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Sample records for anti-cd25 immunotherapy elicits

  1. RA8, A human anti-CD25 antibody against human treg cells

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    Arias, Robyn; Flanagan, Meg; Miller, Keith D.; Nien, Yu-Chih; Hu, Peisheng; Gray, Dixon; Khawli, Leslie A.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2007-06-01

    Although anti-CD25 antibodies exist for clinical use in patients, there is a need for the development of a human Treg antibody that will abrogate the immunosuppressive function of this small but critical T cell subtype. Based upon mounting evidence that the level of Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with clinical prognosis and stage in man, it appears that Treg cells play an important role in the tumor's ability to overcome host immune responses. In mice, the rat anti-mouse CD25 antibody PC61 causes depletion of CD25-bearing Treg cells both peripherally in lymphatic tissues and in the tumor microenvironment, without inducing symptoms of autoimmunity. A similar antibody, though with the ability to delete Treg cells specifically, would be an important new tool for reversing tumor escape associated with Treg immunosuppression in man. To begin to generate such a reagent, we now describe the development of a human anti-CD25 antibody using a novel yeast display library. The target antigen CD25-Fc was constructed and used for five rounds of selection using a non-immune yeast display library that contained as many as 109 single chain variable fragments (scFv). Two unique clones with low KD values (RA4 and RA8) were then selected to construct fully human anti-CD25 antibodies (IgG1/kappa) for stable expression. One antibody, RA8, showed excellent binding to human CD25+ cell lines and to human Treg cells and appears to be an excellent candidate for the generation of a human reagent that may be used in man for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  2. Anti-CD25 treatment depletes Treg cells and decreases disease severity in susceptible and resistant mice infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Felonato

    Full Text Available Regulatory T (Treg cells are fundamental in the control of immunity and excessive tissue pathology. In paracoccidioidomycosis, an endemic mycosis of Latin America, the immunoregulatory mechanisms that control the progressive and regressive forms of this infection are poorly known. Due to its modulatory activity on Treg cells, we investigated the effects of anti-CD25 treatment over the course of pulmonary infection in resistant (A/J and susceptible (B10.A mice infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. We verified that the resistant A/J mice developed higher numbers and more potent Treg cells than susceptible B10.A mice. Compared to B10.A cells, the CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ Treg cells of A/J mice expressed higher levels of CD25, CTLA4, GITR, Foxp3, LAP and intracellular IL-10 and TGF-β. In both resistant and susceptible mice, anti-CD25 treatment decreased the CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ Treg cell number, impaired indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and resulted in decreased fungal loads in the lungs, liver and spleen. In A/J mice, anti-CD25 treatment led to an early increase in T cell immunity, demonstrated by the augmented influx of activated CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells to the lungs. At a later phase, the mild infection was associated with decreased inflammatory reactions and increased Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine production. In B10.A mice, anti-CD25 treatment did not alter the inflammatory reactions but increased the fungicidal mechanisms and late secretion of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines. Importantly, in both mouse strains, the early depletion of CD25(+ cells resulted in less severe tissue pathology and abolished the enhanced mortality observed in susceptible mice. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate that anti-CD25 treatment is beneficial to the progressive and regressive forms of paracoccidioidomycosis, potentially due to the anti-CD25-mediated reduction of Treg cells, as these cells have suppressive effects on the

  3. Immunotherapy

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    ... that will trigger an immune response. What's more, cancer cells may also suppress immunity, which may contribute to the immune system's failure to recognize cancer cells as foreign invaders. Immunotherapy is based on ...

  4. 90Y-daclizumab, an anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody, provided responses in 50% of patients with relapsed Hodgkin's lymphoma.

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    Janik, John E; Morris, John C; O'Mahony, Deirdre; Pittaluga, Stefania; Jaffe, Elaine S; Redon, Christophe E; Bonner, William M; Brechbiel, Martin W; Paik, Chang H; Whatley, Millie; Chen, Clara; Lee, Jae-Ho; Fleisher, Thomas A; Brown, Maggie; White, Jeffrey D; Stewart, Donn M; Fioravanti, Suzanne; Lee, Cathryn C; Goldman, Carolyn K; Bryant, Bonita R; Junghans, Richard P; Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Worthy, Tat'Yana; Corcoran, Erin; Conlon, Kevin C; Waldmann, Thomas A

    2015-10-20

    Despite significant advances in the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), a significant proportion of patients will not respond or will subsequently relapse. We identified CD25, the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit, as a favorable target for systemic radioimmunotherapy of HL. The scientific basis for the clinical trial was that, although most normal cells with exception of Treg cells do not express CD25, it is expressed by a minority of Reed-Sternberg cells and by most polyclonal T cells rosetting around Reed-Sternberg cells. Forty-six patients with refractory and relapsed HL were evaluated with up to seven i.v. infusions of the radiolabeled anti-CD25 antibody (90)Y-daclizumab. (90)Y provides strong β emissions that kill tumor cells at a distance by a crossfire effect. In 46 evaluable HL patients treated with (90)Y-daclizumab there were 14 complete responses and nine partial responses; 14 patients had stable disease, and nine progressed. Responses were observed both in patients whose Reed-Sternberg cells expressed CD25 and in those whose neoplastic cells were CD25(-) provided that associated rosetting T cells expressed CD25. As assessed using phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) as a bioindicator of the effects of radiation exposure, predominantly nonmalignant cells in the tumor microenvironment manifested DNA damage, as reflected by increased expression of γ-H2AX. Toxicities were transient bone-marrow suppression and myelodysplastic syndrome in six patients who had not been evaluated with bone-marrow karyotype analyses before therapy. In conclusion, repeated (90)Y-daclizumab infusions directed predominantly toward nonmalignant T cells rosetting around Reed-Sternberg cells provided meaningful therapy for select HL patients.

  5. Oncolytic Immunotherapy: Dying the Right Way is a Key to Eliciting Potent Antitumor Immunity

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    Zong Sheng eGuo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OVs are novel immunotherapeutic agents whose anticancer effects come from both oncolysis and elicited antitumor immunity. OVs induce mostly immunogenic cancer cell death (ICD, including immunogenic apoptosis, necrosis/necroptosis, pyroptosis and autophagic cell death, leading to exposure of calreticulin and heat-shock proteins to the cell surface, and/or released ATP, high mobility group box-1 [HMGB1], uric acid, and other DAMPs as well as PAMPs as danger signals, along with tumor-associated antigens, to activate dendritic cells (DCs and elicit adaptive antitumor immunity. Dying the right way may greatly potentiate adaptive antitumor immunity. The mode of cancer cell death may be modulated by individual OVs and cancer cells as they often encode and express genes that inhibit/promote apoptosis, necroptosis or autophagic cell death. We can genetically engineer OVs with death-pathway-modulating genes and thus skew the infected cancer cells towards certain death pathways for the enhanced immunogenicity. Strategies combining with some standard therapeutic regimens may also change the immunological consequence of cancer cell death. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of danger signals, modes of cancer cell death induced by OVs, the induced danger signals and functions in eliciting subsequent antitumor immunity. We also discuss potential combination strategies to target cells into specific modes of ICD and enhance cancer immunogenicity, including blockade of immune checkpoints, in order to break immune tolerance, improve antitumor immunity and thus the overall therapeutic efficacy.

  6. Cancer Immunotherapy

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    Immunotherapy is a cancer treatment that helps your immune system fight cancer. It is a type of biological therapy. Biological therapy uses substances ... t yet use immunotherapy as often as other cancer treatments, such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. ...

  7. What Is Cancer Immunotherapy?

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    ... and Side Effects Treatment Types Immunotherapy What is cancer immunotherapy? Immunotherapy is treatment that uses certain parts of ... so that it will destroy them. Types of cancer immunotherapy The main types of immunotherapy now being used ...

  8. Cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairns, Linda; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Anichini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This report covers the Immunotherapy sessions of the 2016 Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) Oncology Days meeting, which was held on 15th-17th June 2016 in Brussels, Belgium. Immunotherapy is a potential cancer treatment that uses an individual's immune system to fight the tumour....... In recent years significant advances have been made in this field in the treatment of several advanced cancers. Cancer immunotherapies include monoclonal antibodies that are designed to attack a very specific part of the cancer cell and immune checkpoint inhibitors which are molecules that stimulate...... or block the inhibition of the immune system. Other cancer immunotherapies include vaccines and T cell infusions. This report will summarise some of the research that is going on in this field and will give us an update on where we are at present....

  9. Cancer testis antigen and immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnadas DK

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Deepa Kolaseri Krishnadas, Fanqi Bai, Kenneth G Lucas Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Louisville, KY, USA Abstract: The identification of cancer testis (CT antigens has been an important advance in determining potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Multiple previous studies have shown that CT antigen vaccines, using both peptides and dendritic cell vaccines, can elicit clinical and immunologic responses in several different tumors. This review details the expression of melanoma antigen family A, 1 (MAGE-A1, melanoma antigen family A, 3 (MAGE-A3, and New York esophageal squamous cell carcinoma-1 (NY-ESO-1 in various malignancies, and presents our current understanding of CT antigen based immunotherapy. Keywords: cancer testis antigens, immunotherapy, vaccine

  10. Sarcoma Immunotherapy

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    Gouw, Launce G., E-mail: launce.gouw@hsc.utah.edu [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Jones, Kevin B. [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Sharma, Sunil [Departments of Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Randall, R. Lor [Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery, Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, 2000 Circle of Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2011-11-10

    Much of our knowledge regarding cancer immunotherapy has been derived from sarcoma models. However, translation of preclinical findings to bedside success has been limited in this disease, though several intriguing clinical studies hint at the potential efficacy of this treatment modality. The rarity and heterogeneity of tumors of mesenchymal origin continues to be a challenge from a therapeutic standpoint. Nonetheless, sarcomas remain attractive targets for immunotherapy, as they can be characterized by specific epitopes, either from their mesenchymal origins or specific alterations in gene products. To date, standard vaccine trials have proven disappointing, likely due to mechanisms by which tumors equilibrate with and ultimately escape immune surveillance. More sophisticated approaches will likely require multimodal techniques, both by enhancing immunity, but also geared towards overcoming innate mechanisms of immunosuppression that favor tumorigenesis.

  11. Melanoma immunotherapy.

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    Sivendran, Shanthi; Glodny, Bradley; Pan, Michael; Merad, Miriam; Saenger, Yvonne

    2010-01-01

    Melanoma immunotherapy has been an area of intense research for decades, and this work is now yielding more tangible results for patients. Work has focused on 4 main areas: cytokine therapy, administration of immune-modulating antibodies, adoptive T-cell therapy, and vaccines. Cytokine therapy is an established treatment for advanced melanoma, and immune-modulating antibodies have recently emerged as an exciting new area of drug development with efficacy now established in a phase III trial. Adoptive T-cell therapy provides the proof of principle that T cells can attack and eliminate tumors. It has been challenging, however, to adapt this treatment for widespread use. Vaccines have generally yielded poor results, but intratumor pathogen-based strategies have shown encouraging results in recent trials, perhaps due to stronger immune stimulation. A review of the field of melanoma immunotherapy is provided here, with emphasis on those agents that have reached clinical testing. Novel strategies to induce the immune system to attack melanomas are reviewed. In the future, it is envisioned that immunotherapy will have further application in combination with cytotoxic and targeted therapies.

  12. Heat shock proteins and immunotherapy

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    XinZHAO; XueMeiXU; GuoxingSONG

    2005-01-01

    Being one of the most abundant intracellular proteins,heat shock proteins(HSPs) have many housekeeping functions which are crucial for the survival of organisms.In addition,some HSPs are new immunoactive molecules which play important roles in both adaptive and innate immunity.They could activate CD8+ and CD4+ lymphocytes,induce innate immune response including natural killer(NK) cell activation and cytokine secretion,and induce maturation of dendritic cells(DCs).These characteristics have been used for immunotherapy of various types of cancers and infectious disenses.This review focuses on the main HSP families——HSP70 and 90 families.The mechanism of HSPs’ function in eliciting immune response are elucidated and various forms of HSPs used in immunotherapy are discussed in details.At the end of this review,authors summarize clinical trials related to HSPs and evaluate their clinical efficacy.

  13. Advances in the understanding of cancer immunotherapy.

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    Shore, Neal D

    2015-09-01

    The principal role of the immune system is to prevent and eradicate pathogens and infections. The key characteristics or features of an effective immune response include specificity, trafficking, antigen spread and durability (memory). The immune system is recognised to have a critical role in controlling cancer through a dynamic relationship with tumour cells. Normally, at the early stages of tumour development, the immune system is capable of eliminating tumour cells or keeping tumour growth abated; however, tumour cells may evolve multiple pathways over time to evade immune control. Immunotherapy may be viewed as a treatment designed to boost or restore the ability of the immune system to fight cancer, infections and other diseases. Immunotherapy manifests differently from traditional cancer treatments, eliciting delayed response kinetics and thus may be more effective in patients with lower tumour burden, in whom disease progression may be less rapid, thereby allowing ample time for the immunotherapy to evolve. Because immunotherapies may have a different mechanism of action from traditional cytotoxic or targeted biological agents, immunotherapy techniques have the potential to combine synergistically with traditional therapies.

  14. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

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    Steven, Antonius; Fisher, Scott A; Robinson, Bruce W

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of lung cancer remains a challenge, and lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Immunotherapy has previously failed in lung cancer but has recently emerged as a very effective new therapy, and there is now growing worldwide enthusiasm in cancer immunotherapy. We summarize why immune checkpoint blockade therapies have generated efficacious and durable responses in clinical trials and why this has reignited interest in this field. Cancer vaccines have also been explored in the past with marginal success. Identification of optimal candidate neoantigens may improve cancer vaccine efficacy and may pave the way to personalized immunotherapy, alone or in combination with other immunotherapy such as immune checkpoint blockade. Understanding the steps in immune recognition and eradication of cancer cells is vital to understanding why previous immunotherapies failed and how current therapies can be used optimally. We hold an optimistic view for the future prospect in lung cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

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    JuhuaZhou; YinZhong

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Although tumorectomy, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone replacement therapy have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, there is no effective therapy for patients with invasive and metastatic breast cancer. Immunotherapy may be proved effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer. Breast cancer immunotherapy includes antibody based immunotherapy, cancer vaccine immunotherapy, adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy and T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Antibody based immunotherapy such as the monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu (trastuzumab) is successfully used in the treatment of breast cancer patients with over-expressed HER-2/neu, however, HER-2/neu is over-expressed only in 25-30% of breast cancer patients. Cancer vaccine immunotherapy is a promising method to treat cancer patients. Cancer vaccines can be used to induce specific anti-tumor immunity in breast cancer patients, but cannot induce objective tumor regression. Adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy is an effective method in the treatment of melanoma patients. Recent advances in anti-tumor T cell generation ex vivo and limited clinical trial data have made the feasibility of adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer patients. T cell receptor gene transfer can redirect the specificity of T cells. Chimeric receptor, scFv(anti-HER-2/neu)/zeta receptor, was successfully used to redirect cytotoxic T lymphocyte hybridoma cells to obtain anti-HER-2/neu positive tumor cells, suggesting the feasibility of treatment of breast cancer patients with T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Clinical trials will approve that immunotherapy is an effective method to cure breast cancer disease in the near future. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  16. Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juhua Zhou; Yin Zhong

    2004-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. Although tumorectomy,radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hormone replacement therapy have been used for the treatment of breast cancer, there is no effective therapy for patients with invasive and metastatic breast cancer. Immunotherapy may be proved effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer. Breast cancer immunotherapy includes antibody based immunotherapy, cancer vaccine immunotherapy, adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy and T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Antibody based immunotherapy such as the monoclonal antibody against HER-2/neu (trastuzumab) is successfully used in the treatment of breast cancer patients with over-expressed HER-2/neu, however, HER-2/neu is over-expressed only in 25-30% of breast cancer patients. Cancer vaccine immunotherapy is a promising method to treat cancer patients. Cancer vaccines can be used to induce specific anti-tumor immunity in breast cancer patients, but cannot induce objective tumor regression. Adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy is an effective method in the treatment of melanoma patients. Recent advances in anti-tumor T cell generation ex vivo and limited clinical trial data have made the feasibility of adoptive T cell transfer immunotherapy in the treatment of breast cancer patients. T cell receptor gene transfer can redirect the specificity of T cells. Chimeric receptor, scFv(anti-HER-2/neu)/zeta receptor, was successfully used to redirect cytotoxic T lymphocyte hybridoma cells to obtain anti-HER-2/neu positive tumor cells, suggesting the feasibility of treatment of breast cancer patients with T cell receptor gene transfer immunotherapy. Clinical trials will approve that immunotherapy is an effective method to cure breast cancer disease in the near future.

  17. Effective immunotherapy of weakly immunogenic solid tumours using a combined immunogene therapy and regulatory T-cell inactivation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whelan, M C

    2012-01-31

    Obstacles to effective immunotherapeutic anti-cancer approaches include poor immunogenicity of the tumour cells and the presence of tolerogenic mechanisms in the tumour microenvironment. We report an effective immune-based treatment of weakly immunogenic, growing solid tumours using a locally delivered immunogene therapy to promote development of immune effector responses in the tumour microenvironment and a systemic based T regulatory cell (Treg) inactivation strategy to potentiate these responses by elimination of tolerogenic or immune suppressor influences. As the JBS fibrosarcoma is weakly immunogenic and accumulates Treg in its microenvironment with progressive growth, we used this tumour model to test our combined immunotherapies. Plasmids encoding GM-CSF and B7-1 were electrically delivered into 100 mm(3) tumours; Treg inactivation was accomplished by systemic administration of anti-CD25 antibody (Ab). Using this approach, we found that complete elimination of tumours was achieved at a level of 60% by immunogene therapy, 25% for Treg inactivation and 90% for combined therapies. Moreover, we found that these responses were immune transferable, systemic, tumour specific and durable. Combined gene-based immune effector therapy and Treg inactivation represents an effective treatment for weakly antigenic solid growing tumours and that could be considered for clinical development.

  18. Cancer immunotherapy targeting neoantigens.

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    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    Neoantigens are antigens encoded by tumor-specific mutated genes. Studies in the past few years have suggested a key role for neoantigens in cancer immunotherapy. Here we review the discoveries of neoantigens in the past two decades and the current advances in neoantigen identification. We also discuss the potential benefits and obstacles to the development of effective cancer immunotherapies targeting neoantigens.

  19. Allergen Specific Immunotherapy

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    Şükrü Çekiç

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT is the only treatment that can provide a cure for allergic disorders. This treatment is based on development of immune tolerance by exposure to allergen in repetitive and increasing doses. It is tertiary to avoidance of allergen and pharmacotherapy. Allergens used for immunotherapy, must be confirmed by skin prick test or specific IgE and must be applied in supervision of allergy specialists. Studies show that immunotherapy, improve asthma symptoms, decreases drug consumption, prevent development of asthma in rhinitis patients and reduce new sensitizations. Common side effects diminished with the usage of standardized allergen solutions. It is contraindicated in severe asthma. Though it is recommended to avoid immunotherapy in patients using beta blockers and ACE inhibitors, immunotherapy can be considered in mandatory situations regarding possible benefits and harms. Most common ways of administration are subcutaneous and sublingual; new methods such as epicutaneous and intralymphatic injections are currently being studied.

  20. Dendritic cell-based nanovaccines for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulis, L.E.M.; Mandal, S.; Kreutz, M.; Figdor, C.G.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy critically relies on the efficient presentation of tumor antigens to T-cells to elicit a potent anti-tumor immune response aimed at life-long protection against cancer recurrence. Recent advances in the nanovaccine field have now resulted in formulations that trigger strong anti

  1. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy.

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    McNamara, Megan A; Nair, Smita K; Holl, Eda K

    2015-01-01

    RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s) of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  2. RNA-Based Vaccines in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan A. McNamara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA vaccines traditionally consist of messenger RNA synthesized by in vitro transcription using a bacteriophage RNA polymerase and template DNA that encodes the antigen(s of interest. Once administered and internalized by host cells, the mRNA transcripts are translated directly in the cytoplasm and then the resulting antigens are presented to antigen presenting cells to stimulate an immune response. Alternatively, dendritic cells can be loaded with either tumor associated antigen mRNA or total tumor RNA and delivered to the host to elicit a specific immune response. In this review, we will explain why RNA vaccines represent an attractive platform for cancer immunotherapy, discuss modifications to RNA structure that have been developed to optimize mRNA vaccine stability and translational efficiency, and describe strategies for nonviral delivery of mRNA vaccines, highlighting key preclinical and clinical data related to cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Cancer immunotherapy in children

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    More often than not, cancer immunotherapies that work in adults are used in modified ways in children. Seldom are new therapies developed just for children, primarily because of the small number of pediatric patients relative to the adult cancer patient

  4. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

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    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  5. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, M A; Simons, F E R; Malling, Hans-Jørgen;

    2012-01-01

    To cite this article: Calderón MA, Simons FER, Malling H-J, Lockey RF, Moingeon P, Demoly P. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy: mode of action and its relationship with the safety profile. Allergy 2012; 67: 302-311. ABSTRACT: Allergen immunotherapy reorients inappropriate immune responses...... in allergic patients. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy (SLIT) has been approved, notably in the European Union, as an effective alternative to subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) for allergic rhinitis patients. Compared with SCIT, SLIT has a better safety profile. This is possibly because oral antigen...... cells and eosinophils (mostly located in submucosal areas) and, in comparison with subcutaneous tissue, are less likely to give rise to anaphylactic reactions. SLIT-associated immune responses include the induction of circulating, allergen-specific Th1 and regulatory CD4+ T cells, leading to clinical...

  6. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Larché Mark

    2007-01-01

    Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT) is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cro...

  7. Immunotherapy in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsueda, Satoko; Graham, David Y

    2014-02-21

    Gastric cancer is the second most common of cancer-related deaths worldwide. In the majority of cases gastric cancer is advanced at diagnosis and although medical and surgical treatments have improved, survival rates remain poor. Cancer immunotherapy has emerged as a powerful and promising clinical approach for treatment of cancer and has shown major success in breast cancer, prostate cancer and melanoma. Here, we provide an overview of concepts of modern cancer immunotherapy including the theory, current approaches, remaining hurdles to be overcome, and the future prospect of cancer immunotherapy in the treatment of gastric cancer. Adaptive cell therapies, cancer vaccines, gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies have all been used with some initial successes in gastric cancer. However, to date the results in gastric cancer have been disappointing as current approaches often do not stimulate immunity efficiently allowing tumors continue to grow despite the presence of a measurable immune response. Here, we discuss the identification of targets for immunotherapy and the role of biomarkers in prospectively identifying appropriate subjects or immunotherapy. We also discuss the molecular mechanisms by which tumor cells escape host immunosurveillance and produce an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We show how advances have provided tools for overcoming the mechanisms of immunosuppression including the use of monoclonal antibodies to block negative regulators normally expressed on the surface of T cells which limit activation and proliferation of cytotoxic T cells. Immunotherapy has greatly improved and is becoming an important factor in such fields as medical care and welfare for human being. Progress has been rapid ensuring that the future of immunotherapy for gastric cancer is bright.

  8. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Emily F.; Smyth, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and urothelial cancers. In this review, we assess the early evidence for efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with gastroesophageal cancer in addition to considering biomarkers associated with response to these treatments. Early results of Anti- Programmed Cell Death Protein-1 (anti-PD-1), anti-PD-L1 and anti-Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assosciated protein-4 (anti-CTLA4) trials are examined, and we conclude with a discussion on the future direction for immunotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer patients. PMID:27669318

  9. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily F. Goode

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and urothelial cancers. In this review, we assess the early evidence for efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with gastroesophageal cancer in addition to considering biomarkers associated with response to these treatments. Early results of Anti- Programmed Cell Death Protein-1 (anti-PD-1, anti-PD-L1 and anti-Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assosciated protein-4 (anti-CTLA4 trials are examined, and we conclude with a discussion on the future direction for immunotherapy for gastroesophageal cancer patients.

  10. Past, present and future targets for immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

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    Schwab, Carlton L; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Pasternak, Monica; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy in the US. Treatments have improved with conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy and advanced surgical techniques but disease recurrence is common and fatal in nearly all cases. Current evidence suggests that the immune system and its ability to recognize and eliminate microscopic disease is paramount in preventing recurrence. Ovarian cancer immunotherapy is targeting tumors through active, passive and adoptive approaches. The goal of immunotherapy is to balance the activation of the immune system against cancer while preventing the potential for tremendous toxicity elicited by immune modulation. In this paper we will review the different immunotherapies available for ovarian cancer as well as current ongoing studies and potential future directions.

  11. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larché Mark

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  12. Active Immunotherapy of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Clinical progress in the field of cancer immunotherapy has been slow for many years but within the last 5 years, breakthrough successes have brought immunotherapy to the forefront in cancer therapy. Promising results have been observed in a variety of cancers including solid tumors and hematological malignancies with adoptive cell therapy using natural host tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, host cells that have been genetically engineered with antitumor T-cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors, immune checkpoint inhibitors like anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1 or PD-L1 monoclonal antibodies and oncolytic virus-based immunotherapy. However, most treatment modalities have shown limited efficacy with single therapy. The complex nature of cancer with intra- and inter-tumor antigen and genomic heterogeneity coupled with the immune suppressive microenvironment emphasizes the prospect of personalized targeted immunotherapy to manipulate the patient's own immune system against cancer. For successful, robust and long-lasting cure of cancer, a multi-modal approach is essential, combining anti-tumor cell therapy with manipulation of multiple pathways in the tumor microenvironment to ameliorate tumor-induced immunosuppression.

  13. Basics of cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yuki; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    The immune system is the body's defense against infectious organisms and other invaders including cancer cells. Cancer immunotherapy, which employs our own immune systems to attack cancer cells, is now emerging as a promising modality of cancer treatment based upon the clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive T cell transfer. In hematologic malignancies, clinical application of anti-PD-1 mAb and CAR (chimeric antigen receptor) T therapy is now being extensively tested in Hodgkin's disease, multiple myeloma, and CD19(+) acute lymphocytic leukemia. In sharp contrast to conventional anti-cancer reagents which directly kill cancer cells, cancer immunotherapy activates various types of immune effector cells to attack cancer cells. However, more than half of the treated patients showed no activation of anti-tumor CD8(+) killer T cells and CD4(+) helper T cells and failed to respond to immune therapies such as immune checkpoint blockade, even when administered in combination regimens. Thus, development of novel immunotherapies to achieve more effective activation of anti-cancer immunity and immuno-monitoring of biomarkers, allowing proper evaluation of immune responses in cancer patients in order to detect responders, are urgent issues. Additionally, we must pay attention to characteristic immunological side effects not observed following treatment with conventional anti-cancer reagents. Herein, we present a summary outline and discuss the future direction of cancer immunotherapy.

  14. Immunotherapy: Disrupting the Cancer Treatment World

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to create the best and most far-reaching cancer immunotherapy treatments. THE BASICS : The human immune system is ... none, abound these days – and point to why cancer immunotherapies matter. Immunotherapy is “providing options for people out ...

  15. Immunotherapy for tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyberg, Jerod A

    2013-11-15

    Francisella tularensis is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease tularemia. Francisella is highly infectious via the respiratory route (~10 CFUs) and pulmonary infections due to type A strains of F. tularensis are highly lethal in untreated patients (> 30%). In addition, no vaccines are licensed to prevent tularemia in humans. Due to the high infectivity and mortality of pulmonary tularemia, F. tularensis has been weaponized, including via the introduction of antibiotic resistance, by several countries. Because of the lack of efficacious vaccines, and concerns about F. tularensis acquiring resistance to antibiotics via natural or illicit means, augmentation of host immunity, and humoral immunotherapy have been investigated as countermeasures against tularemia. This manuscript will review advances made and challenges in the field of immunotherapy against tularemia.

  16. Immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weihua Wang; Liangfeng Fan; De'en Xu; Zhongmin Wen; Rong Yu; Quanhong Ma

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques consisted primarily of aggregated Aβ proteins and neurofibrillary tangles formed by hyperphosphorylated tau protein.Both Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau are toxic both in vivo and in vitro.Immunotherapy targeting Aβ seems to provide a promising approach to reduce the toxic species in the brain.However,there is little evidence from clinical trials so far indicating the efficacy of Aβ immunotherapy in cognitive improvement.Immunization with tau peptides or anti-tau antibodies could remove the tau aggregates and improve the cognitive function in preclinical study,which provides a novel strategy of AD therapy.In this article,we will summarize the immunotherapeutic strategies targeting either Aβ or tau.

  17. Cancer immunotherapy with surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orita,Kunzo

    1977-08-01

    Full Text Available With the recent advances in the immunological surveillance system, an understanding of the role of host immunity has become essential to the management of carcinogenesis, tumor proliferation, recurrence and metastasis. Although it is important to continue chemical and surgical treatment of cancer, support of the anti-tumor immune system of the host should also be considered. Long term remission has been reported in leukemia by treating with BCG after chemotherapy whereas surgical treatment is usually more effective in preventing cancer recurrence in digestive organ cancer. The first step is extirpating the tumor as thoroughly as possible and the second step is chemo-immunotherapy. Cancer immunity, however weak, constitutes the basis for other treatments in selectively attacking cancer cells remaining after surgery, chemotherapy or irradiation. Immunotherapy should thus not replace chemotherapy or radiotherapy, but these methods should be employed in combination to attain more favorable results.

  18. Immunotherapy for Gastroesophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Emily F. Goode; Smyth, Elizabeth C.

    2016-01-01

    Survival for patients with advanced oesophageal and stomach cancer is poor; together these cancers are responsible for more than a million deaths per year globally. As chemotherapy and targeted therapies such as trastuzumab and ramucirumab result in modest improvements in survival but not long-term cure for such patients, development of alternative treatment approaches is warranted. Novel immunotherapy drugs such as checkpoint inhibitors have been paradigm changing in melanoma, non-small cell...

  19. Immunotherapy of cancer in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, John M; Butterfield, Lisa H; Tarhini, Ahmad A; Zarour, Hassane; Kalinski, Pawel; Ferrone, Soldano

    2012-01-01

    The immunotherapy of cancer has made significant strides in the past few years due to improved understanding of the underlying principles of tumor biology and immunology. These principles have been critical in the development of immunotherapy in the laboratory and in the implementation of immunotherapy in the clinic. This improved understanding of immunotherapy, enhanced by increased insights into the mechanism of tumor immune response and its evasion by tumors, now permits manipulation of this interaction and elucidates the therapeutic role of immunity in cancer. Also important, this improved understanding of immunotherapy and the mechanisms underlying immunity in cancer has fueled an expanding array of new therapeutic agents for a variety of cancers. Pegylated interferon-α2b as an adjuvant therapy and ipilimumab as therapy for advanced disease, both of which were approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for melanoma in March 2011, are 2 prime examples of how an increased understanding of the principles of tumor biology and immunology have been translated successfully from the laboratory to the clinical setting. Principles that guide the development and application of immunotherapy include antibodies, cytokines, vaccines, and cellular therapies. The identification and further elucidation of the role of immunotherapy in different tumor types, and the development of strategies for combining immunotherapy with cytotoxic and molecularly targeted agents for future multimodal therapy for cancer will enable even greater progress and ultimately lead to improved outcomes for patients receiving cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Allergen-specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moote William

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergen-specific immunotherapy is a potentially disease-modifying therapy that is effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis/conjunctivitis, allergic asthma and stinging insect hypersensitivity. However, despite its proven efficacy in these conditions, it is frequently underutilized in Canada. The decision to proceed with allergen-specific immunotherapy should be made on a case-by-case basis, taking into account individual patient factors such as the degree to which symptoms can be reduced by avoidance measures and pharmacological therapy, the amount and type of medication required to control symptoms, the adverse effects of pharmacological treatment, and patient preferences. Since this form of therapy carries the risk of anaphylactic reactions, it should only be prescribed by physicians who are adequately trained in the treatment of allergy. Furthermore, injections must be given under medical supervision in clinics that are equipped to manage anaphylaxis. In this article, the authors review the indications and contraindications, patient selection criteria, and the administration, safety and efficacy of allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  1. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNy in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma.

  2. Regulatory T cells as immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin David Singer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells (Tregs suppress exuberant immune system activation and promote immunologic tolerance. Because Tregs modulate both innate and adaptive immunity, the biomedical community has developed intense interest in using Tregs for immunotherapy. Conditions that require clinical tolerance to improve outcomes—autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation—may benefit from Treg immunotherapy. Investigators have designed ex vivo strategies to isolate, preserve, expand, and infuse Tregs. Protocols to manipulate Treg populations in vivo have also been considered. Barriers to clinically feasible Treg immunotherapy include Treg stability, off-cell effects, and demonstration of cell preparation purity and potency. Clinical trials involving Treg adoptive transfer to treat graft versus host disease preliminarily demonstrated the safety and efficacy of Treg immunotherapy in humans. Future work will need to confirm the safety of Treg immunotherapy and establish the efficacy of specific Treg subsets for the treatment of immune-mediated disease.

  3. New directions in immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Linda; Compalati, Enrico; Kundig, Thomas; Larche, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is effective in reducing the clinical symptoms associated with allergic rhinitis, asthma and venom-induced anaphylaxis. Subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) with unmodified allergen extracts are the most widely prescribed AIT regimens. The efficacy of these 2 routes appears comparable, but the safety profile with SLIT is more favorable allowing for home administration and requiring less patient time. However, both require that the treatment is taken regularly over several years, e.g., monthly in a supervised medical setting with SCIT and daily at home with SLIT. Despite the difference in treatment settings, poor adherence has been reported with both routes. Emerging evidence suggests that AIT may be effective in other allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis, venom sting-induced large local reactions, and food allergy. Research with oral immunotherapy (OIT) for food allergies suggest that many patients can be desensitized during treatment, but questions remain about whether this can produce long term tolerance. Further studies are needed to identify appropriate patients and treatment regimens with these conditions. Efforts to develop safer and more effective AIT for inhalant allergies have led to investigations with modified allergens and alternate routes. Intralymphatic (ILIT) has been shown to produce long-lasting clinical benefits after three injections comparable to a 3-year course of SCIT. Epicutaneous (EPIT) has demonstrated promising results for food and inhalant allergies. Vaccine modifications, such as T cell epitopes or the use of viral-like particles as an adjuvant, have been shown to provide sustained clinical benefits after a relatively short course of treatment compared to the currently available AIT treatments, SLIT and SCIT. These newer approaches may increase the utilization and adherence to AIT because the multi-year treatment requirement of currently available AIT is a likely deterrent for

  4. CCL21 Cancer Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yuan, E-mail: yuanlin@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 37-131 CHS, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Sharma, Sherven [Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 37-131 CHS, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Veterans’ Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA 90073 (United States); John, Maie St. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Clinical and Translational Science Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-05-07

    Cancer, a major health problem, affects 12 million people worldwide every year. With surgery and chemo-radiation the long term survival rate for the majority of cancer patients is dismal. Thus novel treatments are urgently needed. Immunotherapy, the harnessing of the immune system to destroy cancer cells is an attractive option with potential for long term anti-tumor benefit. Cytokines are biological response modifiers that stimulate anti-tumor immune responses. In this review, we discuss the anti-tumor efficacy of the chemotactic cytokine CCL21 and its pre-clinical and clinical application in cancer.

  5. Immunotherapy of Genitourinary Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruo Inamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cancer patients are treated with some combination of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in local therapy with curative intent, chemotherapeutic treatments for metastatic disease often remain unsatisfying due to severe side effects and incomplete long-term remission. Therefore, the evaluation of novel therapeutic options is of great interest. Conventional, along with newer treatment strategies target the immune system that suppresses genitourinary (GU malignancies. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma and non-muscle-invasive bladder caner represent the most immune-responsive types of all human cancer. This review examines the rationale and emerging evidence supporting the anticancer activity of immunotherapy, against GU malignancies.

  6. Immunotherapy for Lung Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yi Ho

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Although treatment methods in surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy have improved, prognosis remains unsatisfactory and developing new therapeutic strategies is still an urgent demand. Immunotherapy is a novel therapeutic approach wherein activated immune cells can specifically kill tumor cells by recognition of tumor-associated antigens without damage to normal cells. Several lung cancer vaccines have demonstrated prolonged survival time in phase II and phase III trials, and several clinical trials are under investigation. However, many clinical trials involving cancer vaccination with defined tumor antigens work in only a small number of patients. Cancer immunotherapy is not completely effective in eradicating tumor cells because tumor cells escape from host immune scrutiny. Understanding of the mechanism of immune evasion regulated by tumor cells is required for the development of more effective immunotherapeutic approaches against lung cancer. This paper discusses the identification of tumor antigens in lung cancer, tumor immune escape mechanisms, and clinical vaccine trials in lung cancer.

  7. Inmunoterapia local Local immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lasa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La inmunoterapia específica, junto con la evitación del alergeno y el tratamiento sintomático, forma parte del tratamiento de la patología alérgica. La modalidad más antigua, más conocida y mejor estudiada es la inmunoterapia subcutánea (ITSC, cuya eficacia tanto a corto como a largo plazo, ha sido ampliamente demostrada en numerosos estudios. Sin embargo, a pesar de haberse demostrado segura, no está exenta de efectos adversos y precisa ser administrada bajo supervisión de personal médico. Esto ha animado a buscar nuevas vías de administración de eficacia similar, con un buen perfil de seguridad, y de buena cumplimentación por parte del paciente. De las distintas alternativas estudiadas la más relevante es la inmunoterapia sublingual (ITSL. En ésta, se administra el antígeno en forma de gotas debajo de la lengua. Existen diferentes pautas de administración en función del alergeno implicado. La dosis óptima de tratamiento está aún sin determinar, hallándose en este momento en un rango amplio de dosis respecto a la inmunoterapia subcutánea. Su mecanismo de acción es poco conocido aunque en diversos estudios se han observado cambios inmunológicos. La ITSL ha mostrado un buen perfil de seguridad con escasos efectos secundarios, habitualmente de carácter local. Asimismo se han realizado distintos ensayos clínicos en los que se ha demostrado su eficacia en el tratamiento de la alergia respiratoria tanto en niños como en adultos. Por ello, aunque aún existen datos sin resolver respecto a esta vía de administración de inmunoterapia, ha sido propuesta por la OMS como una alternativa válida a la ITSC.Specific immunotherapy, together with avoidance of the allergen and symptomatic treatment, forms part of the treatment of allergic pathology. The oldest, best known and most studied form is subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT, whose efficacy, both in the short and the long term, has been widely demonstrated in numerous studies

  8. Modified immunotherapy for alopecia areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimasu, Takashi; Furukawa, Fukumi

    2016-07-01

    Squaric acid dibutylester (SADBE) is a commonly used contact sensitizer in immunotherapy for alopecia areata (AA). Severe contact dermatitis is induced by the currently high recommended sensitization dose of 1%-2% SADBE, often decreasing patient compliance. We assessed a modified immunotherapy for AA using SADBE at a starting concentration of 0.01% without sensitization. After one or two weeks of initial 0.01% SADBE application, the concentration of SADBE was increased gradually to 0.025%, 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% until the patients felt itching or erythema at the AA lesion site. The modified immunotherapy showed a response rate of 69.4% (25/36), equivalent to conventional immunotherapy using SADBE starting at 1%-2% sensitization. Furthermore, we investigated the combination therapy of SADBE and multiple courses of steroid pulses for AA. The response rate for combination therapy was 73.7% (28/38); however, the group receiving combination therapy showed a significant prevalence of severe AA compared with the group receiving modified immunotherapy only. We reviewed the efficacy and safety of modified immunotherapy without initial sensitization and combination therapy with immunotherapy and multiple courses of pulses for AA.

  9. CD40 ligand immunotherapy in cancer: an efficient approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwashima, N; Kageyama, S; Eto, Y; Urashima, M

    2001-01-01

    Cancer cells do not elicit a clinically sufficient anti-tumor immune response that results in tumor rejection. Recently, many investigators have been trying to enhance anti-tumor immunity and encouraging results have been reported. This review will discuss current anti-cancer immunotherapy; interleukin-2 therapy, tumor vaccine secreting Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, dendritic cells fused with tumor cells, and CD40 ligand immunotherapy. Moreover, we introduce our two kinds of CD40 ligand immuno-genetherapy; (1) oral CD40 ligand gene therapy against lymphoma using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium (published in BLOOD 2000), (2) cancer vaccine transfected with CD40 ligand ex vivo for neuroblastoma (unpublished). Both approaches resulted in a high degree of protection against the tumor progression and they are simple and safe in the murine system.

  10. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  11. Belief Elicitation in Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, Mariana; Engelmann, Dirk; Koch, Alexander

    Belief elicitation in economics experiments usually relies on paying subjects according to the accuracy of stated beliefs in addition to payments for other decisions. Such incentives, however, allow risk-averse subjects to hedge with their stated beliefs against adverse outcomes of other decisions...... in the experiment. This raises two questions: (i) can we trust the existing belief elicitation results, (ii) can we avoid potential hedging confounds? Our results instill confidence regarding both issues. We propose an experimental design that eliminates hedging opportunities, and use this to test for the empirical...

  12. Genomic determinants of cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Diana; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-08-01

    Cancer immunotherapies - including therapeutic vaccines, adoptive cell transfer, oncolytic viruses, and immune checkpoint blockade - yield durable responses in many cancer types, but understanding of predictors of response is incomplete. Genomic characterization of human cancers has already contributed to the success of targeted therapies; in cancer immunotherapy, identification of tumor-specific antigens through whole-exome sequencing may be key to designing individualized, highly immunogenic therapeutic vaccines. Additionally, pre-treatment tumor mutational and gene expression signatures can predict which patients are most likely to benefit from cancer immunotherapy. Continued work in harnessing genomic, transcriptomic, and immunological data from clinical cohorts of immunotherapy-treated patients will bring the promises of precision medicine to immuno-oncology.

  13. Targeted immunotherapy in Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Rothe et al introduce a new principle of targeted Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) immunotherapy in their report from a phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13.......In this issue of Blood, Rothe et al introduce a new principle of targeted Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) immunotherapy in their report from a phase 1 study of the bispecific anti-CD30/CD16A antibody construct AFM13....

  14. Cancer Immunotherapy of Targeting Angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianmeiHou; LingTian; YuquanWei

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are angiogenesis-dependent. Anti-angiogenic therapy may be a useful approach to cancer therapy. This review discussed tumor angiogenesis and immunotherapy of targeting tumor angiogenesis from two main aspects: (1) active vaccination to induce effective anti-angiogenesis immunity; (2) passive immunotherapy with anti-pro-angiogenic molecules relevant antibody. Evidence from the recent years suggested that anti-angiogenic therapy should be one of the most promising approaches to cancer therapy.

  15. Cancer Immunotherapy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The goals of treating patients with cancer are to cure the disease, prolong survival, and improve quality of life. Immune cells in the tumor microenvironment have an important role in regulating tumor progression. Therefore, stimulating immune reactions to tumors can be an attractive therapeutic and prevention strategy. CONTENT: During immune surveillance, the host provides defense against foreign antigens, while ensuring it limits activation against self antigens. By targeting surface antigens expressed on tumor cells, monoclonal antibodies have demonstrated efficacy as cancer therapeutics. Recent successful antibody-based strategies have focused on enhancing antitumor immune responses by targeting immune cells, irrespective of tumor antigens. The use of antibodies to block pathways inhibiting the endogenous immune response to cancer, known as checkpoint blockade therapy, has stirred up a great deal of excitement among scientists, physicians, and patients alike. Clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of antibodies that block the T cell inhibitory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4 and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1 have reported success in treating subsets of patients. Adoptive cell transfer (ACT is a highly personalized cancer therapy that involve administration to the cancer-bearing host of immune cells with direct anticancer activity. In addition, the ability to genetically engineer lymphocytes to express conventional T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors has further extended the successful application of ACT for cancer treatment. SUMMARY: For cancer treatment, 2011 marked the beginning of a new era. The underlying basis of cancer immunotherapy is to activate a patient’s own T cells so that they can kill their tumors. Reports of amazing recoveries abound, where patients remain cancer-free many years after receiving the therapy. The idea of harnessing immune cells to fight cancer is

  16. Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stage for Kidney Cancer Kidney Cancer Treating Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer The goal of biologic therapy ... Therapy for Kidney Cancer Targeted Therapies for Kidney Cancer Biologic Therapy (Immunotherapy) for Kidney Cancer Chemotherapy for Kidney Cancer Pain ...

  17. Sublingual Immunotherapy: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Compalati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The practice of administering sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy is gaining more and more diffusion worldwide as a consequence of the robust demonstration of clinical efficacy and safety provided by recent high-powered and well-designed studies, confirming for individual seasonal allergens the results of previous metanalyses in adult and pediatric populations. Preliminary evidence derives from recent rigorous trials on perennial allergens, like house dust mites, and specifically designed studies addressed the benefits on asthma. Emerging research suggests that SLIT may have a future role in other allergic conditions such as atopic dermatitis, food, latex and venom allergy. Efforts to develop a safer and more effective SLIT for inhalant allergens have led to the development of allergoids, recombinant allergens and formulations with adjuvants and substances targeting antigens to dendritic cells that possess a crucial role in initiating immune responses. The high degree of variation in the evaluation of clinical effects and immunological changes requires further studies to identify the candidate patients to SLIT and biomarkers of short and long term efficacy. Appropriate management strategies are urgently needed to overcome the barriers to SLIT compliance.

  18. Immunotherapy for Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiaoyun; Kosten, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Substance use disorders continue to be major medical and social problems worldwide. Current medications for substance use disorders have many limitations such as cost, availability, medication compliance, dependence, diversion of some to illicit use and relapse to addiction after discontinuing their use. Immunotherapies using either passive monoclonal antibodies or active vaccines have distinctly different mechanisms and therapeutic utility from small molecule approaches to treatment. They have great potential to help the patient achieve and sustain abstinence and have fewer of the above limitations. This review covers the cocaine vaccine development in detail and provides an overview of directions for developing anti-addiction vaccines against the abuse of other substances. The notable success of the first placebo-controlled clinical trial of a cocaine vaccine, TA-CD, has led to an ongoing multi-site, Phase IIb clinical trial in 300 subjects. The results from these trials are encouarging further development of the cocaine vacine as one of the first anti-addiction vaccines to go forward to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for review and approval for human use. PMID:22229313

  19. Development of cancer immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Yeon Sook; Chung, H. Y.; Yi, S. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, B. K.; Chung, I. S.; Park, J. Y

    1999-04-01

    To increase the curative rate of cancer patients, we developed ideal biological response modifier from medicinal plants: Ginsan, KC68IId-8, KC-8Ala, KG-30. Ginsan activated natural killer cell activity of spleen cells more than 5.4 times than lentinan, 1.4 times than picibanil. Radioprotective activity of Ginsan is stronger than WR2721, glucan, and selenium. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of MOPC tumor cells was augmented by treatment with IL-10 antisense oligonucleotide and by transfection with VEGF sense-, antisense gene. The immunogenicity of A20 tumor cells was also augmented by transfection with B7.1 gene. The immunosuppression of gamma-irradiation was due to the reduction of Th1 sytokine gene expression through STAT pathway. These research will devote to develop new cancer immunotherapy and to reduce side effect of cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

  20. Immunotherapy for malignant glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carter M Suryadevara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas (MG are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor. Most patients diagnosed with glioblastoma (GBM, the most common and malignant glial tumor, die within 12-15 months. Moreover, conventional treatment, which includes surgery followed by radiation and chemotherapy, can be highly toxic by causing nonspecific damage to healthy brain and other tissues. The shortcomings of standard-of-care have thus created a stimulus for the development of novel therapies that can target central nervous system (CNS-based tumors specifically and efficiently, while minimizing off-target collateral damage to normal brain. Immunotherapy represents an investigational avenue with the promise of meeting this need, already having demonstrated its potential against B-cell malignancy and solid tumors in clinical trials. T-cell engineering with tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs is one proven approach that aims to redirect autologous patient T-cells to sites of tumor. This platform has evolved dramatically over the past two decades to include an improved construct design, and these modern CARs have only recently been translated into the clinic for brain tumors. We review here emerging immunotherapeutic platforms for the treatment of MG, focusing on the development and application of a CAR-based strategy against GBM.

  1. Issues in Requirements Elicitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    systems approach: characterized by Checkland’s Soft Systems Methodology (SSM), which is discussed briefly in Appendix A.6; emphasizes the subjectivity of...methodology for requirements elicitation. A.6 Notes on SSM Both the definition of methodology and the philosophy behind soft systems methodology (SSM...1986. [Checkland 89a] Checkland, Peter. Soft Systems Methodology . Rational Analysis for a Problematic World. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 71-100

  2. Elicitation of Unstated Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-17

    in these interviews. The interviews absolutely do not touch on the solution space. This is a challenging approach to interviewing customers/users...hate it when I have to constantly adjust my radio volume! I find classical music quite relaxing. 95 Requirements Elicitation (RE) Training...2014 Carnegie Mellon University Driving in Your Car Exercise Theme of communicating or listening to music in the car without distraction! 96

  3. Adoptive immunotherapy via CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vy Phan-Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The goal of cancer immunotherapy is to induce specific and durable antitumor immunity. Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT has garnered wide interest, particularly in regard to strategies to improve T cell efficacy in trials. There are many types of T cells (and subsets which can be selected for use in ACT. CD4+ T cells are critical for the regulation, activation and aid of host defense mechanisms and, importantly, for enhancing the function of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. To date, much research in cancer immunotherapy has focused on CD8+ T cells, in melanoma and other cancers. Both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells have been evaluated as ACT in mice and humans, and both are effective at eliciting antitumor responses. IL-17 producing CD4+ T cells are a new subset of CD4+ T cells to be evaluated in ACT models. This review discusses the benefits of adoptive immunotherapy mediated by CD8+ and CD4+ cells. It also discusses the various type of T cells, source of T cells, and ex vivo cytokine growth factors for augmenting clinical efficacy of ACT. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(4.000: 588-595

  4. Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0223 TITLE: Innovative Strategies for Breast Cancer Immunotherapy ...studies (2). A promising approach in cancer treatment is adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells to redirect...multiple tissues. DISCUSSION Adoptive immunotherapy is a promising approach for the treatment of cancer , and observations from preclinical and

  5. Emerging nanotechnologies for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Sourabh; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2016-05-01

    Founded on the growing insight into the complex cancer-immune system interactions, adjuvant immunotherapies are rapidly emerging and being adapted for the treatment of various human malignancies. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, for example, have already shown clinical success. Nevertheless, many approaches are not optimized, require frequent administration, are associated with systemic toxicities and only show modest efficacy as monotherapies. Nanotechnology can potentially enhance the efficacy of such immunotherapies by improving the delivery, retention and release of immunostimulatory agents and biologicals in targeted cell populations and tissues. This review presents the current status and emerging trends in such nanotechnology-based cancer immunotherapies including the role of nanoparticles as carriers of immunomodulators, nanoparticles-based cancer vaccines, and depots for sustained immunostimulation. Also highlighted are key translational challenges and opportunities in this rapidly growing field.

  6. Immunotherapy of distant metastatic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schadendorf, D; Algarra, S M; Bastholt, L

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated with signif......Immunotherapy of metastatic melanoma consists of various approaches leading to specific or non-specific immunomodulation. The use of FDA-approved interleukin (IL)-2 alone, in combination with interferon alpha, and/or with various chemotherapeutic agents (biochemotherapy) is associated...... antibodies targeting cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (anti-CTLA-4) or CD137 are discussed. Recent advances of intratumour gene transfer technologies and adoptive immunotherapy, which represents a promising although technically challenging direction, are also discussed....

  7. Current status of cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kono K

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To prove clinical benefits of cancer vaccine is currently difficult, except for one phase III trial has documented improved overall survival with the vaccine, Sipuleucel‑T, although induction of anti-tumor immune responses through cancer vaccine is theoretically promising and would be straightforward. In contrast, immune checkpoint blockade with anti-CTLA4 mAb and anti-PD‑1 mAb has demonstrated clear evidence of objective responses including improved overall survival and tumor shrinkage, driving renewed enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy in multi­ple cancer types. In addition, there is a promising novel cancer immunotherapy, CAR therapy—a personalized treatment that involves genetically modifying a patient’s T- cells to make them target tumor cells. We are now facing new era of cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Rationale for stimulator of interferon genes-targeted cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Vargas, Thaiz; Benoit-Lizon, Isis; Apetoh, Lionel

    2017-02-17

    The efficacy of checkpoint inhibitor therapy illustrates that cancer immunotherapy, which aims to foster the host immune response against cancer to achieve durable anticancer responses, can be successfully implemented in a routine clinical practice. However, a substantial proportion of patients does not benefit from this treatment, underscoring the need to identify alternative strategies to defeat cancer. Despite the demonstration in the 1990's that the detection of danger signals, including the nucleic acids DNA and RNA, by dendritic cells (DCs) in a cancer setting is essential for eliciting host defence, the molecular sensors responsible for recognising these danger signals and eliciting anticancer immune responses remain incompletely characterised, possibly explaining the disappointing results obtained so far upon the clinical implementation of DC-based cancer vaccines. In 2008, STING (stimulator of interferon genes), was identified as a protein that is indispensable for the recognition of cytosolic DNA. The central role of STING in controlling anticancer immune responses was exemplified by observations that spontaneous and radiation-induced adaptive anticancer immunity was reduced in the absence of STING, illustrating the potential of STING-targeting for cancer immunotherapy. Here, we will discuss the relevance of manipulating the STING signalling pathway for cancer treatment and integrating STING-targeting based strategies into combinatorial therapies to obtain long-lasting anticancer immune responses.

  9. Cancer immunotherapy using tumor cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidana, Abhinav

    2014-01-01

    Cryoablation is increasingly being used as a primary treatment for localized cancers and as a salvage therapy for metastatic cancers. Anecdotal clinical reports and animal experiments have confirmed an induction of systemic antitumor immune response by tumor cryoablation. To capitalize on the stimulatory effects of cryoablation for cancer immunotherapy, this response must be intensified using other immunomodulatory agents. This article reviews the preclinical and clinical evidence and discusses the mechanism of the antitumor immune response generated by cryoablation. The rationale and evidence behind several immunotherapy approaches that can be combined with cryoablation to devise a cryoimmunotherapeutic strategy with a potential to impact the progression of metastatic disease are described.

  10. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focus on the recent advances in a proof of concept study in food allergy, FAST (Food allergy specific immunotherapy), which may increase interest within the biomolecular and pharmaceutical industry to embark on similar projects of immunology driven precision medicine within the allergy field.

  11. Immunotherapy and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Elizabeth

    2004-02-01

    The Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy meeting of the Academy of Medical Sciences reviewed the state-of-the-art and translational prospects for therapeutic interventions aimed at killing tumor cells, correcting genetic defects and developing vaccines for chronic infections. Crucial basic science concepts and information about dendritic cells, the structure and function of T-cell receptors, and manipulation of the immune response by cytokine antagonists and peptides were presented. This information underpins vaccine design and delivery, as well as attempts to immunomodulate autoimmune disease. Results from studies using anticancer DNA vaccines, which include appropriate signals for both the innate and adaptive immune response, were presented in several talks. The vaccines incorporated helper epitopes and cancer target epitopes such as immunoglobulin idiotypes (for lymphomas and myelomas), melanoma-associated antigens (for melanoma and other solid tumors) and minor histocompatibility antigens (for leukemia). The results of using vaccines employing similar principles and designed to reduce viral load in HIV/AIDS patients were also presented. The introduction of suicide genes incorporating the bacterial enzyme nitroreductase gene (ntr) targeted at tumor cells prior to administration of the prodrug CB-1954, converted by ntr into a toxic alkylating agent, was discussed against the background of clinical trials and improved suicide gene design. The introduction into hematopoietic stem cells of missing genes for the common gamma-chain, deficiency of which causes severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), used similar retroviral transduction. The outcome of treating six SCID patients in the UK, and ten in France was successful immune reconstitution in the majority of patients, but in two of the French cases a complication of lymphoproliferative disease due to insertional mutagenesis was observed. The adoptive transfer of T-cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens (for

  12. Hypoallergenic molecules for subcutaneous immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongejan, Laurian; van Ree, Ronald; Poulsen, Lars K

    2016-01-01

    Although a large part of the population suffers from allergies, a cure is not yet available. Allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) offers promise for these patients. AIT has proven successful in insect and venom allergies; however, for food allergy this is still unclear. In this editorial we focu...

  13. Integrated Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    CSF. J Clin Invest 117, 1902 (Jul, 2007). 32. H. Yamaguchi et al., Milk fat globule EGF factor 8 in the serum of human patients of systemic lupus erythematosus . J Leukoc Biol 83, 1300 (May, 2008). ...comprehensive and systematic manner is the underlying principle of my goal to develop ’rational combination immunotherapy’ for breast cancer, one

  14. Immunotherapy for tuberculosis: future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abate G

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Getahun Abate,1 Daniel F Hoft1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Allergy and Immunology, 2Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA Abstract: Tuberculosis (TB is still a major global health problem. A third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Only ~10% of infected individuals develop TB but there are 9 million TB cases with 1.5 million deaths annually. The standard prophylactic treatment regimens for latent TB infection take 3–9 months, and new cases of TB require at least 6 months of treatment with multiple drugs. The management of latent TB infection and TB has become more challenging because of the spread of multidrug-resistant and extremely drug-resistant TB. Intensified efforts to find new TB drugs and immunotherapies are needed. Immunotherapies could modulate the immune system in patients with latent TB infection or active disease, enabling better control of M. tuberculosis replication. This review describes several types of potential immunotherapies with a focus on those which have been tested in humans. Keywords: tuberculosis, HDT, immunotherapy, treatment

  15. Engineering opportunities in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanbart, Laura; Swartz, Melody A

    2015-11-24

    Immunotherapy has great potential to treat cancer and prevent future relapse by activating the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells. A variety of strategies are continuing to evolve in the laboratory and in the clinic, including therapeutic noncellular (vector-based or subunit) cancer vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint blockade. Despite their promise, much more research is needed to understand how and why certain cancers fail to respond to immunotherapy and to predict which therapeutic strategies, or combinations thereof, are most appropriate for each patient. Underlying these challenges are technological needs, including methods to rapidly and thoroughly characterize the immune microenvironment of tumors, predictive tools to screen potential therapies in patient-specific ways, and sensitive, information-rich assays that allow patient monitoring of immune responses, tumor regression, and tumor dissemination during and after therapy. The newly emerging field of immunoengineering is addressing some of these challenges, and there is ample opportunity for engineers to contribute their approaches and tools to further facilitate the clinical translation of immunotherapy. Here we highlight recent technological advances in the diagnosis, therapy, and monitoring of cancer in the context of immunotherapy, as well as ongoing challenges.

  16. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT...

  17. New Concepts in Tumor Antigens: Their Significance in Future Immunotherapies for Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yang; Xiao-Feng Yang

    2005-01-01

    The identification and molecular characterization of self-antigens expressed by human malignancies that are capable of elicitation of anti-tumor immune responses in patients have been an active field in tumor immunology.More than 2,000 tumor antigens have been identified, and most of these antigens are self-antigens. These significant progresses have led to the renaissance of tumor immunology and studies on anti-tumor immunotherapy.However, despite of the progress in the identification of self-tumor antigens, current antigen-specific immunotherapies for tumors are far less satisfied than expected, which reflects the urgent need to improve our understanding on self-tumor antigens. In order to develop more effective antigen specific anti-tumor immunotherapies and to monitor the responses to these immunotherapies in patients with tumors, many important fundamental questions need to be addressed. We propose for the first time that the studies in addressing the characteristics of self-tumor antigens and autoantigens are grouped as a new subject termed "antigenology". In this brief review, we would outline the progress in the identification of tumor antigens in solid tumors and hematologic malignancies, and overview the new concepts and principles of antigenology and their significance for future immunotherapies to these malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  18. Experimental studies of tumor immunotherapy. II. Tumor immunotherapy following tumor extirpation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayashi,Shigeo

    1976-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to approach human cancer immunotherapy, the author carried out the immunotherapy with BCG on mice having homotransplanted cancer, observed the posttransplantation results with lapse of time, conduced daily macrophage inhibition test (MI test and found the immunotherapy to be effective. At the same time the MI test proved to be a useful criterion in determining the course of cancer progress and effectiveness of the immunotherapy.

  19. [Cancer immunotherapy by immuno-checkpoint blockade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yutaka

    2015-10-01

    As cancer immunotherapies utilizing anti-tumor T-cell responses, immuno-checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell immunotherapy have recently achieved durable responses even in advanced cancer patients with metastases. Administration of antibodies on the T-cell surface, CTLA-4 and PD-1 (or PD-1 ligand PD-L1), resulted in tumor regression of not only melanoma and renal cell cancer which were known to be relatively sensitive to immunotherapy, but also various malignancies including lung, bladder, ovarian, gastric, and head and neck cancers, as well as hematological malignancies such as Hodgkin and B-cell malignant lymphomas. These findings have changed the status of immunotherapy in the development of cancer treatments. Currently, development of combinations employing cancer immunotherapy with immuno-checkpoint blockade, as well as personalized cancer immunotherapy based on the evaluation of pretreatment immune status, are in progress.

  20. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Melanoma immunotherapy: dendritic cell vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Lozada-Requena, Ivan; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Núñez, César; Empresa de Investigación y Desarrollo en Cáncer (EMINDES) SAC. Lima, Perú.; Aguilar, José Luis; Laboratorios de Inmunología #108, Laboratorio de investigación y Desarrollo, Facultad de Ciencieas y Filosofía, Universidad Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative review that shows accessible information to the scientific community about melanoma and immunotherapy.Dendritic cells have the ability to participate in innate and adaptive immunity, but are not unfamiliar to the immune evasion oftumors. Knowing the biology and role has led to generate in vitro several prospects of autologous cell vaccines against diversetypes of cancer in humans and animal models. However, given the low efficiency they have shown, we must implementstrateg...

  2. Advances in personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Karasaki, Takahiro; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Sugie, Tomoharu

    2017-01-01

    There are currently three major approaches to T cell-based cancer immunotherapy, namely, active vaccination, adoptive cell transfer therapy and immune checkpoint blockade. Recently, this latter approach has demonstrated remarkable clinical benefits, putting cancer immunotherapy under the spotlight. Better understanding of the dynamics of anti-tumor immune responses (the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle") is crucial for the further development of this form of treatment. Tumors employ multiple strategies to escape from anti-tumor immunity, some of which result from the selection of cancer cells with immunosuppressive activity by the process of cancer immunoediting. Apart from this selective process, anti-tumor immune responses can also be inhibited in multiple different ways which vary from patient to patient. This implies that cancer immunotherapy must be personalized to (1) identify the rate-limiting steps in any given patient, (2) identify and combine strategies to overcome these hurdles, and (3) proceed with the next round of the "Cancer-Immunity Cycle". Cancer cells have genetic alterations which can provide the immune system with targets by which to recognize and eradicate the tumor. Mutated proteins expressed exclusively in cancer cells and recognizable by the immune system are known as neoantigens. The development of next-generation sequencing technology has made it possible to determine the genetic landscape of human cancer and facilitated the utilization of genomic information to identify such candidate neoantigens in individual cancers. Future immunotherapies will need to be personalized in terms of the identification of both patient-specific immunosuppressive mechanisms and target neoantigens.

  3. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along......Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...

  4. Novel Approaches and Perspectives in Allergen Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Hans Jürgen; Valovirta, Erkka; Pfaar, Oliver;

    2017-01-01

    In this review we report on relevant current topics in allergen immunotherapy (AIT) which were broadly discussed during the 1(st) Aarhus Immunotherapy Symposium (Aarhus, Denmark) in December, 2015 by leading clinicians, scientists and industry representatives in the field. The aim of this symposium...... have substantiated proof of effectiveness of this disease-modifying therapeutic option. Novel treatments like peptide immunotherapy, intralymphatic immunotherapy and use of recombinant allergens herald a new age in which AIT may address treatment of allergy as a public health issue by reaching a large...

  5. [Current Approaches in Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otáhal, P; Trněný, M

    2015-01-01

    Methods of cancer immunotherapy have finally entered clinical medicine after years of preclinical research. Currently, there are several methods, which have proven to be very effective even in cases of incurable cancer. Antitumor monoclonal antibodies are among major therapeutic anti-cancer drugs and have been successfully used for many ears. Novel group of antibodies are immunomodulatory antibodies which can break tumor -specific immune tolerance and induce regression of tumors by nonspecific activation of immune system. Bispecific antibodies represent a novel class of anticancer agents which can induce expansion of T cells in vivo, blinatumomab is an example of such agents and is currently available for the treatment of acute B -cell leukemia. Cellular immunotherapy is also very effective, especially the use of Chimeric receptor modified T-cells for the therapy of B- cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Although it is a very complicated and expensive method, it is highly effective approach which can induce remission even in previously hopeless conditions. The goal of this article is to explain the basic principles of cancer immunotherapy and summarize the newest findings in this field.

  6. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer (grade 5 of 5 in the guinea-pig maximization test) that is used in various industrial and consumer applications. To prevent sensitization to cobalt and elicitation of allergic cobalt dermatitis, information about the elicitation threshold level...... of cobalt is important. OBJECTIVE: To identify the dermatitis elicitation threshold levels in cobalt-allergic individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published patch test dose-response studies were reviewed to determine the elicitation dose (ED) levels in dermatitis patients with a previous positive patch test...... reaction to cobalt. A logistic dose-response model was applied to data collected from the published literature to estimate ED values. The 95% confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of mean doses that can elicit a reaction in 10% (ED(10)) of a population was calculated with Fieller's method. RESULTS...

  7. Designer exosomes as next-generation cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Brandon M; Kirk, Isabel D; Hiltbrunner, Stefanie; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Bultema, Jarred J

    2016-01-01

    Exosomes are small 40-120 nm vesicles secreted by nearly all cells and are an important form of intercellular communication. Exosomes are abundant, stable, and highly bioavailable to tissues in vivo. Increasingly, exosomes are being recognized as potential therapeutics as they have the ability to elicit potent cellular responses in vitro and in vivo. Patient-derived exosomes have been employed as a novel cancer immunotherapy in several clinical trials, but at this point lack sufficient efficacy. Still other researchers have focused on modifying the content and function of exosomes in various ways, toward the end-goal of specialized therapeutic exosomes. Here we highlight major advances in the use of exosomes for cancer immunotherapy and exosome bioengineering followed by a discussion of focus areas for future research to generate potent therapeutic exosomes. From the Clinical Editor: Exosomes are small vesicles used by cells for intercellular communication. In this short article, the authors described the current status and the potential use of exosomes in the clinical setting.

  8. HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN gp96 AND CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳培彬; 杨树德; 黄常志

    2002-01-01

    Heat shock protein gp96 is a highly conserved and monomorphic glycoprotein in the endoplasmic reticulum.It functions as molecular chaperone and can associate with a variety of antigenic peptides noncovalently in vivo and in vitro. Recent studies have indicated that gp96 molecules participate in major histocompatibility complex class I - restricted antigen presentation pathway. Immunization of mice with gp96 preparations isolated from cancer cells can elicit a cancer - specific protective T cell immune response that is recallable, which is a prerequisite for gp96 as a therapeutic vaccine against cancers. The immunogenicity of gp96 molecules has been attributed to the antigenic peptides associated with them. These phenomena provide a new pathway for cancer immunotherapy. The mechanism that the gp96 -peptide complex induces specific immune response and the explorations for gp96 - peptide complex as a therapeutic cancer vaccine are reviewed.

  9. Tumor Antigen-Derived Peptides Delivery for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenxue, Ma

    2014-02-05

    Tumor antigenic peptides therapeutics is a promising field for cancer immunotherapy. Benefits include the ease and rapid synthesis of antigenic peptides and capacity for modifications. In the past years, many peptide-based cancer vaccines have been tested in clinical trials with a limited success because of the difficulties associated with peptide stability and delivery approaches, consequently, resulting in inefficient antigen presentation and low response rates in patients with cancer. The development of suitable and efficient vaccine carrier systems still remains a major challenge. This article aims to describe a new delivery approach for tumor antigenic peptides and rationales of dendritic cells (DCs)-based vaccination. In order to elicit enhanced immune responses, poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use of drug delivery, diagnostics and other applications of clinical and basic science research were employed for the formulation of making nanoparticles (NPs) while delivering tumor antigenic peptides.

  10. Polymeric particulate systems for immunotherapy of cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimian, S.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has been established as a groundbreaking approach to treat cancer. It involves modulation of the host’s immune response to fight cancer. This is achieved by either enhancing tumor-specific T cell responses or inhibition of the tumor-induced immune suppression. Immunotherapy, however fa

  11. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4(+) T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects.

  12. Cancer immunotherapy and immunological memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

      Human immunological memory is the key distinguishing hallmark of the adaptive immune system and plays an important role in the prevention of morbidity and the severity of infection. The differentiation system of T cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. We believe that only human studies can elucidate the human immune system. The importance of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy has been pointed out, and the trafficking properties and long-lasting anti-tumor capacity of memory T cells play a crucial role in the control of malignant tumors. Adoptive cell transfer of less differentiated T cells has consistently demonstrated superior anti-tumor capacity relative to more differentiated T cells. Therefore, a human T cell population with the characteristics of stem cell memory is thought to be attractive for peptide vaccination and adoptive cell transfer. A novel human memory T cell population that we have identified is closer to the naive state than previous memory T cells in the T cell differentiation lineage, and has the characteristics of stem-like chemoresistance. Here we introduce this novel population and describe the fundamentals of immunological memory in cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Novel Immunotherapies for Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassim, Shamir; Bilodeau, Marc; Vincent, Catherine; Lapierre, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of unknown pathogenesis, characterized by a loss of immunological tolerance against liver autoantigens resulting in the progressive destruction of the hepatic parenchyma. Current treatments are based on non-specific immunosuppressive drugs. Although tremendous progress has been made using specific biological agents in other inflammatory diseases, progress has been slow to come for AIH patients. While current treatments are successful in the majority of patients, treatment discontinuation is difficult to achieve, and relapses are frequent. Lifelong immunosuppression is not without risks, especially in the pediatric population; 4% of patient with type 1 AIH will eventually develop hepatocellular carcinoma with a 2.9% probability after 10 years of treatment. Therefore, future treatments should aim to restore tolerance to hepatic autoantigens and induce long-term remission. Promising new immunotherapies have been tested in experimental models of AIH including T and B cell depletion and regulatory CD4+ T cells infusion. Clinical studies on limited numbers of patients have also shown encouraging results using B-cell-depleting (rituximab) and anti-TNF-α (infliximab) antibodies. A better understanding of key molecular targets in AIH combined with effective site-specific immunotherapies could lead to long-term remission without blanket immunosuppression and with minimal deleterious side effects. PMID:28184367

  14. Novel Approaches to Pediatric Cancer: Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal A. Shah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From the early 20th century, immunotherapy has been studied as a treatment modality for cancers, including in children. Since then, developments in monoclonal antibodies and vaccine therapies have helped to usher in a new era of cancer immunotherapeutics. However, efficacy of these types of therapies has been limited, mostly in part due to low tumor immunogenicity, cancer escape pathways, and toxicities. As researchers investigate the cellular and molecular components of immunotherapies, mechanisms to improve tumor specificity and overcome immune escape have been identified. The goal of immunotherapy now has been to modulate tumor escape pathways while amplifying the immune response by combining innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Although several limiting factors have been identified, these recent advances in immunotherapy remain at the forefront of pediatric oncologic therapeutic trials. Immunotherapy is now coming to the forefront of precision treatment for a variety of cancers, with evidence that agents targeting immunosuppressive mechanisms for cancer progression can be effective therapy [1-3]. In this review, we review various types of immunotherapy, including the cellular biology, limitations, recent novel therapeutics, and the application of immunotherapy to pediatric oncology.

  15. From "magic bullets" to specific cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riether, Carsten; Schürch, Christian; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2013-01-23

    The immune system is able to specifically target antigen-expressing cancer cells. The promise of immunotherapy was to eliminate cancer cells without harming normal tissue and, therefore, with no or very few side effects. Immunotherapy approaches have, for several decades, been tested against several tumours, most often against malignant melanoma. However, although detectable immune responses have regularly been induced, the clinical outcome has often been disappointing. The development of molecular methods and an improved understanding of tumour immunosurveillance led to novel immunotherapy approaches in the last few years. First randomised phase III trials proved that immunotherapy can prolong survival of patients with metastatic melanoma or prostate cancer. The development in the field is very rapid and various molecules (mainly monoclonal antibodies) that activate the immune system are currently being tested in clinical trials and will possibly change our treatment of cancer. The ultimate goal of any cancer therapy and also immunotherapy is to cure cancer. However, this depends on the elimination of the disease originating cancer stem cells. Unfortunately, cancer stem cells seem resistant to most available treatment options. Recent developments in immunotherapy may allow targeting these cancer stem cells specifically in the future. In this review, we summarise the current state of immunotherapy in clinical routine and the expected developments in the near future.

  16. Allergen specific immunotherapy in nasobronchial allergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi S

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: More than one antigen has been used for immunotherapy of allergic disorders. So far less than five antigens have been employed with variable results. AIM: To evaluate effect of multiple antigens up to six in the immunotherapy of nasobronchial allergy. SETTING AND DESIGN: Based on clinical history, symptoms present for at least 3 years with set criteria of immunomodulation for asthma and rhinitis: documented IgE mediated asthma and rhinitis, failure in allergen avoidance and moderate to severe clinical manifestations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five hundred cases of various allergic disorders attending allergy clinic of Bombay hospital were screened. Allergen specific immunotherapy was initiated in 131 subjects (56 -rhinitis and 75 asthma with prior consent. Patients suffering from allergic disorders secondary to diseases or drug therapy were excluded. Multiple allergen immunotherapy was given at specific intervals up to a period of one year. Allergen extracts were prepared as per standard technique. For statistical analysis "students′t test" was used. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Significant improvement in PEFR, reduction in skin sensitivity to allergens used in immunotherapy formulation and symptomatic relief without any untoward reaction show that multiple allergen immunotherapy is as effective as monoallergen immunotherapy in nasobronchial allergy.

  17. Tapping CD4 T cells for cancer immunotherapy: the choice of personalized genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Maurizio

    2015-03-01

    Cellular immune responses that protect against tumors typically have been attributed to CD8 T cells. However, CD4 T cells also play a central role. It was shown recently that, in a patient with metastatic cholangiocarcinoma, CD4 T cells specific for a peptide from a mutated region of ERBB2IP could arrest tumor progression. This and other recent findings highlight new opportunities for CD4 T cells in cancer immunotherapy. In this article, I discuss the role and regulation of CD4 T cells in response to tumor Ags. Emphasis is placed on the types of Ags and mechanisms that elicit tumor-protective responses. I discuss the advantages and drawbacks of cancer immunotherapy through personalized genomics. These considerations should help to guide the design of next-generation therapeutic cancer vaccines.

  18. SQ grass sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for disease-modifying treatment of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Ronald; Roberts, Graham; de Blic, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy is a treatment option for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). It is unique compared with pharmacotherapy in that it modifies the immunologic pathways that elicit an allergic response. The SQ Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet is approved in North...... America and throughout Europe for the treatment of adults and children (≥5 years old) with grass pollen-induced ARC. OBJECTIVE: The clinical evidence for the use of SQ grass SLIT-tablet as a disease-modifying treatment for grass pollen ARC is discussed in this review. METHODS: The review included....... CONCLUSION: Therefore, the SQ grass SLIT-tablet has an indication as a disease-modifying therapy in Europe, and a sustained effect is recognized in the United States....

  19. Bioinformatics for cancer immunotherapy target discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Lars Rønn; Campos, Benito; Barnkob, Mike Stein

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of immune response to cancer have been studied extensively and great effort has been invested into harnessing the therapeutic potential of the immune system. Immunotherapies have seen significant advances in the past 20 years, but the full potential of protective and therapeutic...... cancer immunotherapies has yet to be fulfilled. The insufficient efficacy of existing treatments can be attributed to a number of biological and technical issues. In this review, we detail the current limitations of immunotherapy target selection and design, and review computational methods to streamline...

  20. Elicitation of ostomy pouch preferences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole

    2011-01-01

    in ostomy pouch attributes. The theory, study design, elicitation procedure, and resulting preference structure of the sample is described. Methods: A discrete-choice experiment (DCE) was used to elicit preferences. Respondents were asked to choose between alternatives in choice sets, in which each...... pouches when cost is included as an attribute. A total of 254 patients responded to the survey and preferences were estimated using a random parameter logit econometric specification. Results: Respondents had significantly positive WTP for all potential attribute improvements presented in the survey...

  1. Innovation in Bladder Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, H Barton; Lamm, Donald L; Kamat, Ashish M; Keefe, Stephen; Taylor, John A; Ingersoll, Molly A

    2016-10-01

    Bladder cancer is understudied despite its high prevalence and its remarkable response to immunotherapy. Indeed, funding for studies to explore mechanisms of tumor immunity and novel new therapeutics is disproportionately lower for bladder cancer in comparison with malignancies of the breast, prostate, or lung. However, the recent successes of checkpoint blockade therapy suggest that new therapeutic strategies are on the horizon for bladder cancer. Here, we give a perspective into the evolution of bladder cancer therapy, focusing on strategies to treat high-risk nonmuscle invasive disease, followed by a discussion of recent advances in the treatment of muscle invasive bladder cancer and their potential applicability to lower stage disease. Finally, we explore immunotherapeutic strategies, which have been demonstrated to be successful in the treatment of other malignancies, for their potential to treat and cure patients with nonmuscle and muscle invasive bladder cancer.

  2. Targeting neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-07-01

    Studies first carried out in the 1980s have demonstrated murine T cells can recognize mutated gene products, known as neoantigens, and that these T cells are capable of mediating tumor rejection. The first human tumor antigens isolated in the early 1990s were the products of non-mutated genes expressed in a tissue-specific manner; subsequent studies have indicated that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes that are cultured in vitro frequently recognize mutated gene products. In addition, correlative studies indicate that clinical responses to therapies involving the use of antibodies directed against checkpoint inhibitors such as CTLA-4 and PD-1 may be associated with mutational burden, providing indirect evidence that these responses may primarily be mediated by neoantigen-reactive T cells. The importance of neoantigen-reactive T cells may be elucidated by the results of ongoing and future studies aimed at leveraging information gained from mutational profiling to enhance the potency of immunotherapies.

  3. IMUNODIAGNOSTIC AND IMMUNOTHERAPY OF AUTISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir TRAJKOVSKI

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Infantile autism is one of the most disabling illnesses of neurological, emotional and intellectual development. The cause of autism remains unknown. However, recent investigations suggest that this disorder shares several features of established autoimmune disorders.The aim of this article is to describe the news of imunodiagnostic and immunotherapy in autism. Interpretation of data is made by conceptual and methodological differences between studies. The autoimmune response is most likely directed against the brain myelin, perhaps secondary to a viral infection. The idea that autism is an autoimmune disorder is further strengthened by the fact that autistic patients respond well to treatment with immune modulating drugs. Immune interventions can produce immune modulation-state of suppression or stimulation. Immune therapy should always be done in consultation with physicians.

  4. New Horizons in Allergen Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    of active SLITcomparedwith placebo,with hazard ratios of0.69 (95%CI,0.49-0.96) for the 6 SQ-HDM group and 0.66 (95% CI, 0.47 -0.93) for the 12 SQHDM group. The absolute risk for first exacerbation was 26% (n = 62) for the 6 SQ-HDM group, 24% (n = 59) for the 12 SQHDM group, and 32% (n = 83) for the placebo...... is this outcome.Canthese results truly benefit similar patients encountered in clinical practice? Addressing these questions requires consideration ofnotjust theprimaryendpointbut alsothesecondaryoutcomesandpotentialstudylimitations.With regardtosecondaryoutcomes,thereweresignificantdifferences favoring...... treatmentwith ICS. The authors’ choice of a primary end point based on exacerbations during ICS reduction is also unique to immunotherapy trials,with previous trials ofHDMimmunotherapy focusing onmedication requirements, symptomsscores, or lung function as primary end points. Furthermore, the inclusion...

  5. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT...... in the management of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis. METHODS: We will undertake a systematic review, which will involve searching international biomedical databases for published, in progress and unpublished evidence. Studies will be independently screened against pre-defined eligibility criteria and critically...... appraised using established instruments. Data will be descriptively and, if possible and appropriate, quantitatively synthesised. CONCLUSION: The findings from this review will be used to inform the development of recommendations for EAACI's Guidelines on AIT....

  6. Local Nasal Specific Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passalacqua Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The possibility of producing local hyposensitization by administering allergens via mucosal routes was envisaged at the beginning of 1900, and local nasal immunotherapy has been extensively studied since the 1970s. Presently, there are 21 randomized controlled trials being conducted with the most common allergens, consistently showing the clinical efficacy of local nasal immunotherapy for rhinitis. Other advantages are that it has an optimal safety profile and can be self-administered at home by the patient. Moreover, there are several data from animal models and from humans that confirm the immunomodulatory effect of intranasally administered antigens. On the other hand, local nasal immunotherapy seems to be effective only on rhinitis symptoms and requires a particular technique of administration. For these reasons, its clinical use is progressively declining in favour of the sublingual route although nasal immunotherapy is validated in official documents and remains a viable alternative to injection.

  7. New visions in specific immunotherapy in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halken, Susanne; Lau, Susanne; Valovirta, Erkka

    2008-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy is indicated for confirmed immunoglobulin E-mediated airway diseases using standardized allergen products with documented clinical efficacy and safety. For decades the subcutaneous route of administration (SCIT) has been the gold standard. Recently, the sublingual...

  8. Allergen immunotherapy for the prevention of allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Dhami, Sangeeta; Netuveli, Gopal

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is a need to establish the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) for the prevention of allergic disease. Methods:Two reviewers independently screened nine international biomedical databases. Studies were quantitatively synthesized using ran...

  9. New types of immunotherapy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Noel; Penagos, Martin; Portnoy, Jay M

    2008-11-01

    Injection immunotherapy has been shown to be particularly beneficial in treating allergic rhinitis, mild to moderate asthma, and anaphylaxis caused by bee and wasp venom. It also produces a long-term, antigen-specific, protective immune effect and is the only treatment that offers the possibility of reducing the risk of asthma development in children with allergic rhinitis. Nonetheless, the potentially severe side effects associated with this form of immunotherapy limit its widespread use. Diverse preparations are being developed to increase its safety and improve its efficacy. These include alternative routes of administration, particularly the sublingual route; use of novel adjuvants, such as CpG oligonucleotides and mycobacterial vaccines; and other approaches, such as peptide immunotherapy, recombinant allergens, DNA vaccination, and combined therapy. Some of these immunotherapy forms have been evaluated in children.

  10. Who Will Benefit from Cancer Immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a “genetic signature” in the tumors of patients with advanced melanoma who responded to a form of immunotherapy called checkpoint blockade. The results could be the basis for a test that identifies likely responders.

  11. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  12. MAGE-A Antigens and Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajac, Paul; Schultz-Thater, Elke; Tornillo, Luigi; Sadowski, Charlotte; Trella, Emanuele; Mengus, Chantal; Iezzi, Giandomenica; Spagnoli, Giulio C.

    2017-01-01

    MAGE-A antigens are expressed in a variety of cancers of diverse histological origin and germinal cells. Due to their relatively high tumor specificity, they represent attractive targets for active specific and adoptive cancer immunotherapies. Here, we (i) review past and ongoing clinical studies targeting these antigens, (ii) analyze advantages and disadvantages of different therapeutic approaches, and (iii) discuss possible improvements in MAGE-A-specific immunotherapies. PMID:28337438

  13. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fox Bernard A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move into early stage clinical trials as quickly as it is safe, and if successful, these therapies should efficiently obtain regulatory approval and widespread clinical application. In late 2009 and 2010 the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC, convened an "Immunotherapy Summit" with representatives from immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation of cancer immunotherapy. With consensus on these hurdles, international working groups could be developed to make recommendations vetted by the participating organizations. These recommendations could then be considered by regulatory bodies, governmental and private funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed in this report. Some of the identified hurdles impede all investigators; others hinder investigators only in certain regions or institutions or are more relevant to specific types of immunotherapy or first-in-humans studies. Each of these hurdles can significantly delay clinical translation of promising advances in immunotherapy yet if overcome, have the potential to improve outcomes of patients with cancer.

  14. Immunotherapy for food allergies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinolli, Francesco; Carraro, Silvia; Berardi, Mariangela; Ferraro, Valentina; Baraldi, Eugenio; Zanconato, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Food allergy is an increasingly prevalent problem all over the world and especially in westernized countries, and there is an unmet medical need for an effective form of therapy. During childhood natural tolerance development is frequent, but some children with cow's milk or hen's egg allergy and the majority of children with peanut allergy will remain allergic until adulthood, limiting not only the diet of patients but also their quality of life. Within the last several years, the usefulness of immunotherapy for food allergies has been investigated in food allergic patients. Several food immunotherapies are being developed; these involve oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, or subcutaneous administration of small amounts of native or modified allergens to induce immune tolerance. The approach generally follows the same principles as immunotherapy of other allergic disorders and involves administering small increasing doses of food during an induction phase followed by a maintenance phase with regular intake of a maximum tolerated amount of food. Oral immunotherapy seems to be a promising approach for food allergic patients based on results from small uncontrolled and controlled studies. Diet containing heated milk and egg may represent an alternative approach to oral immunomodulation for cow's milk and egg allergic subjects. However, oral food immunotherapy remains an investigational treatment to be further studied before advancing into clinical practice. Additional bigger, multicentric and hopefully randomized-controlled studies must answer multiple questions including optimal dose, ideal duration of immunotherapy, degree of protection, efficacy for different ages, severity and type of food allergy responsive to treatment.

  15. Immunological comparison of allergen immunotherapy tablet treatment and subcutaneous immunotherapy against grass allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, K; Backer, V; Lund, G;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated allergic rhinitis to grass pollen can successfully be treated with either allergen immunotherapy tablets (SLIT tablet) or SQ-standardized subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). The efficacy of these two treatment modalities for grass allergy is comparable, but the immunological...

  16. Cancer immunotherapy out of the gate: the 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute International Immunotherapy Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tontonoz, Matthew; Gee, Connie E

    2015-05-01

    The 22nd annual Cancer Research Institute (CRI) International Immunotherapy Symposium was held from October 5-8, 2014, in New York City. Titled "Cancer Immunotherapy: Out of the Gate," the symposium began with a Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium satellite meeting focused on issues in immunotherapy drug development, followed by five speaker sessions and a poster session devoted to basic and clinical cancer immunology research. The second annual William B. Coley lecture was delivered by Lieping Chen, one of the four recipients of the 2014 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Tumor Immunology; the other three recipients were Gordon Freeman, Tasuku Honjo, and Arlene Sharpe. Prominent themes of the conference were the use of genomic technologies to identify neoantigens and the emergence of new immune modulatory molecules, beyond CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1, as new therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  17. Research on Immunotherapy: Using the Immune System to Treat Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells that suppress immune responses. These advances in cancer immunotherapy are the result of long-term investments in ... Engineering Patients’ Immune Cells to Treat Their Cancers Cancer immunotherapy in children: How does it differ from approaches ...

  18. Sublingual immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization position paper 2013 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.W. Canonica (Giorgio Walter); L. Cox (Linda); R. Pawankar (Ruby); C.E. Baena-Cagnani (Carlos); M.S. Blaiss (Michael); S. Bonini (Sergio); J. Bousquet (Jean); M. Calderon (Moises); E. Compalati (Enrico); S.R. Durham (Stephen); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); D. Larenas-Linnemann (Désirée); H. Nelson (Harold); G. Passalacqua (Giovanni); O. Pfaar (Oliver); K. Rosario (Karyna); D. Ryan (Dermot); L. Rosenwasser (Lanny); P. Schmid-Grendelmeier (Peter); G.E. Senna (Gianenrico); E. Valovirta (Erkka); H.P. van Bever (Hugo); P. Vichyanond (Pakit); U. Wahn (Ulrich); O.M. Yusuf (Osman)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe have prepared this document, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Paper 2013 Update", according to the evidence-based criteria, revising and updating chapters of the originally published paper, "Sublingual Immunotherapy: World Allergy Organization Position Pa

  19. Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Alan J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Allison, James P.

    2007-01-01

    The progression of a productive immune response requires that a number of immunological checkpoints be passed. Passage may require the presence of excitatory costimulatory signals or the avoidance of negative or coinhibitory signals, which act to dampen or terminate immune activity. The immunoglobulin superfamily occupies a central importance in this coordination of immune responses, and the CD28/cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4):B7.1/B7.2 receptor/ligand grouping represents the archetypal example of these immune regulators. In part the role of these checkpoints is to guard against the possibility of unwanted and harmful self-directed activities. While this is a necessary function, aiding in the prevention of autoimmunity, it may act as a barrier to successful immunotherapies aimed at targeting malignant self-cells that largely display the same array of surface molecules as the cells from which they derive. Therapies aimed at overcoming these mechanisms of peripheral tolerance, in particular by blocking the inhibitory checkpoints, offer the potential to generate antitumor activity, either as monotherapies or in synergism with other therapies that directly or indirectly enhance presentation of tumor epitopes to the immune system. Such immunological molecular adjuvants are showing promise in early clinical trials. This review focuses on the results of the archetypal example of checkpoint blockade, anti-CTLA-4, in preclinical tumor models and clinical trials, while also highlighting other possible targets for immunological checkpoint blockade. PMID:16730267

  20. Recombinant allergens for pollen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Michael; Pichler, Ulrike; Ferreira, Fatima

    2013-12-01

    Specific immunotherapy (IT) represents the only potentially curative therapeutic intervention of allergic diseases capable of suppressing allergy-associated symptoms not only during treatment, but also after its cessation. Presently, IT is performed with allergen extracts, which represent a heterogeneous mixture of allergenic, as well as nonallergenic, compounds of a given allergen source. To overcome many of the problems associated with extract-based IT, strategies based on the use of recombinant allergens or derivatives thereof have been developed. This review focuses on recombinant technologies to produce allergy therapeuticals, especially for allergies caused by tree, grass and weed pollen, as they are among the most prevalent allergic disorders affecting the population of industrialized societies. The reduction of IgE-binding of recombinant allergen derivatives appears to be mandatory to increase the safety profile of vaccine candidates. Moreover, increased immunogenicity is expected to reduce the dosage regimes of the presently cumbersome treatment. In this regard, it has been convincingly demonstrated in animal models that hypoallergenic molecules can be engineered to harbor inherent antiallergenic immunologic properties. Thus, strategies to modulate the allergenic and immunogenic properties of recombinant allergens will be discussed in detail. In recent years, several successful clinical studies using recombinant wild-type or hypoallergens as active ingredients have been published and, currently, novel treatment forms with higher safety and efficacy profiles are under investigation in clinical trials. These recent developments are summarized and discussed.

  1. Anti-CD40-mediated cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Sufia Butt; Sørensen, Jesper Freddie; Olsen, Barbara Nicola

    2014-01-01

    activation and thus enhancement of immune responses. Treatment with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies has been exploited in several cancer immunotherapy studies in mice and led to the development of anti-CD40 antibodies for clinical use. Here, Dacetuzumab and Lucatumumab are in the most advanced stage...... with other cancer immunotherapies, in particular interleukin (IL)-2. An in-depth analysis of this immunotherapy is provided elsewhere. In the present review, we provide an update of the most recent clinical trials with anti-CD40 antibodies. We present and discuss recent and ongoing clinical trials...... in this field, including clinical studies which combine anti-CD40 treatment with other cancer-treatments, such as Rituximab and Tremelimumab....

  2. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Masanori; Koga, Noriko; Moriya, Fukuko; Itoh, Kyogo

    2016-01-01

    Although treatment options for castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) have increased over the last decade, there remains a need for strategies that can provide durable disease control and long-term benefit. Recently, immunotherapy has emerged as a viable and attractive strategy for the treatment of CRPC. To date, there are multiple strategies to target the immune system, and several approaches including therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been most successful in clinical trials. With regard to this, we report the results of the most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in CRPC and discuss the future development of immunotherapy for CRPC, as well as the potential importance of biomarkers in the future progress of this field.

  3. Immunotherapy of tumor by targeting angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jianmei; TIAN Ling; WEI Yuquan

    2004-01-01

    Tumor growth and metastasis are angiogenesis-dependent. Anti-angiogenic therapy represents a new strategy for the development of anti-cancer therapies. In recent years, there has been made great progress in anti-angiogenic therapy. As far as the passive immunotherapy is concerned, a recombinant humanized antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-Avastin has been approved by FDA as the first angiogenesis inhibitor to treat colorectal cancer. For active specific immunotherapy, various strategies for cancer vaccines, including whole endothelial cell vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, DNA vaccines, and peptides or protein vaccines, have been developed to break immune tolerance against important molecules associated with tumor angiogenesis and induce angiogenesis-specific immune responses. This article reviews the angiogenesis-targeted immunotherapy of tumor from the above two aspects.

  4. Immunotherapy advances in uro-genital malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratta, Raffaele; Zappasodi, Roberta; Raggi, Daniele; Grassi, Paolo; Verzoni, Elena; Necchi, Andrea; Di Nicola, Massimo; Salvioni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer has made significant progresses over the last 20 years. Multiple efforts have been attempted to restore immune-mediated tumor elimination, leading to the development of several targeted immunotherapies. Data from recent clinical trials suggest that these agents might improve the prognosis of patients with advanced genito-urinary (GU) malignancies. Nivolumab has been the first immune checkpoint-inhibitor approved for pre-treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Pembrolizumab and atezolizumab have shown promising results in both phase I and II trials in urothelial carcinoma. Brentuximab vedotin has demonstrated early signals of clinical activity and immunomodulatory effects in highly pre-treated patients with testicular germ cell tumors. In this review, we have summarized the major clinical achievements of immunotherapy in GU cancers, focusing on immune checkpoint blockade as well as the new immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) under clinical evaluation for these malignancies.

  5. Defining the critical hurdles in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Bernard A; Schendel, Dolores J; Butterfield, Lisa H

    2011-01-01

    Scientific discoveries that provide strong evidence of antitumor effects in preclinical models often encounter significant delays before being tested in patients with cancer. While some of these delays have a scientific basis, others do not. We need to do better. Innovative strategies need to move...... immunotherapy organizations representing Europe, Japan, China and North America to discuss collaborations to improve development and delivery of cancer immunotherapy. One of the concepts raised by SITC and defined as critical by all parties was the need to identify hurdles that impede effective translation...... companies and academic institutions to facilitate changes necessary to accelerate clinical translation of novel immune-based cancer therapies. The critical hurdles identified by representatives of the collaborating organizations, now organized as the World Immunotherapy Council, are presented and discussed...

  6. Strategies of mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ling Ye; Ya-Hui Chuang; Bor-Luen Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Incidences of allergic disease have recently increased worldwide.Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) has long been a controversial treatment for allergic diseases.Although beneficial effects on clinically relevant outcomes have been demonstrated in clinical trials by subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT),there remains a risk of severe and sometimes fatal anaphylaxis.Mucosal immunotherapy is one advantageous choice because of its non-injection routes of administration and lower side-effect profile.This study reviews recent progress in mucosal immunotherapy for allergic diseases.Administration routes,antigen quality and quantity,and adjuvants used are major considerations in this field.Also,direct uses of unique probiotics,or specific cytokines,have been discussed.Furthermore,some researchers have reported new therapeutic ideas that combine two or more strategies.The most important strategy for development of mucosal therapies for allergic diseases is the improvement of antigen formulation,which includes continuous searching for efficient adjuvants,collecting more information about dominant T-cell epitopes of allergens,and having the proper combination of each.In clinics,when compared to other mucosal routes,sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is a preferred choice for therapeutic administration,although local and systemic side effects have been reported.Additionally,not every allergen has the same beneficial effect.Further studies are needed to determine the benefits of mucosal immunotherapy for different allergic diseases after comparison of the different administration routes in children and adults.Data collected from large,well-designed,double-blind,placebo-controlled,and randomized trials,with post-treatment follow-up,can provide robust substantiation of current evidence.

  7. Adverse Events During Immunotherapy Against Grass Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis - Differences Between Subcutaneous and Sublingual Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Backer, Vibeke

    2015-08-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) triggered by grass pollen is a common disease, affecting millions of people worldwide. Treatment consists of symptom-alleviating drugs, such as topical corticosteroids or antihistamines. Another option is potentially curative immunotherapy, currently available as sublingual and subcutaneous treatment. We investigated the potential differences in the prevalence and severity of adverse events related to subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) against grass pollen-induced AR. A thorough literature search was performed with PubMed and EMBASE. The findings were compared with the available summaries of product characteristics (SPC) and with commercial pharmacology databases (Micromedex). The majority of available safety data originate from registered products of standardized allergens. A surprisingly large percentage of drugs, especially those used in the United States, have no systematically collected safety data. No sufficiently powered randomized trials comparing sublingual and subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) were available, but general safety assessments indicate that sublingual tablet treatment is safer than subcutaneous treatment. Not all commonly used immunotherapy drugs are officially registered, and not all have systematically collected safety data. This is especially true for older drugs used in the United States. In contrast, newer drugs that have undergone extensive clinical testing have better documentation, but unified collection of safety data is still lacking. Considering the evidence available, most drugs elicit similar side effects from the same organ systems, and symptoms from the sublingual drug classes are probably less severe. However, a head-to-head comparison of safety and efficacy is lacking.

  8. Improving cancer immunotherapy with DNA methyltransferase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammad H; Wang, Lei; Goldberg, Michael S

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy confers durable clinical benefit to melanoma, lung, and kidney cancer patients. Challengingly, most other solid tumors, including ovarian carcinoma, are not particularly responsive to immunotherapy, so combination with a complementary therapy may be beneficial. Recent findings suggest that epigenetic modifying drugs can prime antitumor immunity by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens, chemokines, and activating ligands by cancer cells as well as cytokines by immune cells. This review, drawing from both preclinical and clinical data, describes some of the mechanisms of action that enable DNA methyltransferase inhibitors to facilitate the establishment of antitumor immunity.

  9. Proceedings of the 2016 China Cancer Immunotherapy Workshop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Xue

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Table of contents A1 Proceedings of 2016 China Cancer Immunotherapy Workshop, Beijing, China Bin Xue, Jiaqi Xu, Wenru Song, Zhimin Yang, Ke Liu, Zihai Li A2 Set the stage: fundamental immunology in forty minutes Zihai Li A3 What have we learnt from the anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapy of advanced human cancer? Lieping Chen A4 Immune checkpoint inhibitors in lung cancer Edward B. Garon A5 Mechanisms of response and resistance to checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma Siwen Hu-Lieskovan A6 Checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy in lymphoid malignancies Wei Ding A7 Translational research to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies Chong-Xian Pan A8 Immune checkpoint inhibitors in gastrointestinal malignancies Weijing Sun A9 What’s next beyond PD-1/PDL1? Yong-Jun Liu A10 Cancer vaccines: new insights into the oldest immunotherapy strategy Lei Zheng A11 Bispecific antibodies for cancer immunotherapy Delong Liu A12 Updates on CAR-T immunotherapy Michel Sadelain A13 Adoptive T cell therapy: personalizing cancer treatment Cassian Yee A14 Immune targets and neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy Rongfu Wang A15 Phase I/IIa trial of chimeric antigen receptor modified T cells against CD133 in patients with advanced and metastatic solid tumors Meixia Chen, Yao Wang, Zhiqiang Wu, Hanren Dai, Can Luo, Yang Liu, Chuan Tong, Yelei Guo, Qingming Yang, Weidong Han A16 Cancer immunotherapy biomarkers: progress and issues Lisa H. Butterfield A17 Shaping of immunotherapy response by cancer genomes Timothy A. Chan A18 Unique development consideration for cancer immunotherapy Wenru Song A19 Immunotherapy combination Ruirong Yuan A20 Immunotherapy combination with radiotherapy Bo Lu A21 Cancer immunotherapy: past, present and future Ke Liu A22 Breakthrough therapy designation drug development and approval Max Ning A23 Current European regulation of innovative oncology medicines: opportunities for immunotherapy Harald Enzmann, Heinz Zwierzina

  10. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell ...

  11. Adapting conventional cancer treatment for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jian; Liu, Zhida; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-05-01

    The efficacy of directly killing tumors by conventional cancer therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, has been for several decades well established. But, a suppressed immune response might become a lethal side effect after repeated cycles of intensive treatment. Recently, achievements in immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive T cell-mediated immunotherapies have resulted in changes in frontline management of advanced cancer diseases. However, accumulated evidence indicates that immunotherapeutic and conventional strategies alone are often ineffective to eradicate big tumors or metastasis. To improve the outcomes of treatment for advanced cancer diseases, the combination of conventional cancer treatment with various immunotherapeutic approaches has been attempted and has shown potential synergistic effects. Recent studies have unexpectedly demonstrated that some strategies of conventional cancer treatment can regulate the immune response positively, thus the understanding of how to adapt conventional treatment for immunotherapy is crucial to the design of effective combination therapy of conventional treatment with immunotherapy. Here, we review both experimental and clinical studies on the therapeutic effect and its mechanisms of combining conventional therapy with immunotherapy in treatment of cancer.

  12. Role of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Caicun; Ren, Shengxiang

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is one of the key cytokines with pleiotropic effects on immune system. It has been approved for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma and metastatic melanoma. Recent progress has been made in our understanding of IL-2 in regulating lymphocytes that has led to exciting new directions for cancer immunotherapy. While improved IL-2 formulations might be used as monotherapies, their combination with other anticancer immunotherapies, such as adoptive cell transfer regimens, antigen-specific vaccination, and blockade of immune checkpoint inhibitory molecules, for example cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) mono-antibodies, would held the promise of treating metastatic cancer. Despite the comprehensive studies of IL-2 on immune system have established the application of IL-2 for cancer immunotherapy, a number of poignant obstacles remain for future research. In the present review, we will focus on the key biological features of IL-2, current applications, limitations, and future directions of IL-2 in cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Improved endpoints for cancer immunotherapy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hoos (Axel); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); S. Janetzki (Sylvia); F.S. Hodi (Stephen); R. Ibrahim (Ramy); A. Anderson (Aparna); R. Humphrey (Rachel); B. Blumenstein (Brent); L. Old (Lloyd); J. Wolchok (Jedd)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractUnlike chemotherapy, which acts directly on the tumor, cancer immunotherapies exert their effects on the immune system and demonstrate new kinetics that involve building a cellular immune response, followed by changes in tumor burden or patient survival. Thus, adequate design and evaluat

  14. Specific immunotherapy for renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleumer, I.

    2006-01-01

    Despite the fact that evaluation of cytokine-based therapies for mRCC shows that a subset of patients react favourable to immunotherapy, significant side effects do occur. With the increased knowledge of tumor-immunology, the recognition of immunogenic tumor proteins and antibodies, new treatment op

  15. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Japanese Cedar Pollinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimihiro Okubo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of pollinosis caused by cedar pollen has increased by 10% these ten years of 26.5% in the investigation of 2008 in Japan. The pharmacotherapy is a main treatment tool for pollinosis, and the surgical treatment is not acknowledged to the treatment of pollinosis internationally. Moreover, allergen immunotherapy enters a special treatment method, and is an important therapeutic procedure. The allergen immunotherapy is unique for having possibility of curing allergen specific allergic diseases. However the side effect of allergen subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT, such as anaphylaxis is kept at a distance in a medical situation in Japan. Then, a sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT that was safer than it, developed in Europe for pollinosis induced by grass or ragweed, but not in Japan. As a result, the effect of SLIT was proven in the cedar pollinosis in Japan as high level evidence. A whole body immunity induction is thought in the appearance of the effect, and, in addition, it is necessary to be going to be cleared the accurate mechanism of the effect in the future. Moreover, the development of a special SLIT and the import of an overseas product are needed in Japan.

  16. Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Fungal Sinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Jonathan M; Driskill, Brent R; Clenney, Timothy L; Gessler, Eric M

    2015-10-01

    Allergic fungal sinusitis (AFS) is a condition that has an allergic basis caused by exposure to fungi in the sinonasal tract leading to chronic inflammation. Despite standard treatment modalities, which typically include surgery and medical management of allergies, patients still have a high rate of recurrence. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been used as adjuvant treatment for AFS. Evidence exists to support the use of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a safe and efficacious method of treating allergies, but no studies have assessed the utility of SLIT in the management of allergic fungal sinusitis. A record review of cases of AFS that are currently or previously treated with sublingual immunotherapy from 2007 to 2011 was performed. Parameters of interest included serum IgE levels, changes in symptoms, Lund-McKay scores, decreased sensitization to fungal allergens associated with AFS, and serum IgE levels. Ten patients with diagnosed AFS were treated with SLIT. No adverse effects related to the use of SLIT therapy were identified. Decreases in subjective complaints, exam findings, Lund-McKay scores, and serum IgE levels were observed. Thus, sublingual immunotherapy appears to be a safe adjunct to the management of AFS that may improve patient outcomes.

  17. Bioinformatics for cancer immunology and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoentong, Pornpimol; Angelova, Mihaela; Efremova, Mirjana; Gallasch, Ralf; Hackl, Hubert; Galon, Jerome; Trajanoski, Zlatko

    2012-11-01

    Recent mechanistic insights obtained from preclinical studies and the approval of the first immunotherapies has motivated increasing number of academic investigators and pharmaceutical/biotech companies to further elucidate the role of immunity in tumor pathogenesis and to reconsider the role of immunotherapy. Additionally, technological advances (e.g., next-generation sequencing) are providing unprecedented opportunities to draw a comprehensive picture of the tumor genomics landscape and ultimately enable individualized treatment. However, the increasing complexity of the generated data and the plethora of bioinformatics methods and tools pose considerable challenges to both tumor immunologists and clinical oncologists. In this review, we describe current concepts and future challenges for the management and analysis of data for cancer immunology and immunotherapy. We first highlight publicly available databases with specific focus on cancer immunology including databases for somatic mutations and epitope databases. We then give an overview of the bioinformatics methods for the analysis of next-generation sequencing data (whole-genome and exome sequencing), epitope prediction tools as well as methods for integrative data analysis and network modeling. Mathematical models are powerful tools that can predict and explain important patterns in the genetic and clinical progression of cancer. Therefore, a survey of mathematical models for tumor evolution and tumor-immune cell interaction is included. Finally, we discuss future challenges for individualized immunotherapy and suggest how a combined computational/experimental approaches can lead to new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer, improved diagnosis, and prognosis of the disease and pinpoint novel therapeutic targets.

  18. Current progress in immunotherapy for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kelly; Kim, Victoria; Jaffee, Elizabeth; Zheng, Lei

    2016-10-10

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal cancers with few treatment options. Immune-based strategies to treat pancreatic cancer, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors, therapeutic vaccines, and combination immunotherapies, are showing promise where other approaches have failed. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, including anti-CTLA4, anti-PD-1, and anti-PD-L1 antibodies, are effective as single agents in immune sensitive cancers like melanoma, but lack efficacy in immune insensitive cancers including pancreatic cancer. However, these inhibitors are showing clinical activity, even in traditionally non-immunogenic cancers, when combined with other interventions, including chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and therapeutic vaccines. Therapeutic vaccines given together with immune modulating agents are of particular interest because vaccines are the most efficient way to induce effective anti-tumor T cell responses, which is required for immunotherapies to be effective. In pancreatic cancer, early studies suggest that vaccines can induce T cells that have the potential to recognize and kill pancreatic cancer cells, but the tumor microenvironment inhibits effective T cell trafficking and function. While progress has been made in the development of immunotherapies for pancreatic cancer over the last several years, additional trials are needed to better understand the signals within the tumor microenvironment that are formidable barriers to T cell infiltration and function. Additionally, as more pancreatic specific antigens are identified, immunotherapies will continue to be refined to provide the most significant clinical benefit.

  19. Novel immunotherapy approaches to food allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayen, Simone M; Kostadinova, Atanaska I; Garssen, Johan; Otten, Henny G; Willemsen, Linette E M

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Despite reaching high percentages of desensitization using allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) in patients with food allergy, recent studies suggest only a low number of patients to reach persistent clinical tolerance. This review describes current developments in strategies to

  20. Cancer immunotherapy : insights from transgenic animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLaughlin, PMJ; Kroesen, BJ; Harmsen, MC; de Leij, LFMH

    2001-01-01

    A wide range of strategies in cancer immunotherapy has been developed in the last decade, some of which are currently being used in clinical settings. The development of these immunotherapeutical strategies has been facilitated by the generation of relevant transgenic animal models. Since the differ

  1. Steroids vs immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aasbjerg, Kristian; Backer, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for seasonal allergic rhinitis induced by airborne allergens can be divided into two major groups: symptom-dampening drugs, such as antihistamines and corticosteroids, and disease-modifying drugs in the form of immunotherapy. It has been speculated that depot-injection corticosteroids g...

  2. Emerging Opportunities and Challenges in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L; Demaria, Sandra; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Zarour, Hassane M; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-04-15

    Immunotherapy strategies against cancer are emerging as powerful weapons for treatment of this disease. The success of checkpoint inhibitors against metastatic melanoma and adoptive T-cell therapy with chimeric antigen receptor T cells against B-cell-derived leukemias and lymphomas are only two examples of developments that are changing the paradigms of clinical cancer management. These changes are a result of many years of intense research into complex and interrelated cellular and molecular mechanisms controling immune responses. Promising advances come from the discovery of cancer mutation-encoded neoantigens, improvements in vaccine development, progress in delivery of cellular therapies, and impressive achievements in biotechnology. As a result, radical transformation of cancer treatment is taking place in which conventional cancer treatments are being integrated with immunotherapeutic agents. Many clinical trials are in progress testing potential synergistic effects of treatments combining immunotherapy with other therapies. Much remains to be learned about the selection, delivery, and off-target effects of immunotherapy used alone or in combination. The existence of numerous escape mechanisms from the host immune system that human tumors have evolved still is a barrier to success. Efforts to understand the rules of immune cell dysfunction and of cancer-associated local and systemic immune suppression are providing new insights and fuel the enthusiasm for new therapeutic strategies. In the future, it might be possible to tailor immune therapy for each cancer patient. The use of new immune biomarkers and the ability to assess responses to therapy by noninvasive monitoring promise to improve early cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Personalized immunotherapy based on individual genetic, molecular, and immune profiling is a potentially achievable future goal. The current excitement for immunotherapy is justified in view of many existing opportunities for harnessing

  3. Awareness and understanding of cancer immunotherapy in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellstedt, Håkan; Gaudernack, Gustav; Gerritsen, Winald R; Huber, Christoph; Melero, Ignacio; Parmiani, Giorgio; Scholl, Suzy; Thatcher, Nicholas; Wagstaff, John; Zielinski, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunotherapy in the management of cancer is growing, and a range of new immunotherapeutic strategies is becoming available. It is important that people involved in the care of cancer understand how cancer immunotherapies differ from conventional chemotherapy and apply this knowledge to their clinical practice. Therefore, from August-September 2011 we undertook a survey of awareness, attitudes, and perceptions of cancer immunotherapy among 426 healthcare professionals (HCPs) in Europe with the aim of identifying and prioritizing educational needs. Nearly all (98%) HCPs were aware of cancer immunotherapy. While 68% of HCPs indicated a high level of interest in cancer immunotherapies, only 24% of the HCPs had direct experience with them. Overall perceptions of cancer immunotherapy among HCPs were largely positive (60%) and rarely negative (3%). The key advantages of cancer immunotherapy were perceived to be good safety and tolerability (75%), a targeted mechanism of action (61%) and good efficacy (48%). The leading barriers to use of immunotherapies were costs of treatment (58%), past clinical trial failures (45%), and access/formulary restrictions (44%). The results indicate that, among the respondents, awareness of cancer immunotherapy was high but that knowledge levels varied and direct experience with their use was limited. There appears to be a need for educational activities on cancer immunotherapy, as well as generation and communication of clinical data on long-term efficacy and safety.

  4. Chemoenzymatically synthesized multimeric Tn/STn MUC1 glycopeptides elicit cancer-specific anti-MUC1 antibody responses and override tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Louise; Reis, Celso A; Tarp, Mads A;

    2005-01-01

    an optimal vaccine design. Glycopeptides with complete O-glycan occupancy (five sites per repeat) elicited the strongest antibody response reacting with MUC1 expressed in breast cancer cell lines in both Balb/c and MUC1.Tg mice. The elicited humoral immune response showed remarkable specificity for cancer...... cells suggesting that the glycopeptide design holds promise as a cancer vaccine. The elicited immune responses were directed to combined glycopeptide epitopes, and both peptide sequence and carbohydrate structures were important for the antigen. A MAb (5E5) with similar specificity as the elicited......The MUC1 mucin represents a prime target antigen for cancer immunotherapy because it is abundantly expressed and aberrantly glycosylated in carcinomas. Attempts to generate strong humoral immunity to MUC1 by immunization with peptides have generally failed partly because of tolerance. In this study...

  5. Workshop on immunotherapy combinations. Society for immunotherapy of cancer annual meeting Bethesda, November 3, 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forero Ivan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although recent FDA approvals on ipilimumab and sipuleucel-T represent major milestones, the ultimate success of immunotherapy approaches will likely benefit from appropriate combinations with other immunotherapeutic and/or non-immunotherapeutic approaches. However, implementation of ideal combinations in the clinic may still face formidable challenges in regulatory, drug-availability and intellectual property aspects. The 2011 SITC annual meeting hosted a workshop on combination immunotherapy to discuss: 1 the most promising combinations found in the laboratory; 2 early success of combination immunotherapy in clinical trials; 3 industry perspectives on combination approaches, and 4 relevant regulatory issues. The integrated theme was how to accelerate the implementation of efficacious combined immunotherapies for cancer patients. Rodent animal models are providing many examples of synergistic combinations that typically include more than two agents. However, mouse and human immunology differ in a significant number of mechanisms and hence we might be missing opportunities peculiar to humans. Nonetheless, incisive animal experimentation with deep mechanistic insight remains the best compass that we can use to guide our paths in combinatorial immunotherapy. Combination immunotherapy clinical trials are already in progress and preliminary results are extremely promising. As a key to translate promising combinations into clinic, real and “perceived” business and regulatory hurdles were debated. A formidable step forward would be to be able to test combinations of investigational agents prior to individual approval. Taking together the FDA and the industrial perspective on combinatorial immunotherapy, the audience was left with the clear message that this is by no means an impossible task. The general perception is that the road ahead of us is full of combination clinical trials which hopefully will bring clinical benefit to our cancer

  6. Advances of Immunotherapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is complex heterogeneous due to unclear biological characteristics in terms of cell origin, pathogenesis and driver genes etc. Diagnosis and treatment of SCLC has been slowly improved and few breakthroughs have been discovered up to now. Therefore new strategies are urgently needed to improve the efficacy of SCLC treatment. Tumor immunotherapy has potential to restore and trigger the immune system to recognize and eliminate tumor cells, notably it has only minimal adverse impact on normal tissue. Cancer vaccine, adoptive immunotherapy, cytokines and checkpoint inhibitors have now been launched for clinical treatment of SCLC. Ipilimumab is the most promising medicine of immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is expected to bring new vision to the treatment of SCLC. And further researches are needed on such problems affecting efficacy of immunotherapy as the heterogeneity of SCLC, the uncertainty of target for immunotherapy, the immune tolerance, etc.

  7. Advances and Prospects in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhua Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy is a promising and effective treatment modality for patients with cancers. Cytokine, anticytokine, and antibody therapies appear to be effective in treating various forms of cancer. The human papillomavirus vaccine is protective for cervical cancer, and this discovery has paved the way to the development of cancer vaccines for other forms of virus-associated cancers such as liver cancer and Merkel cell carcinoma. Clinical trials have demonstrated that adoptive cell therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes can induce tumor regression in approximately 75% of metastatic melanoma patients, suggesting the possibility of using similar technique to effectively treat breast, lung, and renal cancers in the near future. Besides, genetically engineered T cells transduced with genes encoding specific T cell receptors and chimeric antigen receptors have been shown effective in the treatment of cancer patients. These studies suggest that combination therapies are superior choices in cancer immunotherapy for patients.

  8. Era of cancer immunotherapy has come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

      The dramatic and long durable anti-tumor effect of immune checkpoint blockade, such as anti-CTLA-4 Ab, anti-PD-1 Ab, and anti-PD-L1 Ab was surprised the world. In addition, CAR-T cell therapy that target the CD19 indicates a very high response rate to the CD19-positive hematologic malignancies. Now, no one doubts the presence of immunity against cancer.  Further, accordingly, tumor-specific neoantigen are attention now, the clinical trials of individualized peptide vaccination that target patient individual neoantigens has begun in the Western. On the other hand, the peptide vaccine therapy that target common self-antigen is not yet been approved in Japan, the development is struggling.  In this paper, I overview the cancer immunotherapy and neoantigen and introduce some development of cancer immunotherapy in Japan.

  9. Molecular biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2014-03-26

    Grass pollen allergy represents a significant cause of allergic morbidity worldwide. Component-resolved diagnosis biomarkers are increasingly used in allergy practice in order to evaluate the sensitization to grass pollen allergens, allowing the clinician to confirm genuine sensitization to the corresponding allergen plant sources and supporting an accurate prescription of allergy immunotherapy (AIT), an important approach in many regions of the world with great plant biodiversity and/or where pollen seasons may overlap. The search for candidate predictive biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy (tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells biomarkers, serum blocking antibodies biomarkers, especially functional ones, immune activation and immune tolerance soluble biomarkers and apoptosis biomarkers) opens new opportunities for the early detection of clinical responders for AIT, for the follow-up of these patients and for the development of new allergy vaccines.

  10. Immunotherapy for gastric premalignant lesions and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzetto, Valerio; Maddalo, Gemma; Basso, Daniela; Farinati, Fabio

    2012-06-01

    Chronic atrophic gastritis, a precancerous change for gastric cancer, shows a loss of appropriate glands, Helicobacter pylori infection and autoimmune gastritis being the two main etiologic factors. While H. pylori eradication is the mandatory treatment for the former, no etiologic treatment is available for the latter, in which a Th1-type response, modulated by Tregs and Th17 cells, is involved. H. pylori-related atrophic gastritis is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, while autoimmune atrophic gastritis is also linked to a substantial risk of gastric type I carcinoid, related to the chronic stimulus exerted by hypergastrinemia on enterochromaffin-like cells. Several studies have been published on gastric cancer treatment through an active specific immunotherapy, aimed at improving the immunoregulatory response and increasing the circulating tumor-specific T cells. No study on immunotherapy of carcinoids is available but, in our experience, the administration of an antigastrin 17 vaccine induced carcinoid regression in two out of three patients treated.

  11. Immunological landscape and immunotherapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Jesús; Melero, Ignacio; Sangro, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a serious therapeutic challenge and targeted therapies only provide a modest benefit in terms of overall survival. Novel approaches are urgently needed for the treatment of this prevalent malignancy. Evidence demonstrating the antigenicity of tumour cells, the discovery that immune checkpoint molecules have an essential role in immune evasion of tumour cells, and the impressive clinical results achieved by blocking these inhibitory receptors, are revolutionizing cancer immunotherapy. Here, we review the data on HCC immunogenicity, the mechanisms for HCC immune subversion and the different immunotherapies that have been tested to treat HCC. Taking into account the multiplicity of hyperadditive immunosuppressive forces acting within the HCC microenvironment, a combinatorial approach is advised. Strategies include combinations of systemic immunomodulation and gene therapy, cell therapy or virotherapy.

  12. SUBLINGUAL IMMUNOTHERAPY IN CHILDREN: STATE OF ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterio, T; Manti, S; Colavita, L; Marseglia, L; Sturiale, M; Miraglia Del Giudice, M; Salpietro, A; Cuppari, C

    2015-01-01

    Allergic immunotherapy (AIT) today represents a therapeutic practice for the treatment of allergic diseases such as rhinitis or asthma and is recognized as the only treatment able to modify the natural history of the disease. Administering gradually increasing doses of the causative allergen, AIT, has the objective of achieving immune tolerance against allergens. One of the administration routes most used in clinical practice is represented by the sublingual route. Current research on sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) is focused on confirming the efficacy for all the different relevant allergens, on a better definition of allergen extracts and the improvement of their immunological properties and safety, on the identification of best treatment regimens, and on the possibility of extending the clinical indications. The aim of this review is to describe the most recent step in the field of SLIT development.

  13. [Multidisciplinary therapy for 984 cancer patients--hyperthermic immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Tsutomu; Miyazawa, Kenki; Takeda, Takashi; Takeda, Hiroko; Takeda, Yutaka

    2010-11-01

    We treated 984 advanced or recurrent cancer patients with hyperthermia or immunotherapy (2005/7-2009/12). We have 137 clinical benefit cases (CR, PR and long SD) including 22 complete response (CR) cases. Effective rates of immunotherapy increased from 9.8% to 17.8% using hyperthermia. In the cases of ovarian cancer, head and neck cancer, lung cancer, prostatic cancer, gastric cancer, thyroid cancer and breast cancer, all confirmed high effective rates with hyperthermic immunotherapy.

  14. Therapeutic Effects and Biomarkers in Sublingual Immunotherapy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Fujimura; Yoshitaka Okamoto; Masaru Taniguchi

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy is considered to be the only curative treatment for allergic diseases such as pollinosis, perennial rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. The sublingual route is widely applied for immunotherapy for allergy, instead of the conventional administration by subcutaneous route. A recent meta-analysis of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) has shown that this approach is safe, has positive clinical effects, and provides prolonged therapeutic effects after discontinuation of treatment. Ho...

  15. Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0423 TITLE: Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Smita...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0423 Novel Immune-Modulating Cellular Vaccine for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...immune checkpoint blockade, local CTLA-4 modulation, prostate cancer immunotherapy , prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), RNA-based vaccines 16

  16. ATMPs for Cancer Immunotherapy: A Regulatory Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses European regulatory requirements for development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) for cancer immunotherapy approaches, describing the framework for clinical trials and for marketing authorization.Regulatory critical issues and challenges for developing ATMP are also discussed, with focus on potency determination, long-term follow-up, comparability, and insertional mutagenesis issues. Some of the most critical features of GMP application to ATMP are also described.

  17. Local immunotherapy in experimental murine lung inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Caroline Uebel, Sonja Koch, Anja Maier, Nina Sopel, Anna Graser, Stephanie Mousset & Susetta Finotto ### Abstract Innovative local immunotherapy for severe lung diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or lung cancer requires a successful delivery to access the desired cellular target in the lung. An important route is the direct instillation into the airways in contrast to delivery through the digestive tract. This protocol details a method to deliv...

  18. Allergen immunotherapy, routes of administration and cytokine networks: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuppari, Caterina; Leonardi, Salvatore; Manti, Sara; Filippelli, Martina; Alterio, Tommaso; Spicuzza, Lucia; Rigoli, Luciana; Arrigo, Teresa; Lougaris, Vassilios; Salpietro, Carmelo

    2014-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy is a disease-modifying therapy, effective for the treatment of allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, conjunctivitis or stinging insect allergy. Allergen immunotherapy involves the administration of increasing doses of allergens with the aim of ameliorating the allergic response. Although precise underlying mechanisms of the induction of immune tolerance remain unclear, immunotherapy has been associated with the induction of distinct subsets of Tregs that eventually lead to peripheral tolerance by inducing a deviation from Th2 to Th1 immune responses. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the mechanisms of immunotherapy in relationship to different routes of administration and also provides a unifying view.

  19. Recent advances and future challenges in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Namiko; Tamada, Koji; Tamura, Hideto

    Remarkable advances have been made in cancer immunotherapy. Recent treatment strategies, especially chimeric antigen receptor-T (CAR-T) cell therapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors, reportedly achieve higher objective responses and better survival rates than previous immunotherapies for patients with treatment-resistant malignancies, creating a paradigm shift in cancer treatment. Several clinical trials of cancer immunotherapy for patients with various malignancies are ongoing. However, those with certain malignancies, such as low-immunogenic cancers, cannot be successfully treated with T-cell immunotherapy, and subsets of immunotherapy-treated patients relapse, meaning that more effective immunotherapeutic strategies are needed for such patients. Furthermore, the safety, convenience, and cost of cancer immunotherapy need to be improved in the near future. Herein, we discuss recent advances and future challenges in cancer immunotherapy, i.e., the identification of neoantigens for the development of individualized immunotherapies, the development of new CAR-T cell therapies, including so-called armored CAR-T cells that can induce greater clinical effects and thereby achieve longer survival, the development of off-the-shelf treatment regimens using non-self cells or cell lines, and effective cancer immunotherapy combinations.

  20. Review on Immunotherapies for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha JIN

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis, most cases are diagnosed at a very late stage. More effective medications or therapies should be developed to improve its prognosis. The advancement of tumor immunity and tumor immunosuppression facilitated the feasibility of immunotherapies for lung cancer. Ipilimumab, antibody to Programmed death-1 (PD-1, Toll-like receptor agonists, liposomal BLP25 (L- BLP25, belagenpumatucel-L, melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3 vaccine and talactoferrin have been proved to be effective for lung cancer through early clinical trials, most of the drugs have moved forward to phase III trials, so as to collect much higher level evidence to support the immunotherapies incorporated into the multidisciplinary treatment of lung cancer. The selection of target patients at appropriate stages, breaking down of tumor immunosuppression as well as the objective measurement of tumor response to the therapy are major challenges for the development of immunotherapies for lung cancer. The clarifying of the mechanism of immune escape led to the above drug development, and immune-senescence has already become the hotspot in this field.

  1. Immunotherapy for Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenori Uehara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although multimodal therapies including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy have improved clinical outcomes of patients with bone and soft tissue sarcomas, the prognosis of patients has plateaued over these 20 years. Immunotherapies have shown the effectiveness for several types of advanced tumors. Immunotherapies, such as cytokine therapies, vaccinations, and adoptive cell transfers, have also been investigated for bone and soft tissue sarcomas. Cytokine therapies with interleukin-2 or interferons have limited efficacy because of their cytotoxicities. Liposomal muramyl tripeptide phosphatidylethanolamine (L-MTP-PE, an activator of the innate immune system, has been approved as adjuvant therapeutics in combination with conventional chemotherapy in Europe, which has improved the 5-year overall survival of patients. Vaccinations and transfer of T cells transduced to express chimeric antigen receptors have shown some efficacy for sarcomas. Ipilimumab and nivolumab are monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit immune checkpoint mechanisms. These antibodies have recently been shown to be effective for patients with melanoma and also investigated for patients with sarcomas. In this review, we provide an overview of various trials of immunotherapies for bone and soft tissue sarcomas, and discuss their potential as adjuvant therapies in combination with conventional therapies.

  2. Immunotherapy for nasopharyngeal cancer-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Chia, Whay Kuang; Toh, Han Chong

    2016-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is associated with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and characterized by peritumoral immune infiltrate. Advanced NPC has high lethality. Immunotherapy directed against EBV antigen targets has been previously explored in clinical trials, and is likely to be validated as an important target in NPC as randomized data emerges in the future. Cancer vaccines and adoptive T cell therapy have been explored in the clinic, with the latter showing the greatest success. Recent advances in gene sequencing technology now allow personalized tumor epitope mapping, whilst the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis offers the opportunity to activate adaptive T cell response in vivo. Anti-PD1 antibodies have shown promising activity in early phase clinical trials, and randomized studies against chemotherapy are underway. As immunotherapy is incorporated into standard treatment paradigms, issues of optimal combinations with targeting agents, immune adjuvants, and sequence with chemotherapy and radiation therapy will need to be addressed. Effective strategies to increase tumor antigenicity, improve immunological memory and reduce immune escape, will need to be developed to improve treatment outcomes. Here we present a brief history of the evolution of immunotherapy in NPC, and highlight key concepts relevant to its further development in the clinic.

  3. Immunotherapy with the storage mite lepidoglyphus destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armentia-Medina, A; Tapias, J A; Martín, J F; Ventas, P; Fernández, A

    1995-01-01

    We carried out a double-blind clinical trial of immunotherapy on 35 patients sensitized to the storage mite Lepidoglyphus destructor (Ld). Before and after 12 months of specific hyposensitization (Abelló Lab., Spain) we performed in vivo (skin tests with Ld, methacholine and challenge tests), and in vitro tests (specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and specific IgE, IgG, IgG1 and IgG4 to their major allergen Lep dI). We also monitored the efficacy and safety of the immunotherapy with clinical and analytical controls (symptoms and medication score, detection of immune complexes). After therapy we found a significant decrease in specific skin reactivity, dose of positive challenge tests, and hyperresponsiveness to methacholine. Sputum eosinophilia decreased. Specific IgE to Ld was increased and we also observed an increase in specific IgG1 and IgG4 to Ld and Lep DI. The placebo group showed no changes in these variables. There were no severe secondary reactions after treatment with the extract. Patients-self-evaluation was favourable and their labour absence decreased. No development of circulating immune complexes was associated with this immunotherapy.

  4. Laser immunotherapy of canine and feline neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J. P.; Bartels, Kenneth E.; Davidson, Ellen B.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Lehenbauer, Terry W.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    1998-07-01

    The major cause of treatment failure in human and veterinary cancer patients is tumor invasion and metastasis. The inability of local therapy (surgery, radiation, photodynamic therapy) to eradicate a metastatic cancer presents a challenge in the therapy of residual or micrometastatic disease. Because of its local therapy limitations, chromophore-enhanced selective photothermal laser treatment has been augmented with a superimposed laser-induced systemic photobiological reaction, laser immunotherapy. Laser immunotherapy is a novel cancer treatment consisting of: (1) a laser in the infrared wavelength range (i.e. 805 nm solid state laser); (2) a photosensitizer of the corresponding absorption peak [i.e. indocyanine green (ICG)]; and (3) an immunoadjuvant [i.e. glycated chitosan gel (GCG)]. The intratumor injection of the photosensitizer (ICG) and immunoadjuvant (GCG) solution is followed by noninvasive laser irradiation. The laser energy causes tumor cell destruction by photothermal interaction to reduce the tumor burden and at the same time exposes tumor antigens. The immunoadjuvant concomitantly stimulates the host to mount a systemic anti-tumor immune response against the remaining cells of the tumor and to induce a long-term, tumor-specific immunity. This study investigates the feasibility of utilizing laser immunotherapy as an adjunctive therapy for the control of feline fibrosarcoma in future.

  5. DC-based immunotherapy for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitawaki, Toshio

    2014-02-01

    Great advances have been made in the treatment of hematological malignancies, but achieving a definitive cure remains an elusive goal for the majority of patients. Antigen-specific tumor immunotherapy has the potential to improve clinical outcome in patients with such diseases by eradicating chemotherapy-resistant tumor cell clones without damaging normal tissues. Dendritic cells (DCs) serve as an essential link between the innate and the adaptive immune systems, acting as key controllers of antigen-specific T cell responses. Molecular identification of tumor-specific antigens recognized by T lymphocytes and technical advances in ex vivo generation of human DCs has enabled us to develop DC-based tumor immunotherapies (also called "DC vaccines"). To date, a large number of clinical trials of DC vaccines have been conducted for a variety of tumors, including hematological malignancies. Overall, these trials have demonstrated that DC vaccines have excellent safety profiles, moderate immunological activity, and mild clinical efficacy. To establish a role for DC vaccines in the treatment of hematological malignancies, we need both to define patient populations that can obtain clinical benefit from DC vaccines and to develop combination therapies that augment clinical efficacy of DC vaccines. In this review, I will describe current status of DC-based immunotherapy for hematological malignancies, and discuss future perspectives in this field.

  6. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Moises A; Demoly, Pascal; Gerth van Wijk, Roy; Bousquet, Jean; Sheikh, Aziz; Frew, Anthony; Scadding, Glenis; Bachert, Claus; Malling, Hans J; Valenta, Rudolph; Bilo, Beatrice; Nieto, Antonio; Akdis, Cezmi; Just, Jocelyne; Vidal, Carmen; Varga, Eva M; Alvarez-Cuesta, Emilio; Bohle, Barbara; Bufe, Albrecht; Canonica, Walter G; Cardona, Victoria; Dahl, Ronald; Didier, Alain; Durham, Stephen R; Eng, Peter; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Jacobsen, Lars; Jutel, Marek; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Klimek, Ludger; Lötvall, Jan; Moreno, Carmen; Mosges, Ralph; Muraro, Antonella; Niggemann, Bodo; Pajno, Giovanni; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pfaar, Oliver; Rak, Sabina; Senna, Gianenrico; Senti, Gabriela; Valovirta, Erkka; van Hage, Marianne; Virchow, Johannes C; Wahn, Ulrich; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos

    2012-10-30

    Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy.Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies.Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals' quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases.Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in which Europe is recognized as a

  7. EAACI: A European Declaration on Immunotherapy. Designing the future of allergen specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calderon Moises A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergy today is a public health concern of pandemic proportions, affecting more than 150 million people in Europe alone. In view of epidemiological trends, the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI predicts that within the next few decades, more than half of the European population may at some point in their lives experience some type of allergy. Not only do allergic patients suffer from a debilitating disease, with the potential for major impact on their quality of life, career progression, personal development and lifestyle choices, but they also constitute a significant burden on health economics and macroeconomics due to the days of lost productivity and underperformance. Given that allergy triggers, including urbanization, industrialization, pollution and climate change, are not expected to change in the foreseeable future, it is imperative that steps are taken to develop, strengthen and optimize preventive and treatment strategies. Allergen specific immunotherapy is the only currently available medical intervention that has the potential to affect the natural course of the disease. Years of basic science research, clinical trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses have convincingly shown that allergen specific immunotherapy can achieve substantial results for patients, improving the allergic individuals’ quality of life, reducing the long-term costs and burden of allergies, and changing the course of the disease. Allergen specific immunotherapy not only effectively alleviates allergy symptoms, but it has a long-term effect after conclusion of the treatment and can prevent the progression of allergic diseases. Unfortunately, allergen specific immunotherapy has not yet received adequate attention from European institutions, including research funding bodies, even though this could be a most rewarding field in terms of return on investments, translational value and European integration and, a field in

  8. A combined approach of human leukocyte antigen ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis to improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Janet Kerstin; Stevanović, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    The breakthrough development of immune checkpoint inhibitors as clinically effective novel therapies demonstrates the potential of cancer immunotherapy. The identification of suitable targets for specific immunotherapy, however, remains a challenging task. Most peptides previously used for vaccination in clinical trials were able to elicit strong immunological responses but failed with regard to clinical benefit. This might, at least partly, be caused by an inadequate peptide selection, usually derived from established tumor-associated antigens which are not necessarily presented as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) ligands. Recently, HLA ligandome analysis revealed cancer-associated peptides, which have been used in clinical trials showing encouraging impact on survival. To improve peptide-based cancer immunotherapy, our group established a combined approach of HLA ligandomics and immunogenicity analysis for the identification of vaccine peptides. This approach is based on the identification of naturally presented HLA ligands on tumor samples, the selection of tumor-associated/tumor-specific HLA ligands and their subsequent testing for immunogenicity in vitro. In this review, we want to present our pipeline for the identification of vaccine peptides, focusing on ovarian cancer, and want to discuss differences to other approaches. Furthermore, we want to give a short outlook of a potential multi-peptide vaccination trial using the novel identified peptides.

  9. Engineered Human Ferritin Nanoparticles for Direct Delivery of Tumor Antigens to Lymph Node and Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo-Ram; Ko, Ho Kyung; Ryu, Ju Hee; Ahn, Keum Young; Lee, Young-Ho; Oh, Se Jin; Na, Jin Hee; Kim, Tae Woo; Byun, Youngro; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Lee, Jeewon

    2016-01-01

    Efficient delivery of tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) to lymph nodes (LNs) is essential to eliciting robust immune response for cancer immunotherapy but still remains unsolved. Herein, we evaluated the direct LN-targeting performance of four different protein nanoparticles with different size, shape, and origin [Escherichia coli DNA binding protein (DPS), Thermoplasma acidophilum proteasome (PTS), hepatitis B virus capsid (HBVC), and human ferritin heavy chain (hFTN)] in live mice, using an optical fluorescence imaging system. Based on the imaging results, hFTN that shows rapid LN targeting and prolonged retention in LNs was chosen as a carrier of the model TSA [red fluorescence protein (RFP)], and the flexible surface architecture of hFTN was engineered to densely present RFPs on the hFTN surface through genetic modification of subunit protein of hFTN. The RFP-modified hFTN rapidly targeted LNs, sufficiently exposed RFPs to LN immune cells during prolonged period of retention in LNs, induced strong RFP-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cell response, and notably inhibited RFP-expressing melanoma tumor growth in live mice. This suggests that the strategy using protein nanoparticles as both TSA-carrying scaffold and anti-cancer vaccine holds promise for clinically effective immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:27725782

  10. Cancer immunotherapy: a future paradigm shift in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostou, Valsamo K; Brahmer, Julie R

    2015-03-01

    Emerging evidence on the role of the antitumor activity of the immune system has generated great interest in immunotherapy even for tumors that were historically considered as nonimmunogenic. Immunotherapy is emerging as a major modality in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment focusing on vaccine approaches to elicit specific immune responses and development of inhibitors of the molecular mediators of cancer-induced immunosuppression (immune checkpoints) to boost antitumor immune responses. Amplification of the host response against evolving tumors through vaccination is being investigated in ongoing clinical trials with tumor cell vaccines; however, the clinical efficacy of these agents has been limited. Blocking inhibitory pathways such as the CTL antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint pathways with mAbs has generated antitumor immune responses that are transforming cancer therapeutics. PD-1 and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibodies have shown durable responses in NSCLC, with a favorable safety profile and manageable side effects. The activity of immune checkpoint inhibitors is currently been assessed in treatment-naïve patients with PD-L1-positive advanced NSCLC. Combinatorial approaches with other immune checkpoint inhibitors, chemotherapy, or targeted agents are being explored in ongoing clinical trials, and may improve outcome in NSCLC.

  11. Progress in Adaptive Immunotherapy for Cancer in Companion Animals: Success on the Path to a Cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L. Anderson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the ability of the immune system to eradicate cancer has been a long-held goal of oncology. Work from the last two decades has finally brought immunotherapy into the forefront for cancer treatment, with demonstrable clinical success for aggressive tumors where other therapies had failed. In this review, we will discuss a range of therapies that are in different stages of clinical or preclinical development for companion animals with cancer, and which share the common objective of eliciting adaptive, anti-tumor immune responses. Even though challenges remain, manipulating the immune system holds significant promise to create durable responses and improve outcomes in companion animals with cancer. Furthermore, what we learn from this process will inform and accelerate development of comparable therapies for human cancer patients.

  12. Recombinant allergens for allergen-specific immunotherapy: 10 years anniversary of immunotherapy with recombinant allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Rudolf; Linhart, B; Swoboda, I; Niederberger, V

    2011-06-01

    The broad applicability of allergen-specific immunotherapy for the treatment and eventually prevention of IgE-mediated allergy is limited by the poor quality and allergenic activity of natural allergen extracts that are used for the production of current allergy vaccines. Today, the genetic code of the most important allergens has been deciphered; recombinant allergens equalling their natural counterparts have been produced for diagnosis and immunotherapy, and a large panel of genetically modified allergens with reduced allergenic activity has been characterized to improve safety of immunotherapy and explore allergen-specific prevention strategies. Successful immunotherapy studies have been performed with recombinant allergens and hypoallergenic allergen derivatives and will lead to the registration of the first recombinant allergen-based vaccines in the near future. There is no doubt that recombinant allergen-based vaccination strategies will be generally applicable to most allergen sources, including respiratory, food and venom allergens and allow to produce safe allergy vaccines for the treatment of the most common forms of IgE-mediated allergies.

  13. Awareness and understanding of cancer immunotherapy in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mellstedt, H.; Gaudernack, G.; Gerritsen, W.R.; Huber, C.; Melero, I.; Parmiani, G.; Scholl, S.; Thatcher, N.; Wagstaff, J.; Zielinski, C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of immunotherapy in the management of cancer is growing, and a range of new immunotherapeutic strategies is becoming available. It is important that people involved in the care of cancer understand how cancer immunotherapies differ from conventional chemotherapy and apply this knowledge to t

  14. INTRAPLEURAL IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR METASTATIC PLEURISIES IN PATIENTS WITH BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Titov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrapleural immunotherapy for metastatic pleurisies demonstrates a high efficiency in the treatment of patients with breast cancer (BC. This immunotherapy modality is regarded as one of the stages of complex treatment in patients with disseminated BC and allows its capabilities to be extended for their further management.

  15. Immunobiology and immunotherapy in genitourinary malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivas, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has traditionally been a critical component of the cancer treatment armamentarium in genitourinary (GU) cancers. It has an established role in the management of carefully selected patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) [e.g., high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2)] and non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) [e.g., intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)]. In 2010, the sipuleucel-T vaccine was approved by the FDA for the management of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), based on a phase III trial showing overall survival (OS) benefit compared to placebo. The immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab (anti-PD-1) recently received FDA approval for the management of patients with advanced RCC patients previously treated with anti-angiogenic therapy, based on OS benefit compared to everolimus. Recently, large clinical trials demonstrated meaningful clinical benefit, including durable responses, as well as a good tolerability/safety profile with the use of immune checkpoint inhibitors in advanced RCC and chemotherapy-resistant advanced urothelial carcinoma (UC), while FDA just approved atezolizumab for platinum-treated advanced UC. Numerous interesting trials in different cancers are ongoing. Several combinations of immune checkpoint blockade with chemotherapeutics, vaccines, targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors & monoclonal antibodies, epigenetic modifiers, anti-angiogenic agents, tumor microenvironment & myeloid cell targeting therapies, metabolic modification strategies, radiation, and others, are being tested in clinical trials. Comprehensive understanding of the factors underlying antitumor immune responses in physiologically relevant animal models and humans will refine further the clinical benefit of immunotherapy. Discovery and validation of appropriate molecular biomarkers via coordinated translational research efforts, rational clinical trial designs with suitable endpoints and well-defined eligibility criteria

  16. Allergen immunotherapy for insect venom allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, S; Zaman, H; Varga, Eva-Maria

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the management of insect venom allergy. To inform this process, we sought to assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety...... of AIT in the management of insect venom allergy. METHODS: We undertook a systematic review, which involved searching 15 international biomedical databases for published and unpublished evidence. Studies were independently screened and critically appraised using established instruments. Data were...

  17. Immunotherapy strategies for spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min; Chen, Kai-Ting; Shu, Ya-Hai; Qiu, Chun-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration in the central nervous system (CNS) of adult mammalian after traumatic injury is limited, which often causes permanent functional motor and sensory loss. After spinal cord injury (SCI), the lack of regeneration is mainly attributed to the presence of a hostile microenvironment, glial scarring, and cavitation. Besides, inflammation has also been proved to play a crucial role in secondary degeneration following SCI. The more prominent treatment strategies in experimental models focus mainly on drugs and cell therapies, however, only a few strategies applied in clinical studies and therapies still have only limited effects on the repair of SCI. Recently, the interests in immunotherapy strategies for CNS are increasing in number and breadth. Immunotherapy strategies have made good progresses in treating many CNS degenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), stroke, and multiple sclerosis (MS). However, the strategies begin to be considered to the treatment of SCI and other neurological disorders in recent years. Besides anti-inflamatory therapy, immunization with protein vaccines and DNA vaccines has emerged as a novel therapy strategy because of the simplicity of preparation and application. An inflammatory response followed by spinal cord injury, and is controled by specific signaling molecules, such as some cytokines playing a crucial role. As a result, appropriate immunoregulation, the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines may be an effective therapy strategy for earlier injury of spinal cord. In addition, myelinassociated inhibitors (MAIs) in the injured spinal cord, such as Nogo, myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) and oligodendrocyte- myelin glycoprotein (OMgp) are known to prevent axonal regeneration through their co-receptors, and to trigger demyelinating autoimmunity through T cell-mediated harmful autoimmune response. The antagonism of the MAIs through vaccinating with

  18. Cancer Immunotherapy Targeting the Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Longfei Huo; Janice WS Tang; Junjian Huang; Peitang Huang; Cuifen Huang; Hsiang-fu Kung; Marie C. Lin

    2006-01-01

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is expressed in more than 85% of tumor cells but is usually not found in normal cells, which makes hTERT as an ideal tumor-associate antigen (TAA) to develop potential vaccine specifically destroying cancers without impairing normal tissues in human cancer immunotherapy. Here are reviewed the fundamental advances of studies on immunogenicity of hTERT or its peptides and the early clinical trials using the hTERT vaccine approach in the last decades.

  19. Fighting cancer with magnetic nanoparticles and immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, L.; Mejías, R.; Barber, D. F.; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Serna, C. J.; Lázaro, F. J.; Morales, M. P.

    2012-03-01

    IFN-γ-adsorbed DMSA-coated magnetite nanoparticles can be used as an efficient in vivo drug delivery system for tumor immunotherapy. Magnetic nanoparticles, with adsorbed interferon-γ, were targeted to the tumor site by application of an external magnetic field. A relevant therapeutic dosage of interferon in the tumor was detected and led to a notable reduction in tumor size. In general, only 10% of the total injected nanoparticles after multiple exposures were found in tissues by AC susceptibility measurements of the corresponding resected tissues. Magnetic nanoparticle biodistribution is affected by the application of an external magnetic field.

  20. Immunotherapy and Immune Evasion in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thakur, Archana, E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org; Vaishampayan, Ulka [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Lum, Lawrence G., E-mail: thakur@karmanos.org [Department of Oncology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Department of Immunology and Microbiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

    2013-05-24

    Metastatic prostate cancer remains to this day a terminal disease. Prostatectomy and radiotherapy are effective for organ-confined diseases, but treatment for locally advanced and metastatic cancer remains challenging. Although advanced prostate cancers treated with androgen deprivation therapy achieves debulking of disease, responses are transient with subsequent development of castration-resistant and metastatic disease. Since prostate cancer is typically a slowly progressing disease, use of immune-based therapies offers an advantage to target advanced tumors and to induce antitumor immunity. This review will discuss the clinical merits of various vaccines and immunotherapies in castrate resistant prostate cancer and challenges to this evolving field of immune-based therapies.

  1. Cancer immunotherapy: sipuleucel-T and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstrom, Aimee E; Cauley, Diana H; Atkinson, Bradley J; Sharma, Padmanee

    2011-08-01

    In April 2010, sipuleucel-T became the first anticancer vaccine approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Different from the traditional chemotherapy agents that produce widespread cytotoxicity to kill tumor cells, anticancer vaccines and immunotherapies focus on empowering the immune system to overcome the tumor. The immune system consists of innate and adaptive components. The CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells are the most crucial components of the adaptive arm of the immune system that act to mediate antitumor responses. However, T-cell responses are regulated by intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms, which may interfere with effective antitumor responses. Many anticancer immunotherapies use tumor-associated antigens as vaccines in order to stimulate an immune response against tumor cells. Sipuleucel-T is composed of autologous mononuclear cells incubated with a fusion protein consisting of a common prostate cancer antigen (prostatic acid phosphatase) linked to an adjuvant (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). It is postulated that when the vaccine is infused into the patient, the activated antigen-presenting cells displaying the fusion protein will induce an immune response against the tumor antigen. In a recent randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial, sipuleucel-T significantly improved median overall survival by 4.1 months in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer compared with placebo. Although overall survival was improved, none of the three phase III clinical trials found a significant difference in time to disease progression. This, along with cost and logistic issues, has led to an active discussion. Although sipuleucel-T was studied in the metastatic setting, its ideal place in therapy is unknown, and clinical trials are being conducted in patients at different stages of disease and in combination with radiation therapy, antiandrogen therapy, and chemotherapy. Various other anticancer

  2. Solving the Problem of Nonadherence to Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Bruce G; Lockey, Richard F

    2016-02-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) can improve allergic response by modifying the underlying disease. Many patients are nonadherent, and do not achieve full benefit. Numerous studies reveal that fewer than 10% of patients complete a full course and that most abandon treatment in the first year. The development and testing of interventions to improve AIT are emerging. Data from adherence interventions in other chronic conditions provide guidance to allergists/immunologists. Evidence-based communication strategies-patient-centered care, motivational interviewing, and shared-decision making-underscore the importance of taking time to establish trust, understand patient concerns and priorities, and involve the patient in decisions regarding AIT.

  3. VRP immunotherapy targeting neu: treatment efficacy and evidence for immunoediting in a stringent rat mammary tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laust, Amanda K; Sur, Brandon W; Wang, Kehui; Hubby, Bolyn; Smith, Jonathan F; Nelson, Edward L

    2007-12-01

    The ability to overcome intrinsic tolerance to a strict "self" tumor-associated antigen (TAA) and successfully treat pre-existing tumor is the most stringent test for anti-tumor immunotherapeutic strategies. Although this capacity has been demonstrated in various models using complicated strategies that may not be readily translated into the clinical arena, straightforward antigen-specific immunotherapeutic strategies in the most stringent models of common epithelial cancers have largely failed to meet this standard. We employed an immunotherapeutic strategy using an alphavirus-based, virus-like replicon particle (VRP), which has in vivo tropism for dendritic cells, to elicit immune responses to the non-mutated TAA rat neu in an aggressive rat mammary tumor model. Using this VRP-based immunotherapeutic strategy targeting a single TAA, we generated effective anti-tumor immunity in the setting of pre-existing tumor resulting in the cure of 36% of rats over multiple experiments, P = 0.002. We also observed down-regulation of rat neu expression in tumors that showed initial responses followed by tumor escape with resumption of rapid tumor growth. These responses were accompanied by significant anti-tumor proliferative responses and CD8+ cellular tumor infiltrates, all of which were restricted to animals receiving the anti-neu immunotherapy. Together these data, obtained in a stringent "self" TAA model, indicate that the VRP-based antigen-specific immunotherapy elicits sufficiently potent immune responses to exert immunologic pressure, selection, and editing of the growing tumors, thus supporting the activity of this straightforward immunotherapy and suggesting that it is a promising platform upon which to build even more potent strategies.

  4. Immunotherapy and gene therapy of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, M; Scherbaum, W A

    2004-12-01

    Most forms of thyroid cancer have a good prognosis. Some tumours, however, dedifferentiate and may finally develop into highly malignant anaplastic thyroid carcinomas with a low survival time. Due to their dedifferentiation these tumours are inaccessible to classical therapeutic options as radioiodide treatment or thyrotropin-suppression. Radical surgical revision of the tumour masses is the therapy of choice of patients with limited disease stages including patients with medullary thyroid carcinomas. Despite progress in radiation and chemotherapy regimes, many metastatic forms remain, however, incurable by conventional therapies. During the past few years new developments in immunology have revealed increasing information about the molecular basis of tumour-host interactions. The multitude of information resulting from basic science in cellular immunology, together with the availability of biologic reagents in pharmacological amounts, has opened new venues for the development of immunotherapy approaches for patients with different kind of cancers including thyroid malignancies. This review describes some most important developments in cellular immunotherapies e.g. dendritic cells-based protocols and gene therapy. It also provides a brief overview on the role of cytokines and antibodies in the treatment of advanced thyroid malignancies.

  5. Peptide immunotherapy in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen M Anderton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We now have potent drugs available to treat the inflammatory component of multiple sclerosis (MS. However, not all patients respond, the drugs are not curative, and the associated risks to beneficial immune surveillance are considerable. A more desirable approach is to specifically target those comparatively rare T lymphocytes that are orchestrating the autoimmune attack. Using the autoantigen itself to instill immune tolerance in those cells remains a holy grail of immunotherapy. Peptide immunotherapy (PIT is highly effective at silencing autoimmune responses in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, and clinical trials of PIT are underway in MS. This review discusses the current paradigms for PIT-induced tolerance in naïve T cells. It highlights the need for better understanding of the mode of action of PIT upon memory and effector T cells that are responsible for driving/sustaining ongoing autoimmune pathology. Recent studies in EAEsuggest genetic and epigenetic changes in these pathogenic T-cell populations in response to PIT. Finally, future challenges to effective translation of PIT to the clinic are considered.

  6. Personalized cancer immunotherapy using Systems Medicine approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shailendra K; Jaitly, Tanushree; Schmitz, Ulf; Schuler, Gerold; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-05-01

    The immune system is by definition multi-scale because it involves biochemical networks that regulate cell fates across cell boundaries, but also because immune cells communicate with each other by direct contact or through the secretion of local or systemic signals. Furthermore, tumor and immune cells communicate, and this interaction is affected by the tumor microenvironment. Altogether, the tumor-immunity interaction is a complex multi-scale biological system whose analysis requires a systemic view to succeed in developing efficient immunotherapies for cancer and immune-related diseases. In this review we discuss the necessity and the structure of a systems medicine approach for the design of anticancer immunotherapies. We support the idea that the approach must be a combination of algorithms and methods from bioinformatics and patient-data-driven mathematical models conceived to investigate the role of clinical interventions in the tumor-immunity interaction. For each step of the integrative approach proposed, we review the advancement with respect to the computational tools and methods available, but also successful case studies. We particularized our idea for the case of identifying novel tumor-associated antigens and therapeutic targets by integration of patient's immune and tumor profiling in case of aggressive melanoma.

  7. Personalized approaches to active immunotherapy in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophir, Eran; Bobisse, Sara; Coukos, George; Harari, Alexandre; Kandalaft, Lana E

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is emerging as a promising anti-cancer curative modality. However, in contrast to recent advances obtained employing checkpoint blockade agents and T cell therapies, clinical efficacy of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still limited. Most vaccination attempts in the clinic represent "off-the shelf" approaches since they target common "self" tumor antigens, shared among different patients. In contrast, personalized approaches of vaccination are tailor-made for each patient and in spite being laborious, hold great potential. Recent technical advancement enabled the first steps in the clinic of personalized vaccines that target patient-specific mutated neo-antigens. Such vaccines could induce enhanced tumor-specific immune response since neo-antigens are mutation-derived antigens that can be recognized by high affinity T cells, not limited by central tolerance. Alternatively, the use of personalized vaccines based on whole autologous tumor cells, overcome the need for the identification of specific tumor antigens. Whole autologous tumor cells could be administered alone, pulsed on dendritic cells as lysate, DNA, RNA or delivered to dendritic cells in-vivo through encapsulation in nanoparticle vehicles. Such vaccines may provide a source for the full repertoire of the patient-specific tumor antigens, including its private neo-antigens. Furthermore, combining next-generation personalized vaccination with other immunotherapy modalities might be the key for achieving significant therapeutic outcome.

  8. Immunotherapy Treatments of Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bainan Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (WAIHA is one of four clinical types of autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA, with the characteristics of autoantibodies maximally active at body temperature. It produces a variable anemia—sometimes mild and sometimes severe. With respect to the absence or presence of an underlying condition, WAIHA is either idiopathic (primary or secondary, which determines the treatment strategies in practice. Conventional treatments include immune suppression with corticosteroids and, in some cases, splenectomy. In recent years, the number of clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies and immunosuppressants in the treatment of WAIHA increased as the knowledge of autoimmunity mechanisms extended. This thread of developing new tools of treating WAIHA is well exemplified with the success in using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, Rituximab. Following this success, other treatment methods based on the immune mechanisms of WAIHA have emerged. We reviewed these newly developed immunotherapy treatments here in order to provide the clinicians with more options in selecting the best therapy for patients with WAIHA, hoping to stimulate researchers to find more novel immunotherapy strategies.

  9. A European perspective on immunotherapy for food allergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kirsten

    2012-05-01

    Food allergies are common, and frequently, the only treatment option is strict avoidance. Unfortunately, many patients accidentally ingest allergenic foods, which can result in severe anaphylactic reactions. Several immunotherapies are being developed for food allergies; these involve oral, sublingual, epicutaneous, or subcutaneous administration of small amounts of native or modified allergens to induce immune tolerance. Oral immunotherapy seems to be the most promising approach based on results from small uncontrolled and controlled studies. However, it is a challenge to compare results among immunotherapy trials because of differences in protocols. Studies conducted thus far have tested the most prevalent food allergens: it is not clear whether their results can be extended to other allergens. Sublingual administration of immunotherapy has shown some efficacy and fewer side effects than oral administration in some trials, yet neither approach can be recommended for routine practice. Controlled studies with larger numbers of subjects are needed to determine short- and long-term efficacy and side effects. In Europe immunotherapy trials for food allergies face many ethical and regulatory issues. Guidelines from the European Medicine Agency on the clinical development of products for specific immunotherapy of allergic diseases do not adequately address immunotherapy for food allergies, especially for therapies that orally administer native food or that include pediatric patients.

  10. Cancer immunotherapy: Strategies for personalization and combinatorial approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, Vishwanath; Neelapu, Sattva S

    2015-12-01

    The results of recent clinical trials using novel immunotherapy strategies such as immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy approaches including CAR T-cell therapy have clearly established immunotherapy as an important modality for the treatment of cancer besides the traditional approaches of surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy or targeted therapy. However, to date immunotherapy has been shown to induce durable clinical benefit in only a fraction of the patients. The use of combination strategies is likely to increase the number of patients that might benefit from immunotherapy. Indeed, over the last decade, the characterization of multiple immune resistance mechanisms used by the tumor to evade the immune system and the development of agents that target those mechanisms has generated a lot of enthusiasm for cancer immunotherapy. But a critical issue is to determine how best to combine such agents. This review will focus on novel immunotherapy agents currently in development and discuss strategies to develop and personalize combination cancer immunotherapy strategies.

  11. [Immunotherapy in Latin America. From the past to the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagnani, Carlos E Baena; Lockey, Richard F; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Canonica, G Walter

    2008-01-01

    In Latin America, allergic diseases have a very high prevalence, comparable to that of many other countries of the world, and that prevalence is constantly increasing. Within the region, the number of allergy specialists is quite high, although allergy is not recognized as a full specialty in all countries. Specific immunotherapy is the only available allergen-oriented immunomodulator, capable of improving symptoms and modifying the natural course of the disease, and therefore it represents a powerful therapeutic tool for specialists. During the last 20 years, the practice of immunotherapy in Latin America has much improved, especially because of the intensive educational effort, the widespread divulgation of the international guidelines and the adoption of the paradigm of the evidence-based medicine. In this regard, indications, contraindications, and limits of immunotherapy, are currently well acknowledged. In Latin America, immunotherapy is properly prescribed for inhalant allergens and hymenoptera venom by allergy specialists, although some non-evidence based forms of immunotherapy (e.g. bacterial extracts, treatment of atopic dermatitis) are still occasionally practiced. Sublingual immunotherapy is now accepted as a viable alternative to the traditional subcutaneous administration, and it begins to be proposed and studied also in some Latin American countries. Some debate remains on the use of immunotherapy for one or few versus multiple allergens, and also the availability of standardized extracts is not uniform. Finally, this therapeutic modality is not always given for free to low income patients such is the case in some countries and the different modalities of reimbursement among countries often represent a limit to the use of this treatment. Much has been done in improving the use of immunotherapy in Latin America. The main challenges and objectives for the near future are greater diffusion of the evidence-based medicine, a better standardization of

  12. Cortical activation elicited by unrecognized stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badgaiyan Rajendra D

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is unclear whether a stimulus that cannot be recognized consciously, could elicit a well-processed cognitive response. Methods We used functional imaging to examine the pattern of cortical activation elicited by unrecognized stimuli during memory processing. Subjects were given a recognition task using recognizable and non-recognizable subliminal stimuli. Results Unrecognized stimuli activated the cortical areas that are associated with retrieval attempt (left prefrontal, and novelty detection (left hippocampus. This indicates that the stimuli that were not consciously recognized, activated neural network associated with aspects of explicit memory processing. Conclusion Results suggest that conscious recognition of stimuli is not necessary for activation of cognitive processing.

  13. Cancer immunotherapy: avoiding the road to perdition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bright Robert K

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The hypothesis that human cancers express antigens that can be specifically targeted by cell mediated immunity has become a scientifically justifiable rationale for the design and clinical testing of novel tumor-associated antigens (TAA. Although a number of TAA have been recognized and it has been suggested that they could be useful in the immunological treatment of cancer, the complexity of human beings leads us to reflect on the need to establish new criteria for validating their real applicability. Herein, we show a system level-based approach that includes morphological and molecular techniques, which is specifically required to improve the capacity to produce desired results and to allow cancer immunotherapy to re-emerge from the mist in which it is currently shrouded.

  14. Engineering better immunotherapies via RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioud, Mouldy

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of dendritic cell (DC) cancer vaccines has gained momentum in recent years. However, clinical data indicate that antitumor immune responses generally fail to translate into measurable tumor regression. This has been ascribed to a variety of tolerance mechanisms, one of which is the expression of immunosuppressive factors by DCs and T cells. With respect to cancer immunotherapies, these factors antagonise the ability to induce robust and sustained immunity required for tumor cell eradication. Gene silencing of immunosuppressive factors in either DCs or adoptive transferred T cells enhanced anti-tumor immune responses and significantly inhibited tumor growth. Therefore, engineered next generation of DC vaccines or adoptive T-cell therapy should include immunomodulatory siRNAs to release the "brakes" imposed by the immune system. Moreover, the combination of gene silencing, antigen targeting to DCs and cytoplasmic cargo delivery will improve clinical benefits.

  15. Aluminium in Allergies and Allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is a hot topic in the current debate. Exposure occurs due to environmental, dietary and intentional exposure to aluminium, such as in vaccines where it was introduced in 1926. In spite of the fact that it is a typical Th2 adjuvant, aluminium redirects the immune response in systemic allergen immunotherapy (SIT) upon prolonged immunization. SIT in the US, and SLIT in general, are at present non-adjuvanted therapies, but in Europe aluminium is used as adjuvant in most SIT preparations. It enhances the safety of SIT by local deposition of the allergen. Undesired properties of aluminium adjuvants comprise acute and chronic inflammation at the injection site, its Th2 immune stimulatory capacity, its accumulation besides biodistribution in the body. The adjuvant and safety profile of aluminium adjuvants in allergy vaccines are discussed, as well as the need for putting modern delivery systems and adjuvants on the fast track.

  16. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, Eivind Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell...... infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However......, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells...

  17. Biological Response Modifier in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ronghua; Luo, Feifei; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Luman; Yang, Jiao; Deng, Yuting; Huang, Enyu; Qian, Jiawen; Lu, Zhou; Jiang, Xuechao; Zhang, Dan; Chu, Yiwei

    2016-01-01

    Biological response modifiers (BRMs) emerge as a lay of new compounds or approaches used in improving cancer immunotherapy. Evidences highlight that cytokines, Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, and noncoding RNAs are of crucial roles in modulating antitumor immune response and cancer-related chronic inflammation, and BRMs based on them have been explored. In particular, besides some cytokines like IFN-α and IL-2, several Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists like BCG, MPL, and imiquimod are also licensed to be used in patients with several malignancies nowadays, and the first artificial small noncoding RNA (microRNA) mimic, MXR34, has entered phase I clinical study against liver cancer, implying their potential application in cancer therapy. According to amounts of original data, this chapter will review the regulatory roles of TLR signaling, some noncoding RNAs, and several key cytokines in cancer and cancer-related immune response, as well as the clinical cases in cancer therapy based on them.

  18. Nanochemistry-based immunotherapy for HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, F; Calarota, S A; Lisziewicz, J

    2007-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART), i.e. the combination of three or more drugs against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has greatly improved the clinical outcome of HIV-1-infected individuals. However, HAART is unable to reconstitute HIV-specific immunity and eradicate the virus. Several observations in primate models and in humans support the notion that cell-mediated immunity can control viral replication and slow disease progression. Thus, besides drugs, an immunotherapy that induces long-lasting HIV-specific T-cell responses could play a role in the treatment of HIV/AIDS. To induce such immune responses, DermaVir Patch has been developed. DermaVir consists of an HIV-1 antigen-encoding plasmid DNA that is chemically formulated in a nanoparticle. DermaVir is administered under a patch after a skin preparation that supports the delivery of the nanoparticle to Langerhans cells (LC). Epidermal LC trap and transport the nanomedicine to draining lymph nodes. While in transit, LC mature into dendritic cells (DC), which can efficiently present the DNA-encoded antigens to naïve T-cells for the induction of cellular immunity. Pre-clinical studies and Phase I clinical testing of DermaVir in HIV-1-infected individuals have demonstrated the safety and tolerability of DermaVir Patch. To further modulate cellular immunity, molecular adjuvants might be added into the nanoparticle. DermaVir Patch represents a new nanomedicine platform for immunotherapy of HIV/AIDS. In this review, the antiviral activity of DermaVir-induced cellular immunity is discussed. Furthermore, the action of some cytokines currently being tested as adjuvants are highlighted and the adjuvant effect of cytokine plasmid DNA included in the DermaVir nanoparticle is reviewed.

  19. Immune checkpoint‑targeted cancer immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Swatler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cells may express on their surface various characteristic antigens that can induce antitumor immunity. However, cancer in human body may induce an immunosuppressive microenvironment that limits immune response to its antigens. For many years scientists have tried to develop an immunotherapy which would induce a potent antitumor immune response and lead to an elimination of the disease. One of the most promising immunotherapies is blockade of immune checkpoints, i.e. a group of costimulatory molecules negatively regulating the immune system. Their blockade would overcome immune tolerance in the tumor microenvironment and amplify antitumor immunity. What’s more, immune checkpoint blockade may turn out even more profitable, as some of immune checkpoints and their ligands are expressed on tumor surface and on tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, contributing to the immunosuppressive cancer microenvironment. Phase III clinical trials have confirmed efficacy of an anti‑CTLA‑4 antibody ipilimumab, thereby leading to its acceptance for the treatment of advanced melanoma. Thanks to promising results of the phase I clinical trials, a breakthrough therapy designation and an early approval for the treatment have been granted to anti‑PD‑1 antibodies ‑ nivolumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma and advanced non‑small cell lung cancer and pembrolizumab (for the treatment of advanced melanoma and, in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer, an anti‑PD‑L1 antibody ‑ MPDL3280A as well. Other immune checkpoints, such as LAG‑3, TIM‑3, BTLA, B7‑H3 and B7‑H4, are also under early evaluation.

  20. Advances in strategies and methodologies in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Samuel S K; Zhou, Feifan; Hode, Tomas; Nordquist, Robert E; Alleruzzo, Luciano; Raker, Joseph; Chen, Wei R

    2015-04-01

    Since the invention of Coley's toxin by William Coley in early 1900s, the path for cancer immunotherapy has been a convoluted one. Although still not considered standard of care, with the FDA approval of trastuzumab, Provenge and ipilimumab, the medical and scientific community has started to embrace the possibility that immunotherapy could be a new hope for cancer patients with otherwise untreatable metastatic diseases. This review aims to summarize the development of some major strategies in cancer immunotherapy, from the earliest peptide vaccine and transfer of tumor specific antibodies/T cells to the more recent dendritic cell (DC) vaccines, whole cell tumor vaccines, and checkpoint blockade therapy. Discussion of some major milestones and obstacles in the shaping of the field and the future perspectives is included. Photoimmunotherapy is also reviewed as an example of emerging new therapies combining phototherapy and immunotherapy.

  1. Immunotherapy for food allergies: a myth or a reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praticò, Andrea D; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy is a worldwide issue, with an estimated prevalence of 2-10%. An effective treatment is not available for people affected and the only management is the avoidance of the allergen. Oral immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy have been tested by several authors, in particular for milk, egg and peanuts allergy, with significant results in term of desensitization induction. The achievement of tolerance is by the contrary doubtful, with different results obtained. In this review, we reviewed protocols of oral and sublingual immunotherapy for food allergy published in literature, mainly against milk, egg and peanut. At present, immunotherapy does not represent the gold standard in the treatment of food allergy, even if it can desensitize patients.

  2. Immunotherapy for small-cell lung cancer: emerging evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Martin; Heigener, David; Reinmuth, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Treatment for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has changed little over the past few decades; available therapies have failed to extend survival in advanced disease. In recent years, immunotherapy with treatments such as interferons, TNFs, vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has advanced and shown promise in the treatment of several tumor types. Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, durvalumab, tremelimumab and ulocuplumab are at the forefront of immunotherapy and have achieved approvals for certain cancer types, including melanoma (ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab), non-SCLC (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) and renal cell carcinoma (nivolumab). Clinical trials are investigating different immunotherapies in patients with other solid and hematologic malignancies, including SCLC. We review emerging evidence supporting the use of immunotherapy in SCLC patients.

  3. Future directions in bladder cancer immunotherapy: towards adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sean G; Zaharoff, David A

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of bladder cancer has not changed significantly in several decades. In particular, intravesical bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy has been a mainstay for high-risk nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer since the late 1970s/early 1980s. This is despite the fact that bladder cancer has the highest recurrence rates of any cancer and BCG immunotherapy has not been shown to induce a tumor-specific immune response. We and others have hypothesized that immunotherapies capable of inducing tumor-specific adaptive immunity are needed to impact bladder cancer morbidity and mortality. This article summarizes the preclinical and clinical development of bladder cancer immunotherapies with an emphasis on the last 5 years. Expected progress in the near future is also discussed.

  4. Cancer immunotherapy: harnessing the immune system to battle cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiping

    2015-09-01

    The recent clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies represent a turning point in cancer immunotherapy. These successes also underscore the importance of understanding basic tumor immunology for successful clinical translation in treating patients with cancer. The Reviews in this Review Series focus on current developments in cancer immunotherapy, highlight recent advances in our understanding of basic aspects of tumor immunology, and suggest how these insights can lead to the development of new immunotherapeutic strategies.

  5. LIGHT: A Novel Immunotherapy for Primary and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    effects due to the loss of testosterone (including fatigue, decreased sexual desire, weight gain, loss of muscle mass and osteoporosis ) and the well...beyond the prostate, immunotherapy may be the only way to treat it [6, 7]. A majority of clinical trials for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer...Localized Prostate Cancer. J Sex Med, 2012. 5. Fitzpatrick, J.M., Management of localized prostate cancer in senior adults : the crucial role of comorbidity

  6. Cancer immunotherapy: harnessing the immune system to battle cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    The recent clinical successes of immune checkpoint blockade and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapies represent a turning point in cancer immunotherapy. These successes also underscore the importance of understanding basic tumor immunology for successful clinical translation in treating patients with cancer. The Reviews in this Review Series focus on current developments in cancer immunotherapy, highlight recent advances in our understanding of basic aspects of tumor immunology, and sugg...

  7. Immune targets and neoantigens for cancer immunotherapy and precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong-Fu; Wang, Helen Y

    2017-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to eradicate malignant cells is becoming a most powerful new approach to cancer therapy. FDA approval of the immunotherapy-based drugs, sipuleucel-T (Provenge), ipilimumab (Yervoy, anti-CTLA-4), and more recently, the programmed cell death (PD)-1 antibody (pembrolizumab, Keytruda), for the treatment of multiple types of cancer has greatly advanced research and clinical studies in the field of cancer immunotherapy. Furthermore, recent clinical trials, using NY-ESO-1-specific T cell receptor (TCR) or CD19-chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), have shown promising clinical results for patients with metastatic cancer. Current success of cancer immunotherapy is built upon the work of cancer antigens and co-inhibitory signaling molecules identified 20 years ago. Among the large numbers of target antigens, CD19 is the best target for CAR T cell therapy for blood cancer, but CAR-engineered T cell immunotherapy does not yet work in solid cancer. NY-ESO-1 is one of the best targets for TCR-based immunotherapy in solid cancer. Despite the great success of checkpoint blockade therapy, more than 50% of cancer patients fail to respond to blockade therapy. The advent of new technologies such as next-generation sequencing has enhanced our ability to search for new immune targets in onco-immunology and accelerated the development of immunotherapy with potentially broader coverage of cancer patients. In this review, we will discuss the recent progresses of cancer immunotherapy and novel strategies in the identification of new immune targets and mutation-derived antigens (neoantigens) for cancer immunotherapy and immunoprecision medicine.

  8. The immune landscape of human tumors: Implications for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindea, Gabriela; Mlecnik, Bernhard; Angell, Helen K; Galon, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the spontaneous immune response of cancer patients is critical for the design of efficient anticancer immunotherapies. The power of integrative tumor immunology approaches allowed for a comprehensive view of the immune system evolution in the course of tumor progression and recurrence. We have demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating immune cells are spatiotemporally regulated, a finding that has profound implications for the development of efficient anticancer immunotherapies.

  9. Eliciting User Requirements Using Appreciative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Carol Kernitzki

    2010-01-01

    Many software development projects fail because they do not meet the needs of users, are over-budget, and abandoned. To address this problem, the user requirements elicitation process was modified based on principles of Appreciative Inquiry. Appreciative Inquiry, commonly used in organizational development, aims to build organizations, processes,…

  10. Acting green elicits a literal warm glow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taufik, Danny; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Environmental policies are often based on the assumption that people only act environmentally friendly if some extrinsic reward is implicated, usually money(1,2). We argue that people might also be motivated by intrinsic rewards: doing the right thing (such as acting environmentally friendly) elicit

  11. Methods of Eliciting Information from Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-10-01

    Itzhak Perlman) or a concertmeister in an orchestra, or simply one of its violinists . Differences in amount of expertise may supply different...would lead to becoming a world class violinist . Underlying Assumptions In attempting to elicit information from experts, one makes a number of

  12. Affective multimodal mirror: sensing and eliciting laughter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melder, W.A.; Truong, K.P.; Uyl, M. den; Leeuwen, D.A. van; Neerincx, M.A.; Loos, L.R.; Stock Plum, B.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a multimodal affective mirror that senses and elicits laughter. Currently, the mirror contains a vocal and a facial affect-sensing module, a component that fuses the output of these two modules to achieve a user-state assessment, a user state transition model, and a compone

  13. Allergen immunotherapy: routes, safety,efficacy, and mode of action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochfelder JL

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Jillian Leigh Hochfelder, Punita PondaDivision of Allergy and Immunology, North Shore–Long Island Jewish Health System, New Hyde Park, NY, USAAbstract: Allergic rhinitis, allergic conjunctivitis, and allergic asthma have been steadily increasing in prevalence in recent years. These allergic diseases have a major impact on quality of life and are a major economic burden in the US. Although allergen avoidance and pharmacotherapy are currently the mainstays of therapy, they are not always successful in treating patients’ symptoms effectively. If a patient fails allergen avoidance and medical therapy, immunotherapy may be indicated. Furthermore, immunotherapy is the only therapy that may change the course of the disease and induce long-term remission. Though subcutaneous administration has been the standard route for immunotherapy for many decades, there are several other routes of administration that have been and are currently being studied. The goal of utilizing alternative routes of immunotherapy is to improve safety without decreasing the efficacy of treatment. This paper will review the novel routes of immunotherapy, including sublingual, oral, local nasal, epicutaneous, and intralymphatic.Keywords: immunotherapy, allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma, sublingual, intralymphatic

  14. A comparison of five elicitation techniques for elicitation of attributes of low involvement products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Nielsen, Niels Asger

    1999-01-01

    The critical first step for most instruments used in analysing consumer choice and motivation is the identification of product attributes which are important to the consumer and for which there are differences among the available product alternatives. A number of techniques, ranging from...... the complex elicitation of idiosyncratic attributes or simpler picking procedures, has been developed to elicitate such attributes. The purpose of the study presented here is to com-pare attributes of a low involvement product, viz. vegetable oil, elicited by five different techniques on a number...... of dimensions directed from theories of consumer buying behaviour. Although a number of differences between the techniques are identified in the study, the main findings are that the robustness of the different techniques for attribute elicitation is considerable Udgivelsesdato: JUN...

  15. Can packaging elements elicit consumers’ emotional responses?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, Lewis; Corsi, Armando; Lockshin, Larry;

    Emotion has been an important concept in many areas of consumer research such as judgment, decision-making and advertising. Little research has been done on emotion in packaging adopting the physiological measures used in other areas. This paper draws on past studies in advertising that measure....... The results show that packaging can elicit an emotional response via different elements. The paper also raises concerns about the accuracy of using selfreport measures of emotional responses to packaging research....

  16. Elicitation of secondary metabolism in actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmohsen, Usama Ramadan; Grkovic, Tanja; Balasubramanian, Srikkanth; Kamel, Mohamed Salah; Quinn, Ronald J; Hentschel, Ute

    2015-11-01

    Genomic sequence data have revealed the presence of a large fraction of putatively silent biosynthetic gene clusters in the genomes of actinomycetes that encode for secondary metabolites, which are not detected under standard fermentation conditions. This review focuses on the effects of biological (co-cultivation), chemical, as well as molecular elicitation on secondary metabolism in actinomycetes. Our review covers the literature until June 2014 and exemplifies the diversity of natural products that have been recovered by such approaches from the phylum Actinobacteria.

  17. Essays on probability elicitation scoring rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmino, Paulo Renato A.; dos Santos Neto, Ademir B.

    2012-10-01

    In probability elicitation exercises it has been usual to considerer scoring rules (SRs) to measure the performance of experts when inferring about a given unknown, Θ, for which the true value, θ*, is (or will shortly be) known to the experimenter. Mathematically, SRs quantify the discrepancy between f(θ) (the distribution reflecting the expert's uncertainty about Θ) and d(θ), a zero-one indicator function of the observation θ*. Thus, a remarkable characteristic of SRs is to contrast expert's beliefs with the observation θ*. The present work aims at extending SRs concepts and formulas for the cases where Θ is aleatory, highlighting advantages of goodness-of-fit and entropy-like measures. Conceptually, it is argued that besides of evaluating the personal performance of the expert, SRs may also play a role when comparing the elicitation processes adopted to obtain f(θ). Mathematically, it is proposed to replace d(θ) by g(θ), the distribution that model the randomness of Θ, and do also considerer goodness-of-fit and entropylike metrics, leading to SRs that measure the adherence of f(θ) to g(θ). The implications of this alternative perspective are discussed and illustrated by means of case studies based on the simulation of controlled experiments. The usefulness of the proposed approach for evaluating the performance of experts and elicitation processes is investigated.

  18. Effects of laser immunotherapy on tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Wood, Ethan W.; Hasanjee, Aamr; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2014-02-01

    The microenvironments of tumors are involved in a complex and reciprocal dialog with surrounding cancer cells. Any novel treatment must consider the impact of the therapy on the microenvironment. Recently, clinical trials with laser immunotherapy (LIT) have proven to effectively treat patients with late-stage, metastatic breast cancer and melanoma. LIT is the synergistic combination of phototherapy (laser irradiation) and immunological stimulation. One prominent cell type found in the tumor stroma is the fibroblast. Fibroblast cells can secrete different growth factors and extracellular matrix modifying molecules. Furthermore, fibroblast cells found in the tumor stroma often express alpha smooth muscle actin. These particular fibroblasts are coined cancer-associated fibroblast cells (CAFs). CAFs are known to facilitate the malignant progression of tumors. A collagen lattice assay with human fibroblast cells is used to elucidate the effects LIT has on the microenvironment of tumors. Changes in the contraction of the lattice, the differentiation of the fibroblast cells, as well as the proliferation of the fibroblast cells will be determined.

  19. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujita Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergen-specific immunotherapy (allergen-SIT is a potentially curative treatment approach in allergic diseases. It has been used for almost 100 years as a desensitizing therapy. The induction of peripheral T cell tolerance and promotion of the formation of regulatory T-cells are key mechanisms in allergen-SIT. Both FOXP3+CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg cells and inducible IL-10- and TGF-β-producing type 1 Treg (Tr1 cells may prevent the development of allergic diseases and play a role in successful allergen-SIT and healthy immune response via several mechanisms. The mechanisms of suppression of different pro-inflammatory cells, such as eosinophils, mast cells and basophils and the development of allergen tolerance also directly or indirectly involves Treg cells. Furthermore, the formation of non-inflammatory antibodies particularly IgG4 is induced by IL-10. Knowledge of these molecular basis is crucial in the understanding the regulation of immune responses and their possible therapeutic targets in allergic diseases.

  20. Driving an improved CAR for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2016-08-01

    The recent clinical success of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for B cell malignancies represents a paradigm shift in cancer immunotherapy. Unfortunately, application of CAR T cell-mediated therapy for solid tumors has so far been disappointing, and the reasons for this poor response in solid tumors remain unknown. In this issue of the JCI, Cherkassky and colleagues report on their use of a murine model of human pleural mesothelioma to explore potential factors that limit CAR T cell efficacy. Their studies have uncovered the importance of the tumor microenvironment in the inhibition of CAR T cell functions, revealed a critical role for the programmed death-1 (PD-1) pathway in CAR T cell exhaustion within the tumor microenvironment, and demonstrated improved antitumor effects with a CAR T cell-intrinsic PD-1 blockade strategy using a dominant negative form of PD-1. Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for further evaluation of mechanisms underlying CAR T cell immune evasion within the tumor microenvironment for the improvement of CAR T cell-mediated therapy for solid tumors.

  1. Aptamers: A Feasible Technology in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Soldevilla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers are single-chained RNA or DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs with three-dimensional folding structures which allow them to bind to their targets with high specificity. Aptamers normally show affinities comparable to or higher than that of antibodies. They are chemically synthesized and therefore less expensive to manufacture and produce. A variety of aptamers described to date have been shown to be reliable in modulating immune responses against cancer by either blocking or activating immune receptors. Some of them have been conjugated to other molecules to target the immune system and reduce off-target side effects. Despite the success of first-line treatments against cancer, the elevated number of relapsing cases and the tremendous side effects shown by the commonly used agents hinder conventional treatments against cancer. The advantages provided by aptamers could enhance the therapeutic index of a given strategy and therefore enhance the antitumor effect. Here we recapitulate the provided benefits of aptamers with immunomodulatory activity described to date in cancer therapy and the benefits that aptamer-based immunotherapy could provide either alone or combined with first-line treatments in cancer therapy.

  2. Aptamers: A Feasible Technology in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldevilla, M M; Villanueva, H; Pastor, F

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers are single-chained RNA or DNA oligonucleotides (ODNs) with three-dimensional folding structures which allow them to bind to their targets with high specificity. Aptamers normally show affinities comparable to or higher than that of antibodies. They are chemically synthesized and therefore less expensive to manufacture and produce. A variety of aptamers described to date have been shown to be reliable in modulating immune responses against cancer by either blocking or activating immune receptors. Some of them have been conjugated to other molecules to target the immune system and reduce off-target side effects. Despite the success of first-line treatments against cancer, the elevated number of relapsing cases and the tremendous side effects shown by the commonly used agents hinder conventional treatments against cancer. The advantages provided by aptamers could enhance the therapeutic index of a given strategy and therefore enhance the antitumor effect. Here we recapitulate the provided benefits of aptamers with immunomodulatory activity described to date in cancer therapy and the benefits that aptamer-based immunotherapy could provide either alone or combined with first-line treatments in cancer therapy.

  3. Sarcoma Immunotherapy: Past Approaches and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. D'Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are heterogeneous malignant tumors of mesenchymal origin characterized by more than 100 distinct subtypes. Unfortunately, 25–50% of patients treated with initial curative intent will develop metastatic disease. In the metastatic setting, chemotherapy rarely leads to complete and durable responses; therefore, there is a dire need for more effective therapies. Exploring immunotherapeutic strategies may be warranted. In the past, agents that stimulate the immune system such as interferon and interleukin-2 have been explored and there has been evidence of some clinical activity in selected patients. In addition, many cancer vaccines have been explored with suggestion of benefit in some patients. Building on the advancements made in other solid tumors as well as a better understanding of cancer immunology provides hope for the development of new and exciting therapies in the treatment of sarcoma. There remains promise with immunologic checkpoint blockade antibodies. Further, building on the success of autologous cell transfer in hematologic malignancies, designing chimeric antigen receptors that target antigens that are over-expressed in sarcoma provides a great deal of optimism. Exploring these avenues has the potential to make immunotherapy a real therapeutic option in this orphan disease.

  4. siRNA and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Ghafouri-Fard, Somayyeh

    2012-09-01

    Immunotherapeutic approaches have been gaining attention in the field of cancer treatment because of their possible ability to eradicate cancer cells as well as metastases by recruiting the host immune system. On the other hand, RNA-based therapeutics with the ability to silence expression of specific targets are currently under clinical investigation for various disorders including cancer. As the mechanisms of tumor evasion from the host immune system are versatile, different molecules have the capacity to be targeted by RNAi technology in order to enhance the immune response against tumors. This technology has been used to silence specific targets in tumor cells, as well as immune cells in cancer cell lines, animal models and clinical trials. siRNAs can also stimulate innate immune responses through activation of Toll-like receptors. Although currently clinical trials of the application of siRNA in cancer immunotherapy are few, it is predicted that in future this technology will be used broadly in cancer treatment.

  5. Advances in cancer immunology and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voena, Claudia; Chiarle, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    After decades of setbacks, cancer immunology is living its Golden Age. Recent advances in cancer immunology have provided new therapeutic approaches to treat cancer. The objective clinical response observed in patients treated with antibodies that block the immune checkpoints, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell-death protein 1 (PD-1)/programmed cell-death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathways, has led to their FDA approval for the treatment of melanoma in 2011 and in 2014, respectively. The anti-PD-1 antibody nivolumab has received the FDA-approval in March 2015 for squamous lung cancer treatment. In addition, antibodies targeting PD-1 or PD-L1 have demonstrated their efficacy and safety in additional tumors, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), renal cell carcinoma (RCC), bladder cancer, and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Almost at the same time, the field of adoptive cell transfer has exploded. The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T technology has provided strong evidence of efficacy in the treatment of B cell malignancies, and different T cell based treatments are currently under investigation for different types of tumors. In this review we will discuss the latest advances in cancer immunology and immunotherapy as well as new treatments now under development in the clinic and potential strategies that have shown promising results in preclinical models.

  6. Oncolytic viruses: a step into cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol JG

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan G Pol, Julien Rességuier, Brian D LichtyMcMaster Immunology Research Centre, Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, CanadaAbstract: Oncolytic virotherapy is currently under investigation in phase I–III clinical trials for approval as a new cancer treatment. Oncolytic viruses (OVs selectively infect, replicate in, and kill tumor cells. For a long time, the therapeutic efficacy was thought to depend on the direct viral oncolysis (virocentric view. The host immune system was considered as a brake that impaired virus delivery and spread. Attention was paid primarily to approaches enhancing virus tumor selectivity and cytotoxicity and/or that limited antiviral responses. Thinking has changed over the past few years with the discovery that OV therapy was also inducing indirect oncolysis mechanisms. Among them, induction of an antitumor immunity following OV injection appeared to be a key factor for an efficient therapeutic activity (immunocentric view. Indeed, tumor-specific immune cells persist post-therapy and can search and destroy any tumor cells that escape the OVs, and thus immune memory may prevent relapse of the disease. Various strategies, which are summarized in this manuscript, have been developed to enhance the efficacy of OV therapy with a focus on its immunotherapeutic aspects. These include genetic engineering and combination with existing cancer treatments. Several are currently being evaluated in human patients and already display promising efficacy.Keywords: oncolytic virus, cancer immunotherapy, tumor antigen, cancer vaccine, combination strategies

  7. Immunotherapy Expands and Maintains the Function of High-Affinity Tumor-Infiltrating CD8 T Cells In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Amy E; Polesso, Fanny; Weinberg, Andrew D

    2016-09-15

    Cancer cells harbor high-affinity tumor-associated Ags capable of eliciting potent antitumor T cell responses, yet detecting these polyclonal T cells is challenging. Therefore, surrogate markers of T cell activation such as CD69, CD44, and programmed death-1 (PD-1) have been used. We report in this study that in mice, expression of activation markers including PD-1 is insufficient in the tumor microenvironment to identify tumor Ag-specific T cells. Using the Nur77GFP T cell affinity reporter mouse, we highlight that PD-1 expression can be induced independent of TCR ligation within the tumor. Given this, we characterized the utility of the Nur77GFP model system in elucidating mechanisms of action of immunotherapies independent of PD-1 expression. Coexpression of Nur77GFP and OX40 identifies a polyclonal population of high-affinity tumor-associated Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, which produce more IFN-γ in situ than OX40 negative and doubles in quantity with anti-OX40 and anti-CTLA4 mAb therapy but not with anti-PD-1 or programmed death ligand-1. Moreover, expansion of these high-affinity CD8 T cells prolongs survival of tumor-bearing animals. Upon chronic stimulation in tumors and after adoptive cell therapy, CD8 TCR signaling and Nur77GFP induction is impaired, and tumors progress. However, this can be reversed and overall survival significantly enhanced after adoptive cell therapy with agonist OX40 immunotherapy. Therefore, we propose that OX40 agonist immunotherapy can maintain functional TCR signaling of chronically stimulated tumor-resident CD8 T cells, thereby increasing the frequency of cytotoxic, high-affinity, tumor-associated Ag-specific cells.

  8. Dendritic Cells as Pharmacological Tools for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguille, Sébastien; Smits, Evelien L; Bryant, Christian; Van Acker, Heleen H; Goossens, Herman; Lion, Eva; Fromm, Phillip D; Hart, Derek N; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F; Berneman, Zwi N

    2015-10-01

    Although the earliest—rudimentary—attempts at exploiting the immune system for cancer therapy can be traced back to the late 18th Century, it was not until the past decade that cancer immunotherapeutics have truly entered mainstream clinical practice. Given their potential to stimulate both adaptive and innate antitumor immune responses, dendritic cells (DCs) have come under intense scrutiny in recent years as pharmacological tools for cancer immunotherapy. Conceptually, the clinical effectiveness of this form of active immunotherapy relies on the completion of three critical steps: 1) the DCs used as immunotherapeutic vehicles must properly activate the antitumor immune effector cells of the host, 2) these immune effector cells must be receptive to stimulation by the DCs and be competent to mediate their antitumor effects, which 3) requires overcoming the various immune-inhibitory mechanisms used by the tumor cells. In this review, following a brief overview of the pivotal milestones in the history of cancer immunotherapy, we will introduce the reader to the basic immunobiological and pharmacological principles of active cancer immunotherapy using DCs. We will then discuss how current research is trying to define the optimal parameters for each of the above steps to realize the full clinical potential of DC therapeutics. Given its high suitability for immune interventions, acute myeloid leukemia was chosen here to showcase the latest research trends driving the field of DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  9. [The role of immunotherapy in the prevention of allergic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Duvancić, Tomislav

    2011-01-01

    Immunotherapy through repeated administration of allergens and augmentation of doses (hyposensibilization) with the purpose of decreasing the severity of type I allergic reactions or even its complete elimination is known already for a longer period of time. This type of therapy is especially beneficial in allergies to Hymenoptera venom, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, allergic asthma and is implemented in patients with previously proven allergy to appropriate allergens (insects, pollen, house dust mite, pet dander and other). The most common form of therapy is subcutaneous immunotherapy which includes a series of injections containing specific allergens (allergy vaccines) with increasingly larger doses administered subcutaneously during a period of 3-5 years. There are also other forms of immunotherapy (for instance sublingual immunotherapy) although these are less effective. Repetition of the hyposensibilization procedure leads to further reduction in severity of allergy disease in the majority of patients. The efficacy of immunotherapy is also proven by a lower risk of allergic rhinitis patients developing asthma as well as by prevention of new sensibilizations.

  10. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Brian J. [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Pollack, Ian F. [Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Okada, Hideho, E-mail: okadah@upmc.edu [Department of Immunology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Brain Tumor Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  11. Immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: What have we learned so far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Castañón, María; Er, Tze-Kiong; Bujanda, Luis; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta

    2016-09-01

    After decades of progress based on chemotherapy and targeted agents, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer still have low long-term survival, with more than 500,000 deaths occurring worldwide every year. Recent results showing clinical evidence of efficacy using immunotherapy in other types of tumors, such as melanoma and lung cancer, have also made this a viable therapy for evaluation in colorectal cancer in clinical trials. The development of cancer immunotherapies is progressing quickly, with a variety of technological approaches. This review summarizes the current status of clinical trials testing immunotherapy in colorectal cancer and discusses what has been learned based on previous results. Immunotherapy strategies, such as various models of vaccines, effector-cell therapy and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, provide protection against progression for a limited subset of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. A better understanding of particular immune cell types and pathways in each patient is still needed. These findings will enable the development of novel biomarkers to select the appropriate subset of patients to be treated with a particular immunotherapy, and the tendencies determined from recent results can guide clinical practice for oncologists in this new therapeutic area and in the design of the next round of clinical trials.

  12. [Satisfaction with immunotherapy in patients with advanced cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Yoshiaki; Fujisawa, Fumika; Kotani, Junko; Ohnishi, Masayuki; Watanabe, Toru

    2015-04-01

    Patient satisfaction with cancer immunotherapy, which is not covered by health insurance in Japan, was evaluated among 65 patients with advanced cancer who had received immunotherapy in our hospital for 2 years. Satisfaction measures were based on patients' expectations for medical care, cost, and staff services, and involved a questionnaire consisting of 25 items. Results of the questionnaire analysis showed that most patients, who expected much of antigen-specific vaccination such as dendritic cells (DC) pulsed tumor-associated antigens, were dissatisfied with the high cost of private immunotherapy(i. e., not covered by medical insurance), and were unable to perceive the effectiveness of the treatment because there was no quantitative analysis of killer T cells induced by immunotherapy. Therefore, it is critically important for us to confirm the safety and efficiency of cancer immunotherapy, before introducing medical insurance for cancer patients in Japan. In addition, the quantitative measurement of killer T cells induced by DC peptide vaccines should be considered, to meet patients' expectations.

  13. Immune-Checkpoint Blockade and Active Immunotherapy for Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J. Ahn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunotherapy has made tremendous progress, including promising results in patients with malignant gliomas. Nonetheless, the immunological microenvironment of the brain and tumors arising therein is still believed to be suboptimal for sufficient antitumor immune responses for a variety of reasons, including the operation of “immune-checkpoint” mechanisms. While these mechanisms prevent autoimmunity in physiological conditions, malignant tumors, including brain tumors, actively employ these mechanisms to evade from immunological attacks. Development of agents designed to unblock these checkpoint steps is currently one of the most active areas of cancer research. In this review, we summarize recent progresses in the field of brain tumor immunology with particular foci in the area of immune-checkpoint mechanisms and development of active immunotherapy strategies. In the last decade, a number of specific monoclonal antibodies designed to block immune-checkpoint mechanisms have been developed and show efficacy in other cancers, such as melanoma. On the other hand, active immunotherapy approaches, such as vaccines, have shown encouraging outcomes. We believe that development of effective immunotherapy approaches should ultimately integrate those checkpoint-blockade agents to enhance the efficacy of therapeutic approaches. With these agents available, it is going to be quite an exciting time in the field. The eventual success of immunotherapies for brain tumors will be dependent upon not only an in-depth understanding of immunology behind the brain and brain tumors, but also collaboration and teamwork for the development of novel trials that address multiple layers of immunological challenges in gliomas.

  14. Does allergen-specific immunotherapy induce contact allergy to aluminium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netterlid, Eva; Hindsén, Monica; Siemund, Ingrid; Björk, Jonas; Werner, Sonja; Jacobsson, Helene; Güner, Nuray; Bruze, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Persistent, itching nodules have been reported to appear at the injection site after allergen-specific immuno-therapy with aluminium-precipitated antigen extract, occasionally in conjunction with contact allergy to aluminium. This study aimed to quantify the development of contact allergy to aluminium during allergen-specific immunotherapy. A randomized, controlled, single-blind multicentre study of children and adults entering allergen-specific immunotherapy was performed using questionnaires and patch-testing. A total of 205 individuals completed the study. In the 3 study groups all subjects tested negative to aluminium before allergen-specific immunotherapy and 4 tested positive after therapy. In the control group 4 participants tested positive to aluminium. Six out of 8 who tested positive also had atopic dermatitis. Positive test results were found in 5/78 children and 3/127 adults. Allergen-specific immunotherapy was not shown to be a risk factor for contact allergy to aluminium. Among those who did develop aluminium allergy, children and those with atopic dermatitis were more highly represented.

  15. Current status and prospective of cancer immunotherapy%肿瘤免疫治疗的现状与展望

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任军

    2012-01-01

    Increasing knowledge has increased awareness of roles of immunotherapy in cancer trealmenl. Such immunomodulation targeting specific immunopathways has risen the understandings that more and more methods could be incorporated into the clinical applications. The immunotherapy eliciting specific cellular immune response against cancer cells might result in tumor cell lysis and subsequently enhancing ability of antigen presenting cells and shows synergism with the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy.%目的 随着肿瘤学、免疫学以及分子生物学等相关学科的迅速发展和交叉渗透,肿瘤免疫治疗的研究突飞猛进.免疫治疗成为继手术、放射治疗和化学治疗之后又一种重要的抗肿瘤治疗手段,成为攻克恶性肿瘤的希望.进入21世纪,新型的特异性细胞免疫治疗技术得到迅速发展,为全世界成千上万肿瘤患者带来新的希望.化学治疗联合免疫治疗是肿瘤治疗的新模式.同时如何客观评价免疫治疗疗效也成为研究热点.

  16. Recombinant DNA technology for melanoma immunotherapy: anti-Id DNA vaccines targeting high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, A; Capitani, M; Cesca, M; Tomassoni, D; Kazmi, U; Concetti, F; Vincenzetti, L; Concetti, A; Venanzi, F M

    2014-11-01

    Anti-idiotypic MK2-23 monoclonal antibody (anti-Id MK2-23 mAb), which mimics the high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA), has been used to implement active immunotherapy against melanoma. However, due to safety and standardization issues, this approach never entered extensive clinical trials. In the present study, we investigated the usage of DNA vaccines as an alternative to MK2-23 mAb immunization. MK2-23 DNA plasmids coding for single chain (scFv) MK2-23 antibody were constructed via the insertion of variable heavy (V H) and light (V L) chains of MK2-23 into the pVAC-1mcs plasmids. Two alternative MK2-23 plasmids format V H/V L, and V L/V H were assembled. We demonstrate that both polypeptides expressed by scFv plasmids in vitro retained the ability to mimic HMW-MAA antigen, and to elicit specific anti-HMW-MAA humoral and cellular immunoresponses in immunized mice. Notably, MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines impaired the onset and growth of transplantable B16 melanoma cells not engineered to express HMW-MAA. This pilot study suggests that optimized MK2-23 scFv DNA vaccines could potentially provide a safer and cost-effective alternative to anti-Id antibody immunization, for melanoma immunotherapy.

  17. Therapeutic Effects and Biomarkers in Sublingual Immunotherapy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fujimura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is considered to be the only curative treatment for allergic diseases such as pollinosis, perennial rhinitis, asthma, and food allergy. The sublingual route is widely applied for immunotherapy for allergy, instead of the conventional administration by subcutaneous route. A recent meta-analysis of sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT has shown that this approach is safe, has positive clinical effects, and provides prolonged therapeutic effects after discontinuation of treatment. However, the mechanism of SLIT and associated biomarkers are not fully understood. Biomarkers that change after or during SLIT have been reported and may be useful for response monitoring or as prognostic indicators for SLIT. In this review, we focus on the safety, therapeutic effects, including prolonged effects after treatment, and new methods of SLIT. We also discuss response monitoring and prognostic biomarkers for SLIT. Finally, we discuss immunological mechanisms of SLIT with a focus on oral dendritic cells and facilitated antigen presentation.

  18. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiji Tsukamoto

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  19. Advances in Immunotherapies for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan HE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Globally, Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death of high morbidity and mortality with poor prognosis, which needs some more effective and less toxic therapies. The immunotherapies offer a novel approach for the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in both the adjuvant and palliative disease settings. A number of promising immunotherapies based on different mechanism have now been evaluated showing an increasing response rate. Moreover, further phase II/III clinical trials will be indicated to explore its value. These include checkpoint inhibitors (anti-CTLA4 antibody, anti-PD-1 antibody, anti-PD-L1 antibody, active vaccination (L-BLP25 liposome vaccine, Belagenpumatucel-L vaccine, MAGE-A3 protein vaccine and adoptive vaccination (CIK cells. The purpose of this paper will draw a summary on the theory, clinical trials, toxicity and problems to be solved of the immunotherapies in NSCLC.

  20. IMMUNOTHERAPY FOR EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS-RELATED LYMPHOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Kennedy-Nasser

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Latent EBV infection is associated with several malignancies, including EBV post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD, Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and Burkitt lymphoma. The range of expression of latent EBV antigens varies in these tumors, which influences how susceptible the tumors are to immunotherapeutic approaches. Tumors expressing type III latency, such as in LPD, express the widest array of EBV antigens making them the most susceptible to immunotherapy. Treatment strategies for EBV-related tumors include restoring normal cellular immunity by adoptive immunotherapy with EBV-specific T cells and targeting the malignant B cells with monoclonal antibodies. We review the current immunotherapies and future studies aimed at targeting EBV antigen expression in these tumors.

  1. Novel ways for immune intervention in immunotherapy: mucosal allergy vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarell, Laurent; Van Overtvelt, Laurence; Moingeon, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy is currently the only curative treatment for allergy. Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) has been successfully used to treat patients who are allergic to insect venom, house dust mites, or tree or grass pollens. In the context of potentially severe, albeit infrequent, side effects associated with SCIT, mucosal routes of administration are being investigated to conduct allergenic desensitization. This article reviews recent developments in the field of nasal, oral, and sublingual immunotherapy as they relate to safety, clinical efficacy, and immune mechanisms of action. Implications for the design and development of improved allergy vaccines that could be used through such nonparenteral routes are discussed. Specifically, allergen presentation platforms and adjuvants facilitating the targeting of immune cells at mucosal surfaces to promote tolerance induction are reviewed.

  2. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic.

  3. Immunotherapy and lung cancer: current developments and novel targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingues, Duarte; Turner, Alice; Silva, Maria Dília; Marques, Dânia Sofia; Mellidez, Juan Carlos; Wannesson, Luciano; Mountzios, Giannis; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a highly prevalent and aggressive disease. In the metastatic setting, major advances include the incorporation of immunotherapy and targeted therapies into the clinician's therapeutic armamentarium. Standard chemotherapeutic regimens have long been reported to interfere with the immune response to the tumor; conversely, antitumor immunity may add to the effects of those therapies. The aim of immunotherapy is to specifically enhance the immune response directed to the tumor. Recently, many trials addressed the role of such therapies for metastatic NSCLC treatment: ipilimumab, tremelimumab, nivolumab and lambrolizumab are immunotherapeutic agents of main interest in this field. In addition, anti-tumor vaccines, such as MAGE-A3, Tecetomide, TG4010, CIMAvax, ganglioside vaccines, tumor cell vaccines and dendritic cell vaccines, emerged as potent inducers of immune response against the tumor. The current work aims to address the most recent developments regarding these innovative immunotherapies and their implementation in the treatment of metastatic NSCLC.

  4. Th1 cytokine-based immunotherapy for cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Mei Xu

    2014-01-01

    Cytokine-based immunotherapy is executed by harnessing cytokines to activate the immune system to suppress tumors. Th1-type cytokines including IL-1, IL-2, IL-12 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor are potent stimulators of Th1 differentiation and Th1-based antitumor response. Many preclinical studies demonstrated the antitumor effects of Th1 cytokines but their clinical efficacy is limited. Multiple factors influence the efficacy of immunotherapy for tumors. For instance immunosuppressive cells in the tumor microenvironment can produce inhibitory cytokines which suppress antitumor immune response. Most studies on cytokine immunotherapy focused on how to boost Th1 response; many studies combined cytokine-based therapy with other treatments to reverse immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment. In addition, cytokines have pleiotropic functions and some cytokines show paradoxical activities under different settings. Better understanding the physiological and pathological functions of cytokines helps clinicians to design Th1-based cancer therapy in clinical practice.

  5. Immunotherapy for Urothelial Carcinoma: Current Status and Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi, E-mail: hkitamu@sapmed.ac.jp; Tsukamoto, Taiji [Department of Urology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, South 1 West 16, Chuo-ku, Sapporo 060-8543 (Japan)

    2011-07-29

    Intravesical instillation of bacillus Calmette Guérin (BCG) for the treatment of urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is based on the BCG-induced immune response, which eradicates and prevents bladder cancer. The results of recent studies have suggested that not only major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-nonrestricted immune cells such as natural killer cells, macrophages, neutrophils, etc., but also MHC-restricted CD8{sup +} T cells play an important role and are one of the main effectors in this therapy. Better understanding of the mechanism of BCG immunotherapy supports the idea that active immunotherapy through its augmented T cell response can have great potential for the treatment of advanced UC. In this review, progress in immunotherapy for UC is discussed based on data from basic, translational and clinical studies. We also review the escape mechanism of cancer cells from the immune system, and down-regulation of MHC class I molecules.

  6. Cancer Immunotherapy: Selected Targets and Small-Molecule Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinmann, Hilmar

    2016-03-04

    There is a significant amount of excitement in the scientific community around cancer immunotherapy, as this approach has renewed hope for many cancer patients owing to some recent successes in the clinic. Currently available immuno-oncology therapeutics under clinical development and on the market are mostly biologics (antibodies, proteins, engineered cells, and oncolytic viruses). However, modulation of the immune system with small molecules offers several advantages that may be complementary and potentially synergistic to the use of large biologicals. Therefore, the discovery and development of novel small-molecule modulators is a rapidly growing research area for medicinal chemists working in cancer immunotherapy. This review provides a brief introduction into recent trends related to selected targets and pathways for cancer immunotherapy and their small-molecule pharmacological modulators.

  7. Treating allergic rhinitis by sublingual immunotherapy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristoforo Incorvaia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Allergic rhinitis (AR is a disease with high and increasing prevalence. The management of AR includes allergen avoidance, anti-allergic drugs, and allergen specific immunotherapy (AIT, but only the latter works on the causes of allergy and, due to its mechanisms of action, modifies the natural history of the disease. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT was proposed in the 1990s as an option to traditional, subcutaneous immunotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We reviewed all the available controlled trials on the efficacy and safety of SLIT. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Thus far, more than 60 trials, globally evaluated in 6 meta-analyses, showed that SLIT is an effective and safe treatment for AR. However, it must be noted that to expect clinical efficacy in the current practice SLIT has to be performed following the indications from controlled trials, that is, sufficiently high doses to be regularly administered for at least 3 consecutive years.

  8. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  9. Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppersmith, K. J.

    1997-05-30

    This report presents results of the Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation (UZFMEE) project at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. (Geomatrix), for TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc. The objective of this project was to identify and assess the uncertainties associated with certain key components of the unsaturated zone flow system at Yucca Mountain. This assessment reviewed the data inputs, modeling approaches, and results of the unsaturated zone flow model (termed the ''UZ site-scale model'') being developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the US Geological Survey (USGS). In addition to data input and modeling issues, the assessment focused on percolation flux (volumetric flow rate per unit cross-sectional area) at the potential repository horizon. An understanding of unsaturated zone processes is critical to evaluating the performance of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A major goal of the project was to capture the uncertainties involved in assessing the unsaturated flow processes, including uncertainty in both the models used to represent physical controls on unsaturated zone flow and the parameter values used in the models. To ensure that the analysis included a wide range of perspectives, multiple individual judgments were elicited from members of an expert panel. The panel members, who were experts from within and outside the Yucca Mountain project, represented a range of experience and expertise. A deliberate process was followed in facilitating interactions among the experts, in training them to express their uncertainties, and in eliciting their interpretations. The resulting assessments and probability distributions, therefore, provide a reasonable aggregate representation of the knowledge and uncertainties about key issues regarding the unsaturated zone at the Yucca

  10. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  11. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic.......After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  12. Novel anti-melanoma treatment:focus on immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-Ze Hao; Wen-Ya Zhou; Xiao-Ling Du; Ke-Xin Chen; Guo-Wen Wang; Yun Yang; Ji-Long Yang

    2014-01-01

    Melanoma is an intractable cancer that is aggressive, lethal, and metastatic. The prognosis of advanced melanoma is very poor because it is insensitive to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The incidence of melanoma has been ascending stably for years worldwide, accompanied by increasing mortality. New approaches to managing this deadly disease are much anticipated to enhance the cure rate and to extend clinical benefits to patients with metastatic melanoma. Due to its high degree of immunogenicity, melanoma could be a good target for immunotherapy, which has been developed for decades and has achieved certain progress. This article provides an overview of immunotherapy for melanoma.

  13. Beyond the Immune Suppression: The Immunotherapy in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Silvestri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa is the second most common cancer in men. As well in many other human cancers, inflammation and immune suppression have an important role in their development. We briefly describe the host components that interact with the tumor to generate an immune suppressive environment involved in PCa promotion and progression. Different tools provide to overcome the mechanisms of immunosuppression including vaccines and immune checkpoint blockades. With regard to this, we report results of most recent clinical trials investigating immunotherapy in metastatic PCa (Sipuleucel-T, ipilimumab, tasquinimod, Prostvac-VF, and GVAX and provide possible future perspectives combining the immunotherapy to the traditional therapies.

  14. Gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Sarah; De Oliveira, Satiro N

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available cancer immunotherapies has resulted in favorable early outcomes. Specifically the use of gene therapy to introduce chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) in T cells creates new immunotherapy options for patients. While showing early success with these approaches, limitations remain that can be overcome by the use of modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to express CARs and TCRs. With modern gene therapy technologies, increased safety and control of the modification of the HSCs can be achieved through the use of a suicide gene.

  15. Isolated sleep paralysis elicited by sleep interruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, T; Miyasita, A; Sasaki, Y; Inugami, M; Fukuda, K

    1992-06-01

    We elicited isolated sleep paralysis (ISP) from normal subjects by a nocturnal sleep interruption schedule. On four experimental nights, 16 subjects had their sleep interrupted for 60 minutes by forced awakening at the time when 40 minutes of nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep had elapsed from the termination of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep in the first or third sleep cycle. This schedule produced a sleep onset REM period (SOREMP) after the interruption at a high rate of 71.9%. We succeeded in eliciting six episodes of ISP in the sleep interruptions performed (9.4%). All episodes of ISP except one occurred from SOREMP, indicating a close correlation between ISP and SOREMP. We recorded verbal reports about ISP experiences and recorded the polysomnogram (PSG) during ISP. All of the subjects with ISP experienced inability to move and were simultaneously aware of lying in the laboratory. All but one reported auditory/visual hallucinations and unpleasant emotions. PSG recordings during ISP were characterized by a REM/W stage dissociated state, i.e. abundant alpha electroencephalographs and persistence of muscle atonia shown by the tonic electromyogram. Judging from the PSG recordings, ISP differs from other dissociated states such as lucid dreaming, nocturnal panic attacks and REM sleep behavior disorders. We compare some of the sleep variables between ISP and non-ISP nights. We also discuss the similarities and differences between ISP and sleep paralysis in narcolepsy.

  16. A novel peptide targeting Clec9a on dendritic cell for cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhongyi; Wu, Yahong; Du, Jiangfeng; Li, Guodong; Wang, Shengdian; Cao, Wenpeng; Zhou, Xiuman; Wu, Chunjing; Zhang, Dan; Jing, Xueli; Li, Yifan; Wang, Hongfei; Gao, Yanfeng; Qi, Yuanming

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells with antigen recognition molecules on the surface. Clec9a is selectively expressed on mouse CD8a+ DCs and CD103+ DCs subsets, which are functionally similar to human BDCA3+ DCs. It is reported that Clec9a is responsible for the antigen cross-presentation of these DC subsets. In the present study, by using phage display technique, we discovered a novel peptide WH, which can selectively bind to mouse Flt3L induced Clec9a+ DCs or Clec9a over-expressed HEK-293T cells. Furthermore, by using computer-aided docking model and mutation assay, we observed that Asp248 and Trp250 are two key residues for Clec9a to bind with peptide WH. When coupled with OVA257-264 epitope, peptide WH can significantly enhance the ability of Clec9a+ DCs to activate OVA-specific CD8+ T cells, which elicit strong ability to secret IFN-γ, express perforin and granzyme B mRNA. In B16-OVA lung metastasis mouse model, WH-OVA257-264 fusion peptide can also enhance the activation of CD8+ T cells and decrease the lung metastasis loci. All these results suggested that peptide WH could be considered as an antigen delivery carrier targeting Clec9a+ DCs for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27250027

  17. Zn- and Mg- Containing Tricalcium Phosphates-Based Adjuvants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiupeng; Li, Xia; Onuma, Kazuo; Sogo, Yu; Ohno, Tadao; Ito, Atsuo

    2013-07-01

    Zn-, and Mg-containing tricalcium phosphates (TCPs) loaded with a hydrothermal extract of a human tubercle bacillus (HTB) were prepared by immersing Zn-TCP and Mg-TCP in HTB-containing supersaturated calcium phosphate solutions. The in vitro and in vivo immunogenic activities of the HTB-loaded Zn-, and Mg-TCPs (Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB, respectively) were evaluated as potential immunopotentiating adjuvants for cancer immunotherapy. The Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB adjuvants showed no obvious cytotoxicity and more effectively stimulated granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secretion by macrophage-like cells than unprocessed HTB or HTB-loaded TCP (T-Ap-HTB) in vitro. Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB mixed with liquid-nitrogen-treated tumor tissue markedly inhibited the in vivo development of rechallenged Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells compared with T-Ap-HTB and the unprocessed HTB mixed liquid-nitrogen-treated tumor tissue. Zn-Ap-HTB and Mg-Ap-HTB contributed to eliciting potent systemic antitumor immunity in vivo.

  18. Heat Shock Protein-Peptide and HSP-Based Immunotherapies for the Treatment of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevtsov, Maxim; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular residing heat shock proteins (HSPs) with a molecular weight of approximately 70 and 90 kDa function as molecular chaperones that assist folding/unfolding and transport of proteins across membranes and prevent protein aggregation after environmental stress. In contrast to normal cells, tumor cells have higher cytosolic heat shock protein 70 and Hsp90 levels, which contribute to tumor cell propagation, metastasis, and protection against apoptosis. In addition to their intracellular chaperoning functions, extracellular localized and membrane-bound HSPs have been found to play key roles in eliciting antitumor immune responses by acting as carriers for tumor-derived immunogenic peptides, as adjuvants for antigen presentation, or as targets for the innate immune system. The interaction of HSP-peptide complexes or peptide-free HSPs with receptors on antigen-presenting cells promotes the maturation of dendritic cells, results in an upregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules, induces secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and immune modulatory nitric oxides, and thus integrates adaptive and innate immune phenomena. Herein, we aim to recapitulate the history and current status of HSP-based immunotherapies and vaccination strategies in the treatment of cancer.

  19. Heat Shock Protein (HSP peptide and HSP-based immunotherapies for the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eMulthoff

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular residing heat shock proteins (HSPs with a molecular weight of approximately 70 and 90 kDa function as molecular chaperones that assist folding/unfolding and transport of proteins across membranes and prevent protein aggregation after environmental stress. In contrast to normal cells, tumor cells have higher cytosolic HSP70 and Hsp90 levels which contribute to tumor cell propagation, metastasis and protection against apoptosis. In addition to their intracellular chaperoning functions, extracellular localized and membrane-bound HSPs have been found to play key roles in eliciting anti-tumor immune responses either by acting as carriers for tumor-derived, immunogenic peptides, as adjuvants for antigen presentation or as targets for the innate immune system. The interaction of HSP-peptide complexes or peptide-free HSPs with receptors on antigen presenting cells (APCs promotes the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs, results in an up-regulation of MHC class I and class II molecules, induces secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and immune modulatory nitric oxides and thus integrate adaptive and innate immune phenomena. Herein, we aim to recapitulate the history and current status of HSP-based immunotherapies and vaccination strategies in the treatment of cancer.

  20. Early gene expression changes with rush immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barnett Sherry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine whether whole genome expression profiling could reveal changes in mRNA expression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from allergic patients undergoing rush immunotherapy (RIT that might be manifest within the first few months of treatment. Methods For this study, PBMC from three allergic patients undergoing RIT were assessed at four timepoints: prior to RIT, at 1 week and 7 week post-RIT, during build-up and at 4 months, after establishment of a maintenance dose. PBMC mRNA gene expression changes over time were determined by oligonucleotide microarrays using the Illumina Human-6 BeadChip Platform, which simultaneously interrogates expression profiles of > 47,000 transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were identified using well-established statistical analysis for microarrays. In addition, we analyzed peripheral blood basophil high-affinity IgE receptor (Fc epsilon RI expression and T-regulatory cell frequency as detected by expression of CD3+CD4+CD25bright cells at each timepoint using flow cytometry. Results In comparing the initial 2 timepoints with the final 2 timepoints and analyzing for genes with ≥1.5-fold expression change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR, we identified 507 transcripts. At a 2-fold change (p less than or equal to 0.05, BH-FDR, we found 44 transcripts. Of these, 28 were up-regulated and 16 were down-regulated genes. From these datasets, we have identified changes in immunologically relevant genes from both the innate and adaptive response with upregulation of expressed genes for molecules including IL-1β, IL-8, CD40L, BTK and BCL6. At the 4 month timepoint, we noted a downward trend in Fc epsilon RI expression in each of the three patients and increased allergen-specific IgG4 levels. No change was seen in the frequency of peripheral T-regulatory cells expressed over the four timepoints. Conclusions We observed significant changes in gene expression early in peripheral

  1. Effect of Local Nasal Immunotherapy on Nasal Blockage in Pollen-Induced Allergic Rhinitis of Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Takeshi Nabe; Kayoko Kubota; Nobuaki Mizutani; Masanori Fujii; Tetsuya Terada; Hiroshi Takenaka; Shigekatsu Kohno

    2008-01-01

    Background: As a non-injection route for immunotherapy, local nasal immunotherapy has been examined in allergic rhinitis patients. However, it is unclear how the immunotherapy affects sneezing, biphasic nasal blockage and nasal hyperresponsiveness. Thus, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of nasal immunotherapy on the symptoms of guinea pig allergic rhinitis. Additionally, we also evaluated whether the immunotherapy relieved pollen-induced allergic conjunctivitis. Methods: Sensitized ani...

  2. The current state of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Gabrielle; Malling, H-J

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy is a well documented treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The majority of the disadvantages of the treatment are related to the poor quality of the natural allergen extracts which can contain varying amounts of individual allergens including allergens to which...

  3. Novel technologies and emerging biomarkers for personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianda; Hegde, Priti S; Clynes, Raphael; Foukas, Periklis G; Harari, Alexandre; Kleen, Thomas O; Kvistborg, Pia; Maccalli, Cristina; Maecker, Holden T; Page, David B; Robins, Harlan; Song, Wenru; Stack, Edward C; Wang, Ena; Whiteside, Theresa L; Zhao, Yingdong; Zwierzina, Heinz; Butterfield, Lisa H; Fox, Bernard A

    2016-01-01

    The culmination of over a century's work to understand the role of the immune system in tumor control has led to the recent advances in cancer immunotherapies that have resulted in durable clinical responses in patients with a variety of malignancies. Cancer immunotherapies are rapidly changing traditional treatment paradigms and expanding the therapeutic landscape for cancer patients. However, despite the current success of these therapies, not all patients respond to immunotherapy and even those that do often experience toxicities. Thus, there is a growing need to identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers that enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the complex interactions between the immune system and cancer. Therefore, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) reconvened an Immune Biomarkers Task Force to review state of the art technologies, identify current hurdlers, and make recommendations for the field. As a product of this task force, Working Group 2 (WG2), consisting of international experts from academia and industry, assembled to identify and discuss promising technologies for biomarker discovery and validation. Thus, this WG2 consensus paper will focus on the current status of emerging biomarkers for immune checkpoint blockade therapy and discuss novel technologies as well as high dimensional data analysis platforms that will be pivotal for future biomarker research. In addition, this paper will include a brief overview of the current challenges with recommendations for future biomarker discovery.

  4. Improving the clinical impact of biomaterials in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Joshua M; Dold, Neil M; Jewell, Christopher M

    2016-03-29

    Immunotherapies for cancer have progressed enormously over the past few decades, and hold great promise for the future. The successes of these therapies, with some patients showing durable and complete remission, demonstrate the power of harnessing the immune system to eradicate tumors. However, the effectiveness of current immunotherapies is limited by hurdles ranging from immunosuppressive strategies employed by tumors, to inadequate specificity of existing therapies, to heterogeneity of disease. Further, the vast majority of approved immunotherapies employ systemic delivery of immunomodulators or cells that make addressing some of these challenges more difficult. Natural and synthetic biomaterials - such as biocompatible polymers, self-assembled lipid particles, and implantable biodegradable devices - offer unique potential to address these hurdles by harnessing the benefits of therapeutic targeting, tissue engineering, co-delivery, controlled release, and sensing. However, despite the enormous investment in new materials and nanotechnology, translation of these ideas to the clinic is still an uncommon outcome. Here we review the major challenges facing immunotherapies and discuss how the newest biomaterials and nanotechnologies could help overcome these challenges to create new clinical options for patients.

  5. Big Data Offers Novel Insights for Oncolytic Virus Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Stephanie L.; Stojdl, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale assays, such as microarrays, next-generation sequencing and various “omics” technologies, have explored multiple aspects of the immune response following virus infection, often from a public health perspective. Yet a lack of similar data exists for monitoring immune engagement during oncolytic virus immunotherapy (OVIT) in the cancer setting. Tracking immune signatures at the tumour site can create a snapshot or longitudinally analyse immune cell activation, infiltration and functionality within global populations or individual cells. Mapping immune changes over the course of oncolytic biotherapy—from initial infection to tumour stabilisation/regression through to long-term cure or escape/relapse—has the potential to generate important therapeutic insights around virus-host interactions. Further, correlating such immune signatures with specific tumour outcomes has significant value for guiding the development of novel oncolytic virus immunotherapy strategies. Here, we provide insights for OVIT from large-scale analyses of immune populations in the infection, vaccination and immunotherapy setting. We analyse several approaches to manipulating immune engagement during OVIT. We further explore immunocentric changes in the tumour tissue following immunotherapy, and compile several immune signatures of therapeutic success. Ultimately, we highlight clinically relevant large-scale approaches with the potential to strengthen future oncolytic strategies to optimally engage the immune system. PMID:26861383

  6. SPECIFIC IMMUNOTHERAPY AND CELLULAR IMMUNITY IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Kenbaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms are quite important immunological components of tumor surveillance, being, however, most vulnerable to influence of different adverse factors, including surgery-associated stress and ionizing radiation. Our study was aimed for assessing specific effects of immunotherapy upon indices of cellular immunity in patients with cervical cancer. Eighty-eight patients with cervical cancer (clinical stage I-IIA, Т1аN0M0-T2aN0M0, who underwent appropriate surgery (for IA stage, or a combined treatment, including surgery gamma-ray teletherapy (IB, IIA stages are under study. The patients were distributed in two groups, depending on the therapy applied. Group 1 included patients subjected to surgical treatment plus and radiation therapy, Group 2 included those patients who were treated according to this protocol, with addition of a specific immunotherapy. Contents of T cells and various CD subpopulations of T-lymphocytes were identified by immunofluorescence techniques. Among patients with cervical cancer at clinical stages IA, IB, IIA, a reliable decrease in cellular immunity indices was registered, both after surgery, and during combined treatment. Introduction of specific immunotherapy to the conventional treatment schedule was associated with increase of cellular immune indices, and, in first line, the antineoplastic mechanisms (e.g., NK’s and NKT cell contents. One should point to a relatively low efficiency of this immunotherapy in combined treatment of patients with cervical cancer at IIA stage.

  7. Nanoparticulate Adjuvants and Delivery Systems for Allergen Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana De Souza Rebouças

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, significant progress in research and clinics has been made to offer possible innovative therapeutics for the management of allergic diseases. However, current allergen immunotherapy shows limitations concerning the long-term efficacy and safety due to local side effects and risk of anaphylaxis. Thus, effective and safe vaccines with reduced dose of allergen have been developed using adjuvants. Nevertheless, the use of adjuvants still has several disadvantages, which limits its use in human vaccines. In this context, several novel adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy are currently being investigated and developed. Currently, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems have received much interest as potential adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy. It has been demonstrated that the incorporation of allergens into a delivery system plays an important role in the efficacy of allergy vaccines. Several nanoparticles-based delivery systems have been described, including biodegradable and nondegradable polymeric carriers. Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the current adjuvants used for allergen immunotherapy. Furthermore, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems are focused as a novel and promising strategy for allergy vaccines.

  8. Immunotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer: Current and Future Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander D. Rapidis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC are at considerable risk for death, with 5-year relative survival rates of approximately 60%. The profound multifaceted deficiencies in cell-mediated immunity that persist in most patients after treatment may be related to the high rates of treatment failure and second primary malignancies. Radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy commonly have severe acute and long-term side effects on immune responses. The development of immunotherapies reflects growing awareness that certain immune system deficiencies specific to HNSCC and some other cancers may contribute to the poor long-term outcomes. Systemic cell-mediated immunotherapy is intended to activate the entire immune system and mount a systemic and/or locoregional antitumor response. The delivery of cytokines, either by single cytokines, for example, interleukin-2, interleukin-12, interferon-, interferon-, or by a biologic mix of multiple cytokines, such as IRX-2, may result in tumor rejection and durable immune responses. Targeted immunotherapy makes use of monoclonal antibodies or vaccines. All immunotherapies for HNSCC except cetuximab remain investigational, but a number of agents whose efficacy and tolerability are promising have entered phase 2 or phase 3 development.

  9. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy for ovarian cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leffers, N.; Daemen, T.; Helfrich, W.; Boezen, H. M.; Cohlen, B. J.; Melief, Cornelis; Nijman, H. W.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite advances in chemotherapy, prognosis of ovarian cancer remains poor. Antigen-specific active immunotherapy aims to induce a tumour-antigen-specific anti-tumour immune responses as an alternative treatment for ovarian cancer. OBJECTIVES: To assess feasibility of antigen-specific ac

  10. Bubble-assisted ultrasound : Application in immunotherapy and vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escoffre, JM; Deckers, Roel; Bos, Clemens; Moonen, Chrit

    2016-01-01

    Bubble-assisted ultrasound is a versatile technology with great potential in immunotherapy and vaccination. This technology involves the exposure of immune cells (i.e., dendritic cells, lymphocytes) in-vitro or diseased tissues (i.e., brain, tumor) in-vivo to ultrasound treatment with gas bubbles. B

  11. Immunotherapy of malignant gliomas using autologous and alllogeneic tissue cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, F.M.; Stathopoulos, A.; Kruse, C.A.; Chen, T.C.; Schijns, V.E.J.C.

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy of brain tumors is rapidly emerging as a potential clinical option [1-3]. The quality and magnitude of immune responses evoked by the new generation anti-tumor vaccines is in general highly dependent on the source or choice of peptide antigens, and as well, a suitable immunopotentiator

  12. Nanoparticulate adjuvants and delivery systems for allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza Rebouças, Juliana; Esparza, Irene; Ferrer, Marta; Sanz, María Luisa; Irache, Juan Manuel; Gamazo, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, significant progress in research and clinics has been made to offer possible innovative therapeutics for the management of allergic diseases. However, current allergen immunotherapy shows limitations concerning the long-term efficacy and safety due to local side effects and risk of anaphylaxis. Thus, effective and safe vaccines with reduced dose of allergen have been developed using adjuvants. Nevertheless, the use of adjuvants still has several disadvantages, which limits its use in human vaccines. In this context, several novel adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy are currently being investigated and developed. Currently, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems have received much interest as potential adjuvants for allergen immunotherapy. It has been demonstrated that the incorporation of allergens into a delivery system plays an important role in the efficacy of allergy vaccines. Several nanoparticles-based delivery systems have been described, including biodegradable and nondegradable polymeric carriers. Therefore, this paper provides an overview of the current adjuvants used for allergen immunotherapy. Furthermore, nanoparticles-based allergen-delivery systems are focused as a novel and promising strategy for allergy vaccines.

  13. One-Shot Immunomodulatory Nanodiamond Agents for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Cui, Zhifen; Kong, Huating; Xia, Kai; Pan, Liang; Li, Jiang; Sun, Yanhong; Shi, Jiye; Wang, Lihua; Zhu, Ying; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-04-13

    The use of functional nanodiamonds (fNDs) to deliver CpG oligonucleotides (ODNs) for sustained immunostimulation is reported. It is demonstrated that monotherapy using this immunostimulatory agent significantly suppresses the tumor growth in two murine tumor models. This fND-based nanoagent opens new opportunities for immunotherapy, as well as clinical applications of various types of therapeutic nucleic acids.

  14. Immunotherapy for head and neck cancer patients: shifting the balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turksma, A.W.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Bloemena, E.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Leemans, C.R.; Hooijberg, E.

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer in the western world. Over the last few decades little improvement has been made to increase the relatively low 5-year survival rate. This calls for novel and improved therapies. Here, we describe opportunities in immunotherapy fo

  15. [Development of Nucleic Acid-Based Adjuvant for Cancer Immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobiyama, Kouji; Ishii, Ken J

    2015-09-01

    Since the discovery of the human T cell-defined tumor antigen, the cancer immunotherapy field has rapidly progressed, with the research and development of cancer immunotherapy, including cancer vaccines, being conducted actively. However, the disadvantages of most cancer vaccines include relatively weak immunogenicity and immune escape or exhaustion. Adjuvants with innate immunostimulatory activities have been used to overcome these issues, and these agents have been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of cancer vaccines and to act as mono-therapeutic anti-tumor agents. CpG ODN, an agonist for TLR9, is one of the promising nucleic acid-based adjuvants, and it is a potent inducer of innate immune effector functions. CpG ODN suppresses tumor growth in the absence of tumor antigens and peptide administration. Therefore, CpG ODN is expected to be useful as a cancer vaccine adjuvant as well as a cancer immunotherapy agent. In this review, we discuss the potential therapeutic applications and mechanisms of CpG ODN for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Cancer immunotherapy: the beginning of the end of cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkona, Sofia; Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Blasutig, Ivan M

    2016-05-05

    These are exciting times for cancer immunotherapy. After many years of disappointing results, the tide has finally changed and immunotherapy has become a clinically validated treatment for many cancers. Immunotherapeutic strategies include cancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses, adoptive transfer of ex vivo activated T and natural killer cells, and administration of antibodies or recombinant proteins that either costimulate cells or block the so-called immune checkpoint pathways. The recent success of several immunotherapeutic regimes, such as monoclonal antibody blocking of cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1), has boosted the development of this treatment modality, with the consequence that new therapeutic targets and schemes which combine various immunological agents are now being described at a breathtaking pace. In this review, we outline some of the main strategies in cancer immunotherapy (cancer vaccines, adoptive cellular immunotherapy, immune checkpoint blockade, and oncolytic viruses) and discuss the progress in the synergistic design of immune-targeting combination therapies.

  17. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  18. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells currently being used as a cellular adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy strategies. Unfortunately, DC-based vaccines have not demonstrated spectacular clinical results. DC loading with tumor antigens and DC differentiation and activation...

  19. Seasonal versus perennial immunotherapy: evaluation after three years of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Lejarazu, D; Bernaola, G; Fernández, E; Audícana, M; Ventas, P; Martín, S; Fernández de Corres, L

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a comparative study to evaluate seasonal and perennial schedules after 3 years of immunotherapy. Sixty patients suffering from rhinitis and/or asthma due to grass pollen sensitization were randomly allocated to receive a semi-depot extract of Phleum pratense according to a perennial or seasonal schedule. The last year of the study, 14 patients were recruited as a control group without immunotherapy. The cumulative dose was 602 BU in the perennial group and 372 BU in the seasonal group. The frequency and severity of side-effects were similar and very low in both treated groups. The IgE level was significantly lower after perennial immunotherapy at the end of the first 2 years. A seasonal decrease in specific IgG levels was observed in patients who interrupted immunotherapy, while this was not observed in patients under the perennial schedule. Symptoms and medication scores did not show differences between groups. Nevertheless, we found a significant difference between treated patients and the control group.

  20. Towards Curative Cancer Immunotherapy: Overcoming Posttherapy Tumor Escape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has witnessed the evolvement of cancer immunotherapy as an increasingly effective therapeutic modality, evidenced by the approval of two immune-based products by the FDA, that is, the cancer vaccine Provenge (sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer and the antagonist antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4 ipilimumab for advanced melanoma. In addition, the clinical evaluations of a variety of promising immunotherapy drugs are well under way. Benefiting from more efficacious immunotherapeutic agents and treatment strategies, a number of recent clinical studies have achieved unprecedented therapeutic outcomes in some patients with certain types of cancers. Despite these advances, however, the efficacy of most cancer immunotherapies currently under clinical development has been modest. A recurring scenario is that therapeutic maneuvers initially led to measurable antitumor immune responses in cancer patients but ultimately failed to improve patient outcomes. It is increasingly recognized that tumor cells can antagonize therapy-induced immune attacks through a variety of counterregulation mechanisms, which represent a fundamental barrier to the success of cancer immunotherapy. Herein we summarize the findings from some recent preclinical and clinical studies, focusing on how tumor cells advance their survival and expansion by hijacking therapy-induced immune effector mechanisms that would otherwise mediate their destruction.

  1. The evolving role of immunotherapy in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    The prognosis for men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is limited, and patients have very few treatment options, particularly if the treatment failed with docetaxel (Taxotere). As a result, there is a requirement for novel approaches to therapy. Using immunotherapy to ind

  2. From Bench to Bedside: Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Wan-Chi Tse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The mainstay therapeutic strategy for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC continues to be androgen deprivation therapy usually in combination with chemotherapy or androgen receptor targeting therapy in either sequence, or recently approved novel agents such as Radium 223. However, immunotherapy has also emerged as an option for the treatment of this disease following the approval of sipuleucel-T by the FDA in 2010. Immunotherapy is a rational approach for prostate cancer based on a body of evidence suggesting these cancers are inherently immunogenic and, most importantly, that immunological interventions can induce protective antitumour responses. Various forms of immunotherapy are currently being explored clinically, with the most common being cancer vaccines (dendritic-cell, viral, and whole tumour cell-based and immune checkpoint inhibition. This review will discuss recent clinical developments of immune-based therapies for prostate cancer that have reached the phase III clinical trial stage. A perspective of how immunotherapy could be best employed within current treatment regimes to achieve most clinical benefits is also provided.

  3. [Scleroderma related to specific immunotherapy. A report of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfín Maciel, Blanca María; Castillo Morfín, Blanca María

    2009-01-01

    It has been described two main phenotypes of helper T cells. On activation, the immune system develops the most effective Th response. Whereas Th1 cells promote cell-mediate immunity against intracellular pathogens and an over expression could favor autoimmune diseases; Th2 cells develop humoral immunity against extracellular pathogens promoting allergic response. Normally, the two profiles coexist in the same individual with different grades of expression. Recently, it has been described a new subset: Th17, which is related to tissue injury in autoimmune diseases. Then, allergic and autoimmune diseases result from an unbalanced response of the immune system. Allergen-specific immunotherapy is the only curative treatment of a specific allergy, which leads to a life-long tolerance against allergens. There are no controlled studies about the effectiveness or risks associated with allergen-specific immunotherapy in patients with autoimmune disorders. On the other hand, scleroderma is an autoimmune chronic systemic disorder of unknown etiology characterized by excess collagen deposition in the skin and viscera, along with vascular injury. We report a girl with allergic asthma and with a second degree family history of systemic sclerosis who developed localized scleroderma during allergen specific immunotherapy. Because allergy vaccination alter the balance between effector and regulatory T-cell populations, which regulate immune tolerance, a positive family history of autoimmunity in first or second degree, could be a contraindication for allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  4. Allergen immunotherapy for IgE-mediated food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Dhami, Sangeeta; Arasi, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is developing Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for IgE-mediated Food Allergy. To inform the development of clinical recommendations, we sought to critically assess evidence on the effectiveness, safety and cost...

  5. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis : protocol for a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Roberts, Graham; Pfaar, Oliver; Muraro, Antonella; Ansotegui, Ignacio J; Calderon, Moises; Cingi, Cemal; Demoly, Pascal; Durham, Stephen; van Wijk, Ronald Gerth; Halken, Susanne; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hellings, Peter; Jacobsen, Lars; Knol, Edward; Linnemann, Desiree Larenas; Lin, Sandra; Maggina, Vivian; Oude-Elberink, Hanneke; Pajno, Giovanni; Panwankar, Ruby; Pastorello, Elideanna; Pitsios, Constantinos; Rotiroti, Giuseppina; Timmermans, Frans; Tsilochristou, Olympia; Varga, Eva-Maria; Wilkinson, Jamie; Williams, Andrew; Worm, Margitta; Zhang, Luo; Sheikh, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT i

  6. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic asthma: Protocol for a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhami, S. (Sangeeta); Nurmatov, U. (Ulugbek); I. Agache; S. Lau (Susanne); Muraro, A. (Antonella); M. Jutel (M.); G. Roberts; C.A. Akdis; M. Bonini (Matteo); M. Calderon (Moises); T.B. Casale (Thomas); Cavkaytar, O. (Ozlem); L. Cox (Linda); P. Demoly; Flood, B. (Breda); Hamelmann, E. (Eckard); Izuhara, K. (Kenji); O. Kalayci; J. Kleine-Tebbe (Jörg); A. Nieto (Antonio); N. Papadopoulos; O. Pfaar (Oliver); L. Rosenwasser (Lanny); D. Ryan (Dermot); C.B. Schmidt-Weber; S.J. Szefler; U. Wahn (Ulrich); R.G. van Wijk (Roy Gerth); Wilkinson, J. (Jamie); A. Sheikh (Aziz)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for Allergic Asthma. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT in the management of

  7. Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: Protocol for a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhami, S. (Sangeeta); Nurmatov, U. (Ulugbek); G. Roberts; O. Pfaar (Oliver); Muraro, A. (Antonella); I.J. Ansotegui (I.); M. Calderon (Moises); Cingi, C. (Cemal); P. Demoly; S.R. Durham (Stephen); R.G. van Wijk (Roy Gerth); S. Halken (Susanne); Hamelmann, E. (Eckard); P.W. Hellings (P.); L. Jacobsen; E.F. Knol (Edward Frank); D.L. Linnemann (D. Larenas); Lin, S. (Sandra); Maggina, V. (Vivian); H.N.G. Oude Elberink (Hanneke N.G.); G. Pajno (G.); Panwankar, R. (Ruby); Pastorello, E. (Elideanna); C. Pitsios; Rotiroti, G. (Giuseppina); Timmermans, F. (Frans); Tsilochristou, O. (Olympia); E.M. Varga; Wilkinson, J. (Jamie); Williams, A. (Andrew); M. Worm (M.); Zhang, L. (Luo); A. Sheikh (Aziz)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Management of Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and saf

  8. Needs Elicitation for Novel Pervasive Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Forchhammer, B. H.; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that engaging with end-users to elicit their needs is beneficial when designing a new artefact. This can be particularly challenging, however, when end-users are limited in their ability to provide input. When there is broad variation in users' needs, a further challenge...... is to include the large number of users required to represent the entire population. Failure to do so may lead to a solution that is over specialised to fit the needs of only a small subset of users. Both challenges are common in healthcare applications in which the end-user is also care recipient (or patient......). What if instead of trying to engage vastly many users in design activities, we could hear the voice of the patient by tapping into existing channels within the health care service system? Many interactions between healthcare providers and patients involve knowledge transfer. Observing these could...

  9. Needs Elicitation for Novel Pervasive Healthcare Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorpe, Julia Rosemary; Forchhammer, B. H.; Maier, Anja

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that engaging with end-users to elicit their needs is beneficial when designing a new artefact. This can be particularly challenging, however, when end-users are limited in their ability to provide input. When there is broad variation in users' needs, a further challenge...... is to include the large number of users required to represent the entire population. Failure to do so may lead to a solution that is over specialised to fit the needs of only a small subset of users. Both challenges are common in healthcare applications in which the end-user is also care recipient (or patient...... inform designers about patients’ support needs and healthcare providers’ information needs.H ealthcare professionals offer a wealth of knowledge based on a clinical understanding of the condition as well as experience listening to patients' problems. Especially where patients are in denial about...

  10. Preference elicitation and inverse reinforcement learning

    CERN Document Server

    Rothkopf, Constantin

    2011-01-01

    We state the problem of inverse reinforcement learning in terms of preference elicitation, resulting in a principled (Bayesian) statistical formulation. This generalises previous work on Bayesian inverse reinforcement learning and allows us to obtain a posterior distribution on the agent's preferences, policy and optionally, the obtained reward sequence, from observations. We examine the relation of the resulting approach to other statistical methods for inverse reinforcement learning via analysis and experimental results. We show that preferences can be determined accurately, even if the observed agent's policy is sub-optimal with respect to its own preferences. In that case, significantly improved policies with respect to the agent's preferences are obtained, compared to both other methods and to the performance of the demonstrated policy.

  11. Immunotherapy of Trypanosoma cruzi infection with DNA vaccines in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, Eric; Escobedo-Ortegon, Javier; Reyes-Rodriguez, Norma; Arjona-Torres, Arletty; Ramirez-Sierra, Maria Jesus

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the pathology of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy are still debated, and the controversy has interfered with the development of new treatments and vaccines. Because of the potential of DNA vaccines for immunotherapy of chronic and infectious diseases, we tested if DNA vaccines could control an ongoing Trypanosoma cruzi infection. BALB/c mice were infected with a lethal dose (5 x 10(4) parasites) as a model of acute infection, and then they were treated with two injections of 100 microg of plasmid DNA 1 week apart, beginning on day 5 postinfection. Control mice had high levels of parasitemia and mortality and severe cardiac inflammation, while mice treated with plasmid DNA encoding trypomastigote surface antigen 1 or Tc24 had reduced parasitemia and mild cardiac inflammation and >70% survived the infection. The efficacy of the immunotherapy also was significant when it was delayed until days 10 and 15 after infection. Parasitological analysis of cardiac tissue of surviving mice indicated that most mice still contained detectable parasite kinetoplast DNA but fewer mice contained live parasites, suggesting that there was efficient but not complete parasite elimination. DNA vaccine immunotherapy was also evaluated in CD1 mice infected with a low dose (5 x 10(2) parasites) as a model of chronic infection. Immunotherapy was initiated on day 70 postinfection and resulted in improved survival and reduced cardiac tissue inflammation. These results suggest that DNA vaccines have strong potential for the immunotherapy of T. cruzi infection and may provide new alternatives for the control of Chagas' disease.

  12. Systems biology applied to vaccine and immunotherapy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapies, including vaccines, represent a potent tool to prevent or contain disease with high morbidity or mortality such as infections and cancer. However, despite their widespread use, we still have a limited understanding of the mechanisms underlying the induction of protective immune responses. Immunity is made of a multifaceted set of integrated responses involving a dynamic interaction of thousands of molecules; among those is a growing appreciation for the role the innate immunity (i.e. pathogen recognition receptors - PRRs plays in determining the nature and duration (immune memory of adaptive T and B cell immunity. The complex network of interactions between immune manipulation of the host (immunotherapy on one side and innate and adaptive responses on the other might be fully understood only employing the global level of investigation provided by systems biology. In this framework, the advancement of high-throughput technologies, together with the extensive identification of new genes, proteins and other biomolecules in the "omics" era, facilitate large-scale biological measurements. Moreover, recent development of new computational tools enables the comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the interactions between all of the components of immunity over time. Here, we review recent progress in using systems biology to study and evaluate immunotherapy and vaccine strategies for infectious and neoplastic diseases. Multi-parametric data provide novel and often unsuspected mechanistic insights while enabling the identification of common immune signatures relevant to human investigation such as the prediction of immune responsiveness that could lead to the improvement of the design of future immunotherapy trials. Thus, the paradigm switch from "empirical" to "knowledge-based" conduct of medicine and immunotherapy in particular, leading to patient-tailored treatment.

  13. Cytotoxic immunotherapy strategies for cancer: mechanisms and clinical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Laura K; Guzik, Brian W; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo

    2011-08-01

    Traditional therapies for cancer include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Chemotherapy has widespread systemic cytotoxic effects against tumor cells but also affects normal cells. Radiation has more targeted local cytotoxicity but is limited to killing cells in the radiation field. Immunotherapy has the potential for systemic, specific killing of tumor cells. However, if the immune response is specific to a single antigen, tumor evasion can occur by down-regulation of that antigen. An immunotherapy approach that induces polyvalent immunity to autologous tumor antigens can provide a personalized vaccine with less potential for immunologic escape. A cytotoxic immunotherapy strategy creates such a tumor vaccine in situ. Immunogenic tumor cell death provides tumor antigen targets for the adaptive immune response and stimulates innate immunity. Attraction and activation of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells is important to process and present tumor antigens to T cells. These include cytotoxic T cells that kill tumor cells and T cells which positively and negatively regulate immunity. Tipping the balance in favor of anti-tumor immunity is an important aspect of an effective strategy. Clinically, immunotherapies may be most effective when combined with standard therapies in a complimentary way. An example is gene-mediated cytotoxic immunotherapy (GMCI) which uses an adenoviral vector, AdV-tk, to deliver a cytotoxic and immunostimulatory gene to tumor cells in vivo in combination with standard therapies creating an immunostimulatory milieu. This approach, studied extensively in animal models and early stage clinical trials, is now entering a definitive Phase 3 trial for prostate cancer.

  14. Applying Subject Matter Expertise (SME) Elicitation Techniques to TRAC Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    experts for elicitation Jenkinson.48 They are: • Tangible evidence of expertise . • Reputation. • Availability and willingness to participate...Corps facilities”, op. cit. 94Brenda M. Wenzel and Kathy L. Nau, Code of Best Practices for Survey Efforts, op. cit. C-21 expertise , be specifically...formal procedure for elicitation. But SHELF is more than this. Good elicitation generally requires a facilitator who has expertise in the process

  15. Expert elicitation of population-level effects of disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleishman, Erica; Burgman, Mark; Runge, Michael C.; Schick, Robert S; Krauss, Scott; Popper, Arthur N.; Hawkins, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Expert elicitation is a rigorous method for synthesizing expert knowledge to inform decision making and is reliable and practical when field data are limited. We evaluated the feasibility of applying expert elicitation to estimate population-level effects of disturbance on marine mammals. Diverse experts estimated parameters related to mortality and sublethal injury of North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis). We are now eliciting expert knowledge on the movement of right whales among geographic regions to parameterize a spatial model of health. Expert elicitation complements methods such as simulation models or extrapolations from other species, sometimes with greater accuracy and less uncertainty.

  16. 癌症免疫治疗进展综述%Developments in Cancer Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王爱和; 高莉萍

    2011-01-01

    In the past three decades, cancer immunology and immune therapy have made significant progress. An important step forward was the identification of human cancer antigens eliciting spontaneous immune responses in cancer patients. At present, the most immunogenic human cancer antigens known belong to the cancer-testis family of antigens, which are proteins expressed in various types of cancer but not in any healthy tissues except germ cells. The aims of cancer immunotherapy were to induce or boost the existing tumor-specific immune response by vaccinating with a relevant antigen together with an adjuvant. In addition, it may be favor of patients with early-stage disease in immunotherapy trials, as immune escape may be less pronounced.%在过去三十年,癌症的免疫学研究和免疫治疗取得了重大进展。一个重要的进步就是识别人类癌症抗原对癌症患者引起的自发性免疫反应。迄今已知的大部分免疫原性人类癌症抗原属于睾丸癌抗原家族,这种抗原蛋白在各种类型癌症中均有表达,但正常组织不表达(除胚胎细胞外)。癌症免疫治疗的目的就是通过接种相关抗原联合免疫佐剂诱导或激发肿瘤特异性免疫反应。免疫佐剂与抗原联合应用可诱导强效的免疫反应,或者显著提高原有的免疫反应。免疫治疗对于早期癌症患者可能是有益的,因为在此阶段免疫逃逸不明显。

  17. Acting green elicits a literal warm glow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Danny; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Steg, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Environmental policies are often based on the assumption that people only act environmentally friendly if some extrinsic reward is implicated, usually money. We argue that people might also be motivated by intrinsic rewards: doing the right thing (such as acting environmentally friendly) elicits psychological rewards in the form of positive feelings, a phenomenon known as warm glow. Given the fact that people's psychological state may affect their thermal state, we expected that this warm glow could express itself quite literally: people who act environmentally friendly may perceive the temperature to be higher. In two studies, we found that people who learned they acted environmentally friendly perceived a higher temperature than people who learned they acted environmentally unfriendly. The underlying psychological mechanism pertains to the self-concept: learning you acted environmentally friendly signals to yourself that you are a good person. Together, our studies show that acting environmentally friendly can be psychologically rewarding, suggesting that appealing to intrinsic rewards can be an alternative way to encourage pro-environmental actions.

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Specific Immunotherapy in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific immunotherapies, including vaccines with autologous tumor cells and tumor antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies, are important treatments for PC patients. To evaluate the clinical outcomes of PC-specific immunotherapy, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relevant published clinical trials. The effects of specific immunotherapy were compared with those of nonspecific immunotherapy and the meta-analysis was executed with results regarding the overall survival (OS, immune responses data, and serum cancer markers data. The pooled analysis was performed by using the random-effects model. We found that significantly improved OS was noted for PC patients utilizing specific immunotherapy and an improved immune response was also observed. In conclusion, specific immunotherapy was superior in prolonging the survival time and enhancing immunological responses in PC patients.

  19. Induction of Eosinophilic Esophagitis by Sublingual Pollen Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Miehlke

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT is increasingly investigated and utilized for the treatment of food and pollen allergies. Previous case reports suggested that eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE might develop as a long-term complication in children after completion of oral immunotherapy. Here, we describe a 44-year-old female with a medical history of pollinosis who for the first time in her life developed complete manifestation of EoE (peak eosinophils 164/high power field 4 weeks after initiation of SLIT using specific soluble allergens (hazelnut, birch, alder according to previous specific serum IgE testing. After discontinuation of SLIT, EoE resolved completely within 4 weeks without any other medical intervention. During a follow-up of 12 months the patient remained free of any esophageal symptoms. This is the first case report demonstrating a close and therefore likely causative association between pollen SLIT and EoE in an adult patient.

  20. Exosomes as nanocarriers for immunotherapy of cancer and inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thanh-Huyen; Mattheolabakis, George; Aldawsari, Hibah; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-09-01

    Cell secreted exosomes (30-100nm vesicles) play a major role in intercellular communication due to their ability to transfer proteins and nucleic acids from one cell to another. Depending on the originating cell type and the cargo, exosomes can have immunosuppressive or immunostimulatory effects, which have potential application as immunotherapies for cancer and autoimmune diseases. Cellular components shed from tumor cells or antigen presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells, macrophages and B cells, have been shown to be efficiently packaged in exosomes. In this review, we focus on the application of exosomes as nanocarriers and immunological agents for cancer and autoimmune immunotherapy. APC-derived exosomes demonstrate effective therapeutic efficacy for the treatment of cancer and experimental autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis. In addition to their intrinsic immunomodulating activity, exosomes have many advantages over conventional nanocarriers for drug and gene delivery.

  1. Rationale for anti-CD137 cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkouk, Amani; Chester, Cariad; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2016-02-01

    The consideration of the complex interplay between the tumour microenvironment (TME) and the immune response is the key for designing effective immunotherapies. Therapeutic strategies that harness co-stimulatory receptors have recently gained momentum in the clinic. One such strategy with promising clinical applications is the targeting of CD137, a member of the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily. Its expression on both innate and adaptive immune cells, coupled with its unique ability to potentiate antitumour responses through modulating the TME and to ameliorate autoimmune responses, has established it as an appealing target. In this review, we will discuss the various CD137-targeted immunotherapeutics that have reached clinical development, with a focus on recent advances and novel modalities such as CD137 chimeric antigen receptors and CD137 bispecific antibodies. We will also highlight the effect of CD137 targeting on the TME and discuss the importance of probing TME changes for predicting and testing the efficacy of CD137-mediated immunotherapy.

  2. Overview of Cellular Immunotherapy for Patients with Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Vauleon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High grade gliomas (HGG including glioblastomas (GBM are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite important progresses in GBM treatment that currently includes surgery combined to radio- and chemotherapy, GBM patients' prognosis remains very poor. Immunotherapy is one of the new promising therapeutic approaches that can specifically target tumour cells. Such an approach could also maintain long term antitumour responses without inducing neurologic defects. Since the past 25 years, adoptive and active immunotherapies using lymphokine-activated killer cells, cytotoxic T cells, tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes, autologous tumour cells, and dendritic cells have been tested in phase I/II clinical trials with HGG patients. This paper inventories these cellular immunotherapeutic strategies and discusses their efficacy, limits, and future perspectives for optimizing the treatment to achieve clinical benefits for GBM patients.

  3. Cancer-associated fibroblasts as targets for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarla, Sunitha; Song, Xiao-Tong; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Immunotherapy for solid tumors has shown promise in preclinical as well as early clinical studies. However, its efficacy remains limited. The hindrance to achieving objective, long-lasting therapeutic responses in solid tumors is, in part, mediated by the dynamic nature of the tumor and its complex microenvironment. Tumor-directed therapies fail to eliminate components of the microenvironment, which can reinstate a tumorigenic milieu and contribute to recurrence. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the most preponderant cell type in the solid tumor microenvironment. Given their pervasive role in facilitating tumor growth and metastatic dissemination, CAFs have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets in the tumor microenvironment. In this article, we highlight the cross-talk between CAFs and cancer cells, and discuss how targeting CAFs has the potential to improve current immunotherapy approaches for cancer.

  4. Current advances in T-cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Yin, Bingnan; Wang, Helen Y; Wang, Rong-Fu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide; due to the lack of ideal cancer biomarkers for early detection or diagnosis, most patients present with late-stage disease at the time of diagnosis, thus limiting the potential for successful treatment. Traditional cancer treatments, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, have demonstrated very limited efficacy for patients with late-stage disease. Therefore, innovative and effective cancer treatments are urgently needed for cancer patients with late-stage and refractory disease. Cancer immunotherapy, particularly adoptive cell transfer, has shown great promise in the treatment of patients with late-stage disease, including those who are refractory to standard therapies. In this review, we will highlight recent advances and discuss future directions in adoptive cell transfer based cancer immunotherapy.

  5. IL-13 receptor-directed cancer vaccines and immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Hideyuki; Husain, Syed R; Puri, Raj K

    2012-04-01

    Many immunotherapy approaches including therapeutic cancer vaccines targeting specific tumor-associated antigens are at various stages of development. Although the significance of overexpression of (IL-13Rα2) in cancer is being actively investigated, we have reported that IL-13Rα2 is a novel tumor-associated antigen. The IL-13Rα2-directed cancer vaccine is one of the most promising approaches to tumor immunotherapy, because of the selective expression of IL-13Rα2 in various solid tumor types but not in normal tissues. In this article, we will summarize its present status and potential strategies to improve IL-13Rα2-directed cancer vaccines for an optimal therapy of cancer.

  6. DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccine for cancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guizhi; Liu, Yijing; Yang, Xiangyu; Kim, Young-Hwa; Zhang, Huimin; Jia, Rui; Liao, Hsien-Shun; Jin, Albert; Lin, Jing; Aronova, Maria; Leapman, Richard; Nie, Zhihong; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2016-03-01

    Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit cancer development. Unmethylated CpG dinucleotide-containing oligonucleotides (CpG), a class of potent adjuvants that activate the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) located in the endolysosome of many antigen-presenting cells (APCs), are promising for cancer immunotherapy. However, clinical application of synthetic CpG confronts many challenges such as suboptimal delivery into APCs, unfavorable pharmacokinetics caused by limited biostability and short in vivo half-life, and side effects associated with leaking of CpG into the systemic circulation. Here we present DNA-inorganic hybrid nanovaccines (hNVs) for efficient uptake into APCs, prolonged tumor retention, and potent immunostimulation and cancer immunotherapy. hNVs were self-assembled from concatemer CpG analogs and magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). Mg2PPi renders hNVs resistant to nuclease degradation and thermal denaturation, both of which are demanding characteristics for effective vaccination and the storage and transportation of vaccines. Fluorophore-labeled hNVs were tracked to be efficiently internalized into the endolysosomes of APCs, where Mg2PPi was dissolved in an acidic environment and thus CpG analogs were exposed to hNVs. Internalized hNVs in APCs led to (1) elevated secretion of proinflammatory factors, and (2) elevated expression of co-stimulatory factors. Compared with molecular CpG, hNVs dramatically prolonged the tissue retention of CpG analogs and reduced splenomegaly, a common side effect of CpG. In a melanoma mouse model, two injections of hNVs significantly inhibited the tumor growth and outperformed the molecular CpG. These results suggest hNVs are promising for cancer immunotherapy.Cancer evolves to evade or compromise the surveillance of the immune system, and cancer immunotherapy aims to harness the immune system in order to inhibit

  7. Novel Anti-Melanoma Immunotherapies: Disarming Tumor Escape Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivan Sapoznik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The immune system fights cancer and sometimes temporarily eliminates it or reaches an equilibrium stage of tumor growth. However, continuous immunological pressure also selects poorly immunogenic tumor variants that eventually escape the immune control system. Here, we focus on metastatic melanoma, a highly immunogenic tumor, and on anti-melanoma immunotherapies, which recently, especially following the FDA approval of Ipilimumab, gained interest from drug development companies. We describe new immunomodulatory approaches currently in the development pipeline, focus on the novel CEACAM1 immune checkpoint, and compare its potential to the extensively described targets, CTLA4 and PD1. This paper combines multi-disciplinary approaches and describes anti-melanoma immunotherapies from molecular, medical, and business angles.

  8. Nanotechnology to augment immunotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ung, Nolan; Yang, Isaac

    2015-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is characterized as one of the most common and most deadly malignant primary brain tumors. Current treatment modalities include the use of surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy, though survival is still limited. Because of this, new treatment strategies are needed to improve overall survival. Immunotherapy has emerged as a potential treatment, but still possesses certain limitations to have a substantial clinical effect. In addition, nanotechnology has emerged as potent treatment effectors that have been shown to augment the effects of therapies including chemotherapy, gene therapy, and more. Nanoparticles possess a novel approach due to the myriad of functional groups that can create targeted treatments, though further optimization is still required. In this review, the authors will present the current uses and abilities of nanotechnology and its implication for use with immunotherapy in the treatment of GBM.

  9. Food allergy to apple and specific immunotherapy with birch pollen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kirsten Skamstrup; Khinchi, Marianne Søndergaard; Skov, Per Stahl

    2004-01-01

    Conflicting results concerning the effect of specific pollen immunotherapy (SIT) on allergy to plant foods have been reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SIT using a birch pollen extract on food allergy with focus on allergy to apple. Seventy-four birch pollen......-allergic patients were included in a double-blind, double-dummy, and placebo-controlled comparison of sublingual-swallow (SLIT) and subcutaneous (SCIT) administration of a birch pollen extract. Sixty-nine percent of these patients reported allergy to apple. The clinical reactivity to apple was evaluated by open....... Therefore, oral allergy syndrome (OAS) to apple should not be considered as a main criterion for selecting patients for birch pollen immunotherapy at present....

  10. Fever and the use of paracetamol during IL-2-based immunotherapy in metastatic melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køstner, Anne Helene; Ellegaard, Mai-Britt Bjørklund; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2015-01-01

    Fever is frequently observed in conjunction with interleukin-2 (IL-2)-based immunotherapy. Traditionally, fever has been regarded as an undesirable side effect and treated with fever-lowering drugs. However, new insights in tumor immunology suggest that elevated temperature may facilitate a more......-reducing drugs during immunotherapy can therefore be questioned. More studies are needed to evaluate the role of fever and the use of antipyretics during cytokine-based immunotherapy....

  11. Tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy: summary of the 2014 SITC primer

    OpenAIRE

    Page, David B.; Bourla, Ariel Bulua; Daniyan, Anthony; Naidoo, Jarushka; Smith, Eric; Smith, Melody; Friedman, Claire; Khalil, Danny N.; Funt, Samuel; Shoushtari, Alexander N; Willem W Overwijk; Sharma, Padmanee; Callahan, Margaret K

    2015-01-01

    The pioneers of tumor immunology and cancer immunotherapy, including the late William B. Coley and Lloyd J. Old, have championed the potential for immunotherapy for over a century. Finally, advances in our understanding of the fundamentals of tumor immunology are translating into clinical success, with recent US Food and Drug Administration approval of several immunotherapies that improve clinical outcomes across prostate cancer, metastatic melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer and lymphocytic...

  12. Immunotherapy of Ovarian Cancer: The Role of Checkpoint Inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca De Felice; Claudia Marchetti; Innocenza Palaia; Daniela Musio; Ludovico Muzii; Vincenzo Tombolini; Pierluigi Benedetti Panici

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most important cause of gynecological cancer-related mortality, with the majority of women presenting with advanced disease. Although surgery and chemotherapy can improve survival rates, it is necessary to integrate alternative strategies to improve the outcomes. Advances in understanding the role of immune system in the pathogenesis of cancer have led to the rapid evolvement of immunotherapy, which might establish a sustained immune system response against recurring can...

  13. Cancer immunotherapy products: Regulatory aspects in the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Active immunotherapy products (widely known as “cancer vaccines”) are products intended to stimulate an immune response to mediate tumor destruction or reduce the progression of disease in patients where cancer has been diagnosed. Some quality attributes of these products are very difficult to characterize or present a high variability (especially if they are for autologous use), further complicating the interpretation of some of the clinical data. Furthermore, questions arise in the evaluati...

  14. Central Tolerance Blockade to Augment Checkpoint Immunotherapy in Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    cancer immunotherapies because of this unique mode of action. By itself, anti-RANKL antibody improves the survival of mice injected with melanoma cells...approval of anti-RANKL antibody for other indications, including bone metastases from cancer . In order to develop anti-RANKL antibody as a combination...with colleagues and hear what other investigators are exploring. Another highlight was our participation in the Southeast Immunology Symposium in

  15. The IL-2 cytokine family in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Geok Choo; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    The use of cytokines from the IL-2 family (also called the common γ chain cytokine family) such as interleukin (IL)-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 to activate the immune system of cancer patients is one of the most important areas of current cancer immunotherapy research. The infusion of IL-2 at low or high doses for multiple cycles in patients with metastatic melanoma and renal cell carcinoma was the first successful immunotherapy for cancer proving that the immune system could completely eradicate tumor cells under certain conditions. The initial clinical success observed in some IL-2-treated patients encouraged further efforts focused on developing and improving the application of other IL-2 family cytokines (IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21) that have unique biological effects playing important roles in the development, proliferation, and function of specific subsets of lymphocytes at different stages of differentiation with some overlapping effects with IL-2. IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21, as well as mutant forms or variants of IL-2, are now also being actively pursued in the clinic with some measured early successes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the biology of the IL-2 cytokine family focusing on IL-2, IL-15 and IL-21. We discuss the similarities and differences between the signaling pathways mediated by these cytokines and their immunomodulatory effects on different subsets of immune cells. Current clinical application of IL-2, IL-15 and IL-21 either as single agents or in combination with other biological agents and the limitation and potential drawbacks of these cytokines for cancer immunotherapy are also described. Lastly, we discuss the future direction of research on these cytokines, such as the development of new cytokine mutants and variants for improving cytokine-based immunotherapy through differential binding to specific receptor subunits.

  16. Therapeutic cancer vaccines and combination immunotherapies involving vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen T

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Trang Nguyen,1 Julie Urban,1 Pawel Kalinski1–5 1Department of Surgery, 2Department of Immunology, 3Department of Microbiology and Infectious Disease, 4Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, 5University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Recent US Food and Drug Administration approvals of Provenge® (sipuleucel-T as the first cell-based cancer therapeutic factor and ipilimumab (Yervoy®/anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 as the first “checkpoint blocker” highlight recent advances in cancer immunotherapy. Positive results of the clinical trials evaluating additional checkpoint blocking agents (blockade of programmed death [PD]-1, and its ligands, PD-1 ligand 1 and 2 and of several types of cancer vaccines suggest that cancer immunotherapy may soon enter the center stage of comprehensive cancer care, supplementing surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. This review discusses the current status of the clinical evaluation of different classes of therapeutic cancer vaccines and possible avenues for future development, focusing on enhancing the magnitude and quality of cancer-specific immunity by either the functional reprogramming of patients' endogenous dendritic cells or the use of ex vivo-manipulated dendritic cells as autologous cellular transplants. This review further discusses the available strategies aimed at promoting the entry of vaccination-induced T-cells into tumor tissues and prolonging their local antitumor activity. Finally, the recent improvements to the above three modalities for cancer immunotherapy (inducing tumor-specific T-cells, prolonging their persistence and functionality, and enhancing tumor homing of effector T-cells and rationale for their combined application in order to achieve clinically effective anticancer responses are addressed.Keywords: immunotherapy, cancer, vaccines

  17. Immunotherapy in prostate cancer: review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-García, E M; Vera-Badillo, F E; Perez-Valderrama, B; Matos-Pita, A S; Duran, I

    2015-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common male malignancy in the Western world. Once it metastasizes, it is incurable. The current gold standard for metastatic disease is the combined docetaxel/prednisone regimen. Prostate cancer shows several characteristics that make it a suitable candidate for immunotherapy, as recently exemplified by the approval of sipuleucel-T, the first vaccine to treat any malignancy. Here, we review different tumor-associated antigen immunotherapy strategies currently being investigated, from a humanized radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (J-591) that targets radiation into tumor cells, moving on to vaccines and through to immunomodulator agents such as anti-CPLA-4 and anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibodies that activate T-cell responses via immune checkpoint inhibition. We explore different opinions on the best approach to integrate immunotherapy into existing standard therapies, such as androgen-deprivation therapy, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, and review different combination sequences, patient types and time points during the course of the disease to achieve a lasting immune response. We present data from recent phase III clinical trials that call for a change in trial endpoint design with immunotherapy agents, from the traditional tumor progression to overall survival and how such trials should include immune response measurements as secondary or intermediate endpoints to help identify patient clinical benefit in the earlier phases of treatment. Finally, we join in the recent questioning on the validity of RECIST criteria to measure response to immunotherapeutic agents, as initial increases in the size of tumors/lymph nodes, which are part of a normal immune response, could be categorized as disease progression under RECIST.

  18. Assessing T-cell responses in anticancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escors, David; Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Schwarze, Julia; Dufait, Ines; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Lanna, Alessio; Arce, Frederick; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Kochan, Grazyna; Guerrero-Setas, David; Breckpot, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Since dendritic cells operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and hence are capable of jumpstarting the immune system, they have been exploited to develop a variety of immunotherapeutic regimens against cancer. In the few past years, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to mediate robust immunosuppressive functions, thereby inhibiting tumor-targeting immune responses. Thus, we propose that the immunomodulatory activity of MDSCs should be carefully considered for the development of efficient anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:24244902

  19. Allergen specificity is relevant for immunotherapy prescription in polysensitised children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprandi Giorgio

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The sensitization to more allergens, such as polysenitization, is becoming a frequent characteristic of allergic patients, since the childhood. However, this phenomenon is considered an obstacle to prescribe immunotherapy by many doctors. This study investigated the relevance of polysensitization in a cohort of allergic children and evaluated the number of allergen extracts prescribed for these children. There are allergens that are frequent, but not prescribed. This issue should be matter of adequate debate for Italian paediatricians.

  20. Immunotherapies for Targeting Ancient Retrovirus during Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    nature of virus activity in the cancer cell and its involvement in cancer prognosis. Melanoma forms 80% of all skin cancer and about 10% of all... CDK4 pathways in melanoma cells. Cancer investigation 28, 1031-1037 (2010). 7.Hahn, S., et al. Serological response to human endogenous retrovirus K...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0002 TITLE: Immunotherapies for Targeting Ancient Retrovirus during Breast Cancer

  1. Elicited Emotions and Cognitive Functioning in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Rivka; Klein, Pnina S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the effects of eliciting positive and negative emotions on various cognitive functions of four- to five-year-old preschool children were examined. Emotions were elicited through presentations of "happy" and "sad" video clips, before the children performed the cognitive tasks. Behavioural (facial expressions) and…

  2. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ick Byun

    Full Text Available To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE and new-onset seizure.Adult (age ≥18 years patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2-4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as "seizure remission", "> 50% seizure reduction", or "no change" based on the degree of its decrease.Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2-4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events.AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE.

  3. The clinical-immunological analysis of a specific and combined immunotherapy of patients with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Kenbayeva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Research objective is the comparative assessment of efficiency of two various ways of an immunotherapy of patients with cervical cancer. 57 patients with cervical cancer, the III stages, distributed on 3 groups – combined radiotherapy, a combination of a radiotherapy and specific immunotherapy, and also a radiotherapy, specific and adaptive immunotherapy are surveyed. Clinical efficiency of treatment was estimated by means of primary tumor regression and 3-year survival rate. The scheme of combined immunotherapy was shown to possess the most clinical efficiency. Positive dynamics of cell immunity indicators was accompanied to clinical efficiency of treatment.

  4. CANCER IMMUNOLOGY AND IMMUNOTHERAPY – UNDERSTANDING AND ADAPTATION THE CURRENT EVIDENCE TO OPTIMIZE PATIENT THERAPY OUTCOMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlin Savov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication includes the try to act as intermediary to the readers, which should be able to understand: - The description of the cancer immunotherapy mechanisms in the context of current therapy decisions for the treatment of cancer - The including criteria for those patients with cancer who could be appropriate candidates for immunotherapy - And to optimize patient outcomes by using best practices to manage the adverse events associated with immunotherapy treatment More than 15 promising immunotherapy approaches being tested in clinical trials with appropriate patients and colleagues for enrollment and peer-to-peer education purposes, respectively.

  5. Mathematical Model Creation for Cancer Chemo-Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisette de Pillis

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging tasks in constructing a mathematical model of cancer treatment is the calculation of biological parameters from empirical data. This task becomes increasingly difficult if a model involves several cell populations and treatment modalities. A sophisticated model constructed by de Pillis et al., Mixed immunotherapy and chemotherapy of tumours: Modelling, applications and biological interpretations, J. Theor. Biol. 238 (2006, pp. 841–862; involves tumour cells, specific and non-specific immune cells (natural killer (NK cells, CD8+T cells and other lymphocytes and employs chemotherapy and two types of immunotherapy (IL-2 supplementation and CD8+T-cell infusion as treatment modalities. Despite the overall success of the aforementioned model, the problem of illustrating the effects of IL-2 on a growing tumour remains open. In this paper, we update the model of de Pillis et al. and then carefully identify appropriate values for the parameters of the new model according to recent empirical data. We determine new NK and tumour antigen-activated CD8+T-cell count equilibrium values; we complete IL-2 dynamics; and we modify the model in de Pillis et al. to allow for endogenous IL-2 production, IL-2-stimulated NK cell proliferation and IL-2-dependent CD8+T-cell self-regulations. Finally, we show that the potential patient-specific efficacy of immunotherapy may be dependent on experimentally determinable parameters.

  6. Specific immunotherapy by the sublingual route for respiratory allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorvaia Cristoforo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Specific immunotherapy is the only treatment able to act on the causes and not only on the symptoms of respiratory allergy. Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT was introduced as an option to subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT, the clinical effectiveness of which is partly counterbalanced by the issue of adverse systemic reactions, which occur at a frequency of about 0.2% of injections and 2-5% of the patients and may also be life-threatening. A large number of trials, globally evaluated by several meta-analyses, demonstrated that SLIT is an effective and safe treatment for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma, severe reactions being extremely rare. The application of SLIT is favored by a good compliance, higher than that reported for SCIT, in which the injections are a major factor for noncompliance because of inconvenience, and by its cost-effectiveness. In fact, a number of studies showed that SLIT may be very beneficial to the healthcare system, especially when its effectiveness persists after treatment withdrawal because of the induced immunologic changes.

  7. Rush immunotherapy in an experimental model of feline allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinero, Carol R; Byerly, Jenni R; Berghaus, Roy D; Berghaus, Londa J; Schelegle, Edward S; Hyde, Dallas M; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2006-03-15

    Specific allergen immunotherapy represents the only curative treatment of allergy. No studies have evaluated its efficacy in feline allergic asthma. We hypothesized that an abbreviated course of immunotherapy (rush immunotherapy, RIT) would blunt eosinophilic airways inflammation in experimental feline asthma induced with Bermuda grass allergen (BGA). The 6-month study included asthmatic-RIT treated cats; asthmatic-no RIT treated cats; and non-asthmatic cats. RIT involved increasing parenteral doses (20-200 microg) of BGA over 2 days. Numbers of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), serum and BALF immunoglobulins, lymphocyte blastogenesis assays, and cytokines in blood and BALF were evaluated. BALF eosinophils decreased (P=0.048) only in asthmatic-RIT treated cats (baseline 1.1 x 10(6); Month 6, 2.4 x 10(5)). Serum BGA-specific IgG was higher (Peosinophilic airways inflammation in cats with experimental asthma. The mechanism of RIT may involve changes in allergen-specific immunoglobulins, induction of hyporesponsive lymphocytes, or alteration of cytokine profiles.

  8. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Mansour

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  9. Cancer immunotherapy in veterinary medicine: Current options and new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, Daniel; Guth, Amanda; Coy, Jonathan; Dow, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Excitement in the field of tumor immunotherapy is being driven by several remarkable breakthroughs in recent years. This review will cover recent advances in cancer immunotherapy, including the use of T cell checkpoint inhibitors, engineered T cells, cancer vaccines, and anti-B cell and T cell antibodies. Inhibition of T cell checkpoint molecules such as PD-1 and CTLA-4 using monoclonal antibodies has achieved notable success against advanced tumors in humans, including melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, and non-small cell lung cancer. Therapy with engineered T cells has also demonstrated remarkable tumor control and regression in human trials. Autologous cancer vaccines have recently demonstrated impressive prolongation of disease-free intervals and survival times in dogs with lymphoma. In addition, caninized monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 and CD52 just recently received either full (CD20) or conditional (CD52) licensing by the United States Department of Agriculture for clinical use in the treatment of canine B-cell and T-cell lymphomas, respectively. Thus, immunotherapy for cancer is rapidly moving to the forefront of cancer treatment options in veterinary medicine as well as human medicine.

  10. Bubble-Assisted Ultrasound: Application in Immunotherapy and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffre, Jean-Michel; Deckers, Roel; Bos, Clemens; Moonen, Chrit

    2016-01-01

    Bubble-assisted ultrasound is a versatile technology with great potential in immunotherapy and vaccination. This technology involves the exposure of immune cells (i.e., dendritic cells, lymphocytes) in-vitro or diseased tissues (i.e., brain, tumor) in-vivo to ultrasound treatment with gas bubbles. Bubble destruction leads to physical forces that induce the direct delivery of weakly permeant immuno-stimulatory molecules either into the cytoplasm of immune cells, or through the endothelial barrier of diseased tissues. Hence, therapeutic antibodies (i.e., antibody-based immunotherapy) and cytokine-encoding nucleic acids (i.e., cytokine gene therapy) can be successfully delivered into diseased tissues, thus improving immune responses. In addition, protein antigens, as well as antigen-encoding nucleic acids (pDNA, mRNA), can be delivered into dendritic cells (i.e., dendritic cell-based vaccines), thus leading to a long-lasting prophylactic or therapeutic immunization. This chapter focuses on the state-of-the-art of bubble-assisted ultrasound in the field of immunotherapy and vaccination.

  11. Immunotherapy of cancer employing adoptive T cell transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAOLI

    2005-01-01

    The current concept of“Adoptive T Cell Immunotherapy of Cancer”is quite different from how it was originally conceived.With the development of modern technology in molecular biology,cell biology,immunology and biochemistry during the last twenty years or so,adoptive immunotherapy has grown from its initial form of a simple“blood cell transfer”into its present process which involves host vauccination,effector cell activation/polarization and genetic modification.With the use of immune adjuvants and the identification/characterization of tumor-reactive T cell subsets,or in combination with other therapeutic strategies,adoptively transferred T cells have become much more potent inmediating tumor regression.In addition,studies on the trafficking of infused T cells,cell transfer performed in lymphopenic models,as well as the discovery of novel techniques in immune monitoring for the generation of effector cells in vitro and after cell transfer in vivo have provided useful tools to further improve the therapeutic efficacy of this approach.This article will review these related aspects of adoptive T cell immunotherapy of cancer with specific comments on certain critical areas in the application of this approach.With the rapidly evolving advances in this area,it is hoped that this cellular immunologic therapy as it was conceptualized in the past,can become more useful in the treatment of human cancer in the near future.

  12. Targeting O-Acetyl-GD2 Ganglioside for Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurence, Julien; Fougeray, Sophie; Bahri, Meriem; Cochonneau, Denis; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Paris, François; Heczey, Andras; Birklé, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Target selection is a key feature in cancer immunotherapy, a promising field in cancer research. In this respect, gangliosides, a broad family of structurally related glycolipids, were suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy based on their higher abundance in tumors when compared with the matched normal tissues. GD2 is the first ganglioside proven to be an effective target antigen for cancer immunotherapy with the regulatory approval of dinutuximab, a chimeric anti-GD2 therapeutic antibody. Although the therapeutic efficacy of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies is well documented, neuropathic pain may limit its application. O-Acetyl-GD2, the O-acetylated-derivative of GD2, has recently received attention as novel antigen to target GD2-positive cancers. The present paper examines the role of O-acetyl-GD2 in tumor biology as well as the available preclinical data of anti-O-acetyl-GD2 monoclonal antibodies. A discussion on the relevance of O-acetyl-GD2 in chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy development is also included.

  13. Immune Modulation by Chemotherapy or Immunotherapy to Enhance Cancer Vaccines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, Genevieve M. [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada); Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Liwski, Robert S. [Room 11-L1, Sir Charles Tupper Building, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Dalhousie University, 5850 College St, Halifax, NS, B3H 1X5 (Canada); Room 206E, Dr. D. J. Mackenzie Building, Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, 5788 University Avenue, Halifax, NS, B3H 2Y9 (Canada); Mansour, Marc [Suite 411, 1344 Summer St., Immunovaccine Inc., Halifax, NS, B3H 0A8 (Canada)

    2011-08-05

    Chemotherapy has been a mainstay in cancer treatment for many years. Despite some success, the cure rate with chemotherapy remains unsatisfactory in some types of cancers, and severe side effects from these treatments are a concern. Recently, understanding of the dynamic interplay between the tumor and immune system has led to the development of novel immunotherapies, including cancer vaccines. Cancer vaccines have many advantageous features, but their use has been hampered by poor immunogenicity. Many developments have increased their potency in pre-clinical models, but cancer vaccines continue to have a poor clinical track record. In part, this could be due to an inability to effectively overcome tumor-induced immune suppression. It had been generally assumed that immune-stimulatory cancer vaccines could not be used in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapies, but recent evidence has challenged this dogma. Chemotherapies could be used to condition the immune system and tumor to create an environment where cancer vaccines have a better chance of success. Other types of immunotherapies could also be used to modulate the immune system. This review will discuss how immune modulation by chemotherapy or immunotherapy could be used to bolster the effects of cancer vaccines and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these treatments.

  14. Immunotherapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Comprehensive Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachna Raman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized renal cell carcinoma (RCC is often curable by surgery alone. However, metastatic RCC is generally incurable. In the 1990s, immunotherapy in the form of cytokines was the mainstay of treatment for metastatic RCC. However, responses were seen in only a minority of highly selected patients with substantial treatment-related toxicities. The advent of targeted agents such as vascular endothelial growth factor tyrosine kinase inhibitors VEGF-TKIs and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitors led to a change in this paradigm due to improved response rates and progression-free survival, a better safety profile, and the convenience of oral administration. However, most patients ultimately progress with about 12% being alive at 5 years. In contrast, durable responses lasting 10 years or more are noted in a minority of those treated with cytokines. More recently, an improved overall survival with newer forms of immunotherapy in other malignancies (such as melanoma and prostate cancer has led to a resurgence of interest in immune therapies in metastatic RCC. In this review we discuss the rationale for immunotherapy and recent developments in immunotherapeutic strategies for treating metastatic RCC.

  15. Possible role of laser phototherapy in laser immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hode, Tomas; Hode, Lars

    2009-02-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a promising cancer treatment method that induces antitumor immunity and appears to be effective both locally and systemically. In this context, an important factor is the overall state of the immune system, both locally and systemically. The success of any immunotherapy treatment depends on the balance between the local immunosuppressive forces induced by the tumor and the immune response of the host organism. Factors that influence this balance include heat-shock proteins (for example HSP70), transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukins, and more. Laser phototherapy, which is based on non-thermal photobiological processes, has been shown to modulate the body's own immune response, both locally and systemically, with a strong influence on for example cytokine production and heat-shock protein synthesis. Laser phototherapy may therefore be an important component in the overall efficacy of laser immunotherapy, and may tip the balance between the immunosuppressive and immunostimulatory forces in favor of immunostimulation.

  16. IgE-based immunotherapy of cancer: challenges and chances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, J; Jensen-Jarolim, E

    2014-02-01

    Passive immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies is an indispensable cornerstone of clinical oncology. Notably, all FDA-approved antibodies comprise the IgG class, although numerous research articles proposed monoclonal antibodies of the IgM, IgG, IgA and IgE classes directed specifically against tumor-associated antigens. In particular, for the IgE isotype class, several recent studies could demonstrate high tumoricidic efficacy. Therefore, this review specifically highlights the latest developments toward IgE-based immunotherapy of cancer. Possible mechanisms and safety aspects of IgE-mediated tumor cell death are discussed with special focus on the attracted immune cells. An outlook is given on how especially comparative oncology could contribute to further developments. Humans and dogs have a highly comparable IgE biology, suggesting that translational AllergoOncology studies in patients with canine cancer could have predictive value for the potential of IgE-based anticancer immunotherapy in human clinical oncology.

  17. Peptide immunotherapy for childhood allergy - addressing translational challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie Karen J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Allergic sensitisation usually begins early in life. The number of allergens a patient is sensitised to can increase over time and the development of additional allergic conditions is increasingly recognised. Targeting allergic disease in childhood is thus likely to be the most efficacious means of reducing the overall burden of allergic disease. Specific immunotherapy involves administering protein allergen to tolerise allergen reactive CD4+ T cells, thought key in driving allergic responses. Yet specific immunotherapy risks allergic reactions including anaphylaxis as a consequence of preformed allergen-specific IgE antibodies binding to the protein, subsequent cross-linking and mast cell degranulation. CD4+ T cells direct their responses to short "immunodominant" peptides within the allergen. Such peptides can be given therapeutically to induce T cell tolerance without facilitating IgE cross-linking. Peptide immunotherapy (PIT offers attractive treatment potential for allergic disease. However, PIT has not yet been shown to be effective in children. This review discusses the immunological mechanisms implicated in PIT and briefly covers outcomes from adult PIT trials. This provides a context for discussion of the challenges for the application of PIT, both generally and more specifically in relation to children.

  18. A Review of Allergy and Allergen Specific Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoon Bidad

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Since 20th  century, when allergy was defined, an ongoing attempt for discovering the mechanisms underlying it and its treatment began. Defining allergens as well as cells such as regulatory T-cells and characterizing the antibodies involved in the pathogenesis (including blocking antibodies have helped very much towards a better understanding of the immunologic process.However, Allergen specific immunotherapy (SIT, as a specific curative treatment for allergy also dates back to the beginning of the previous century and has progressed considerably during these years. SIT similar to natural immunomodulation, directs the immune response towards tolerance.New strategies in this field, such as using recombinant allergens, T- and B-cell-epitope- containing peptides, and DNA vaccination have shown promising results. Sublingual immunotherapy, although not yet  FDA-approved, as an alternative  strategy in SIT  has demonstrated efficacy as well as safety.Furthermore, allergen extracts, their standardization and their modification have also been the focus of much research. Undoubtedly, specific immunotherapy is proven to be an efficacious  method  to  treat  allergy,  so  its  cost-effectiveness  should  be  estimated  in developing countries in order to include it in the country's health priorities. Informing physicians about the new anti-vaccination movement is also crucial.

  19. Radio-immunotherapy of non Hodgkin lymphomas: Experience from Lille; Radio-immunotherapie des lymphomes non hodgkiniens, experience lilloise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huglo, D.; Morschhauser, F.; Steinling, M. [Lille Univ. Nord de France, UPRESS EA 1049, 59 (France); Huglo, D.; Prangere, T.; Robu, D.; Malek, E.; Petyt, G.; Steinling, M. [CHU de Lille, Service de Medecine Nucleaire et Imagerie Fonctionnelle, Hopital Huriez, 59 - Lille (France); Huglo, D. [Inserm U703, 59 - Lille (France); Morschhauser, F.; Robu, D. [CHU de Lille, Service des maladies du sang, Hopital Huriez, 59 - Lille (France)

    2009-08-15

    From an experience of radio-immunotherapy of non Hodgkin lymphomas from March 2002 to December 2008 (near 7 years), corresponding to 160 treatments, an analysis of indications has been done: clinical research trials, authorized indications from A.M.M. or medically justified. Some elements which could be problematic are pointed: coordination between the regional Haematology departments and our Nuclear Medicine department, radio labelling and radioprotection. (authors)

  20. De-Risking Immunotherapy: Report of a Consensus Workshop of the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellman, Ira; Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J; Kalos, Michael D; Chen, Daniel S; Allison, James P; Drake, Charles G; Levitsky, Hy; Lonberg, Nils; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Fearon, Douglas T; Wherry, E John; Lowy, Israel; Vonderheide, Robert H; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    With the recent FDA approvals of pembrolizumab and nivolumab, and a host of additional immunomodulatory agents entering clinical development each year, the field of cancer immunotherapy is changing rapidly. Strategies that can assist researchers in choosing the most promising drugs and drug combinations to move forward through clinical development are badly needed in order to reduce the likelihood of late-stage clinical trial failures. On October 5, 2014, the Cancer Immunotherapy Consortium of the Cancer Research Institute, a collaborative think tank composed of stakeholders from academia, industry, regulatory agencies, and patient interest groups, met to discuss strategies for de-risking immunotherapy development, with a focus on integrating preclinical and clinical studies, and conducting smarter early-phase trials, particularly for combination therapies. Several recommendations were made, including making better use of clinical data to inform preclinical research, obtaining adequate tissues for biomarker studies, and choosing appropriate clinical trial endpoints to identify promising drug candidates and combinations in nonrandomized early-phase trials.

  1. Requirements for acquiring a high-quality house dust mite extract for allergen immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frati F

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Franco Frati,1 Cristoforo Incorvaia,2 Marie David,3 Silvia Scurati,3 Simona Seta,4 Guglielmo Padua,4 Eleonora Cattaneo,1 Carlo Cavaliere,5 Alessia Di Rienzo,6 Ilaria Dell'Albani,1 Paola Puccinelli11Medical and Scientific and Regulatory Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 2Allergy/Pulmonary Rehabilitation, ICP Hospital, Milan, Italy; 3Laboratoire Stallergenes, Antony, France; 4Marketing Department, Stallergenes, Milan, Italy; 5Ear, Nose and Throat Department, University Sapienza, Rome, Italy; 6Azienda Sanitaria Locale, Allergology Service, Frosinone, ItalyAbstract: The house dust mite is a major cause of respiratory allergy worldwide. The management of mite allergy is based on avoidance measures, drug treatment, and allergen immunotherapy, but only allergen immunotherapy is able to modify the natural history of the disease. Injectable subcutaneous immunotherapy was introduced a century ago, while sublingual immunotherapy was proposed in the 1980s and emerged in the ensuing years as an effective and safe option to subcutaneous immunotherapy. However, the quality of the extracts to be used in allergen immunotherapy is crucial for the success of treatment. The mite extract for sublingual immunotherapy known as Staloral 300 was developed to offer optimal characteristics concerning the mite culture medium, standardization, and allergen dose. Double-blind, placebo-controlled trials with Staloral 300 have provided a substantial part of the clinical evidence analyzed in a meta-analysis of the efficacy of allergen immunotherapy in mite-induced rhinitis and asthma. Safety and tolerability are very good, mild local reactions in the mouth being the most common side effect. This makes it feasible to carry out sublingual immunotherapy for the 3–5-year duration needed to achieve long-lasting tolerance to the specific allergen. The performance of Staloral 300 may provide optimal conditions for an effective and safe sublingual immunotherapy in patients with

  2. Exploiting the Immunomodulatory Properties of Chemotherapeutic Drugs to Improve the Success of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Kelly; Salvagno, Camilla; de Visser, Karin E

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is gaining momentum in the clinic. The current challenge is to understand why a proportion of cancer patients do not respond to cancer immunotherapy, and how this can be translated into the rational design of combinatorial cancer immunotherapy strategies aimed at maximizing success of immunotherapy. Here, we discuss how tumors orchestrate an immunosuppressive microenvironment, which contributes to their escape from immune attack. Relieving the immunosuppressive networks in cancer patients is an attractive strategy to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy. Since the clinical availability of drugs specifically targeting immunosuppressive cells or mediators is still limited, an alternative strategy is to use conventional chemotherapy drugs with immunomodulatory properties to improve cancer immunotherapy. We summarize the preclinical and clinical studies that illustrate how the anti-tumor T cell response can be enhanced by chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppressive networks. Treatment strategies aimed at combining chemotherapy-induced relief of immunosuppression and T cell-boosting checkpoint inhibitors provide an attractive and clinically feasible approach to overcome intrinsic and acquired resistance to cancer immunotherapy, and to extend the clinical success of cancer immunotherapy.

  3. Sublingual immunotherapy not effective in house dust mite-allergic children in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Cindy M. A.; Moed, Heleen; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Roder, Esther; Hop, Wim C. J.; de Groot, Hans; de Jongste, Johan C.; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Bindels, Patrick J. E.; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) as a therapy for the treatment of allergic rhinitis in children might be acceptable as an alternative for subcutaneous immunotherapy. However, the efficacy of SLIT with house dust mite extract is not well established. Objective: To investigate whether SLIT

  4. Improved survival for patients diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the era of chemo-immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, C; Simonsen, J; Rostgaard, K

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is in rapid transition, and during recent decades both combination chemotherapy and immunotherapy have been introduced. To evaluate the effects of this development, we identified all CLL patients registered in the nation-wide Danish Cancer...... for patients treated with chemo-immunotherapy demonstrated in clinical studies....

  5. Difficulties and dangers of CEA-targeted immunotherapy against colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Rinke

    2006-01-01

    The studies described in this thesis focus on the feasibility of using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as a target for immunotherapy of colorectal cancer and on the balance between anti-tumor immunity and autoimmune pathology. The potential of CEA as a target antigen for immunotherapy of cancer is co

  6. Immune responsiveness in a mouse model of combined adoptive immunotherapy with NK and dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Cui

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: NK cells and DCs adoptive immunotherapy targeted the tumor and exhibited improved therapeutic efficacy as compared to that of the cells given alone. This strategy could induce tumorigenic immunological memory and suggests that mixed NK cells and DCs adoptive immunotherapy offers therapeutic options against cancer.

  7. Spoonerisms as Sequencer Conflicts: Evidence from Artifically Elicited Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Bernard J.; Motley, Michael T.

    1976-01-01

    Presents evidence that spoonerisms result from a conflict in word sequencing that carries through to phoneme sequencing, and in the process illustrates the use of some techniques for the experimental elicitation of spoonerisms. (Author/RK)

  8. CCSI Risk Estimation: An Application of Expert Elicitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, David W.; Dalton, Angela C.

    2012-10-01

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a multi-laboratory simulation-driven effort to develop carbon capture technologies with the goal of accelerating commercialization and adoption in the near future. One of the key CCSI technical challenges is representing and quantifying the inherent uncertainty and risks associated with developing, testing, and deploying the technology in simulated and real operational settings. To address this challenge, the CCSI Element 7 team developed a holistic risk analysis and decision-making framework. The purpose of this report is to document the CCSI Element 7 structured systematic expert elicitation to identify additional risk factors. We review the significance of and established approaches to expert elicitation, describe the CCSI risk elicitation plan and implementation strategies, and conclude by discussing the next steps and highlighting the contribution of risk elicitation toward the achievement of the overarching CCSI objectives.

  9. PABRE-Proj: applying patterns in requirements elicitation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Software requirement patterns have been proposed as a type of artifact for fostering requirements reuse. In this paper, we present PABRE-Proj, a tool aimed at supporting requirements elicitation and specification. Peer Reviewed

  10. How can nanotechnology help membrane vesicle-based cancer immunotherapy development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xin; Zhu, Motao; Nie, Guangjun

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are nanosized vesicles originating from endosomal compartments and secreted by most living cells. In the past decade, exosomes have emerged as potent tools for cancer immunotherapy due to their important roles in modulation of immune responses, and promising results have been achieved in exosome-based immunotherapy. The recent rapid progress of nanotechnology, especially on tailored design of nanocarriers for drug delivery based on both passive and active targeting strategies, sheds light on re-engineering native membrane vesicles for enhanced immune regulation and therapy. Applications of nanotechnology toolkits might provide new opportunity not only for value-added therapeutic or diagnostic strategies based on exosomes in cancer immunotherapy, but also new insights for biogenesis and biological relevance of membrane vesicles. This commentary focuses on the recent development and limitations of using exosomes in cancer immunotherapy and our perspectives on how nanomaterials with potential immune regulatory effects could be introduced into exosome-based immunotherapy.

  11. Elicitation of structure-specific antibodies by epitope scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Elicitation of antibodies against targets that are immunorecessive, cryptic, or transient in their native context has been a challenge for vaccine design. Here we demonstrate the elicitation of structure-specific antibodies against the HIV-1 gp41 epitope of the broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5. This conformationally flexible region of gp41 assumes mostly helical conformations but adopts a kinked, extended structure when bound by antibody 2F5. Computational techniques were employed to transpl...

  12. Subjective Probability Distribution Elicitation in Cost Risk Analysis: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    where reasonable, to counteract known biases in elicitation). 1 For the triangle distribution, the probability is set to zero outside the endpoints...probability is set to zero outside the endpoints, while between the endpoints the density rises linearly from the lower value to the most-likely values...Wheeler, T. A., S. C. Hora , W. R. Cramond, and S. D. Unwin, Analysis of Core Damage Frequency from Internal Events: Expert Judgment Elicitation

  13. A mathematical prognosis model for pancreatic cancer patients receiving immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuefang; Xu, Jian-Xin

    2016-10-07

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly types of cancer since it typically spreads rapidly and can seldom be detected in its early stage. Pancreatic cancer therapy is thus a challenging task, and appropriate prognosis or assessment for pancreatic cancer therapy is of critical importance. In this work, based on available clinical data in Niu et al. (2013) we develop a mathematical prognosis model that can predict the overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients who receive immunotherapy. The mathematical model incorporates pancreatic cancer cells, pancreatic stellate cells, three major classes of immune effector cells CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, helper T cells, and two major classes of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ). The proposed model describes the dynamic interaction between tumor and immune cells. In order for the model to be able to generate appropriate prognostic results for disease progression, the distribution and stability properties of equilibria in the mathematical model are computed and analysed in absence of treatments. In addition, numerical simulations for disease progression with or without treatments are performed. It turns out that the median overall survival associated with CIK immunotherapy is prolonged from 7 to 13months compared with the survival without treatment, this is consistent with the clinical data observed in Niu et al. (2013). The validity of the proposed mathematical prognosis model is thus verified. Our study confirms that immunotherapy offers a better prognosis for pancreatic cancer patients. As a direct extension of this work, various new therapy methods that are under exploration and clinical trials could be assessed or evaluated using the newly developed mathematical prognosis model.

  14. Immunotherapy in melanoma: Recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, C; Livingstone, E; Roesch, A; Schilling, B; Schadendorf, D

    2017-03-01

    Malignant melanoma contributes the majority of skin cancer related deaths and shows an increasing incidence in the past years. Despite all efforts of early diagnosis, metastatic melanoma still has a poor prognosis and remains a challenge for treating physicians. In recent years, improved knowledge of the pathophysiology and a better understanding of the role of the immune system in tumour control have led to the development and approval of several immunotherapies. Monoclonal antibodies against different immune checkpoints have been revolutionizing the treatment of metastatic and unresectable melanoma. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody against the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) as well as nivolumab and pembrolizumab which target the programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) have been shown to prolong overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. The latter substances seem to have an increased response rate and more tolerable safety profile compared to ipilimumab. The combination of a CTLA-4 and a PD-1 inhibitor seems to be superior to the monotherapies, especially in patients with PD-L1 negative tumours. Checkpoint inhibitors are currently being tested in the adjuvant setting with initial data for ipilimumab suggesting efficacy in this context. Talimogene laherparepvec (TVEC) is the first oncolytic virus approved in the therapy of metastatic melanoma offering a treatment option especially for patients with limited disease. In this review, data on these recently developed and approved immunotherapies are presented. However, further studies are necessary to determine the optimal duration, sequencing and combinations of immunotherapies to further improve the outcome of patients with advanced melanoma.

  15. Cancer immunotherapy: nanodelivery approaches for immune cell targeting and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conniot, João; Silva, Joana; Fernandes, Joana; Silva, Liana; Gaspar, Rogério; Brocchini, Steve; Florindo, Helena; Barata, Teresa

    2014-11-01

    Cancer is one of the most common diseases afflicting people globally. New therapeutic approaches are needed due to the complexity of cancer as a disease. Many current treatments are very toxic and have modest efficacy at best. Increased understanding of tumor biology and immunology has allowed the development of specific immunotherapies with minimal toxicity. It is important to highlight the performance of monoclonal antibodies, immune adjuvants, vaccines and cell-based treatments. Although these approaches have shown varying degrees of clinical efficacy, they illustrate the potential to develop new strategies. Targeted immunotherapy is being explored to overcome the heterogeneity of malignant cells and the immune suppression induced by both the tumor and its microenvironment. Nanodelivery strategies seek to minimize systemic exposure to target therapy to malignant tissue and cells. Intracellular penetration has been examined through the use of functionalized particulates. These nano-particulate associated medicines are being developed for use in imaging, diagnostics and cancer targeting. Although nano-particulates are inherently complex medicines, the ability to confer, at least in principle, different types of functionality allows for the plausible consideration these nanodelivery strategies can be exploited for use as combination medicines. The development of targeted nanodelivery systems in which therapeutic and imaging agents are merged into a single platform is an attractive strategy. Currently, several nanoplatform-based formulations, such as polymeric nanoparticles, micelles, liposomes and dendrimers are in preclinical and clinical stages of development. Herein, nanodelivery strategies presently investigated for cancer immunotherapy, cancer targeting mechanisms and nanocarrier functionalization methods will be described. We also intend to discuss the emerging nano-based approaches suitable to be used as imaging techniques and as cancer treatment options.

  16. Systemic chemo-immunotherapy for advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Yin; Ming-De Lü; Li-Jian Liang; Jia-Ming Lai; Dong-Ming Li; Ming Kuang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of systemic chemo-immunotherapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).METHODS: Twenty-six patients with advanced HCC were treated by using systemic chemo-immunotherapy (PIAF regimen), which consisted of cisplatin (20 mg/m2) intravenously daily for 4 consecutive day, doxorubicin (40 mg/m2)intravenously on day 1, 5-fiuorouracil (400 mg/m2)intravenously daily for 4 consecutive day, and human recombinant α-interferon-2a (5 Mu/m2) subcutaneous injection daily for 4 consecutive day. The treatment was repeated every 3 wk, with a maximum of six cycles.RESULTS: A total of 90 cycles of PIAF treatment were administered, with a mean number of 3.9 cycles per patient.Eight patients received six cycles of treatment (group A),and the remaining 18 were subjected to two to five cycles (group B). There were 0 complete response, 4 partial responses, 9 static diseases and 13 progressive diseases,with a disease control rate of 50% (13/26). The 1-year survival rate was 24.3%, with a median survival time of 6.0 mo. Group A had a remarkably better survival as compared with group B, the 1- and 2-year survival rates were 62.5% vs 6.1% and 32.3% vs 0%, and a median survival time was 12.5 mo vs 5.0 mo (P = 0.001).CONCLUSION: Systemic chemo-immunotherapy using PIAF regimen represented an effective treatment and could improve the survival rate and prolong the survival time in selected patients with advanced HCC.

  17. Subcutaneous Immunotherapy Improves the Symptomatology of Allergic Rhinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourenço, Edmir Américo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The relevance of allergic rhinitis is unquestionable. This condition affects people's quality of life and its incidence has increased over the last years. Objective Thus, this study aims to analyze the effectiveness of subcutaneous injectable immunotherapy in cases of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea and nasal congestion in allergic rhinitis patients. Methods In the present study, the same researcher analyzed the records of 281 patients. Furthermore, the researchers identified allergens through puncture cutaneous tests using standardized extracts containing acari, fungi, pet hair, flower pollen, and feathers. Then, the patients underwent treatment with subcutaneous specific immunotherapy, using four vaccine vials for desensitization, associated with environmental hygiene. The authors analyzed conditions of nasal itching, sneeze, rhinorrhea, and nasal congestion throughout the treatment, and assigned them with a score ranging from zero (0, meaning absence of these symptoms to three (3, for severe cases. The symptoms were statistically compared in the beginning, during, and after treatment. Results In this study, authors analyzed the cases distribution according to age and the evolution of symptomatology according to the scores, comparing all phases of treatment. The average score for the entire population studied was 2.08 before treatment and 0.44 at the end. These results represent an overall improvement of ∼79% in symptomatology of allergic rhinitis in the studied population. Conclusion The subcutaneous immunotherapy as treatment of allergic rhinitis led to a reduction in all symptoms studied, improving the quality of life of patients, proving itself as an important therapeutic tool for these pathological conditions.

  18. A multiscale systems perspective on cancer, immunotherapy, and Interleukin-12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klinke David J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monoclonal antibodies represent some of the most promising molecular targeted immunotherapies. However, understanding mechanisms by which tumors evade elimination by the immune system of the host presents a significant challenge for developing effective cancer immunotherapies. The interaction of cancer cells with the host is a complex process that is distributed across a variety of time and length scales. The time scales range from the dynamics of protein refolding (i.e., microseconds to the dynamics of disease progression (i.e., years. The length scales span the farthest reaches of the human body (i.e., meters down to the range of molecular interactions (i.e., nanometers. Limited ranges of time and length scales are used experimentally to observe and quantify changes in physiology due to cancer. Translating knowledge obtained from the limited scales observed experimentally to predict patient response is an essential prerequisite for the rational design of cancer immunotherapies that improve clinical outcomes. In studying multiscale systems, engineers use systems analysis and design to identify important components in a complex system and to test conceptual understanding of the integrated system behavior using simulation. The objective of this review is to summarize interactions between the tumor and cell-mediated immunity from a multiscale perspective. Interleukin-12 and its role in coordinating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity is used illustrate the different time and length scale that underpin cancer immunoediting. An underlying theme in this review is the potential role that simulation can play in translating knowledge across scales.

  19. NVC Based Model for Selecting Effective Requirement Elicitation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rizwan Beg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Requirement Engineering process starts from gathering of requirements i.e.; requirements elicitation. Requirementselicitation (RE is the base building block for a software project and has very high impact onsubsequent design and builds phases as well. Accurately capturing system requirements is the major factorin the failure of most of software projects. Due to the criticality and impact of this phase, it is very importantto perform the requirements elicitation in no less than a perfect manner. One of the most difficult jobsfor elicitor is to select appropriate technique for eliciting the requirement. Interviewing and Interactingstakeholder during Elicitation process is a communication intensive activity involves Verbal and Nonverbalcommunication (NVC. Elicitor should give emphasis to Non-verbal communication along with verbalcommunication so that requirements recorded more efficiently and effectively. In this paper we proposea model in which stakeholders are classified by observing non-verbal communication and use it as a basefor elicitation technique selection. We also propose an efficient plan for requirements elicitation which intendsto overcome on the constraints, faced by elicitor.

  20. Immunotherapy applications of carbon nanotubes: from design to safe applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Tarek R; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2014-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential to overcome significant challenges related to vaccine development and immunotherapy. Central to these applications is an improved understanding of CNT interactions with the immune system. Unique properties such as high aspect ratio, flexible surface chemistry, and control over structure and morphology may allow for enhanced target specificity and transport of antigens across cell membranes. Although recent work has demonstrated the potential of CNTs to amplify the immune response as adjuvants, other results have also linked their proinflammatory properties to harmful health effects. Here, we review the recent advances of CNT-based immunological research, focusing on current understandings of therapeutic efficacy and mechanisms of immunotoxicology.

  1. CD70: An emerging target in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J; Deschoolmeester, V; Zwaenepoel, K; Rolfo, C; Silence, K; Rottey, S; Lardon, F; Smits, E; Pauwels, P

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decades, advances in the knowledge of immunology have led to the identification of immune checkpoints, reinvigorating cancer immunotherapy. Although normally restricted to activated T and B cells, constitutive expression of CD70 in tumor cells has been described. Moreover, CD70 is implicated in tumor cell and regulatory T cell survival through interaction with its ligand, CD27. In this review, we summarize the targetable expression patterns of CD70 in a wide range of malignancies and the promising mechanism of anti-CD70 therapy in stimulating the anti-tumor immune response. In addition, we will discuss clinical data and future combination strategies.

  2. Allergen immunotherapy for IgE-mediated food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Pajno, Giovanni Battista

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for IgE-mediated food allergy. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT in IgE-mediated food...... allergy. METHODS: We will undertake a systematic review, which will involve searching international biomedical databases for published, in progress and unpublished evidence. Studies will be independently screened against pre-defined eligibility criteria and critically appraised using established...

  3. The journey from discoveries in fundamental immunology to cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jacques F A P; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-04-13

    Recent advances in cancer immunotherapy have directly built on 50 years of fundamental and technological advances that made checkpoint blockade and T cell engineering possible. In this review, we intend to show that research, not specifically designed to bring relief or cure to any particular disease, can, when creatively exploited, lead to spectacular results in the management of cancer. The discovery of thymus immune function, T cells, and immune surveillance bore the seeds for today's targeted immune interventions and chimeric antigen receptors.

  4. Adoptive T cell therapy: Addressing challenges in cancer immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee Cassian

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Adoptive T cell therapy involves the ex vivo selection and expansion of effector cells for the treatment of patients with cancer. In this review, the advantages and limitations of using antigen-specific T cells are discussed in counterpoint to vaccine strategies. Although vaccination strategies represent more readily available reagents, adoptive T cell therapy provides highly selected T cells of defined phenotype, specificity and function that may influence their biological behavior in vivo. Adoptive T cell therapy offers not only translational opportunities but also a means to address fundamental issues in the evolving field of cancer immunotherapy.

  5. The current state of recombinant allergens for immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Gabrielle; Malling, H-J

    2010-01-01

    Subcutaneous immunotherapy is a well documented treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The majority of the disadvantages of the treatment are related to the poor quality of the natural allergen extracts which can contain varying amounts of individual allergens including allergens to which...... the patient may not be sensitized. Recombinant allergens offer a possibility to use well defined molecules with consistent pharmaceutical quality defined in mass units. The proof of concept of the clinical efficacy of recombinant allergens is based on two studies published as full articles....

  6. Allergen immunotherapy for the prevention of allergic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Halken, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for the Prevention of Allergic Disease. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT...... in the prevention of allergic disease. METHODS: We will undertake a systematic review, which will involve searching international biomedical databases for published, in progress and unpublished evidence. Studies will be independently screened against pre-defined eligibility criteria and critically appraised using...

  7. Perspectives on allergen-specific immunotherapy in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderon, M A; Gerth van Wijk, R; Eichler, I;

    2012-01-01

    This article is the result of consensus reached by a working group of clinical experts in paediatric allergology as well as representatives from an ethical committee and the European Medicine Agency (EMA). The manuscript covers clinical, scientific, regulatory and ethical perspectives on allergen......-specific immunotherapy in childhood. Unmet needs are identified. To fill the gaps and to bridge the different points of view, recommendations are made to researchers, to scientific and patient organizations and to regulators and ethical committees. Working together for the benefit of the community is essential....... The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) serves as the platform of such cooperation....

  8. Immunotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer: checkpoint blockade, cancer vaccines, and future directions in combination immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Heather L; Page, David B

    2016-11-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses both vaccines that direct immune responses to tumor-associated antigens, and checkpoint blocking antibodies that inhibit immune system suppression by targeting key pathways mediated by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4, programmed death 1 (PD-1), and programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1). Both of these approaches currently are being explored as potential strategies for the treatment of breast cancer. Recent studies suggest that immunotherapy is poised to change the therapeutic landscape for some breast cancers. Specifically, overall response rates of 19% with PD-1/PD-L1-directed antibodies have been reported in 2 small studies of women with PD-L1-positive, heavily pretreated advanced triple-negative breast cancer. In combination with nab-paclitaxel, confirmed response rates were 46% in a PD-L1-unselected population in the first-line metastatic triple-negative breast cancer setting. Checkpoint-blocking antibodies also have been evaluated in small studies of women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, and in women whose breast cancers lack PD-L1 expression, with more modest response rates. It has been hypothesized that some breast cancers are not inherently recognized by the immune system; however, preclinical and preliminary clinical data suggest that inherently modest immunogenicity may be overcome with novel vaccination strategies, as well as strategies that combine immune checkpoint blockade with methods of optimizing antigen presentation, such as tumor ablation, radiation, chemotherapy, or other approaches. If ongoing registrational trials support the use of immunotherapy, it could revolutionize the care of early-stage and metastatic breast cancer, and ideally improve cure rates.

  9. Current clinical trials testing combinations of immunotherapy and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Marka; Kohrt, Holbrook; Levy, Ronald; Jones, Jennifer; Camphausen, Kevin; Dicker, Adam; Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical evidence of successful combinations of ionizing radiation with immunotherapy has inspired testing the translation of these results to the clinic. Interestingly, the preclinical work has consistently predicted the responses encountered in clinical trials. The first example came from a proof-of-principle trial started in 2001 that tested the concept that growth factors acting on antigen-presenting cells improve presentation of tumor antigens released by radiation and induce an abscopal effect. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was administered during radiotherapy to a metastatic site in patients with metastatic solid tumors to translate evidence obtained in a murine model of syngeneic mammary carcinoma treated with cytokine FLT-3L and radiation. Subsequent clinical availability of vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has triggered a wave of enthusiasm for testing them in combination with radiotherapy. Examples of ongoing clinical trials are described in this report. Importantly, most of these trials include careful immune monitoring of the patients enrolled and will generate important data about the proimmunogenic effects of radiation in combination with a variety of immune modulators, in different disease settings. Results of these studies are building a platform of evidence for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to immunotherapy and encourage the growth of this novel field of radiation oncology.

  10. Immunotherapy of hepatoma with a monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Hong Tan; Feng-Ying Huang; Hua Wang; Yong-Hao Huang; Ying-Ying Lin; Yue-Nan Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the capability of a monoclonal antibody(mAb) against murine endoglin to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and suppression of hepatoma growth in murine models.METHODS: A monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin was purified by affinity chromatography and passively transfused through tail veins in two murine hepatoma models. Tumor volume and survival time were observed at three-day intervals for 48 d. Microvessels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry against CD31, and angiogenesis in vivo was determined by alginate encapsulated assay. In addition, tumor cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Passive immunotherapy with anti-endoglin mAb could effectively suppress tumor growth, and prolonged the survival time of hepatoma-bearing mice.Angiogenesis was apparently inhibited within the tumor tissues, and the vascularization of alginate beads was also reduced in the mice passively transfused with antiendoglin mAb. In addition, increased apoptotic cells were observed within the tumor tissues from the mice passively transfused with anti-endoglin mAb.CONCLUSION: Passive immunotherapy with antiendoglin mAb effectively inhibits tumor growth via inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and increasing tumor cell apoptosis, which may be highly correlated with the blockage of endoglin-related signal pathway induced by anti-endoglin mAb.

  11. CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY BASED ON THE BLOCKADE OF IMMUNE CHECKPOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Bogolyubova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoints represent the system of inhibitory mechanisms regulating the activation of the immune response, preventing the autoimmune processes and modulating the immune response by decreasing the immune cell-mediated damage of tissues and organs. Tumor cells may utilize these checkpoints to prevent the activation of tumor-specific lymphocytes, thereby acquiring resistance against the immune response. The blockade of inhibitory signal that is transduced in immune checkpoints leading to the reactivation of antitumor immune response is a promising method of tumor immunotherapy. Since the majority of immune checkpoints are based on the ligand-receptor interactions, one of contemporary modalities of anti-tumor therapy is based on the development of ligandor receptor-blocking therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, as well as soluble recombinant receptors capable of competing for a ligand and thereby modulating the signal transduction. In the past few years, this field of tumor immunotherapy experienced an impressive success; however, the potential tradeoff for altering of the natural suppressive mechanisms is the development of the autoimmune reactions.

  12. Irradiation and immunotherapy: From concept to the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, April K S; Postow, Michael A; Salama, Joseph K

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, an increased understanding of T-cell-regulatory mechanisms has led to the development of a novel class of immune-checkpoint inhibitors that have robust clinical activity against a broad array of malignancies-even those that historically were not believed to be sensitive to immune therapy. With this, there has been renewed interest in the potential for synergy with more traditional forms of anticancer therapy like radiation therapy (RT). The role of RT in palliation or as definitive treatment for certain malignancies has been well established. Yet, in recent years, the concept has come to light that RT could be an attractive partner for use in combination with other immunotherapies. The effects of RT include not only control of an irradiated tumor but also multiple immunomodulatory effects on both the tumor and the microenvironment, priming tumors for an immune-mediated response. Herein, the authors summarize relevant preclinical data and rationale supporting the synergy of combined RT and immunotherapy and highlight recent clinical work on promising combination strategies. Cancer 2016;122:1659-71. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  13. Can calcium signaling be harnessed for cancer immunotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    Experimental evidence shows the importance of the immune system in controlling tumor appearance and growth. Immunotherapy is defined as the treatment of a disease by inducing, enhancing or suppressing an immune response. In the context of cancer treatment, it involves breaking tolerance to a cancer-specific self-antigen and/or enhancing the existing anti-tumor immune response, be it specific or not. Part of the complexity in developing such treatment is that cancers are selected to escape adaptive or innate immune responses. These escape mechanisms are numerous and they may cumulate in one cancer. Moreover, different cancers of a same type may present different combinations of escape mechanisms. The limited success of immunotherapeutics in the clinic as stand-alone products may in part be explained by the fact that most of them only activate one facet of the immune response. It is important to identify novel methods to broaden the efficacy of immunotherapeutics. Calcium signaling is central to numerous cellular processes, leading to immune responses, cancer growth and apoptosis induced by cancer treatments. Calcium signaling in cancer therapy and control will be integrated to current cancer immunotherapy approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium Signaling in Health and Disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck, Jacques Haiech, Claus W. Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, and Marc Moreau.

  14. The promising alliance of anti-cancer electrochemotherapy with immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Christophe Y; Mir, Lluis M

    2016-06-01

    Anti-tumor electrochemotherapy, which consists in increasing anti-cancer drug uptake by means of electroporation, is now implanted in about 140 cancer treatment centers in Europe. Its use is supported by the English National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for the palliative treatment of skin metastases, and about 13,000 cancer patients were treated by this technology by the end of 2015. Efforts are now focused on turning this local anti-tumor treatment into a systemic one. Electrogenetherapy, that is the electroporation-mediated transfer of therapeutic genes, is currently under clinical evaluation and has brought excitement to enlarge the anti-cancer armamentarium. Among the promising electrogenetherapy strategies, DNA vaccination and cytokine-based immunotherapy aim at stimulating anti-tumor immunity. We review here the interests and state of development of both electrochemotherapy and electrogenetherapy. We then emphasize the potent beneficial outcome of the combination of electrochemotherapy with immunotherapy, such as immune checkpoint inhibitors or strategies based on electrogenetherapy, to simultaneously achieve excellent local debulking anti-tumor responses and systemic anti-metastatic effects.

  15. Stability evaluation of house dust mite vaccines for sublingual immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIJA GAVROVIĆ-JANKULOVIĆ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergen-specific immunotherapy with house dust mite (HDM allergen extracts can effectively alleviate the symptoms of allergic rhinitis and asthma. The efficacy of the immunotherapeutic treatment is highly dependent on the quality of house dust mite vaccines. This study was performed to assess the stability of house dust mite allergen vaccines prepared for sublingual immunotherapy. Lyophilized Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt mite bodies were the starting material for the production of sublingual vaccines in four therapeutic concentrations. The stability of the extract for vaccine production, which was stored below 4 °C for one month, showed consistence in the protein profile in SDS PAGE. ELISA-inhibition showed that the potencies of Dpt vaccines during a 12 month period were to 65–80 % preserved at all analyzed therapeutic concentrations. This study showed that glycerinated Dpt vaccines stored at 4 °C preserved their IgE-binding potential during a 12 month period, implying their suitability for sublingual immunotherapeutic treatment of HDM allergy.

  16. Mesothelin Immunotherapy for Cancer: Ready for Prime Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Raffit; Thomas, Anish; Alewine, Christine; Le, Dung T; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Pastan, Ira

    2016-12-01

    Mesothelin is a tumor antigen that is highly expressed in many human cancers, including malignant mesothelioma and pancreatic, ovarian, and lung adenocarcinomas. It is an attractive target for cancer immunotherapy because its normal expression is limited to mesothelial cells, which are dispensable. Several antibody-based therapeutic agents as well as vaccine and T-cell therapies directed at mesothelin are undergoing clinical evaluation. These include antimesothelin immunotoxins (SS1P, RG7787/LMB-100), chimeric antimesothelin antibody (amatuximab), mesothelin-directed antibody drug conjugates (anetumab ravtansine, DMOT4039A, BMS-986148), live attenuated Listeria monocytogenes-expressing mesothelin (CRS-207, JNJ-64041757), and chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapies. Two antimesothelin agents are currently in multicenter clinical registration trials for malignant mesothelioma: amatuximab in the first-line setting and anetumab ravtansine as second-line therapy. Phase II randomized clinical trials of CRS-207 as a boosting agent and in combination with immune checkpoint inhibition for pancreatic cancer are nearing completion. These ongoing studies will define the utility of mesothelin immunotherapy for treating cancer.

  17. HDAC inhibitors and immunotherapy; a double edged sword?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroesen, Michiel; Gielen, Paul; Brok, Ingrid C; Armandari, Inna; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Adema, Gosse J

    2014-08-30

    Epigenetic modifications, like histone acetylation, are essential for regulating gene expression within cells. Cancer cells acquire pathological epigenetic modifications resulting in gene expression patterns that facilitate and sustain tumorigenesis. Epigenetic manipulation therefore is emerging as a novel targeted therapy for cancer. Histone Acetylases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) regulate histone acetylation and hence gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are well known to affect cancer cell viability and biology and are already in use for the treatment of cancer patients. Immunotherapy can lead to clinical benefit in selected cancer patients, especially in patients with limited disease after tumor debulking. HDAC inhibitors can potentially synergize with immunotherapy by elimination of tumor cells. The direct effects of HDAC inhibitors on immune cell function, however, remain largely unexplored. Initial data have suggested HDAC inhibitors to be predominantly immunosuppressive, but more recent reports have challenged this view. In this review we will discuss the effects of HDAC inhibitors on tumor cells and different immune cell subsets, synergistic interactions and possible mechanisms. Finally, we will address future challenges and potential application of HDAC inhibitors in immunocombination therapy of cancer.

  18. Clinical contraindications to allergen immunotherapy: an EAACI position paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsios, C; Demoly, P; Bilò, M B; Gerth van Wijk, R; Pfaar, O; Sturm, G J; Rodriguez del Rio, P; Tsoumani, M; Gawlik, R; Paraskevopoulos, G; Ruëff, F; Valovirta, E; Papadopoulos, N G; Calderón, M A

    2015-08-01

    Clinical indications for allergen immunotherapy (AIT) in respiratory and Hymenoptera venom allergy are well established; however, clinical contraindications to AIT are not always well documented. There are some discrepancies when classifying clinical contraindications for different forms of AIT as 'absolute' or 'relative'. EAACI Task Force on 'Contraindications to AIT' was created to evaluate and review current literature on clinical contraindications, and to update recommendations for both sublingual and subcutaneous AIT for respiratory and venom immunotherapy. An extensive review of the literature was performed on the use of AIT in asthma, autoimmune disorders, malignant neoplasias, cardiovascular diseases, acquired immunodeficiencies and other chronic diseases (including mental disorders), in patients treated with β-blockers, ACE inhibitors or monoamine oxidase inhibitors, in children under 5 years of age, during pregnancy and in patients with poor compliance. Each topic was addressed by the following three questions: (1) Are there any negative effects of AIT on this concomitant condition/disease? (2) Are more frequent or more severe AIT-related side-effects expected? and (3) Is AIT expected to be less efficacious? The evidence, for the evaluation of these clinical conditions as contraindications, was limited, and most of the conclusions were based on case reports. Based on an extended literature research, recommendations for each medical condition assessed are provided. The final decision on the administration of AIT should be based on individual evaluation of any medical condition and a risk/benefit assessment for each patient.

  19. Role of Local Radiation Therapy in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaria, Sandra; Golden, Encouse B; Formenti, Silvia C

    2015-12-01

    The recent success of cancer immunotherapy has demonstrated the power of the immune system to clear tumors, generating renewed enthusiasm for identifying ways to induce antitumor immune responses in patients. Natural antitumor immune responses are detectable in a fraction of patients across multiple malignant neoplasms and can be reactivated by targeting rate-limiting immunosuppressive mechanisms. In most patients, however, interventions to induce a de novo antitumor immune response are necessary. We review growing evidence that radiation therapy targeted to the tumor can convert it into an in situ tumor vaccine by inducing release of antigens during cancer cell death in association with proinflammatory signals that trigger the innate immune system to activate tumor-specific T cells. In addition, radiation's effects on the tumor microenvironment enhance infiltration of activated T cells and can overcome some of the barriers to tumor rejection. Thus, the complementary effects of radiation on priming and effector phases of antitumor immunity make it an appealing strategy to generate immunity against a patient's own individual tumor, that through immunological memory, can result in long-lasting systemic responses. Several anecdotal cases have demonstrated the efficacy of combining radiation with available immunotherapies, and results of prospective trials are forthcoming.

  20. New Approaches to Immunotherapy for HPV Associated Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Mittal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer of women worldwide and is the first cancer shown to be entirely induced by a virus, the human papillomavirus (HPV, major oncogenic genotypes HPV-16 and -18. Two recently developed prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines, using virus-like particles (VLP technology, have the potential to prevent a large proportion of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection and to ensure long-term protection. However, prophylactic HPV vaccines do not have therapeutic effects against pre-existing HPV infections and do not prevent their progression to HPV-associated malignancy. In animal models, therapeutic vaccines for persisting HPV infection can eliminate transplantable tumors expressing HPV antigens, but are of limited efficacy in inducing rejection of skin grafts expressing the same antigens. In humans, clinical trials have reported successful immunotherapy of HPV lesions, providing hope and further interest. This review discusses possible new approaches to immunotherapy for HPV associated cancer, based on recent advances in our knowledge of the immunobiology of HPV infection, of epithelial immunology and of immunoregulation, with a brief overview on previous and current HPV vaccine clinical trials.

  1. Enhancing Cancer Immunotherapy Via Activation of Innate Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Jacob L; Sondel, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Given recent technological advances and advances in our understanding of cancer, immunotherapy of cancer is being used with clear clinical benefit. The immunosuppression accompanying cancer itself, as well as with current cancer treatment with radiation or chemotherapy, impairs adaptive immune effectors to a greater extent than innate effector cells. In addition to being less suppressed, innate immune cells are capable of being enhanced via immune-stimulatory regimens. Most strategies being investigated to promote innate immune responses against cancer do not require complex, patient-specific, ex vivo cellular or molecular creation of therapeutic agents; thus they can, generally, be used as "off the shelf" therapeutics that could be administered by most cancer clinics. Successful applications of innate immunotherapy in the clinic have effectively targeted components of the innate immune response. Preclinical data demonstrate how initiation of innate immune responses can lead to subsequent adaptive long-term cancer immunity. We hypothesize that integration of innate immune activation strategies into combination therapies for cancer treatment will lead to more effective and long-term clinical benefit.

  2. 2015 Guidance on cancer immunotherapy development in early-phase clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The development of cancer immunotherapies is progressing rapidly with a variety of technological approaches. They consist of "cancer vaccines", which are based on the idea of vaccination, "effector cell therapy", classified as passive immunotherapy, and "inhibition of immunosuppression", which intends to break immunological tolerance to autoantigens or immunosuppressive environments characterizing antitumor immune responses. Recent reports showing clinical evidence of efficacy of immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive immunotherapies with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and tumor-specific receptor gene-modified T cells indicate the beginning of a new era for cancer immunotherapy. This guidance summarizes ideas that will be helpful to those who plan to develop cancer immunotherapy. The aims of this guidance are to discuss and offer important points in early phase clinical studies of innovative cancer immunotherapy, with future progress in this field, and to contribute to the effective development of cancer immunotherapy aligned with the scope of regulatory science. This guidance covers cancer vaccines, effector cell therapy, and inhibition of immunosuppression, including immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  3. Development of a hypoallergenic recombinant parvalbumin for first-in-man subcutaneous immunotherapy of fish allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Huber, Hans; Swoboda, Ines;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The FAST (food allergy-specific immunotherapy) project aims at developing safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy for fish allergy, using recombinant hypoallergenic carp parvalbumin, Cyp c 1. OBJECTIVES: Preclinical characterization and good manufacturing practice (GMP) production...... PBMCs. Toxicity studies revealed no toxic effects and real-time stability studies on the Al(OH)3-adsorbed drug product demonstrated at least 20 months of stability. CONCLUSION: The GMP drug product developed for treatment of fish allergy has the characteristics targeted for in FAST: i.......e. hypoallergenicity with retained immunogenicity. These results have warranted first-in-man immunotherapy studies to evaluate the safety of this innovative vaccine....

  4. Application of nanostructured drug delivery systems in immunotherapy of cancer: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Nahideh; Davaran, Soodabeh; Panahi, Yunes; Hasanzadeh, Arash; Malakootikhah, Javad; Fallah Moafi, Hadi; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2017-02-01

    The cancer immunotherapy method uses the specificity of the immune system to provide a more effective than more conventional treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Immunotherapy has two main strategies (passive or active) to organize the immune system. Passive strategies use advantage of tumor-hyperpermeable cells, which have enhanced permeability and retention effects. Nanoparticles due to their better accumulation within tissues and cells of the immune system are well suitable for delivery of immune therapies such as vaccines or adjuvants. In this review, we explained application of nanotechnology in immunotherapy of cancer.

  5. Translating Science into Survival: Report on the Inaugural International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard-Lucey, Vanessa M; Tontonoz, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    The inaugural International Cancer Immunotherapy Conference, cohosted by the Cancer Research Institute (CRI), the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), the Association for Cancer Immunotherapy (CIMT), and the European Academy of Tumor Immunology (EATI), was held in New York City on September 16–19, 2015. The conference brought together nearly 1,400 scientists, clinicians, regulators, patient advocates, and other stakeholders to discuss the latest scientific developments in cancer immunology and immunotherapy, as well as the regulatory hurdles facing new drug development. This conference report summarizes the main themes that emerged during the 4-day meeting.

  6. Expert elicitation on the uncertainties associated with chronic wasting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyshenko, Michael G; Oraby, Tamer; Darshan, Shalu; Westphal, Margit; Croteau, Maxine C; Aspinall, Willy; Elsaadany, Susie; Krewski, Daniel; Cashman, Neil

    2016-01-01

    A high degree of uncertainty exists for chronic wasting disease (CWD) transmission factors in farmed and wild cervids. Evaluating the factors is important as it helps to inform future risk management strategies. Expert opinion is often used to assist decision making in a number of health, science, and technology domains where data may be sparse or missing. Using the "Classical Model" of elicitation, a group of experts was asked to estimate the most likely values for several risk factors affecting CWD transmission. The formalized expert elicitation helped structure the issues and hence provide a rational basis for estimating some transmission risk factors for which evidence is lacking. Considered judgments regarding environmental transmission, latency of CWD transmission, management, and species barrier were provided by the experts. Uncertainties for many items were determined to be large, highlighting areas requiring more research. The elicited values may be used as surrogate values until research evidence becomes available.

  7. Regret-based Reward Elicitation for Markov Decision Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Regan, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The specification of aMarkov decision process (MDP) can be difficult. Reward function specification is especially problematic; in practice, it is often cognitively complex and time-consuming for users to precisely specify rewards. This work casts the problem of specifying rewards as one of preference elicitation and aims to minimize the degree of precision with which a reward function must be specified while still allowing optimal or near-optimal policies to be produced. We first discuss how robust policies can be computed for MDPs given only partial reward information using the minimax regret criterion. We then demonstrate how regret can be reduced by efficiently eliciting reward information using bound queries, using regret-reduction as a means for choosing suitable queries. Empirical results demonstrate that regret-based reward elicitation offers an effective way to produce near-optimal policies without resorting to the precise specification of the entire reward function.

  8. Elicitability of muscle cramps in different leg and foot muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetto, Marco Alessandro; Botter, Alberto

    2009-10-01

    To explore the efficacy of muscle motor point stimulation in eliciting muscle cramps, 11 subjects underwent eight sessions of electrical stimulation of the following muscles bilaterally: abductor hallucis flexor hallucis brevis, and both heads of the gastrocnemius muscles. Bursts of 150 square wave stimuli (duration: 152 micros; current intensity: 30% supramaximal) were applied. The stimulation frequency was increased from 4 pulses per second (pps) at increments of 2 pps until a cramp was induced. The number of cramps that could be elicited was smaller in flexor hallucis brevis than in abductor hallucis (16 vs. 22 out of 22 trials each; P muscles have different cramp susceptibility, and the intermuscle variability in the elicitability profile for electrically induced cramps supports the use of the proposed method for cramp research.

  9. Stimulation of lateral hypothalamic kainate receptors selectively elicits feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettes, Stacey R; Heyming, Theodore W; Stanley, B Glenn

    2007-12-12

    Glutamate and its receptor agonists, NMDA, AMPA, and KA, elicit feeding when microinjected into the lateral hypothalamus (LH) of satiated rats. However, determining the relative contributions of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) and KA receptors (KARs) to LH feeding mechanisms has been difficult due to a lack of receptor selective agonists and antagonists. Furthermore, LH injection of KA produces behavioral hyperactivity, questioning a role for KARs in feeding selective stimulation. In the present study, we used the KAR agonist, (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA), which selectively binds the GluR5 subunit of KARs, to stimulate feeding, presumably via KAR activation. Using ATPA, we tested whether: (1) LH injection of ATPA elicits feeding, (2) prior treatment with the non-selective AMPA/KAR antagonist, CNQX, suppresses ATPA-elicited feeding, and (3) LH injection of ATPA elicits behavioral patterns specific for feeding. We found that injection of ATPA (0.1 and 1 nmol) elicited an intense feeding response (e.g., 4.8+/-1.6 g) that was blocked by LH pretreatment with CNQX, but was unaffected by pretreatment with the AMPAR selective antagonist, GYKI 52466. Furthermore, minute-by-minute behavioral analysis revealed that LH injection of ATPA increased time spent feeding to 55% of the initial test period with little or no effects on other behaviors at any time. In contrast, LH injection of KA similarly increased feeding but also produced intense locomotor activity. These data suggest that selective activation of LH KARs containing GluR5 subunit(s) is sufficient to elicit feeding.

  10. Belief elicitation in experiments: Is there a hedging problem?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanco, Mariana; Engelmann, Dirk; Koch, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Belief-elicitation experiments usually reward accuracy of stated beliefs in addition to payments for other decisions. But this allows risk-averse subjects to hedge with their stated beliefs against adverse outcomes of the other decisions. So can we trust the existing belief-elicitation results...... opportunities are very prominent. If hedging opportunities are transparent, and incentives to hedge are strong, many subjects do spot hedging opportunities and respond to them. The bias can go beyond players actually hedging themselves, because some expect others to hedge and best respond to this....

  11. Is immunotherapy an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licastro Federico

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD is rapidly becoming a hot topic of modern geriatric and clinical gerontology. Current views see immunization with Aβ peptide, the amyloidogenic protein found in senile plaque of AD patient's brains, or the infusion of preformed antibody specific for human Aβ, as possible therapeutic approaches to improve the cognitive status in the disease. Animal models of the disease have provided positive results from both approaches. Thus, an initial clinical trial using immunization with human Aβ in AD patients was started, but then shortly halted because of an unusually high incidence (6% of meningoencephalitis. A long and currently ongoing debate in the scientific community about the pro or contra of vaccination or passive immunization with Aβ in AD is thereafter started. Here, the authors would like to stress few points of concern regarding these approaches in clinical practice.

  12. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Białek, Waldemar; Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-12-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  13. Checkpoint Blockade in Cancer Immunotherapy: Squaring the Circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A.V. Marzolini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Manipulating the complex interaction between the immune system and tumour cells has been the focus of cancer research for many years, but it is only in the past decade that significant progress has been made in the field of cancer immunotherapy resulting in clinically effective treatments. The blockade of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints, essential for maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis and self-tolerance, by immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies has resulted in the augmentation of anti-tumour responses. The greatest successes so far have been seen with the blockade of cytotoxic T lymphocyte associated antigen-4, which has resulted in the first Phase III clinical trial showing an overall survival benefit in metastatic melanoma, and in the blockade of the programmed cell death protein-1 axis. This concise review will focus on the clinical advances made by the blockade of these two pathways and their role in current cancer treatment strategies.

  14. Analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Susanne; Mead, Andrew; Malinovskis, Aleksandrs; Hardwick, Nicola R; Guinn, Barbara-Ann

    2015-11-01

    The use of peptide vaccines, enhanced by adjuvants, has shown some efficacy in clinical trials. However, responses are often short-lived and rarely induce notable memory responses. The reason is that self-antigens have already been presented to the immune system as the tumor develops, leading to tolerance or some degree of host tumor cell destruction. To try to break tolerance against self-antigens, one of the methods employed has been to modify peptides at the anchor residues to enhance their ability to bind major histocompatibility complex molecules, extending their exposure to the T-cell receptor. These modified or analogue peptides have been investigated as stimulators of the immune system in patients with different cancers with variable but sometimes notable success. In this review we describe the background and recent developments in the use of analogue peptides for the immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukemia describing knowledge useful for the application of analogue peptide treatments for other malignancies.

  15. Mycobacterium marinum: a potential immunotherapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian WW

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Wei-wei Tian,1 Qian-qiu Wang,1 Wei-da Liu,2 Jian-ping Shen,1 Hong-sheng Wang11Laboratory of Mycobacterial Disease, Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Skin Diseases and STIs, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Mycology, Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology for Skin Diseases and STIs, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of ChinaPurpose: The aim of the present study was to investigate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium marinum infection in vitro and the potential of M. marinum as an immunotherapy for M. tuberculosis infection.Methods: The potential human immune response to certain bacillus infections was investigated in an immune cell–bacillus coculture system in vitro. As a potential novel immunotherapy, M. marinum was studied and compared with two other bacilli, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG and live attenuated M. tuberculosis. We examined the changes in both the bacilli and immune cells, especially the time course of the viability of mycobacteria in the coculture system and host immune responses including multinuclear giant cell formation by Wright–Giemsa modified staining, macrophage polarization by cell surface antigen expression, and cytokines/chemokine production by both mRNA expression and protein secretion.Results: The M. marinum stimulated coculture group showed more expression of CD209, CD68, CD80, and CD86 than the BCG and M. tuberculosis (an attenuated strain, H37Ra groups, although the differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, the M. marinum group expressed more interleukin (IL-1B and IL-12p40 on day 3 (IL-1B: P = 0.003 and 0.004, respectively; IL-12p40: P = 0.001 and 0.011, respectively, a higher level of CXCL10 on day 1 (P = 0.006 and 0.026, respectively, and

  16. Molecular imaging of cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucignani, Giovanni; Ottobrini, Luisa; Martelli, Cristina; Rescigno, Maria; Clerici, Mario

    2006-09-01

    New strategies based on the activation of a patient's immune response are being sought to complement present conventional exogenous cancer therapies. Elucidating the trafficking pathways of immune cells in vivo, together with their migratory properties in relation to their differentiation and activation status, is useful for understanding how the immune system interacts with cancer. Methods based on tissue sampling to monitor immune responses are inadequate for repeatedly characterizing the responses of the immune system in different organs. A solution to this problem might come from molecular and cellular imaging - a branch of biomedical sciences that combines biotechnology and imaging methods to characterize, in vivo, the molecular and cellular processes involved in normal and pathologic states. The general concepts of noninvasive imaging of targeted cells as well as the technology and probes applied to cell-mediated cancer immunotherapy imaging are outlined in this review.

  17. Allergen-specific immunotherapy: from therapeutic vaccines to prophylactic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, R; Campana, R; Marth, K; van Hage, M

    2012-08-01

    Immunoglobulin E-mediated allergies affect more than 25% of the population. Allergen exposure induces a variety of symptoms in allergic patients, which include rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, dermatitis, food allergy and life-threatening systemic anaphylaxis. At present, allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), which is based on the administration of the disease-causing allergens, is the only disease-modifying treatment for allergy. Current therapeutic allergy vaccines are still prepared from relatively poorly defined allergen extracts. However, with the availability of the structures of the most common allergen molecules, it has become possible to produce well-defined recombinant and synthetic allergy vaccines that allow specific targeting of the mechanisms of allergic disease. Here we provide a summary of the development and mechanisms of SIT, and then review new forms of therapeutic vaccines that are based on recombinant and synthetic molecules. Finally, we discuss possible allergen-specific strategies for prevention of allergic disease.

  18. Koch Institute Symposium on Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Adam; Joshi, Nikhil S; Szeto, Gregory L; Zhu, Eric; Eisen, Herman N; Irvine, Darrell J

    2013-10-01

    The 12(th) annual summer symposium of The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT was held in Cambridge, MA, on June 14(th), 1023. The symposium entitled "Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy" focused on recent advances in preclinical research in basic immunology and biomedical engineering, and their clinical application in cancer therapies. The day-long gathering also provided a forum for discussion and potential collaborations between engineers and clinical investigators. The major topics presented include: (i) enhancement of adoptive cell therapy by engineering to improve the ability and functionality of T-cells against tumor cells; (ii) current therapies using protein and antibody therapeutics to modulate endogenous anti-tumor immunity; and (iii) new technologies to identify molecular targets and assess therapeutic efficacy, and devices to control and target drug delivery more effectively and efficiently.

  19. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Zilio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer.

  20. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-09-09

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer.

  1. Neutrophils and Granulocytic MDSC: The Janus God of Cancer Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilio, Serena; Serafini, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant circulating blood cell type in humans, and are the first white blood cells recruited at the inflammation site where they orchestrate the initial immune response. Although their presence at the tumor site was recognized in the 1970s, until recently these cells have been neglected and considered to play just a neutral role in tumor progression. Indeed, in recent years neutrophils have been recognized to play a dual role in tumor development by either assisting the growth, angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis or by exerting tumoricidal action directly via the secretion of antitumoral compounds, or indirectly via the orchestration of antitumor immunity. Understanding the biology of these cells and influencing their polarization in the tumor micro- and macro-environment may be the key for the development of new therapeutic strategies, which may finally hold the promise of an effective immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:27618112

  2. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  3. Cancer immunotherapy in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Pedersen, Magnus; Svane, Inge Marie

    2016-01-01

    Patients with preexisting active autoimmune disorders were excluded from clinical trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, patients with autoimmune disorders are diagnosed with cancer at least as frequently as the global population, and clinicians treating patients outside clinical trials...... have generally been reluctant to offer cancer immunotherapy to this patient group. In this brief article, we review the most recent literature on the efficacy and safety of CTLA-4- and PD-1-blocking antibodies in patients with preexisting autoimmune disorders.......Patients with preexisting active autoimmune disorders were excluded from clinical trials of immune checkpoint inhibitors. However, patients with autoimmune disorders are diagnosed with cancer at least as frequently as the global population, and clinicians treating patients outside clinical trials...

  4. Recognizing and managing on toxicities in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Yu, Huifang; Dong, Shuang; Zhong, Yi; Hu, Sheng

    2017-03-01

    Over the past 4 years, cancer immunotherapy has significantly prolonged survival time of patients with prostate cancer, melanoma, lung cancer, and liver cancer, but its side effects are also impressive. Different types of the immune therapeutic agents have different on-target or off-target toxicity due to high affinity or weak specificity, respectively. Treatment toxicity spectrums vary greatly even in patients with the same type of cancer. Common toxicities are fevers, chills, diarrhea colitis, maculopapular rash, hepatitis, and hormone gland disorder; therefore, routine monitoring of thyroid function, liver function, renal function, and complete blood count are absolutely necessary once treatment begins. Some side effects are reversible, and can be processed through the standard medicines. However, serious toxicities are lethal, which should be frequently followed-up, identified at an early stage and immediately symptomatic treated by high-dose immunosuppressors. In this case, thereafter, the same agent should not be challenged again.

  5. Immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy of Staphylococcus epidermidis infections: challenges and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mellaert, Lieve; Shahrooei, Mohammad; Hofmans, Dorien; Eldere, Johan Van

    2012-03-01

    Previously considered a human commensal, Staphylococcus epidermidis is a frequent cause of nosocomial infections and the most common cause of device-related infections. Because the expression of toxins and other obvious virulence factors is less in S. epidermidis, the biofilm-forming capacity is its major virulence factor. Biofilm growth is characterized by high resistance to antimicrobial agents and host immune responses, making biofilm eradication tremendously difficult. The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant S. epidermidis strains additionally hampers antimicrobial therapy. Therefore, immunoprophylaxis and immunotherapy targeting factors expressed at some point in biofilm formation might offer new tools to combat S. epidermidis infections. So far, a limited number of targets have been examined for their immunotherapeutic potential. In this review, we focus on the already tested and possible targets for vaccine development, discuss the accompanying challenges and speculate on future possibilities with respect to immunotherapeutic solutions to deal with S. epidermidis infections.

  6. Allergen immunotherapy for IgE-mediated food allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhami, Sangeeta; Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Pajno, Giovanni Battista;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (EAACI) is in the process of developing the EAACI Guidelines for Allergen Immunotherapy (AIT) for IgE-mediated food allergy. We seek to critically assess the effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and safety of AIT in IgE-mediated food...... allergy. METHODS: We will undertake a systematic review, which will involve searching international biomedical databases for published, in progress and unpublished evidence. Studies will be independently screened against pre-defined eligibility criteria and critically appraised using established...... instruments. Data will be descriptively and, if possible and appropriate, quantitatively synthesised. DISCUSSION: The findings from this review will be used to inform the development of recommendations for EAACI's Guidelines on AIT....

  7. Cytokine gene-mediated immunotherapy: current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinushi, Masahisa; Tahara, Hideaki

    2009-08-01

    Recent understanding of the molecular events crucial in overcoming immunosuppressive tumor microenvironments and generating effective antitumor immunity provides us with the wreath opportunity to manipulate genes that have a key role in antitumor immune responses. Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) are two indispensable cytokines for activating dendritic cells and boosting the strong immune responses against cancer. In this review, we describe the antitumor mechanisms and clinical application of gene-modified tumor cells and dendritic cells to secrete GM-CSF or IL-12, respectively, in various preclinical and clinical settings. The principles operative in these vaccination strategies may prove applicable to other immunotherapy strategies, especially in combination with other therapeutic modalities, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  8. Future aspects of immunotherapy and gene therapy in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, S

    2009-09-01

    Immunotherapy against cancer aims at stimulating the immune system or building an immune response against targeted tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). It was proposed theoretically as a potential therapy for cancer over a century ago but it became popular in the past two decades. Gene therapy represents a promising approach for reversing the neoplastic phenotype or driving tumor cells to self-destruction. Although survival rates of neuroblastoma (NB) with biologically favorable disease are greater than 90%, outcomes of patients with high risk disease are less than 40%. Stage 4 metastatic NB cases over 18 months of age are often incurable with multimodality chemotherapy regimens. In this article, translation of immuno-gene therapy strategies into clinical trials for NB are reviewed. Future aspects of immuno-gene therapy are discussed.

  9. Allergen extracts for immunotherapy: to mix or not to mix?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nony, Emmanuel; Martelet, Armelle; Jain, Karine; Moingeon, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is established as a curative treatment for allergic rhinitis, asthma, as well as insect venom allergy. AIT is based on the administration of natural allergen extracts via the subcutaneous or sublingual routes to reorient the immune system towards tolerogenic mechanisms. In this regard, since many patients are poly-allergic, mixtures of allergen extracts are often used with a potential risk to cause allergen degradation, thereby affecting treatment efficacy. Herein, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of mixing homologous (i.e., related) or heterogeneous (i.e., unrelated) allergen extracts. We provide evidence for incompatibilities between mixes of grass pollen and house dust mite extracts containing bodies and feces, and summarize critical points to consider when mixing allergen extracts for AIT.

  10. Autophagy-associated immune responses and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hongming; Chen, Liuxi; Xu, Yinghua; Han, Weidong; Lou, Fang; Fei, Weiqiang; Liu, Shuiping; Jing, Zhao; Sui, Xinbing

    2016-04-19

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process by which cellular components are sequestered into a double-membrane vesicle and delivered to the lysosome for terminal degradation and recycling. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy plays a critical role in cell survival, senescence and homeostasis, and its dysregulation is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration. Recent studies show that autophagy is also an important regulator of cell immune response. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates tumor immune responses remains elusive. In this review, we will describe the role of autophagy in immune regulation and summarize the possible molecular mechanisms that are currently well documented in the ability of autophagy to control cell immune response. In addition, the scientific and clinical hurdles regarding the potential role of autophagy in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed.

  11. Prolactin as an Adjunct for Type 1 Diabetes Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop, Colin M; Tsai, Sue; Shrivastava, Vipul; Santamaria, Pere; Huang, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells. Although immunotherapy can restore self-tolerance thereby halting continued immune-mediated β-cell loss, residual β-cell mass and function is often insufficient for normoglycemia. Using a growth factor to boost β-cell mass can potentially overcome this barrier and prolactin (PRL) may fill this role. Previous studies have shown that PRL can stimulate β-cell proliferation and up-regulate insulin synthesis and secretion while reducing lymphocytic infiltration of islets, suggesting that it may restore normoglycemia through complementary mechanisms. Here, we test the hypothesis that PRL can improve the efficacy of an immune modulator, the anticluster of differentiation 3 monoclonal antibody (aCD3), in inducing diabetes remission by up-regulating β-cell mass and function. Diabetic nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were treated with a 5-day course of aCD3 with or without a concurrent 3-week course of PRL. We found that a higher proportion of diabetic mice treated with the aCD3 and PRL combined therapy achieved diabetes reversal than those treated with aCD3 alone. The aCD3 and PRL combined group had a higher β-cell proliferation rate, an increased β-cell fraction, larger islets, higher pancreatic insulin content, and greater glucose-stimulated insulin release. Lineage-tracing analysis found minimal contribution of β-cell neogenesis to the formation of new β-cells. Although we did not detect a significant difference in the number or proliferative capacity of T cells, we observed a higher proportion of insulitis-free islets in the aCD3 and PRL group. These results suggest that combining a growth factor with an immunotherapy may be an effective treatment paradigm for autoimmune diabetes.

  12. Stinging insect allergy: current perspectives on venom immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludman SW

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sian W Ludman,1 Robert J Boyle2 1Paediatric Allergy Department, St Mary's Hospital, Imperial Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; 2Department of Paediatrics, Imperial College London, London, UKAbstract: Systemic allergic reactions to insect stings affect up to 5% of the population during their lifetime, and up to 32% of beekeepers. Such reactions can be fatal, albeit very rarely, and fear of a further systemic reaction (SR can lead to significant anxiety and quality of life impairment. A recent Cochrane systematic review confirmed that venom immunotherapy (VIT is an effective treatment for people who have had a systemic allergic reaction to an insect sting. VIT reduces risk of a further SR (relative risk 0.10, 95% confidence interval 0.03–0.28, but VIT also reduces risk of a future large local reaction, and significantly improves disease-specific quality of life. However, health economic analysis showed that VIT is generally not cost effective for preventing future SRs; most people are stung infrequently, most SRs resolve without long-term consequences, and a fatal outcome is extremely rare. VIT only becomes cost effective if one is stung frequently (eg, beekeepers or if quality of life improvement is considered. Thus, for most people with insect sting allergy, anxiety and quality of life impairment should be the overriding consideration when making treatment decisions, highlighting the importance of a patient-centered approach. Areas which need to be explored in future research include efforts to improve the safety and convenience of VIT such as the use of sublingual immunotherapy; quality of life effects of venom allergy in children and adolescents as well as their parents; and the optimal duration of treatment.Keywords: anaphylaxis, quality of life

  13. Immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karussis, Dimitrios

    2013-04-01

    It is widely accepted that the main common pathogenetic pathway in multiple sclerosis (MS) involves an immune-mediated cascade initiated in the peripheral immune system and targeting CNS myelin. Logically, therefore, the therapeutic approaches to the disease include modalities aiming at downregulation of the various immune elements that are involved in this immunologic cascade. Since the introduction of interferons in 1993, which were the first registered treatments for MS, huge steps have been made in the field of MS immunotherapy. More efficious and specific immunoactive drugs have been introduced and it appears that the increased specificity for MS of these new treatments is paralleled by greater efficacy. Unfortunately, this seemingly increased efficacy has been accompanied by more safety issues. The immunotherapeutic modalities can be divided into two main groups: those affecting the acute stages (relapses) of the disease and the long-term treatments that are aimed at preventing the appearance of relapses and the progression in disability. Immunomodulating treatments may also be classified according to the level of the 'immune axis' where they exert their main effect. Since, in MS, a neurodegenerative process runs in parallel and as a consequence of inflammation, early immune intervention is warranted to prevent progression of relapses of MS and the accumulation of disability. The use of neuroimaging (MRI) techniques that allow the detection of silent inflammatory activity of MS and neurodegeneration has provided an important tool for the substantiation of the clinical efficacy of treatments and the early diagnosis of MS. This review summarizes in detail the existing information on all the available immunotherapies for MS, old and new, classifies them according to their immunologic mechanisms of action and proposes a structured algorithm/therapeutic scheme for the management of the disease.

  14. Recombinant alphaviruses as vectors for anti-tumour and anti-microbial immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos-Brilman, A; de Mare, A; Bungener, L; Huckriede, A; Wischut, J; Daemen, T

    2006-01-01

    Background: Vectors derived from alphaviruses are gaining interest for their high transfection potency and strong immunogenicity. Objectives: After a brief introduction on alphaviruses and their vectors, an overview is given on current preclinical immunotherapy studies using vector systems based on

  15. Recent Advance in Antigen-Specific Immunotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimitsu Kadowaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapse after chemotherapy is inevitable in the majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Thus, it is necessary to develop novel therapies that have different antileukemic mechanisms. Recent advances in immunology and identification of promising leukemia-associated antigens open the possibilities for eradicating minimal residual diseases by antigen-specific immunotherapy after chemotherapy. Several methods have been pursued as immunotherapies for AML: peptide vaccines, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-secreting tumor vaccines, dendritic cell vaccines, and adoptive T cell therapy. Whereas immunogenicity and clinical outcomes are improving in these trials, severe adverse events were observed in highly avid engineered T cell therapies, indicating the importance of the balance between effectiveness and side effects in advanced immunotherapy. Such progress in inducing antitumor immune responses, together with strategies to attenuate immunosuppressive factors, will establish immunotherapy as an important armament to combat AML.

  16. Immunology in the Clinic Review Series; focus on allergies: immunotherapy for food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousallem, T; Burks, A W

    2012-01-01

    There is no approved therapy for food allergy. The current standard of care is elimination of the triggering food from the diet and accessibility to epinephrine. Immunotherapy is a promising treatment approach. While desensitization to most foods seems feasible, it remains unclear if a permanent state of tolerance is achievable. The research team at Duke is pioneering immunotherapy for food allergies. Work here has evolved over time from small open-label pilot studies to larger randomized designs. Our data show that immunological changes associated with immunotherapy include reduction in mast cell reactivity, decreased basophil responses, decreased specific-immunoglobulin (Ig)E, increased IgG4 and induction of regulatory T cells. Immunotherapy has generated much excitement in the food allergy community; however, further studies are needed before it is ready for clinical use.

  17. The majority of patients with metastatic melanoma are not represented in pivotal phase III immunotherapy trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Kimper-Karl, Marie Louise; Høyer, Katrine Lundby

    2017-01-01

    in 2014, were included in the analysis. Seven pre-defined eligibility criteria, all used to select patients for enrolment in five recent randomised phase III immunotherapy trials, were analysed. Results Fifty-five percent of the total population with MM did not meet one or more eligibility criteria (‘not...... worse baseline prognostic features. However, patients treated with immunotherapy had similar survival outcomes regardless of eligibility. Conclusion Over half of the patients evaluated for systemic treatment of MM are not represented in phase III registration immunotherapy trials. The data reveal a huge...... knowledge gap regarding the usefulness of new immunotherapies in the ‘real-world’ patient population, and urge additional testing of known regimens in selected poor prognosis cohorts....

  18. ErbB-targeted CAR T-cell immunotherapy of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whilding, Lynsey M; Maher, John

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) based immunotherapy has been under development for the last 25 years and is now a promising new treatment modality in the field of cancer immunotherapy. The approach involves genetically engineering T cells to target malignant cells through expression of a bespoke fusion receptor that couples an HLA-independent antigen recognition domain to one or more intracellular T-cell activating modules. Multiple clinical trials are now underway in several centers to investigate CAR T-cell immunotherapy of diverse hematologic and solid tumor types. The most successful results have been achieved in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, in whom several complete and durable responses have been achieved. This review focuses on the preclinical and clinical development of CAR T-cell immunotherapy of solid cancers, targeted against members of the ErbB family.

  19. Analysis of allergen immunotherapy studies shows increased clinical efficacy in highly symptomatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howarth, P; Malling, Hans-Jørgen; Molimard, M;

    2011-01-01

    To cite this article: Howarth P, Malling H-J, Molimard M, Devillier P. Analysis of allergen immunotherapy studies shows increased clinical efficacy in highly symptomatic patients. Allergy 2012; 67: 321-327. ABSTRACT: Background:  The assessment of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) efficacy...... in the treatment for seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (SAR) symptoms is challenging. Allergen immunotherapy differs from symptomatic therapy in that while symptomatic therapy treats patients after symptoms appear and aims to reduce symptoms, AIT is administered before symptoms are present and aims to prevent...... them. Thus, clinical studies of AIT can neither establish baseline symptom levels nor limit the enrolment of patients to those with the most severe symptoms. Allergen immunotherapy treatment effects are therefore diluted by patients with low symptoms for a particular pollen season. The objective...

  20. Prospects in cancer immunotherapy: treating advanced stage disease or preventing tumor recurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjili, Masoud H; Payne, Kyle K

    2015-06-01

    Human vaccines against infectious agents are often effective in a prophylactic setting. However, they are usually not effective when used post-exposure. Rabies vaccine is one of the exceptions, which can be used post-exposure, but is effective only when used in combination with other treatments. Similar results have been obtained with cancer vaccines and immunotherapies. Cancer immunotherapies generally prolong patients' survival when they are used during advanced stage disease. The potential of immunotherapy to cure cancer could be revealed when it is applied in a prophylactic setting. This article provides a brief overview of cancer immunotherapeutics and suggests that immunotherapy can cure cancer if used at the right time against the right target; we suggest that targeting cancer during dormancy in order to prevent tumor recurrence as advanced stage disease is potentially curative.

  1. The effect of immunotherapy with gynandropsis gynandra pollen in atopic asthma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latha G

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Immunotherapy (IT was first described by Noon and Freeman in 1911. The mechanism underlying successful immunotherapy is however not known. The protection from allergy is achieved long before IgE levels are de-creased, and they are indeed not frequently increased. Continued therapy may decrease IgE and skin reaction, although it may take years. Objective: The evaluation of effect of immunotherapy with specific pollen Gyn-andropsis gynandra. Material & Methods: Clinical subjects like skin test response, symptoms score, drugs intake and total sIgE levels were studied in sixty patients. Results: Both immediate and delayed skin test responses were highly significant. The intensity of symptoms score and medication was reduced and total sIgE levels were inconsistent after the course of IT. Conclusion: The decrease in clinical subjects may be attributed to the beneficial effect of immunotherapy with Gynandropsis gynandra.

  2. Tumor and Host Factors Controlling Antitumor Immunity and Efficacy of Cancer Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranger, Stefani; Sivan, Ayelet; Corrales, Leticia; Gajewski, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent clinical advances in immunotherapy, a fraction of cancer patients fails to respond to these interventions. Evidence from preclinical mouse models as well as clinical samples has provided evidence that the extent of activated T cell infiltration within the tumor microenvironment is associated with clinical response to immunotherapies including checkpoint blockade. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms mediating the lack of T cell infiltration into the tumor microenvironment will be instrumental for the development of new therapeutic strategies to render those patients immunotherapy responsive. Recent data have suggested that major sources of intersubject heterogeneity include differences in somatic mutations in specific oncogene pathways between cancers of individual subjects and also environmental factors including commensal microbial composition. Successful identification of such causal factors should lead to new therapeutic approaches that may facilitate T cell entry into noninflamed tumors and expand the fraction of patients capable of responding to novel immunotherapies.

  3. Eliciting Design Patterns for E-Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retalis, Symeon; Georgiakakis, Petros; Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2006-01-01

    Design pattern creation, especially in the e-learning domain, is a highly complex process that has not been sufficiently studied and formalized. In this paper, we propose a systematic pattern development cycle, whose most important aspects focus on reverse engineering of existing systems in order to elicit features that are cross-validated through…

  4. Multisensory integration affects ERP components elicited by exogenous cues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santangelo, Valerio; Lubbe, van der Rob H.J.; Belardinelli, Marta Olivetti; Postma, Albert

    2008-01-01

    revious studies have shown that the amplitude of event related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by a combined audiovisual stimulus is larger than the sum of a single auditory and visual stimulus. This enlargement is thought to reflect multisensory integration. Based on these data, it may be hypothes

  5. Creating a Framework: Art Therapy Elicits the Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harber, Karen

    2011-01-01

    A case study illustrates how art therapy was used to elicit the narrative of an adolescent male student in transition from incarceration to a transfer school setting. Childhood trauma was addressed in individual sessions and within a literacy group co-led by a reading specialist. The art therapist responded to the client's needs by broadening the…

  6. A Task that Elicits Reasoning: A Dual Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankelewitz, Dina; Mueller, Mary; Maher, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the forms of reasoning elicited as fourth grade students in a suburban district and sixth grade students in an urban district worked on similar tasks involving reasoning with the use of Cuisenaire rods. Analysis of the two data sets shows similarities in the reasoning used by both groups of students on specific tasks, and the…

  7. Structured Language Requirement Elicitation Using Case Base Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marryam Murtaza

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Requirement elicitation is very difficult process in highly challenging and business based software as well as in real time software. Common problems associated with these types of software are rapidly changing the requirements and understanding the language of the layman person. In this study, a framework for requirement elicitation by using knowledge based system is proposed, which is very helpful for knowledge documentation, intelligent decision support, self-learning and more specifically it is very helpful for case based reasoning and explanation. Basically in this method requirements are gathered from Artificial Intelligence (AI expert system from various sources e.g., via interviews, scenarios or use cases. Then, these are converted into structured natural language using ontology and this new problem/case is put forward to Case Based Reasoning (CBR. CBR based on its previous information having similar requirements combines with new case and suggests a proposed solution. Based on this solution a prototype is developed and delivered to customer. The use of case-based reasoning in requirements elicitation process has greatly reduced the burden and saved time of requirement analyst and results in an effective solution for handling complex or vague requirements during the elicitation process.

  8. Visual emotional context modulates brain potentials elicited by unattended tones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Sayaka; Nittono, Hiroshi; Hori, Tadao

    2007-10-01

    To examine whether brain electrical responses to environmental stimuli were influenced by emotional contexts, event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by nonstartle probe tones were recorded from 13 student volunteers while they were viewing emotionally positive, neutral, and negative slides of the International Affective Picture System. The auditory stimuli consisted of high-deviant (2000 Hz, p=.08), low-deviant (1050 Hz, p=.08), and standard (1000 Hz, p=.84) tones with a mean onset-to-onset interval of 600 ms. Participants were told to ignore the tones. High-deviant tones elicited a larger N1 (peaking around 100 ms) when participants were viewing negative slides than when viewing positive slides. The amplitude of the P2 elicited by standard tones (peaking around 170 ms) was smaller when participants were viewing positive slides than when viewing negative and neutral slides. The amplitude of the mismatch negativity (150-200 ms) tended to reduce during positive slide presentation, but this difference appeared to be due to reduction of the P2 elicited by standard tones. These findings suggest that visually induced emotional states have a sequential effect on auditory information processing, in that the influence of negative emotion appears at an earlier stage than that of positive emotion.

  9. Conditioned craving cues elicit an automatic approach tendency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Gucht; D. Vansteenwegen; O. Van den Bergh; T. Beckers

    2008-01-01

    In two experiments, we used a Pavlovian differential conditioning procedure to induce craving for chocolate. As a result of repeated pairing with chocolate intake, initially neutral cues came to elicit an automatic approach tendency in a speeded stimulus-response compatibility reaction time task. Th

  10. Pattern Visual Evoked Potentials Elicited by Organic Electroluminescence Screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Soiti Matsumoto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether organic electroluminescence (OLED screens can be used as visual stimulators to elicit pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (p-VEPs. Method. Checkerboard patterns were generated on a conventional cathode-ray tube (S710, Compaq Computer Co., USA screen and on an OLED (17 inches, 320 × 230 mm, PVM-1741, Sony, Tokyo, Japan screen. The time course of the luminance changes of each monitor was measured with a photodiode. The p-VEPs elicited by these two screens were recorded from 15 eyes of 9 healthy volunteers (22.0 ± 0.8 years. Results. The OLED screen had a constant time delay from the onset of the trigger signal to the start of the luminescence change. The delay during the reversal phase from black to white for the pattern was 1.0 msec on the cathode-ray tube (CRT screen and 0.5 msec on the OLED screen. No significant differences in the amplitudes of P100 and the implicit times of N75 and P100 were observed in the p-VEPs elicited by the CRT and the OLED screens. Conclusion. The OLED screen can be used as a visual stimulator to elicit p-VEPs; however the time delay and the specific properties in the luminance change must be taken into account.

  11. Computational Support for Early Elicitation and Classification of Tone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Steven; Lee, Haejoong

    2014-01-01

    Investigating a tone language involves careful transcription of tone on words and phrases. This is challenging when the phonological categories--the tones or melodies--have not been identified. Effects such as coarticulation, sandhi, and phrase-level prosody appear as obstacles to early elicitation and classification of tone. This article presents…

  12. Eliciting Production of L2 Target Structures through Priming Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Kim; Trofimovich, Pavel; Neumann, Heike

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the pedagogical applications of structural priming research in an English for academic purposes (EAP) context, investigating whether priming activities are an effective tool for eliciting production of target grammatical structures. University students across four EAP classes carried out a total of 6 information-exchange…

  13. Effect of Obesity and Chronic Inflammation on TRAIL-Based Immunotherapy for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0271 TITLE: “Effect of obesity and chronic inflammation on TRAIL-based immunotherapy for advanced breast cancer...JAN 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Effect of Obesity and Chronic Inflammation on TRAIL-Based Immunotherapy for Advanced Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...arise in cancer patients, rendering antitumor immune responses ineffective. In addition, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that obese

  14. Effects of surgery, immunization, and laser immunotherapy on a non-immunogenic metastic tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei R.; Huang, Zheng; Andrienko, Kirill; Stefanov, Stefan; Wolf, Roman F.; Liu, Hong

    2006-08-01

    Traditional local cancer treatment modalities include surgery and radiation, which has the immediate tumor response due to tumor removal or radiation induced cell death. However, such therapeutic approaches usually do not result in eradiation of tumors, particularly when treating metastatic tumors. In fact, local treatment of primary tumors may stimulate the growth and spread of remote metastasis. Commonly used systemic therapies include chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which target the dividing cells or the immune systems. However, in addition to the severe side effects, chemotherapy often suppresses the immune systems, hence lessening the host's ability to fight the disease. Immunotherapy, on the other hand, aims at educating and stimulating immune systems using either general immune enhancements or antigen-oriented specific immune stimulation. However, so far, the traditional immunotherapy has yielded only limited success in treating cancer patients. A different approach is needed. To combine the advantages of both local therapies for acute and targeted treatment responses and the systemic therapies for stimulation of the immune systems, laser immunotherapy was proposed to use selective photothermal therapy as the local treatment modality and the adjuvant-assisted immunotherapy for systemic control. Laser immunotherapy has show positive results in treating metastatic tumors. In this study, we conducted a comparative study using surgery, freeze-thaw immunization and laser immunotherapy in the treatment of metastatic rat mammary tumors. Our results showed that removal of the primary tumors was unsuccessful at changing the course of tumor progression. The tumor cell lysate immunization delayed the emergence of metastases but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. Laser immunotherapy, on the other hand, resulted in regression and eradication.

  15. Improved antitumor activity of immunotherapy with BRAF and MEK inhibitors in BRAFV600E melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen; Mok, Stephen; Moreno, Blanca Homet; Tsoi, Jennifer; Faja, Lidia Robert; Goedert, Lucas; Pinheiro, Elaine M.; Koya, Richard C; Graeber, Thomas; Comin-Anduix, Begoña; Ribas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Combining immunotherapy and BRAF targeted therapy may result in improved antitumor activity with the high response rates of targeted therapy and the durability of responses with immunotherapy. However, the first clinical trial testing the combination of the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib and the CTLA-4 antibody ipilimumab was terminated early due to substantial liver toxicities. MEK inhibitors can potentiate the MAPK inhibition in BRAF mutant cells, while potentially alleviating the unwanted para...

  16. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed adoptive immunotherapy: a new era in targeted cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yamei; Liu, Delong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in molecular immunology, virology, genetics, and cell processing, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed cancer therapy has finally arrived for clinical application. CAR-directed adoptive immunotherapy represents a novel form of gene therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy, a combination of three in one. Early phase clinical trial was reported in patients with refractory chronic lymphoid leukemia with 17p deletion. Accompanying the cyto...

  17. Immunotherapy for B-cell lymphoma: current status and prospective advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurit eHollander

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has progressed significantly over the last decades. However, the majority of patients remain incurable, and novel therapies are needed. Because immunotherapy ideally offers target selectivity, an ever increasing number of immunotherapies, both passive and active, are undergoing development. The champion of passive immunotherapy to date is the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab that revolutionized the standard of care for lymphoma. The great success of rituximab catalyzed the development of new passive immunotherapy strategies that are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. These include improvement of rituximab efficacy, newer generation anti-CD20 antibodies, drug-conjugated and radiolabelled anti-CD20 antibodies, monoclonal antibodies targeting non-CD20 lymphoma antigens, and bispecific antibodies. Active immunotherapy aims at inducing long-lasting antitumor immunity, thereby limiting the likelihood of relapse. Current clinical studies of active immunotherapy for lymphoma consist largely of vaccination and immune checkpoint blockade. A variety of protein- and cell-based vaccines are being tested in ongoing clinical studies. Recently completed phase III clinical trials of an idiotype protein vaccine suggest that the vaccine may have clinical activity in a subset of patients. Efforts to enhance the efficacy of active immunotherapy are ongoing with an emphasis on optimization of antigen delivery and presentation of vaccines and modulation of the immune system toward counteracting immunosuppression, using antibodies against immune regulatory checkpoints. This article discusses results of the various immunotherapy approaches applied to date for B-cell lymphoma and the ongoing trials to improve their effect.

  18. Randomized phase II clinical trial of chemo-immunotherapy in advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lasalvia-Prisco

    2008-09-01

    and 44 weeks and 1-year survival (33.3% and 39.1% were statistically higher with chemoimmunotherapy. No difference in toxicity between both arms was demonstrated. A switch in the laboratory immunity profile, nonspecific and specific, was associated with the chemoimmunotherapy treatment: increase of proliferative lymphocyte response, decrease of tolerogenic T-regulatory cells and eliciting TAA-sensitization.Keywords: lung cancer chemotherapy, lung cancer chemoimmunotherapy, cancer vaccine, immunomodulatory cancer treatment, immunotherapy adjuvants, cancer therapy

  19. Antigen-Specific Immunotherapy against Allergic Rhinitis: The State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fujimura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis is the most prevalent type I allergy in industrialized countries. Pollen scattering from trees or grasses often induces seasonal allergic rhinitis, which is known as pollinosis or hay fever. The causative pollen differs across different areas and times of the year. Impaired performance due to pollinosis and/or medication used for treating pollinosis is considered to be an important reason for the loss of concentration and productivity in the workplace. Antigen-specific immunotherapy is an only available curative treatment against allergic rhinitis. Subcutaneous injection of allergens with or without adjuvant has been commonly used as an immunotherapy; however, recently, sublingual administration has come to be considered a safer and convenient alternative administration route of allergens. In this review, we focus on the safety and protocol of subcutaneous and sublingual immunotherapy against seasonal allergic rhinitis. We also describe an approach to selecting allergens for the vaccine so as to avoid secondary sensitization and adverse events. The biomarkers and therapeutic mechanisms for immunotherapy are not fully understood. We discuss the therapeutic biomarkers that are correlated with the improvement of clinical symptoms brought about by immunotherapy as well as the involvement of Tr1 and regulatory T cells in the therapeutic mechanisms. Finally, we focus on the current immunotherapeutic approach to treating Japanese cedar pollinosis, the most prevalent pollinosis in Japan, including sublingual immunotherapy with standardized extract, a transgenic rice-based edible vaccine, and an immunoregulatory liposome encapsulating recombinant fusion protein.

  20. An alternative approach for eliciting willingness-to-pay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Damschroder

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Open-ended methods that elicit willingness-to-pay (WTP in terms of absolute dollars often result in high rates of questionable and highly skewed responses, insensitivity to changes in health state, and raise an ethical issue related to its association with personal income. We conducted a 2x2 randomized trial over the Internet to test 4 WTP formats: 1 WTP in dollars; 2 WTP as a percentage of financial resources; 3 WTP in terms of monthly payments; and 4 WTP as a single lump-sum amount. WTP as a percentage of financial resources generated fewer questionable values, had better distribution properties, greater sensitivity to severity of health states, and was not associated with income. WTP elicited on a monthly basis also showed promise.

  1. Elicitation of preferences for improvements in ostomy pouches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Ole

    This paper attempts to examine and measure ostomates’ preferences for improvements in ostomy pouches. Described are the study design, elicitation procedure and resulting preference structure of the Swedish ostomate sample. The method used to elicit the preferences is a Discrete Choice Experiment...... the attributes and allows for the estimation of individuals’ Willingness to Pay (WTP) for the attributes of ostomy pouches when cost is included as an attribute. The data consists of 254 ostomates responding to the survey. The respondents have positive WTP for all improvement attributes presented to them...... in the survey, with strongest preferences for reducing the number of leakages. The DCE utilised in the survey performs well in terms of reliability and validity of the obtained results. The results suggest that since reducing leakages is the most important attribute for the respondents when making their choices...

  2. Expert elicitation for a national-level volcano hazard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, Mark; Stirling, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Wang, Ting; Jolly, Gill

    2016-04-01

    The quantification of volcanic hazard at national level is a vital pre-requisite to placing volcanic risk on a platform that permits meaningful comparison with other hazards such as earthquakes. New Zealand has up to a dozen dangerous volcanoes, with the usual mixed degrees of knowledge concerning their temporal and spatial eruptive history. Information on the 'size' of the eruptions, be it in terms of VEI, volume or duration, is sketchy at best. These limitations and the need for a uniform approach lend themselves to a subjective hazard analysis via expert elicitation. Approximately 20 New Zealand volcanologists provided estimates for the size of the next eruption from each volcano and, conditional on this, its location, timing and duration. Opinions were likewise elicited from a control group of statisticians, seismologists and (geo)chemists, all of whom had at least heard the term 'volcano'. The opinions were combined via the Cooke classical method. We will report on the preliminary results from the exercise.

  3. Voltage transients elicited by sudden step-up of auxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, B. G.

    1984-01-01

    It is hypothesized (i) that the molecular mechanism for the reception of friction and flexure and the mechanism by which auxin enhances ethylene production have in common a release of free calcium into the cytosol, (ii) that elevated cytosolic calcium initiates vesicle exocytosis, and (iii) that the vesicles release a factor or set of factors which depolarizes the plasmalemma and promotes ethylene synthesis. One consequence of such exocytosis should be small, extracellularly observable voltage transients. Transients, ranging in size up to 600 microvolts and possessing risetimes (10-90%) of approximately 200 ms, are known to be elicited in etiolated stems of Pisum sativum L. by friction and are here shown to be elicited by sudden increase of auxin concentration and also by a Ca2+ ionophore.

  4. The application of natural killer (NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayne H Rouce

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are essential components of the innate immune system and play a critical role in host immunity against cancer. Recent progress in our understanding of NK cell immunobiology has paved the way for novel NK cell-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in the field of NK cell immunotherapy, including augmentation of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, manipulation of receptor-mediated activation, and adoptive immunotherapy with ex vivo expanded, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR engineered or engager-modified NK cells. In contrast to T lymphocytes, donor NK cells do not attack non-hematopoietic tissues, suggesting that an NK-mediated anti-tumor effect can be achieved in the absence of graft-versus-host disease. Despite reports of clinical efficacy, a number of factors limit the application of NK cell immunotherapy for the treatment of cancer such as the failure of infused NK cells to expand and persist in vivo. Therefore efforts to enhance the therapeutic benefit of NK cell-based immunotherapy by developing strategies to manipulate the NK cell product, host factors and tumor targets are the subject of intense research. In the preclinical setting, genetic engineering of NK cells to express CARs to redirect their antitumor specificity has shown significant promise. Given the short lifespan and potent cytolytic function of mature NK cells, they are attractive candidate effector cells to express CARs for adoptive immunotherapies. Another innovative approach to redirect NK cytotoxicity towards tumor cells is to create either bispecific or trispecific antibodies, thus augmenting cytotoxicity against tumor-associated antigens. These are exciting times for the study of NK cells; with recent advances in the field of NK cell biology and translational research, it is likely that NK cell immunotherapy will move to the forefront of cancer immunotherapy over the next

  5. Neutrosophic Logic for Mental Model Elicitation and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Pérez-Teruel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Mental models are personal, internal representations of external reality that people use to interact with the world around them. They are useful in multiple situations such as muticriteria decision making, knowledge management, complex system learning and analysis. In this paper a framework for mental models elicitation and analysis based on neutrosophic Logic is presented. An illustrative example is provided to show the applicability of the proposal. The paper ends with conclusion future research directions.

  6. Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Expert Elicitation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppersmith, Kevin J.; Perman, Roseanne C.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents results of the Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Expert Elicitation (SZEE) project for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. (Geomatrix), for TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc. The DOE's Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (referred to as the YMP) is intended to evaluate the suitability of the site for construction of a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The SZEE project is one of several that involve the elicitation of experts to characterize the knowledge and uncertainties regarding key inputs to the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The objective of the current project was to characterize the uncertainties associated with certain key issues related to the saturated zone system in the Yucca Mountain area and downgradient region. An understanding of saturated zone processes is critical to evaluating the performance of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A major goal of the project was to capture the uncertainties involved in assessing the saturated flow processes, including uncertainty in both the models used to represent the physical processes controlling saturated zone flow and transport, and the parameter values used in the models. So that the analysis included a wide range of perspectives, multiple individual judgments were elicited from members of an expert panel. The panel members, who were experts from within and outside the Yucca Mountain project, represented a range of experience and expertise. A deliberate process was followed in facilitating interactions among the experts, in training them to express their uncertainties, and in eliciting their interpretations. The resulting assessments and probability distributions, therefore, provide a reasonable aggregate representation of the knowledge and

  7. Visual emotional context modulates brain potentials elicited by unattended tones

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Sayaka; Nittono, Hiroshi; Hori, Tadao

    2007-01-01

    To examine whether brain electrical responses to environmental stimuli were influenced by emotional contexts, event-related potentials (ERPs) elicited by nonstartle probe tones were recorded from 13 student volunteers while they were viewing emotionally positive, neutral, and negative slides of the International Affective Picture System. The auditory stimuli consisted of high-deviant (2000 Hz, p=.08), low-deviant (1050 Hz, p=.08), and standard (1000 Hz, p=.84) tones with a mean onset-to-onset...

  8. Interviewing strategically to elicit admissions from guilty suspects

    OpenAIRE

    Tekin, Serra; Granhag, Pär Anders; Strömwall, Leif; Giolla, Erik Mac; Vrij, Aldert; Hartwig, Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this article we introduce a novel interviewing tactic to elicit admissions from guilty suspects. By influencing the suspects’ perception of the amount of evidence the interviewer holds against them, we aimed to shift the suspects’ counterinterrogation strategies from less to more forthcoming. The proposed tactic (SUE-Confrontation) is a development of the Strategic Use of Evidence (SUE) framework and aims to affect the suspects’ perception by confronting them with statement-evidence incons...

  9. A Step-Wise Approach to Elicit Triangular Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Marc W.

    2013-01-01

    Adapt/combine known methods to demonstrate an expert judgment elicitation process that: 1.Models expert's inputs as a triangular distribution, 2.Incorporates techniques to account for expert bias and 3.Is structured in a way to help justify expert's inputs. This paper will show one way of "extracting" expert opinion for estimating purposes. Nevertheless, as with most subjective methods, there are many ways to do this.

  10. Elicitation of Unstated Needs - Training Session 02 (KJ Interviewing)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-23

    analysis to determine must-be’s vs. satisfiers vs. delighters Step 8: Use AHP weighting and QFD matrix to determine quality and performance...Elicitation (RE) Training © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Overview of SEI Approach Step 1: Evaluate existing knowledge of stated needs and...requirements Step 2: Design the open-ended, probing questions to be used in KJ interviews Step 3: Conduct KJ interviews collecting all possible

  11. Nicotine Elicits Convulsive Seizures by Activating Amygdalar Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iha, Higor A.; Kunisawa, Naofumi; Shimizu, Saki; Tokudome, Kentaro; Mukai, Takahiro; Kinboshi, Masato; Ikeda, Akio; Ito, Hidefumi; Serikawa, Tadao; Ohno, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine (nACh) receptors are implicated in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders; however, the mechanisms of nACh receptors in seizure generation remain unknown. Here, we performed behavioral and immunohistochemical studies in mice and rats to clarify the mechanisms underlying nicotine-induced seizures. Treatment of animals with nicotine (1–4 mg/kg, i.p.) produced motor excitement in a dose-dependent manner and elicited convulsive seizures at 3 and 4 mg/kg. The nicotine-induced seizures were abolished by a subtype non-selective nACh antagonist, mecamylamine (MEC). An α7 nACh antagonist, methyllycaconitine, also significantly inhibited nicotine-induced seizures whereas an α4β2 nACh antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine, affected only weakly. Topographical analysis of Fos protein expression, a biological marker of neural excitation, revealed that a convulsive dose (4 mg/kg) of nicotine region-specifically activated neurons in the piriform cortex, amygdala, medial habenula, paratenial thalamus, anterior hypothalamus and solitary nucleus among 48 brain regions examined, and this was also suppressed by MEC. In addition, electric lesioning of the amygdala, but not the piriform cortex, medial habenula and thalamus, specifically inhibited nicotine-induced seizures. Furthermore, microinjection of nicotine (100 and 300 μg/side) into the amygdala elicited convulsive seizures in a dose-related manner. The present results suggest that nicotine elicits convulsive seizures by activating amygdalar neurons mainly via α7 nACh receptors.

  12. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Escors

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(g-retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and b-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  13. Extensive necrosis of visceral melanoma metastases after immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poston Graeme J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognosis for metastatic melanoma remains poor even with traditional decarbazine or interferon therapy. 5-year survival is markedly higher amongst patients undergoing metastatectomy. Unfortunately not all are suitable for metastatectomy. Alternative agents for systemic therapy have, to date, offered no greater rates of survival beyond traditional therapy. A toll-like receptor 9 agonist, PF-3512676 (formerly known as CPG 7909 is currently being evaluated for its potential. Case presentation We present the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian male with completely resected metastatic cutaneous melanoma after immunotherapy. The patient initially progressed during adjuvant high-dose interferon, with metastases to the liver, spleen, and pelvic lymph nodes. During an 18-month treatment period with PF-3512676 (formerly known as CPG 7909, a synthetic cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine rich oligodeoxynucleotide, slow radiologic disease progression was demonstrated at the original disease sites. Subsequent excision of splenic and pelvic nodal metastases was performed, followed by resection of the liver metastases. Histologic examination of both hepatic and splenic melanoma metastases showed extensive necrosis. Subsequent disease-free status was demonstrated by serial positron emission tomography (PET. Conclusion Existing evidence from phase I/II trials suggests systemic treatment with PF-3512676 is capable of provoking a strong tumor-specific immune response and may account for the prolonged tumor control in this instance.

  14. Combination of photodynamic therapy and immunotherapy - evolving role in dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Li; Wang, Hong-Wei; Huang, Zheng

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality. It offers alternative options in the treatment of cancer and vascular diseases. In cancer treatment, PDT has been used primarily for localized superficial or endoluminal malignant and premalignant conditions. More recently, its application has also been expanded to solid tumors. However, its antitumor efficacy remains debatable and its acceptance still variable. Pre-clinical studies demonstrate that, in addition to the primary local cytotoxicity, PDT might induce secondary host immune responses, which may further enhance PDT's therapeutic effects on primary tumor as well as metastasis. Therefore, PDT-induced local and systemic antitumor immune response might play an important role in successful control of malignant diseases. Furthermore, PDT's antitumor efficacy might also be enhanced through an effective immunoadjuvant or immunomodulator. Our recent clinical data also indicate that improved clinical outcomes can be obtained by a combination of PDT and immunomodulation therapy for the treatment of pre-malignant skin diseases. For instance, the combination of topical ALA-PDT and Imiquimod is effective for the treatment of genital bowenoid papulosis. This presentation will also report our preliminary data in developing combination approaches of PDT and immunotherapy for actinic keratosis (AK), basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and Bowen's disease.

  15. Interleukin-33 in tumorigenesis, tumor immune evasion, and cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Binfeng; Yang, Min; Wang, Qingqing

    2016-05-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a member of the IL-1 gene family and mainly expressed in the nucleus of tissue lining cells, stromal cells, and activated myeloid cells. IL-33 is considered a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule and plays an important role in many physiological and pathological settings such as tissue repair, allergy, autoimmune disease, infectious disease, and cancer. The biological functions of IL-33 include maintaining tissue homeostasis, enhancing type 1 and 2 cellular immune responses, and mediating fibrosis during chronic inflammation. IL-33 exerts diverse functions through signaling via its receptor ST2, which is expressed in many types of cells including regulatory T cells (Treg), group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s), myeloid cells, cytotoxic NK cells, Th2 cells, Th1 cells, and CD8(+) T cells. Tumor development results in downregulation of IL-33 in epithelial cells but upregulation of IL-33 in the tumor stroma and serum. The current data suggest that IL-33 expression in tumor cells increases immunogenicity and promotes type 1 antitumor immune responses through CD8(+) T cells and NK cells, whereas IL-33 in tumor stroma and serum facilitates immune suppression via Treg and myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC). Understanding the role of IL-33 in cancer immunobiology sheds lights on targeting this cytokine for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Harnessing the power of Vδ2 cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, D W; Bodman-Smith, M D

    2015-04-01

    γδ T cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that have been implicated in immunosurveillance against infections and tumours. In the peripheral blood of humans the γδ T cell pool is made up predominantly of Vδ2 cells, which can detect both foreign and self-metabolites of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway. This unique axis of antigen recognition enables Vδ2 cells to respond to a range of pathogenic infections as well as perturbations in endogenous isoprenoid biosynthesis that can occur during cell stress and malignant transformation. There has been growing interest in Vδ2 cells as a potential avenue for cancer immunotherapy, and a number of strategies have been utilized in an attempt to boost the anti-tumour response of Vδ2 cells in patients. In this review we discuss critically the evidence that Vδ2 cells contribute to the cytotoxic response against tumours and evaluate current immunotherapeutic approaches that target these cells in cancer patients, with specific focus on their shortcomings and how they may be improved.

  17. Circulating protein and antibody biomarker for personalized cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianda

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade therapies are revolutionizing standard cancer treatments. Immune checkpoint inhibitors likely function to enhance the tumor specific antigen response in order to achieve favorable clinical outcomes. Thus, continuous efforts to identify the common tumor-specific antigens are essential for the broad clinical application of these therapies. Several immunoproteomics approaches have been used in order to screen for this specificity. In a recent article from Jhaveri and colleagues published in the February issue of Cancer Immunology Research, antibody biomarkers were screened in pancreatic cancer patients who received allogeneic, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor-secreting pancreatic cancer vaccine (GVAX) by using a serum antibody-based SILAC immunoprecipitation (SASI) approach. Using this assay, several new tumor antigens (MYPT1, PSMC5 and TRFR) were identified that were found to have significantly different expression in tumors compared with normal tissue. Moreover, patients with detectable antibodies showed improved disease-free survival after GVAX therapy. These targets need to be further validated to determine the full spectrum of tumor antigen immunogencity and their potential clinical application. In addition to antibodies, circulating protein, DNA and RNA in peripheral blood are under clinical investigation as liquid biopsies and have the potential to provide guidance for future personalized cancer immunotherapy.

  18. Dual Roles of IL-27 in Cancer Biology and Immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbi, Marina; Carbotti, Grazia

    2017-01-01

    IL-27 is a pleiotropic two-chain cytokine, composed of EBI3 and IL-27p28 subunits, which is structurally related to both IL-12 and IL-6 cytokine families. IL-27 acts through a heterodimer receptor consisting of IL-27Rα (WSX1) and gp130 chains, which mediate signaling predominantly through STAT1 and STAT3. IL-27 was initially reported as an immune-enhancing cytokine that supports CD4+ T cell proliferation, T helper (Th)1 cell differentiation, and IFN-γ production, acting in concert with IL-12. However, subsequent studies demonstrated that IL-27 displays complex immune-regulatory functions, which may result in either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory effects in relationship to the biological context and experimental models considered. Several pieces of evidence, obtained in preclinical tumor models, indicated that IL-27 has a potent antitumor activity, related not only to the induction of tumor-specific Th1 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses but also to direct inhibitory effects on tumor cell proliferation, survival, invasiveness, and angiogenic potential. Nonetheless, given its immune-regulatory functions, the effects of IL-27 on cancer may be dual and protumor effects may also occur. Here, we will summarize IL-27 biological activities and its functional overlaps with the IFNs and discuss its dual role in tumors in the light of potential applications to cancer immunotherapy. PMID:28255204

  19. Clinical effects of laser immunotherapy on metastatic cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Mark F.; Lam, Anh K.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Chen, Wei R.

    2016-03-01

    Clinical trials of late-stage breast cancer patients and late-stage melanoma patients treated by laser immunotherapy (LIT) have shown promising results. In a 2010 study of Li et al, eleven late-stage melanoma patients received LIT in one or multiple 6-week treatment cycles applied to a 200-cm2 treatment site, which usually contained multiple cutaneous metastases. Long-term, positive response was observed in six patients. All lesions in the treatment area of the patients responded to LIT, eight of which achieved complete local response (CLR). CLR was observed in the non-treatment site (regional) lesions in four patients. Five patients were still alive at the time of last follow-up. The probability of 12-month overall survival was 70%.2 In 2011, Li et al, treated ten late stage breast cancer patients with LIT.1 In 8 patients available for evaluation, the objective response rate was 62.5% and the clinical beneficial response rate was 75%.1 This review demonstrates that LIT is safe and well tolerated, so it can be easily applied on an outpatient basis and can be combined with other pharmaceutical modalities to improve the therapeutic response of metastatic cancers.

  20. Immunotherapies for Neurological Manifestations in the Context of Systemic Autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampylafka, Eleni I; Alexopoulos, Harry; Dalakas, Marinos C; Tzioufas, Athanasios G

    2016-01-01

    Neurological involvement is relatively common in the majority of systemic autoimmune diseases and may lead to severe morbidity and mortality, if not promptly treated. Treatment options vary greatly, depending on the underlying systemic pathophysiology and the associated neurological symptoms. Selecting the appropriate therapeutic scheme is further complicated by the lack of definite therapeutic guidelines, the necessity to differentiate primary neurological syndromes from those related to the underlying systemic disease, and to sort out adverse neurological manifestations caused by immunosuppressants or the biological agents used to treat the primary disease. Immunotherapy is a sine qua non for treating most, if not all, neurological conditions presenting in the context of systemic autoimmunity. Specific agents include classical immune modulators such as corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, intravenous immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, as well as numerous biological therapies, for example anti-tumor necrosis factor agents and monoclonal antibodies that target various immune pathways such as B cells, cytokines, and co-stimulatory molecules. However, experience regarding the use of these agents in neurological complications of systemic diseases is mainly empirical or based on small uncontrolled studies and case series. The aim of this review is to present the state-of-the-art therapies applied in various neurological manifestations encountered in the context of systemic autoimmune diseases; evaluate all treatment options on the basis of existing guidelines; and compliment these data with our personal experience derived from a large number of patients.

  1. Seed-based oral vaccines as allergen-specific immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaiwa, Fumio

    2011-03-01

    Plant-based vaccines have advantages over conventional vaccines in terms of scalability, lack of requirement for cold chain logistics, stability, safety, cost-effectiveness and needle-free administration. In particular, when antigen is expressed in seeds, high production is possible and immunogenicity is not lost even if stocked at ambient temperature for several years. Induction of immune tolerance (desensitization) to allergen is a principle strategy for controlling allergic diseases, and is generally carried out by subcutaneous injection. Seed-based oral administration offers a straightforward and inexpensive alternative approach to deliver vaccines effectively to the GALT without loss of activity. Consumption of transgenic seeds containing modified hypo-allergenic tolerogen or T-cell epitope peptides derived from allergens has no or very few severe side effects and can induce immune tolerance leading to reduction of allergen-specific IgE production, T-cell proliferation and release of histamine. Suppression of allergen-specific clinical symptoms results. Thus, seed-based allergy vaccines offer an innovative and convenient allergen-specific immunotherapeutic approach as an alternative to conventional allergen-specific immunotherapy.

  2. The special challenge of nonadherence with sublingual immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Bruce G; Oppenheimer, John

    2014-01-01

    Patient nonadherence is a problem that impacts all chronic illness treatments. To determine the degree of nonadherence and its impact on treatment effect in sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), we conducted a systematic review of published research that assessed adherence or tested interventions to improve SLIT adherence. Adherence to SLIT is similar to other long-term therapies. Across studies, 55% to 82% of patients abandoned SLIT before completing the recommended course of therapy. Only 1 study attempted to test an educational intervention to improve SLIT adherence. Composite evidence indicates that 3 to 5 years of sustained SLIT is required for full long-term benefits, but fewer than half of the patients on SLIT persist to that point. Surprisingly little research has addressed the consequence of partial adherence, including implication to its cost-benefit profile or strategies to improve adherence. Lessons from research into treatments of other chronic health conditions suggest several adherence interventions that may be applied to SLIT, including strategic use of communication and education tools, incorporation of standardized follow-up visits, and employment of telecommunication technologies.

  3. Rationale for anti-OX40 cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; Rusakiewicz, Sylvie; Soria, Jean-Charles; Zitvogel, Laurence; Marabelle, Aurélien

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint blockade with antagonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting B7 immunoglobulin superfamily molecules (CTLA-4, PD-1, and PD-L1) generate long lasting anti-tumour immune responses translating into clinical benefit across many cancer types. However, many patients are primarily resistant to immune checkpoint blockade -based monotherapy and many others will eventually relapse. Therefore, new immunostimulatory targets are needed to overcome primary and secondary resistance to immunotherapy. Besides the B7 co-inhibitory receptors, the tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily contains many other immune checkpoints, which could become the next generation immunomodulators. Among them stands OX40 (CD134), a co-stimulatory molecule that can be expressed by activated immune cells. Several anti-OX40 agonistic monoclonal antibodies are currently tested in early phase cancer clinical trials. Accumulating preclinical evidence supports their clinical development. However, conflicting results and controversies between in vitro and in vivo data point to the need for comprehensive ancillary studies to be performed in upcoming clinical trials to better understand the mechanism of action of anti-OX40 mAbs-based therapy.

  4. Assays for predicting and monitoring responses to lung cancer immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Teixid; Niki Karachaliou; Maria Gonzlez-Cao; Daniela Morales-Espinosa; Rafael Rosell

    2015-01-01

    AbstrAct Immunotherapy has become a key strategy for cancer treatment, and two immune checkpoints, namely, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1), have recently emerged as important targets. hTe interaction blockade of PD-1 and PD-L1 demonstrated promising activity and antitumor effcacy in early phase clinical trials for advanced solid tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Many cell types in multiple tissues express PD-L1 as well as several tumor types, thereby suggesting that the ligand may play important roles in inhibiting immune responses throughout the body. hTerefore, PD-L1 is a critical immunomodulating component within the lung microenvironment, but the correlation between PD-L1 expression and prognosis is controversial. More evidence is required to support the use of PD-L1 as a potential predictive biomarker. Clinical trials have measured PD-L1 in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with different antibodies, but the assessment of PD-L1 is not yet standardized. Some commercial antibodies lack speciifcity and their reproducibility has not been fully evaluated. Further studies are required to clarify the optimal IHC assay as well as to predict and monitor the immune responses of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway.

  5. Novel Antibody-Based Proteins for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuenmayor, Jaheli; Montaño, Ramon F., E-mail: jfuenmay@ivic.gob.ve [Laboratorio de Patología Celular y Molecular, Centro de Medicina Experimental, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas. Caracas, 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2011-08-19

    The relative success of monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy and the vast manipulation potential of recombinant antibody technology have encouraged the development of novel antibody-based antitumor proteins. Many insightful reagents have been produced, mainly guided by studies on the mechanisms of action associated with complete and durable remissions, results from experimental animal models, and our current knowledge of the human immune system. Strikingly, only a small percent of these new reagents has demonstrated clinical value. Tumor burden, immune evasion, physiological resemblance, and cell plasticity are among the challenges that cancer therapy faces, and a number of antibody-based proteins are already available to deal with many of them. Some of these novel reagents have been shown to specifically increase apoptosis/cell death of tumor cells, recruit and activate immune effectors, and reveal synergistic effects not previously envisioned. In this review, we look into different approaches that have been followed during the past few years to produce these biologics and analyze their relative success, mainly in terms of their clinical performance. The use of antibody-based antitumor proteins, in combination with standard or novel therapies, is showing significant improvements in objective responses, suggesting that these reagents will become important components of the antineoplastic protocols of the future.

  6. Tumor-Associated Antigens for Specific Immunotherapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiessling, Andrea [Biologics Safety and Disposition, Preclinical Safety, Translational Sciences, Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Novartis Pharma AG, Werk Klybeck, Klybeckstraße 141, Basel CH-4057 (Switzerland); Wehner, Rebekka [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Füssel, Susanne [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Bachmann, Michael [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Wirth, Manfred P. [Department of Urology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Schmitz, Marc, E-mail: marc.schmitz@tu-dresden.de [Institute of Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Technology Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, Dresden 01307 (Germany)

    2012-02-22

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common noncutaneous cancer diagnosis and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Effective treatment modalities for advanced metastatic PCa are limited. Immunotherapeutic strategies based on T cells and antibodies represent interesting approaches to prevent progression from localized to advanced PCa and to improve survival outcomes for patients with advanced disease. CD8{sup +} cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) efficiently recognize and destroy tumor cells. CD4{sup +} T cells augment the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells and promote the expansion of tumor-reactive CTLs. Antibodies mediate their antitumor effects via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, activation of the complement system, improving the uptake of coated tumor cells by phagocytes, and the functional interference of biological pathways essential for tumor growth. Consequently, several tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) have been identified that represent promising targets for T cell- or antibody-based immunotherapy. These TAAs comprise proteins preferentially expressed in normal and malignant prostate tissues and molecules which are not predominantly restricted to the prostate, but are overexpressed in various tumor entities including PCa. Clinical trials provide evidence that specific immunotherapeutic strategies using such TAAs represent safe and feasible concepts for the induction of immunological and clinical responses in PCa patients. However, further improvement of the current approaches is required which may be achieved by combining T cell- and/or antibody-based strategies with radio-, hormone-, chemo- or antiangiogenic therapy.

  7. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liechtenstein, Therese, E-mail: t.liechtenstein.12@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Perez-Janices, Noemi; Escors, David [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Navarrabiomed Fundacion Miguel Servet, 3 Irunlarrea St., Hospital Complex of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2013-07-02

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  8. Sipuleucel-T: immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olson BM

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Brian M Olson, Douglas G McNeelUniversity of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USAAbstract: Prostate cancer continues to be one of the most serious afflictions of men of advanced age, remaining the most commonly diagnosed and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. The treatment options for patients with incurable metastatic, castrate-resistant disease have long focused on various chemotherapeutic approaches, which provide a slight survival benefit while being associated with potentially significant side effects. However, the recent approval of sipuleucel-T has given patients with advanced disease an additional treatment option that has demonstrated benefit without the side effects associated with chemotherapy. Sipuleucel-T is an antigen-presenting cell-based active immunotherapy that utilizes a patient's own immune cells, presumably to activate an antigen-specific immune response against tumor cells. This review focuses on the development and implementation of sipuleucel-T as a therapy for prostate cancer. Specifically, we present some of the issues associated with the management of advanced prostate cancer, the research and development that led to the approval of sipuleucel-T, how the approval of sipuleucel-T could change the clinical management of prostate cancer, and current and future areas of investigation that are being pursued with regard to sipuleucel-T and other treatments for advanced prostate cancer.Keywords: sipuleucel-T, prostatic acid phosphatase, granulocyte-macrophage colonystimulating factor

  9. Sipuleucel-T: immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Brian M; McNeel, Douglas G

    2011-05-03

    Prostate cancer continues to be one of the most serious afflictions of men of advanced age, remaining the most commonly diagnosed and second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in American men. The treatment options for patients with incurable metastatic, castrate-resistant disease have long focused on various chemotherapeutic approaches, which provide a slight survival benefit while being associated with potentially significant side effects. However, the recent approval of sipuleucel-T has given patients with advanced disease an additional treatment option that has demonstrated benefit without the side effects associated with chemotherapy. Sipuleucel-T is an antigen-presenting cell-based active immunotherapy that utilizes a patient's own immune cells, presumably to activate an antigen-specific immune response against tumor cells. This review focuses on the development and implementation of sipuleucel-T as a therapy for prostate cancer. Specifically, we present some of the issues associated with the management of advanced prostate cancer, the research and development that led to the approval of sipuleucel-T, how the approval of sipuleucel-T could change the clinical management of prostate cancer, and current and future areas of investigation that are being pursued with regard to sipuleucel-T and other treatments for advanced prostate cancer.

  10. New Roads Open Up for Implementing Immunotherapy in Mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cornelissen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment options for malignant mesothelioma are limited, and the results with conventional therapies have been rather disappointing to this date. Chemotherapy is the only evidence-based treatment for mesothelioma patients in good clinical condition, with an increase in median survival of only 2 months. Therefore, there is urgent need for a different approach to battle this malignancy. As chronic inflammation precedes mesothelioma, the immune system plays a key role in the initiation of this type of tumour. Also, many immunological cell types can be found within the tumour at different stages of the disease. However, mesothelioma cells can evade the surveillance capacity of the immune system. They build a protective tumour microenvironment to harness themselves against the immune system's attacks, in which they even abuse immune cells to act against the antitumour immune response. In our opinion, modulating the immune system simultaneously with the targeting of mesothelioma tumour cells might prove to be a superior treatment. However, this strategy is challenging since the tumour microenvironment possesses numerous forms of defence strategies. In this paper, we will discuss the interplay between immunological cells that can either inhibit or stimulate tumour growth and the challenges associated with immunotherapy. We will provide possible strategies and discuss opportunities to overcome these problems.

  11. Immunotherapy in the management of melanoma: current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alston D

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Dylan Alston,1 Jerry D Brewer21Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL, 2Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: As the rate of melanoma continues to increase, so does the need for more effective and durable therapies. Despite considerable research, the management of advanced disease remains challenging. Numerous therapies are being investigated, many of which aim at upregulating the immune system's innate ability to attack the tumor. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 antibodies are immune stimulants that act as negative regulators of the immune system by modifying an antitumor T-cell response. Ipilimumab, one such cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 antibody, and vemurafenib, a BRAF competitive inhibitor, were approved as first-line therapies in 2011 due to improved survival rates versus standard chemotherapy. Allovectin-7 is a lipid plasmid that encodes for major histone compatibility complex DNA sequences. It has led to increases in cytotoxic T-cell production, which subsequently attacks the tumor. OncoVEX, an oncolytic herpes virus, and PV-10, a chemoablative agent, have yielded promising results in metastatic lesions and have demonstrated a unique "bystandarder" phenomenon. In this paper we review the basics of melanoma from the pathophysiology, risk factors, signs, diagnostic approaches, and current status of immunologic management of melanoma.Keywords: melanoma, immunotherapy, ipilimumab, vemurafenib, OncoVEX, Allovectin-7

  12. Evaluation of effectiveness of specific subcutaneous immunotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis and asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Zandkarimi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergen immunotherapy involves the administration of gradually increasing quantities of specific allergens to patients with IgE-mediated conditions until a dose is reached that is effective in reducing disease severity from natural exposure. This study evaluated the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy with extracts of common aeroallergens North-East of Iran in asthma and allergic rhinitis. Material and Methods: In this prospective study 156 cases were chosen randomley. The mean age of patients was 37 years (range 5-65 years. The patients with mild to moderate asthma and allergic rhinitis and history of atopy were selected for immunotherapy when they showed no effective response to medical treatment.Immunotherapy materials were made from common aeroallergens in north-eastern region of Iran by Dome Hollister US company. Immunotherapy schedule for injection of the extract with vial dilution of 1:10000pg was one injection every week for ten weeks and one injection with dilution of 1:1000pg every other week for the other ten weeks and one injection monthly from dilution of 1:100pg for two years. Results: One hundred twenty (77% of cases had allergic rhinitis 29(18.5% cases had allergic asthma and 7(4.5% cases were mixed. Mean age of patients were 37 years old. 48(30.8% cases were male. Analysis of efficacy of treatment showed that immunotherapy significantlyimproved the signs and symptoms of all the groups. In allergic rhinitis group 84(70% cases completely improved, 22(18.4% patients moderately responded and no response to immunotherapy was observed in 14(11.6% patients. In allergic asthma group, 22(75% cases completely improved 4(13.6% cases moderately responded and no response to immunotherapy was detected in 3(11.4% cases. In mixed group, 3(42.8% cases completely improved, 3(42.8% cases moderately responded and no response was observed in 1(14.4% case. Conclusion: Specific allergen immunotherapy for patients with allergic persistent

  13. Induction of cytotoxic T lymphocyte respones in vivo after immunotherapy with dendritic cells in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAN MIN ZUO; LING ZHOU; ZHI JIAN CHEN; DE RUI LI; QI WANG; JIONG YU CHEN; ZHAN WANG; SHU QING YE; YI ZENG

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the efficacy of immunotherapy with dendritic cells to elicit EBV-specific CTL-immunity in advanced cases of EBV-positive patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and to determine the safety and toxicity of this preparation. Nine cases of histologically confirmed patients with NPC undergoing treatment with radiological therapy were enrolled in this study. Dendritic cells, generated in vitro from blood monocytes of patients were cultured and matured with cytokines and then infected with recombinant adenovirus vaccine containing EBV-latent membrane protein-2 (Ad-LMP2). On 9 days' cultivation of cells, the matured DCs were harvested, irradiated with 60Co and then injected intradermally to patients with NPC. The injections were performed 3 times totally. After immunization, the CTL responses were assayed by means of cytotoxicity and epitope-specific IFN-γ production. The results of this trial showed that all patients could tolerate this kind of treatment without any side effect, during which marked increase of LMP2-specific CTL-responses could be demonstrated in 5 patients of this group. And the level of IgA/VCA antibody decreased in 8 of 9 patients, thus accounting for a better prognosis for these patients. All patients will be followed up for another one year. At least, the present work shows that intradermal vaccination with autologous DCs infected with recombinant Ad-LMP2 adenovirus is a safe procedure in NPC patients, in which this procedure can enhance the LMP2-specific CTL responses in patients. These data are encouraging to develop more effective vaccine strategies for the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  14. Rush allergen specific immunotherapy protocol in feline atopic dermatitis: a pilot study of four cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmer, Ann M; Griffin, Craig E; Boord, Mona J; Rosenkrantz, Wayne S

    2005-10-01

    Rush immunotherapy has been shown to be as safe as conventional immunotherapy in canine atopic patients. Rush immunotherapy has not been reported in the feline atopic patient. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine a safe protocol for rush immunotherapy in feline atopic patients. Four atopic cats diagnosed by history, physical examination and exclusion of appropriate differential diagnoses were included in the study. Allergens were identified via liquid phase immunoenzymatic testing (VARL: Veterinary Allergy Reference Labs, Pasadena, CA). Cats were premedicated with 1.5 mg triamcinolone orally 24 and 2 h prior to first injection and 10 mg hydroxyzine PO 24, 12 and 2 h prior to first injection. An intravenous catheter was placed prior to first injection. Allergen extracts (Greer Laboratories, Lenoir, North Carolina) were all administered subcutaneously at increasing protein nitrogen units (pnu) every 30 minutes for 5 h to maintenance dose of 15,000 pnus ml-1. Vital signs were assessed every 15 minutes. Two cats developed mild pruritus and the subsequent injection was delayed 30 minutes. No changes in either cat's vital signs were noted, nor was there any further pruritus. All four cats successfully completed rush immunotherapy. Two cats developed a dermal swelling on the dorsal neck one week later. In these four cats, this protocol appeared to be a safe regimen to reach maintenance therapy. A larger sample of feline patients is needed to determine the incidence of adverse reactions and to follow the success of ASIT based upon this method of induction.

  15. Prussian blue nanoparticle-based photothermal therapy combined with checkpoint inhibition for photothermal immunotherapy of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Mejia, Juliana; Burga, Rachel A; Sweeney, Elizabeth E; Fisher, John P; Bollard, Catherine M; Sandler, Anthony D; Cruz, Conrad Russell Y; Fernandes, Rohan

    2017-02-01

    We describe "photothermal immunotherapy," which combines Prussian blue nanoparticle (PBNP)-based photothermal therapy (PTT) with anti-CTLA-4 checkpoint inhibition for treating neuroblastoma, a common, hard-to-treat pediatric cancer. PBNPs exhibit pH-dependent stability, which makes them suitable for intratumorally-administered PTT. PBNP-based PTT is able to lower tumor burden and prime an immune response, specifically an increased infiltration of lymphocytes and T cells to the tumor area, which is complemented by the antitumor effects of anti-CTLA-4 immunotherapy, providing a more durable treatment against neuroblastoma in an animal model. We observe 55.5% survival in photothermal immunotherapy-treated mice at 100days compared to 12.5%, 0%, 0%, and 0% survival in mice receiving: anti-CTLA-4 alone, PBNPs alone, PTT alone, and no treatment, respectively. Additionally, long-term surviving, photothermal immunotherapy-treated mice exhibit protection against neuroblastoma rechallenge, suggesting the development of immunity against these tumors. Our findings suggest the potential of photothermal immunotherapy in improving treatments for neuroblastoma.

  16. Aluminium adjuvants and adverse events in sub-cutaneous allergy immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-20

    Sub-cutaneous immunotherapy is an effective treatment for allergy. It works by helping to modify or re-balance an individual's immune response to allergens and its efficacy is greatly improved by the use of adjuvants, most commonly, aluminium hydroxide. Aluminium salts have been used in allergy therapy for many decades and are assumed to be safe with few established side-effects. This assumption belies their potency as adjuvants and their potential for biological reactivity both at injection sites and elsewhere in the body. There are very few data purporting to the safety of aluminium adjuvants in allergy immunotherapy and particularly so in relation to longer term health effects. There are, if only few, published reports of adverse events following allergy immunotherapy and aluminium adjuvants are the prime suspects in the majority of such incidents. Aluminium adjuvants are clearly capable of initiating unwanted side effects in recipients of immunotherapy and while there is as yet no evidence that such are commonplace it is complacent to consider aluminium salts as harmless constituents of allergy therapies. Future research should establish the safety of the use of aluminium adjuvants in sub-cutaneous allergy immunotherapy.

  17. An epitope common to gangliosides O-acetyl-GD3 and GD3 recognized by antibodies in melanoma patients after active specific immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindranath, M H; Morton, D L; Irie, R F

    1989-07-15

    GD3 is a major ganglioside of human melanoma and was shown to be an effective target for passive immunotherapy with murine monoclonal antibodies. It was noted earlier that GD3 neither purified nor in melanoma cell vaccine (MCV), could elicit an antibody response in melanoma patients. In this study, we demonstrate that melanoma patients who received MCV had autoantibodies against a derivative of GD3, O-acetylated GD3 (O-AcGD3), a minor ganglioside expressed on human melanoma cells, and that the antibodies cross-reacted with GD3. Thin layer chromatographic immunostaining revealed that all of the sera containing antibodies against O-AcGD3 also reacted to GD3. None of the other sera responded only to GD3, although the MCV contained 7- to 12-fold higher GD3 than O-AcGD3. Furthermore, the antibody activity was completely abolished by absorption with animal erythrocytes expressing either O-acetyl disialogangliosides or GD3, indicating that the antibodies recognize an epitope commonly shared by GD3 and O-AcGD3. The antibodies bound only to the sialyloligosaccharide moiety but not to the ceramide portion of GD3 after endoglycosylceramidase treatment. The antibodies failed to bind to GD3 after neuraminidase treatment. These results indicate that the sialyloligosaccharides of the gangliosides are important components of the epitope. Periodate oxidation abolished reactivity of the antibodies to GD3 but not that to O-AcGD3, revealing that the glycerol side chain of the sialic acids in both GD3s was an important structure of the epitope. The binding of the antibodies to melanoma cell surface gangliosides was confirmed by an absorption with a GD3- and O-AcGD3-positive melanoma cell line. These results in the light of previous reports on the inability of GD3 to elicit immune response in humans suggest that anti-GD3 antibodies found in the melanoma patients were induced by immunization with O-AcGD3 and O-AcGD3 present in the MCV would serve as an antigen source for GD3-targeted

  18. A stronger patch test elicitation reaction to the allergen hydroxycitronellal plus the irritant sodium lauryl sulfate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, S; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Johansen, Jeanne Duus;

    2003-01-01

    elicitation reaction than patch testing with the allergen (hydroxycitronellal) alone, in patients previously patch tested positive to hydroxycitronellal. A stronger patch test elicitation reaction was defined as at least 1 day of patch test reading showing more positive patch tests...

  19. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of sublingual immunotherapy in children with house dust mite allergy in primary care : study design and recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bot, Cindy M. A.; Moed, Heleen; Berger, Marjolein Y.; Roder, Esther; de Groot, Hans; de Jongste, Johan C.; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; van der Wouden, Johannes C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: For respiratory allergic disorders in children, sublingual immunotherapy has been developed as an alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Sublingual immunotherapy is more convenient, has a good safety profile and might be an attractive option for use in primary care. A randomized doub

  20. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of sublingual immunotherapy in children with house dust mite allergy in primary care: Study design and recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M.A. de Bot (Cindy); H. Moed (Heleen); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein); E. Röder (Esther); H. de Groot (Hans); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); R. Gerth van Wijk (Roy); J.C. van der Wouden (Hans)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. For respiratory allergic disorders in children, sublingual immunotherapy has been developed as an alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy. Sublingual immunotherapy is more convenient, has a good safety profile and might be an attractive option for use in primary care. A ran

  1. Research Dilemmas Associated with Photo Elicitation in Comparative Early Childhood Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Asta

    2013-01-01

    Photo elicitation has become an important method to produce data in qualitative research. There is quite an extensive literature indicating the benefits of photo elicitation in order to facilitate collaboration in meaning making between researcher and the interviewee. This article addresses dilemmas associated with using photo elicitation in a…

  2. A Rare Thyroid Metastasis from Uveal Melanoma and Response to Immunotherapy Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Dearbhaile Catherine; Yela, Ruben; Horgan, Noel; Power, Derek Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid metastasis is a rare occurrence with cutaneous melanoma and even more uncommon with uveal melanoma. The management of such metastasis is uncertain due to its infrequency and, in the era of immunotherapy, the effect of these novel drugs on uncommon metastasis, such as to the thyroid, is unknown. We report the rare case of a thyroid metastasis in a patient diagnosed with ocular melanoma initially managed with enucleation. Metastatic disease developed in the lung and thyroid gland. The case patient received the immunotherapy ipilimumab with stable disease in the thyroid and progressive disease elsewhere. The patient was then further treated with a second immunotherapy agent, pembrolizumab, and remains with stable disease one year later. We discuss the current literature on thyroid metastases from all causes and the optimal known management strategies. Furthermore, we provide an original report on the response of this disease to the novel immunomodulators, ipilimumab, and pembrolizumab with stable disease four years after initial diagnosis of ocular melanoma.

  3. Response to immunotherapy in a patient with Landau-Kleffner syndrome and GRIN2A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainberg, Nina; Harper, Amy; Tchapyjnikov, Dmitry; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2016-03-01

    Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) has been demonstrated in the past to respond to immunotherapy. Recently, some cases of LKS have been shown to be secondary to glutamate receptor (GRIN2A) mutations. Whether such cases respond to immunotherapy is not known. Here, we present the case of a 3-year-old boy with LKS found to have a GRIN2A heterozygous missense mutation, whose clinical symptoms and EEG responded to a course of combination oral steroids and monthly infusions of intravenous immunoglobulin. He then relapsed after discontinuation of this therapy, and responded again after a second course of intravenous immunoglobulin. We conclude that immunotherapy should be considered as a therapeutic option in patients with LKS who are also found to harbour GRIN2A mutations.

  4. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jo A.; Jochems, Caroline [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Gulley, James L. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Schlom, Jeffrey, E-mail: js141c@nih.gov; Tsang, Kwong Y. [Laboratory of Tumor Immunology and Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2012-12-11

    Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  5. Overall survival after immunotherapy, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and surgery in treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Lichtenberg, Trine Honnens; Hermann, Gregers G.; Rorth, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    -three consecutive mRCC patients were given immunotherapy (n = 59), TKIs (n = 49) or sequential therapy (IMM→TKI group; n = 35). The TKI group included patients with higher age (p ... of metastases and sites and tumour histology did not differ between groups. Results. First line immunotherapy gave a median OS of 16.3 months and first line TKIs 10.9 months (p = 0.003). Survival longer than 5 years was limited to immunotherapy. Sarcomatoid component, metastatic sites, papillary histology......, stage, performance status and white cell blood count were related to poor OS. Using multivariate analyses to adjust for risk predictors the difference in OS disappeared. Median OS before and after introduction of TKIs was 16 months and 14 months, respectively (p = 0.189). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer...

  6. Immunotherapy: Shifting the Balance of Cell-Mediated Immunity and Suppression in Human Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Schlom

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Active immunotherapy is dependent on the ability of the immune system to recognize and respond to tumors. Despite overwhelming evidence to support a cell-mediated immune response to prostate cancer, it is insufficient to eradicate the disease. This is likely due to a high level of suppression at the tumor site from a variety of sources, including immunosuppressive cells. Immune cells entering the tumor microenvironment may be inhibited directly by the tumor, stromal cells or other immune cells that have been induced to adopt a suppressive phenotype. The resurgence of interest in immunotherapy following the approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab by the Food and Drug Administration has brought about new strategies for overcoming tumor-mediated suppression and bolstering anti-tumor responses. Improved understanding of the immune response to prostate cancer can lead to new combination therapies, such as the use of vaccine with small molecule and checkpoint inhibitors or other immunotherapies.

  7. Use of new technology to improve utilization and adherence to immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Smita; Dimov, Ves

    2014-01-01

    Technology and social media have dramatically altered the landscape in which we practice medicine. Clinicians have increasingly turned to technology and the internet to enhance patient care. Allergists have used these modalities to improve utilization and adherence to immunotherapy. Electronic medical records (EMRs) are being widely adopted by allergy practices and some offer allergy/immunology specific modules that aid in daily workflow. The development of specialized devices that reduce pain associated with immunotherapy administration may improve compliance with immunotherapy. Social media and other forms of electronic communication such as e-mail, Facebook, Twitter, short message service (SMS), and YouTube give clinicians multiple avenues to disseminate information and reach their patients, possibly improving patient adherence to therapy. Finally, tablet computers, online networks, and electronic surveys provide additional ways to connect patients and physicians.

  8. Targeted immunotherapy of cancer with CAR T cells: achievements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Gilham, David E; Hawkins, Robert E; Rothwell, Dominic G

    2012-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells is a relatively new but promising approach in the field of cancer immunotherapy. This therapeutic strategy is based on the genetic reprogramming of T cells with an artificial immune receptor that redirects them against targets on malignant cells and enables their destruction by exerting T cell effector functions. There has been an explosion of interest in the use of CAR T cells as an immunotherapy for cancer. In the pre-clinical setting, there has been a considerable focus upon optimizing the structural and signaling potency of the CAR while advances in bio-processing technology now mean that the clinical testing of these gene-modified T cells has become a reality. This review will summarize the concept of CAR-based immunotherapy and recent clinical trial activity and will further discuss some of the likely future challenges facing CAR-modified T cell therapies.

  9. The effect of a new communication template on anticipated willingness to initiate or resume allergen immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderon, Moises A; Cox, Linda; Casale, Thomas B;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A patient's knowledge of his/her allergic condition and treatment is a key factor in adherence and effectiveness. METHODS: To assess patients' understanding of allergy and acceptance of allergen immunotherapy on the basis of (i) information given by their physician at the time...... of prescription and (ii) a new communication template viewed some months later, we performed an Internet-based survey of patient panels in France, Germany, Spain, the USA and Russia. The survey participants were either recent "early abandoners" (having discontinued allergen immunotherapy before the end...... of the prescribed course) or "non-starters" (having decided not to initiate a course of allergen immunotherapy recommended by their physician). All participants completed an on-line questionnaire immediately before and immediately after viewing the new communication template. The study's main objectives were...

  10. SAPHO syndrome with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumaru, Katsuhiko; Nagai, Kazuki; Murakami, Takayuki; Andoh, Kazuo

    2010-08-31

    The authors describe a case of SAPHO syndrome with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy for bladder cancer. The patient had undergone transurethral resection (TUR) and was treated with BCG immunotherapy following TUR. Two years after treatment for bladder cancer, the patient had palmoplantar pustulosis, and in the past 1 month suffered from pain localised to the anterior chest wall. The bone scintigraphy showed a strong focal enrichment in the right chest wall, suggesting spondyloarthropathy rather than malignant disease. On the basis of clinical and scintigraphy findings, SAPHO syndrome was diagnosed. The patient was treated with topical therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and symptoms improved. The authors suggest that SAPHO syndrome might be caused by an association with BCG immunotherapy.

  11. Immunotherapy for genitourinary cancer: state of the art and new perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattrini, Carlo; Dellepiane, Chiara; Cavo, Alessia; Buzzatti, Giulia; Tolomeo, Francesco; Messina, Carlo; Boccardo, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    In the last few years, cancer immunotherapy has changed the natural history and treatment strategies of a number of solid tumors, including melanoma and lung cancer. The anti-PD-1 nivolumab showed a survival benefit compared with everolimus in the second-line treatment of renal cell carcinoma, resulting in a radical shift in perspective in the treatment of this neoplasia and suggesting a new scenario beyond tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Checkpoint inhibitors might also improve the treatment of urothelial cancer, considering the promising results achieved so far and the relatively low efficacy of currently available treatments. Sipuleucel-T was the first approved immunotherapy for prostate cancer, showing a clear benefit in overall survival, and paved the way for the clinical testing of other novel cancer vaccines. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge and new perspectives of immunotherapy in the treatment of urogenital malignancies.

  12. A novel series of conferences tackling the hurdles confronting the translation of novel cancer immunotherapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bot Adrian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While there has been significant progress in advancing novel immune therapies to the bedside, much more needs to be done to fully tap into the potential of the immune system. It has become increasingly clear that besides practical and operational challenges, the heterogeneity of cancer and the limited efficacy profile of current immunotherapy platforms are the two main hurdles. Nevertheless, the promising clinical data of several approaches point to a roadmap that carries the promise to significantly advance cancer immunotherapy. A new annual series sponsored by Arrowhead Publishers and Conferences aims at bringing together scientific and business leadership from academia and industry, to identify, share and discuss most current priorities in research and translation of novel immune interventions. This Editorial provides highlights of the first event held earlier this year and outlines the focus of the second meeting to be held in 2013 that will be dedicated to stem cells and immunotherapy.

  13. The development of mathematical creativity through model-eliciting activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M. Wessels

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to think creatively and solve problems is regarded as crucial for economic and personal success. The traditional approach in classrooms is not conducive to mathematical creativity, and prospective teachers should be exposed to alternative problem solving activities through which mathematical knowledge, competencies and creativity can be developed. Research studies have pointed out the possibilities and successes of a modelling approach in which complex, open problems or model-eliciting problems are used to develop meaningful mathematical knowledge and prepare learners for everyday life, as well as for tertiary studies and their occupations. Model-eliciting activities (MEAs do not only develop mathematical knowledge, but also creativity. Five hundred and one preservice Foundation Phase teachers completed different model-eliciting activities (MEAs in a longitudinal project over a period of two years. The purpose was to develop and consolidate their own mathematical knowledge, and at the same time develop creativity and modelling competencies. The ultimate purpose of the project is to prepare preservice teachers to use mathematical modelling to develop creativity in young children aged six to nine. Through solving MEAs learners also build and consolidate their mathematical knowledge and improve their own problem-solving abilities. A framework with four criteria for the identification of creativity was successfully used to evaluate levels of creativity in the solutions offered to the MEAs. Preservice teachers’ final models displayed reasonably consistent levels of creativity regarding the four criteria. Their willingness to solve MEAs and create multiple, original and useful – therefore creative – solutions also increased over the period of their exposure to modelling tasks.

  14. Nicotine elicits prolonged calcium signaling along ventral hippocampal axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chongbo; Talmage, David A; Role, Lorna W

    2013-01-01

    Presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have long been implicated in the modulation of CNS circuits. We previously reported that brief exposure to low concentrations of nicotine induced sustained potentiation of glutamatergic transmission at ventral hippocampal (vHipp)-striatal synapses. Here, we exploited nAChR subtype-selective antagonists and agonists and α7*nAChR knockout mutant mice (α7-/-) to elucidate the signaling mechanisms underlying nAChR-mediated modulation of synaptic transmission. Using a combination of micro-slices culture from WT and α7-/-mice, calcium imaging, and immuno-histochemical techniques, we found that nicotine elicits localized and oscillatory increases in intracellular Ca(2+) along vHipp axons that persists for up to 30 minutes. The sustained phase of the nicotine-induced Ca(2+) response was blocked by α-BgTx but not by DHβE and was mimicked by α7*nAChR agonists but not by non-α7*nAChR agonists. In vHipp slices from α7-/- mice, nicotine elicited only transient increases of axonal Ca(2+) signals and did not activate CaMKII. The sustained phase of the nicotine-induced Ca(2+) response required localized activation of CaMKII, phospholipase C, and IP3 receptor mediated Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). In conclusion, activation of presynaptic nAChRs by nicotine elicits Ca(2+) influx into the presynaptic axons, the sustained phase of the nicotine-induced Ca(2+) response requires that axonal α7*nAChR activate a downstream signaling network in the vHipp axons.

  15. Integrating Effectiveness, Transparency and Fairness into a Value Elicitation Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortier, Michael; Sheng, Grant [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada). Faculty of Environmental Studies; Collins, Alison [York Centre for Applied Sustainability, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    As part of the evaluation of Canada's proposed nuclear fuel waste disposal concept, the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Panel (FEARP) undertook an extensive, nation-wide public hearing process. The hearing process itself was contentious and has been criticized on numerous grounds. It is our contention that the fundamental weakness of the FEARP process was that it was designed as an information-based forum, as opposed to a value-based forum.' Our observations and analyses of these hearings indicate that the FEARP envisioned a different purpose and a different outcome of this process than the public in general. As a result, public acceptability for the Concept or even the assessment process itself was not garnered due to a failure in the process to identify, address and incorporate values. To address this, we proposed a seven-step value elicitation process specifically designed to assess public acceptability of the disposal concept. An unfortunate consequence of the flawed public consultation process employed by the FEARP is that it is unclear exactly what it is the public finds unacceptable. Both from discussions and observations, it is difficult to ascertain whether the unacceptability lies with the Concept itself and/or the process by which the Concept was to be assessed. As a result, there is uncertainty as to what questions should be asked and how should the 'unacceptability' be addressed. In other words, does Canada need a new concept? Does Canada need to develop a mechanism for assessing the public acceptability of the Concept? Or both? The inability of the current process to answer such fundamental questions demonstrates the importance of developing an effective public acceptability and consultation process. We submit that, to create an acceptable Public Participation mechanism, it is necessary to found the construction of such a mechanism on the principles of effectiveness, transparency and fairness. Moreover, we believe that

  16. Eliciting Audience's Experience to Improve Interactive Art Installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baharin, Hanif; Morrison, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Designing with the users in mind is one of the widely accepted design practices in the Interaction Design field. On the other hand, it can be said that audience's experience is the heart of an interactive art. Since Interaction Design has shown that user's involvement in the design process can...... be beneficial, it is speculated that involving the audiences in the creative process of developing an interactive art piece can make the artist improve the art in general and the audience's experience in particular. In this paper, the experience of eliciting the experience of the audiences of an interactive art...

  17. Exploring the Roles in a Photo Elicitation Dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte Frederikke Rex; Pedersen, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    This paper begins to delineate the different roles in a participatory research setting with a focus of using photography as a medium for an elicitation dialogue. We investigate how others have used photography and we include our own experiences of using photography explaining how it established...... a communication bridge between participants and researchers. Based upon a concluded case, we illustrate how the photographs encourage and contribute to a lively dialogue among the participants. Furthermore, we describe our reflections and considerations of the roles of the photos, the participants...

  18. Eliciting Informative Feedback: The Peer-Prediction Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nolan; Resnick, Paul; Zeckhauser, Richard

    Many recommendation and decision processes depend on eliciting evaluations of opportunities, products, and vendors. A scoring system is devised that induces honest reporting of feedback. Each rater merely reports a signal, and the system applies proper scoring rules to the implied posterior beliefs about another rater's report. Honest reporting proves to be a Nash Equilibrium. The scoring schemes can be scaled to induce appropriate effort by raters and can be extended to handle sequential interaction and continuous signals. We also address a number of practical implementation issues that arise in settings such as academic reviewing and on-line recommender and reputation systems.

  19. Expert Panel Elicitation of Seismicity Following Glaciation in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hora, Stephen; Jensen, Mikael (eds.)

    2005-12-15

    The Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate and the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company have jointly carried out a project on expert panel elicitation on the issue of glacial induced Swedish earthquakes. Following a broad nomination procedure, 5 experts were chosen by a selection committee of 4 professors within Earth sciences disciplines. The 5 experts presented judgments about the frequency of earthquakes greater the magnitude 6 within 10 km for two Swedish sites, Oskarshamn and Forsmark, in connection with a glaciation cycle. The experts' median value vas 0,1 earthquakes for one glaciation cycle.

  20. Understanding, eliciting and negotiating clients' multicultural health beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, L E

    1993-04-01

    People of many cultures explain and treat illness in ways that are different from and that may conflict with the biomedical beliefs and practices on which the American health care system is based. Eliciting clients' health beliefs and negotiating treatment plans with them can help avoid problems caused by discrepancies in belief systems. This article presents three major categories of belief systems commonly found in the United States as well as other countries. Questions designed to discover clients' health beliefs are included, along with guidelines for arriving at plans of care that accommodate those beliefs. Case studies are provided that illustrate this process of negotiation.