.6 mg/kg MHCSZ-123 significantly reduced CFRs by 29.4%, 57.9%, and 73.1%, respectively. When 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg MHCSZ-123 were administered, 46.6%–65.8% inhibition of ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation was observed between 15 and 30 min after injection. We observed minimal effects on bleeding time, minimal blood loss, and no spontaneous bleeding or thrombocytopenia. Conclusions The VWF-A3 inhibitor MHCSZ-123 significantly reduced thrombosis in Rhesus monkeys and appeared to be safe and well tolerated.

  13. Ofatumumab, a human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with an inadequate response to one or more disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs: results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase I/II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mikkel; Baslund, Bo; Rigby, William

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a novel human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose disease did not respond to > or = 1 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug.......To investigate the safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a novel human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) whose disease did not respond to > or = 1 disease-modifying antirheumatic drug....

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies Recognize Gly-Leu-Phe-Gly Repeat of Nucleoporin Nup98 of Tetrahymena, Yeasts, and Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Ohtsuki, Chizuru; Osakada, Hiroko; Koujin, Takako; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2013-01-01

    Nucleoporin Nup98, an essential component of the nuclear pore complex, has multifunctional roles in nuclear functions including transcriptional regulation and nucleocytoplasmic transport. These functions mostly depend on a Gly-Leu-Phe-Gly (GLFG) sequence appearing repetitively in the N-terminal region of Nup98. As the GLFG sequence is well conserved among Nup98s from a wide variety of species including humans, yeasts, and ciliates such as Tetrahymena thermophila, a specific antibody that reco...

  15. Safety, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity of 99mTc-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 (bivatuzumab) in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colnot, David R; Roos, Jan C; de Bree, Remco; Wilhelm, Abraham J; Kummer, J Alain; Hanft, Gertraud; Heider, Karl-Heinz; Stehle, Gerd; Snow, Gordon B; van Dongen, Guus A M S

    2003-09-01

    Previous studies have shown the potential of murine and chimeric anti-CD44v6 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). A limitation of these MAbs, however, appeared to be their immunogenicity. Therefore, humanized monoclonal antibody BIWA 4 (bivatuzumab), with an intermediate affinity for CD44v6, was recently selected. As a prelude to RIT, we evaluated the safety, tumor-targeting potential, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity of technetium-99m-labeled BIWA 4 in patients undergoing operations for primary HNSCC in this study. Ten patients were treated at BIWA 4 dose levels of 25 mg (n=3), 50 mg (n=4), and 100 mg (n=3). Patients received 2 mg of 750 MBq 99mTc-BIWA 4, together with 23-, 48-, and 98-mg unlabeled BIWA 4, respectively. Radioimmunoscintigraphy (RIS) was performed within 1 h and after 21 h, and patients underwent surgery at 48 h after injection. Biodistribution of 99mTc-BIWA 4 was evaluated by radioactivity measurements in blood, bone marrow, and in biopsies of a surgical specimen obtained 48 h after injection. BIWA 4 concentration in blood was assessed by ELISA and high performance liquid chromatography and related to soluble CD44v6 levels in serum samples. The development of human anti-human antibody (HAHA) responses was determined. Administration of 99mTc-BIWA 4 was well tolerated by all patients and no HAHA responses were observed. A mean t1/2 in plasma of 54.8 +/- 11.5 h, 76.1 +/- 21.8 h, and 68.5 +/- 21.2 h was found for the 25-, 50-, and 100-mg dose group, respectively. No complex formation of BIWA 4 with soluble CD44v6 in blood was observed. RIS showed targeting of primary tumors and lymph node metastases in 8 of 10 and 1 of 5 patients, respectively. The highest tumor uptake and tumor to nontumor ratios were observed for the 50-mg dose group. Tumor uptake was 12.9 +/- 5.9, 26.2 +/- 3.1, and 15.4 +/- 1.9% of the injected dose (ID)/kg for the 25-, 50-, and 100-mg dose group

  16. Heterologous radioimmunoassay for llama and alpaca luteinizing hormone with a monoclonal antibody, and equine standard and a human tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aba, M.A.; Forsberg, M. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Veterinary medicine, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    A radioimmunoassay for llama and alpaca LH was developed using a human I{sup 125}LH tracer from a commercial kit, equine LH diluted in human LH free serum as standard, and amonoclonal antibody (518B7) specific for LH but with low species specificity. A 60-min delay in the addition of the tracer and overnight incubation gave a sensitivity of 0.8 {mu}3g L{sup -1}. The intra-assay coefficient of variation was 37% at 1 {mu}g L{sup -1}, declined to 15% at 4 {mu}g L{sup -1} and was below 6% for concentrations up to 32 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The inter-assay coefficients of variation for 3 control samples were 20% (2.8 {mu}g L{sup -1}), 16% (7.1 {mu}g L{sup -1}) and 9.8% (19 {mu}g L{sup -1}). In an attempt to increase sensitivity, all tubes were preincubated for 4 h at room temperature before adding the tracer, and the sample volume was increased from 50 {mu}L to 100 {mu}L (in the standard curve the increased volume was compensated for by human LH free serum). With this protocol, the assay sensitivity was 0,5 {mu}g L{sup -1}. The assay was validated clinically and demonstrated increased concentrations of LH after mating in llamas and alpacas. Furthermore, the assay was used to monitor LH responses to a single dose of GnRH in llamas (adult males and females at different ages). (au) 9 refs.

  17. P-glycoprotein epitope mapping. I. Identification of a linear human-specific epitope in the fourth loop of the P-glycoprotein extracellular domain by MM4.17 murine monoclonal antibody to human multi-drug-resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfriglia, M; Willingham, M C; Tombesi, M; Scagliotti, G V; Frasca, G; Chersi, A

    1994-01-02

    A new murine monoclonal antibody (MAb), MM4.17, to human multi-drug-resistant (MDR) cells was found to be reactive in an ELISA with a synthetic 16-amino acid peptide selected from the fourth loop of the P-glycoprotein extracellular domain. Immunohistochemistry indicated that this MAb reacted in human tissues in the same pattern as that previously found with other human-specific MAbs to P-glycoprotein. For a precise definition of the MM4.17 epitope, a peptide library consisting of overlapping 4- to 10-mer residues covering the entire P-glycoprotein-fragment was synthesized on polyethylene pins and tested for MAb binding. The results of this ELISA demonstrated that the MM4.17 epitope is constituted by the continuous-linear TRIDDPET amino-acid sequence (residues 750-757 of the human MDRI-P-glycoprotein). The MAb MM4.17 recognizes only the human MDRI-P-glycoprotein isoform, and excess TRIDDPET peptide blocks the binding of the MAb to MDR variants of CEM cells. These results demonstrate that the amino-acid sequence TRIDDPET from the human MDRI gene represents the first continuous-linear epitope identified in the P-glycoprotein extracellular domain.

  18. The Human CD38 Monoclonal Antibody Daratumumab Shows Antitumor Activity and Hampers Leukemia-Microenvironment Interactions in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas-Céspedes, Alba; Vidal-Crespo, Anna; Rodriguez, Vanina; Villamor, Neus; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; Roca-Ho, Heleia; Menéndez, Pablo; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Colomer, Dolors; Roué, Gaël; Wiestner, Adrian; Parren, Paul W H I; Doshi, Parul; van Bueren, Jeroen Lammerts; Pérez-Galán, Patricia

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: To establish a proof-of-concept for the efficacy of the anti-CD38 antibody daratumumab in the poor prognosis CD38 + chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) subtype. Experimental Design: The mechanism of action of daratumumab was assessed in CLL primary cells and cell lines using peripheral blood mononuclear cells to analyze antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), murine and human macrophages to study antibody-dependent cell phagocytosis (ADCP), or human serum to analyze complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The effect of daratumumab on CLL cell migration and adhesion to extracellular matrix was characterized. Daratumumab activity was validated in two in vivo models. Results: Daratumumab demonstrated efficient lysis of patient-derived CLL cells and cell lines by ADCC in vitro and ADCP both in vitro and in vivo whereas exhibited negligible CDC in these cells. To demonstrate the therapeutic effect of daratumumab in CLL, we generated a disseminated CLL mouse model with the CD38 + MEC2 cell line and CLL patient-derived xenografts (CLL-PDX). Daratumumab significantly prolonged overall survival of MEC2 mice, completely eliminated cells from the infiltrated organs, and significantly reduced disease burden in the spleen of CLL-PDX. The effect of daratumumab on patient-derived CLL cell dissemination was demonstrated in vitro by its effect on CXCL12-induced migration and in vivo by interfering with CLL cell homing to spleen in NSG mice. Daratumumab also reduced adhesion of CLL cells to VCAM-1, accompanied by downregulation of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP9. Conclusions: These unique and substantial effects of daratumumab on CLL viability and dissemination support the investigation of its use in a clinical setting of CLL. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1493-505. ©2016 AACR . ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Safety and pharmacokinetics of the Fc-modified HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody VRC01LS: A Phase 1 open-label clinical trial in healthy adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R Gaudinski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available VRC01 is a human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody (bnMAb against the CD4-binding site of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env that is currently being evaluated in a Phase IIb adult HIV-1 prevention efficacy trial. VRC01LS is a modified version of VRC01, designed for extended serum half-life by increased binding affinity to the neonatal Fc receptor.This Phase I dose-escalation study of VRC01LS in HIV-negative healthy adults was conducted by the Vaccine Research Center (VRC at the National Institutes of Health (NIH Clinical Center (Bethesda, MD. The age range of the study volunteers was 21-50 years; 51% of study volunteers were male and 49% were female. Primary objectives were safety and tolerability of VRC01LS intravenous (IV infusions at 5, 20, and 40 mg/kg infused once, 20 mg/kg given three times at 12-week intervals, and subcutaneous (SC delivery at 5 mg/kg delivered once, or three times at 12-week intervals. Secondary objectives were pharmacokinetics (PK, serum neutralization activity, and development of antidrug antibodies. Enrollment began on November 16, 2015, and concluded on August 23, 2017. This report describes the safety data for the first 37 volunteers who received administrations of VRC01LS. There were no serious adverse events (SAEs or dose-limiting toxicities. Mild malaise and myalgia were the most common adverse events (AEs. There were six AEs assessed as possibly related to VRC01LS administration, and all were mild in severity and resolved during the study. PK data were modeled based on the first dose of VRC01LS in the first 25 volunteers to complete their schedule of evaluations. The mean (±SD serum concentration 12 weeks after one IV administration of 20 mg/kg or 40 mg/kg were 180 ± 43 μg/mL (n = 7 and 326 ± 35 μg/mL (n = 5, respectively. The mean (±SD serum concentration 12 weeks after one IV and SC administration of 5 mg/kg were 40 ± 3 μg/mL (n = 2 and 25 ± 5 μg/mL (n = 9, respectively. Over the 5-40 mg

  20. The Second Extracellular Loop of CCR5 Contains the Dominant Epitopes for Highly Potent Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Monoclonal Antibodies▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Rao, Eileen; Dioszegi, Marianna; Kondru, Rama; DeRosier, Andre; Chan, Eva; Schwoerer, Stephan; Cammack, Nick; Brandt, Michael; Sankuratri, Surya; Ji, Changhua

    2007-01-01

    Six mouse anti-human CCR5 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that showed potent antiviral activities were identified from over 26,000 mouse hybridomas. The epitopes for these mAbs were determined by using various CCR5 mutants, including CCR5/CCR2B chimeras. One mAb, ROAb13, was found to bind to a linear epitope in the N terminus of CCR5. Strikingly, the other five mAbs bind to epitopes derived from extracellular loop 2 (ECL2). The three most potent mAbs, ROAb12, ROAb14, and ROAb18, require residues from both the N-terminal (Lys171 and Glu172) and C-terminal (Trp190) halves of ECL2 for binding; two other mAbs, ROAb10 and ROAb51, which also showed potent antiviral activities, require Lys171 and Glu172 but not Trp190 for binding. Binding of the control mAb 2D7 completely relies on Lys171 and Glu172. Unlike 2D7, the novel mAbs ROAb12, ROAb14, and ROAb18 do not bind to the linear peptide 2D7-2SK. In addition, all three mAbs bind to monkey CCR5 (with Arg at position 171 instead of Lys); however, 2D7 does not. Since five of the six most potent CCR5 mAbs derived from the same pool of immunized mice require ECL2 as epitopes, we hypothesize that CCR5 ECL2 contains the dominant epitopes for mAbs with potent antiviral activities. These dominant epitopes were found in CCR5 from multiple species and were detected in large proportions of the total cell surface CCR5. mAbs recognizing these epitopes also showed high binding affinity. A homology model of CCR5 was generated to aid in the interpretation of these dominant epitopes in ECL2. PMID:17242138

  1. Analysis of epitopes on dengue virus envelope protein recognized by monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal human sera by a high throughput assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-En Lin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The envelope (E protein of dengue virus (DENV is the major target of neutralizing antibodies and vaccine development. While previous studies on domain III or domain I/II alone have reported several epitopes of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against DENV E protein, the possibility of interdomain epitopes and the relationship between epitopes and neutralizing potency remain largely unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a dot blot assay by using 67 alanine mutants of predicted surface-exposed E residues as a systematic approach to identify epitopes recognized by mAbs and polyclonal sera, and confirmed our findings using a capture-ELISA assay. Of the 12 mouse mAbs tested, three recognized a novel epitope involving residues (Q211, D215, P217 at the central interface of domain II, and three recognized residues at both domain III and the lateral ridge of domain II, suggesting a more frequent presence of interdomain epitopes than previously appreciated. Compared with mAbs generated by traditional protocols, the potent neutralizing mAbs generated by a new protocol recognized multiple residues in A strand or residues in C strand/CC' loop of DENV2 and DENV1, and multiple residues in BC loop and residues in DE loop, EF loop/F strand or G strand of DENV1. The predominant epitopes of anti-E antibodies in polyclonal sera were found to include both fusion loop and non-fusion residues in the same or adjacent monomer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses have implications for epitope-specific diagnostics and epitope-based dengue vaccines. This high throughput method has tremendous application for mapping both intra and interdomain epitopes recognized by human mAbs and polyclonal sera, which would further our understanding of humoral immune responses to DENV at the epitope level.

  2. Dose-escalation of human anti-interferon-α receptor monoclonal antibody MEDI-546 in subjects with systemic sclerosis: a phase 1, multicenter, open label study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Avram; Geppert, Thomas; Schiopu, Elena; Frech, Tracy; Hsu, Vivien; Simms, Robert W; Peng, Stanford L; Yao, Yihong; Elgeioushi, Nairouz; Chang, Linda; Wang, Bing; Yoo, Stephen

    2014-02-24

    Type I interferons (IFNs) are implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc). MEDI-546 is an investigational human monoclonal antibody directed against the type I IFN receptor. This Phase 1 study evaluated the safety/tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), immunogenicity, and pharmacodynamics (PD) of single and multiple intravenous doses of MEDI-546 in adults with SSc. Subjects (≥18 years) with SSc were enrolled in an open-label, dose-escalation study to receive single (0.1, 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, 10.0, or 20.0 mg/kg), or 4 weekly intravenous doses (0.3, 1.0, or 5.0 mg/kg/week) of MEDI-546. Subjects were followed for 12 weeks. Safety assessments included adverse events (AEs), laboratory results, and viral monitoring. Blood samples were collected from all subjects for determination of PK, presence of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs), and expression of type I IFN-inducible genes. Of 34 subjects (mean age 47.4 years), 32 completed treatment and 33 completed the study. Overall, 148 treatment-emergent AEs (TEAEs) were reported (68.9% mild, 27.7% moderate). TEAEs included one grade 1 infusion reaction (5.0 mg/kg/week multiple dose). Of 4 treatment-emergent serious AEs (skin ulcer, osteomyelitis, vertigo, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)), only CML (1.0 mg/kg/week multiple dose) was considered possibly treatment-related. MEDI-546 exhibited non-linear PK at lower doses. ADAs were detected in 5 subjects; no apparent impact on PK was observed. Peak inhibition of the type I IFN signature in whole blood was achieved within 1 day and in skin after 7 days. The safety/tolerability, PK, and PD profiles observed in this study support further clinical development of MEDI-546. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00930683.

  3. Characterization of a recombinant humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody produced from multiple clones for the selection of a master cell bank candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Hanna N; Webster, Rose P; Saeed, Fatima O; Kirley, Terence L; Ball, William J; Norman, Andrew B

    2017-06-03

    We have generated a humanized anti-cocaine monoclonal antibody (mAb), which is at an advanced stage of pre-clinical development. We report here in vitro binding affinity studies, and in vivo pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies of the recombinant mAb. The overall aim was to characterize the recombinant antibody from each of the three highest producing transfected clones and to select one to establish a master cell bank. In mAb pharmacokinetic studies, after injection with h2E2 (120 mg/kg iv) blood was collected from the tail tip of mice over 28 days. Antibody concentrations were quantified using ELISA. The h2E2 concentration as a function of time was fit using a two-compartment pharmacokinetic model. To test in vivo efficacy, mice were injected with h2E2 (120 mg/kg iv), then one hour later injected with an equimolar dose of cocaine. Blood and brain were collected 5 min after cocaine administration. Cocaine concentrations were quantified using LC/MS. The affinity of the antibody for cocaine was determined using a [ 3 H] cocaine binding assay. All three antibodies had long elimination half-lives, 2-5 nM Kd for cocaine, and prevented cocaine's entry into the brain by sequestering it in the plasma. Pharmacokinetic and radioligand binding assays supported designation of the highest producing clone 85 as the master cell bank candidate. Overall, the recombinant h2E2 showed favorable binding properties, pharmacokinetics, and in vivo efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nuclear localization of CD26 induced by a humanized monoclonal antibody inhibits tumor cell growth by modulating of POLR2A transcription.

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    Kohji Yamada

    Full Text Available CD26 is a type II glycoprotein known as dipeptidyl peptidase IV and has been identified as one of the cell surface markers associated with various types of cancers and a subset of cancer stem cells. Recent studies have suggested that CD26 expression is involved in tumor growth, tumor invasion, and metastasis. The CD26 is shown in an extensive intracellular distribution, ranging from the cell surface to the nucleus. We have previously showed that the humanized anti-CD26 monoclonal antibody (mAb, YS110, exhibits inhibitory effects on various cancers. However, functions of CD26 on cancer cells and molecular mechanisms of impaired tumor growth by YS110 treatment are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the treatment with YS110 induced nuclear translocation of both cell-surface CD26 and YS110 in cancer cells and xenografted tumor. It was shown that the CD26 and YS110 were co-localized in nucleus by immunoelectron microscopic analysis. In response to YS110 treatment, CD26 was translocated into the nucleus via caveolin-dependent endocytosis. It was revealed that the nuclear CD26 interacted with a genomic flanking region of the gene for POLR2A, a subunit of RNA polymerase II, using a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. This interaction with nuclear CD26 and POLR2A gene consequently led to transcriptional repression of the POLR2A gene, resulting in retarded cell proliferation of cancer cells. Furthermore, the impaired nuclear transport of CD26 by treatment with an endocytosis inhibitor or expressions of deletion mutants of CD26 reversed the POLR2A repression induced by YS110 treatment. These findings reveal that the nuclear CD26 functions in the regulation of gene expression and tumor growth, and provide a novel mechanism of mAb-therapy related to inducible translocation of cell-surface target molecule into the nucleus.

  5. A novel monoclonal antibody to human laminin α5 chain strongly inhibits integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration on laminins 511 and 521.

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    Zenebech Wondimu

    Full Text Available Laminins, a large family of αβγ heterotrimeric proteins mainly found in basement membranes, are strong promoters of adhesion and migration of multiple cell types, such as tumor and immune cells, via several integrin receptors. Among laminin α (LMα chains, α5 displays the widest tissue distribution in adult life and is synthesized by most cell types. Here, we have generated and characterized five novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs to the human LMα5 chain to further study the biological relevance of α5 laminins, such as laminins 511 (α5β1γ1 and 521 (α5β2γ1. As detected by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, each antibody displayed unique properties when compared to mAb 4C7, the prototype LMα5 antibody. Of greatest interest, mAb 8G9, but not any other antibody, strongly inhibited α3β1/α6β1 integrin-mediated adhesion and migration of glioma, melanoma, and carcinoma cells on laminin-511 and, together with mAb 4C7, on laminin-521. Accordingly, mAb 8G9 abolished the interaction of soluble α3β1 integrin with immobilized laminins 511 and 521. Binding of mAb 8G9 to laminin-511 was unaffected by the other mAbs to the LMα5 chain but largely hindered by mAb 4E10 to a LMβ1 chain epitope near the globular domain of laminin-511. Thus, mAb 8G9 defines a novel epitope localized at or near the integrin-binding globular domain of the LMα5 chain, which is essential for cell adhesion and migration, and identifies a potential therapeutic target in malignant and inflammatory diseases.

  6. Nuclear Factor κB is required for tumor growth inhibition mediated by enavatuzumab (PDL192, a humanized monoclonal antibody to TweakR

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    James W. Purcell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available TweakR is a TNF receptor family member, whose natural ligand is the multifunctional cytokine TWEAK. The growth inhibitory activity observed following TweakR stimulation in certain cancer cell lines and the overexpression of TweakR in many solid tumor types led to the development of enavatuzumab (PDL192, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody to TweakR. The purpose of this study was to determine the mechanism of action of enavatuzumab’s tumor growth inhibition and to provide insight into the biology behind TweakR as a cancer therapeutic target. A panel of 105 cancer lines was treated with enavatuzumab in vitro; and 29 cell lines of varying solid tumor backgrounds had >25% growth inhibition in response to the antibody. Treatment of sensitive cell lines with enavatuzumab resulted in the in vitro and in vivo (xenograft activation of both classical (p50, p65 and non-classical (p52, RelB NFκB pathways. Using NFκB DNA binding functional ELISAs and microarray analysis, we observed increased activation of NFκB subunits and NFκB regulated genes in sensitive cells over that observed in resistant cell lines. Inhibiting NFκB subunits (p50, p65, RelB, p52 and upstream kinases (IKK1, IKK2 with siRNA and chemical inhibitors consistently blocked enavatuzumab’s activity. Furthermore, enavatuzumab treatment resulted in NFκB-dependent reduction in cell-division as seen by the activation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21 both in vitro and in vivo. The finding that NFκB drives the growth inhibitory activity of enavatuzumab suggests that targeting TweakR with enavatuzumab may represent a novel cancer treatment strategy.

  7. Mechanism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 resistance to monoclonal antibody B12 that effectively targets the site of CD4 attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xueling; Zhou, Tongqing; O'Dell, Sijy; Wyatt, Richard T; Kwong, Peter D; Mascola, John R

    2009-11-01

    The region of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein gp120 that engages its primary cellular receptor CD4 forms a site of vulnerability to neutralizing antibodies. The monoclonal antibody b12 exploits the conservation and accessibility of the CD4-binding site to neutralize many, though not all, HIV-1 isolates. To understand the basis of viral resistance to b12, we used the atomic-level definition of b12-gp120 contact sites to study a panel of diverse circulating viruses. A combination of sequence analysis, computational modeling, and site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the influence of amino acid variants on binding and neutralization by b12. We found that several substitutions within the dominant b12 contact surface, called the CD4-binding loop, mediated b12 resistance, and that these substitutions resided just proximal to the known CD4 contact surface. Hence, viruses varied in key b12 contact residues that are proximal to, but not part of, the CD4 contact surface. This explained how viral isolates were able to evade b12 neutralization while maintaining functional binding to CD4. In addition, some viruses were resistant to b12 despite minimal sequence variation at b12 contact sites. Such neutralization resistance usually could be reversed by alterations at residues thought to influence the quaternary configuration of the viral envelope spike. To design immunogens that elicit neutralizing antibodies directed to the CD4-binding site, researchers need to address the antigenic variation within this region of gp120 and the restricted access to the CD4-binding site imposed by the native configuration of the trimeric viral envelope spike.

  8. Identification and characterization of a broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody that binds to both gp120 and gp41.

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    Mei-Yun Zhang

    Full Text Available Identification of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs may assist vaccine immunogen design. Here we report a novel human monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated m43, which co-targets the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env. M43 bound to recombinant gp140 s from various primary isolates, to membrane-associated Envs on transfected cells and HIV-1 infected cells, as well as to recombinant gp120 s and gp41 fusion intermediate structures containing N-trimer structure, but did not bind to denatured recombinant gp140 s and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs mutant, gp120 D368R, suggesting that the m43 epitope is conformational and overlaps the CD4bs on gp120 and the N-trimer structure on gp41. M43 neutralized 34% of the HIV-1 primary isolates from different clades and all the SHIVs tested in assays based on infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by replication-competent virus, but was less potent in cell line-based pseudovirus assays. In contrast to CD4, m43 did not induce Env conformational changes upon binding leading to exposure of the coreceptor binding site, enhanced binding of mAbs 2F5 and 4E10 specific for the membrane proximal external region (MPER of gp41 Envs, or increased gp120 shedding. The overall modest neutralization activity of m43 is likely due to the limited binding of m43 to functional Envs which could be increased by antibody engineering if needed. M43 may represent a new class of bnAbs targeting conformational epitopes overlapping structures on both gp120 and gp41. Its novel epitope and possibly new mechanism(s of neutralization could helpdesign improved vaccine immunogens and candidate therapeutics.

  9. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein resistance to monoclonal antibody 2G12 is subject-specific and context-dependent in macaques and humans.

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    Delphine C Malherbe

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Envelope (Env protein is the sole target of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs that arise during infection to neutralize autologous variants. Under this immune pressure, HIV escape variants are continuously selected and over the course of infection Env becomes more neutralization resistant. Many common alterations are known to affect sensitivity to NAbs, including residues encoding potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS. Knowledge of Env motifs associated with neutralization resistance is valuable for the design of an effective Env-based vaccine so we characterized Envs isolated longitudinally from a SHIV(SF162P4 infected macaque for sensitivity to neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs B12, 2G12, 4E10 and 2F5. The early Env, isolated from plasma at day 56 after infection, was the most sensitive and the late Env, from day 670, was the most resistant to MAbs. We identified four PNGS in these Envs that accumulated over time at positions 130, 139, 160 and 397. We determined that removal of these PNGS significantly increased neutralization sensitivity to 2G12, and conversely, we identified mutations by in silico analyses that contributed resistance to 2G12 neutralization. In order to expand our understanding of these PNGS, we analyzed Envs from clade B HIV-infected human subjects and identified additional glycan and amino acid changes that could affect neutralization by 2G12 in a context-dependent manner. Taken together, these in vitro and in silico analyses of clade B Envs revealed that 2G12 resistance is achieved by previously unrecognized PNGS substitutions in a context-dependent manner and by subject-specific pathways.

  10. Selective modification of NMR relaxation time in human colorectal carcinoma by using gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid conjugated with monoclonal antibody 19-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtet, C; Tellier, C; Bohy, J; Conti, M L; Saccavini, J C; Thedrez, P; Douillard, J Y; Chatal, J F; Koprowski, H

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody 19-9 (mAb 19-9) against human colon adenocarcinoma was conjugated with gadolinium X diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd X DTPA) and used as a contrast agent in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in an effort to improve tumor target selectivity in nude mice. The data indicate that Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 in solution decreased the T1 relaxation of water protons at 90 MHz in direct proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and this effect was greater than in Gd X DTPA solutions. T1 relaxation time at 90 MHz, measured in tumors removed from nude mice 24 hr after injection of Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 (Gd, 20 mumol/kg; 16 DTPA molecules per mAb molecule), was significantly decreased (by 15%) as compared with the control group. Similar results were obtained in tumors from mice injected with Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 solutions in which Gd was used at 2, 6, or 10 mumol/kg (16 DTPA molecules per mAb molecule). These doses are lower than those commonly used for Gd X DTPA (10-100 mumol/kg) as contrast agent. Tumor localization by the Gd X DTPA-mAb 19-9 complex containing radioactive Gd (0.3 microCi/microgram of 153Gd) to confirm scintigraphy revealed significant concentrations of the complex (5% of the injected dose per gram of tissue) in the tumor. Scan images recorded in planar scintigraphy at day 5 showed good visualization of tumors. Images PMID:3459174

  11. In vivo analysis of insulin-like growth factor type 1 receptor humanized monoclonal antibody MK-0646 and small molecule kinase inhibitor OSI-906 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiphrakpam, Premila D; Agarwal, Ekta; Mathiesen, Michelle; Haferbier, Katie L; Brattain, Michael G; Chowdhury, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    The development and characterization of effective anticancer drugs against colorectal cancer (CRC) is of urgent need since it is the second most common cause of cancer death. The study was designed to evaluate the effects of two IGF-1R antagonists, MK-0646, a recombinant fully humanized monoclonal antibody and OSI-906, a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor on CRC cells. Xenograft study was performed on IGF-1R-dependent CRC cell lines for analyzing the antitumor activity of MK-0646 and OSI-906. Tumor proliferation and apoptosis were assessed using Ki67 and TUNEL assays, respectively. We also performed in vitro characterization of MK-0646 and OSI-906 treatment on CRC cells to identify mechanisms associated with drug-induced cell death. Exposure of the GEO and CBS tumor xenografts to MK-0646 or OSI-906 led to a decrease in tumor growth. TUNEL analysis showed an increase of approximately 45-55% in apoptotic cells in both MK-0646 and OSI-906 treated tumor samples. We report the novel finding that treatment with IGF-1R antagonists led to downregulation of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) protein involved in cell survival and inhibition of cell death. In conclusion, IGF-1R antagonists (MK-0646 and OSI-906) demonstrated single agent inhibition of subcutaneous CRC xenograft growth. This was coupled to pro-apoptotic effects resulting in downregulation of XIAP and inhibition of cell survival. We report a novel mechanism by which MK-0646 and OSI-906 elicits cell death in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, these results indicate that MK-0646 and OSI-906 may be potential anticancer candidates for the treatment of patients with IGF-1R-dependent CRC.

  12. Development of capillary size exclusion chromatography for the analysis of monoclonal antibody fragments extracted from human vitreous humor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Jennifer C; Lou, Yun; Cuzzi, Joel; Hu, Yuhua; de Jong, Isabella; Wang, Yajun Jennifer; Farnan, Dell

    2012-12-28

    Recombinant antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) are currently on the market and in development for the treatment of ophthalmologic indications. Recently, Quality by Design (QbD) initiatives have been implemented that emphasize understanding the relationship between quality attributes of the product and their impact on safety and efficacy. In particular, changes in product quality once the protein is administered to the patient are of particular interest. Knowledge of protein aggregation in vivo is of importance due to the possibility of antibody aggregates eliciting an immunogenic response in the patient. Presently, there are few analytical methods with adequate sensitivity to analyze Fab aggregates in human vitreous humor (HVH) because the Fab amount available for analysis is often quite low. Here, we report the development of a highly sensitive capillary size exclusion chromatography (SEC) methodology for Fab aggregate analysis in HVH. We demonstrate a process to perform capillary SEC to analyze Fabs with picogram sensitivity and an RSD of less than 8% for the relative peak area of high molecular weight species (HMWS). In addition, we have developed a Protein G affinity chromatography method to capture Fabs from HVH for capillary SEC analysis. Recovery efficiencies ranging from 86 to 99% were achieved using this recovery method with 300 μL HVH samples containing Fab1. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of the methodology by quantifying Fab aggregates in HVH, which can potentially be used for aggregate analysis of clinically relevant samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sonoporation delivery of monoclonal antibodies against human papillomavirus 16 E6 restores p53 expression in transformed cervical keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Togtema

    Full Text Available High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV, such as HPV16, have been found in nearly all cases of cervical cancer. Therapies targeted at blocking the HPV16 E6 protein and its deleterious effects on the tumour suppressor pathways of the cell can reverse the malignant phenotype of affected keratinocytes while sparing uninfected cells. Through a strong interdisciplinary collaboration between engineering and biology, a novel, non-invasive intracellular delivery method for the HPV16 E6 antibody, F127-6G6, was developed. The method employs high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU in combination with microbubbles, in a process known as sonoporation. In this proof of principle study, it was first demonstrated that sonoporation antibody delivery into the HPV16 positive cervical carcinoma derived cell lines CaSki and SiHa was possible, using chemical transfection as a baseline for comparison. Delivery of the E6 antibody using sonoporation significantly restored p53 expression in these cells, indicating the antibody is able to enter the cells and remains active. This delivery method is targeted, non-cytotoxic, and non-invasive, making it more easily translatable for in vivo experiments than other transfection methods.

  14. Discovery of Fully Human Anti-MET Monoclonal Antibodies with Antitumor Activity against Colon Cancer Tumor Models In Vivo

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    Edward Htun van der Horst

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The receptor tyrosine kinase MET is a major component controlling the invasive growth program in embryonic development and in invasive malignancies. The discovery of therapeutic antibodies against MET has been difficult, and antibodies that compete with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF act as agonists. By applying phage technology and cell-based panning strategies, we discovered two fully human antibodies against MET (R13 and R28, which synergistically inhibit HGF binding to MET and elicit antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Cell-based phosphorylation assays demonstrate that R13 and R28 abrogate HGF-induced activation of MET, AKT1, ERK1/2, and HGF-induced migration and proliferation. FACS experiments suggest that the inhibitory effect is mediated by “locking” MET receptor in a state with R13, which then increases avidity of R28 for the extracellular domain of MET, thus blocking HGF binding without activating the receptor. In vivo studies demonstrate that the combination of R13/28 significantly inhibited tumor growth in various colon tumor xenograft models. Inhibition of tumor growth was associated with induction of hypoxia. Global gene expression analysis shows that inhibition of HGF/MET pathway significantly upregulated the tumor suppressors KLF6, CEACAM1, and BMP2, the negative regulator of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase PIK3IP1, and significantly suppressed SCF and SERPINE2, both enhancers of proliferation and invasiveness. Moreover, in an experimental metastasis model, R13/28 increased survival by preventing the recurrence of otherwise lethal lung metastases. Taken together, these results underscore the utility of a dual-antibody approach for targeting MET and possibly other receptor tyrosine kinases. Our approach could be expanded to drug discovery efforts against other cell surface proteins.

  15. Phase I clinical and pharmacological study of suppression of human antimouse antibody response to monoclonal antibody L6 by deoxyspergualin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, K; Fritsche, H; Murray, J L; LoBuglio, A F; Khazaeli, M B; Kelley, S; Tepper, M A; Grasela, D; Buzdar, A; Valero, V

    1995-07-15

    Development of human antimouse antibody (HAMA) is a major limiting factor in the application of murine mAb for clinical use. A novel immunomodulatory drug, deoxyspergualin (DSG), has shown potential to suppress antimouse antibody response in preclinical model systems. We conducted a Phase I trial to determine the effect of DSG on HAMA response to murine mAb L6 administered to patients with advanced cancers (in previous trials, this antibody elicited HAMA in two-thirds of the treated patients). L6 mAb was administered at a fixed dose of 200 mg/m2 on days 1-5. DSG was administered at doses of 50 mg/m2 [dose level (dl) 1] or 150 mg/m2 (dls II and III) on days 1-7. Treatment courses were repeated every 6 weeks (dls I and II) or every 3 weeks (dl III). HAMAs were quantitated by a commercially available ELISA assay (ImmuSTRIP; anti-isotypic antibodies) and a radiometric assay (antiisotypic and anti-idiotypic antibodies). Pharmacokinetics of L6 and DSG was also studied in all consenting patients. Among 24 evaluable patients, 2 patients developed detectable HAMAs using the ELISA (one each at dls I and II) after a median follow-up of 122 days (P = 0.0001 as compared to historical controls). Even in the two patients who developed HAMA, the HAMA levels were quite low (160 and 181 ng/ml; historical experience, 70-38,744 ng/ml). The radiometric assay detected anti-L6 antibodies in 13 patients (4, 6, and 3 at dls I-III, respectively) after a median of 82 days. The median highest anti-L6 antibody level was 129 ng/ml (range, 21-2150). The highest anti-L6 antibody level at dl III was only 44 ng/ml. The results suggest suppression of anti-idiotypic response also. No clinical antitumor activity was observed, and no significant changes in T4/T8 subsets or immunoglobulins occurred (suggesting a lack of generalized immunosuppression). We conclude that DSG can suppress HAMA response to L6. A starting dose of 150 mg/m2/day is recommended for Phase II trials to confirm this observation.

  16. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a human monoclonal antibody to oxidized LDL in cynomolgus monkey using PET imaging.

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    Amrita V Kamath

    Full Text Available Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK of a human recombinant IgG1 antibody to oxidized LDL (anti-oxLDL in cynomolgus monkey. The tissue biodistribution of anti-oxLDL was also investigated using positron emission tomography (PET imaging.Anti-oxLDL was conjugated with the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester of DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane 1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid and radiolabeled by chelation of radioactive copper-64 ((64Cu for detection by PET. Anti-oxLDL was administered as a single intravenous (IV dose of 10 mg/kg (as a mixture of radiolabeled and non-labeled material to two male and two female cynomolgus monkeys. Serum samples were collected over 29 days. Two ELISA methods were used to measure serum concentrations of anti-oxLDL; Assay A was a ligand binding assay that measured free anti-oxLDL (unbound and partially bound forms and Assay B measured total anti-oxLDL. The biodistribution was observed over a 48-hour period following dose administration using PET imaging.Anti-oxLDL serum concentration-time profiles showed a biphasic elimination pattern that could be best described by a two-compartment elimination model. The serum concentrations obtained using the two ELISA methods were comparable. Clearance values ranged from 8 to 17 ml/day/kg, while beta half-life ranged from 8 to 12 days. The initial volume of distribution and volume of distribution at steady state were approximately 55 mL/kg and 150 mL/kg, respectively. PET imaging showed distribution predominantly to the blood pool, visible as the heart and great vessels in the trunk and limbs, plus diffuse signals in the liver, kidney, spleen, and bone marrow.The clearance of anti-oxLDL is slightly higher than typical IgG1 antibodies in cynomolgus monkeys. The biodistribution pattern appears to be consistent with an antibody that has no large, rapid antigen

  17. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  18. Two first-in-human, open-label, phase I dose-escalation safety trials of MEDI-528, a monoclonal antibody against interleukin-9, in healthy adult volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Barbara; Leon, Francisco; White, Wendy; Robbie, Gabriel

    2009-04-01

    Interleukin-9 (IL-9) is involved in pathogenic aspects of the asthmatic response, including induction of the proliferation of T-helper type 2 lymphocytes, mucus production, and mast-cell differentiation, proliferation, and recruitment to the lung. In preclinical studies in mice, inhibition of IL-9 through neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatment partially reduced airway hyperresponsiveness and mast-cell progenitor migration to the lung. The goal of the present studies was to determine the safety and pharmacokinetic profiles and immunogenicity of MEDI-528, a humanized immunoglobulin G1k anti-IL-9 mAb, in healthy adult volunteers. In separate open-label, Phase I dose-escalation studies, single doses of MEDI-528 0.3, 1.0, 3.0, or 9.0 mg/kg were administered as an intravenous infusion (20 mg/min administered over 1-40 minutes, depending on dose) and by subcutaneous injection. All subjects were followed for 84 days. Any laboratory test value outside the normal reference range was considered an adverse event (AE). Twenty-four subjects were enrolled in the intravenous study, and 29 subjects were enrolled in the subcutaneous study. No deaths or serious or severe AEs occurred in either study. The most frequently reported AEs in the intravenous study were laboratory test abnormalities; the most frequently reported AEs in the subcutaneous study were pharyngolaryngeal pain, palpable lymph nodes, and laboratory test abnormalities. The single-dose pharmacokinetics of MEDI-528 were linear and dose proportional over the dose range studied with both routes of administration. The mean t((1/2)) after intravenous administration was approximately 26 days (range, 25-28 days); the mean t((1/2)) after subcutaneous administration ranged from 33 to 87 days across doses. A low titer (1:80) of antibodies to MEDI-528 was detected on day 84 in a single volunteer receiving intravenous MEDI-528 3.0 mg/kg. No antibody titers were detected in any of the volunteers receiving subcutaneous

  19. Human Non-neutralizing HIV-1 Envelope Monoclonal Antibodies Limit the Number of Founder Viruses during SHIV Mucosal Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I; Liao, Hua-Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi-Mao; Schutte, Robert J; Pemble Iv, Charles W; Dennison, S Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Montefiori, David C; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Soderberg, Kelly A; Giorgi, Elena E; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J; Letvin, Norman L; Schmitz, Joern E; Moody, M A; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4+ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Thus, some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  20. Effect of four monthly doses of a human monoclonal anti-FGF23 antibody (KRN23 on quality of life in X-linked hypophosphatemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary D. Ruppe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH is characterized by lower extremity deformities that lead to bone and/or joint pain that result from decreased renal tubular reabsorption leading to hypophosphatemia caused by elevated levels of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23. Objective: Validate the use of SF-36v2 Health Survey (SF-36v2 and the Western Ontario and McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC to measure previously unstudied health-related quality of life (HRQoL in XLH patients and determine the change in HRQoL before and after treatment with KRN23, a human monoclonal anti-FGF23 antibody. Methods: Twenty-eight adult outpatients with XLH received up to four doses of KRN23 administered subcutaneously every 28 days. General HRQoL was measured with the SF-36v2 and condition-related HRQoL with the WOMAC at baseline and study endpoint as a secondary outcome of a Phase 1/2, open-label, multicenter, dose-escalation trial. Results: Testing for scale discriminant validity and convergent-divergent validity supported the use of these scales in the assessment of HRQoL in XLH. Both instruments indicated impairment of physical function at baseline with all mean scores showing a trend to improved health at study endpoint compared to baseline. When corrected for multiple comparisons, the score for Role Limitations due to physical health on the SF-36v2 which measures the patient's perception of their own chronic functional impairments due to poor physical health remained significantly improved (P < 0.05, increasing to the mean score of US adults. For the WOMAC, Physical Functioning and Stiffness scores were significantly improved (P < 0.05. Conclusion: KRN23 administration was associated with significantly improved patient perception of their Physical Functioning and Stiffness due to their disease. This study demonstrates that the SF-36v2 and WOMAC are valid tools for assessing HRQoL in XLH. Keywords: X-linked hypophosphatemia, KRN23, Health-related quality of life

  1. Safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a fully human monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a phase 1-2 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coiffier, B.; Lepretre, S.; Pedersen, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Safety and efficacy of the fully human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, ofatumumab, was analyzed in a multicenter dose-escalating study including 33 patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Three cohorts of 3 (A), 3 (B), and 27 (C) patients received 4, once weekly, infusions...... rate of cohort C was 50% (13/26), one patient having a nodular partial remission and 12 patients partial remission. In conclusion, ofatumumab was found to be well tolerated in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in doses up to 2000 mg. Preliminary data on safety and objective response...

  2. Effect of cetuximab and fractionated irradiation on tumour micro-environment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santiago, A.; Eicheler, W.; Bussink, J.; Rijken, P.F.J.W.; Yaromina, A.; Beuthien-Baumann, B.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Baumann, M.; Krause, M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Previous experiments have shown that application of the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225 (cetuximab) improves local tumour control after irradiation in FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma (hSCC) due to the combined effect of decreased repopulation and improved reoxygenation.

  3. In vitro evaluation of the monoclonal antibody Cu-64-IgG M75 against human carbonic anhydrase IX and its in vivo imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepa, Adam; Ráliš, Jan; Král, Vlastimil; Paurová, M.; Kučka, Jan; Humajová, J.; Lázníček, M.; Lebeda, Ondřej

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. March (2018), s. 9-13 ISSN 0969-8043 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 ; RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : IgG M75 * immunoaffinity * imaging * monoclonal atibody * Cu-64 Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines; CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V); EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) OBOR OECD: Radiology, nuclear medicine and medical imaging; Polymer science (UMCH-V); Biochemical research methods (UMG-J) Impact factor: 1.128, year: 2016

  4. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  5. P-glycoprotein epitope mapping. II. The murine monoclonal antibody MM6.15 to human multidrug-resistant cells binds with three distinct loops in the MDR1-P-glycoprotein extracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfriglia, M; Romagnoli, G; Tombesi, M; Poloni, F; Falasca, G; Di Modugno, F; Castagna, M; Chersi, A

    1995-03-29

    A new murine monoclonal antibody (MAb), MM6.15, to human MDR1 P-glycoprotein was found to be reactive in ELISA with synthetic peptides selected from the predicted sequences of the first, fourth and sixth extracellular loop of MDR1-P-glycoprotein. In order to precisely define the MM6.15-binding site, a peptide library of overlapping 5- to 9-mer residues covering the entire sixth extracellular loop of both human and rodent class-1 P-glycoproteins was synthesized on polyethylene pins and tested for MAb binding. The results of this ELISA demonstrated that the MAb MM6.15 reacts only with human synthetic peptides and that the critical component of the MAb recognition is made up of the amino-acid sequence LVAHKL (residues 963-968 of the MDR1-P-glycoprotein) with histidine (H), lysine (K) and possibly leucine (L), key residues of this immunogenic domain.

  6. Anticuerpos monoclonales contra la gonadotropina coriónica humana (hCG para su uso en la detección de embarazo Monoclonal antibodies against human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG for their use in pregnancy detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha V. Rodríguez Pendás

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Se reporta la generación de 2 anticuerpos monoclonales (AcM de ratón dirigidos contra la hormona gonadotropina coriónica humana (hCG, a partir de la inmunización de ratones BALB/c con hCG humana, purificada en el Instituto Nacional de Endocrinología (INEN. Los AcM obtenidos son de la clase IgG y fueron purificados a partir de líquido ascítico, mediante cromatografía de afinidad en proteína G Sepharosa. El estudio de afinidad y especificidad demostró que estos anticuerpos podían ser útiles en ensayos inmunoenzimáticos, con el uso de uno de ellos en el sistema microELISA, de nuestra institución, para la detección cualitativa de embarazo en orina.The generation of 2 mouse monoclonal antibodies directed against the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (CGh, starting from the immunization of BALB/c mice with human CGh purified at the National Institute of Endocrinology (NIEN is reported. IgG monoclonal antibodies were obtained. They were purified starting from the ascitic fluid by affinity chromatography in protein G Sepharose. The affinity and specificity study showed that these antibodies could be useful in immunoenzimatic assays, using one of them in the microELISA system of our institution for the qualitative detection of pregnancy in urine.

  7. The reliability of rabbit monoclonal antibodies in the immunohistochemical assessment of estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, and HER2 in human breast carcinomas

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, A.; Sarson, J.; Assam, E. E.; Dean, S. J.; Cribb, E. C.; Parker, A.

    2010-01-01

    The reliability of the rabbit monoclonal antibodies SP1, SP2, SP3, and 4B5 was immunohistochemically assessed on a range of 96 invasive breast and carcinomas and the results compared with those achieved with established antibody markers for estrogen receptors (6F11), progesterone receptors (PgR636), and HER2 (polyclonal A0485 and clone CB11), with HER2 status validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and silver in situ hybridization. Optimal results depended on the duration of mi...

  8. A monoclonal antibody to ameliorate central nervous system infection and improve survival in a murine model of human Enterovirus-A71 encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Soon Hao; Ong, Kien Chai; Perera, David; Wong, Kum Thong

    2016-08-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) encephalomyelitis is an often fatal disease for which there is no specific treatment available. Passive immunization with a specific monoclonal antibody to EV-A71 was used on a murine model of EV-A71 encephalomyelitis to evaluate its therapeutic effectiveness before and after established central nervous system (CNS) infection. Mice were intraperitoneally-infected with a mouse-adapted EV-A71 strain and treated with a dose of monoclonal antibody (MAb) daily for 3 days on day 1, 2 and 3 post-infection or for 3 days on 3, 4 and 5 post-infection. Treatment effectiveness was evaluated by signs of infection and survival rate. Histopathology and qPCR analyses were performed on mice sacrificed a day after completing treatment. In mock-treated mice, CNS infection was established from day 3 post-infection. All mice treated before established CNS infection, survived and recovered completely without CNS infection. All mice treated after established CNS infection survived with mild paralysis, and viral load and antigens/RNA at day 6 post-infection were significantly reduced. Passive immunization with our MAb could prevent CNS infection in mice if given early before the establishment of CNS infection. It could also ameliorate established CNS infection if optimal and repeated doses were given. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Development, evaluation, and in-vivo validation of two non-invasive methods for quantitation of activity and dosimetry of monoclonal antibodies in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, N.D.; Moldofsky, P.J.; Exten, R.E.; Gatenby, R.A.; Broder, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have applied both a conjugate view imaging method and a first pass study for quantitation of absolute I-131 activity in lesions and normal tissue of patients with colon carcinoma in order to study biological clearance of the I-131 F(ab)'/sub 2/ fragments of mouse monoclonal antibody and the resultant dosimetry. Both methods require a transmission scan for determining patient attenuation and measurement of patient lesion or organ size in the region of interest. The conjugate view method is analyzed for both SPECT and planar imaging. The percent error of both methods relates to lesion size and absolute activity when compared to actual well-counter assayed samples of malignant and normal tissue obtained from CT-guided needle biopsies or surgical specimens. Dosimetric evaluation was based on determination of activity, clearance from computer-generated time-activity curves and lesion or organ volumes from volumetric CT scan data. The dose to the thyroid gland was calculated for one population receiving Lugol's solution 3 days prior and for the other who received Lugol's at the time of administration. Data showed no significant difference in absorbed thyroid dose. Lastly, the absolute uptake of I-131, lesion to background ratios, and the dosimetry data were compared for three different monoclonal antibody fragments

  10. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infection (CDI is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA, and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB, which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4 and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1 antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  11. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  12. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  13. Efficacy of Urtoxazumab (TMA-15 Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Specific for Shiga Toxin 2 Against Post-Diarrheal Neurological Sequelae Caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7 Infection in the Neonatal Gnotobiotic Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Moxley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC is the most common cause of hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in human patients, with brain damage and dysfunction the main cause of acute death. We evaluated the efficacy of urtoxazumab (TMA-15, Teijin Pharma Limited, a humanized monoclonal antibody against Shiga toxin (Stx 2 for the prevention of brain damage, dysfunction, and death in a piglet EHEC infection model. Forty-five neonatal gnotobiotic piglets were inoculated orally with 3 × 109 colony-forming units of EHEC O157:H7 strain EDL933 (Stx1+, Stx2+ when 22–24 h old. At 24 h post-inoculation, piglets were intraperitoneally administered placebo or TMA-15 (0.3, 1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg body weight. Compared to placebo (n = 10, TMA-15 (n = 35 yielded a significantly greater probability of survival, length of survival, and weight gain (p <0.05. The efficacy of TMA-15 against brain lesions and death was 62.9% (p = 0.0004 and 71.4% (p = 0.0004, respectively. These results suggest that TMA-15 may potentially prevent or reduce vascular necrosis and infarction of the brain attributable to Stx2 in human patients acutely infected with EHEC. However, we do not infer that TMA-15 treatment will completely protect human patients infected with EHEC O157:H7 strains that produce both Stx1 and Stx2.

  14. Immunoscintigraphy with the human monoclonal antibody 88 BV 59 in case of negative TDM and suspicion of recurrence of colorectal cancer; Immunoscintigraphie avec l`anticorps monoclonal humain 88 BV 59 en cas de TDM negative et suspicion de recidive de cancer colorectal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetanneau, A.; Douillard, J.Y.; Barbet, E. [CRLC, Nantes (France); Herpst, J.; Wynant, G.; Hanna, M.G. [PERIMMUNE, Rockville (United States); Chatal, J.F. [CRLC, Nantes (France)

    1997-12-31

    Twelve patients (6 F, 6 M) of average age 60 years (between 41 and 75 years) presented a suspicion of recurrence of colorectal cancer having in all cases an elevation of the rate of serumal ACE to which in two patients other diseases were also present. For all the patients the tomodensitometry (TDM) was negative at the abdomen and pelvis level in the two weeks preceding the pre-operation immunoscintigraphy (IS). The tumoral targeting was realised with 10 mg of complete human monoclonal antibodies (Mab) 88 BV 59 labelled with 1110 to 1330 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc. The planar images and SPECT were carried out at 14 to 20 hours after the IV injection of radiolabelled Mab and in a case a late IS was carried out also at the fortieth hour. For a patient a second IS in the same conditions was realised 9 months later. Serumal sampling before injecting the 88 BV 59 antibody, then, 1 and 3 months later, were realised for possible surveillance of human anti-antibody antibody apparition (HAAA). The final diagnosis has been proved histologically in 8 patients within 4 weeks following the IS. A patient positive in IS rejected the surgery but 11 months later was positive in echo-endoscopy. The other 3 patients non operated being IS negative have developed hepatic or pulmonary metastases during one year of medical surveillance. The global results of IS were: 6 true-positive, 1 true-negative, 4 false negative (in 3 cases for hepatic metastases and in one case for pulmonary metastases) and a false positive (with scintigraphic suspicion of peritoneal carcinoma being not confirmed at laparotomy). No patient developed HAAA. Totally, the IS with human Mab 88 BV 59 has consequently confirmed its profit for the localization of colo-rectal cancer recurrence associated with a confirmed ACE elevation with negative TDM

  15. Linear pharmacokinetic parameters for monoclonal antibodies are similar within a species and across different pharmacological targets: A comparison between human, cynomolgus monkey and hFcRn Tg32 transgenic mouse using a population-modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Alison; Keunecke, Anne; van Steeg, Tamara J; van der Graaf, Piet H; Avery, Lindsay B; Jones, Hannah; Berkhout, Jan

    2018-04-10

    The linear pharmacokinetics (PK) of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be considered a class property with values that are similar to endogenous IgG. Knowledge of these parameters across species could be used to avoid unnecessary in vivo PK studies and to enable early PK predictions and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) simulations. In this work, population-pharmacokinetic (popPK) modeling was used to determine a single set of 'typical' popPK parameters describing the linear PK of mAbs in human, cynomolgus monkey and transgenic mice expressing the human neonatal Fc receptor (hFcRn Tg32), using a rich dataset of 27 mAbs. Non-linear PK was excluded from the datasets and a 2-compartment model was applied to describe mAb disposition. Typical human popPK estimates compared well with data from comparator mAbs with linear PK in the clinic. Outliers with higher than typical clearance were found to have non-specific interactions in an affinity-capture self-interaction nanoparticle spectroscopy assay, offering a potential tool to screen out these mAbs at an early stage. Translational strategies were investigated for prediction of human linear PK of mAbs, including use of typical human popPK parameters and allometric exponents from cynomolgus monkey and Tg32 mouse. Each method gave good prediction of human PK with parameters predicted within 2-fold. These strategies offer alternative options to the use of cynomolgus monkeys for human PK predictions of linear mAbs, based on in silico methods (typical human popPK parameters) or using a rodent species (Tg32 mouse), and call into question the value of completing extensive in vivo preclinical PK to inform linear mAb PK.

  16. An anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody and small molecule CCR5 antagonists synergize by inhibiting different stages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safarian, Diana; Carnec, Xavier; Tsamis, Fotini; Kajumo, Francis; Dragic, Tatjana

    2006-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptors are attractive targets for novel antivirals. Here, inhibition of entry by two classes of CCR5 antagonists was investigated. We confirmed previous findings that HIV-1 isolates vary greatly in their sensitivity to small molecule inhibitors of CCR5-mediated entry, SCH-C and TAK-779. In contrast, an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody (PA14) similarly inhibited entry of diverse viral isolates. Sensitivity to small molecules was V3 loop-dependent and inversely proportional to the level of gp120 binding to CCR5. Moreover, combinations of the MAb and small molecules were highly synergistic in blocking HIV-1 entry, suggesting different mechanisms of action. This was confirmed by time course of inhibition experiments wherein the PA14 MAb and small molecules were shown to inhibit temporally distinct stages of CCR5 usage. We propose that small molecules inhibit V3 binding to the second extracellular loop of CCR5, whereas PA14 preferentially inhibits subsequent events such as CCR5 recruitment into the fusion complex or conformational changes in the gp120-CCR5 complex that trigger fusion. Importantly, our findings suggest that combinations of CCR5 inhibitors with different mechanisms of action will be central to controlling HIV-1 infection and slowing the emergence of resistant strains

  17. Inhibition of P-Selectin and PSGL-1 Using Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Increases the Sensitivity of Multiple Myeloma Cells to Bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Muz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a plasma cell malignancy localized in the bone marrow. Despite the introduction of novel therapies majority of MM patients relapse. We have previously shown that inhibition of P-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 play a key role in proliferation of MM and using small-molecule inhibitors of P-selectin/PSGL-1 sensitized MM cells to therapy. However, these small-molecule inhibitors had low specificity to P-selectin and showed poor pharmacokinetics. Therefore, we tested blocking of P-selectin and PSGL-1 using functional monoclonal antibodies in order to sensitize MM cells to therapy. We have demonstrated that inhibiting the interaction between MM cells and endothelial and stromal cells decreased proliferation in MM cells and in parallel induced loose-adhesion to the primary tumor site to facilitate egress. At the same time, blocking this interaction in vivo led to MM cells retention in the circulation and delayed homing to the bone marrow, thus exposing MM cells to bortezomib which contributed to reduced tumor growth and better mice survival. This study provides a better understanding of the biology of P-selectin and PSGL-1 and their roles in dissemination and resensitization of MM to treatment.

  18. Rebmab200, a Humanized Monoclonal Antibody Targeting the Sodium Phosphate Transporter NaPi2b Displays Strong Immune Mediated Cytotoxicity against Cancer: A Novel Reagent for Targeted Antibody Therapy of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Mariana Lopes; Yeda, Fernanda Perez; Tsuruta, Lilian Rumi; Horta, Bruno Brasil; Pimenta, Alécio A.; Degaki, Theri Leica; Soares, Ibere C.; Tuma, Maria Carolina; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith; Alves, Venancio A. F.; Ritter, Gerd; Moro, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    NaPi2b, a sodium-dependent phosphate transporter, is highly expressed in ovarian carcinomas and is recognized by the murine monoclonal antibody MX35. The antibody had shown excellent targeting to ovarian cancer in several early phase clinical trials but being murine the antibody's full therapeutic potential could not be explored. To overcome this impediment we developed a humanized antibody version named Rebmab200, expressed in human PER.C6® cells and cloned by limiting dilution. In order to select a clone with high therapeutic potential clones were characterized using a series of physicochemical assays, flow cytometry, real-time surface plasmon resonance, glycosylation analyses, immunohistochemistry, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement-dependent-cytotoxicity assays and quantitative PCR. Comparative analyses of Rebmab200 and MX35 monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that the two antibodies had similar specificity for NaPi2b by flow cytometry with a panel of 30 cell lines and maintained similar kinetic parameters. Robust and high producer cell clones potentially suitable for use in manufacturing were obtained. Rebmab200 antibodies were assessed by immunohistochemistry using a large panel of tissues including human carcinomas of ovarian, lung, kidney and breast origin. An assessment of its binding towards 33 normal human organs was performed as well. Rebmab200 showed selected strong reactivity with the tested tumor types but little or no reactivity with the normal tissues tested confirming its potential for targeted therapeutics strategies. The remarkable cytotoxicity shown by Rebmab200 in OVCAR-3 cells is a significant addition to the traits of stability and productivity displayed by the top clones of Rebmab200. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated toxicity functionality was confirmed in repeated assays using cancer cell lines derived from ovary, kidney and lung as targets. To explore use of this antibody in clinical trials, GMP production of Rebmab

  19. The classification of Sejroe group serovars of Leptospira interrogans with monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, W. J.; Korver, H.; van Leeuwen, J.; Klatser, P. R.; Kolk, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Using the hybridoma technique we produced monoclonal antibodies to serovars of Leptospira interrogans. We focussed on serovar hardjo which is an important pathogen for humans and animals, and on other serovars of the Sejroe group. With combinations of monoclonals, characteristic patterns of

  20. Self-Assembly of the Recombinant Capsid Protein of a Swine Norovirus into Virus-Like Particles and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies Cross-Reactive with a Human Strain from Genogroup II▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanza, Horacio; Cubillos, Carolina; Angulo, Iván; Mateos, Francisco; Castón, José R.; van der Poel, Wim H. M.; Vinje, Jan; Bárcena, Juan; Mena, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are responsible for the majority of gastroenteritis outbreaks in humans. Recently, NoV strains which are genetically closely related to human genogroup II (GII) NoVs have been detected in fecal specimens from swine. These findings have raised concern about the possible role of pigs as reservoirs for NoVs that could infect humans. To better understand the epidemiology of swine NoVs in both the swine and the human populations, rapid immunoassays are needed. In this study, baculovirus recombinants were generated to express the capsid gene of a swine NoV GII genotype 11 (GII.11) strain which self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs). Subsequently, the purified VLPs were used to evoke monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in mice. A panel of eight promising MAbs was obtained and evaluated for their ability to bind to heterologous VLPs, denaturated antigens, and truncated capsid proteins. The MAbs could be classified into two groups: two MAbs that recognized linear epitopes located at the amino-terminal half (shell domain) of the swine NoV GII.11 VLPs and that cross-reacted with human GII.4 NoV VLPs. The other six MAbs bound to conformational epitopes and did not cross-react with the human GII.4 VLPs. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the characterization of MAbs against swine NoVs. The swine NoV VLPs and the MAbs described here may be further used for the design of diagnostic reagents that could help increase our knowledge of the prevalence of NoV infections in pigs and the possible role of pigs as reservoirs for NoVs. PMID:18842943

  1. Generation of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against a conformational epitope of human adenovirus type 7 (HAdv-7 incorporated in capsid encoded in a HAdv-3-based vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Liu

    Full Text Available The generation of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs by epitope-based immunization is difficult because the immunogenicity of simple peptides is poor and T cells must be potently stimulated and immunological memory elicited. A strategy in which antigen is incorporated into the adenoviral capsid protein has been used previously to develop antibody responses against several vaccine targets and may offer a solution to this problem. In this study, we used a similar strategy to develop HAdv-7-neutralizing MAbs using rAdMHE3 virions into which hexon hypervariable region 5 (HVR5 of adenovirus type 7 (HAdv-7 was incorporated. The epitope mutant rAdMHE3 was generated by replacing HVR5 of Ad3EGFP, a recombinant HAdv-3-based vector expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein, with HVR5 of HAdv-7. We immunized BALB/c mice with rAdMHE3 virions and produced 22 different MAbs against them, four of which showed neutralizing activity against HAdv-7 in vitro. Using an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA analysis and an antibody-binding-competition ELISA with Ad3EGFP, HAdv-7, and a series of chimeric adenoviral particles containing epitope mutants, we demonstrated that the four MAbs recognize the neutralization site within HVR5 of the HAdv-7 virion. Using an immunoblotting analysis and ELISA with HAdv-7, recombinant peptides, and a synthetic peptide, we also showed that the neutralizing epitope within HVR5 of the HAdv-7 virion is a conformational epitope. These findings suggest that it is feasible to use a strategy in which antigen is incorporated into the adenoviral capsid protein to generate neutralizing MAbs. This strategy may also be useful for developing therapeutic neutralizing MAbs and designing recombinant vector vaccines against HAdv-7, and in structural analysis of adenoviruses.

  2. Identification of a second T-cell antigen receptor in human and mouse by an anti-peptide γ-chain-specific monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioannides, C.G.; Itoh, K.; Fox, F.E.; Pahwa, R.; Good, R.A.; Platsoucas, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    The authors developed a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (9D7) against a synthetic peptide (P13K) selected from the deduced amino acid sequence of the constant region of the λ chain of the murine T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) (amino acids 118-130). Using this mAb, they identified a putative second TCR expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from a patient with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) that were propagated in culture with recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) and Con A. This mAb immunoprecipitated two polypeptide chains of 40 and 58 kDa under nonreducing conditions and of 40 and 56 kDa under reducing conditions from 125 I-labeled denatured lysates of T3 + WT31 - lymphocytes expanded in culture from a SCID patient. Chemical crosslinking of 125 I-labeled cells followed by immunoprecipitation with anti-Leu-4 mAb under nonreducing or reducing conditions revealed that the 40- and 56-kDa polypeptide chains were associated with the T3 differentiation antigen. These experiments were done with polyclonal cell populations. Cloned T3 + WT31 - cell populations are required to determine whether the TCR contains two λ polypeptide chains. Using the same 9D7 anti-P18K mAb and immunoblotting analysis, they identified a 35 kDa γ-chain polypeptide under reducing conditions expressed on purified L3T4 - Lyt2 - BALB/c mouse thymocytes. This γ-chain TCR is disulfide linked and has a molecular mass of 80 kDa under nonreducing conditions

  3. Epitope of titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody Tit1 5 H1.1 is highly conserved in several Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Centriole staining in human, mouse and zebrafish cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikelsaar Aavo-Valdur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously we have reported on the development of a new mouse anti-titin monoclonal antibody, named MAb Titl 5 H1.1, using the synthetic peptide N-AVNKYGIGEPLESDSVVAK-C which corresponds to an amino acid sequence in the A-region of the titin molecule as immunogen. In the human skeletal muscles, MAb Titl 5 H1.1 reacts specifically with titin in the A-band of the sarcomere and in different non-muscle cell types with nucleus and cytoplasm, including centrioles. In this report we have studied the evolutionary aspects of the binding of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 with its target antigen (titin. Results We have specified the epitope area of MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 by subpeptide mapping to the hexapeptide N-AVNKYG-C. According to protein databases this amino acid sequence is located in the COOH-terminus of several different Fn3 domains of the A-region of titin molecule in many organisms, such as human being, mouse, rabbit, zebrafish (Danio rerio, and even in sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis. Our immunohisto- and cytochemical studies with MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 in human, mouse and zebrafish tissues and cell cultures showed a striated staining pattern in muscle cells and also staining of centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei in non-muscle cells. Conclusions The data confirm that titin can play, in addition to the known roles in striated muscle cells also an important role in non-muscle cells as a centriole associated protein. This phenomenon is highly conserved in the evolution and is related to Fn3 domains of the titin molecule. Using titin A-band-specific monoclonal antibody MAb Tit1 5 H1.1 it was possible to locate titin in the sarcomeres of skeletal muscle cells and in the centrioles, cytoplasm and nuclei of non-muscle cells in phylogenetically so distant organisms as Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and zebrafish (Danio rerio.

  4. Monoclonal gammopathies of renal significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca-Fontán, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Delgado Lillo, Ramón; Praga, Manuel

    The term monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) comprises a group of diseases pathogenetically characterised by proliferation of a B-cell or plasma cell clone that synthesises and secretes a monoclonal immunoglobulin or its components (light and/or heavy chains), that may deposit and cause glomerular, tubular, interstitial and/or vascular damage. The importance of differentiating the term MGRS from other monoclonal gammopathies lies in the fact that diagnostic and therapeutic procedures aimed at controlling monoclonal protein synthesis and secretion can be indicated, irrespective of the classic criteria based on malignant tumour expansion. Renal pathology associated with MGRS is highly heterogeneous, and therefore renal biopsy should be considered a key diagnostic tool. A precise diagnostic approach, however, must also identify the monoclonal protein in plasma and/or in urine, together with a complete haematological study in order to determine the nature and extension of cell clones. Recent advances in the understanding of these entities have resulted in significant improvements in clinical course and survival in several forms of MGRS, although more studies and clinical experience are needed in order to delineate more effective therapeutic strategies. In this review, we summarise the main clinical and pathological features of MGRS, highlighting the most appropriate diagnostic approach and current therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human serum albumin (HSA) for the development of an immunoaffinity system with oriented anti-HSA mAbs as immobilized ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajak, Poonam; Vijayalakshmi, M A; Jayaprakash, N S

    2013-05-05

    Proteins present in human serum are of immense importance in the field of biomarker discovery. But, the presence of high-abundant proteins like albumin makes the analysis more challenging because of masking effect on low-abundant proteins. Therefore, removal of albumin using highly specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can potentiate the discovery of low-abundant proteins. In the present study, mAbs against human serum albumin (HSA) were developed and integrated in to an immunoaffinity based system for specific removal of albumin from the serum. Hybridomas were obtained by fusion of Sp2/0 mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells from the mouse immunized with HSA. Five clones (AHSA1-5) producing mAbs specific to HSA were established and characterized by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblotting for specificity, sensitivity and affinity in terms of antigen binding. The mAbs were able to bind to both native albumin as well as its glycated isoform. Reactivity of mAbs with different mammalian sera was tested. The affinity constant of the mAbs ranged from 10(8) to 10(9)M(-1). An approach based on oriented immobilization was followed to immobilize purified anti-HSA mAbs on hydrazine activated agarose gel and the dynamic binding capacity of the column was determined. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A 2-4-Amino Acid Deletion in the V5 Region of HIV-1 Env gp120 Confers Viral Resistance to the Broadly Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody, VRC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Shingo; Sasaki, Maho; Tanaka, Takako; Inoue, Mari; Ophinni, Youdiil; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Kameoka, Masanori

    2017-12-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) plays a critical role in viral entry into host cells. The broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody VRC01, which recognizes the CD4 binding site on gp120, neutralizes more than 90% of HIV-1 isolates. However, some of the CRF01_AE viruses prevalent in Southeast Asia are resistant to VRC01-mediated neutralization. We previously reported that 3 amino acid residues at positions 185, 186, and 197 of gp120 played an important role in the VRC01 resistance of CRF01_AE Env (AE-Env) clones isolated from HIV-infected Thai individuals. However, the VRC01 susceptibility of AE-Env clones was not fully explained by mutations at these 3 residues. In the present study, we examined other factors involved in the acquisition of viral VRC01 resistance. Neutralization tests using lentiviral vectors expressing a series of mutant AE-Env clones revealed that the deletion of 2-4 amino acid residues on the loop structure in the V5 region of gp120 conferred VRC01 resistance to several AE-Env clones. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying viral VRC01 resistance.

  7. Generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Penicillic acid is one of the main mycotoxins in moldy feedstuff and has toxic effect on livestock and poultry and probably humans due to food chain transmission. The objective of this study was to generate and characterize a monoclonal antibody to penicillic acid for the efficient detection of penicillic acid from Penicillium ...

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in immunodiagnostic assays: a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In general, these antibodies are important biomedical reagents used in research, especially in the field of laboratory diagnostics for a number of different types of diseases in humans and animals. Some of the areas where application of monoclonal antibodies triumph are herein discussed. This review is aimed to assess ...

  9. Systematic comparison of monoclonal versus polyclonal antibodies for mapping histone modifications by ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Michele; Xue, Catherine; Li, Catherine; Farjoun, Yossi; Gienger, Elizabeth; Yofe, Ido; Gladden, Adrianne; Epstein, Charles B; Cornett, Evan M; Rothbart, Scott B; Nusbaum, Chad; Goren, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The robustness of ChIP-seq datasets is highly dependent upon the antibodies used. Currently, polyclonal antibodies are the standard despite several limitations: They are non-renewable, vary in performance between lots and need to be validated with each new lot. In contrast, monoclonal antibody lots are renewable and provide consistent performance. To increase ChIP-seq standardization, we investigated whether monoclonal antibodies could replace polyclonal antibodies. We compared monoclonal antibodies that target five key histone modifications (H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, H3K27ac and H3K27me3) to their polyclonal counterparts in both human and mouse cells. Overall performance was highly similar for four monoclonal/polyclonal pairs, including when we used two distinct lots of the same monoclonal antibody. In contrast, the binding patterns for H3K27ac differed substantially between polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. However, this was most likely due to the distinct immunogen used rather than the clonality of the antibody. Altogether, we found that monoclonal antibodies as a class perform equivalently to polyclonal antibodies for the detection of histone post-translational modifications in both human and mouse. Accordingly, we recommend the use of monoclonal antibodies in ChIP-seq experiments.

  10. Making Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody And Radiolabelling For Medical Purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Thu; Duong Van Dong; Vo Thi Cam Hoa; Bui Van Cuong; Chu Van Khoa; Vu Bich Huong; Le Quang Huan

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant monoclonal antibody labeling with 131 I specific to tumor cell has been studied and prepared for treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. In this study, a recombinant monoclonal antibody with two specific properties is a hybrid molecule created by coupling an antibody variable fragments with peptide melittin. The gene coding the antibody fragment has been obtained from human synthetic Fv libraries using for panning and screening on populations of lymphocytes fragmented from human blood cells with Hodgkin diseases. The gene encoding peptit melittin has been cloned from honeybee Apis cerana DNA. The gene coding recombinant monoclonal antibody has been expressed in E.coli BL21 (DE3) at 37 o C and was induced with 0.6 mM IPTG. The recombinant compound has been purified by affinity chromatography with HiTrap affinity column. The obtained recombinant monoclonal antibody has showed cytolytic activities when added to cell culture medium for LU cancer cell line with the amount of 100 - 200 mg/ml. This monoclonal antibody is labeled with 131 I using chloramine T procedure. ChT mass for the oxidation of 50 μg monoclonal antibody in 76 MBq was 10 μg. Sodium metabisulfite was used as a reducing agent. Reaction time was above 3 mins. The radiochemical purity was determined using electrophoresis and TLC methods. Radiochemical yield was > 97%. Radiochemical purity after purification was > 99%. Nuclear purity was > 99%. Stability of the label antibody was 12 days. This is the product promise potential used in the diagnostic and therapeutic of Hodgkin lymphoma. (author)

  11. High prevalence of human anti-bovine IgG antibodies as the major cause of false positive reactions in two-site immunoassays based on monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte C; Koch, Claus; Jensen, Charlotte H

    2004-01-01

    were purified by protein G affinity chromatography from culture supernatant containing 10% (v/v) fetal calf serum (FCS). Human anti-animal IgG (bovine, mouse, horse, and swine) antibodies and human anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies were measured using an ELISA design, with direct bridging...... of the solid phase and biotinylated antigens. The false positive reactions were abolished by addition of 1% (v/v) bovine serum to the dilution buffer (DB). Human anti-bovine IgG antibodies (HABIA) were detected in 99 out of 104 sera from blood donors (50 females; 54 males). HABIA levels in male sera (n = 54...... positively correlated to human anti-bovine serum albumin antibodies in the donor sera (r = 0.639; p

  12. A Mixture of Functionally Oligoclonal Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies That Neutralize Clostridium difficile TcdA and TcdB with High Levels of In Vitro Potency Shows In Vivo Protection in a Hamster Infection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nicola L.; Compson, Joanne E.; MacKenzie, Brendon; O'Dowd, Victoria L.; Oxbrow, Amanda K. F.; Heads, James T.; Turner, Alison; Sarkar, Kaushik; Dugdale, Sarah L.; Jairaj, Mark; Christodoulou, Louis; Knight, David E. O.; Cross, Amanda S.; Hervé, Karine J. M.; Tyson, Kerry L.; Hailu, Hanna; Doyle, Carl B.; Ellis, Mark; Kriek, Marco; Cox, Matthew; Page, Matthew J. T.; Moore, Adrian R.; Lightwood, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are a major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospital and care facility patients. In spite of the availability of effective antibiotic treatments, C. difficile infection (CDI) is still a major cause of patient suffering, death, and substantial health care costs. Clostridium difficile exerts its major pathological effects through the actions of two protein exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, which bind to and disrupt gut tissue. Antibiotics target the infecting bacteria but not the exotoxins. Administering neutralizing antibodies against TcdA and TcdB to patients receiving antibiotic treatment might modulate the effects of the exotoxins directly. We have developed a mixture of three humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which neutralize TcdA and TcdB to address three clinical needs: reduction of the severity and duration of diarrhea, reduction of death rates, and reduction of the rate of recurrence. The UCB MAb mixture showed higher potency in a variety of in vitro binding and neutralization assays (∼10-fold improvements), higher levels of protection in a hamster model of CDI (82% versus 18% at 28 days), and higher valencies of toxin binding (12 versus 2 for TcdA and 3 versus 2 for TcdB) than other agents in clinical development. Comparisons of the MAb properties also offered some insight into the potential relative importance of TcdA and TcdB in the disease process. PMID:23324518

  13. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  14. Development of β-lactoglobulin-specific chimeric human IgEκ monoclonal antibodies for in vitro safety assessment of whey hydrolysates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knipping, Karen; Simons, Peter; Buelens-Sleumer, Laura S; Cox, Linda; den Hartog, Marcel; de Jong, Niels; Teshima, Reiko; Garssen, Johan; Boon, Louis; Knippels, Léon M J

    BACKGROUND: Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are nutritional substitutes for allergic infants. Safety or residual allergenicity assessment of these whey hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells expressing the human IgE receptor α-chain (huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3),

  15. Generation and epitope analysis of human monoclonal antibody isotypes with specificity for the timothy grass major allergen Phl p 5a

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, J.; Diethers, A.; Seismann, H.

    2011-01-01

    and cross-reactivity, standardisation of allergens as well as improvement of allergy diagnostics and therapeutics. Here we report the generation and application of the first set of authentic human IgG, IgE and IgA antibodies. On the basis of a Phl p 5a specific antibody fragment, a lambda light chain...

  16. Preclinical in vitro and in vivo characterization of the fully human monoclonal IgM antibody KBPA101 specific for Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype IATS-O11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Michael P; Zuercher, Adrian W; Imboden, Martin A

    2010-01-01

    with P. aeruginosa at doses as low as 5 microg/animal. Furthermore, a high efficacy of KBPA101 in protection from local respiratory infections in an acute lung infection model in mice was demonstrated. Preclinical toxicology evaluation on human tissue, in rabbits, and in mice did not indicate any...

  17. Localization of MHC class II/human cartilage glycoprotein-39 complexes in synovia of rheumatoid arthritis patients using complex-specific monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbakkers, Peter G. A.; Baeten, Dominique; Rovers, Eric; Veys, Eric M.; Rijnders, Antonius W. M.; Meijerink, Jan; de Keyser, Filip; Boots, Annemieke M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Recently human cartilage gp-39 (HC gp-39) was identified as a candidate autoantigen in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). To further investigate the relevance of this Ag in RA, we have generated a set of five mAbs to a combination epitope of complexes of HC gp-39(263-275) and the RA-associated DR alpha beta

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies 13A4 and AC133 Do Not Recognize the Canine Ortholog of Mouse and Human Stem Cell Antigen Prominin-1 (CD133.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Thamm

    Full Text Available The pentaspan membrane glycoprotein prominin-1 (CD133 is widely used in medicine as a cell surface marker of stem and cancer stem cells. It has opened new avenues in stem cell-based regenerative therapy and oncology. This molecule is largely used with human samples or the mouse model, and consequently most biological tools including antibodies are directed against human and murine prominin-1. Although the general structure of prominin-1 including its membrane topology is conserved throughout the animal kingdom, its primary sequence is poorly conserved. Thus, it is unclear if anti-human and -mouse prominin-1 antibodies cross-react with their orthologs in other species, especially dog. Answering this issue is imperative in light of the growing number of studies using canine prominin-1 as an antigenic marker. Here, we address this issue by cloning the canine prominin-1 and use its overexpression as a green fluorescent protein fusion protein in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells to determine its immunoreactivity with antibodies against human or mouse prominin-1. We used immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry and immunoblotting techniques and surprisingly found no cross-species immunoreactivity. These results raise some caution in data interpretation when anti-prominin-1 antibodies are used in interspecies studies.

  19. A protein-conjugate approach to develop a monoclonal antibody-based antigen detection test for the diagnosis of human brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patra, Kailash P.; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L.; Rolán, Hortensia G.; Young, Briana; Kerrinnes, Tobias; Smits, Henk; Ricaldi, Jessica N.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsolis, Renee M.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2014-01-01

    Human brucellosis is most commonly diagnosed by serology based on agglutination of fixed Brucella abortus as antigen. Nucleic acid amplification techniques have not proven capable of reproducibly and sensitively demonstrating the presence of Brucella DNA in clinical specimens. We sought to optimize

  20. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  1. Phase 2, multicenter, open-label study of tigatuzumab (CS-1008), a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting death receptor 5, in combination with gemcitabine in chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forero-Torres, Andres; Infante, Jeffrey R; Waterhouse, David; Wong, Lucas; Vickers, Selwyn; Arrowsmith, Edward; He, Aiwu Ruth; Hart, Lowell; Trent, David; Wade, James; Jin, Xiaoping; Wang, Qiang; Austin, TaShara; Rosen, Michael; Beckman, Robert; Roemeling, Reinhard von; Greenberg, Jonathan; Saleh, Mansoor

    2013-01-01

    Tigatuzumab is the humanized version of the agonistic murine monoclonal antibody TRA-8 that binds to the death receptor 5 and induces apoptosis of human cancer cell lines via the caspase cascade. The combination of tigatuzumab and gemcitabine inhibits tumor growth in murine pancreatic xenografts. This phase 2 trial evaluated the efficacy of tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine in 62 chemotherapy-naive patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients received intravenous tigatuzumab (8 mg/kg loading dose followed by 3 mg/kg weekly) and gemcitabine (1000 mg/m 2 once weekly for 3 weeks followed by 1 week of rest) until progressive disease (PD) or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) at 16 weeks. Secondary end points included objective response rate (ORR) (complete responses plus partial responses), duration of response, and overall survival (OS). Safety of the combination was also evaluated. Mean duration of treatment was 18.48 weeks for tigatuzumab and 17.73 weeks for gemcitabine. The PFS rate at 16 weeks was 52.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 39.3–64.1%). The ORR was 13.1%; 28 (45.9%) patients had stable disease and 14 (23%) patients had PD. Median PFS was 3.9 months (95% CI, 2.2–5.4 months). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI, 5.1–9.6 months). The most common adverse events related to tigatuzumab were nausea (35.5%), fatigue (32.3%), and peripheral edema (19.4%). Tigatuzumab combined with gemcitabine was well tolerated and may be clinically active for the treatment of chemotherapy-naive patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer

  2. Enhancement of retroviral infection in vitro by anti-Le(y) IgG: reversal by humanization of monoclonal mouse antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Sørensen, A M; Arendrup, M

    1993-01-01

    with no indication of any alternative pathway of infection, as evidenced by abrogation of enhancement by anti-CD4 MAb or soluble recombinant CD4, and also the inability of anti-Le(y) MAb to mediate HIV infection of HSB-2 cells in which HTLV-1/HIV pseudovirus infection was enhanced. While F(ab)2 fragments of ABL 364...... also enhanced infection, a human/mouse chimeric antibody and a fully humanized antibody had no enhancing effect on free virus infection. We suggest that binding of anti-Le(y) ABL 364 or its F(ab)2 fragment induced a conformational change in the gp120 oligomers facilitating the process of infection...

  3. Reversion of somatic mutations of the respiratory syncytial virus-specific human monoclonal antibody Fab19 reveal a direct relationship between association rate and neutralizing potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, John T; Keefer, Christopher J; Utley, Thomas J; Correia, Bruno E; Schief, William R; Crowe, James E

    2013-04-01

    The role of affinity in determining neutralizing potency of mAbs directed against viruses is not well understood. We investigated the kinetic, structural, and functional advantage conferred by individual naturally occurring somatic mutations in the Ab H chain V region of Fab19, a well-described neutralizing human mAb directed to respiratory syncytial virus. Comparison of the affinity-matured Ab Fab19 with recombinant Fab19 Abs that were variants containing reverted amino acids from the inferred unmutated ancestor sequence revealed the molecular basis for affinity maturation of this Ab. Enhanced binding was achieved through mutations in the third H chain CDR (HCDR3) that conferred a markedly faster on-rate and a desirable increase in antiviral neutralizing activity. In contrast, most somatic mutations in the HCDR1 and HCDR2 regions did not significantly enhance Ag binding or antiviral activity. We observed a direct relationship between the measured association rate (Kon) for F protein and antiviral activity. Modeling studies of the structure of the Ag-Ab complex suggested the HCDR3 loop interacts with the antigenic site A surface loop of the respiratory syncytial virus F protein, previously shown to contain the epitope for this Ab by experimentation. These studies define a direct relationship of affinity and neutralizing activity for a viral glycoprotein-specific human mAb.

  4. Development of β-lactoglobulin-specific chimeric human IgEκ monoclonal antibodies for in vitro safety assessment of whey hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Karen; Simons, Peter J; Buelens-Sleumer, Laura S; Cox, Linda; den Hartog, Marcel; de Jong, Niels; Teshima, Reiko; Garssen, Johan; Boon, Louis; Knippels, Léon M J

    2014-01-01

    Cow's milk-derived whey hydrolysates are nutritional substitutes for allergic infants. Safety or residual allergenicity assessment of these whey hydrolysates is crucial. Currently, rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells expressing the human IgE receptor α-chain (huFcεRIα-RBL-2H3), sensitized with serum IgE from cow's milk allergic children, are being employed to assess in vitro residual allergenicity of these whey hydrolysates. However, limited availability and inter-lot variation of these allergic sera impede standardization of whey hydrolysate safety testing in degranulation assays. An oligoclonal pool of chimeric human (chu)IgE antibodies against bovine β-lactoglobulin (a major allergen in whey) was generated to increase sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of existing degranulation assays. Mice were immunized with bovine β-lactoglobulin, and subsequently the variable domains of dissimilar anti-β-lactoglobulin mouse IgG antibodies were cloned and sequenced. Six chimeric antibodies were generated comprising mouse variable domains and human constant IgE/κ domains. After sensitization with this pool of anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs, huFcεRIα-expressing RBL-2H3 cells demonstrated degranulation upon cross-linking with whey, native 18 kDa β-lactoglobulin, and 5-10 kDa whey hydrolysates, whereas a 3 kDa whey hydrolysate and cow's milk powder (mainly casein) showed no degranulation. In parallel, allergic serum IgEs were less sensitive. In addition, our pool anti-β-lactoglobulin chuIgEs recognized multiple allergenic immunodominant regions on β-lactoglobulin, which were also recognized by serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic children. Usage of our 'unlimited' source and well-defined pool of β-lactoglobulin-specific recombinant chuIgEs to sensitize huFcεRIα on RBL-2H3 cells showed to be a relevant and sensitive alternative for serum IgEs from cow's milk allergic patients to assess safety of whey-based non-allergic hydrolyzed formula.

  5. The human CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab shows anti-tumor activity and hampers leukemia-microenvironment interactions in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas-Céspedes, Alba; Vidal-Crespo, Anna; Rodriguez, Vanina; Villamor, Neus; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; Roca-Ho, Heleia; Menéndez, Pablo; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Colomer, Dolors; Roué, Gaël; Wiestner, Adrian; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Doshi, Parul; van Bueren, Jeroen Lammerts; Pérez-Galán, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish a proof-of-concept for the efficacy of the anti-CD38 antibody daratumumab in the poor prognosis CD38+ CLL subtype. Experimental design The mechanism of action of daratumumab was assessed in CLL primary cells and cell lines using peripheral blood mononuclear cells to analyze antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC), murine and human macrophages to study antibody-dependent cell phagocytosis (ADCP) or human serum to analyze complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). The effect of daratumumab on CLL cell migration and adhesion to extracellular matrix was characterized. Daratumumab activity was validated in two in vivo models. Results Daratumumab demonstrated efficient lysis of patient-derived CLL cells and cell lines by ADCC in vitro and ADCP both in vitro and in vivo, while exhibited negligible CDC in these cells. To demonstrate the therapeutic effect of daratumumab in CLL, we generated a disseminated CLL mouse model with the CD38+ MEC2 cell line and CLL patient derived xenografts (CLL-PDX). Daratumumab significantly prolonged overall survival of MEC2 mice, completely eliminated cells from the infiltrated organs and significantly reduced disease burden in the spleen of CLL-PDX. The effect of daratumumab on patient-derived CLL cell dissemination was demonstrated in vitro by its effect on CXCL12-induced migration and in vivo by interfering with CLL cell homing to spleen in NSG mice. Daratumumab also reduced adhesion of CLL cells to VCAM-1, accompanied by down-regulation of the matrix metalloproteinase MMP9. Conclusions These unique and substantial effects of daratumumab on CLL viability and dissemination support the investigation of its use in a clinical setting of CLL. PMID:27637890

  6. Phase I study of GC1008 (fresolimumab: a human anti-transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ monoclonal antibody in patients with advanced malignant melanoma or renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Morris

    Full Text Available In advanced cancers, transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ promotes tumor growth and metastases and suppresses host antitumor immunity. GC1008 is a human anti-TGFβ monoclonal antibody that neutralizes all isoforms of TGFβ. Here, the safety and activity of GC1008 was evaluated in patients with advanced malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma.In this multi-center phase I trial, cohorts of patients with previously treated malignant melanoma or renal cell carcinoma received intravenous GC1008 at 0.1, 0.3, 1, 3, 10, or 15 mg/kg on days 0, 28, 42, and 56. Patients achieving at least stable disease were eligible to receive Extended Treatment consisting of 4 doses of GC1008 every 2 weeks for up to 2 additional courses. Pharmacokinetic and exploratory biomarker assessments were performed.Twenty-nine patients, 28 with malignant melanoma and 1 with renal cell carcinoma, were enrolled and treated, 22 in the dose-escalation part and 7 in a safety cohort expansion. No dose-limiting toxicity was observed, and the maximum dose, 15 mg/kg, was determined to be safe. The development of reversible cutaneous keratoacanthomas/squamous-cell carcinomas (4 patients and hyperkeratosis was the major adverse event observed. One malignant melanoma patient achieved a partial response, and six had stable disease with a median progression-free survival of 24 weeks for these 7 patients (range, 16.4-44.4 weeks.GC1008 had no dose-limiting toxicity up to 15 mg/kg. In patients with advanced malignant melanoma and renal cell carcinoma, multiple doses of GC1008 demonstrated acceptable safety and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity, warranting further studies of single agent and combination treatments.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00356460.

  7. Safety profile and clinical activity of multiple subcutaneous doses of MEDI-528, a humanized anti-interleukin-9 monoclonal antibody, in two randomized phase 2a studies in subjects with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joseph M; Oh, Chad K; LaForce, Craig; Miller, S David; Pearlman, David S; Le, Chenxiong; Robbie, Gabriel J; White, Wendy I; White, Barbara; Molfino, Nestor A

    2011-02-28

    Interleukin-9 (IL-9)-targeted therapies may offer a novel approach for treating asthmatics. Two randomized placebo-controlled studies were conducted to assess the safety profile and potential efficacy of multiple subcutaneous doses of MEDI-528, a humanized anti-IL-9 monoclonal antibody, in asthmatics. Study 1: adults (18-65 years) with mild asthma received MEDI-528 (0.3, 1, 3 mg/kg) or placebo subcutaneously twice weekly for 4 weeks. Study 2: adults (18-50 years) with stable, mild to moderate asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction received 50 mg MEDI-528 or placebo subcutaneously twice weekly for 4 weeks. Adverse events (AEs), pharmacokinetics (PK), immunogenicity, asthma control (including asthma exacerbations), and exercise challenge test were evaluated in study 1, study 2, or both. In study 1 (N = 36), MEDI-528 showed linear serum PK; no anti-MEDI-528 antibodies were detected. Asthma control: 1/27 MEDI-528-treated subjects had 1 asthma exacerbation, and 2/9 placebo-treated subjects had a total of 4 asthma exacerbations (one considered a serious AE). In study 2, MEDI-528 (n = 7) elicited a trend in the reduction in mean maximum decrease in FEV1 post-exercise compared to placebo (n = 2) (-6.49% MEDI-528 vs -12.60% placebo; -1.40% vs -20.10%; -5.04% vs -15.20% at study days 28, 56, and 150, respectively). Study 2 was halted prematurely due to a serious AE in an asymptomatic MEDI-528-treated subject who had an abnormal brain magnetic resonance imaging that was found to be an artifact on further evaluation. In these studies, MEDI-528 showed an acceptable safety profile and findings suggestive of clinical activity that support continued study in subjects with mild to moderate asthma.

  8. A phase 1 study to evaluate the safety and LDL cholesterol-lowering effects of RG7652, a fully human monoclonal antibody against proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Amos; Luca, Diana; Kahn, Robert S; Cowan, Kyra J; Leabman, Maya; Budha, Nageshwar R; Chiu, Cecilia P C; Wu, Yan; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Peterson, Andrew; Davis, John C; Tingley, Whittemore G

    2017-07-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) downregulates low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, thereby leading to a rise in circulating LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). RG7652 is a fully human monoclonal antibody against PCSK9. This placebo-controlled, phase 1 ascending-dose study in healthy subjects evaluated the safety of RG7652 and its efficacy as a potential LDL-C-lowering drug. Anti-PCSK9 antibody therapy safely and effectively reduces LDL-C. Subjects (N = 80) were randomized into 10 cohorts. Six sequential single-dose cohorts received 10, 40, 150, 300, 600, or 800 mg of RG7652 via subcutaneous injection. Four multiple-dose cohorts received 40 or 150 mg of RG7652 once weekly for 4 weeks, either with or without statin therapy (atorvastatin). Adverse events (AEs) were generally mild; the most common AEs were temporary injection-site reactions. No serious AEs, severe AEs, AEs leading to study-drug discontinuation, or dose-limiting toxicities were reported. RG7652 monotherapy reduced mean LDL-C levels by up to 64% and as much as 100 mg/dL at week 2; the effect magnitude and duration increased with dose (≥57 days following a single RG7652 dose ≥300 mg). Exploratory analyses showed reduced oxidized LDL, lipoprotein(a), and lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 with RG7652. Antidrug antibody against RG7652 tested positive in 2 of 60 (3.3%) RG7652-treated and in 4 of 20 (20.0%) placebo-treated subjects. Simultaneous atorvastatin administration did not appear to impact the pharmacokinetic profile or lipid-lowering effects of RG7652. Overall, RG7652 elicited substantial and sustained dose-related LDL-C reductions with an acceptable safety profile and minimal immunogenicity. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The value of gamma camera and computed tomography data set coregistration to assess Lewis Y antigen targeting in small cell lung cancer by 111Indium-labeled humanized monoclonal antibody 3S193

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaia, Emilio; Krug, Lee M.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Nagel, Andrew; Reuter, Victor E.; Humm, John; Divgi, Chaitanya

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the value of data set coregistration of gamma camera and computed tomography (CT) in the assessment of targeting of humanized monoclonal antibody 3S193 labeled with indium-111 ( 111 In-hu3S193) to small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Methods and materials: Ten patients (6 male and 4 female; mean age ± S.D., 60 ± 4 years), from an overall population of 20 patients with SCLCs expressing Lewis Y antigen at immunohistochemical analysis, completed a four weekly injections of 111 In-hu3S193 and underwent gamma camera imaging. All had had, as part of their baseline evaluation, Fluorine18 fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). Two readers in consensus retrospectively coregistered the gamma camera images with the CT component of the FDG PET/CT by automatic or manual alignment. The resulting image sets were visually examined and SCLC lesions targeting at coregistered gamma camera and CT was correlated side-by-side with the 18 F-FDG uptake. Results: A total number of 31 lesions from SCLC with a thoracic (n = 13) or extrathoracic location (n = 18) were all positive on FDG PET/CT. Coregistration of the gamma camera to the CT demonstrated targeting of antibody to all lesions >2 cm (n = 20) and in a few lesions ≤2 cm (n = 2), with no visualization of most lesions ≤2 cm (n = 9). No 111 In-hu3S193 uptake in normal tissues was observed. Conclusion: Coregistration of antibody gamma camera imaging to FDG PET/CT is feasible and allows valuable assessment of 111 In-hu3S193 antibody targeting to SCLC lesions >2 cm, while lesions ≤2 cm reveal a limited targeting

  10. Characterization of germline antibody libraries from human umbilical cord blood and selection of monoclonal antibodies to viral envelope glycoproteins: Implications for mechanisms of immune evasion and design of vaccine immunogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weizao; Streaker, Emily D; Russ, Daniel E; Feng, Yang; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-01-27

    We have previously observed that all known HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are highly divergent from germline antibodies in contrast to bnAbs against Hendra virus, Nipah virus and SARS coronavirus (SARS CoV). We have hypothesized that because the germline antibodies are so different from the mature HIV-1-specific bnAbs they may not bind the epitopes of the mature antibodies and provided the first evidence to support this hypothesis by using individual putative germline-like predecessor antibodies. To further validate the hypothesis and understand initial immune responses to different viruses, two phage-displayed human cord blood-derived IgM libraries were constructed which contained mostly germline antibodies or antibodies with very low level of somatic hypermutations. They were panned against different HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs), SARS CoV protein receptor-binding domain (RBD), and soluble Hendra virus G protein (sG). Despite a high sequence and combinatorial diversity observed in the cord blood-derived IgM antibody repertoire, no enrichment for binders of Envs was observed in contrast to considerable specific enrichments produced with panning against RBD and sG; one of the selected monoclonal antibodies (against the RBD) was of high (nM) affinity with only few somatic mutations. These results further support and expand our initial hypothesis for fundamental differences in immune responses leading to elicitation of bnAbs against HIV-1 compared to SARS CoV and Hendra virus. HIV-1 uses a strategy to minimize or eliminate strong binding of germline antibodies to its Env; in contrast, SARS CoV and Hendra virus, and perhaps other viruses causing acute infections, can bind germline antibody or minimally somatically mutated antibodies with relatively high affinity which could be one of the reasons for the success of sG and RBD as vaccine immunogens. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Using the natural evolution of a rotavirus-specific human monoclonal antibody to predict the complex topography of a viral antigenic site

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Brett A; Kallewaard, Nicole L; Crowe, James E; Meiler, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Background Understanding the interaction between viral proteins and neutralizing antibodies at atomic resolution is hindered by a lack of experimentally solved complexes. Progress in computational docking has led to the prediction of increasingly high-quality model antibody-antigen complexes. The accuracy of atomic-level docking predictions is improved when integrated with experimental information and expert knowledge. Methods Binding affinity data associated with somatic mutations of a rotavirus-specific human adult antibody (RV6-26) are used to filter potential docking orientations of an antibody homology model with respect to the rotavirus VP6 crystal structure. The antibody structure is used to probe the VP6 trimer for candidate interface residues. Results Three conformational epitopes are proposed. These epitopes are candidate antigenic regions for site-directed mutagenesis of VP6, which will help further elucidate antigenic function. A pseudo-atomic resolution RV6-26 antibody-VP6 complex is proposed consistent with current experimental information. Conclusion The use of mutagenesis constraints in docking calculations allows for the identification of a small number of alternative arrangements of the antigen-antibody interface. The mutagenesis information from the natural evolution of a neutralizing antibody can be used to discriminate between residue-scale models and create distance constraints for atomic-resolution docking. The integration of binding affinity data or other information with computation may be an advantageous approach to assist peptide engineering or therapeutic antibody design. PMID:17877819

  12. Ablation of human colon carcinoma in nude mice by 131I-labeled monoclonal anti-carcinoembryonic antigen antibody F(ab')2 fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchegger, F.; Pfister, C.; Fournier, K.; Prevel, F.; Schreyer, M.; Carrel, S.; Mach, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    Pooled F(ab')2 fragments of three MAbs against distinct epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were used for radioimmunotherapy of nude mice bearing a subcutaneous human colon carcinoma xenograft. 9-10 d after transplantation when tumor nodules were in exponential growth, 36 mice were treated by intravenous injection of different amounts of 131 I-labeled MAb F(ab')2. All 14 mice injected with a single dose of 2,200 (n = 10) or 2,800 microCi (n = 4) showed complete tumor remission. 8 of the 10 mice treated with 2,200 microCi survived in good health for 1 yr when they were killed and shown to be tumor free. Four of nine other mice treated with four fractionated doses of 400 microCi showed no tumor relapse for more than 9 mo. In contrast, all 15 mice injected with 1,600-3,000 microCi 131 I-control IgG F(ab')2 showed tumor growth retardation of only 1-4 wk, and 15 of 16 mice injected with unlabeled anti-CEA MAb F(ab')2 showed unmodified tumor progression as compared with untreated mice. From tissue radioactivity distributions it was calculated that by an injection of 2,200 microCi 131 I-MAb F(ab')2 a mean dose of 8,335 rad was selectively delivered to the tumor, while the tissue-absorbed radiation doses for the normal organs were: peripheral blood, 2,093; stomach, 1,668; kidney, 1,289; lung, 1,185; liver, 617; spleen, 501; small intestine, 427; large intestine, 367; bone, 337; and muscle, 198. These treatments were well tolerated since out of 19 mice with complete tumor remission only 4 required bone marrow transplantation and 17 were in good health for 6-12 mo of observation

  13. Human pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of the kit of monoclonal antibody IOR EGF/R3 labelled with {sup 99m} Tc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, L.A.; Ramos, M.; Perera, A.; Hernandez, A.; Iznaga, M.E. N. [Solano, Ivette Alvarez, Jose L. Rodriguez. Centro de InvestigacionesClinicas. 34 no.4501 e/45 y 47 Kohly, Playa, C. Habana (Cuba)

    1998-12-31

    The aim of this work was to assess the human pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of the {sup 99m} Tc-labeled MAb ior egf/r3. Five patients were included in the biodistribution and dosimetric studies and three in the pharmacokinetic analysis. Multiple blood and urine samples we recollected and sequential anterior and posterior whole-body scintigraphies u pto 24 hr post-injection were performed to all patients . The internal radiation dosimetry was estimated from gamma camera imaging data using the methods developed by the Medical Internal radiation dosimetry (MIRD)committee. Raw data were computed from operations between gamma graphic images and regions of interest (ROI) using the Bio-Dose software and time-activity curves were calculated in order to determine the residence times of the source organs. The Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution results showed that this compound have a bio exponential plasmatic and blood clearance with a rapid biodistribution phase of 9.1 {+-} 8.4 min and 12.2{+-}4.4 min, respectively, and a slower elimination phase of 6.6 {+-} 1.6 hr and 10.8 {+-} 6.8 hr. respectively. The urinary and hepatobiliary excretion showed 4.7 {+-} 0.4 % and 9.9 {+-} 1.8 % of the total administered dose,eliminated by these ways. Liver was the target organ of this product and had an uptake peak at 1 hr post-injection (61.2%) and a great retention of the MAb(T 1/2 eff = 5.3 hr, T 1/2 Biol. = 45.0 hr). The dosimetric results showed that liver, gallbladder and spleen received the higher absorbed. The effective dose and the effective equivalent dose were 1,2E-01 mSv/MBq and 9,2E-02 mSv/MBq respectively. These results allow to see the i or egf/r3 kit in a safe and controlled way. (Author)

  14. Human pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of the kit of monoclonal antibody IOR EGF/R3 labelled with 99m Tc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, L.A.; Ramos, M.; Perera, A.; Hernandez, A.; Iznaga, M.E. N.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the human pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and dosimetry of the 99m Tc-labeled MAb ior egf/r3. Five patients were included in the biodistribution and dosimetric studies and three in the pharmacokinetic analysis. Multiple blood and urine samples we recollected and sequential anterior and posterior whole-body scintigraphies u pto 24 hr post-injection were performed to all patients . The internal radiation dosimetry was estimated from gamma camera imaging data using the methods developed by the Medical Internal radiation dosimetry (MIRD)committee. Raw data were computed from operations between gamma graphic images and regions of interest (ROI) using the Bio-Dose software and time-activity curves were calculated in order to determine the residence times of the source organs. The Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution results showed that this compound have a bio exponential plasmatic and blood clearance with a rapid biodistribution phase of 9.1 ± 8.4 min and 12.2±4.4 min, respectively, and a slower elimination phase of 6.6 ± 1.6 hr and 10.8 ± 6.8 hr. respectively. The urinary and hepatobiliary excretion showed 4.7 ± 0.4 % and 9.9 ± 1.8 % of the total administered dose,eliminated by these ways. Liver was the target organ of this product and had an uptake peak at 1 hr post-injection (61.2%) and a great retention of the MAb(T 1/2 eff = 5.3 hr, T 1/2 Biol. = 45.0 hr). The dosimetric results showed that liver, gallbladder and spleen received the higher absorbed. The effective dose and the effective equivalent dose were 1,2E-01 mSv/MBq and 9,2E-02 mSv/MBq respectively. These results allow to see the i or egf/r3 kit in a safe and controlled way. (Author)

  15. CCR 20th Anniversary commentary: in search of cetuximab's first indication-combination therapy with irinotecan in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicklin, Daniel J

    2015-04-01

    The research article by Prewett and colleagues, published in the May 1, 2002, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, provided important translational data that extended earlier preclinical and clinical studies with the human-murine chimeric anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody C225. Subsequent clinical trials with C225 led to the demonstration of its efficacy in combination with irinotecan and regulatory approval for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies against rat leukocyte surface antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, T. K.; Puklavec, M. J.; Barclay, A. N.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be powerful tools for studying the properties of leukocyte surface antigens and the cells that express them. In the past decades many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for identifying the different rat leukocyte surface antigens have been described. A list of mAb is

  17. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2018-04-10

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  18. Non-random escape pathways from a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody map to a highly conserved region on the hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein encompassing amino acids 412-423.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-yong Keck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A challenge for hepatitis C virus (HCV vaccine development is to define epitopes that are able to elicit protective antibodies against this highly diverse virus. The E2 glycoprotein region located at residues 412-423 is conserved and antibodies to 412-423 have broadly neutralizing activities. However, an adaptive mutation, N417S, is associated with a glycan shift in a variant that cannot be neutralized by a murine but by human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs against 412-423. To determine whether HCV escapes from these antibodies, we analyzed variants that emerged when cell culture infectious HCV virions (HCVcc were passaged under increasing concentrations of a specific HMAb, HC33.1. Multiple nonrandom escape pathways were identified. Two pathways occurred in the context of an N-glycan shift mutation at N417T. At low antibody concentrations, substitutions of two residues outside of the epitope, N434D and K610R, led to variants having improved in vitro viral fitness and reduced sensitivity to HC33.1 binding and neutralization. At moderate concentrations, a S419N mutation occurred within 412-423 in escape variants that have greatly reduced sensitivity to HC33.1 but compromised viral fitness. Importantly, the variants generated from these pathways differed in their stability. N434D and K610R-associated variants were stable and became dominant as the virions were passaged. The S419N mutation reverted back to N419S when immune pressure was reduced by removing HC33.1. At high antibody concentrations, a mutation at L413I was observed in variants that were resistant to HC33.1 neutralization. Collectively, the combination of multiple escape pathways enabled the virus to persist under a wide range of antibody concentrations. Moreover, these findings pose a different challenge to vaccine development beyond the identification of highly conserved epitopes. It will be necessary for a vaccine to induce high potency antibodies that prevent the formation of escape

  19. Modification of the Fc Region of a Human Anti-oncostatin M Monoclonal Antibody for Higher Affinity to FcRn Receptor and Extension of Half-life in Cynomolgus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnane, Ivo P; Han, Chao; Jiao, Qun; Tam, Susan H; Davis, Hugh M; Xu, Zhenhua

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PK) of anti-oncostatin M (OSM) IgG1 monoclonal antibodies, CNTO 1119 and its Fc variant (CNTO 8212), which incorporates the LS(Xtend) mutation to extend terminal half-life (T 1/2 ), after a single intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) administration in cynomolgus monkeys, and to predict human PK. In study 1, single doses of CNTO 1119 and CNTO 8212 were administered IV or SC at 3 mg/kg to cynomolgus monkeys (n = 3 per group). In study 2, single doses of CNTO 8212 were administered IV at 1, 5 or 20 mg/kg, or SC at 5 mg/kg to cynomolgus monkeys (n = 5 per group). Serial blood samples were collected for assessment of serum concentrations of CNTO 1119 and/or CNTO 8212. A two-compartment population PK model with first-order elimination was utilized to simultaneously describe the serum concentrations of CNTO 1119 and CNTO 8212 over time after IV and SC administration in cynomolgus monkeys. The typical population PK parameter estimates for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys were clearance (CL) = 2.81 mL/day/kg, volume of distribution of central compartment (V 1 ) = 31.3 mL/kg, volume of distribution of peripheral compartment (V 2 ) = 23.3 mL/kg, absolute bioavailability (F) = 0.84 and T 1/2 = 13.4 days. In comparison, the typical population PK parameter estimates for CNTO 8212 in cynomolgus monkeys were CL = 1.41 mL/day/kg, V 1 = 39.8 mL/kg, V 2 = 32.6 mL/kg, F = 0.75 and T 1/2 = 35.7 days. The mean CL of CNTO 8212 was ~50% lower compared with that for CNTO 1119 in cynomolgus monkeys. The overall volume of distribution (V 1 +V 2 ) for CNTO 8212 was about 32% larger compared with that for CNTO 1119, but generally similar to the vascular volume in cynomolgus monkeys. The T 1/2 of CNTO 8212 was significantly (p monkeys. Thus, the modification of the Fc portion of an anti-OSM IgG1 mAb for higher FcRn binding affinity resulted in lower systemic clearance and a longer terminal half-life in cynomolgus monkeys. CNTO 8212

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Moroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of monoclonal antibodies (mAb are now under investigation in clinical trials to assess their potential role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. The most frequently used mAb is rituximab, which is directed against CD20, a membrane protein expressed on B lymphocytes. Uncontrolled trials reported an improvement of SLE activity in non-renal patients and other studies even reported an improvement of severe lupus nephritis unresponsive to conventional treatments. However two randomized trials failed to show the superiority of rituximab over conventional treatment in non renal SLE and in lupus nephritis. Preliminary trials reported promising results with epratuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against CD22, and with belimumab, a human mAb that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of BLyS a cytokine of the tumornecrosis-factor (TNF ligand superfamily. Other clinical trials with mAb directed against TNF-alpha, interleukin-10 (Il-10, Il-6, CD154, CD40 ligand, IL-18 or complement component C5 are under way. At present, however, in spite of good results reported by some studies, no firm conclusion on the risk-benefit profile of these mAbs in patients with SLE can be drawn from the available studies.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  2. Recent Advances in Monoclonal Antibody Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Nikolaos; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Dasari, Harika; Abdelrahim, Murtada A.; Henley, John R.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Warrington, Arthur E.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS and results in neurological disability. Existing immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive approaches lower the number of relapses but do not cure or reverse existing deficits nor improve long-term disability in MS patients. Areas Covered Monogenic antibodies were described as treatment options for MS, however the immunogenicity of mouse antibodies hampered the efficacy of potential therapeutics in humans. Availability of improved antibody production technologies resulted in a paradigm shift in MS treatment strategies. In this review, an overview of immunotherapies for MS that use conventional monoclonal antibodies reactive to immune system and their properties and mechanisms of action will be discussed, including recent advances in MS therapeutics and highlight natural autoantibodies (NAbs) that directly target CNS cells. Expert Opinion Recent challenges for MS therapy are the identification of relevant molecular and cellular targets, time frame of treatment, and antibody toxicity profiles to identify safe treatment options for MS patients. The application of monoclonal antibody therapies with better biological efficacy associated with minimum side effects possesses huge clinical potential. Advances in monoclonal antibody technologies that directly target cells of nervous system may promote the CNS regeneration field from bench to bedside. PMID:26914737

  3. Relationship between hyperthyroidism and monoclonal gammapathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canas, Carlos Alberto

    2007-01-01

    A 66-year-old man with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and monoclonal gammapathy associated to it of uncertain significance (MGUS). A possible pathogenic relationship between HPTP and MGUS is analyzed. Interleukin 6 could play a pivotal role.

  4. Clinical Translation and Validation of a Predictive Biomarker for Patritumab, an Anti-human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 3 (HER3) Monoclonal Antibody, in Patients With Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendell, Jeanne; Freeman, Daniel J; Feng, Wenqin; Hettmann, Thore; Schneider, Matthias; Blum, Sabine; Ruhe, Jens; Bange, Johannes; Nakamaru, Kenji; Chen, Shuquan; Tsuchihashi, Zenta; von Pawel, Joachim; Copigneaux, Catherine; Beckman, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    During early clinical development, prospective identification of a predictive biomarker and validation of an assay method may not always be feasible. Dichotomizing a continuous biomarker measure to classify responders also leads to challenges. We present a case study of a prospective-retrospective approach for a continuous biomarker identified after patient enrollment but defined prospectively before the unblinding of data. An analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of this approach and the challenges encountered in its practical application are also provided. HERALD (NCT02134015) was a double-blind, phase 2 study in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) randomized to erlotinib with placebo or with high or low doses of patritumab, a monoclonal antibody targeted against human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3). While the primary objective was to assess safety and progression-free survival (PFS), a secondary objective was to determine a single predictive biomarker hypothesis to identify subjects most likely to benefit from the addition of patritumab. Although not identified as the primary biomarker in the study protocol, on the basis of preclinical results from 2 independent laboratories, expression levels of the HER3 ligand heregulin (HRG) were prospectively declared the predictive biomarker before data unblinding but after subject enrollment. An assay to measure HRG mRNA was developed and validated. Other biomarkers, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status, were also evaluated in an exploratory fashion. The cutoff value for high vs. low HRG mRNA levels was set at the median delta threshold cycle. A maximum likelihood analysis was performed to evaluate the provisional cutoff. The relationship of HRG values to PFS hazard ratios (HRs) was assessed as a measure of internal validation. Additional NSCLC samples were analyzed to characterize HRG mRNA distribution. The subgroup of patients with high HRG mRNA levels ("HRG

  5. A single-arm, open-label, phase 2 clinical trial evaluating disease response following treatment with BI-505, a human anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichert, Stina; Juliusson, Gunnar; Johansson, Åsa; Sonesson, Elisabeth; Teige, Ingrid; Wickenberg, Anna Teige; Frendeus, Björn; Korsgren, Magnus; Hansson, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) is an indolent disease stage, considered to represent the transition phase from the premalignant MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) state towards symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM). Even though this diagnosis provides an opportunity for early intervention, few treatment studies have been done and the current standard of care is observation until progression. BI-505, a monoclonal antibody directed against intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) with promising anti-myeloma activity in preclinical trials, is a possible treatment approach for this patient category with potential to eliminate tumor cells with minimal long-term side effects. BI-505 was well tolerated in an earlier phase 1 trial. In this phase 2 trial the effects of BI-505 in patients with SMM were studied. Four patients were enrolled and three of them completed the first cycle of treatment defined as 5 doses of BI-505, a total of 43 mg/kg BW, over a 7-week period. In the three evaluable patients, BI-505 showed a benign safety profile. None of the patients achieved a response as defined per protocol. EudraCT number: 2012-004884-29. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety and pharmacodynamics of BI-505 in patients with SMM. BI-505 showed no clinically relevant efficacy on disease activity in these patients with SMM, even if well tolerated. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01838369.

  6. A single-arm, open-label, phase 2 clinical trial evaluating disease response following treatment with BI-505, a human anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 monoclonal antibody, in patients with smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stina Wichert

    Full Text Available Smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM is an indolent disease stage, considered to represent the transition phase from the premalignant MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance state towards symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM. Even though this diagnosis provides an opportunity for early intervention, few treatment studies have been done and the current standard of care is observation until progression. BI-505, a monoclonal antibody directed against intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 with promising anti-myeloma activity in preclinical trials, is a possible treatment approach for this patient category with potential to eliminate tumor cells with minimal long-term side effects. BI-505 was well tolerated in an earlier phase 1 trial.In this phase 2 trial the effects of BI-505 in patients with SMM were studied. Four patients were enrolled and three of them completed the first cycle of treatment defined as 5 doses of BI-505, a total of 43 mg/kg BW, over a 7-week period. In the three evaluable patients, BI-505 showed a benign safety profile. None of the patients achieved a response as defined per protocol. EudraCT number: 2012-004884-29.The study was conducted to assess the efficacy, safety and pharmacodynamics of BI-505 in patients with SMM. BI-505 showed no clinically relevant efficacy on disease activity in these patients with SMM, even if well tolerated.ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01838369.

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  8. Chimeric Monoclonal Antibody Cetuximab Targeting Epidermal Growth Factor-Receptor in Advanced Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Uwe Wollina; Georgi Tchernev; Torello Lotti

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in humans. Targeted therapy with monoclonal antibody cetuximab is an option in case of advanced tumor or metastasis. AIM: We present and update of the use of cetuximab in NMSC searching PUBMED 2011-2017. METHODS: The monoclonal antibody cetuximab against epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been investigated for its use in NMSC during the years 2011 to 2017 by a PUBMED research using the following items: ...

  9. Purification process monitoring in monoclonal antibody preparation: contamination with viruses, DNA and peptide growth factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. ter Avest (Anja); E.J.J. van Zoelen (Everardus); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); C.F. van Kreyl; G. van Steenis (Bert); H.E.M. Spijkers (Ine)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractAdministration in vivo of monoclonal antibodies to humans is challenged by considerations regarding their safety. Contamination with viruses, potentially oncogenic nucleic acids and biologically active components like growth factors and hormones forms a serious point of concern in this

  10. INITIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST THE FUNGAL HEMOLYSIN STACHYLYSIN FROM STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachybotrys chartarum is known to produce the hemolysin stachylysin and its detection in human serum has been proposed as a biomarker for exposure to the fungus. In this study we report the initial characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against stachylysin and the dev...

  11. Measurement of serum levels of natalizumab, an immunoglobulin G4 therapeutic monoclonal antibody

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispens, Theo; van Leeuwen, Astrid; Vennegoor, Anke; Killestein, Joep; Aalberse, Rob C.; Wolbink, Gerrit J.; Aarden, Lucien A.

    2011-01-01

    Human immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) is a poor trigger of effector functions and, therefore, is the preferred subclass for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies that merely aim to block their in vivo targets. An example is natalizumab, a recombinant IgG4 antibody directed against alpha 4-integrin and used for

  12. Intravenous cidofovir for resistant cutaneous warts in a patient with psoriasis treated with monoclonal antibodies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McAleer, M A

    2012-02-01

    Human papilloma virus is a common and often distressing cutaneous disease. It can be therapeutically challenging, especially in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of recalcitrant cutaneous warts that resolved with intravenous cidofovir treatment. The patient was immunocompromised secondary to monoclonal antibody therapy for psoriasis.

  13. Anti-interleukin-17 monoclonal antibody ixekizumab in chronic plaque psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonardi, Craig; Matheson, Robert; Zachariae, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Type 17 helper T cells have been suggested to play a pathological role in psoriasis. They secrete several proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-17A (also known as interleukin-17). We evaluated the safety and efficacy of ixekizumab (LY2439821), a humanized anti-interleukin-17 monoclonal...

  14. Development of a Highly Protective Combination Monoclonal Antibody Therapy against Chikungunya Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal, Pankaj; Dowd, Kimberly A.; Brien, James D.; Edeling, Melissa A.; Gorlatov, Sergey; Johnson, Syd; Lee, Iris; Akahata, Wataru; Nabel, Gary J.; Richter, Mareike K. S.; Smit, Jolanda M.; Fremont, Daved H.; Pierson, Theodore C.; Heise, Mark T.; Diamond, Michael S.

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes global epidemics of a debilitating polyarthritis in humans. As there is a pressing need for the development of therapeutic agents, we screened 230 new mouse anti-CHIKV monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for their ability to inhibit

  15. Monoclonal antibody evidence for structural similarities between the central rod regions of actinin and dystrophin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T. M.; Ellis, J. M.; Ginjaar, I. B.; van Paassen, M. M.; van Ommen, G. J.; Moorman, A. F.; Cartwright, A. J.; Morris, G. E.

    1990-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, MANDYS141, binds to both dystrophin and actinin on Western blots (SDS-denatured), but only to actinin in frozen sections of human muscle (native conformation). It differs from a polyclonal cross-reacting antiserum in that it binds to several muscle isoforms of actinin (smooth,

  16. Efficacy of HER2-targeted therapy in metastatic breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorte L; Kümler, Iben; Palshof, Jesper Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Therapies targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2 are effective in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We review the efficacy of HER2-directed therapies, focussing on monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting HER2 that have been tested in phase II-III studies...

  17. Porcine humoral immune responses to multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Kamstrup, Søren

    2005-01-01

    In humans and cattle, multiple injections of murine monoclonal antibodies (m-mAbs) induce anti-mouse antibody responses. The objectives of the present. study were to investigate whether a similar response could be seen when pigs were subjected to m-mAb therapy, and to study the kinetics of such a...

  18. Daratumumab: a first-in-class CD38 monoclonal antibody for the treatment of multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larysa Sanchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Daratumumab is a human monoclonal antibody that targets CD38, a cell surface protein that is overexpressed on multiple myeloma (MM cells. Preclinical studies have shown that daratumumab induces MM cell death through several mechanisms, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP, and apoptosis. Given the encouraging efficacy and acceptable safety profile of daratumumab demonstrated in clinical trials, daratumumab has emerged as a novel treatment option for myeloma and became the first monoclonal antibody approved by the FDA for the treatment of MM.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies Against IL-13 and IL-31RA in Development for Atopic Dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Carsten R; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    phase two trial has been completed for a humanized antibody against IL-31 receptor alpha, one subunit of the IL-31 receptor complex. This study showed significant dose-dependent reductions in pruritus, EASI scores, and markers of sleep quality. Initial clinical trials for monoclonal antibodies against......The IL-13 and IL-31 cytokines and inflammatory pathways have been identified as important for atopic dermatitis (AD) pathophysiology. Monoclonal antibodies against IL-13 have been studied for the treatment of asthma since 2011. More recently, two phase two trials have been completed...

  20. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic antibody development is one of the fastest growing areas of the pharmaceutical industry. Generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies against a given therapeutic target is very crucial for the success of the drug development. However, due to immune tolerance, some proteins that are highly conserved between mice and humans are not very immunogenic in mice, making it difficult to generate antibodies using a conventional approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, the impaired immune tolerance of NZB/W mice was exploited to generate monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved or self-antigens. Using two highly conserved human antigens (MIF and HMGB1 and one mouse self-antigen (TNF-alpha as examples, we demonstrate here that multiple clones of high affinity, highly specific antibodies with desired biological activities can be generated, using the NZB/W mouse as the immunization host and a T cell-specific tag fused to a recombinant antigen to stimulate the immune system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We developed an efficient and universal method for generating surrogate or therapeutic antibodies against "difficult antigens" to facilitate the development of therapeutic antibodies.

  1. Comparison of biodistribution profile of monoclonal antibodies nanoparticles and aptamers in rats with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira-Coutinho, Cristal; Missailidis, Sotiris; Alessandra-Perini, Jéssica; Machado, Daniel Escorsim; Perini, Jamila Alessandra; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2017-05-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies and aptamers is growing every single day, as the use of nanoparticle systems. Although most of the products are under investigation, there are a few commercialized products available at the market, for human consume. In this study, we have compared three formulations (aptamer anti-MUC1, monoclonal antibody - Trastuzumab and monoclonal antibodies nanoparticles - PLA/PVA/MMT trastuzumab) to identify their profile as also to understand their behavior into an alive biological system. In this direction the radiolabeling of the products were done and they were all tested in animals (in vivo) in two conditions: healthy rats and breast cancer induced animals. The results showed that the nanoparticle has the better biodistribution profile, followed by the aptamer. We conclude that more studies and a global effort to elucidate the biological behavior of drugs and especially nano-drugs are necessary.

  2. Improved radioimaging and tumor localization with monoclonal F(ab')2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.; Parker, C.W.; Philpott, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Monoclonal anti-tumor antibodies have great promise for radioimmunodetection and localization of tumors. Fab and F(ab')2 fragments, which lack the Fc fragment of antibody (Ab), are cleared more rapidly from the circulation and may have less nonspecific tissue binding than intact Ab. In radioimaging studies using a murine monoclonal antibody to carcinoembryonic antigen in a human colon carcinoma xenografted into hamsters, F(ab')2 fragments were shown superior to Fab fragments and intact antibody for scintiscanning. In double-label experiments with anti-CEA antibody and control monoclonal IgG, F(ab')2 fragments were found to give better and more rapid specific tumor localization than intact antibody or Fab fragments. F(ab')2 fragments offer significant promise for tumor imaging and possibly therapy

  3. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Aghebati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After twelve days, approximately 7 ml ascetic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. In the present study, we describe a protocol for large scale production of MAbs. Results: We prepared monoclonal antibodies (mAbs with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD20 by hybridoma method and characterized them by ELISA. The subclass of antibody was IgG2a and its light chain was kappa. Ascetic fluid was purified by Protein-A Sepharose affinity chromatography and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC and Immunofluorescence was done for confirming the specific binding. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis B-cell lymphomas, hairy cell leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and melanoma cancer stem cells.

  4. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  5. Inhibition of HIV protease by monoclonal antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; Fábry, Milan; Hořejší, Magdalena; Štouračová, Renata; Lescar, J.; Riottot, M. M.; Sedláček, Juraj; Bentley, G. A.

    15(5), č. 15 (2002), s. 272-276 ISSN 0952-3499 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA5052502; GA ČR GV203/98/K023 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : monoclonal antibodies * HIV protease * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.838, year: 2002

  6. Strain differentiation of polioviruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; A.J.H. Stegmann; J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractPanels of monoclonal antibodies raised against different poliovirus type 1, 2 and 3 strains, were tested in a micro-neutralization test and in a micro-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay against a large number of poliovirus strains. The results were compared with those obtained with the

  7. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  8. T cells and T-cell subsets in mycosis fungoides and parapsoriasis. A study of 18 cases with anti-human T-cell monoclonal antibodies and histochemical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buechner, S A; Winkelmann, R K; Banks, P M

    1984-07-01

    Skin lesions from 15 patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) and from three with parapsoriasis were studied immunohistochemically with monoclonal antibodies against T cells (Leu 1) and against T-cell subsets (Leu 2a, Leu 3a). Lymphoid cell reactivity was diverse among these sampled cases. In two cases of parapsoriasis and nine of MF, there was a predominance of helper/inducer (Leu-3a-reactive) cells over suppressor/cytotoxic (Leu-2a-reactive) cells. In one case of parapsoriasis and one (advanced tumor stage) of MF, there was suppressor/cytotoxic cell predominance. One case of MF showed strong reactivity for both T-cell subset markers. Four cases of MF (two plaque-stage and two tumor-stage) featured a predominant cell type in the dermis which was nonreactive for all three antibodies. The intraepidermal lymphoid cellularity was Leu-1-reactive in ten cases of MF and two of parapsoriasis. Among these 12 cases, the intraepidermal cellularity was Leu-2a-reactive in four and Leu-3a-reactive in three. The use of such studies of T-cell subsets on in situ cutaneous lymphoid infiltrates may demonstrate a correlation with cytomorphology, clinical stage, and disease prognosis.

  9. [Crystalline keratopathy due to kappa chains in a monoclonal gammopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa-Gutiérrez, J C; Rouras-López, A; Amías-Lamana, V; Hoyos-Chacón, J; Cabiró-Badimón, I; Porta-Monnet, J

    2013-12-01

    The following case shows corneal crystal formation in a patient in whom thee systemic work-up led to the diagnosis of a monoclonal gammopathy with increased monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG). We present the corneal signs and subsequent haematological investigations undertaken to establish this important association. Systemic work-up of a patient with corneal deposits showed a monoclonal gammopathy with increased monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG-type kappa). Corneal crystals, a rare, but significant, clinical finding, may be the initial presentation in a patient with monoclonal gammopathy. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation of highly active monoclonal antibodies against multiresistant gram-positive bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike S Rossmann

    Full Text Available Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA. At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium, a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030 and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials.

  11. [After the TGN1412 incident. Principles for assessment of first-in-man trials with monoclonal antibodies by the Paul Ehrlich Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C K; Kalinke, U

    2007-10-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies has led to new therapeutic possibilities for many clinical conditions. However, their application also bears risks, as demonstrated by the acute occurrence of a cytokine storm following administration of TGN1412, an anti-CD28 superagonist, in March 2006. This article highlights the principles of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) for the scientific assessment of first-in-man clinical trial applications for monoclonal antibodies. These principles are implemented as a standard operating procedure in the PEI Quality Management System and are intended as a supplement specific to monoclonal antibodies to the published general guideline issued by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP). Central aspects are the identification of risk factors for monoclonal antibodies based on defined criteria, since not every novel monoclonal antibody represents a risk per se. Furthermore, a PEI expert group that supports the scientific assessment procedure has been founded.

  12. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  13. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs

  14. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zider, Alexander; Drakeman, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commer...

  15. Safety and immunotoxicity assessment of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Laura Dill; Spindeldreher, Sebastian; Kiessling, Andrea; Allenspach, Roy; Hey, Adam; Muller, Patrick Y; Frings, Werner; Sims, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Most therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) licensed for human use or in clinical development are indicated for treatment of patients with cancer and inflammatory/autoimmune disease and as such, are designed to directly interact with the immune system. A major hurdle for the development and early clinical investigation of many of these immunomodulatory mAbs is their inherent risk for adverse immune-mediated drug reactions in humans such as infusion reactions, cytokine storms, immunosuppression and autoimmunity. A thorough understanding of the immunopharmacology of a mAb in humans and animals is required to both anticipate the clinical risk of adverse immunotoxicological events and to select a safe starting dose for first-in-human (FIH) clinical studies. This review summarizes the most common adverse immunotoxicological events occurring in humans with immunomodulatory mAbs and outlines non-clinical strategies to define their immunopharmacology and assess their immunotoxic potential, as well as reduce the risk of immunotoxicity through rational mAb design. Tests to assess the relative risk of mAb candidates for cytokine release syndrome, innate immune system (dendritic cell) activation and immunogenicity in humans are also described. The importance of selecting a relevant and sensitive toxicity species for human safety assessment in which the immunopharmacology of the mAb is similar to that expected in humans is highlighted, as is the importance of understanding the limitations of the species selected for human safety assessment and supplementation of in vivo safety assessment with appropriate in vitro human assays. A tiered approach to assess effects on immune status, immune function and risk of infection and cancer, governed by the mechanism of action and structural features of the mAb, is described. Finally, the use of immunopharmacology and immunotoxicity data in determining a minimum anticipated biologic effect Level (MABEL) and in the selection of safe human

  16. Application of a monoclonal antibody to a comparative study of alpha-lactalbumins from various species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminogawa, S.; Shimoda, M.; Kurisaki, J.; Yamauchi, K.

    1989-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody to bovine alpha-lactalbumin was prepared and purified. The binding ability of alpha-lactalbumin from different species (cow, goat, giraffe, horse, pig, human, monkey, and guinea pig) was examined by a competitive radioimmunoassay. The order in strength of the binding affinity was cow goat, giraffe, horse, cynomolgus monkey and human, pig, and guinea pig. The order of evolutional divergence calculated from the amino acid composition was cow, goat, giraffe, horse, pig, guinea pig and human, and monkey. The orders in both cases were similar. Hence, it is suggested that immunological divergence as deduced by a monoclonal antibody is likely to be close to the evolutional divergence of alpha-lactalbumin

  17. Application of a monoclonal antibody to a comparative study of alpha-lactalbumins from various species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminogawa, S; Shimoda, M; Kurisaki, J; Yamauchi, K

    1989-05-01

    A monoclonal antibody to bovine alpha-lactalbumin was prepared and purified. The binding ability of alpha-lactalbumin from different species (cow, goat, giraffe, horse, pig, human, monkey, and guinea pig) was examined by a competitive radioimmunoassay. The order in strength of the binding affinity was cow goat, giraffe, horse, cynomolgus monkey and human, pig, and guinea pig. The order of evolutional divergence calculated from the amino acid composition was cow, goat, giraffe, horse, pig, guinea pig and human, and monkey. The orders in both cases were similar. Hence, it is suggested that immunological divergence as deduced by a monoclonal antibody is likely to be close to the evolutional divergence of alpha-lactalbumin.

  18. Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance and Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is characterized by the presence of a serum monoclonal (M) protein level less than 3 g/dL, less than 10% clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow, and the absence of hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, or bone lesions attributable to a clonal plasma cell disorder. Patients may be tested for a monoclonal gammopathy by serum protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, and the free light chain (FLC) assay. The prevalence of MGUS is 3% ...

  19. Development and Characterization of Canine Distemper Virus Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiu; Hao, Liying; Li, Xiangdong; Wang, Linxiao; Zhang, Jianpo; Deng, Junhua; Tian, Kegong

    2017-06-01

    Five canine distemper virus monoclonal antibodies were developed by immunizing BALB/c mice with a traditional vaccine strain Snyder Hill. Among these monoclonal antibodies, four antibodies recognized both field and vaccine strains of canine distemper virus without neutralizing ability. One monoclonal antibody, 1A4, against hemagglutinin protein of canine distemper virus was found to react only with vaccine strain virus but not field isolates, and showed neutralizing activity to vaccine strain virus. These monoclonal antibodies could be very useful tools in the study of the pathogenesis of canine distemper virus and the development of diagnostic reagents.

  20. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Robert A; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is characterized by an M spike less than 3 g/dL and a bone marrow containing fewer than 10% plasma cells without evidence of CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, or bone lesions). Light chain MGUS has an abnormal free light chain (FLC) ratio, increased level of the involved FLC, no monoclonal heavy chain, and fewer than 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Smoldering multiple myeloma has an M protein of at least 3 g/dL and/or at least 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow without CRAB features. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Cherry

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML. As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  2. [Monoclonal antibodies against PCSK9: from bench to clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro Herraiz, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins with high specificity binding to multiple antigens due to the large number of structural conformations of the variable chains. Hybridoma technology (fusion of myeloma cells with immunoglobulin-producing lymphocytes) has allowed the synthesis of large quantities of unique antibodies (monoclonal [mAb]). mAbs were initially murine. Subsequently, chimeric mAbs were developed, followed by humanized mAbs and finally human mAbs. The high selectivity and good tolerance of human mAbs allows their therapeutic administration to block specific exogenous or endogenous molecules. Selective human mAbs to the catalytic domain of PCSK9 have recently been developed. These antibodies block PCSK9, favour low-density lipoprotein receptor recycling and markedly reduce circulating cholesterol. Preliminary studies indicate that lowering cholesterol through anti-PCSK9 antibodies may significantly reduce the cardiovascular complications of arteriosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel monoclonal antibody specific to the C-terminal tail of the gap envelope transmembrane protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 that preferentially neutralizes virus after it has attached to the target cell and inhibits the production of infectious progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reading, Steven A; Heap, Caroline J; Dimmock, Nigel J.

    2003-01-01

    SAR1 is a new IgG2a murine monoclonal antibody derived by immunization with a plant virus expressing the sequence GERDRDR from the C-terminal tail of the gp41 transmembrane glycoprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). SAR1 binds to peptides and proteins carrying the GERDRDR sequence, to some but not all preparations of purified virus, and to cells infected with all viruses tested. In a standard neutralization assay, SAR1 failed to neutralize, or neutralized poorly, a number of T cell line-adapted viruses. However, it was more effective at postattachment neutralization. This was measured by two assays, the inhibition of the syncytium production by input virus, and the inhibition of the production of infectious progeny virus. In general SAR1 was more effective at neutralizing progeny virus than inoculum virus. Fifty percent inhibition of progeny virus production by different HIV-1 strains was obtained with 2-26 μg/ml of SAR1. The SAR1 neutralizing epitope was mapped specifically to the gp41 C-terminal tail. SAR1 is an unusual, if not unique, antibody whose activity supports the view that part of the gp41 C-terminal tail is exposed on the outside of the virion

  4. Laboratory testing for monoclonal gammopathies: Focus on monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willrich, Maria A V; Murray, David L; Kyle, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are defined by increased proliferation of clonal plasma cells, resulting in a detectable abnormality called monoclonal component or M-protein. Detection of the M-protein as either narrow peaks on protein electrophoresis and discrete bands on immunofixation is the defining feature of MG. MG are classified as low-tumor burden disorders, pre-malignancies and malignancies. Since significant disease can be present at any level, several different tests are employed in order to encompass the inherent diverse nature of the M-proteins. In this review, we discuss the main characteristics and limitations of clinical assays to detect M-proteins: protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, immunoglobulin quantitation, serum free light chains and heavy-light chain assays, as well as the newly developed MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric methods. In addition, the definitions of the pre-malignancies monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), as well as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) are presented in the context of the 2014 international guidelines for definition of myeloma requiring treatment, and the role of the laboratory in test selection for screening and monitoring these conditions is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of producer cell line on functional activity of anti-D monoclonal antibodies destined for prevention of rhesus sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olovnikova, N I; Ershler, M A; Belkina, E V; Nikolaeva, T L; Miterev, G Yu

    2009-04-01

    The ability of anti-D antibodies to cause antigen-specific immunosuppression depends on their interaction with low-affinity Fcgamma-receptors. Human monoclonal antibodies to D antigen of the rhesus system were investigated by antibody-dependent cytotoxicity assay in order to estimate their ability to induce hemolysis mediated by low-affinity Fcgamma receptors. We demonstrate that affinity of monoclonal antibodies to receptors of this type does not depend on primary structure of Fc-fragment, but depends on the producer cell line which expresses the antibodies. Monoclonal IgG1 antibodies interacting with FcgammaRIIa and FcgammaRIII lost this property, if they were secreted by human-mouse heterohybridoma, but not by human B-cell line. On the opposite, monoclonal antibodies that could not activate low-affinity Fcgamma receptors were highly active after human cells fusion with rat myeloma YB2/0. Hemolytic activity of IgG3 remained unchanged after fusion of human cells with rodent cells.

  6. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  7. Do monoclonal antibodies recognize linear sequential determinants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, M; Muratti, E; Trinca, M L; Chersi, A

    1988-01-01

    A group of 19 anti-class II monoclonal antibodies produced in different laboratories were tested in ELISA for their ability to bind to a panel of synthetic peptides selected from HLA-DQ alpha and beta chains. No one of the antibodies tested was found to react with the synthetic fragments, thus confirming the common finding that MoAbs generally fail to recognize fragments of the native antigen. The possibility that this result might be partly due to the procedure used for screening hybridoma supernatants is discussed.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies: Principles and applications of immmunodiagnosis and immunotherapy for hepatitis C virus

    OpenAIRE

    Tabll, Ashraf; Abbas, Aymn T; El-Kafrawy, Sherif; Wahid, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major health problem worldwide. Early detection of the infection will help better management of the infected cases. The monoclonal antibodies (mAb) of mice are predominantly used for the immunodiagnosis of several viral, bacterial, and parasitic antigens. Serological detection of HCV antigens and antibodies provide simple and rapid methods of detection but lack sensitivity specially in the window phase between the infection and antibody development. Human mAb are ...

  9. Target antigens for Hs-14 monoclonal antibody and their various expression in normozoospermic and asthenozoospermic men

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čapková, Jana; Margaryan, Hasmik; Kubátová, Alena; Novák, Petr; Pěknicová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 11 (2015) ISSN 2051-4190 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : acrosome * human sperm atozoa * monoclonal antibody * asthenozoospermia * transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry http://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12610-015-0025-0

  10. Interaction of some sterilizing filter materials with [111In]In-labelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    The retention of [ 111 In]In-labelled monoclonal antibodies by four different types of sterilizing filters was investigated. Minimal retention was observed with filters composed of polysulfone or polyvinylidene difluoride. When the radio-labelled antibody was formulated in normal saline, there was almost complete retention on filters composed of cellulose acetate/nitrate. This phenomenon could be effectively overcome by including 1% human serum albumin in the formulation vehicle. (author)

  11. A dual-monoclonal sandwich ELISA specific for hepcidin-25.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, Anthony M; Luan, Peng; Witcher, Derrick R; Manetta, Joseph; Murphy, Anthony T; Wroblewski, Victor J; Konrad, Robert J

    2010-11-01

    Hepcidin, a key regulator of iron metabolism, binds to the iron transporter ferroportin to cause its degradation. In humans, hepcidin deficiency has been linked to hemochromatosis and iron overload, whereas increased concentrations have been reported in anemia of cancer and chronic disease. There is currently an unmet clinical need for a specific immunoassay with a low limit of quantification to measure serum concentrations of hepcidin-25, the active form of the protein. We generated 2 antihepcidin-25 monoclonal antibodies and used them to build a sandwich ELISA. We correlated ELISA results to hepcidin-25 measurements by LC-MS and used ELISA to measure serum hepcidin-25 concentrations in normal individuals, cancer patients, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The sandwich ELISA was highly specific for hepcidin-25, having a limit of quantification of 0.01 μg/L (10 pg/mL). Serum concentrations of hepcidin-25 measured by ELISA correlated with hepcidin-25 concentrations measured by using an independent LC-MS assay (r = 0.98, P < 0.001). Hepcidin-25 concentrations were increased in patients with cancer (median 54.8 μg/L, 25%-75% range 23.2-93.5 μg/L, n = 34) and rheumatoid arthritis (median 10.6 μg/L, 25%-75% range 5.9-18.4 μg/L, n = 76) compared with healthy individuals (median 1.20 μg/L, 25%-75% range 0.42-3.07 μg/L, n = 100). The use of 2 monoclonal antibodies in a sandwich ELISA format provides a robust and convenient method for measuring concentrations of the active form of hepcidin. This ELISA should help to improve our understanding of the role of hepcidin in regulating iron metabolism.

  12. Anti-alpha-hemolysin monoclonal antibodies mediate protection against Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragle, Brook E; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2009-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia is one of the most common invasive diseases caused by this human pathogen. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin, a pore-forming cytotoxin, is an essential virulence factor in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. Vaccine-based targeting of this toxin provides protection against lethal staphylococcal pneumonia in a murine model system, suggesting that a monoclonal antibody-based therapy may likewise prove to be efficacious for prevention and treatment of this disease. We report the generation of two distinct anti-alpha-hemolysin monoclonal antibodies that antagonize toxin activity, preventing human lung cell injury in vitro and protecting experimental animals against lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Each of these two monoclonal antibodies recognized an epitope within the first 50 amino acid residues of the mature toxin and blocked the formation of a stable alpha-hemolysin oligomer on the target cell surface. Active immunization with the first 50 amino acids of the toxin also conferred protection against S. aureus pneumonia. Together, these data reveal passive and active immunization strategies for prevention or therapy of staphylococcal pneumonia and highlight the potential role that a critical epitope may play in defining human susceptibility to this deadly disease.

  13. Human monoclonal antibodies as a tool for the detection of HLA class I allele-specific expression loss in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma and corresponding lymph node metastases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koene, G.; Mulder, A.; Ven, K. van der; Eijsink, C.; Franke, M.; Slootweg, P.J.; Claas, F.; Tilanus, M.

    2006-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) expression is important for the elimination of tumor cells by the immune system and immunotherapy. Activated T cells directed against tumor-associated antigens are fully capable of recognizing and eradicating neoplastic cells. Therefore, HLA expression loss is

  14. Kinetics of intralymphatically delivered monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, R.L.; Geatti, O.; Liebert, M.; Beers, B.; Jackson, G.; Laino, L.; Kronberg, S.; Wilson, B.S.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (MoAb) administration subcutaneously (sq), so that preferential uptake is to the lymphatics, holds significant promise for the detection of lymph node metastases. Only limited information is available about clearance rates of intralymphatically administered MoAbs. I-131 labeled intact IgG (225.28S), F(ab's)2 (225.28S) or IgM (FT162) were administered sq to anesthetized Balb/C mice. Eight mice were studied with each MoAb, 4 with a foot-pad injection, 4 with an anterior abdominal injection. Gamma camera images were collected into a computer, over the first 6 hrs after injection with the animals anesthetized and immobile. Animals were then allowed to move about freely. Additional images were then acquired out to 48 hrs. Regions of interest wre selected over the injection site and the kinetics of antibody egress determined. Clearance rates from local sq injection sites are influenced by motion and somewhat by location. The class and fragment status of the MoAb appear relatively less important in determining clearance rates from sq injections than they are in determining whole-body clearance after iv injections. Additional studies using Fab fragments and additional monoclonals will be useful in extending these observations

  15. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigler, R.E.; Zanzonico, P.B.; Leonard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131 I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  16. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-1 contributes to resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor drugs in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Roberto; Rosa, Roberta; Damiano, Vincenzo; Daniele, Gennaro; Gelardi, Teresa; Garofalo, Sonia; Tarallo, Valeria; De Falco, Sandro; Melisi, Davide; Benelli, Roberto; Albini, Adriana; Ryan, Anderson; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2008-08-15

    The resistance to selective EGFR inhibitors involves the activation of alternative signaling pathways, and Akt activation and VEGF induction have been described in EGFR inhibitor-resistant tumors. Combined inhibition of EGFR and other signaling proteins has become a successful therapeutic approach, stimulating the search for further determinants of resistance as basis for novel therapeutic strategies. We established human cancer cell lines with various degrees of EGFR expression and sensitivity to EGFR inhibitors and analyzed signal transducers under the control of EGFR-dependent and EGFR-independent pathways. Multitargeted inhibitor vandetanib (ZD6474) inhibited the growth and the phosphorylation of Akt and its effector p70S6 kinase in both wild-type and EGFR inhibitor-resistant human colon, prostate, and breast cancer cells. We found that the resistant cell lines exhibit, as common feature, VEGFR-1/Flt-1 overexpression, increased secretion of VEGF and placental growth factor, and augmented migration capabilities and that vandetanib is able to antagonize them. Accordingly, a new kinase assay revealed that in addition to VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2, RET, and EGFR, vandetanib efficiently inhibits also VEGFR-1. The contribution of VEGFR-1 to the resistant phenotype was further supported by the demonstration that VEGFR-1 silencing in resistant cells restored sensitivity to anti-EGFR drugs and impaired migration capabilities, whereas exogenous VEGFR-1 overexpression in wild-type cells conferred resistance to these agents. This study shows that VEGFR-1 contributes to anti-EGFR drug resistance in different human cancer cells. Moreover, vandetanib inhibits VEGFR-1 activation, cell proliferation, and migration, suggesting its potential utility in patients resistant to EGFR inhibitors.

  17. Recent Progress towards Engineering HIV-1-specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Sun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The recent discoveries of broadly potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (bNAbs represent a new generation of antiretrovirals for the treatment and prophylaxis. Antibodies are generally considered more effective and safer, and have been proved to provide passive protection against mucosal challenge in humanized mice and macaques. Several neutralizing Abs could protect animals against HIV-1 but are not effective when used in an established infected model for therapy. In order to overcome the limitation of antiviral activities, multiple antibody engineering technologies have been explored to generate the better neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 since bNAbs attack viral entry by various mechanisms. Thus, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit rational antibody combination or engineered antibodies (eAbs as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. It has been reported that inclusion of fusion-neutralizing antibodies in a set of bNAbs could improve their overall activities and neutralizing spectrum. Here we review several routes for engineering bNAbs, such as design and generation of bispecific antibodies, specific glycosylation of antibodies to enhance antiviral activity, and variable region specific modification guided by structure and computer, as well as reviewing antibody-delivery technologies by non-viral vector, viral vector and human HSPCs transduced with a lentiviral construct. We also discuss the optimized antiviral activities and benefits of these strategy and potential mechanisms.

  18. Monoclonal antibody to the type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) receptor blocks IGF-I receptor-mediated DNA synthesis: clarification of the mitogenic mechanisms of IGF-I and insulin in human skin fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flier, J.S.; Usher, P.; Moses, A.C.

    1986-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor type I (IGF-I) stimulate an overlapping spectrum of biological responses in human skin fibroblasts. Although insulin and IGF-I are known to stimulate the incorporation of [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA in these cells, the identify of the receptor(s) that mediates this effect has not been fully clarified. The mouse anti-human IGF-I receptor antibody αIR-3 binds with specificity to IGF-I but not to insulin receptors in human placental membranes; it also specifically inhibits the binding of 125 I-labeled IGF-I but not 125 I-labeled insulin to suspensions of human skin fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner. αIR-3 competitively inhibits IGF-I-mediated stimulation of [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. This inhibition is dependent on the concentration of αIR-3 and in the presence of a fixed antibody concentration can be partially overcome by high concentrations of IGF-I. In contrast, at concentrations of 3 H]thymidine incorporation is not inhibited by αIR-3. However, the incremental effects of higher concentrations (> 1 μg/ml) of insulin on [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation are inhibited by αIR-3. αIR-3 is a highly specific antagonist of IGF-I receptor-mediated mitogenesis in human skin fibroblasts. By using this antibody, it is shown directly that insulin can act through the IGF-I receptor to stimulate DNA synthesis but can also activate this effect through the insulin receptor itself

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies That Bind to the Ly6 Domain of GPIHBP1 Abolish the Binding of LPL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xuchen; Sleeman, Mark W; Miyashita, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    GPIHBP1, an endothelial cell protein, binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the interstitial spaces and shuttles it to its site of action inside blood vessels. For years, studies of human GPIHBP1 have been hampered by an absence of useful antibodies. We reasoned that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) agai...

  20. Monoclonal antibody-assisted structure-function analysis of the carbohydrate recognition domain of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Rynkiewicz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in host defense against a variety of pathogens including influenza A virus (IAV). Ligand binding by SP-D is mediated by the trimeric neck and carbohydrate recognition domain (NCRD). We used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human SP-D and a panel...

  1. Specificity and affinity of 26 monoclonal antibodies against the CA 125 antigen : First report from the ISOBM TD-1 workshop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nustad, K; Bast, RC; OBrien, TJ; Nilsson, O; Seguin, P; Suresh, MR; Saga, T; Nozawa, S; Bormer, OP; deBruijn, HWA; Vitali, A; Gadnell, M; Clark, J; Shigemasa, K; Karlsson, B; Kreutz, FT; Jette, D; Sakahara, H; Endo, K; Paus, E; Warren, D; Hammarstrom, S; Kenemans, P; Hilgers, J

    1996-01-01

    The specificity of 26 monoclonal antibodies against the CA 125 antigen was investigated in two phases of the ISOBM TD-1 workshop. The binding specificity was studied using CA 125 immunoextracted by specific antibodies immobilized on various solid phases, or on the surface of human cell lines.

  2. Biotechnology and genetic engineering in the new drug development. Part II. Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryjewska, Agnieszka; Kiepura, Katarzyna; Librowski, Tadeusz; Lochyński, Stanisław

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies, modern vaccines and gene therapy have become a major field in modern biotechnology, especially in the area of human health and fascinating developments achieved in the past decades are impressive examples of an interdisciplinary interplay between medicine, biology and engineering. Among the classical products from cells one can find viral vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, and interferons, as well as recombinant therapeutic proteins. Gene therapy opens up challenging new areas. In this review, a definitions of these processes are given and fields of application and products, as well as the future prospects, are discussed.

  3. Monoclonal carcinoembryonic antigen radioimmunoassay in prostatic cancer: Validation of the method and comparison to some other tumor-associated markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, V.; Ignjatovic, M.; Milosavljevic, B.; Dinic, A.; Nis Univ.

    1987-01-01

    The use of a monoclonal CEA RIA and of some other biological markers for a diagnosis of prostatic cancer was investigated. The increased level of serum CEA was found in both prostatic cancer and in non-malignant disease. The low sensitivity of the CEA monoclonal assay precludes its use for a clinical diagnosis of prostatic cancer. The simultaneous use of some other biological markers (PAP, TPA, β2-microglobulin and ferritin) did increase sensitivity. However, further studies should be directed to a much more specific and sensitive marker of the human prostatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.) [de

  4. Long-term efficacy and downstream mechanism of anti-annexinA2 monoclonal antibody (anti-ANX A2 mAb) in a pre-clinical model of aggressive human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mahesh C; Tuszynski, George P; Blackman, Marc R; Sharma, Meena

    2016-04-01

    There is considerable direct evidence that calcium binding protein ANX A2 is a potential target for treating aggressive breast cancer. The most compelling data are based on the finding of ANX A2 overexpression in aggressive triple negative human breast cancer (TNBC) cell lines and in human breast cancer tissues. Previously, we and others reported a unique role of ANX A2 in cancer invasion, including breast cancer. Moreover, we demonstrated that anti-ANX A2 mAb-mediated immunoneutralization of ANX A2 inhibited invasive human breast cancer growth in a xenograft model. We further evaluated the long-term effects of multiple treatments with anti-ANX A2 mAb and its mechanism of inhibition on human breast tumor growth. We now demonstrate that three treatments with anti-ANX A2 mAb led to significant inhibition of breast tumor growth in immunodeficient mice, and that the anti-tumor response was demonstrable from day 94. After treatment, we followed tumor growth for 172 days and demonstrated 67% inhibition of tumor growth without detectable adverse effects. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that anti-ANX A2 mAb treatment caused significant inhibition of conversion of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in the tumor microenvironment. This led to disruption of plasmin generation that consequently inhibited activation of MMP-9 and MMP-2. These results suggest that ANX A2 plays an important role in aggressive breast tumor growth by regulating proteolytic pathways in the tumor microenvironment. ANX A2 may represent a new target for the development of therapeutics for treatment of aggressive breast cancer. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: focus on panitumumab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tay, Rebecca Y; Wong, Rachel; Hawkes, Eliza A

    2015-01-01

    Targeted agents are an important therapeutic option in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Panitumumab is a recombinant, fully humanized, immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody that targets the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with efficacy in mCRC as monotherapy and in combination with chemotherapy. Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS) mutation status has emerged as an important biomarker to predict response to anti-EGFR therapy. Optimal timing for panitumumab use in the mCRC treatment algorithm has not been established. This review discusses the mechanism of action, predictive biomarkers, and role of panitumumab in the treatment of mCRC

  6. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  7. A new monoclonal antibody (5D3-F7) which recognizes human monocyte-chemotactic protein-1 but not related chemokines. Development of a sandwich ELISA and in situ detection of producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, G; Milanese, C; Matteucci, C; Ruco, L; Zhou, D; Sozzani, S; Coletta, I; Mantovani, A

    1994-09-14

    Chemokines are a superfamily of structurally related cytokines involved in leukocyte recruitment in normal and neoplastic tissues. The availability of non-cross-reacting reagents specific for each member of the C-C and C-X-C family is important for careful characterization of their in vitro and in vivo production and relevance. Here we describe a novel, highly specific, mAb against monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1). The 5D3-F7 mAb (IgG1,kappa) recognizes human recombinant and natural MCP-1 in ELISA, immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis. As a source of natural MCP-1 we used the 8387 human sarcoma line which produces spontaneously MCP-1 and responds to TNF with increased expression and release. The 5D3-F7 mAb inhibited the chemotactic activity of MCP-1 for monocytes. Using the 5D3-F7 mAb and a polyclonal rabbit anti-MCP-1 serum, a sandwich ELISA was developed. In both the direct and the sandwich ELISA, the 5D3-F7 mAb recognized human MCP-1, but not the closely related C-C chemokines MCP-1, MCP-2, MCP-3, MIP-1 alpha, and RANTES and the C-X-C chemokines IL-8, gro alpha and NAP-2. In culture supernatants the sensitivity of the sandwich ELISA was approximately equal to 30 pg/ml. The sandwich ELISA permitted detection of MCP-1 in resting or cytokine-stimulated endothelial, mesothelial and Kaposi's sarcoma cells. Preliminary immunohistochemical analysis revealed production of MCP-1 by macrophage-like cells at sites of inflammation. The 5D3-F7 mAb provides a novel, highly specific reagent with which to investigate the in vitro and in vivo production and role of MCP-1.

  8. Identification of novel proteins in Neospora caninum using an organelle purification and monoclonal antibody approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine S Sohn

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Neospora caninum is an important veterinary pathogen that causes abortion in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs. Neospora has also generated substantial interest because it is an extremely close relative of the human pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, yet does not appear to infect humans. While for Toxoplasma there are a wide array of molecular tools and reagents available for experimental investigation, relatively few reagents exist for Neospora. To investigate the unique biological features of this parasite and exploit the recent sequencing of its genome, we have used an organelle isolation and monoclonal antibody approach to identify novel organellar proteins and develop a wide array of probes for subcellular localization. We raised a panel of forty-six monoclonal antibodies that detect proteins from the rhoptries, micronemes, dense granules, inner membrane complex, apicoplast, mitochondrion and parasite surface. A subset of the proteins was identified by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry and reveal that we have identified and localized many of the key proteins involved in invasion and host interaction in Neospora. In addition, we identified novel secretory proteins not previously studied in any apicomplexan parasite. Thus, this organellar monoclonal antibody approach not only greatly enhances the tools available for Neospora cell biology, but also identifies novel components of the unique biological characteristics of this important veterinary pathogen.

  9. Identification of Novel Proteins in Neospora caninum Using an Organelle Purification and Monoclonal Antibody Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Catherine S.; Cheng, Tim T.; Drummond, Michael L.; Peng, Eric D.; Vermont, Sarah J.; Xia, Dong; Cheng, Stephen J.; Wastling, Jonathan M.; Bradley, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Neospora caninum is an important veterinary pathogen that causes abortion in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs. Neospora has also generated substantial interest because it is an extremely close relative of the human pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, yet does not appear to infect humans. While for Toxoplasma there are a wide array of molecular tools and reagents available for experimental investigation, relatively few reagents exist for Neospora. To investigate the unique biological features of this parasite and exploit the recent sequencing of its genome, we have used an organelle isolation and monoclonal antibody approach to identify novel organellar proteins and develop a wide array of probes for subcellular localization. We raised a panel of forty-six monoclonal antibodies that detect proteins from the rhoptries, micronemes, dense granules, inner membrane complex, apicoplast, mitochondrion and parasite surface. A subset of the proteins was identified by immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry and reveal that we have identified and localized many of the key proteins involved in invasion and host interaction in Neospora. In addition, we identified novel secretory proteins not previously studied in any apicomplexan parasite. Thus, this organellar monoclonal antibody approach not only greatly enhances the tools available for Neospora cell biology, but also identifies novel components of the unique biological characteristics of this important veterinary pathogen. PMID:21483743

  10. Microglial internalization and degradation of pathological tau is enhanced by an anti-tau monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wenjie; Liu, Wencheng; Hu, Xiaoyan; Hanna, Mary; Caravaca, April; Paul, Steven M

    2015-06-09

    Microglia have been shown to contribute to the clearance of brain amyloid β peptides (Aβ), the major component of amyloid plaques, in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is not known whether microglia play a similar role in the clearance of tau, the major component of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). We now report that murine microglia rapidly internalize and degrade hyperphosphorylated pathological tau isolated from AD brain tissue in a time-dependent manner in vitro. We further demonstrate that microglia readily degrade human tau species released from AD brain sections and eliminate NFTs from brain sections of P301S tauopathy mice. The anti-tau monoclonal antibody MC1 enhances microglia-mediated tau degradation in an Fc-dependent manner. Our data identify a potential role for microglia in the degradation and clearance of pathological tau species in brain and provide a mechanism explaining the potential therapeutic actions of passively administered anti-tau monoclonal antibodies.

  11. Discrimination between Fibrin and Fibrinogen by a Monoclonal Antibody against a Synthetic Peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheefers-Borchel, Ursula; Muller-Berghaus, Gert; Fuhge, Peter; Eberle, Reinhard; Heimburger, Nobert

    1985-10-01

    Circulating soluble fibrin, observed in the blood of patients with ongoing intravascular coagulation, is generated from the plasma protein fibrinogen by the limited proteolytic action of thrombin. We report the production of a monoclonal antibody that discriminates between fibrin and fibrinogen in blood. The synthetic hexapeptide Gly-Pro-Arg-Val-Val-Glu, representing the amino terminus of the α chain of human fibrin, was used as immunogen. This hexapeptide is located within the Aα chain of fibrinogen but becomes the amino terminus of the fibrin α chain, after fibrinopeptide A is removed by the action of thrombin, and thus becomes accessible for antibody binding. The monoclonal antibody we have prepared can discriminate between fibrin and fibrinogen and thus can be used in assay systems to quantitate soluble fibrin or, potentially, to image fibrin-rich thrombi.

  12. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of fusariosis with monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbæk, B.; Jungersen, Gregers

    Objectives: Fusariosis is an emerging fungal infection, especially in neutropenic patients. Proper identification of Fusarium spp. is important because the choice of antifungal treatment of fusariosis differs from that of aspergillosis, candidosis or scedosporidiosis (pseudalleceriosis). Cultural...... isolation attempts from fusarium lesions often fail, and because the tissue forms of Fusarium spp. are histologically indistinguishable from fungal elements of aspergillosis, true hyphae containing candidosis and scedosporidiosis (pseudalleceriosis), alternative diagnostic techniques are often necessary...... for establishing an accurate diagnosis. Although molecular techniques (e.g. in situ hybridization and PCR) have been explored for diagnostic use, the development of specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) for immunohistochemical identification of Fusarium spp. will extend the availability of diagnostic options...

  13. Antibacterial monoclonal antibodies: the next generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Sellman, Bret R

    2015-10-01

    There is a clear need for renewed efforts to combat the increasing incidence of antibiotic resistance. While the antibiotic resistance epidemic is due in part to the misuse of antibiotics, even proper empiric antibiotic therapy increases the selective pressure and potential for drug-resistance and spread of resistance mechanisms between bacteria. Antibiotic resistance coupled with the detrimental effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics on the healthy microbiome, have led the field to explore pathogen specific antibacterials such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Medical need along with advances in mAb discovery, engineering, and production have driven significant effort developing mAb-based antibacterials. If successful, they will provide physicians with precision weapons to combat bacterial infections and can help prevent a return to a pre-antibiotic era. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01