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Sample records for anti-cancer target gene

  1. Targeting mitosis for anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudakin, Valery; Yen, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    Basic research that has focused on achieving a mechanistic understanding of mitosis has provided unprecedented molecular and biochemical insights into this highly complex phase of the cell cycle. The discovery process has uncovered an ever-expanding list of novel proteins that orchestrate and coordinate spindle formation and chromosome dynamics during mitosis. That many of these proteins appear to function solely in mitosis makes them ideal targets for the development of mitosis-specific cancer drugs. The clinical successes seen with anti-microtubule drugs such as taxanes and the vinca alkaloids have also encouraged the development of drugs that specifically target mitosis. Drugs that selectively inhibit mitotic kinesins involved in spindle and kinetochore functions, as well as kinases that regulate these activities, are currently in various stages of clinical trials. Our increased understanding of mitosis has also revealed that this process is targeted by inhibitors of farnesyl transferase, histone deacetylase, and Hsp90. Although these drugs were originally designed to block cell proliferation by inhibiting signaling pathways and altering gene expression, it is clear now that these drugs can also directly interfere with the mitotic process. The increased attention to mitosis as a chemotherapeutic target has also raised an important issue regarding the cellular determinants that specify drug sensitivity. One likely contribution is the mitotic checkpoint, a failsafe mechanism that delays mitotic exit so that cells whose chromosomes are not properly attached to the spindle have extra time to correct their errors. As the biochemical activity of the mitotic checkpoint is finite, cells cannot indefinitely sustain the delay, as in cases where cells are treated with anti-mitotic drugs. When the mitotic checkpoint activity is eventually lost, cells will exit mitosis and become aneuploid. While many of the aneuploid cells may die because of massive chromosome imbalance

  2. Mitochondrially targeted anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Biasutto, L.; Dong, L.A.; Zoratti, M.; Neužil, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 6 (2010), s. 670-681 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrial targeting * pro-oxidant effect * reactive oxygen species Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.238, year: 2010

  3. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  4. Absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG): An updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ren-You; Li, Hua-Bin; Sui, Zhong-Quan; Corke, Harold

    2018-04-13

    Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world, especially in Asian countries. Consumption of green tea has been demonstrated to possess many health benefits, which mainly attributed to the main bioactive compound epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a flavone-3-ol polyphenol, in green tea. EGCG is mainly absorbed in the intestine, and gut microbiota play a critical role in its metabolism prior to absorption. EGCG exhibits versatile bioactivities, with its anti-cancer effect most attracting due to the cancer preventive effect of green tea consumption, and a great number of studies intensively investigated its anti-cancer effect. In this review, we therefore, first stated the absorption and metabolism process of EGCG, and then summarized its anti-cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, including its manifold anti-cancer actions and mechanisms, especially its anti-cancer stem cell effect, and next highlighted its various molecular targets involved in cancer inhibition. Finally, the anti-cancer effect of EGCG analogs and nanoparticles, as well as the potential cancer promoting effect of EGCG were also discussed. Understanding of the absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of EGCG can be of importance to better utilize it as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent.

  5. Molecular targets and anti-cancer potential of escin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Dorothy H J; Arfuso, Frank; Sethi, Gautam; Wang, Lingzhi; Hui, Kam Man; Kumar, Alan Prem; Tran, Thai

    2018-02-21

    Escin is a mixture of triterpenoid saponins extracted from the horse chestnut tree, Aesculus hippocastanum. Its potent anti-inflammatory and anti-odematous properties makes it a choice of therapy against chronic venous insufficiency and odema. More recently, escin is being actively investigated for its potential activity against diverse cancers. It exhibits anti-cancer effects in many cancer cell models including lung adenocarcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma and leukemia. Escin also attenuates tumor growth and metastases in various in vivo models. Importantly, escin augments the effects of existing chemotherapeutic drugs, thereby supporting the role of escin as an adjunct or alternative anti-cancer therapy. The beneficial effects of escin can be attributed to its inhibition of proliferation and induction of cell cycle arrest. By regulating transcription factors/growth factors mediated oncogenic pathways, escin also potentially mitigates chronic inflammatory processes that are linked to cancer survival and resistance. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge of escin and its potential as an anti-cancer therapy through its anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mitosis as an anti-cancer drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Anna-Leena; Kallio, Marko J

    2013-10-01

    Suppression of cell proliferation by targeting mitosis is one potential cancer intervention. A number of existing chemotherapy drugs disrupt mitosis by targeting microtubule dynamics. While efficacious, these drugs have limitations, i.e. neuropathy, unpredictability and development of resistance. In order to overcome these issues, a great deal of effort has been spent exploring novel mitotic targets including Polo-like kinase 1, Aurora kinases, Mps1, Cenp-E and KSP/Eg5. Here we summarize the latest developments in the discovery and clinical evaluation of new mitotic drug targets.

  7. Mitosis-targeted anti-cancer therapies: where they stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, K-S; Koh, C-G; Li, H-Y

    2012-10-18

    The strategy of clinically targeting cancerous cells at their most vulnerable state during mitosis has instigated numerous studies into the mitotic cell death (MCD) pathway. As the hallmark of cancer revolves around cell-cycle deregulation, it is not surprising that antimitotic therapies are effective against the abnormal proliferation of transformed cells. Moreover, these antimitotic drugs are also highly selective and sensitive. Despite the robust rate of discovery and the development of mitosis-selective inhibitors, the unpredictable complexities of the human body's response to these drugs still herald the biggest challenge towards clinical success. Undoubtedly, the need to bridge the gap between promising preclinical trials and effective translational bedside treatment prompts further investigations towards mapping out the mechanistic pathways of MCD, understanding how these drugs work as medicine in the body and more comprehensive target validations. In this review, current antimitotic agents are summarized with particular emphasis on the evaluation of their clinical efficacy as well as their limitations. In addition, we discuss the basis behind the lack of activity of these inhibitors in human trials and the potential and future directions of mitotic anticancer strategies.

  8. Centrosome – a promising anti-cancer target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera-Rivera Y

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yainyrette Rivera-Rivera, Harold I Saavedra Department of Pharmacology, Ponce Health Sciences University-School of Medicine, Ponce Research Institute, Ponce, Puerto Rico Abstract: The centrosome, an organelle discovered >100 years ago, is the main microtubule-organizing center in mammalian organisms. The centrosome is composed of a pair of centrioles surrounded by the pericentriolar material (PMC and plays a major role in the regulation of cell cycle transitions (G1-S, G2-M, and metaphase-anaphase, ensuring the normality of cell division. Hundreds of proteins found in the centrosome exert a variety of roles, including microtubule dynamics, nucleation, and kinetochore–microtubule attachments that allow correct chromosome alignment and segregation. Errors in these processes lead to structural (shape, size, number, position, and composition, functional (abnormal microtubule nucleation and disorganized spindles, and numerical (centrosome amplification [CA] centrosome aberrations causing aneuploidy and genomic instability. Compelling data demonstrate that centrosomes are implicated in cancer, because there are important oncogenic and tumor suppressor proteins that are localized in this organelle and drive centrosome aberrations. Centrosome defects have been found in pre-neoplasias and tumors from breast, ovaries, prostate, head and neck, lung, liver, and bladder among many others. Several drugs/compounds against centrosomal proteins have shown promising results. Other drugs have higher toxicity with modest or no benefits, and there are more recently developed agents being tested in clinical trials. All of this emerging evidence suggests that targeting centrosome aberrations may be a future avenue for therapeutic intervention in cancer research. Keywords: centrosomes, cell cycle, mitosis, CA, CIN, cancer therapy

  9. NPACT: Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Manu; Sagar, Parul; Singh, Harinder; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Agarwal, Subhash M

    2013-01-01

    Plant-derived molecules have been highly valued by biomedical researchers and pharmaceutical companies for developing drugs, as they are thought to be optimized during evolution. Therefore, we have collected and compiled a central resource Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database (NPACT, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/npact/) that gathers the information related to experimentally validated plant-derived natural compounds exhibiting anti-cancerous activity (in vitro and in vivo), to complement the other databases. It currently contains 1574 compound entries, and each record provides information on their structure, manually curated published data on in vitro and in vivo experiments along with reference for users referral, inhibitory values (IC(50)/ED(50)/EC(50)/GI(50)), properties (physical, elemental and topological), cancer types, cell lines, protein targets, commercial suppliers and drug likeness of compounds. NPACT can easily be browsed or queried using various options, and an online similarity tool has also been made available. Further, to facilitate retrieval of existing data, each record is hyperlinked to similar databases like SuperNatural, Herbal Ingredients' Targets, Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, PubChem and NCI-60 GI(50) data.

  10. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore as a selective target for anti-cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Hoon eSuh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP is the ultimate step in dozens of lethal apoptotic signal transduction pathways which converge on mitochondria. One of the representative systems proposed to be responsible for the MOMP is the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP. Although the molecular composition of the MPTP is not clearly understood, the MPTP attracts much interest as a promising target for resolving two conundrums regarding cancer treatment: tumor selectivity and resistance to treatment. The regulation of the MPTP is closely related to metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells including mitochondrial alterations. Restoration of deregulated apoptotic machinery in cancer cells by tumor-specific modulation of the MPTP could therefore be a promising anti-cancer strategy. Currently, a number of MPTP-targeting agents are under pre-clinical and clinical studies. Here, we reviewed the structure and regulation of the MPTP as well as the current status of the development of promising MPTP-targeting drugs.

  11. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  12. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, Neil; Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  14. Landscape of Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Synergies in Melanoma Identifies a Novel BRAF-VEGFR/PDGFR Combination Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A Friedman

    Full Text Available A newer generation of anti-cancer drugs targeting underlying somatic genetic driver events have resulted in high single-agent or single-pathway response rates in selected patients, but few patients achieve complete responses and a sizeable fraction of patients relapse within a year. Thus, there is a pressing need for identification of combinations of targeted agents which induce more complete responses and prevent disease progression. We describe the results of a combination screen of an unprecedented scale in mammalian cells performed using a collection of targeted, clinically tractable agents across a large panel of melanoma cell lines. We find that even the most synergistic drug pairs are effective only in a discrete number of cell lines, underlying a strong context dependency for synergy, with strong, widespread synergies often corresponding to non-specific or off-target drug effects such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 transporter inhibition. We identified drugs sensitizing cell lines that are BRAFV600E mutant but intrinsically resistant to BRAF inhibitor PLX4720, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/kinase insert domain receptor (VEGFR/KDR and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR family inhibitor cediranib. The combination of cediranib and PLX4720 induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in animal models. This synergistic interaction is likely due to engagement of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, demonstrating the potential of drug- rather than gene-specific combination discovery approaches. Patients with elevated biopsy KDR expression showed decreased progression free survival in trials of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase pathway inhibitors. Thus, high-throughput unbiased screening of targeted drug combinations, with appropriate library selection and mechanistic follow-up, can yield clinically-actionable drug combinations.

  15. Mitochondrial complex II, a novel target for anti-cancer agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klučková, Katarína; Bezawork-Geleta, A.; Rohlena, Jakub; Dong, L.; Neužil, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1827, č. 5 (2013), s. 552-564 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/1937; GA ČR GAP301/12/1851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitochondrion * Complex II * Anti- cancer agent Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.829, year: 2013

  16. Structure and Potential Cellular Targets of HAMLET-like Anti-Cancer Compounds made from Milk Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Emma M; Duff, Anthony P; Håkansson, Anders P; Vacher, Catherine S; Liu, Guo Jun; Knott, Robert B; Church, William Bret

    2015-01-01

    The HAMLET family of compounds (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made Lethal to Tumours) was discovered during studies on the properties of human milk, and is a class of protein-lipid complexes having broad spectrum anti-cancer, and some specific anti-bacterial properties. The structure of HAMLET-like compounds consists of an aggregation of partially unfolded protein making up the majority of the compound's mass, with fatty acid molecules bound in the hydrophobic core. This is a novel protein-lipid structure and has only recently been derived by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis. The structure is the basis of a novel cytotoxicity mechanism responsible for anti-cancer activity to all of the around 50 different cancer cell types for which the HAMLET family has been trialled. Multiple cytotoxic mechanisms have been hypothesised for the HAMLET-like compounds, but it is not yet clear which of those are the initiating cytotoxic mechanism(s) and which are subsequent activities triggered by the initiating mechanism(s). In addition to the studies into the structure of these compounds, this review presents the state of knowledge of the anti-cancer aspects of HAMLET-like compounds, the HAMLET-induced cytotoxic activities to cancer and non-cancer cells, and the several prospective cell membrane and intracellular targets of the HAMLET family. The emerging picture is that HAMLET-like compounds initiate their cytotoxic effects on what may be a cancer-specific target in the cell membrane that has yet to be identified. This article is open to POST-PUBLICATION REVIEW. Registered readers (see "For Readers") may comment by clicking on ABSTRACT on the issue's contents page.

  17. Role of SNARE proteins in tumourigenesis and their potential as targets for novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jianghui; Wang, Jiafu

    2015-08-01

    The function of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) in cellular trafficking, membrane fusion and vesicle release in synaptic nerve terminals is well characterised. Recent studies suggest that SNAREs are also important in the control of tumourigenesis through the regulation of multiple signalling and transportation pathways. The majority of published studies investigated the effects of knockdown/knockout or overexpression of particular SNAREs on the normal function of cells as well as their dysfunction in tumourigenesis promotion. SNAREs are involved in the regulation of cancer cell invasion, chemo-resistance, the transportation of autocrine and paracrine factors, autophagy, apoptosis and the phosphorylation of kinases essential for cancer cell biogenesis. This evidence highlights SNAREs as potential targets for novel cancer therapy. This is the first review to summarise the expression and role of SNAREs in cancer biology at the cellular level, their interaction with non-SNARE proteins and modulation of cellular signalling cascades. Finally, a strategy is proposed for developing novel anti-cancer therapeutics using targeted delivery of a SNARE-inactivating protease into malignant cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitocans: Mitochondrial targeted anti-cancer drugs as improved therapies and related patent documents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ralph, S.J.; Low, P.; Dong, L.; Lawen, A.; Neužil, Jiří

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1, - (2006), s. 327-346 ISSN 1574-8928 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : mitocans * vitamin E analogues * mitochondria-based targeting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  19. Performance evaluation of structure based and ligand based virtual screening methods on ten selected anti-cancer targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Thilagavathi; Selvam, Chelliah

    2015-10-15

    Virtual screening has become an important tool in drug discovery process. Structure based and ligand based approaches are generally used in virtual screening process. To date, several benchmark sets for evaluating the performance of the virtual screening tool are available. In this study, our aim is to compare the performance of both structure based and ligand based virtual screening methods. Ten anti-cancer targets and their corresponding benchmark sets from 'Demanding Evaluation Kits for Objective In silico Screening' (DEKOIS) library were selected. X-ray crystal structures of protein-ligand complexes were selected based on their resolution. Openeye tools such as FRED, vROCS were used and the results were carefully analyzed. At EF1%, vROCS produced better results but at EF5% and EF10%, both FRED and ROCS produced almost similar results. It was noticed that the enrichment factor values were decreased while going from EF1% to EF5% and EF10% in many cases. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Novel Mitochondria-Targeted Furocoumarin Derivatives as Possible Anti-Cancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mattarei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Targeting small molecules to appropriate subcellular compartments is a way to increase their selectivity and effectiveness while minimizing side effects. This can be accomplished either by stably incorporating specific “homing” properties into the structure of the active principle, or by attaching to it a targeting moiety via a labile linker, i.e., by producing a “targeting pro-drug.” Mitochondria are a recognized therapeutic target in oncology, and blocking the population of the potassium channel Kv1.3 residing in the inner mitochondrial membrane (mtKv1.3 has been shown to cause apoptosis of cancerous cells expressing it. These concepts have led us to devise novel, mitochondria-targeted, membrane-permeant drug candidates containing the furocoumarin (psoralenic ring system and the triphenylphosphonium (TPP lipophilic cation. The strategy has proven effective in various cancer models, including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, melanoma, and glioblastoma, stimulating us to devise further novel molecules to extend and diversify the range of available drugs of this type. New compounds were synthesized and tested in vitro; one of them—a prodrug in which the coumarinic moiety and the TPP group are linked by a bridge comprising a labile carbonate bond system—proved quite effective in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Selective death induction is attributed to inhibition of mtKv1.3. This results in oxidative stress, which is fatal for the already-stressed malignant cells. This compound may thus be a candidate drug for the mtKv1.3-targeting therapeutic approach.

  1. Inhibition of microRNA-500 has anti-cancer effect through its conditional downstream target of TFPI in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Bing; Chen, Wei; Pan, Yue; Chen, Hongde; Zhang, Yirong; Weng, Zhiliang; Li, Yeping

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the prognostic potential and regulatory mechanism of microRNA-500 (miR-500), and human gene of tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) in prostate cancer. MiR-500 expression was assessed by qRT-PCR in prostate cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Cancer patients' clinicopathological factors and overall survival were analyzed according to endogenous miR-500 level. MiR-500 was downregulated in DU145 and VCaP cells. Its effect on prostate cancer proliferation, invasion in vitro, and tumorigenicity in vivo, were probed. Possible downstream target of miR-500, TFPI was assessed by luciferase assay and qRT-PCR in prostate cancer cells. In miR-500-downregulated DU145 and VCaP cells, TFPI was silenced to see whether it was directly involved in the regulation of miR-500 in prostate cancer. TFPI alone was either upregulated or downregulated in DU145 and VCaP cells. Their effect on prostate cancer development was further evaluated. MiR-500 is upregulated in both prostate cancer cells and primary tumors. In prostate cancer patients, high miR-500 expression is associated with poor prognosis and overall survival. In DU145 and VCaP cells, miR-500 downregulation inhibited cancer proliferation, invasion in vitro, and explant growth in vivo. TFPI was verified to be associated with miR-500 in prostate cancer. Downregulation of TFPI reversed anti-cancer effects of miR-500 downregulation in prostate cancer cells. However, neither TFPI upregulation nor downregulation alone had any functional impact on prostate cancer development. MiR-500 may be a potential biomarker and molecular target in prostate cancer. TFPI may conditionally regulate prostate cancer in miR-500-downregualted prostate cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Exploiting developments in nanotechnology for the preferential delivery of platinum-based anti-cancer agents to tumours: targeting some of the hallmarks of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, James P; Ude, Ziga; Marmion, Celine J

    2016-01-01

    Platinum drugs as anti-cancer therapeutics are held in extremely high regard. Despite their success, there are drawbacks associated with their use; their dose-limiting toxicity, their limited activity against an array of common cancers and patient resistance to Pt-based therapeutic regimes. Current investigations in medicinal inorganic chemistry strive to offset these shortcomings through selective targeting of Pt drugs and/or the development of Pt drugs with new or multiple modes of action. A comprehensive overview showcasing how liposomes, nanocapsules, polymers, dendrimers, nanoparticles and nanotubes may be employed as vehicles to selectively deliver cytotoxic Pt payloads to tumour cells is provided.

  3. Delivery of TLR7 agonist to monocytes and dendritic cells by DCIR targeted liposomes induces robust production of anti-cancer cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klauber, Thomas Christopher Bogh; Laursen, Janne Marie; Zucker, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Tumor immune escape is today recognized as an important cancer hallmark and is therefore a major focus area in cancer therapy. Monocytes and dendritic cells (DCs), which are central to creating a robust anti-tumor immune response and establishing an anti-tumorigenic microenvironment, are directly...... as their immune activating potential in blood-derived monocytes, myeloid DCs (mDCs), and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs). Monocytes and mDCs were targeted with high specificity over lymphocytes, and exhibited potent TLR7-specific secretion of the anti-cancer cytokines IL-12p70, IFN-α 2a, and IFN-γ. This delivery system...... could be a way to improve cancer treatment either in the form of a vaccine with co-formulated antigen or as an immunotherapeutic vector to boost monocyte and DC activity in combination with other treatment protocols such as chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Cancer immunotherapy is a powerful new tool...

  4. Transcription factor HBP1 is a direct anti-cancer target of transcription factor FOXO1 in invasive oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chien-Yi; Huang, Shih-Yi; Sheu, Jim Jinn-Chyuan; Roth, Mendel M; Chou, I-Tai; Lien, Chia-Hsien; Lee, Ming-Fen; Huang, Chun-Yin

    2017-02-28

    Either FOXO1 or HBP1 transcription factor is a downstream effector of the PI3K/Akt pathway and associated with tumorigenesis. However, the relationship between FOXO1 and HBP1 in oral cancer remains unclear. Analysis of 30 oral tumor specimens revealed that mean mRNA levels of both FOXO1 and HBP1 in non-invasive and invasive oral tumors were found to be significantly lower than that of the control tissues, and the status of low FOXO1 and HBP1 (oral tumors. To investigate if HBP1 is a direct transcription target of FOXO1, we searched potential FOXO1 binding sites in the HBP1 promoter using the MAPPER Search Engine, and two putative FOXO1 binding sites located in the HBP1 promoter -132 to -125 bp and -343 to -336 bp were predicted. These binding sites were then confirmed by both reporter gene assays and the in cellulo ChIP assay. In addition, Akt activity manipulated by PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or Akt mutants was shown to negatively affect FOXO1-mediated HBP1 promoter activation and gene expression. Last, the biological significance of the FOXO1-HBP1 axis in oral cancer malignancy was evaluated in cell growth, colony formation, and invasiveness. The results indicated that HBP1 knockdown potently promoted malignant phenotypes of oral cancer and the suppressive effect of FOXO1 on cell growth, colony formation, and invasion was alleviated upon HBP1 knockdown in invasive oral cancer cells. Taken together, our data provide evidence for HBP1 as a direct downstream target of FOXO1 in oral cancer malignancy.

  5. Minimalism in fabrication of self-organized nanogels holding both anti-cancer drug and targeting moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Park, Kyong Mi; Ko, Jin Young; Kwon, Ick Chan; Cho, Hyeon Geun; Kang, Dongmin; Yu, In Tag; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Na, Kun

    2008-05-01

    Recent researches to develop nano-carrier systems in anti-cancer drug delivery have focused on more complicated design to improve therapeutic efficacy and to reduce side effects. Although such efforts have great impact to biomedical science and engineering, the complexity has been a huddle because of clinical and economic problems. In order to overcome the problems, a simplest strategy to fabricate nano-carriers to deliver doxorubicin (DOX) was proposed in the present study. Two significant subjects (i) formation of nanoparticles loading and releasing DOX and (ii) binding specificity of them to cells, were examined. Folic acid (FA) was directly coupled with pullulan (Pul) backbone by ester linkage (FA/Pul conjugate) and the degree of substitution (DS) was varied, which were confirmed by 1H NMR and UV spectrophotometry. Light scattering results revealed that the nanogels possessed two major size distributions around 70 and 270 nm in an aqueous solution. Their critical aggregation concentrations (CACs) were less than 10 microg/mL, which are lower than general critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of low-molecular-weight surfactants. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed well-dispersed nanogel morphology in a dried state. Depending on the DS, the nanogels showed different DOX-loading and releasing profiles. The DOX release rate from FA8/Pul (with the highest DS) for 24h was slower than that from FA4/or FA6/Pul, indicating that the FA worked as a hydrophobic moiety for drug holding. Cellular uptake of the nanogels (KB cells) was also monitored by confocal microscopy. All nanogels were internalized regardless of the DS of FA. Based on the results, the objectives of this study, to suggest a new method overcoming the complications in the drug carrier design, were successfully verified.

  6. Development of a new anti-cancer agent for targeted radionuclide therapy: β- radiolabeled RAFT-RGD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petitprin, A.

    2013-01-01

    β-emitters radiolabeled RAFT-RGD as new agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. The αvβ3 integrin is known to play an important role in tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor proliferation, survival and metastasis. Because of its overexpression on neo-endothelial cells such as those present in growing tumors, as well as on tumor cells of various origins, αvβ3 integrin is an attractive molecular target for diagnosis and therapy of the rapidly growing and metastatic tumors. A tetrameric RGD-based peptide, regioselectively addressable functionalized template-(cyclo-[RGDfK])4 (RAFT-RGD), specifically targets integrin αvβ3 in vitro and in vivo. RAFT-RGD has been used for tumor imaging and drug targeting. This study is the first to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the β-emitters radiolabeled tetrameric RGD peptide RAFT-RGD in a Nude mouse model of αvβ3 -expressing tumors. An injection of 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD in mice with αvβ3 -positive tumors caused a significant growth delay as compared with mice treated with 37 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RAD or 177 Lu-RAFT-RAD or untreated mice. In comparison, an injection of 30 MBq of 90 Y-RAFT-RGD had no efficacy for the treatment of αvβ3 -negative tumors. 90 Y-RAFT-RGD and 177 Lu-RAFT-RGD are potent αvβ3 -expressing tumor targeting agents for internal targeted radiotherapy. (author)

  7. Designing the Sniper: Improving Targeted Human Cytolytic Fusion Proteins for Anti-Cancer Therapy via Molecular Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bochicchio

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeted human cytolytic fusion proteins (hCFPs are humanized immunotoxins for selective treatment of different diseases including cancer. They are composed of a ligand specifically binding to target cells genetically linked to a human apoptosis-inducing enzyme. hCFPs target cancer cells via an antibody or derivative (scFv specifically binding to e.g., tumor associated antigens (TAAs. After internalization and translocation of the enzyme from endocytosed endosomes, the human enzymes introduced into the cytosol are efficiently inducing apoptosis. Under in vivo conditions such enzymes are subject to tight regulation by native inhibitors in order to prevent inappropriate induction of cell death in healthy cells. Tumor cells are known to upregulate these inhibitors as a survival mechanism resulting in escape of malignant cells from elimination by immune effector cells. Cytosolic inhibitors of Granzyme B and Angiogenin (Serpin P9 and RNH1, respectively, reduce the efficacy of hCFPs with these enzymes as effector domains, requiring detrimentally high doses in order to saturate inhibitor binding and rescue cytolytic activity. Variants of Granzyme B and Angiogenin might feature reduced affinity for their respective inhibitors, while retaining or even enhancing their catalytic activity. A powerful tool to design hCFPs mutants with improved potency is given by in silico methods. These include molecular dynamics (MD simulations and enhanced sampling methods (ESM. MD and ESM allow predicting the enzyme-protein inhibitor binding stability and the associated conformational changes, provided that structural information is available. Such “high-resolution” detailed description enables the elucidation of interaction domains and the identification of sites where particular point mutations may modify those interactions. This review discusses recent advances in the use of MD and ESM for hCFP development from the viewpoints of scientists involved in both fields.

  8. Novel anti-cancer strategy in bone tumors by targeting molecular and cellular modulators of bone resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brounais, Bénédicte; Ruiz, Carmen; Rousseau, Julie; Lamoureux, François; Blanchard, Frédéric; Heymann, Dominique; Redini, Françoise

    2008-11-01

    Tumor cells alter the balanced process of bone formation and bone resorption mediated respectively by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, leading to the disruption of the normal equilibrium and resulting in a spectrum of osteolytic to osteoblastic lesions. This review will summarize research on molecules that play direct and essential roles in the differentiation and activity of osteoclasts, and the role of these molecules in bone destruction caused by cancer. Results from experimental models suggest that the Receptor Activator of NF-kB Ligand (RANKL), a member of the TNF superfamily is a common effector of bony lesions in osteolysis caused by primary and secondary bone tumors. Therefore, osteoclast represents an attractive target across a broad range of tumors that develop in bone. Elucidation of the mechanisms of RANKL interactions with its activator (RANK) and decoy (osteoprotegerin: OPG) receptors has enable the development of pharmacological inhibitors of RANKL (and of its signalling pathway) which have been recently patented, with potential for the treatment of cancer-induced bone disease. Blocking bone resorption by specific other drugs such as bisphosphonates, inhibitors of cathepsin K (the main enzyme involved in bone resorption mechanisms) or signalling pathways regulating osteoclast differentiation and activation is also a promising target for the treatment of osteolysis associated to bone tumors.

  9. Potential Development of Tumor-Targeted Oral Anti-Cancer Prodrugs: Amino Acid and Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Gemcitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Drelich, Adam J; Smith, David E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2017-08-10

    One of the main obstacles for cancer therapies is to deliver medicines effectively to target sites. Since stroma cells are developed around tumors, chemotherapeutic agents have to go through stroma cells in order to reach tumors. As a method to improve drug delivery to the tumor site, a prodrug approach for gemcitabine was adopted. Amino acid and dipeptide monoester prodrugs of gemcitabine were synthesized and their chemical stability in buffers, resistance to thymidine phosphorylase and cytidine deaminase, antiproliferative activity, and uptake/permeability in HFF cells as a surrogate to stroma cells were determined and compared to their parent drug, gemcitabine. The activation of all gemcitabine prodrugs was faster in pancreatic cell homogenates than their hydrolysis in buffer, suggesting enzymatic action. All prodrugs exhibited great stability in HFF cell homogenate, enhanced resistance to glycosidic bond metabolism by thymidine phosphorylase, and deamination by cytidine deaminase compared to their parent drug. All gemcitabine prodrugs exhibited higher uptake in HFF cells and better permeability across HFF monolayers than gemcitabine, suggesting a better delivery to tumor sites. Cell antiproliferative assays in Panc-1 and Capan-2 pancreatic ductal cell lines indicated that the gemcitabine prodrugs were more potent than their parent drug gemcitabine. The transport and enzymatic profiles of gemcitabine prodrugs suggest their potential for delayed enzymatic bioconversion and enhanced resistance to metabolic enzymes, as well as for enhanced drug delivery to tumor sites, and cytotoxic activity in cancer cells. These attributes would facilitate the prolonged systemic circulation and improved therapeutic efficacy of gemcitabine prodrugs.

  10. Cytotoxicity and cell death mechanisms induced by the polyamine-vectorized anti-cancer drug F14512 targeting topoisomerase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brel, Viviane; Annereau, Jean-Philippe; Vispé, Stéphane; Kruczynski, Anna; Bailly, Christian; Guilbaud, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The polyamines transport system (PTS) is usually enhanced in cancer cells and can be exploited to deliver anticancer drugs. The spermine-conjugated epipodophyllotoxin derivative F14512 is a topoisomerase II poison that exploits the PTS to target preferentially tumor cells. F14512 has been characterized as a potent anticancer drug candidate and is currently in phase 1 clinical trials. Here we have analyzed the mechanisms of cell death induced by F14512, compared to the parent drug etoposide lacking the polyamine tail. F14512 proved to be >30-fold more cytotoxic than etoposide against A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells and triggers less but unrecoverable DNA damages. The cytotoxic action of F14512 is extremely rapid (within 3 h) and does not lead to a marked accumulation in the S-phase of the cell cycle, unlike etoposide. Interestingly, A549 cells treated with F14512 were less prone to undergo apoptosis (neither caspases-dependent nor caspases-independent pathways) or autophagy but preferentially entered into senescence. Drug-induced senescence was characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by an increased β-galactosidase activity, both by cytochemical staining and by flow cytometry. A morphological analysis by electron microscopy revealed the presence of numerous multi-lamellar and vesicular bodies and large electron-lucent (methuosis-like) vacuoles in F14512-treated cell samples. The mechanism of drug-induced cell death is thus distinct for F14512 compared to etoposide, and this difference may account for their distinct pharmacological profiles and the markedly superior activity of F14512 in vivo. This study suggests that senescence markers should be considered as potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers of F14512 antitumor activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Model-based global sensitivity analysis as applied to identification of anti-cancer drug targets and biomarkers of drug resistance in the ErbB2/3 network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Galina; Sorokin, Anatoly; Faratian, Dana; Mullen, Peter; Goltsov, Alexey; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-01-01

    High levels of variability in cancer-related cellular signalling networks and a lack of parameter identifiability in large-scale network models hamper translation of the results of modelling studies into the process of anti-cancer drug development. Recently global sensitivity analysis (GSA) has been recognised as a useful technique, capable of addressing the uncertainty of the model parameters and generating valid predictions on parametric sensitivities. Here we propose a novel implementation of model-based GSA specially designed to explore how multi-parametric network perturbations affect signal propagation through cancer-related networks. We use area-under-the-curve for time course of changes in phosphorylation of proteins as a characteristic for sensitivity analysis and rank network parameters with regard to their impact on the level of key cancer-related outputs, separating strong inhibitory from stimulatory effects. This allows interpretation of the results in terms which can incorporate the effects of potential anti-cancer drugs on targets and the associated biological markers of cancer. To illustrate the method we applied it to an ErbB signalling network model and explored the sensitivity profile of its key model readout, phosphorylated Akt, in the absence and presence of the ErbB2 inhibitor pertuzumab. The method successfully identified the parameters associated with elevation or suppression of Akt phosphorylation in the ErbB2/3 network. From analysis and comparison of the sensitivity profiles of pAkt in the absence and presence of targeted drugs we derived predictions of drug targets, cancer-related biomarkers and generated hypotheses for combinatorial therapy. Several key predictions have been confirmed in experiments using human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We also compared GSA-derived predictions with the results of local sensitivity analysis and discuss the applicability of both methods. We propose that the developed GSA procedure can serve as a

  12. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2005-01-01

    ... embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity required for ovarian cancer gene therapy. This approach is based on targeting the delivered anti-cancer gene to tumor via two complimentary approaches...

  13. A Double Selection Approach to Achieve Specific Expression of Toxin Genes for Ovarian Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Curiel, David T; Siegal, Gene; Wang, Minghui

    2006-01-01

    ... embodies the requisite properties of efficacy and specificity required for ovarian cancer gene therapy. This approach is based on targeting the delivered anti-cancer gene to tumor via two complimentary approaches...

  14. Tumor targeted gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Joo Hyun

    2006-01-01

    Knowledge of molecular mechanisms governing malignant transformation brings new opportunities for therapeutic intervention against cancer using novel approaches. One of them is gene therapy based on the transfer of genetic material to an organism with the aim of correcting a disease. The application of gene therapy to the cancer treatment had led to the development of new experimental approaches such as suicidal gene therapy, inhibition of oncogenes and restoration of tumor-suppressor genes. Suicidal gene therapy is based on the expression in tumor cells of a gene encoding an enzyme that converts a prodrug into a toxic product. Representative suicidal genes are Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) and cytosine deaminase (CD). Especially, physicians and scientists of nuclear medicine field take an interest in suicidal gene therapy because they can monitor the location and magnitude, and duration of expression of HSV1-tk and CD by PET scanner

  15. When ubiquitin meets NF-κB: a trove for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Yuling

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades, the studies on ubiquitination in regulating transcription factor NF-κB activation have elucidated the expanding role of ubiquitination in modulating cellular events by non-proteolytic mechanisms, as well as by proteasomal degradation. The significance of ubiquitination has also been recognized in regulating gene transcription, epigenetic modifications, kinase activation, DNA repair and subcellular translocation. This progress has been translated into novel strategies for developing anti-cancer therapeutics, exemplified by the success of the first FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor drug Bortezomib. Here we discuss the current understanding of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and how it is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling pathways in response to a variety of stimuli. We also focus on the recent progress of anti-cancer drug development targeting various steps of ubiquitination process, and the potential of these drugs in cancer treatment as related to their impact on NF-κB activation.

  16. Targeted deletion of the ara operon of Salmonella typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and drives PBAD-promoted expression of anti-cancer toxins and imaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyun; Lim, Daejin; Kim, Geun-Joong; Park, Seung-Hwan; Sik Kim, Hyeon; Hong, Yeongjin; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-specific expression of antitumor drugs can be achieved using attenuated Salmonella typhimurium harboring the PBAD promoter, which is induced by L-arabinose. However, L-arabinose does not accumulate because it is metabolized to D-xylulose-5-P by enzymes encoded by the ara operon in Salmonellae. To address this problem, we developed an engineered strain of S. typhimurium in which the ara operon is deleted. Linear DNA transformation was performed using λ red recombinase to exchange the ara operon with linear DNA carrying an antibiotic-resistance gene with homology to regions adjacent to the ara operon. The ara operon-deleted strain and its parental strain were transformed with a plasmid encoding Renilla luciferase variant 8 (RLuc8) or cytolysin A (clyA) under the control of the PBAD promoter. Luciferase assays demonstrated that RLuc8 expression was 49-fold higher in the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium than in the parental strain after the addition of L-arabinose. In vivo bioluminescence imaging showed that the tumor tissue targeted by the ara operon-deleted Salmonella had a stronger imaging signal (~30-fold) than that targeted by the parental strain. Mice with murine colon cancer (CT26) that had been injected with the ara operon-deleted S. typhimurium expressing clyA showed significant tumor suppression. The present report demonstrates that deletion of the ara operon of S. typhimurium enhances L-arabinose accumulation and thereby drives PBAD-promoted expression of cytotoxic agents and imaging agents. This is a promising approach for tumor therapy and imaging.

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional effects of the anti-cancer agent camptothecin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Veloso

    Full Text Available The anti-cancer drug camptothecin inhibits replication and transcription by trapping DNA topoisomerase I (Top1 covalently to DNA in a "cleavable complex". To examine the effects of camptothecin on RNA synthesis genome-wide we used Bru-Seq and show that camptothecin treatment primarily affected transcription elongation. We also observed that camptothecin increased RNA reads past transcription termination sites as well as at enhancer elements. Following removal of camptothecin, transcription spread as a wave from the 5'-end of genes with no recovery of transcription apparent from RNA polymerases stalled in the body of genes. As a result, camptothecin preferentially inhibited the expression of large genes such as proto-oncogenes, and anti-apoptotic genes while smaller ribosomal protein genes, pro-apoptotic genes and p53 target genes showed relative higher expression. Cockayne syndrome group B fibroblasts (CS-B, which are defective in transcription-coupled repair (TCR, showed an RNA synthesis recovery profile similar to normal fibroblasts suggesting that TCR is not involved in the repair of or RNA synthesis recovery from transcription-blocking Top1 lesions. These findings of the effects of camptothecin on transcription have important implications for its anti-cancer activities and may aid in the design of improved combinatorial treatments involving Top1 poisons.

  18. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dong, L. F.; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 199-208 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitocans * Anti-cancer therapeutics * Classification Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.524, year: 2013

  19. Targeting Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, Ali Y; Fakhoury, Ahmad M; Brown, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Chemical detoxification and physical destruction of aflatoxins in foods and feed commodities are mostly unattainable in a way that preserves the edibility of the food. Therefore, preventing mycotoxins in general and aflatoxins in particular from entering the food chain is a better approach. This requires early detection of the aflatoxin-causing organisms. Detection and quantification of aflatoxin-producing fungi has always been a challenge, especially within species of Aspergillus and Penicillium. Culture-based methods require a high level of expertise and a list of sophisticated equipment. Furthermore, even for a trained taxonomist, species that are identical in morphology, physiology, and nutritional aspects can be challenging to classify. Fungal taxonomy has changed over the past few decades; more species are being reclassified, and new species are being described due to advances in sequencing and genome assembly. These developments make the use of PCR-based approaches practical, rapid, and more reliable for the identification of fungi to the species level. This chapter presents a variety of protocols to detect and quantify aflatoxin-producing fungi using mycotoxin biosynthesis pathway genes.

  20. Prodigiosins as anti cancer agents: living upto their name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R; Chander, R; Sainis, K B

    2009-01-01

    Prodigiosins are a family of bright red colored bacterial pigment and derive their name from the miraculous (prodigious) events associated with their occurrence. They indeed seem to be living upto their name as a host of activities such as anti-microbial, anti-malarial, anti-cancer and immunosuppressive have been associated with them. Out of these, immunosuppressive and anti-cancer activity has received more importance as it has a clinical promise. Prodigiosins, isolated mostly from Gram negative bacteria are characterized by a common pyrryldipyrrylmethene structure with varying side chains. The review discusses the mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activity of this class of compounds. In vitro, prodigiosins have been shown to primarily target the cancer cells independently of the p53 status while little or no effect has been observed on normal cells. In addition, prodigiosins are effective in cancer cells with multidrug resistance phenotype and defects in the apoptotic pathways. These make prodigiosins attractive candidates for further development. Though the molecular targets of prodigiosins have not been clearly defined, they have been found to target different signaling pathways possibly through induction of DNA double strand breaks and/ or neutralization of pH gradients leading to changes in cell cycle proteins and apoptosis. The review will discuss the recent findings related to the mechanism involved in the anti-cancer activity of this class of molecules.

  1. Targeted delivery and pH-responsive release of stereoisomeric anti-cancer drugs using β-cyclodextrin assemblied Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Congli; Huang, Lizhen; Song, Shengmei; Saif, Bassam; Zhou, Yehong; Dong, Chuan; Shuang, Shaomin, E-mail: smshuang@sxu.edu.cn

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • β-Cyclodextrin assemblied magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (β-CD-MNPs) with good stability were successfully fabricated. • Stereoisomeric doxorubicin (DOX) and epirubicin (EPI) were used to explore the loading and release performance. • The loading properties of β-CD-MNPs were investigated using the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption equilibrium models. • {sup 1}H NMR and the computer simulation were used to demonstrate the inclusion position between drug molecules and β-CD. - Abstract: The β-cyclodextrin assemblied magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (β-CD-MNPs) were successfully fabricated via a layer-by-layer method. Possessing an average size 14 nm, good stability and super-paramagnetic response (Ms 64 emu/g), the resultant nanocomposites could be served as a versatile biocompatible platform for selective loading, targeted delivery and pH-responsive release of stereoisomeric doxorubicin (DOX) and epirubicin (EPI). {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance ({sup 1}H NMR) and the computer simulation further give the evidence that partial anthracene ring of drug molecule is included by β-CD. In addition, non-toxic β-CD-MNPs have excellent biocompatibility on MCF-7 cells, and cellular uptake indicate that different amounts of DOX or EPI can be transported to targeting site and released from the internalized carriers. The results demonstrate that as-prepared β-CD-MNPs could be a very promising vehicle for DOX and EPI.

  2. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  3. Design and docking of novel series of hybrid xanthones as anti-cancer agent to target human DNA topoisomerase 2-alpha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Mohan Nainwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase (topo IIα is a homodimeric protein catalyzes topological vicissitudes by adding or by soothing super coiling transpiration, occurs in human DNA during DNA replication as an outcome chromosome segregation and condensation occurs during meiosis I and recombination. To prevent the cleavage and religation activity we administered novel hybrid substituted Xanthone series of drugs. The toxicity prediction showed outstanding results which impetus to study its anticancer activities by targeting topoisomerase (topo IIα. We developed the homology model of the topoisomerase (topo IIα due to the unavailability of 3D structure in the Protein Data Bank. Structural assessment of the modeled protein and confirmed the quality of the model. The ligands were docked using Autodock4.2 software and binding energy was reported. The compound XM9, XN2, XM7, XLNU and XNS scored lowest binding energy and highest binding affinity. The interaction sites and the hydrogen bond were observed.

  4. Curcumin binds in silico to anti-cancer drug target enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) with affinity comparable to two known inhibitors of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerah, Ahmed; Hobani, Yahya; Kumar, B Vinod; Bidwai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    In silico interaction of curcumin with the enzyme MMP-3 (human stromelysin-1) was studied by molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 as the docking software application. AutoDock 4.2 software serves as a valid and acceptable docking application to study the interactions of small compounds with proteins. Interactions of curcumin with MMP-3 were compared to those of two known inhibitors of the enzyme, PBSA and MPPT. The calculated free energy of binding (ΔG binding) shows that curcumin binds with affinity comparable to or better than the two known inhibitors. Binding interactions of curcumin with active site residues of the enzyme are also predicted. Curcumin appears to bind in an extendended conformation making extensive VDW contacts in the active site of the enzyme. Hydrogen bonding and pi-pi interactions with key active site residues is also observed. Thus, curcumin can be considered as a good lead compound in the development of new inhibitors of MMP-3 which is a potential target of anticancer drugs. The results of these studies can serve as a starting point for further computational and experimental studies.

  5. Mitosis as an anti-cancer target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, A; Medema, R H

    2011-06-23

    Most of the current drugs used to treat cancer can be classified as anti-proliferative drugs. These drugs perturb the proliferative cycle of tumor cells at diverse stages of the cell cycle. Examples of such drugs are DNA-damaging agents and inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases that arrest cell cycle progression at different stages of interphase. Another class of anti-proliferative drugs is the so-called anti-mitotic drugs, which selectively perturb progression through mitosis. Mitosis is the shortest and final stage in the cell cycle and has evolved to accurately divide the duplicated genome over the two daughter cells. This review deals with the different strategies that are currently considered to perturb mitotic progression in the treatment of cancer.

  6. Towards prostate cancer gene therapy: Development of a chlorotoxin-targeted nanovector for toxic (melittin) gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarokh, Zahra; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein; Nazari, Mahboobeh

    2017-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death due to cancer in men. Owing to shortcomings in the current treatments, other therapies are being considered. Toxic gene delivery is one of the most effective methods for cancer therapy. Cationic polymers are able to form stable nanoparticles via interaction with nucleic acids electrostatically. Branched polyethylenimine that contains amine groups has notable buffering capacity and the ability to escape from endosome through the proton sponge effect. However, the cytotoxicity of this polymer is high, and modification is one of the applicable strategies to overcome this problem. In this study, PEI was targeted with chlorotoxin (CTX) via N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio) propionate (SPDP) cross-linker. CTX can bind specifically to matrix metalloproteinase-2 that is overexpressed in certain cancers. Melittin as the major component of bee venom has been reported to have anti-cancer activity. This was thus selected to deliver to PC3 cell line. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that transfection efficiency of targeted nanoparticles is significantly higher compared to non-targeted nanoparticles. Targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene also decreased cell viability of PC3 cells significantly while no toxic effects were observed on NIH3T3 cell line. Therefore, CTX-targeted nanoparticles carrying the melittin gene could serve as an appropriate gene delivery system for prostate and other MMP-2 positive cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Gene Therapy Targeting HIV Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuka Didigu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the unquestionable success of antiretroviral therapy (ART in the treatment of HIV infection, the cost, need for daily adherence, and HIV-associated morbidities that persist despite ART all underscore the need to develop a cure for HIV. The cure achieved following an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT using HIV-resistant cells, and more recently, the report of short-term but sustained, ART-free control of HIV replication following allogeneic HSCT, using HIV susceptible cells, have served to both reignite interest in HIV cure research, and suggest potential mechanisms for a cure. In this review, we highlight some of the obstacles facing HIV cure research today, and explore the roles of gene therapy targeting HIV entry, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in the development of strategies to cure HIV infection.

  8. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  9. Targeted integration of genes in Xenopus tropicalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Zhaoying; Tian, Dandan; Xin, Huhu

    2017-01-01

    With the successful establishment of both targeted gene disruption and integration methods in the true diploid frog Xenopus tropicalis, this excellent vertebrate genetic model now is making a unique contribution to modelling human diseases. Here, we summarize our efforts on establishing homologous...... recombination-mediated targeted integration in Xenopus tropicalis, the usefulness, and limitation of targeted integration via the homology-independent strategy, and future directions on how to further improve targeted gene integration in Xenopus tropicalis....

  10. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  11. Structure Identification and Anti-Cancer Pharmacological Prediction of Triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yanyan; Qiao, Liansheng; Wu, Lingfang; Sun, Xuefei; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Guanghui; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Mao, Xin; Chen, Wenjing; Liang, Wenyi; Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Lanzhen

    2016-05-21

    Ganoderma triterpenes (GTs) are the major secondary metabolites of Ganoderma lucidum, which is a popularly used traditional Chinese medicine for complementary cancer therapy. In the present study, systematic isolation, and in silico pharmacological prediction are implemented to discover potential anti-cancer active GTs from G. lucidum. Nineteen GTs, three steroids, one cerebroside, and one thymidine were isolated from G. lucidum. Six GTs were first isolated from the fruiting bodies of G. lucidum, including 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid methyl ester (1), 3β,7β,15β-trihydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid (2), 3β,7β,15α,28-tetrahydroxy-11,23-dioxo-lanost-8,16-dien-26-oic acid (3), ganotropic acid (4), 26-nor-11,23-dioxo-5α-lanost-8-en-3β,7β,15α,25-tetrol (5) and (3β,7α)-dihydroxy-lanosta-8,24-dien- 11-one (6). (4E,8E)-N-d-2'-hydroxypalmitoyl-l-O-β-d-glucopyranosyl-9-methyl-4,8-spingodienine (7), and stigmasta-7,22-dien-3β,5α,6α-triol (8) were first reported from the genus Ganodema. By using reverse pharmacophoric profiling of the six GTs, thirty potential anti-cancer therapeutic targets were identified and utilized to construct their ingredient-target interaction network. Then nineteen high frequency targets of GTs were selected from thirty potential targets to construct a protein interaction network (PIN). In order to cluster the pharmacological activity of GTs, twelve function modules were identified by molecular complex detection (MCODE) and gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis. The results indicated that anti-cancer effect of GTs might be related to histone acetylation and interphase of mitotic cell cycle by regulating general control non-derepressible 5 (GCN5) and cyclin-dependent kinase-2 (CDK2), respectively. This research mode of extraction, isolation, pharmacological prediction, and PIN analysis might be beneficial to rapidly predict and discover pharmacological activities of novel compounds.

  12. Suicide genes or p53 gene and p53 target genes as targets for cancer gene therapy by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bing; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Zhang Hong

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy has some disadvantages due to the severe side-effect on the normal tissues at a curative dose of ionizing radiation (IR). Similarly, as a new developing approach, gene therapy also has some disadvantages, such as lack of specificity for tumors, limited expression of therapeutic gene, potential biological risk. To certain extent, above problems would be solved by the suicide genes or p53 gene and its target genes therapies targeted by ionizing radiation. This strategy not only makes up the disadvantage from radiotherapy or gene therapy alone, but also promotes success rate on the base of lower dose. By present, there have been several vectors measuring up to be reaching clinical trials. This review focused on the development of the cancer gene therapy through suicide genes or p53 and its target genes mediated by IR. (authors)

  13. Targeted Gene Therapy for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    or immunotoxin therapy, natural vector-host tropisms must be altered. Recent improvements in monoclonal antibody (mAb) engineering have expanded the...endocytosis. To achieve targeted gene therapy or immunotoxin therapy, natural vector-host tropisms must be altered. Recent improvements in monoclonal...trafficking of monoclonal antibody- antigen to an endolysosomal pathway is important. After altering targeting specificities, prokaryotic and plant

  14. Proteomics of anti-cancer drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Hana; Martinková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Skalníková, Helena; Novák, Petr; Hajdůch, M.; Gadher, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Supplement 1 (2009), s. 84-84 E-ISSN 1742-4658. [34th FEBS Congress. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : proteomics * anti-cancer drugs * biomarkers Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  15. Two likely targets for the anti-cancer effect of indole derivatives from cruciferous vegetables: PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popolo, Ada; Pinto, Aldo; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Rastrelli, Luca

    2017-10-01

    Diets containing high quantities of plant foods are linked with a decreased likelihood of incidence of cancer. Several common plant-based dietary components exert effects on DNA methylation levels, and can positively influence genome stability and the transcription of tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C) is a substance present in vegetables of the Brassicaeae family, especially broccoli, white cabbage, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower. The in vivo biological effects of I3C are ascribed to a series of oligomeric products (including 3,3'-diindolylmethane), developed under acidic conditions. I3C is one of the many natural products and bioactive compounds found in foods which have recently received much attention for its potential effects in cancer prevention and treatment. In vitro studies report that I3C suppresses the proliferation of different tumor cells, including those isolated from breast, prostate, endometrium, and colon cancers. I3C resulted to be a potent in vivo chemopreventive agent for certain hormone-dependent cancers, including breast and cervical cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are not well defined. In this review, we have analysed recent literature on the use of indole derivatives against various forms of cancer, and have identified the main signalling pathways involved in their anti-cancer effect as PI3K/Akt/mTOR and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliki Tsakraklides

    Full Text Available Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications.

  17. Targeting Herpetic Keratitis by Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Mostafa Elbadawy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular gene therapy is rapidly becoming a reality. By November 2012, approximately 28 clinical trials were approved to assess novel gene therapy agents. Viral infections such as herpetic keratitis caused by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 can cause serious complications that may lead to blindness. Recurrence of the disease is likely and cornea transplantation, therefore, might not be the ideal therapeutic solution. This paper will focus on the current situation of ocular gene therapy research against herpetic keratitis, including the use of viral and nonviral vectors, routes of delivery of therapeutic genes, new techniques, and key research strategies. Whereas the correction of inherited diseases was the initial goal of the field of gene therapy, here we discuss transgene expression, gene replacement, silencing, or clipping. Gene therapy of herpetic keratitis previously reported in the literature is screened emphasizing candidate gene therapy targets. Commonly adopted strategies are discussed to assess the relative advantages of the protective therapy using antiviral drugs and the common gene therapy against long-term HSV-1 ocular infections signs, inflammation and neovascularization. Successful gene therapy can provide innovative physiological and pharmaceutical solutions against herpetic keratitis.

  18. Investigation of antibacterial and anti-cancer activities of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of antibacterial and anti-cancer activities of Streptomyces sp SRF1 culture filtrate. Kusavadee Sangdee, Benjaporn Buranrat, Prapairat Seephonkai, Nilawan Surapong, Aphidech Sangdee ...

  19. Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Using Carbohydrate-Based Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbari, Javad; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Alibakhshi, Abbas; Tabarzad, Maryam; Hejazi, Maryam; Ramezani, Mohammad

    2018-02-12

    Polymeric drug delivery systems in the form of nanocarriers are the most interesting vehicles in anticancer therapy. Among different types of biocompatible polymers, carbohydrate-based polymers or polysaccharides are the most common natural polymers with complex structures consisting of long chains of monosaccharide or disaccharide units bound by glycosidic linkages. Their appealing properties such as availability, biocompatibility, biodegradability, low toxicity, high chemical reactivity, facile chemical modification and low cost led to their extensive applications in biomedical and pharmaceutical fields including development of nano-vehicles for delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic agents. Generally, reducing systemic toxicity, increasing short half-lives and tumor localization of agents are the top priorities for a successful cancer therapy. Polysaccharide-based or - coated nanosystems with respect to their advantageous features as well as accumulation in tumor tissue due to enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect can provide promising carrier systems for the delivery of noblest impressive agents. Most challenging factor in cancer therapy was the toxicity of anti-cancer therapeutic agents for normal cells and therefore, targeted delivery of these drugs to the site of action can be considered as an interesting therapeutic strategy. In this regard, several polysaccharides exhibited selective affinity for specific cell types, and so they can act as a targeting agent in drug delivery systems. Accordingly, different aspects of polysaccharide applications in cancer treatment or diagnosis were reviewed in this paper. In this regard, after a brief introduction of polysaccharide structure and its importance, the pharmaceutical usage of carbohydrate-based polymers was considered according to the identity of accompanying active pharmaceutical agents. It was also presented that the carbohydrate based polymers have been extensively considered as promising materials in

  20. Co-delivery of VP-16 and Bcl-2-targeted antisense on PEG-grafted oMWCNTs for synergistic in vitro anti-cancer effects in non-small and small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Zbynek; Polanska, Hana; Krizkova, Sona; Balvan, Jan; Raudenska, Martina; Dostalova, Simona; Moulick, Amitava; Masarik, Michal; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-02-01

    Present study describes the preparation of a polyethylene glycol-grafted oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (oMWCNTs-PEG) hybrid nanosystem as a carrier of etoposide (VP-16) and Bcl-2 phosphorothioate antisense deoxyoligonucleotides (Aso) to achieve a superior cytostastic efficacy in non-small and small cell lung cancer in vitro. We have demonstrated that the adsorption of hydrophobic VP-16 and Bcl-2 Aso results in a stable nanotransporter exhibiting good dispersion with excellent release profiles (both, in pH 7.4 and 4.8) and negligible hemolytic activity (up to 6.5%). The evaluation of cytotoxicity was carried out in in vitro using small cell (SCLC; DMS53) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC; NCIH2135) cell lines. It was found that Bcl-2 interference significantly increased the anti-cancer efficiency of VP-16 in the chemoresistant NSCLC cells. This was further supported using a flow-cytometry (Annexin V/propidium iodide assay), which revealed a significant increase in apoptotic cells in both the cell lines after the co-administration of VP-16 and Bcl-2 Aso using oMWCNTs-PEG hybrid, and fluorescence microscopy, which showed an increase in reactive oxygen species identified after Bcl-2 knock-down. Overall, oMWCNTs-PEG provided an exceptional biocompatible vehicle enabling the internalization of negatively charged nucleic acids and pH-sensitive release of cargoes in a hypoxic environment of the most of solid tumors. Moreover, Aso specifically binding to the first six codons of the Bcl-2 mRNA gave a satisfactorily decrease in Bcl-2 translation and an increase in NCIH2135 chemosensitivity towards VP-16. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. [Molecular mechanism regulating effect of anti-cancer agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saya, Hideyuki

    2009-01-01

    Faithful genome duplication is achieved by accurate coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Abnormalities occurring in this process are checked by biochemical signal transduction pathways, called checkpoints, which ensure the orderly progression of events in the cell cycle. Checkpoints prevent transition into subsequent phases until all processes in the previous phase are completed. Defects in cell cycle checkpoints result in gene mutations, chromosome damage, and aneuploidy, all of which contribute to tumorigenesis. However, it has recently been uncovered that the impairment of checkpoint function is the major reason why DNA damaging anti-cancer agents can selectively kill cancer cells. Given that G1 and G2 checkpoint functions are generally impaired in cancer cells, cells with DNA damage are unable to maintain G2 arrest and eventually die as they enter mitosis. This process is known as mitotic catastrophe.

  2. Identification and targeting of genes in atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Capelleveen, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was to assess the relevance of variations in known and novel genes for CVD associated endpoints in order to ultimately identify therapeutic targets for the treatment of atherosclerosis. The type of research is truly translational; it nourishes on the

  3. Genetic nanomedicine: gene delivery by targeted lipoplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzgüneş, Nejat; de Ilarduya, Conchita Tros

    2012-01-01

    Cationic liposome-DNA complexes (lipoplexes) are used for the delivery of plasmid DNA to cultured cells and various tissues in vivo. In this chapter, we describe the preparation and evaluation of plain and targeted lipoplexes, using targeting ligands, including epidermal growth factor and transferrin. Ligand-associated lipoplexes may be used to target DNA or other nucleic acid drugs to specific cells, particularly cancer cells that overexpress the receptors for the ligands. We provide examples of the enhancement of gene expression mediated by epidermal growth factor in murine and human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells, and human hepatoblastoma and rat colon adenocarcinoma cells. We also summarize the studies on the use of transferrin-lipoplexes for enhancing gene delivery to cervical carcinoma, murine colon carcinoma, and African green monkey kidney cells. We outline two animal models in which transferrin-lipoplexes have been used for antitumor therapy by delivering either the gene encoding interleukin-12 or a suicide gene: a CT26 murine colon carcinoma, and a syngeneic, orthotopic murine oral squamous cell carcinoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A two-cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product inclusion body formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dual cassette reporter system capable of assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding. The present invention further relates to vectors and host cells comprising the dual cassette reporter system. In addition the invention relates to the use...... of the dual cassette reporter system for assessing target gene translation and target gene product folding....

  5. Targeting Conserved Genes in Alternaria Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón, Miguel Ángel; López-Calleja, Inés María; González, Isabel; Martín, Rosario; García, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a molecular biology technique based on the detection of the fluorescence produced by a reporter molecule, which increases as the reaction proceeds proportionally to the accumulation of the PCR product within each amplification cycle. The fluorescent reporter molecules include dyes that bind to the double-stranded DNA (i.e., SYBR ® Green) or sequence-specific probes (i.e., Molecular Beacons or TaqMan ® Probes). Real-time PCR provides a tool for accurate and sensitive quantification of target fungal DNA. Here, we describe a TaqMan real-time PCR method for specific detection and quantification of Alternaria spp. The method uses Alternaria-specific primers and probe, targeting the internal transcribed spacer regions ITS1 and ITS2 of the rRNA gene, and a positive amplification control based on 18S rRNA gene.

  6. Engineering liposomal nanoparticles for targeted gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylberberg, C; Gaskill, K; Pasley, S; Matosevic, S

    2017-08-01

    Recent mechanistic studies have attempted to deepen our understanding of the process by which liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material occurs. Understanding the interactions between lipid nanoparticles and cells is still largely elusive. Liposome-mediated delivery of genetic material faces systemic obstacles alongside entry into the cell, endosomal escape, lysosomal degradation and nuclear uptake. Rational design approaches for targeted delivery have been developed to reduce off-target effects and enhance transfection. These strategies, which have included the modification of lipid nanoparticles with target-specific ligands to enhance intracellular uptake, have shown significant promise at the proof-of-concept stage. Control of physical and chemical specifications of liposome composition, which includes lipid-to-DNA charge, size, presence of ester bonds, chain length and nature of ligand complexation, is integral to the performance of targeted liposomes as genetic delivery agents. Clinical advances are expected to rely on such systems in the therapeutic application of liposome nanoparticle-based gene therapy. Here, we discuss the latest breakthroughs in the development of targeted liposome-based agents for the delivery of genetic material, paying particular attention to new ligand and cationic lipid design as well as recent in vivo advances.

  7. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-10-16

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  8. Anti-cancer effect of oncolytic adenovirus-armed shRNA targeting MYCN gene on doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Zhuo, Baobiao; Yin, Yiyu; Han, Tao; Li, Shixian; Li, Zhengwei; Wang, Jian

    2017-09-09

    Chemotherapy is one of the few effective choices for patients with neuroblastoma. However, the development of muti-drug resistance (MDR) to chemotherapy is a major obstacle to the effective treatment of advanced or recurrent neuroblastoma. The muti-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP), which encodes a transmembrane glycoprotein, is a key regulator of MDR. The expression of MRP is a close correlation with MYCN oncogene in neuroblastoma. We have recently shown ZD55-shMYCN (oncolytic virus armed with shRNA against MYCN) can down-regulate MYCN to inhibit tumor cells proliferation and induce apoptosis in neuroblastoma. Here we further report ZD55-shMYCN re-sensitized doxorubicin-resistant cells to doxorubicin (as shown by reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and inhibited cell migration), and reduced the in vivo growth rate of neuroblastoma xenografts by down-regulation of MRP expression. Sequential therapy with doxorubicin did not affect the replication of ZD55-shMYCN in doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma cells, but decreased the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-X L , MMP-1. Thus, this synergistic effect of ZD55-shMYCN in combination with doxorubicin provides a novel therapy strategy for doxorubicin-resistant neuroblastoma, and is a promising approach for further clinical development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene transfer technology and genetic radioisotope targeting therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jiaqiong; Wang Zizheng

    2004-01-01

    With deeper cognition about mechanisms of disease at the cellular and molecular level, gene therapy has become one of the most important research fields in medical molecular biology at present. Gene transfer technology plays an important role during the course of gene therapy, and further improvement should be made about vectors carrying target gene sequences. Also, gene survey is needed during gene therapy, and gene imaging is the most effective method. The combination of gene therapy and targeted radiotherapy, that is, 'Genetic Radioisotope Targeting Therapy', will be a novel approach to tumor gene therapy

  10. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this case, the ...

  11. Targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1- casein gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-11-28

    Nov 28, 2011 ... Targeting an exogenous gene into a favorable gene locus and for expression under endogenous regulators is an ideal method in mammary gland bioreactor research. For this purpose, a gene targeting vector was constructed to targeting the human lysozyme gene on bovine αs1-casein gene locus. In this.

  12. Selective anti-cancer agents as anti-aging drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-12-01

    Recent groundbreaking discoveries have revealed that IGF-1, Ras, MEK, AMPK, TSC1/2, FOXO, PI3K, mTOR, S6K, and NFκB are involved in the aging process. This is remarkable because the same signaling molecules, oncoproteins and tumor suppressors, are well-known targets for cancer therapy. Furthermore, anti-cancer drugs aimed at some of these targets have been already developed. This arsenal could be potentially employed for anti-aging interventions (given that similar signaling molecules are involved in both cancer and aging). In cancer, intrinsic and acquired resistance, tumor heterogeneity, adaptation, and genetic instability of cancer cells all hinder cancer-directed therapy. But for anti-aging applications, these hurdles are irrelevant. For example, since anti-aging interventions should be aimed at normal postmitotic cells, no selection for resistance is expected. At low doses, certain agents may decelerate aging and age-related diseases. Importantly, deceleration of aging can in turn postpone cancer, which is an age-related disease.

  13. Anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives and analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-09-01

    Natural products have played a vital role in drug discovery and development process for cancer. Diospyrin, a plant based bisnaphthoquinonoid, has been used as a lead molecule in an effort to develop anti-cancer drugs. Several derivatives/analogues have been synthesized and screened for their pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities so far. Our review is focused on the pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives/analogues and the different mechanisms potentially involved in the bioactivity of these compounds. Particular focus has been placed on the different mechanisms (both chemical and molecular) thought to underlie the bioactivity of these compounds. A brief bioinformatics analysis at the end of the article provides novel insights into the new potential mechanisms and pathways by which these compounds might exert their effects and lead to a better realization of the full therapeutic potential of these compounds as anti-cancer drugs. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Beliefs Underlying Messages of Anti-Cancer-Screening Websites in Japan: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhara, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Okada, Masahumi; Kato, Mio; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2018-02-26

    Background: Cancer screening rates are lower in Japan than in Western countries. Meanwhile, anti-cancer-screening activists take to the internet to spread their messages that cancer screening has little or no efficacy, poses substantial health risks such as side effects from radiation exposure, and that people should forgo cancer screening. We applied a qualitative approach to explore the beliefs underlying the messages of anti-cancer-screening websites, by focusing on perceived value the beliefs provided to those who held them. Methods: We conducted online searches using Google Japan and Yahoo! Japan, targeting websites we classified as “pro,” “anti,” or “neutral” depending on their claims. We applied a dual analytic approach- inductive thematic analysis and deductive interpretative analysis- to the textual data of the anti websites. Results: Of the 88 websites analyzed, five themes that correspond to beliefs were identified: destruction of common knowledge, denial of standard cancer control, education about right cancer control, education about hidden truths, and sense of superiority that only I know the truth. Authors of anti websites ascribed two values (“safety of people” and “self-esteem”) to their beliefs. Conclusion: The beliefs of authors of anti-cancer-screening websites were supposed to be strong. It would be better to target in cancer screening promotion not outright screening refusers but screening hesitant people who are more amenable to changing their attitudes toward screening. The possible means to persuade them were discussed. Creative Commons Attribution License

  15. Ethnobotany and ethnopharmacy--their role for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Michael; Bremner, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Local and traditional knowledge has been the starting point for many successful drug development projects over the last decades. Here we discuss some examples of anti-cancer drugs which have had enormous impact as anti-cancer agents (camptothecan, taxol and derivatives) and a few examples of drugs currently under various stages of preclinical development. Ethnobotanists investigate the relationship between humans and plants in all its complexity, and such research is generally based on a detailed observation and study of the use a society makes of plants. The requirements of modern research on natural products as, for example, outlined in the Convention on Biological Diversity (Rio Convention) and the overall approach in ethnobotanical research are also discussed. Selected phytochemical-pharmacological studies based on traditional plant use are used to highlight the potential of ethnobotany driven anti-cancer research. The link between traditionally used plants and targets of the NF-kappaB pathway is discussed using on an EU-funded, multidisciplinary project as an example. Lastly the potential of chemopreventive agents derived from traditional food plants is briefly addressed.

  16. Chromosomal position effects on AAV-mediated gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornea, Anda M; Russell, David W

    2010-06-01

    The effects of chromosomal position and neighboring genomic elements on gene targeting in human cells remain largely unexplored. To study these, we used a shuttle vector system in which murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based proviral targets present at different chromosomal locations and containing mutations in the neomycin phosphotransferase (neo) gene were corrected by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene targeting. Sixteen identical target loci present in HT-1080 human sarcoma cells were all successfully corrected by gene targeting. The gene targeting frequencies varied by as much as 10-fold, and there was a clear bias for correction of one of the targets in clones containing two target sites. The targeting frequency at each site was correlated to the proximity and density of various genomic elements, and we found a significant association of higher targeting frequencies at loci near a subset of dinucleotide microsatellite repeats (r = -0.55, P targeting frequencies at the target loci (r = 0.52, P targeting frequencies. Our results indicate that certain chromosomal positions are preferred sites for gene targeting in human cells.

  17. Listeria monocytogenes as a vector for anti-cancer therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tangney, Mark

    2012-01-31

    The intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes represents a promising therapeutic vector for the delivery of DNA, RNA or protein to cancer cells or to prime immune responses against tumour-specific antigens. A number of biological properties make L. monocytogenes a promising platform for development as a vector for either gene therapy or as an anti-cancer vaccine vector. L. monocytogenes is particularly efficient in mediating internalization into host cells. Once inside cells, the bacterium produces specific virulence factors which lyse the vaculolar membrane and allow escape into the cytoplasm. Once in the cytosol, L. monocytogenes is capable of actin-based motility and cell-to-cell spread without an extracellular phase. The cytoplasmic location of L. monocytogenes is significant as this potentiates entry of antigens into the MHC Class I antigen processing pathway leading to priming of specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The cytoplasmic location is also beneficial for the delivery of DNA (bactofection) by L. monocytogenes whilst cell-to-cell spread may facilitate access of the vector to cells throughout the tumour. Several preclinical studies have demonstrated the ability of L. monocytogenes for intracellular gene or protein delivery in vitro and in vivo, and this vector has also displayed safety and efficacy in clinical trial. Here, we review the features of the L. monocytogenes host-pathogen interaction that make this bacterium such an attractive candidate with which to induce appropriate therapeutic responses. We focus primarily upon work that has led to attenuation of the pathogen, demonstrated DNA, RNA or protein delivery to tumour cells as well as research that shows the efficacy of L. monocytogenes as a vector for tumour-specific vaccine delivery.

  18. Anti-cancer natural products isolated from chinese medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Guosheng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, a number of natural products isolated from Chinese herbs have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, suppress angiogenesis, retard metastasis and enhance chemotherapy, exhibiting anti-cancer potential both in vitro and in vivo. This article summarizes recent advances in in vitro and in vivo research on the anti-cancer effects and related mechanisms of some promising natural products. These natural products are also reviewed for their therapeutic potentials, including flavonoids (gambogic acid, curcumin, wogonin and silibinin, alkaloids (berberine, terpenes (artemisinin, β-elemene, oridonin, triptolide, and ursolic acid, quinones (shikonin and emodin and saponins (ginsenoside Rg3, which are isolated from Chinese medicinal herbs. In particular, the discovery of the new use of artemisinin derivatives as excellent anti-cancer drugs is also reviewed.

  19. Neurological complications of medical anti-cancer therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Hildebrand

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This review describes the features of central and peripheral neurological disorders caused by anti-cancer chemotherapy and supportive medications, such as antiepileptic drugs, glucocorticosteroids and opioids, frequently used in cancer patients. Diffuse encephalopathy with or without epileptic seizures, cerebellar disorders and aseptic meningitis may occur after systemic administration of conventional drug doses, but their incidence is much higher when either high-dose chemotherapy, or intrathecal or intracarotid administration is used. Spinal cord and/or spinal root lesions have been reported after intrathecal administration of methotrexate or cytosinearabinoside. Anti-cancer chemotherapy is the leading cause of peripheral neuropathy in cancer patients. The main culprits are vinca alkaloids, platinum derivatives and taxanes. Anti-cancer chemotherapy has no significant toxic effect on muscle tissue, but heavy administration of glucocorticosteroids is a common cause of disabling, predominantly pelvic, muscle atrophy.

  20. The mechanism of gene targeting in human somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinan Kan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting in human somatic cells is of importance because it can be used to either delineate the loss-of-function phenotype of a gene or correct a mutated gene back to wild-type. Both of these outcomes require a form of DNA double-strand break (DSB repair known as homologous recombination (HR. The mechanism of HR leading to gene targeting, however, is not well understood in human cells. Here, we demonstrate that a two-end, ends-out HR intermediate is valid for human gene targeting. Furthermore, the resolution step of this intermediate occurs via the classic DSB repair model of HR while synthesis-dependent strand annealing and Holliday Junction dissolution are, at best, minor pathways. Moreover, and in contrast to other systems, the positions of Holliday Junction resolution are evenly distributed along the homology arms of the targeting vector. Most unexpectedly, we demonstrate that when a meganuclease is used to introduce a chromosomal DSB to augment gene targeting, the mechanism of gene targeting is inverted to an ends-in process. Finally, we demonstrate that the anti-recombination activity of mismatch repair is a significant impediment to gene targeting. These observations significantly advance our understanding of HR and gene targeting in human cells.

  1. Gene therapy and radionuclides targeting therapy in mammary carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinhua

    2003-01-01

    Breast carcinoma's gene therapy is a hotspot in study of the tumor's therapy in the recent years. Currently the major therapy methods that in the experimentative and primary clinical application phases include immunological gene therapy, multidrug resistance gene therapy, antisense oligonucleotide therapy and suicide gene therapy. The gene targeting brachytherapy, which is combined with gene therapy and radiotherapy has enhanced the killer effects of the suicide gene and nuclide in tumor cells. That has break a new path in tumor's gene therapy. The further study in this field will step up it's space to the clinical application

  2. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  3. Molecular targeting of gene therapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Kufe, D.W.; Advani, S.J.; Roizman, B.

    2001-01-01

    The full promise of gene therapy has been limited by the lack of specificity of vectors for tumor tissue as well as the lack of antitumor efficacy of transgenes encoded by gene delivery systems. In this paper we review our studies investigating two modifications of gene therapy combined with radiotherapy. The first investigations described include studies of radiation inducible gene therapy. In this paradigm, radio-inducible DNA sequences from the CarG elements of the Egr-1 promoter are cloned upstream of a cDNA encoding TNFa. The therapeutic gene (TNFa) is induced by radiation within the tumor microenvironment. In the second paradigm, genetically engineered herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) is induced by ionizing radiation to proliferate within the tumor volume. These modifications of radiotherapy and gene therapy may enhance the efficacy of both treatments

  4. Development of a Novel Anti-HIF-1α Screening System Coupled with Biochemical and Biological Validation for Rapidly Selecting Potent Anti-Cancer Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Madu, Chikezie; Masters, Jordan; Lu, Andrew; Li, Liyuan

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) is the most diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death in the American women. Adaptation to the hypoxic environment seen in solid tumors is critical for tumor cell survival and growth. The activation of hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α), an important master transcriptional factor that is induced and stabilized by intratumoral hypoxia, stimulates a group of HIF-1α-regulated genes including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), leading tumor cells towards malignant progression. Therefore, a promising therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is to target HIF-1α. The goal of this project was to develop and validate a screening system coupled with secondary screen/validation process that has the capability to screen large numbers of potential anti-cancer small-molecule compounds based on their anti-HIF-1α activities. Breast cancer MDA-231 cells were used as the model to select potent anti-HIF-1α compounds by their abilities to inhibit transactivation of a VEGF promoter fused to a luciferase reporter gene under hypoxia. Positive compounds were then validated by a series of assays that confirm compounds' anti-HIF-1α activities including measurement of HIF-1α downstream VEGF gene expression and angiogenic ability of BCa cells. Results of our pilot screening demonstrate that this prototype screening coupled with validation system can effectively select highly potent anti-HIF-1α agents from the compound library, suggesting that this prototype screen system has the potential to be developed into a high-throughput screen (HTS) coupled with automated validation process for the screening and identification of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs based on anti-HIF-1α mechanism.

  5. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  6. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  7. Onion: Anti Cancer Sulfur Compounds with High Cancer Chemo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Onions are chock full of anti cancer sulfur compounds which are highly beneficial for cancer chemoprevention. Advanced studies have shown that onion may be inhibit liver, colon, prostate, lung cancer etc. with high antioxidant properties which also reduce not only oxidative stress, free radicals but also xenobiotics.

  8. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dong, L. F.; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 199-208 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitocans * Anti-cancer therapeutics * Classification Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.524, year: 2013

  9. Screening of Chinese brassica species for anti-cancer sulforaphane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural sulforaphane and erucin have been of increasing interest for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries due to their anti-cancer effect. The sulforaphane and/or erucin contents in seeds of 43 different Chinese Brassica oleracea L. varieties were analyzed by HPLC and GC-MS. Among them, 21 cultivars seed meal ...

  10. Syntheses, characterization, and anti-cancer activities of pyridine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Syntheses, characterization, and anti-cancer activities of pyridine-amide based compounds containing appended phenol or catechol groups. AFSAR ALIa, DEEPAK BANSALa, NAGENDRA K KAUSHIKb, NEHA KAUSHIKb,. EUN HA CHOIb and RAJEEV GUPTAa,∗. aDepartment of Chemistry, University of Delhi, Delhi 110 ...

  11. Screening of Chinese brassica species for anti-cancer sulforaphane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... Natural sulforaphane and erucin have been of increasing interest for nutraceutical and pharmaceutical industries due to their anti-cancer effect. The sulforaphane and/or erucin contents in seeds of 43 different Chinese Brassica oleracea L. varieties were analyzed by HPLC and GC-MS. Among them, 21.

  12. Molecular Biological Study of Anti-cancer Effects of Bee Venom Aqua-acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Chan-Yol

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available To study anti-cancer effect and molecular biological mechanism of bee venom for aqua-acupuncture, the effects of bee venom on cell viability and apoptosis were analyzed using MTT assay, tryphan blue assay, [3H]thymidine release assay, flow cytometric analysis, and activity of caspase-3 protease activity assay. To explore whether anti-cancer effects of bee venom are associated with the transcriptional control of gene expression, quantitative RT-PCR analysis of apoptosis-related genes was performed. The obtained results are summarized as follows: 1. The MTT assay demonstrated that cell viability was decreased by bee venom in a dose-dependant manner. 2. Significant induction of apoptosis was identified using tryphan blue assay, [3H]thymidine release assay, and flow cytometric analysis of sub G1 fraction. 3. In analysis of caspase-3 protease activity, the activity had increased significantly, in a dose-dependant manner. 4. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of the apoptosis-related genes showed that Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL were down-regulated whereas Bax was up-regulated by bee venom treatment.

  13. Observation and Analysis of Anti-cancer Drug Use and Dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As all anti-cancer drugs are of narrow therapeutic window so dose individualization is required to be done. A study was conducted to check the use of anti-cancer drugs in the local anti-cancer facility of Bahawalpur i.e. Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (BINO). In this study, the dose individualization ...

  14. Network pharmacology analysis of the anti-cancer pharmacological mechanisms of Ganoderma lucidum extract with experimental support using Hepa1-6-bearing C57 BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruo-Lin; He, Yu-Min

    2018-01-10

    Ganoderma lucidum (GL) is an oriental medical fungus, which was used to prevent and treat many diseases. Previously, the effective compounds of Ganoderma lucidum extract (GLE) were extracted from two kinds of GL, [Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. Ex Fr.) Karst.] and [Ganoderma sinense Zhao, Xu et Zhang], which have been used for adjuvant anti-cancer clinical therapy for more than 20 years. However, its concrete active compounds and its regulation mechanisms on tumor are unclear. In this study, we aimed to identify the main active compounds from GLE and to investigate its anti-cancer mechanisms via drug-target biological network construction and prediction. The main active compounds of GLE were identified by HPLC, EI-MS and NMR, and the compounds related targets were predicted using docking program. To investigate the functions of GL holistically, the active compounds of GL and related targets were predicted based on four public databases. Subsequently, the Identified-Compound-Target network and Predicted-Compound-Target network were constructed respectively, and they were overlapped to detect the hub potential targets in both networks. Furthermore, the qRT-PCR and western-blot assays were used to validate the expression levels of target genes in GLE treated Hepa1-6-bearing C57 BL/6 mice. In our work, 12 active compounds of GLE were identified, including Ganoderic acid A, Ganoderenic acid A, Ganoderic acid B, Ganoderic acid H, Ganoderic acid C2, Ganoderenic acid D, Ganoderic acid D, Ganoderenic acid G, Ganoderic acid Y, Kaemferol, Genistein and Ergosterol. Using the docking program, 20 targets were mapped to 12 compounds of GLE. Furthermore, 122 effective active compounds of GL and 116 targets were holistically predicted using public databases. Compare with the Identified-Compound-Target network and Predicted-Compound-Target network, 6 hub targets were screened, including AR, CHRM2, ESR1, NR3C1, NR3C2 and PGR, which was considered as potential markers and might play

  15. A new electrospray method for targeted gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stephan; Ruzgys, Paulius; Tamò, Luca; Šatkauskas, Saulius; Geiser, Thomas; Gazdhar, Amiq; Hradetzky, David

    2018-03-05

    A challenge for gene therapy is absence of safe and efficient local delivery of therapeutic genetic material. An efficient and reproducible physical method of electrospray for localized and targeted gene delivery is presented. Electrospray works on the principle of coulombs repulsion, under influence of electric field the liquid carrying genetic material is dispersed into micro droplets and is accelerated towards the targeted tissue, acting as a counter electrode. The accelerated droplets penetrate the targeted cells thus facilitating the transfer of genetic material into the cell. The work described here presents the principle of electrospray for gene delivery, the basic instrument design, and the various optimized parameters to enhance gene transfer in vitro. We estimate a transfection efficiency of up to 60% was achieved. We describe an efficient gene transfer method and a potential electrospray-mediated gene transfer mechanism.

  16. Characterisation of genome-wide PLZF/RARA target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Spicuglia

    Full Text Available The PLZF/RARA fusion protein generated by the t(11;17(q23;q21 translocation in acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL is believed to act as an oncogenic transcriptional regulator recruiting epigenetic factors to genes important for its transforming potential. However, molecular mechanisms associated with PLZF/RARA-dependent leukaemogenesis still remain unclear.We searched for specific PLZF/RARA target genes by ChIP-on-chip in the haematopoietic cell line U937 conditionally expressing PLZF/RARA. By comparing bound regions found in U937 cells expressing endogenous PLZF with PLZF/RARA-induced U937 cells, we isolated specific PLZF/RARA target gene promoters. We next analysed gene expression profiles of our identified target genes in PLZF/RARA APL patients and analysed DNA sequences and epigenetic modification at PLZF/RARA binding sites. We identify 413 specific PLZF/RARA target genes including a number encoding transcription factors involved in the regulation of haematopoiesis. Among these genes, 22 were significantly down regulated in primary PLZF/RARA APL cells. In addition, repressed PLZF/RARA target genes were associated with increased levels of H3K27me3 and decreased levels of H3K9K14ac. Finally, sequence analysis of PLZF/RARA bound sequences reveals the presence of both consensus and degenerated RAREs as well as enrichment for tissue-specific transcription factor motifs, highlighting the complexity of targeting fusion protein to chromatin. Our study suggests that PLZF/RARA directly targets genes important for haematopoietic development and supports the notion that PLZF/RARA acts mainly as an epigenetic regulator of its direct target genes.

  17. Gene therapy for meningioma: improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, Clemens M. F.; Grill, Jacques; Lamfers, Martine L. M.; van der Valk, Paul; Leonhart, Angelique M.; van Beusechem, Victor W.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Pinedo, Herbert M.; Curiel, David T.; Vandertop, W. Peter; Gerritsen, Winald R.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECT: Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  18. Gene therapy for meningioma : improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, CMF; Grill, J; Lamfers, MLM; Van der Valk, P; Leonhart, AM; Van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Curiel, DT; Vandertop, WP; Gerritsen, WR

    Object. Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  19. TBC2target: A Resource of Predicted Target Genes of Tea Bioactive Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Yijun; Yang, Jian; Liao, Mingzhi; Bi, Shoudong; Xie, Zhongwen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Wan, Xiaochun

    2018-01-01

    Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages consumed worldwide. Numerous bioactive constituents of tea were confirmed to possess healthy benefits via the mechanisms of regulating gene expressions or protein activities. However, a complete interacting profile between tea bioactive compounds (TBCs) and their target genes is lacking, which put an obstacle in the study of healthy function of tea. To fill this gap, we developed a database of target genes of TBCs (TBC2target, http://camellia.ahau.edu.cn/TBC2target) based on a pharmacophore mapping approach. In TBC2target, 6,226 interactions between 240 TBCs and 673 target genes were documented. TBC2target contains detailed information about each interacting entry, such as TBC, CAS number, PubChem CID, source of compound (e.g., green, black), compound type, target gene(s) of TBC, gene symbol, gene ID, ENSEMBL ID, PDB ID, TBC bioactivity and the reference. Using the TBC-target associations, we constructed a bipartite network and provided users the global network and local sub-network visualization and topological analyses. The entire database is free for online browsing, searching and downloading. In addition, TBC2target provides a BLAST search function to facilitate use of the database. The particular strengths of TBC2target are the inclusion of the comprehensive TBC-target interactions, and the capacity to visualize and analyze the interacting networks, which may help uncovering the beneficial effects of tea on human health as a central resource in tea health community.

  20. TBC2target: A Resource of Predicted Target Genes of Tea Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihua Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tea is one of the most popular non-alcoholic beverages consumed worldwide. Numerous bioactive constituents of tea were confirmed to possess healthy benefits via the mechanisms of regulating gene expressions or protein activities. However, a complete interacting profile between tea bioactive compounds (TBCs and their target genes is lacking, which put an obstacle in the study of healthy function of tea. To fill this gap, we developed a database of target genes of TBCs (TBC2target, http://camellia.ahau.edu.cn/TBC2target based on a pharmacophore mapping approach. In TBC2target, 6,226 interactions between 240 TBCs and 673 target genes were documented. TBC2target contains detailed information about each interacting entry, such as TBC, CAS number, PubChem CID, source of compound (e.g., green, black, compound type, target gene(s of TBC, gene symbol, gene ID, ENSEMBL ID, PDB ID, TBC bioactivity and the reference. Using the TBC-target associations, we constructed a bipartite network and provided users the global network and local sub-network visualization and topological analyses. The entire database is free for online browsing, searching and downloading. In addition, TBC2target provides a BLAST search function to facilitate use of the database. The particular strengths of TBC2target are the inclusion of the comprehensive TBC-target interactions, and the capacity to visualize and analyze the interacting networks, which may help uncovering the beneficial effects of tea on human health as a central resource in tea health community.

  1. Targeting a Novel Vector for Breast Cancer Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bzik, David

    2002-01-01

    .... The primary purpose and scope of this IDEA award project is to experimentally examine approaches to safely target the Toxoplasma gondii parasite gene therapy vector to breast cancer tissue using...

  2. Gene-Specific Demethylation as Targeted Therapy in MDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0161 TITLE: Gene-Specific Demethylation as Targeted Therapy in MDS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniel G. Tenen, M.D...15JUN2016-14JUN2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gene-Specific Demethylation as Targeted Therapy in MDS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM... magnetic beads capture all newly synthesized transcripts. To compare the transcriptional profiles under these conditions with our previous results, we

  3. Targeted gene deletion in Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollapour, M; Piper, P

    2001-01-30

    Yeasts of the genus Zygosaccharomyces are notable agents of large-scale food spoilage. Despite the economic importance of these organisms, little is known about the stress adaptations whereby they adapt to many of the more severe conditions of food preservation. In this study it was shown that genes of Z. bailii, a yeast notable for its high resistances to food preservatives and ethanol, can be isolated by complementation of the corresponding mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It was also discovered that the acquisition by S. cerevisiae of a single small Z. bailii gene (ZbYME2) was sufficient for the former yeast to acquire the ability to degrade two major food preservatives, benzoic acid and sorbic acid. Using DNA cassettes containing dominant selectable markers and methods originally developed for performing gene deletions in S. cerevisiae, the two copies of ZbYME2 in the Z. bailii genome were sequentially deleted. The resulting Zbyme2/Zbyme2 homozygous deletant strain had lost any ability to utilize benzoate as sole carbon source and was more sensitive to weak acid preservatives during growth on glucose. Thus, ZbYME2, probably the nuclear gene for a mitochondrial mono-oxygenase function, is essential for Z. bailii to degrade food preservatives. This ability to catabolize weak acid preservatives is a significant factor contributing to the preservative resistance of Z. bailii under aerobic conditions. This study is the first to demonstrate that it is possible to delete in Z. bailii genes that are suspected as being important for growth of this organism in preserved foods and beverages. With the construction of further mutant of Z. bailii strains, a clearer picture should emerge of how this yeast adapts to the conditions of food preservation. This information will, in turn, allow the design of new preservation strategies. GenBank Accession Nos: ZbURA3 (AF279259), ZbTIM9 (AF279260), ZbYME2 (AF279261), ZbTRP1 (AF279262), ZbHHT1(AF296170). Copyright 2000 John

  4. Inducement of radionuclides targeting therapy by gene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Quanyong

    2001-01-01

    The author presents an overview of gene transfection methods to genetically induce tumor cells to express enhanced levels of cell surface antigens and receptors to intake radiolabeled antibody and peptide targeting and thus increase their therapeutic effect in radiotherapy. The current research include inducement of radioimmunotherapy through CEA gene transfection, inducement of iodine-131 therapy by sodium iodide symporter gene transfection and inducement of MIBG therapy by noradrenaline transporter gene transfection. These studies raise the prospect that gene-therapy techniques could be used to enable the treatment of a wide range of tumors with radiopharmaceuticals of established clinical acceptability

  5. Resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Abdur; Imran, Muhammad; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Nadeem, Muhammad; Peters, Dennis G; Mubarak, Mohammad S

    2016-12-21

    Owing to their antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activity, grapes (Vitis vinifera L.) are the archetypal paradigms of fruits used not only for nutritional purposes, but also for exclusive therapeutics. Grapes are a prominent and promising source of phytochemicals, especially resveratrol, a phytoalexin antioxidant found in red grapes which has both chemopreventive and therapeutic effects against various ailments. Resveratrol's role in reducing different human cancers, including breast, cervical, uterine, blood, kidney, liver, eye, bladder, thyroid, esophageal, prostate, brain, lung, skin, gastric, colon, head and neck, bone, ovarian, and cervical, has been reviewed. This review covers the literature that deals with the anti-cancer mechanism of resveratrol with special reference to antioxidant potential. Furthermore, this article summarizes the literature pertaining to resveratrol as an anti-cancer agent.

  6. TargetMine, an integrated data warehouse for candidate gene prioritisation and target discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-An Chen

    Full Text Available Prioritising candidate genes for further experimental characterisation is a non-trivial challenge in drug discovery and biomedical research in general. An integrated approach that combines results from multiple data types is best suited for optimal target selection. We developed TargetMine, a data warehouse for efficient target prioritisation. TargetMine utilises the InterMine framework, with new data models such as protein-DNA interactions integrated in a novel way. It enables complicated searches that are difficult to perform with existing tools and it also offers integration of custom annotations and in-house experimental data. We proposed an objective protocol for target prioritisation using TargetMine and set up a benchmarking procedure to evaluate its performance. The results show that the protocol can identify known disease-associated genes with high precision and coverage. A demonstration version of TargetMine is available at http://targetmine.nibio.go.jp/.

  7. Epigenetic Editing: targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, M.L.; Verschure, P.J.; Rots, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined

  8. Epigenetic Editing : targeted rewriting of epigenetic marks to modulate expression of selected target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groote, Marloes L.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Rots, Marianne G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant advances made in epigenetic research in recent decades, many questions remain unresolved, especially concerning cause and consequence of epigenetic marks with respect to gene expression modulation (GEM). Technologies allowing the targeting of epigenetic enzymes to predetermined

  9. Epigenetic Modification of the Repair Donor Regulates Targeted Gene Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Humbert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimizing design of vectors is critical to effective gene therapy. In targeted gene correction (TGC, cleavage of chromosomal DNA near a mutation stimulates homology-directed repair of a target gene using a donor provided in trans. We have systematically addressed epigenetic parameters of donor design, using a flow-based assay to quantify correction frequencies and expression levels of a green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter gene in a human cell line. We show that active transcription of the donor increased correction frequency by threefold, establishing that a proximal promoter enhances donor use. Conversely, CpG methylation of the donor diminished correction frequency and reduced expression of the repaired gene. However, bisulfite sequencing of the target revealed no transfer of methylation marks during repair with a methylated donor. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors can partially compensate for epigenetic inactivation, suggesting a role for class I and II HDACs in regulation of donor use. These results establish that epigenetic status of a trans-donor determines both the efficiency and outcome of gene correction, and identify and clarify parameters that should guide donor design for targeted gene therapy.

  10. TF Target Mapper: A BLAST search tool for the identification of Transcription Factor target genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Spek Peter

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the current era of high throughput genomics a major challenge is the genome-wide identification of target genes for specific transcription factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP allows the isolation of in vivo binding sites of transcription factors and provides a powerful tool for examining gene regulation. Crosslinked chromatin is immunoprecipitated with antibodies against specific transcription factors, thus enriching for sequences bound in vivo by these factors in the immunoprecipitated DNA. Cloning and sequencing the immunoprecipitated sequences allows identification of transcription factor target genes. Routinely, thousands of such sequenced clones are used in BLAST searches to map their exact location in the genome and the genes located in the vicinity. These genes represent potential targets of the transcription factor of interest. Such bioinformatics analysis is very laborious if performed manually and for this reason there is a need for developing bioinformatic tools to automate and facilitate it. Results In order to facilitate this analysis we generated TF Target Mapper (Transcription Factor Target Mapper. TF Target Mapper is a BLAST search tool allowing rapid extraction of annotated information on genes around each hit. It combines sequence cleaning/filtering, pattern searching and BLAST searches with extraction of information on genes located around each BLAST hit and comparisons of the output list of genes or gene ontology IDs with user-implemented lists. We successfully applied and tested TF Target Mapper to analyse sequences bound in vivo by the transcription factor GATA-1. We show that TF Target Mapper efficiently extracted information on genes around ChIPed sequences, thus identifying known (e.g. α-globin and ζ-globin and potentially novel GATA-1 gene targets. Conclusion TF Target Mapper is a very efficient BLAST search tool that allows the rapid extraction of annotated information on the genes

  11. Exploiting Cancer Metal Metabolism using Anti-Cancer Metal-Binding Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlot, Angelica M; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Jansson, Patric J; Sahni, Sumit; Huang, Michael L; Lane, Darius L; Lok, Hiu; Richardson, Des R

    2017-07-05

    Metals are vital cellular elements necessary for multiple indispensable biological processes of living organisms, including energy transduction and cell proliferation. Interestingly, alterations in metal levels and also changes in the expression of proteins involved in metal metabolism have been demonstrated in a variety of cancers. Considering this and the important role of metals for cell growth, the development of drugs that sequester metals have become an attractive target for the development of novel anti-cancer agents. Interest in this field has surged with the design and development of new generations of chelators of the thiosemicarbazone class. These ligands have shown potent anti-cancer and anti-metastatic activity in vitro and in vivo. Due to their efficacy and safe toxicological assessment, some of these agents have recently entered multi-center clinical trials as therapeutics for advanced and resistant tumors. This review highlights the role, and changes in homeostasis, of metals in cancer and emphasizes the pre-clinical development and clinical assessment of metal ion-binding agents, namely, thiosemicarbazones, as anti-tumor agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. The Anti-Cancer Effect of Polyphenols against Breast Cancer and Cancer Stem Cells: Molecular Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdal Dayem

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of breast cancer in developed and developing countries, and its correlation to cancer-related deaths, has prompted concerned scientists to discover novel alternatives to deal with this challenge. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of polyphenol structures and classifications, as well as on the carcinogenic process. The biology of breast cancer cells will also be discussed. The molecular mechanisms involved in the anti-cancer activities of numerous polyphenols, against a wide range of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo, will be explained in detail. The interplay between autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer activity of polyphenols will also be highlighted. In addition, the potential of polyphenols to target cancer stem cells (CSCs via various mechanisms will be explained. Recently, the use of natural products as chemotherapeutics and chemopreventive drugs to overcome the side effects and resistance that arise from using chemical-based agents has garnered the attention of the scientific community. Polyphenol research is considered a promising field in the treatment and prevention of breast cancer.

  13. Cancer gene therapy targeting angiogenesis: An updated Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Chiu; Shen, Zan; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Lin, Marie CM

    2006-01-01

    Since the relationship between angiogenesis and tumor growth was established by Folkman in 1971, scientists have made efforts exploring the possibilities in treating cancer by targeting angiogenesis. Inhibition of angiogenesis growth factors and administration of angiogenesis inhibitors are the basics of anti-angiogenesis therapy. Transfer of anti-angiogenesis genes has received attention recently not only because of the advancement of recombinant vectors, but also because of the localized and sustained expression of therapeutic gene product inside the tumor after gene transfer. This review provides the up-to-date information about the strategies and the vectors studied in the field of anti-angiogenesis cancer gene therapy. PMID:17109514

  14. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillat, Cristina, E-mail: cristina.fillat@crg.es; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano [Programa Gens i Malaltia, Centre de Regulació Genòmica-CRG, UPF, Parc de Recerca Biomedica de Barcelona-PRBB and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBERER), Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-18

    The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  16. A comprehensive review on the anti-cancer properties and mechanisms of action of sesamin, a lignan in sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Massri, Mariam; Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2017-11-15

    Sesamin is the major active ingredient is Sesamum indicum seeds. Several studies revealed that sesamin possesses potent anti-cancer properties. The anti-cancer effects of sesamin have been mainly attributed to its anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, anti-metastatic, anti- and pro-angiogenic, and pro-autophagocytic activities. In this review, we provide a comprehensive summary of the reported anti-cancer effects of sesamin, both in vitro and in vivo. Experimental findings related to the potential of sesamin to attenuate oxidative stress, inflammation, proliferation, metastasis, and angiogenesis in various cancer cells and tumors are analyzed. Studies focusing on the ability of sesamin to induce apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells are also underscored. Moreover, the molecular mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer effects of sesamin are highlighted, and the major signaling pathways targeted by sesamin are identified. Although the exact signaling events triggered by sesamin in cancer cells are not fully revealed, our analysis indicates that NF-κB, STAT3, JNK, ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, PI3K/AKT, caspase-3, and p53 signaling pathways are critically involved in mediating the anti-cancer effects of sesamin. In sum, the experimental evidence suggesting that sesamin could exert potent anti-cancer activities in vitro and in vivo is compelling. Hence, sesamin can potentially be employed as an effective adjuvant therapeutic agent in ameliorating tumor development and progression, and therefore, it could be used in the prevention and/or treatment of various types of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimizing the design of oligonucleotides for homology directed gene targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miné-Hattab, Judith; Fleury, Geneviève; Prevost, Chantal; Dutreix, Marie; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-04-05

    Gene targeting depends on the ability of cells to use homologous recombination to integrate exogenous DNA into their own genome. A robust mechanistic model of homologous recombination is necessary to fully exploit gene targeting for therapeutic benefit. In this work, our recently developed numerical simulation model for homology search is employed to develop rules for the design of oligonucleotides used in gene targeting. A Metropolis Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to predict the pairing dynamics of an oligonucleotide with the target double-stranded DNA. The model calculates the base-alignment between a long, target double-stranded DNA and a probe nucleoprotein filament comprised of homologous recombination proteins (Rad51 or RecA) polymerized on a single strand DNA. In this study, we considered different sizes of oligonucleotides containing 1 or 3 base heterologies with the target; different positions on the probe were tested to investigate the effect of the mismatch position on the pairing dynamics and stability. We show that the optimal design is a compromise between the mean time to reach a perfect alignment between the two molecules and the stability of the complex. A single heterology can be placed anywhere without significantly affecting the stability of the triplex. In the case of three consecutive heterologies, our modeling recommends using long oligonucleotides (at least 35 bases) in which the heterologous sequences are positioned at an intermediate position. Oligonucleotides should not contain more than 10% consecutive heterologies to guarantee a stable pairing with the target dsDNA. Theoretical modeling cannot replace experiments, but we believe that our model can considerably accelerate optimization of oligonucleotides for gene therapy by predicting their pairing dynamics with the target dsDNA.

  18. Optimizing the design of oligonucleotides for homology directed gene targeting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Miné-Hattab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting depends on the ability of cells to use homologous recombination to integrate exogenous DNA into their own genome. A robust mechanistic model of homologous recombination is necessary to fully exploit gene targeting for therapeutic benefit. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work, our recently developed numerical simulation model for homology search is employed to develop rules for the design of oligonucleotides used in gene targeting. A Metropolis Monte-Carlo algorithm is used to predict the pairing dynamics of an oligonucleotide with the target double-stranded DNA. The model calculates the base-alignment between a long, target double-stranded DNA and a probe nucleoprotein filament comprised of homologous recombination proteins (Rad51 or RecA polymerized on a single strand DNA. In this study, we considered different sizes of oligonucleotides containing 1 or 3 base heterologies with the target; different positions on the probe were tested to investigate the effect of the mismatch position on the pairing dynamics and stability. We show that the optimal design is a compromise between the mean time to reach a perfect alignment between the two molecules and the stability of the complex. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: A single heterology can be placed anywhere without significantly affecting the stability of the triplex. In the case of three consecutive heterologies, our modeling recommends using long oligonucleotides (at least 35 bases in which the heterologous sequences are positioned at an intermediate position. Oligonucleotides should not contain more than 10% consecutive heterologies to guarantee a stable pairing with the target dsDNA. Theoretical modeling cannot replace experiments, but we believe that our model can considerably accelerate optimization of oligonucleotides for gene therapy by predicting their pairing dynamics with the target dsDNA.

  19. Advances in sarcoma gene mutations and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Seebacher, Nicole A; Hornicek, Francis; Guo, Zheng; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2018-01-01

    Sarcomas are rare and complex malignancies that have been associated with a poor prognostic outcome. Over the last few decades, traditional treatment with surgery and/or chemotherapy has not significantly improved outcomes for most types of sarcomas. In recent years, there have been significant advances in the understanding of specific gene mutations that are important in driving the pathogenesis and progression of sarcomas. Identification of these new gene mutations, using next-generation sequencing and advanced molecular techniques, has revealed a range of potential therapeutic targets. This, in turn, may lead to the development of novel agents targeted to different sarcoma subtypes. In this review, we highlight the advances made in identifying sarcoma gene mutations, including those of p53, RB, PI3K and IDH genes, as well as novel therapeutic strategies aimed at utilizing these mutant genes. In addition, we discuss a number of preclinical studies and ongoing early clinical trials in sarcoma targeting therapies, as well as gene editing technology, which may provide a better choice for sarcoma patient management. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Profiling the anti-protozoal activity of anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors against Plasmodium and Trypanosoma parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica A. Engel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase (HDAC enzymes work together with histone acetyltransferases (HATs to reversibly acetylate both histone and non-histone proteins. As a result, these enzymes are involved in regulating chromatin structure and gene expression as well as other important cellular processes. HDACs are validated drug targets for some types of cancer, with four HDAC inhibitors clinically approved. However, they are also showing promise as novel drug targets for other indications, including malaria and other parasitic diseases. In this study the in vitro activity of four anti-cancer HDAC inhibitors was examined against parasites that cause malaria and trypanosomiasis. Three of these inhibitors, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; vorinostat®, romidepsin (Istodax® and belinostat (Beleodaq®, are clinically approved for the treatment of T-cell lymphoma, while the fourth, panobinostat, has recently been approved for combination therapy use in certain patients with multiple myeloma. All HDAC inhibitors were found to inhibit the growth of asexual-stage Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in the nanomolar range (IC50 10–200 nM, while only romidepsin was active at sub-μM concentrations against bloodstream form Trypanosoma brucei brucei parasites (IC50 35 nM. The compounds were found to have some selectivity for malaria parasites compared with mammalian cells, but were not selective for trypanosome parasites versus mammalian cells. All compounds caused hyperacetylation of histone and non-histone proteins in P. falciparum asexual stage parasites and inhibited deacetylase activity in P. falciparum nuclear extracts in addition to recombinant PfHDAC1 activity. P. falciparum histone hyperacetylation data indicate that HDAC inhibitors may differentially affect the acetylation profiles of histone H3 and H4.

  1. Anti-cancer effects of xanthones from pericarps of mangosteen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akao, Yukihiro; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Iinuma, Munekazu; Nozawa, Yoshinori

    2008-03-01

    Mangosteen, Garcinia mangostana Linn, is a tree found in South East Asia, and its pericarps have been used as traditional medicine. Phytochemical studies have shown that they contain a variety of secondary metabolites, such as oxygenated and prenylated xanthones. Recent studies revealed that these xanthones exhibited a variety of biological activities containing anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer effects. We previously investigated the anti-proliferative effects of four prenylated xanthones from the pericarps; alpha-mangostin, beta-mangostin, gamma-mangostin, and methoxy-beta-mangostin in various human cancer cells. These xanthones are different in the number of hydroxyl and methoxy groups. Except for methoxy-beta-mangostin, the other three xanthones strongly inhibited cell growth at low concentrations from 5 to 20 microM in human colon cancer DLD-1 cells. Our recent study focused on the mechanism of alpha-mangostin-induced growth inhibition in DLD-1 cells. It was shown that the anti-proliferative effects of the xanthones were associated with cell-cycle arrest by affecting the expression of cyclins, cdc2, and p27; G1 arrest by alpha-mangostin and beta-Mangostin, and S arrest by gamma-mangostin. alpha-Mangostin found to induce apoptosis through the activation of intrinsic pathway following the down-regulation of signaling cascades involving MAP kinases and the serine/threonine kinase Akt. Synergistic effects by the combined treatment of alpha-mangostin and anti-cancer drug 5-FU was to be noted. alpha-Mangostin was found to have a cancer preventive effect in rat carcinogenesis bioassay and the extract from pericarps, which contains mainly alpha-mangostin and gamma-mangostin, exhibited an enhancement of NK cell activity in a mouse model. These findings could provide a relevant basis for the development of xanthones as an agent for cancer prevention and the combination therapy with anti-cancer drugs.

  2. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H.J. Kao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides being widely known as the major active ingredients, the different biological pathways by which they exert their anti-cancer effect remain poorly defined. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of action may lead to more widespread use of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.The aim of this paper is to summarise the various bioactive mechanisms that have been proposed for the anti-cancer properties of triterpenes and polysaccharides extracted from G. lucidum. A literature search of published papers on NCBI with keywords “Ganoderma” and “cancer” was performed. Among those, studies which specifically examined the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides were selected to be included in this paper.We have found five potential mechanisms which are associated with the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and three potential mechanisms for Ganoderma polysaccharides. In addition, G. lucidum has been used in combination with known anti-cancer agents to improve the anti-cancer efficacies. This suggests Ganoderma’s bioactive pathways may compliment that of anti-cancer agents. In this paper we present several potential anti-cancer mechanisms of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides which can be used for the development of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.

  3. Quinones derived from plant secondary metabolites as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jin-Jian; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wu, Guo-Sheng; Xu, Wen-Shan; Huang, Ming-Qing; Chen, Xiu-Ping; Wang, Yi-Tao

    2013-03-01

    Quinones are plant-derived secondary metabolites that present some anti-proliferation and anti-metastasis effects in various cancer types both in vitro and in vivo. This review focuses on the anti-cancer prospects of plant-derived quinones, namely, aloe-emodin, juglone, β-lapachol, plumbagin, shikonin, and thymoquinone. We intend to summarize their anti-cancer effects and investigate the mechanism of actions to promote the research and development of anti-cancer agents from quinones.

  4. Black cumin seeds show promising anti-cancer effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is responsible for millions of death worldwide each year and it is the second most common cancer in both men and women. According to the American Cancer Society, lung cancer is responsible for about 1 in 4 cancer deaths and 14% of all new cases. More and more people require treatment, but due to the side effects and complications of modern drugs, there has been a growing interest in naturally occurring compounds with anti-cancer potential. Black cumin seed is one of the most promising and extensively studied plants which could provide support in considering this compound as an emerging drug.

  5. [A smear method for measuring anti-cancer drugs residues in hospitals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Takumi; Suzuki, Shigeru; Tsukiyama, Ikuto; Saito, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Anti-cancer drugs are harmful to healthy persons. In recent years, occupational exposure to anti-cancer drugs has become a major concern to health care workers. To address this issue, a smear method was developed to measure widely using anti-cancer drugs depositing on the floors, safety cabinet surfaces, and tables in hospital. Ten kinds of widely used anti-cancer drugs, paclitaxel, vincristine, docetaxel, vinorelbine, irinotecan, methotrexate, oxaliplatin, cyclophosphamide, gemcitabine and fluorouracil were collected by smearing material surfaces with methanol impregnated cellulose filter paper and/or polypropylene nonwoven. The collected anti-cancer drugs are extracted in 5 ml of 0.01% (v/v) hydrazine/methanol solution by sonication. The extracted solution was filtered and concentrated to prepare 1ml of sample solution. Then, the anti-cancer drugs in the sample solution were simultaneously measured by LC/MS. The anti-cancer drugs excepting fluorouracil spread on P-tile surface were measured with recoveries of 37-101% and standard deviations (SD) of 1.8-19%. All 10 of the anti-cancer drugs on a stainless steel plate surface were measured with the recoveries of 35-111% and SD of 1.3-11%. Using this smear method, 9 or 10 kinds of widely used anti-cancer drug residues in hospital, possibly exposed to health care workers, were grasped.

  6. Revealing targeted therapy for human cancer by gene module maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, David J.; Nuyten, Dimitry S. A.; Regev, Aviv; Lin, Meihong; Adler, Adam S.; Segal, Eran; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2008-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is to match specific therapies to molecular targets in cancer. Genome-scale expression profiling has identified new subtypes of cancer based on consistent patterns of variation in gene expression, leading to improved prognostic predictions. However, how these new

  7. E2F target genes: unraveling the biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Ciro, Marco; Cocito, Andrea

    2004-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are downstream effectors of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway and are required for the timely regulation of numerous genes essential for DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Several laboratories have used genome-wide approaches to discover novel target...

  8. Synthetic Small Molecule Inhibitors of Hh Signaling As Anti-Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschinot, C.A.; Pace, J.R.; Hadden, M.K.

    2016-01-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) pathway is a developmental signaling pathway that is essential to the proper embryonic development of many vertebrate systems. Dysregulation of Hh signaling has been implicated as a causative factor in the development and progression of several forms of human cancer. As such, the development of small molecule inhibitors of Hh signaling as potential anti-cancer chemotherapeutics has been a major area of research interest in both academics and industry over the past ten years. Through these efforts, synthetic small molecules that target multiple components of the Hh pathway have been identified and advanced to preclinical or clinical development. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the current status of several synthetic small molecule Hh pathway inhibitors and explore the potential of several recently disclosed inhibitory scaffolds. PMID:26310919

  9. Trypanocidal activity of the proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xia

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The proteasome inhibitor and anti-cancer drug bortezomib was tested for in vitro activity against bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma brucei. The concentrations of bortezomib required to reduce the growth rate by 50% and to kill all trypanosomes were 3.3 nM and 10 nM, respectively. In addition, bortezomib was 10 times more toxic to trypanosomes than to human HL-60 cells. Moreover, exposure of trypanosomes to 10 nM bortezomib for 16 h was enough to kill 90% of the parasites following incubation in fresh medium. However, proteasomal peptidase activities of trypanosomes exposed to bortezomib were only inhibited by 10% and 30% indicating that the proteasome is not the main target of the drug. The results suggest that bortezomib may be useful as drug for the treatment of human African trypanosomiasis.

  10. Identification of novel androgen receptor target genes in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald William L

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The androgen receptor (AR plays critical roles in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant prostate cancer (PCa. However, little is known about AR target genes that mediate the receptor's roles in disease progression. Results Using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP Display, we discovered 19 novel loci occupied by the AR in castrate resistant C4-2B PCa cells. Only four of the 19 AR-occupied regions were within 10-kb 5'-flanking regulatory sequences. Three were located up to 4-kb 3' of the nearest gene, eight were intragenic and four were in gene deserts. Whereas the AR occupied the same loci in C4-2B (castrate resistant and LNCaP (androgen-dependent PCa cells, differences between the two cell lines were observed in the response of nearby genes to androgens. Among the genes strongly stimulated by DHT in C4-2B cells – D-dopachrome tautomerase (DDT, Protein kinase C delta (PRKCD, Glutathione S- transferase theta 2 (GSTT2, Transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 3 (TRPV3, and Pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 (PYCR1 – most were less strongly or hardly stimulated in LNCaP cells. Another AR target gene, ornithine aminotransferase (OAT, was AR-stimulated in a ligand-independent manner, since it was repressed by AR siRNA knockdown, but not stimulated by DHT. We also present evidence for in vivo AR-mediated regulation of several genes identified by ChIP Display. For example, PRKCD and PYCR1, which may contribute to PCa cell growth and survival, are expressed in PCa biopsies from primary tumors before and after ablation and in metastatic lesions in a manner consistent with AR-mediated stimulation. Conclusion AR genomic occupancy is similar between LNCaP and C4-2B cells and is not biased towards 5' gene flanking sequences. The AR transcriptionally regulates less than half the genes nearby AR-occupied regions, usually but not always, in a ligand-dependent manner. Most are stimulated and a few are

  11. Cancer therapeutic target genes identified on chromosome 20q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Office

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated quantitative genome data analysis was recently able to pinpoint 18 genes on human chromosome 20q that could potentially serve as novel molecular targets for cancer therapy. Researchers Antoine M Snijders and Jian-Hua Mao from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Biological Systems and Engineering Division in Berkeley, California, United States, in their study published by the journal Advances in Modern Oncology Research (AMOR sought to compare the amounts of individual mRNAs – messenger RNAs that specify the amino acid sequence of the protein products of gene expression – in cancerous human tissues with corresponding normal tissues. The duo conducted a meta-analysis of genes on chromosome 20q that are found to be consistently upregulated across different human tumor types, while collecting gene transcript data of normal and tumor tissues across 11 different tumor types including brain, breast, colon, gastric, head and neck, liver, lung, ovarian, cervix, pancreas, and prostate cancers. “We calculated the differential expression of all 301 genes present on chromosome 20q for which gene transcript data was available. We then filtered for genes that were upregulated in tumors by at least 1.5 fold (p < 0.05 in seven or more tumor types,” they said. The resulting analysis identified 18 genes – some such as AURKA, UBE2C, TPX2, FAM83D, ZNF217, SALL4 and MMP9 have been previously known to potentially cause cancer. The 18-gene signature is revealed by the study to have robustly elevated levels across human cancers. “We observed significant association of our signature with disease-free survival in all 18 independent data… These data indicated that our signature is broadly predictive for disease-free survival, independent of tumor type,” the researchers said. In certain cases, Snijders and Mao found that increased gene expression was associated with better prognosis. “For example, the increased expressions of MMP9 and

  12. Large scale RNAi screen in Tribolium reveals novel target genes for pest control and the proteasome as prime target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Julia; Dao, Van Anh; Majumdar, Upalparna; Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schwirz, Jonas; Schultheis, Dorothea; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Leboulle, Gérard; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stanke, Mario; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-09-03

    Insect pest control is challenged by insecticide resistance and negative impact on ecology and health. One promising pest specific alternative is the generation of transgenic plants, which express double stranded RNAs targeting essential genes of a pest species. Upon feeding, the dsRNA induces gene silencing in the pest resulting in its death. However, the identification of efficient RNAi target genes remains a major challenge as genomic tools and breeding capacity is limited in most pest insects impeding whole-animal-high-throughput-screening. We use the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum as a screening platform in order to identify the most efficient RNAi target genes. From about 5,000 randomly screened genes of the iBeetle RNAi screen we identify 11 novel and highly efficient RNAi targets. Our data allowed us to determine GO term combinations that are predictive for efficient RNAi target genes with proteasomal genes being most predictive. Finally, we show that RNAi target genes do not appear to act synergistically and that protein sequence conservation does not correlate with the number of potential off target sites. Our results will aid the identification of RNAi target genes in many pest species by providing a manageable number of excellent candidate genes to be tested and the proteasome as prime target. Further, the identified GO term combinations will help to identify efficient target genes from organ specific transcriptomes. Our off target analysis is relevant for the sequence selection used in transgenic plants.

  13. TF Target Mapper: a BLAST search tool for the identification of Transcription Factor target genes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Horsman (Sebastiaan); M.J. Moorhouse (Michael); V. de Jager (Victor); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); J. Strouboulis (John); E. Katsantoni (Eleni)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: In the current era of high throughput genomics a major challenge is the genome-wide identification of target genes for specific transcription factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows the isolation of in vivo binding sites of transcription factors and provides a

  14. STAT3 Target Genes Relevant to Human Cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, Richard L.; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery, the STAT3 transcription factor has been extensively studied for its function as a transcriptional regulator and its role as a mediator of development, normal physiology, and pathology of many diseases, including cancers. These efforts have uncovered an array of genes that can be positively and negatively regulated by STAT3, alone and in cooperation with other transcription factors. Through regulating gene expression, STAT3 has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in many cellular processes including oncogenesis, tumor growth and progression, and stemness. Interestingly, recent studies suggest that STAT3 may behave as a tumor suppressor by activating expression of genes known to inhibit tumorigenesis. Additional evidence suggested that STAT3 may elicit opposing effects depending on cellular context and tumor types. These mixed results signify the need for a deeper understanding of STAT3, including its upstream regulators, parallel transcription co-regulators, and downstream target genes. To help facilitate fulfilling this unmet need, this review will be primarily focused on STAT3 downstream target genes that have been validated to associate with tumorigenesis and/or malignant biology of human cancers

  15. RFMirTarget: predicting human microRNA target genes with a random forest classifier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana R Mendoza

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are key regulators of eukaryotic gene expression whose fundamental role has already been identified in many cell pathways. The correct identification of miRNAs targets is still a major challenge in bioinformatics and has motivated the development of several computational methods to overcome inherent limitations of experimental analysis. Indeed, the best results reported so far in terms of specificity and sensitivity are associated to machine learning-based methods for microRNA-target prediction. Following this trend, in the current paper we discuss and explore a microRNA-target prediction method based on a random forest classifier, namely RFMirTarget. Despite its well-known robustness regarding general classifying tasks, to the best of our knowledge, random forest have not been deeply explored for the specific context of predicting microRNAs targets. Our framework first analyzes alignments between candidate microRNA-target pairs and extracts a set of structural, thermodynamics, alignment, seed and position-based features, upon which classification is performed. Experiments have shown that RFMirTarget outperforms several well-known classifiers with statistical significance, and that its performance is not impaired by the class imbalance problem or features correlation. Moreover, comparing it against other algorithms for microRNA target prediction using independent test data sets from TarBase and starBase, we observe a very promising performance, with higher sensitivity in relation to other methods. Finally, tests performed with RFMirTarget show the benefits of feature selection even for a classifier with embedded feature importance analysis, and the consistency between relevant features identified and important biological properties for effective microRNA-target gene alignment.

  16. Reproducible gene targeting in recalcitrant Escherichia coli isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Greve Henri

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of allele replacement methods can be used to mutate bacterial genes. For instance, the Red recombinase system of phage Lambda has been used very efficiently to inactivate chromosomal genes in E. coli K-12, through recombination between regions of homology. However, this method does not work reproducibly in some clinical E. coli isolates. Findings The procedure was modified by using longer homologous regions (85 bp and 500-600 bp, to inactivate genes in the uropathogenic E. coli strain UTI89. An lrhA regulator mutant, and deletions of the lac operon as well as the complete type 1 fimbrial gene cluster, were obtained reproducibly. The modified method is also functional in other recalcitrant E. coli, like the avian pathogenic E. coli strain APEC1. The lrhA regulator and lac operon deletion mutants of APEC1 were successfully constructed in the same way as the UTI89 mutants. In other avian pathogenic E. coli strains (APEC3E, APEC11A and APEC16A it was very difficult or impossible to construct these mutants, with the original Red recombinase-based method, with a Red recombinase-based method using longer (85 bp homologous regions or with our modified protocol, using 500 - 600 bp homologous regions. Conclusions The method using 500-600 bp homologous regions can be used reliably in some clinical isolates, to delete single genes or entire operons by homologous recombination. However, it does not invariably show a greater efficiency in obtaining mutants, when compared to the original Red-mediated gene targeting method or to the gene targeting method with 85 bp homologous regions. Therefore the length of the homology regions is not the only limiting factor for the construction of mutants in these recalcitrant strains.

  17. Experimentally validated positive target genes for human from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravish

    Experimentally validated positive target genes for human from miRecords databse. AGTR1. BACE1. BCL2. BCL6. C21orf33. C6orf134. CDK6. CDKN2A. CYP1B1. DNMT3B. E2F3. E2F6. ERBB2. ERBB3. ESR1. FBXW11. Fmr1. GJA1. HCN2. HCN4. HMGA2. HOXA11. HOXB8. HOXC8. HOXD10. HOXD8. HSPA1A. HSPD1.

  18. Mannan-Modified PLGA Nanoparticles for Targeted Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fansheng Kong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies of targeted gene delivery nanocarriers have gained increasing attention during the past decades. In this study, mannan modified DNA loaded bioadhesive PLGA nanoparticles (MAN-DNA-NPs were investigated for targeted gene delivery to the Kupffer cells (KCs. Bioadhesive PLGA nanoparticles were prepared and subsequently bound with pEGFP. Following the coupling of the mannan-based PE-grafted ligands (MAN-PE with the DNA-NPs, the MAN-DNA-NPs were delivered intravenously to rats. The transfection efficiency was determined from the isolated KCs and flow cytometry was applied for the quantitation of gene expression after 48 h post transfection. The size of the MAN-DNA-NPs was found to be around 190 nm and the Zeta potential was determined to be −15.46mV. The pEGFP binding capacity of MAN-DNA-NPs was (88.9±5.8% and the in vitro release profiles of the MAN-DNA-NPs follow the Higuchi model. When compared with non-modified DNA-NPs and Lipofectamine 2000-DNA, MAN-DNA-NPs produced the highest gene expressions, especially in vivo. The in vivo data from flow cytometry analysis showed that MAN-DNA-NPs displayed a remarkably higher transfection efficiency (39% than non-modified DNA-NPs (25% and Lipofectamine 2000-DNA (23% in KCs. The results illustrate that MAN-DNA-NPs have the ability to target liver KCs and could function as promising active targeting drug delivery vectors.

  19. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous....... This review describes and discusses the current status of the application of gene therapy in relation to SCLC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...... DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA...

  20. Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Victoria Maliandi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed.

  1. Novel Colchicine Derivatives and their Anti-cancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lorelei; Goping, Ing Swie; Rieger, Aja; Mane, Jonathan Y; Huzil, Torin; Banerjee, Asok; Luduena, Richard; Hassani, Bashar; Winter, Philip; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we provide an overview of the status of various colchicine derivatives in preclinical development with special focus on their anti-cancer activity. We discuss several groups of compounds that have been designed to differentially bind with specific affinities for tubulin β isotypes, especially in regard to βIII, which is commonly over-expressed in cancer. Computational prediction, protein-based and cell-based assays are summarized as well as some animal tests conducted on these compounds. It is concluded that an untapped potential exists for exploiting the colchicine scaffold as a pharmacophore with the possibility of increasing its affinity for tubulin isotypes overexpressed in cancer and decreasing it for normal cells thereby widening the therapeutic window. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  2. Utilization and Expenditure of Anti-cancer Medicines in Kosovo: Findings and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakupi, Arianit; Godman, Brian; Martin, Antony; Haycox, Alan; Baholli, Indrit

    2018-02-02

    The Ministry of Health (MoH) leads and organizes health policy in Kosovo, which includes procurement and provision of medicines, including anti-cancer medicines, which compose a special group of medicines. However, there has been limited analysis of the utilization and expenditure on anti-cancer medicines in Kosovo; consequently, the objective of this study is to undertake research to provide future guidance on the use of anti-cancer medicines. National drug utilization data is available in Kosovo. Utilization and expenditure on anti-cancer medicines [Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) code L], initially from 2011 to 2013, especially for anti-cancer medicines on the essential medicines list was analysed from national data. In addition, current systems for procuring and managing anti-cancer medicines in Kosovo was documented. There was appreciable variability in the utilization of anti-cancer medicines over the years, with low or limited use of some anti-cancer medicines on the Essential Medicine List. This is a concern in view of their essential medicine status. From 2011 to 2013, €16.49 million was spent on anti-cancer medicines (ATC L). The process of selection of new medicines begins with suggestions from doctors at the University Clinical Centre in Kosovo. The analysis has shown appreciable variation with current utilization patterns for anti-cancer medicines in Kosovo. This needs to be addressed as part of improving the drug management process to optimize patient care within available resources. Future years and reforms need to be assessed to improve current utilization and expenditure patterns.

  3. RNAi-Based Identification of Gene-Specific Nuclear Cofactor Networks Regulating Interleukin-1 Target Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Meier-Soelch

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The potent proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL-1 triggers gene expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway. Here, we investigated the cofactor requirements of strongly regulated IL-1 target genes whose expression is impaired in p65 NF-κB-deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts. By two independent small-hairpin (shRNA screens, we examined 170 genes annotated to encode nuclear cofactors for their role in Cxcl2 mRNA expression and identified 22 factors that modulated basal or IL-1-inducible Cxcl2 levels. The functions of 16 of these factors were validated for Cxcl2 and further analyzed for their role in regulation of 10 additional IL-1 target genes by RT-qPCR. These data reveal that each inducible gene has its own (quantitative requirement of cofactors to maintain basal levels and to respond to IL-1. Twelve factors (Epc1, H2afz, Kdm2b, Kdm6a, Mbd3, Mta2, Phf21a, Ruvbl1, Sin3b, Suv420h1, Taf1, and Ube3a have not been previously implicated in inflammatory cytokine functions. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that they are components of complex nuclear protein networks that regulate chromatin functions and gene transcription. Collectively, these data suggest that downstream from the essential NF-κB signal each cytokine-inducible target gene has further subtle requirements for individual sets of nuclear cofactors that shape its transcriptional activation profile.

  4. Construction of RNAi lentiviral vector targeting mouse Islet-1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-shen ZHI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective To construct and select RNAi lentiviral vectors that can silence mouse Islet-1 gene effectively.Methods Three groups of RNAi-target of mouse Islet-1 gene were designed,and corresponding shRNA oligo(sh1,sh2 and sh3 were synthesized,and then they were respectively inserted to the PLVTHM vector that had been digested by endonuclease.Agarose gel electrophoresis and sequencing were used to select and indentify the positive clones.The positive clones were extracted and then mixed with E.coli to amplify positive clones.The amplified clones were then infected into 293T along with the other 3 helper plasmids to produce lentiviral vector.After the construction of the lentiviral vector,plaque formation test was performed to determine the titer of lentiviral vector.The lentiviral vectors were then infected into C3H10T1/2 cells.The transfect efficiency of the lentiviral vectors was determined with flow cytometry with detection of green fluorescent protein(GFP.Q-PCR was employed to detect the RNAi efficiency of the lentiviral vectors.Results Agarose gel electrophoresis analysis showed that the clones with right gene at the target size were successfully established;gene sequencing showed that the right DNA fragments had been inserted;plaque formation test showed that the titer of the virus solution was 3.87×108TU/ml;the transfect efficiency of the lentiviral vector infected into C3H10T1/2 cells was 90.36%.All the 3 groups of shRNA targets(sh1,sh2 and sh3 showed an inhibitory effect on Islet-1 gene,and the sh1 showed the highest inhibitory effect(76.8%,as compared with that of normal cells(P < 0.05.Conclusion The RNAi lentiviral vector that can effectively silence the mouse Islet-1 gene has been constructed successfully,which may lay a foundation for further investigation of Islet-1 gene.

  5. A targeted ultrasound contrast agent carrying gene and cell-penetrating peptide: preparation and gene transfection in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jianli; Zhang, Ping; Tian, Ju; Zhou, Zhiyi; Liu, Xingzhao; Wang, Dong; Wang, Zhigang

    2014-09-01

    Targeted and high efficient gene delivery is a main issue in gene treatment. Taking advantage of ischemic memory target P-selectin and our previous study-synergistic effects of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) and TAT peptide on gene transfection, which were characterized by targeted aggregation and high efficient gene transfection, we set up a 'smart' gene delivery system-targeted ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) carrying gene and cell-permeable peptides (CPP). Such UCA had a strong binding force with DNA which was protected from being hydrolysed by nuclease. Moreover, synergistic effects of UTMD and TAT peptide increased gene transfection. Specifically, the UCA were reacted with an ischemic memory target P-selectin overexpressed by ischemic issues (including ischemic heart disease) and loaded with gene and CPP, which enabled targeted localization and gene delivery to ischemic cells overexpressing P-selectin. We demonstrated their targeting affinity for hypoxia human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) and gene transfection in vitro. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that gene and CPP were distributed on the shell of UCA. Red fluorescence was observed on the surface of targeted UCA using immunofluorescent microscopy, which demonstrated that the antibody was successfully connected to the UCA. The targeted UCA was specifically and tightly binded to hypoxia HUVEC, while there were no or little non-targeted UCA binding around hypoxia HUVEC. 24h after transfection, gene transfection efficiency detected by FCM was higher in targeted group than non-targeted group. Overall, the targeted UCA carrying gene and CPP was prepared successfully. It had a strong target binding capacity to hypoxia HUVEC and high efficient gene transfection, which maybe provide a novel strategy for gene therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo, Maria Victoria; Yelo, Estefania; Gimeno, Lourdes; Campillo, Jose Antonio; Parrado, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The PLZF gene encodes a BTB/POZ-zinc finger-type transcription factor, involved in physiological development, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In this paper, we investigate proliferation, survival, and gene expression regulation in stable clones from the human haematopoietic K562, DG75, and Jurkat cell lines with inducible expression of PLZF. In Jurkat cells, but not in K562 and DG75 cells, PLZF induced growth suppression and apoptosis in a cell density-dependent manner. Deletion of the BTB/POZ domain of PLZF abrogated growth suppression and apoptosis. PLZF was expressed with a nuclear speckled pattern distinctively in the full-length PLZF-expressing Jurkat clones, suggesting that the nuclear speckled localization is required for PLZF-induced apoptosis. By microarray analysis, we identified that the apoptosis-inducer TP53INP1, ID1, and ID3 genes were upregulated, and the apoptosis-inhibitor TERT gene was downregulated. The identification of apoptosis-related PLZF target genes may have biological and clinical relevance in cancer typified by altered PLZF expression

  7. Anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles containing IL12 and salmosin genes for targeted cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Seok; Kang, Seong Jae; Jeong, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Min Woo; Park, Sang Il; Lee, Yeon Kyung; Kim, Hong Sung; Kim, Keun Sik; Park, Yong Serk

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-directed gene delivery is of major interest in the field of cancer gene therapy. Varied functionalizations of non-viral vectors have been suggested to enhance tumor targetability. In the present study, we prepared two different types of anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) immunonanoparticles containing pDNA, neutrally charged liposomes and cationic lipoplexes, for tumor-directed transfection of cancer therapeutic genes. Even though both anti-EGFR immunonanoparticles had a high binding affinity to the EGFR-positive cancer cells, the anti-EGFR immunolipoplex formulation exhibited approximately 100-fold higher transfection to the target cells than anti-EGFR immunoliposomes. The lipoplex formulation also showed a higher transfection to SK-OV-3 tumor xenografts in mice. Thus, IL12 and/or salmosin genes were loaded in the anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes and intravenously administered to mice carrying SK-OV-3 tumors. Co-transfection of IL12 and salmosin genes using anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes significantly reduced tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Furthermore, combinatorial treatment with doxorubicin synergistically inhibited tumor growth. These results suggest that anti-EGFR immunolipoplexes containing pDNA encoding therapeutic genes could be utilized as a gene-transfer modality for cancer gene therapy.

  8. Gene therapy to target ER stress in brain diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Vicente; Martínez, Gabriela; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-10-01

    Gene therapy based on the use of Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) is emerging as a safe and stable strategy to target molecular pathways involved in a variety of brain diseases. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is proposed as a transversal feature of most animal models and clinical samples from patients affected with neurodegenerative diseases. Manipulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a major homeostatic reaction under ER stress conditions, had proved beneficial in diverse models of neurodegeneration. Although increasing number of drugs are available to target ER stress, the use of small molecules to treat chronic brain diseases is challenging because of poor blood brain barrier permeability and undesirable side effects due to the role of the UPR in the physiology of peripheral organs. Gene therapy is currently considered a possible future alternative to circumvent these problems by the delivery of therapeutic agents to selective regions and cell types of the nervous system. Here we discuss current efforts to design gene therapy strategies to alleviate ER stress on a disease context. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:ER stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles for enhancement of anti-cancer activities of phytochemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuan, Li; Jia, Zhang; Yu-Jiao, Zu; Shu-Fang, Nie; Jun, Cao; Qian, Wang; Shao-Ping, Nie; Ze-Yuan, Deng; Ming-Yong, Xie; Shu, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Many phytochemicals show promise in cancer prevention and treatment, but their low aqueous solubility, poor stability, unfavorable bioavailability, and low target specificity make administering them at therapeutic doses unrealistic. This is particularly true for (–)-epigallocatechin gallate, curcumin, quercetin, resveratrol, and genistein. There is an increasing interest in developing novel delivery strategies for these natural products. Liposomes, micelles, nanoemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers and poly (lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles are biocompatible and biodegradable nanoparticles. Those nanoparticles can increase the stability and solubility of phytochemicals, exhibit a sustained release property, enhance their absorption and bioavailability, protect them from premature enzymatic degradation or metabolism, prolong their circulation time, improve their target specificity to cancer cells or tumors via passive or targeted delivery, lower toxicity or side-effects to normal cells or tissues through preventing them from prematurely interacting with the biological environment, and enhance anti-cancer activities. Nanotechnology opens a door for developing phytochemical-loaded nanoparticles for prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:26412423

  10. Modeling and Targeting MYC Genes in Childhood Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Sonja; Bolin, Sara; Weishaupt, Holger; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Brain tumors are the second most common group of childhood cancers, accounting for about 20%–25% of all pediatric tumors. Deregulated expression of the MYC family of transcription factors, particularly c-MYC and MYCN genes, has been found in many of these neoplasms, and their expression levels are often correlated with poor prognosis. Elevated c-MYC/MYCN initiates and drives tumorigenesis in many in vivo model systems of pediatric brain tumors. Therefore, inhibition of their oncogenic function is an attractive therapeutic target. In this review, we explore the roles of MYC oncoproteins and their molecular targets during the formation, maintenance, and recurrence of childhood brain tumors. We also briefly summarize recent progress in the development of therapeutic approaches for pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity in these tumors. PMID:28333115

  11. Anti-cancer Effects of a Novel Quinoline Derivative 83b1 on Human Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma through Down-Regulation of COX-2 mRNA and PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Ivan Ho Yuen; Chan, Dessy; Chan, Sau Hing; Chung, Po Yee; Zhou, Yuan Yuan; Law, Simon; Lam, Alfred King Yin; Chui, Chung Hin; Chan, Albert Sun Chi; Lam, Kim Hung; Tang, Johnny Cheuk On

    2017-01-01

    83b1 is a novel quinoline derivative that has been shown to inhibit cancer growth in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). This study was conducted to comprehensively evaluate the cytotoxic effects of 83b1 on a series of ESCC cell lines and investigate the mechanisms by which 83b1 suppresses cancer growth based on molecular docking analysis. A series of ESCC and nontumor immortalized cell lines were exposed to 83b1 and cisplatin (CDDP) in a dose-dependent manner, and the cytotoxicity was examined by a MTS assay kit. Prediction of the molecular targets of 83b1 was conducted by molecular docking analysis. Expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA and COX-2-derived prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzymelinked immuno-sorbent assay, respectively. In vivo anti-tumor effect was determined using a nude mice xenografted model transplanted with an ESCC cell line, KYSE-450. 83b1 showed the significant anti-cancer effects on all ESCC cell lines compared to CDDP; however, 83b1 revealed much lower toxic effects on non-tumor cell lines than CDDP. The predicted molecular target of 83b1 is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ), which is a widely known oncoprotein. Additionally the expression of COX-2 mRNA and COX-2-derived PGE 2 were down-regulated by 83b1 in a dose-dependent manner in ESCC cell lines. Furthermore, 83b1 was shown to significantly reduce the tumor size in nude mice xenograft. The results of this study suggest that the potential anti-cancer effects of 83b1 on human esophageal cancers occur through the possible oncotarget, PPARδ, and down-regulation of the cancer related genes and molecules.

  12. Specific genetic modifications of domestic animals by gene targeting and animal cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    2003-11-13

    The technology of gene targeting through homologous recombination has been extremely useful for elucidating gene functions in mice. The application of this technology was thought impossible in the large livestock species until the successful creation of the first mammalian clone "Dolly" the sheep. The combination of the technologies for gene targeting of somatic cells with those of animal cloning made it possible to introduce specific genetic mutations into domestic animals. In this review, the principles of gene targeting in somatic cells and the challenges of nuclear transfer using gene-targeted cells are discussed. The relevance of gene targeting in domestic animals for applications in bio-medicine and agriculture are also examined.

  13. Immuno-Oncology-The Translational Runway for Gene Therapy: Gene Therapeutics to Address Multiple Immune Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weß, Ludger; Schnieders, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Cancer therapy is once again experiencing a paradigm shift. This shift is based on extensive clinical experience demonstrating that cancer cannot be successfully fought by addressing only single targets or pathways. Even the combination of several neo-antigens in cancer vaccines is not sufficient for successful, lasting tumor eradication. The focus has therefore shifted to the immune system's role in cancer and the striking abilities of cancer cells to manipulate and/or deactivate the immune system. Researchers and pharma companies have started to target the processes and cells known to support immune surveillance and the elimination of tumor cells. Immune processes, however, require novel concepts beyond the traditional "single-target-single drug" paradigm and need parallel targeting of diverse cells and mechanisms. This review gives a perspective on the role of gene therapy technologies in the evolving immuno-oncology space and identifies gene therapy as a major driver in the development and regulation of effective cancer immunotherapy. Present challenges and breakthroughs ranging from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, gene-modified oncolytic viruses, combination cancer vaccines, to RNA therapeutics are spotlighted. Gene therapy is recognized as the most prominent technology enabling effective immuno-oncology strategies.

  14. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  15. 'Big data' approaches for novel anti-cancer drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benstead-Hume, Graeme; Wooller, Sarah K; Pearl, Frances M G

    2017-06-01

    The development of improved cancer therapies is frequently cited as an urgent unmet medical need. Recent advances in platform technologies and the increasing availability of biological 'big data' are providing an unparalleled opportunity to systematically identify the key genes and pathways involved in tumorigenesis. The discoveries made using these new technologies may lead to novel therapeutic interventions. Areas covered: The authors discuss the current approaches that use 'big data' to identify cancer drivers. These approaches include the analysis of genomic sequencing data, pathway data, multi-platform data, identifying genetic interactions such as synthetic lethality and using cell line data. They review how big data is being used to identify novel drug targets. The authors then provide an overview of the available data repositories and tools being used at the forefront of cancer drug discovery. Expert opinion: Targeted therapies based on the genomic events driving the tumour will eventually inform treatment protocols. However, using a tailored approach to treat all tumour patients may require developing a large repertoire of targeted drugs.

  16. Annotating Cancer Variants and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics in Reactome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milacic, Marija; Haw, Robin, E-mail: robin.haw@oicr.on.ca; Rothfels, Karen; Wu, Guanming [Informatics and Bio-computing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON, M5G0A3 (Canada); Croft, David; Hermjakob, Henning [European Bioinformatics Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge, CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); D’Eustachio, Peter [Department of Biochemistry, NYU School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Stein, Lincoln [Informatics and Bio-computing Platform, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON, M5G0A3 (Canada)

    2012-11-08

    Reactome describes biological pathways as chemical reactions that closely mirror the actual physical interactions that occur in the cell. Recent extensions of our data model accommodate the annotation of cancer and other disease processes. First, we have extended our class of protein modifications to accommodate annotation of changes in amino acid sequence and the formation of fusion proteins to describe the proteins involved in disease processes. Second, we have added a disease attribute to reaction, pathway, and physical entity classes that uses disease ontology terms. To support the graphical representation of “cancer” pathways, we have adapted our Pathway Browser to display disease variants and events in a way that allows comparison with the wild type pathway, and shows connections between perturbations in cancer and other biological pathways. The curation of pathways associated with cancer, coupled with our efforts to create other disease-specific pathways, will interoperate with our existing pathway and network analysis tools. Using the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as an example, we show how Reactome annotates and presents the altered biological behavior of EGFR variants due to their altered kinase and ligand-binding properties, and the mode of action and specificity of anti-cancer therapeutics.

  17. Annotating cancer variants and anti-cancer therapeutics in reactome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milacic, Marija; Haw, Robin; Rothfels, Karen; Wu, Guanming; Croft, David; Hermjakob, Henning; D'Eustachio, Peter; Stein, Lincoln

    2012-11-08

    Reactome describes biological pathways as chemical reactions that closely mirror the actual physical interactions that occur in the cell. Recent extensions of our data model accommodate the annotation of cancer and other disease processes. First, we have extended our class of protein modifications to accommodate annotation of changes in amino acid sequence and the formation of fusion proteins to describe the proteins involved in disease processes. Second, we have added a disease attribute to reaction, pathway, and physical entity classes that uses disease ontology terms. To support the graphical representation of "cancer" pathways, we have adapted our Pathway Browser to display disease variants and events in a way that allows comparison with the wild type pathway, and shows connections between perturbations in cancer and other biological pathways. The curation of pathways associated with cancer, coupled with our efforts to create other disease-specific pathways, will interoperate with our existing pathway and network analysis tools. Using the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as an example, we show how Reactome annotates and presents the altered biological behavior of EGFR variants due to their altered kinase and ligand-binding properties, and the mode of action and specificity of anti-cancer therapeutics.

  18. Annotating Cancer Variants and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics in Reactome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milacic, Marija; Haw, Robin; Rothfels, Karen; Wu, Guanming; Croft, David; Hermjakob, Henning; D’Eustachio, Peter; Stein, Lincoln

    2012-01-01

    Reactome describes biological pathways as chemical reactions that closely mirror the actual physical interactions that occur in the cell. Recent extensions of our data model accommodate the annotation of cancer and other disease processes. First, we have extended our class of protein modifications to accommodate annotation of changes in amino acid sequence and the formation of fusion proteins to describe the proteins involved in disease processes. Second, we have added a disease attribute to reaction, pathway, and physical entity classes that uses disease ontology terms. To support the graphical representation of “cancer” pathways, we have adapted our Pathway Browser to display disease variants and events in a way that allows comparison with the wild type pathway, and shows connections between perturbations in cancer and other biological pathways. The curation of pathways associated with cancer, coupled with our efforts to create other disease-specific pathways, will interoperate with our existing pathway and network analysis tools. Using the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling pathway as an example, we show how Reactome annotates and presents the altered biological behavior of EGFR variants due to their altered kinase and ligand-binding properties, and the mode of action and specificity of anti-cancer therapeutics

  19. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called "tumor microenvironment (TME)", in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF) functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  20. Targeted Gene Therapy of Cancer: Second Amendment toward Holistic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It seems solid tumors are developing smart organs with specialized cells creating specified bio-territory, the so called “tumor microenvironment (TME”, in which there is reciprocal crosstalk among cancer cells, immune system cells and stromal cells. TME as an intricate milieu also consists of cancer stem cells (CSCs that can resist against chemotherapies. In solid tumors, metabolism and vascularization appears to be aberrant and tumor interstitial fluid (TIF functions as physiologic barrier. Thus, chemotherapy, immunotherapy and gene therapy often fail to provide cogent clinical outcomes. It looms that it is the time to accept the fact that initiation of cancer could be generation of another form of life that involves a cluster of thousands of genes, while we have failed to observe all aspects of it. Hence, the current treatment modalities need to be re-visited to cover all key aspects of disease using combination therapy based on the condition of patients. Perhaps personalized cluster of genes need to be simultaneously targeted.

  1. Systematic targeted integration to study Albumin gene control elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchari Bhattacharyya

    Full Text Available To study transcriptional regulation by distant enhancers, we devised a system of easily modified reporter plasmids for integration into single-copy targeting cassettes in clones of HuH7, a human hepatocellular carcinoma. The plasmid constructs tested transcriptional function of a 35-kb region that contained the rat albumin gene and its upstream flanking region. Expression of integrants was analyzed in two orientations, and compared to transient expression of non-integrated plasmids. Enhancers were studied in their natural positions relative to the promoter and localized by deletion. All constructs were also analyzed by transient transfection assays. In addition to the known albumin gene enhancer (E1 at -10 kb, we demonstrated two new enhancers, E2 at -13, and E4 at +1.2 kb. All three enhancers functioned in both transient assays and integrated constructs. However, chromosomal integration demonstrated several differences from transient expression. For example, analysis of E2 showed that enhancer function within the chromosome required a larger gene region than in transient assays. Another conserved region, E3 at -0.7 kb, functioned as an enhancer in transient assays but inhibited the function of E1 and E2 when chromosomally integrated. The enhancers did not show additive or synergistic behavior,an effect consistent with competition for the promoter or inhibitory interactions among enhancers. Growth arrest by serum starvation strongly stimulated the function of some integrated enhancers, consistent with the expected disruption of enhancer-promoter looping during the cell cycle.

  2. AAC as a Potential Target Gene to Control Verticillium dahliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Su

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Verticillium dahliae invades the roots of host plants and causes vascular wilt, which seriously diminishes the yield of cotton and other important crops. The protein AAC (ADP, ATP carrier is responsible for transferring ATP from the mitochondria into the cytoplasm. When V. dahliae protoplasts were transformed with short interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting the VdAAC gene, fungal growth and sporulation were significantly inhibited. To further confirm a role for VdAAC in fungal development, we generated knockout mutants (ΔVdACC. Compared with wild-type V. dahliae (Vd wt, ΔVdAAC was impaired in germination and virulence; these impairments were rescued in the complementary strains (ΔVdAAC-C. Moreover, when an RNAi construct of VdAAC under the control of the 35S promoter was used to transform Nicotiana benthamiana, the expression of VdAAC was downregulated in the transgenic seedlings, and they had elevated resistance against V. dahliae. The results of this study suggest that VdAAC contributes to fungal development, virulence and is a promising candidate gene to control V. dahliae. In addition, RNAi is a highly efficient way to silence fungal genes and provides a novel strategy to improve disease resistance in plants.

  3. Anti-cancer agents in Saudi Arabian herbals revealed by automated high-content imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina

    2017-06-13

    Natural products have been used for medical applications since ancient times. Commonly, natural products are structurally complex chemical compounds that efficiently interact with their biological targets, making them useful drug candidates in cancer therapy. Here, we used cell-based phenotypic profiling and image-based high-content screening to study the mode of action and potential cellular targets of plants historically used in Saudi Arabia\\'s traditional medicine. We compared the cytological profiles of fractions taken from Juniperus phoenicea (Arar), Anastatica hierochuntica (Kaff Maryam), and Citrullus colocynthis (Hanzal) with a set of reference compounds with established modes of action. Cluster analyses of the cytological profiles of the tested compounds suggested that these plants contain possible topoisomerase inhibitors that could be effective in cancer treatment. Using histone H2AX phosphorylation as a marker for DNA damage, we discovered that some of the compounds induced double-strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the active fraction isolated from Juniperus phoenicea revealed possible anti-cancer compounds. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of cell-based phenotypic screening of natural products to reveal their biological activities.

  4. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Chi H.J. Kao; Amalini C. Jesuthasan; Karen S. Bishop; Marcus P. Glucina; Lynnette R. Ferguson

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides bei...

  5. Identification of epigenetically altered genes and potential gene targets in melanoma using bioinformatic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan HH

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Honghao Duan, Ke Jiang, Dengke Wei, Lijun Zhang, Deliang Cheng, Min Lv, Yuben Xu, Aimin He Department of Hand Surgery, Honghui Hospital, Xi’an Jiaotong University Health Science Center, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: This study aimed to analyze epigenetically and genetically altered genes in melanoma to get a better understanding of the molecular circuitry of melanoma and identify potential gene targets for the treatment of melanoma. The microarray data of GSE31879, including mRNA expression profiles (seven melanoma and four melanocyte samples and DNA methylation profiles (seven melanoma and five melanocyte samples, were downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs and differentially methylated positions (DMPs were screened using the linear models for microarray data (limma package in melanoma compared with melanocyte samples. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs were carried out using the Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery. Moreover, differentially methylated genes (DMGs were identified, and a transcriptional regulatory network was constructed using the University of California Santa Cruz genome browser database. A total of 1,215 DEGs (199 upregulated and 1,016 downregulated and 14,094 DMPs (10,450 upregulated and 3,644 downregulated were identified in melanoma compared with melanocyte samples. Additionally, the upregulated and downregulated DEGs were significantly associated with different GO terms and pathways, such as pigment cell differentiation, biosynthesis, and metabolism. Furthermore, the transcriptional regulatory network showed that DMGs such as Aristaless-related homeobox (ARX, damage-specific DNA binding protein 2 (DDB2, and myelin basic protein (MBP had higher node degrees. Our results showed that several methylated genes (ARX, DDB2, and MBP may be involved in melanoma progression. Keywords: melanoma, DNA

  6. Preparation and characterization of magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, S. W.; Liu, G.; Hong, R. Y.; Li, H. Z.; Li, Y. G.; Wei, D. G.

    2012-10-01

    The PEI-CMD-MNPs were successfully prepared by the surface modification of magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). The PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior and were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. These PEI-CMD-MNPs were used as magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery. The prepared MNPs at different surface modification stages were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emissions canning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) analysis. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To evaluate the performance of the magnetic nanoparticles as gene transfer vector, the PEI-CMD-MNPs were used to delivery green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into BHK21 cells. The expression of GFP gene was detected by fluorescence microscope. DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes absorbed by the cells were also monitored by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency of that transfected with a magnet were much higher than that of standard transfection.

  7. Synthesis, Identification and Anti-Cancer Activity of 1-(4-Methylpent-2-enyl-2-(4-phenylbut-2-enyldisulfane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we synthesized 1-(4-methylpent-2-enyl-2-(4-phenylbut-2- enyldisulfane using sodium sulfide, 1-bromine-4-methyl-2-amylene and 1-(4-bromine-2- butylenebenzene as raw materials. The yield rate of target product was 84%. The structure of the target product was confirmed by GC-MS, 1H-NMR and elemental analysis. The results of anti-cancer activity experiments showed that 1-(4-methylpent-2-enyl-2-(4- phenylbut-2-enyldisul-fane could significantly inhibit the proliferation, induce the apoptosis of CNE2 cells in a dose dependent manner, and could significantly enhance the activity of XIAP.

  8. Eliciting societal preferences of reimbursement decision criteria for anti cancer drugs in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sun-Hong; Park, Sun-Kyeong; Byun, Ji-Hye; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2017-08-01

    In order to look beyond the cost-effectiveness analysis, this study used a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA), which reflects societal values with regard to reimbursement decisions. This study aims to elicit societal preferences of the reimbursement decision criteria for anti cancer drugs from public and healthcare professionals. Eight criteria were defined based on a literature review and focus group sessions: disease severity, disease population size, pediatrics targets, unmet needs, innovation, clinical benefits, cost-effectiveness, and budget impacts. Using quota sampling and purposive sampling, 300 participants from the Korean public and 30 healthcare professionals were selected for the survey. Preferences were elicited using an analytic hierarchy process. Both groups rated clinical benefits the highest, followed by cost-effectiveness and disease severity, but differed with regard to disease population size and unmet needs. Innovation was the least preferred criteria. Clinical benefits and other social values should be reflected appropriately with cost-effectiveness in healthcare coverage. MCDA can be used to assess decision priorities for complicated health policy decisions, including reimbursement decisions. It is a promising method for making logical and transparent drug reimbursement decisions that consider a broad range of factors, which are perceived as important by relevant stakeholders.

  9. Taking a Stab at Cancer; Oncolytic Virus-Mediated Anti-Cancer Vaccination Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Sadie Aitken

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines have classically been used for disease prevention. Modern clinical vaccines are continuously being developed for both traditional use as well as for new applications. Typically thought of in terms of infectious disease control, vaccination approaches can alternatively be adapted as a cancer therapy. Vaccines targeting cancer antigens can be used to induce anti-tumour immunity and have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy both pre-clinically and clinically. Various approaches now exist and further establish the tremendous potential and adaptability of anti-cancer vaccination. Classical strategies include ex vivo-loaded immune cells, RNA- or DNA-based vaccines and tumour cell lysates. Recent oncolytic virus development has resulted in a surge of novel viruses engineered to induce powerful tumour-specific immune responses. In addition to their use as cancer vaccines, oncolytic viruses have the added benefit of being directly cytolytic to cancer cells and thus promote antigen recognition within a highly immune-stimulating tumour microenvironment. While oncolytic viruses are perfectly equipped for efficient immunization, this complicates their use upon previous exposure. Indeed, the host’s anti-viral counter-attacks often impair multiple-dosing regimens. In this review we will focus on the use of oncolytic viruses for anti-tumour vaccination. We will explore different strategies as well as ways to circumvent some of their limitations.

  10. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munju; Gillies, Robert J; Rejniak, Katarzyna A

    2013-11-18

    Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  11. Phytochemicals - A Novel and Prominent Source of Anti-cancer Drugs Against Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevappa, Ravikiran; Kwok, Hang Fai

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a malignant disease whose incidence and mortality rates are greatly influenced by environmental factors. Under-treatment of CRC such as a poor diagnostic evaluation, less aggressive surgery, less intensive chemotherapy results in metastasizing of the primary tumor cells and recurrence of cancer. Prolonged chemotherapy treatment against cancer is hazardous to the patients, which also limits its use in cancer therapy. Current research in developing a novel anti-cancer agent, direct towards finding a better antimetastatic and an anti-invasive drug with reduced side effects. In this direction, plant derived chemical compounds or phytochemical act as a prominent source of new compounds for drug development. Phytochemicals have a multi-action and a multi-target capacity, and has gained attention among the research communities from last two decades. Epidemiological study shows a direct relationship between a diet and CRC development. A diet rich in plant based products such as vegetables, fruits and cereals is known to prevent CRC development. This review is an effort to explore more about the potential phytochemicals in CRC prevention and also in CRC treatment. Here, we have discussed few phytochemicals actively used in CRC research and are in clinical trials against CRC. We have explored more on some of these phytochemicals which can act as a source for new drug or can act as a lead compound for further modifications during the drug development against cancer. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy with AFP driving Apoptin gene shows potent antitumor effect in hepatocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kang-Jian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy and viral therapy are used for cancer therapy for many years, but the results are less than satisfactory. Our aim was to construct a new recombinant adenovirus which is more efficient to kill hepatocarcinoma cells but more safe to normal cells. Methods By using the Cancer Targeting Gene-Viro-Therapy strategy, Apoptin, a promising cancer therapeutic gene was inserted into the double-regulated oncolytic adenovirus AD55 in which E1A gene was driven by alpha fetoprotein promoter along with a 55 kDa deletion in E1B gene to form AD55-Apoptin. The anti-tumor effects and safety were examined by western blotting, virus yield assay, real time polymerase chain reaction, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, Hoechst33342 staining, Fluorescence-activated cell sorting, xenograft tumor model, Immunohistochemical assay, liver function analysis and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling assay. Results The recombinant virus AD55-Apoptin has more significant antitumor effect for hepatocelluar carcinoma cell lines (in vitro than that of AD55 and even ONYX-015 but no or little impair on normal cell lines. Furthermore, it also shows an obvious in vivo antitumor effect on the Huh-7 liver carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with bigger beginning tumor volume till about 425 mm3 but has no any damage on the function of liver. The induction of apoptosis is involved in AD55-Apoptin induced antitumor effects. Conclusion The AD55-Apoptin can be a potential anti-hepatoma agent with remarkable antitumor efficacy as well as higher safety in cancer targeting gene-viro-therapy system.

  13. Preparation and characterization of magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, S.W.; Liu, G. [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hong, R.Y., E-mail: rhong@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); State Key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Li, H.Z. [State Key Laboratory of Multi-phase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Li, Y.G., E-mail: ilguoliang@sohu.com [Department of radiology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215007 (China); Wei, D.G., E-mail: dougwei@deas.harvard.edu [Center for Nanoscale Systems, School of Engineering and Applied Science, Harvard University, 11 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEI is ideal candidate polymer for the design of gene delivery systems. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEI-CMD-MNPs exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PEI-CMD-MNPs were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs transfected cells by a magnet have higher transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency. - Abstract: The PEI-CMD-MNPs were successfully prepared by the surface modification of magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) and polyethyleneimine (PEI). The PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes exhibited a typical superparamagnetic behavior and were well stable over the entire range of pH and NaCl concentration. These PEI-CMD-MNPs were used as magnetic gene vectors for targeting gene delivery. The prepared MNPs at different surface modification stages were characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), field emissions canning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) analysis. The magnetic properties were studied by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). To evaluate the performance of the magnetic nanoparticles as gene transfer vector, the PEI-CMD-MNPs were used to delivery green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene into BHK21 cells. The expression of GFP gene was detected by fluorescence microscope. DNA-PEI-CMD-MNPs polyplexes absorbed by the cells were also monitored by Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The transfection efficiency and gene expression efficiency of that transfected with a magnet were much higher than that of standard transfection.

  14. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  15. Targeted Exome Sequencing of Deafness Genes After Failure of Auditory Phenotype-Driven Candidate Gene Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bong Jik; Kim, Ah Reum; Park, Gibeom; Park, Woong Yang; Chang, Sun O; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-07-01

    To demonstrate the efficacy and advantages of targeted exome sequencing (TES) of known deafness genes in cases with failed or misleading auditory phenotype-driven candidate gene screening. Prospective cohort survey. Otolaryngology department of a tertiary referral hospital. Six hearing-impaired probands with seemingly non-syndromic features from six deaf families were enrolled in this study after failure of genetic diagnosis using auditory phenotype-driven candidate gene screening. TES of known deafness genes was performed in the six probands, and a final causative variant was pursued using subsequent filtering steps. Potential causative variants determined using TES were confirmed by previously introduced filtering steps. We detected causative variants in three (50%) of six families, and these variants were in the COCH, PAX3, and GJB2 genes. Additionally, we also recapitulated the recent finding from other report arguing for the non-pathogenic potential of MYO1A variant. TES of a deafness panel provides a comprehensive genetic screening tool that can be implemented without being misled by the audiogram configuration information and can complement incomplete clinical physical examinations. In addition, the secondary incidental finding obtained by TES contributes useful information regarding the deafness field.

  16. Determination of the Relative Efficacy of Eicosapentaenoic Acid and Docosahexaenoic Acid for Anti-Cancer Effects in Human Breast Cancer Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurak, Vera C.; Damaraju, Sambasivarao

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have associated high fish oil consumption with decreased risk of breast cancer (BC). n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) found in fish and fish oils exert anti-cancer effects. However, few studies have examined the relative efficacy of EPA and DHA alone and in mixtures on BC subtypes. This was the objective of the present review, as this research is a necessity for the translation of findings to human health and disease. The literature suggests that DHA has a greater anti-cancer effect in triple negative BC (TNBC). In estrogen positive (ER+) BC, DHA has a greater effect on cell viability, while both fatty acids have similar effects on apoptosis and proliferation. These effects are associated with preferential uptake of DHA into TNBC lipid rafts and EPA in ER+ BC. EPA:DHA mixtures have anti-cancer activity; however, the ratio of EPA:DHA does not predict the relative incorporation of these two fatty acids into membrane lipids as EPA appears to be preferentially incorporated. In summary, DHA and EPA should be considered separately in the context of BC prevention. The elucidation of optimal EPA:DHA ratios will be important for designing targeted n-3 LCPUFA treatments. PMID:29207553

  17. Anti-cancer and anti-hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase activity of etodolac 1,2,4-triazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çıkla-Süzgün, Pelin; Kaushik-Basu, Neerja; Basu, Amartya; Arora, Payal; Talele, Tanaji T; Durmaz, Irem; Çetin-Atalay, Rengül; Küçükgüzel, Ş Güniz

    2015-01-01

    Arachidonic acid is an unsaturated fatty acid liberated from phospholipids of cell membranes. NSAIDs are known as targets of cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-1, COX-2 and COX-3) in arachidonic acid metabolism. This mechanism of COX-2 in carcinogenesis causes cancer. In addition, COX-2 plays a role in the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is cause of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of our study was to improve effective agents against HCV. A novel series of new etodolac 1,2,4-triazoles derivatives (4a-h) have been synthesized and investigated for their activity against HCV NS5B polymerase. Compound 4a was found to be the most active with IC(50) value of 14.8 µM. In accordance with these results, compound 4a was screened for anti-cancer activity on liver cancer cell lines (Huh7, Mahlavu, HepG2, FOCUS). Compound 4a showed anti-cancer activity against Huh7 human hepatoma cell line with IC(50) value of 4.29 µM. Therefore, compound 4a could be considered as a new anti-cancer and anti-HCV lead compound.

  18. Challenges and strategies in anti-cancer nanomedicine development: An industry perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Jennifer I; Lammers, Twan; Ashford, Marianne B; Puri, Sanyogitta; Storm, Gert; Barry, Simon T

    2017-01-01

    Successfully translating anti-cancer nanomedicines from pre-clinical proof of concept to demonstration of therapeutic value in the clinic is challenging. Having made significant advances with drug delivery technologies, we must learn from other areas of oncology drug development, where patient stratification and target-driven design have improved patient outcomes. We should evolve our nanomedicine development strategies to build the patient and disease into the line of sight from the outset. The success of small molecule targeted therapies has been significantly improved by employing a specific decision-making framework, such as AstraZeneca's 5R principle: right target/efficacy, right tissue/exposure, right safety, right patient, and right commercial potential. With appropriate investment and collaboration to generate a platform of evidence supporting the end clinical application, a similar framework can be established for enhancing nanomedicine translation and performance. Building informative data packages to answer these questions requires the following: (I) an improved understanding of the heterogeneity of clinical cancers and of the biological factors influencing the behaviour of nanomedicines in patient tumours; (II) a transition from formulation-driven research to disease-driven development; (III) the implementation of more relevant animal models and testing protocols; and (IV) the pre-selection of the patients most likely to respond to nanomedicine therapies. These challenges must be overcome to improve (the cost-effectiveness of) nanomedicine development and translation, and they are key to establishing superior therapies for patients. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A model of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions and its implications for targeting environmental interventions by genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Helen M

    2006-10-09

    The potential public health benefits of targeting environmental interventions by genotype depend on the environmental and genetic contributions to the variance of common diseases, and the magnitude of any gene-environment interaction. In the absence of prior knowledge of all risk factors, twin, family and environmental data may help to define the potential limits of these benefits in a given population. However, a general methodology to analyze twin data is required because of the potential importance of gene-gene interactions (epistasis), gene-environment interactions, and conditions that break the 'equal environments' assumption for monozygotic and dizygotic twins. A new model for gene-gene and gene-environment interactions is developed that abandons the assumptions of the classical twin study, including Fisher's (1918) assumption that genes act as risk factors for common traits in a manner necessarily dominated by an additive polygenic term. Provided there are no confounders, the model can be used to implement a top-down approach to quantifying the potential utility of genetic prediction and prevention, using twin, family and environmental data. The results describe a solution space for each disease or trait, which may or may not include the classical twin study result. Each point in the solution space corresponds to a different model of genotypic risk and gene-environment interaction. The results show that the potential for reducing the incidence of common diseases using environmental interventions targeted by genotype may be limited, except in special cases. The model also confirms that the importance of an individual's genotype in determining their risk of complex diseases tends to be exaggerated by the classical twin studies method, owing to the 'equal environments' assumption and the assumption of no gene-environment interaction. In addition, if phenotypes are genetically robust, because of epistasis, a largely environmental explanation for shared sibling

  20. A model of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions and its implications for targeting environmental interventions by genotype

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace Helen M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The potential public health benefits of targeting environmental interventions by genotype depend on the environmental and genetic contributions to the variance of common diseases, and the magnitude of any gene-environment interaction. In the absence of prior knowledge of all risk factors, twin, family and environmental data may help to define the potential limits of these benefits in a given population. However, a general methodology to analyze twin data is required becaus...

  1. Gene targeting, genome editing: from Dolly to editors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenfang; Proudfoot, Chris; Lillico, Simon G; Whitelaw, C Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    One of the most powerful strategies to investigate biology we have as scientists, is the ability to transfer genetic material in a controlled and deliberate manner between organisms. When applied to livestock, applications worthy of commercial venture can be devised. Although initial methods used to generate transgenic livestock resulted in random transgene insertion, the development of SCNT technology enabled homologous recombination gene targeting strategies to be used in livestock. Much has been accomplished using this approach. However, now we have the ability to change a specific base in the genome without leaving any other DNA mark, with no need for a transgene. With the advent of the genome editors this is now possible and like other significant technological leaps, the result is an even greater diversity of possible applications. Indeed, in merely 5 years, these 'molecular scissors' have enabled the production of more than 300 differently edited pigs, cattle, sheep and goats. The advent of genome editors has brought genetic engineering of livestock to a position where industry, the public and politicians are all eager to see real use of genetically engineered livestock to address societal needs. Since the first transgenic livestock reported just over three decades ago the field of livestock biotechnology has come a long way-but the most exciting period is just starting.

  2. Il2rg gene-targeted severe combined immunodeficiency pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Iwamoto, Masaki; Saito, Yoriko; Fuchimoto, Daiichiro; Sembon, Shoichiro; Suzuki, Misae; Mikawa, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Michiko; Aoki, Yuki; Najima, Yuho; Takagi, Shinsuke; Suzuki, Nahoko; Suzuki, Emi; Kubo, Masanori; Mimuro, Jun; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Madoiwa, Seiji; Sakata, Yoichi; Perry, Anthony C F; Ishikawa, Fumihiko; Onishi, Akira

    2012-06-14

    A porcine model of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) promises to facilitate human cancer studies, the humanization of tissue for xenotransplantation, and the evaluation of stem cells for clinical therapy, but SCID pigs have not been described. We report here the generation and preliminary evaluation of a porcine SCID model. Fibroblasts containing a targeted disruption of the X-linked interleukin-2 receptor gamma chain gene, Il2rg, were used as donors to generate cloned pigs by serial nuclear transfer. Germline transmission of the Il2rg deletion produced healthy Il2rg(+/-) females, while Il2rg(-/Y) males were athymic and exhibited markedly impaired immunoglobulin and T and NK cell production, robustly recapitulating human SCID. Following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, donor cells stably integrated in Il2rg(-/Y) heterozygotes and reconstituted the Il2rg(-/Y) lymphoid lineage. The SCID pigs described here represent a step toward the comprehensive evaluation of preclinical cellular regenerative strategies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Co-factors necessary for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Nielsen, Ronni; Stunnenberg, Henk

    of endogenous target gene in different cell types are elusive. To mutually compare the ability of the PPAR subtypes to activate endogenous target genes in a given cell, PPARa, PPARb/d and PPARg2 were HA tagged and rapidly, equally and synchronously expressed using adenoviral delivery. Within a few hours after...... subtype specific activation of target genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcriptional co-factors can function as master regulators for nuclear receptors and impose promoter selectivity. To study co-factor necessity for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes, specific co...

  4. Cytotoxicity Enhancement in Breast Cancer Cells with Carbonate Apatite-Facilitated Intracellular Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemian, Tahereh; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2018-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy as the mainstay in the management of breast cancer has demonstrated various drawbacks, including non-targeted bio distribution and narrow therapeutic and safety windows. Thus, enhancements in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of the classical anti-cancer drugs could lead to improved efficacy against cancer cells. Therefore, inorganic pH-dependent carbonate apatite (CA) nanoparticles were utilized to efficiently deliver various drugs into cancer cells. Following characterization and various modifications in the structure of CA complexes with different drugs, lifted outcomes were achieved. Markedly, complexing paclitaxel with CA resulted in 20.71 ± 4.34% loading efficiency together with 24.14 ± 2.21% enhancement in cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells plus superior in vivo anti-tumour efficacy compared to free paclitaxel. PMID:29401738

  5. Cytotoxicity Enhancement in Breast Cancer Cells with Carbonate Apatite-Facilitated Intracellular Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Fatemian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacotherapy as the mainstay in the management of breast cancer has demonstrated various drawbacks, including non-targeted bio distribution and narrow therapeutic and safety windows. Thus, enhancements in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of the classical anti-cancer drugs could lead to improved efficacy against cancer cells. Therefore, inorganic pH-dependent carbonate apatite (CA nanoparticles were utilized to efficiently deliver various drugs into cancer cells. Following characterization and various modifications in the structure of CA complexes with different drugs, lifted outcomes were achieved. Markedly, complexing paclitaxel with CA resulted in 20.71 ± 4.34% loading efficiency together with 24.14 ± 2.21% enhancement in cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells plus superior in vivo anti-tumour efficacy compared to free paclitaxel.

  6. Specific genetic modifications of domestic animals by gene targeting and animal cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Jiangfeng

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The technology of gene targeting through homologous recombination has been extremely useful for elucidating gene functions in mice. The application of this technology was thought impossible in the large livestock species until the successful creation of the first mammalian clone "Dolly" the sheep. The combination of the technologies for gene targeting of somatic cells with those of animal cloning made it possible to introduce specific genetic mutations into domestic animals. In this review, the principles of gene targeting in somatic cells and the challenges of nuclear transfer using gene-targeted cells are discussed. The relevance of gene targeting in domestic animals for applications in bio-medicine and agriculture are also examined.

  7. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng; An, Yanli

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression. (paper)

  8. Homologous gene targeting of a carotenoids biosynthetic gene in Rhodosporidium toruloides by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenyi; Yang, Xiaobing; Wang, Xueying; Lin, Xinping; Wang, Yanan; Zhang, Sufang; Luan, Yushi; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2017-07-01

    To target a carotenoid biosynthetic gene in the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides by using the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) method. The RHTO_04602 locus of R. toruloides NP11, previously assigned to code the carotenoid biosynthetic gene CRTI, was amplified from genomic DNA and cloned into the binary plasmid pZPK-mcs, resulting in pZPK-CRT. A HYG-expression cassette was inserted into the CRTI sequence of pZPK-CRT by utilizing the restriction-free clone strategy. The resulted plasmid was used to transform R. toruloides cells according to the AMT method, leading to a few white transformants. Sequencing analysis of those transformants confirmed homologous recombination and insertional inactivation of CRTI. When the white variants were transformed with a CRTI-expression cassette, cells became red and produced carotenoids as did the wild-type strain NP11. Successful homologous targeting of the CrtI locus confirmed the function of RHTO_04602 in carotenoids biosynthesis in R. toruloides. It provided valuable information for metabolic engineering of this non-model yeast species.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Targeted Mouse Mutations Reveals the Topography of Local Changes in Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B West

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The unintended consequences of gene targeting in mouse models have not been thoroughly studied and a more systematic analysis is needed to understand the frequency and characteristics of off-target effects. Using RNA-seq, we evaluated targeted and neighboring gene expression in tissues from 44 homozygous mutants compared with C57BL/6N control mice. Two allele types were evaluated: 15 targeted trap mutations (TRAP; and 29 deletion alleles (DEL, usually a deletion between the translational start and the 3' UTR. Both targeting strategies insert a bacterial beta-galactosidase reporter (LacZ and a neomycin resistance selection cassette. Evaluating transcription of genes in +/- 500 kb of flanking DNA around the targeted gene, we found up-regulated genes more frequently around DEL compared with TRAP alleles, however the frequency of alleles with local down-regulated genes flanking DEL and TRAP targets was similar. Down-regulated genes around both DEL and TRAP targets were found at a higher frequency than expected from a genome-wide survey. However, only around DEL targets were up-regulated genes found with a significantly higher frequency compared with genome-wide sampling. Transcriptome analysis confirms targeting in 97% of DEL alleles, but in only 47% of TRAP alleles probably due to non-functional splice variants, and some splicing around the gene trap. Local effects on gene expression are likely due to a number of factors including compensatory regulation, loss or disruption of intragenic regulatory elements, the exogenous promoter in the neo selection cassette, removal of insulating DNA in the DEL mutants, and local silencing due to disruption of normal chromatin organization or presence of exogenous DNA. An understanding of local position effects is important for understanding and interpreting any phenotype attributed to targeted gene mutations, or to spontaneous indels.

  10. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M.; Baehrecke, Eric H.; Duncan, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the same regulators pattern two distinct forms. Recent studies indicate that this ability is facilitated by a global change in the responsiveness of target genes during metamorphosis. Here we show that this shift is controlled in part by the ecdysone-induced transcription factor E93. Although long considered a dedicated regulator of larval cell death, we find that E93 is expressed widely in adult cells at the pupal stage and is required for many patterning processes at this time. To understand the role of E93 in adult patterning, we focused on a simple E93-dependent process, the induction of the Dll gene within bract cells of the pupal leg by EGF receptor signaling. In this system, we show that E93 functions to cause Dll to become responsive to EGF receptor signaling. We demonstrate that E93 is both necessary and sufficient for directing this switch. E93 likely controls the responsiveness of many other target genes because it is required broadly for patterning during metamorphosis. The wide conservation of E93 orthologs suggests that similar mechanisms control life-cycle transitions in other organisms, including vertebrates. PMID:22308414

  11. Control of target gene specificity during metamorphosis by the steroid response gene E93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Xiaochun; Duncan, Dianne M; Baehrecke, Eric H; Duncan, Ian

    2012-02-21

    Hormonal control of sexual maturation is a common feature in animal development. A particularly dramatic example is the metamorphosis of insects, in which pulses of the steroid hormone ecdysone drive the wholesale transformation of the larva into an adult. The mechanisms responsible for this transformation are not well understood. Work in Drosophila indicates that the larval and adult forms are patterned by the same underlying sets of developmental regulators, but it is not understood how the same regulators pattern two distinct forms. Recent studies indicate that this ability is facilitated by a global change in the responsiveness of target genes during metamorphosis. Here we show that this shift is controlled in part by the ecdysone-induced transcription factor E93. Although long considered a dedicated regulator of larval cell death, we find that E93 is expressed widely in adult cells at the pupal stage and is required for many patterning processes at this time. To understand the role of E93 in adult patterning, we focused on a simple E93-dependent process, the induction of the Dll gene within bract cells of the pupal leg by EGF receptor signaling. In this system, we show that E93 functions to cause Dll to become responsive to EGF receptor signaling. We demonstrate that E93 is both necessary and sufficient for directing this switch. E93 likely controls the responsiveness of many other target genes because it is required broadly for patterning during metamorphosis. The wide conservation of E93 orthologs suggests that similar mechanisms control life-cycle transitions in other organisms, including vertebrates.

  12. Identification of the human ApoAV gene as a novel RORα target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lind, Ulrika; Nilsson, Tina; McPheat, Jane; Stroemstedt, Per-Erik; Bamberg, Krister; Balendran, Clare; Kang, Daiwu

    2005-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor-α (RORα) (NR1F1) is an orphan nuclear receptor with a potential role in metabolism. Previous studies have shown that RORα regulates transcription of the murine Apolipoprotein AI gene and human Apolipoprotein CIII genes. In the present study, we present evidence that RORα also induces transcription of the human Apolipoprotein AV gene, a recently identified apolipoprotein associated with triglyceride levels. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of RORα increased the endogenous expression of ApoAV in HepG2 cells and RORα also enhanced the activity of an ApoAV promoter construct in transiently transfected HepG2 cells. Deletion and mutation studies identified three AGGTCA motifs in the ApoAV promoter that mediate RORα transactivation, one of which overlaps with a previously identified binding site for PPARα. Together, these results suggest a novel mechanism whereby RORα modulates lipid metabolism and implies RORα as a potential target for the treatment of dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis

  13. Using PCR to Target Misconceptions about Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie K. Wright

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a PCR-based laboratory exercise that can be used with first- or second-year biology students to help overcome common misconceptions about gene expression. Biology students typically do not have a clear understanding of the difference between genes (DNA and gene expression (mRNA/protein and often believe that genes exist in an organism or cell only when they are expressed. This laboratory exercise allows students to carry out a PCR-based experiment designed to challenge their misunderstanding of the difference between genes and gene expression. Students first transform E. coli with an inducible GFP gene containing plasmid and observe induced and un-induced colonies. The following exercise creates cognitive dissonance when actual PCR results contradict their initial (incorrect predictions of the presence of the GFP gene in transformed cells. Field testing of this laboratory exercise resulted in learning gains on both knowledge and application questions on concepts related to genes and gene expression.

  14. Anti-Cancer Effect of IN-2001 in T47D Human Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung, Ki Eun; Min, Kyung Nan; Kim, Dae-Kee; Sheen, Yhun Yhong

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes involved in the remodelling of chromatin, and have a key role in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are emerging as an exciting new class of potential anti-cancer agents. In recent years, a number of structurally diverse HDAC inhibitors have been identified and these HDAC inhibitors induce growth arrest, differentiation and/or apoptosis of cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study aimed at investigating the anti-tumor activity of various HDAC inhibitors, IN-2001, using T47D human breast cancer cells. Moreover, the possible mechanism by which HDAC inhibitors exhibit anti-tumor activity was also explored. In estrogen receptor positive T47D cells, IN-2001, HDAC inhibitor showed anti-proliferative effects in dose-and time-dependent manner. In T47D human breast cancer cells showed anti-tumor activity of IN-2001 and the growth inhibitory effects of IN-2001 were related to the cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Flow cytometry studies revealed that IN-2001 showed accumulation of cells at G2/M phase. At the same time, IN-2001 treatment time-dependently increased sub-G1 population, representing apoptotic cells. IN-2001-mediated cell cycle arrest was associated with induction of cdk inhibitor expression. In T47D cells, IN-2001 as well as other HDAC inhibitors treatment significantly increased p21(WAF1) and p27(KIP1) expression. In addition, thymidylate synthase, an essential enzyme for DNA replication and repair, was down-regulated by IN-2001 and other HDAC inhibitors in the T47D human breast cancer cells. In summary, IN-2001 with a higher potency than other HDAC inhibitors induced growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and eventual apoptosis in human breast cancer possibly through modulation of cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory proteins, such as cdk inhibitors, cyclins, and thymidylate synthase.

  15. Gene targeting in human-induced pluripotent stem cells with adenoviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2014-01-01

    Helper-dependent adenoviral vector (HDAdV), which is also called gutless AdV, has been used to deliver donor DNA for gene targeting in human pluripotent stem cells. Surprisingly, the targeting efficacies, both per chromosomal integration (drug-resistant colony) and per treated cells, are much higher than those by standard electroporation and equivalent to those by utilizing artificial nucleases, such as TAL effector nucleases (Aizawa et al., Mol Ther 20:424-431, 2012; Suzuki, Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:13781-13786, 2008). Importantly, gene targeting with HDAdVs was equally efficient in transcriptionally inactive loci in human ES/iPS cells. Therefore, multiple gene-targeted clones can be obtained from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human-induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) cultured in one 100-mm dish. For virus-mediated gene targeting, it is not required to introduce artificial double-strand breaks. By using electroporation for gene targeting, target cells should be expanded to 10⁶-10⁷ cells. In contrast, as an advantage of virus-mediated method, DNA delivery efficiency is high even in a smaller number of cells, resulting in minimizing the number of passages/cell divisions before performing gene targeting. The characteristics suggest that HDAdV-mediated gene targeting has potential advantages for manipulation of chromosomes of pluripotent stem cells for therapeutic applications.

  16. The potential for substance P antagonists as anti-cancer agents in brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Despite recent advances in cancer treatment and diagnosis, the prognosis for patients with CNS tumours remains extremely poor. This is, in part, due to the difficulty in completely removing tumours surgically, and also because of the presence of the blood brain barrier, which can prevent the entry of chemotherapeutic agents typically used in cancer treatment. Despite the presence of the blood brain barrier, tumour cells are capable of entering and colonising the brain to form secondary brain tumours. Additionally, tumour related disruption of the blood brain barrier is associated with the clinical presentation of many patients, with accompanying increases in intracranial pressure due, in part, to the development of vasogenic oedema. Vasogenic oedema results because the newly formed angiogenic vessels within brain tumours do not retain the highly selective properties of the blood brain barrier, and thus allow for the extravasation of plasma proteins and water into the brain parenchyma. Tachykinins, and in particular substance P, have been implicated in blood brain barrier disruption and the genesis of cerebral oedema in other CNS insults via a process known as neurogenic inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that substance P may play a similar role in CNS tumours. It has been well established that an upregulation of substance P and its receptors occurs in a number of different cancer types, including CNS neoplasms. In addition to disrupting blood brain barrier permeability, substance P and the NK1 receptors facilitate promotion of tumour growth and the development of cerebral oedema. Accordingly, recent patents describe the potential of NK1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer agents suggesting that substance P may provide a novel cancer treatment target. This review will examine the role of substance P in the development of CNS tumours.

  17. Synthetic Strigolactone Analogues Reveal Anti-Cancer Activities on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hasan, Mohammed Nihal

    2018-02-09

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains one of the leading causes of death worldwide. The complex etiology is attributed to many factors like heredity, cirrhosis, hepatitis infections or the dysregulation of the different molecular pathways. Nevertheless, the current treatment regimens have either severe side effects or tumors gradually acquire resistance upon prolonged use. Thus, developing a new selective treatment for HCC is the need of the hour. Many anticancer agents derived from plants have been evaluated for their cytotoxicity towards many human cancer cell lines. Strigolactones (SLs)-a newly discovered class of phytohormones, play a crucial role in the development of plant-root and shoot. Recently, many synthetic analogues of SLs have demonstrated pro-apoptotic effects on different cancer cell lines like prostate, breast, colon and lung. In this study, we tested synthetic SLs analogues on HCC cell line-HepG2 and evaluated their capability to induce cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis. Primary WST-1 assays, followed by annexin-V/7AAD staining, demonstrated the anti-proliferative effects. The SLs analogues TIT3 and TIT7 were found to significantly reduce HepG2 cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induce apoptosis. Interestingly, though TIT3 and TIT7 strongly affected cancer cell proliferation, both compounds showed moderate anti-proliferative effect on normal cells. Further, migration of cancer cells was suppressed upon treatment with TIT3 and TIT7 in a wound healing assay. In summary, these findings suggest that two SLs analogues TIT3 and TIT7 exert selective inhibitory effects on cancer cells most likely through targeting microtubules. SLs analogues could be used in future as potential anti-cancer candidates in chemotherapy.

  18. A Genome-Wide Map of AAV-Mediated Human Gene Targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Deyle, David R.; Hansen, R. Scott; Cornea, Anda M.; Li, Li B.; Burt, Amber A.; Alexander, Ian E.; Sandstrom, Richard S.; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Wei, Chia-Lin; Russell, David W.

    2014-01-01

    To determine which genomic features promote homologous recombination, we created a genome-wide map of gene targeting sites. An adeno-associated virus vector was used to target identical loci introduced as transcriptionally active retroviral vector proviruses. A comparison of ~2,000 targeted and untargeted sites showed that targeting occurred throughout the human genome and was not influenced by the presence of nearby CpG islands, sequence repeats, or DNase I hypersensitive sites. Targeted sit...

  19. Efficient four fragment cloning for the construction of vectors for targeted gene replacement in filamentous fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rasmus John Normand; Andersson, Jens A.; Kristensen, Matilde Bylov

    2008-01-01

    technique that allows single step cloning of the two required homologous recombination sequences into different sites of a recipient vector. The advantages are: A simple experimental design, free choice of target sequence, few procedures and user convenience. The vectors are intented for Agrobacterium...... with an average efficiency of 84% for gene replacement and 80% for targeted overexpression. Conclusion: The new vectors designed for USER Friendly cloning provided a fast reliable method to construct vectors for targeted gene manipulations in fungi....

  20. Benzene-poly-carboxylic acid complex, a novel anti-cancer agent induces apoptosis in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuad Fares

    Full Text Available Some cases of breast cancer are composed of clones of hormonal-independent growing cells, which do not respond to therapy. In the present study, the effect of Benzene-Poly-Carboxylic Acid Complex (BP-C1 on growth of human breast-cancer cells was tested. BP-C1 is a novel anti-cancer complex of benzene-poly-carboxylic acids with a very low concentration of cis-diammineplatinum (II dichloride. Human breast cancer cells, MCF-7 and T47D, were used. Cell viability was detected by XTT assay and apoptosis was detected by Flow Cytometry and by annexin V/FITC/PI assay. Caspases were detected by western blot analysis and gene expression was measured by using the Applied Biosystems® TaqMan® Array Plates. The results showed that exposure of the cells to BP-C1 for 48 h, significantly (P<0.001 reduced cell viability, induced apoptosis and activated caspase 8 and caspace 9. Moreover, gene expression experiments indicated that BP-C1 increased the expression of pro-apoptotic genes (CASP8AP1, TNFRSF21, NFkB2, FADD, BCL10 and CASP8 and lowered the level of mRNA transcripts of inhibitory apoptotic genes (BCL2L11, BCL2L2 and XIAP. These findings may lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatment of human cancer using BP-C1 analog.

  1. Liposomal delivery systems for anti-cancer analogues of vitamin E

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, S.; Knotigova, P.T.; Masek, J.; Prochazka, L.; Lukac, R.; Miller, A.D.; Neužil, Jiří; Turanek, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 207, Jun 10 (2015), s. 59-69 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Alpha-tocopheryl succinate * Analogues of vitamin E * Anti-cancer drugs Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.441, year: 2015

  2. Anti-Cancer Efficacy of Silybin Derivatives - A Structure-Activity Relationship

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agarwal, Ch.; Wadhwa, R.; Deep, G.; Biedermann, David; Gažák, Radek; Křen, Vladimír; Agarwal, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2013), e00074 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10027 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Silybin * silibinin * anti- cancer efficacy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  3. Phytochemical investigation and the anti-cancer properties of pengularia daemia and phylica paniculata

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Khorombi, TE

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) implemented an in-house anti-cancer screen aimed at testing several plant extracts. This was done in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in the USA and involved training...

  4. Anti-Cancer Properties of Diethylether Extract of Wood from Sukun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-cancer properties of the diethylether extract of Sukun (Artocarpus altilis) wood. Methods: The extract was tested in human T47D breast cancer cells and examined for its effect on cell viability, nuclear morphology and sub-G1 formation. Cell viability was determined by microculture tetrazolium ...

  5. High throughput screening of South African plants for anti-cancer properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fouché, Gerda

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Plants have a long history of use in the treatment of cancer and over 60% of currently used anti-cancer agents are derived in one way or another from natural sources. South Africa has a rich plant biodiversity with only a limited number reported...

  6. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0824-z. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer activity of new Schiff base and its copper complex derived from sulfamethoxazole. I RAMA∗ and R SELVAMEENA. PG and Research Department of Chemistry, Seethalakshmi Ramaswami College,. Tiruchirappalli 620 002 ...

  7. Evolutionary relationships of Aurora kinases: Implications for model organism studies and the development of anti-cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Denis R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As key regulators of mitotic chromosome segregation, the Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cell division. Abnormalities in Aurora kinases have been strongly linked with cancer, which has lead to the recent development of new classes of anti-cancer drugs that specifically target the ATP-binding domain of these kinases. From an evolutionary perspective, the species distribution of the Aurora kinase family is complex. Mammals uniquely have three Aurora kinases, Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, while for other metazoans, including the frog, fruitfly and nematode, only Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases are known. The fungi have a single Aurora-like homolog. Based on the tacit assumption of orthology to human counterparts, model organism studies have been central to the functional characterization of Aurora kinases. However, the ortholog and paralog relationships of these kinases across various species have not been rigorously examined. Here, we present comprehensive evolutionary analyses of the Aurora kinase family. Results Phylogenetic trees suggest that all three vertebrate Auroras evolved from a single urochordate ancestor. Specifically, Aurora-A is an orthologous lineage in cold-blooded vertebrates and mammals, while structurally similar Aurora-B and Aurora-C evolved more recently in mammals from a duplication of an ancestral Aurora-B/C gene found in cold-blooded vertebrates. All so-called Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases of non-chordates are ancestral to the clade of chordate Auroras and, therefore, are not strictly orthologous to vertebrate counterparts. Comparisons of human Aurora-B and Aurora-C sequences to the resolved 3D structure of human Aurora-A lends further support to the evolutionary scenario that vertebrate Aurora-B and Aurora-C are closely related paralogs. Of the 26 residues lining the ATP-binding active site, only three were variant and all were specific to Aurora-A. Conclusions In

  8. Screening for Anti-Cancer Compounds in Marine Organisms in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobretsov, Sergey; Tamimi, Yahya; Al-Kindi, Mohamed A; Burney, Ikram

    2016-05-01

    Marine organisms are a rich source of bioactive molecules with potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and industry; however, few bioactive compounds have been isolated from organisms inhabiting the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. This study aimed to isolate and screen the anti-cancer activity of compounds and extracts from 40 natural products of marine organisms collected from the Gulf of Oman. This study was carried out between January 2012 and December 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. Fungi, bacteria, sponges, algae, soft corals, tunicates, bryozoans, mangrove tree samples and sea cucumbers were collected from seawater at Marina Bandar Al-Rowdha and Bandar Al-Khayran in Oman. Bacteria and fungi were isolated using a marine broth and organisms were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate. Compounds were identified from spectroscopic data. The anti-cancer activity of the compounds and extracts was tested in a Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF)-7 cell line breast adenocarcinoma model. Eight pure compounds and 32 extracts were investigated. Of these, 22.5% showed strong or medium anti-cancer activity, with malformin A, kuanoniamine D, hymenialdisine and gallic acid showing the greatest activity, as well as the soft coral Sarcophyton sp. extract. Treatment of MCF-7 cells at different concentrations of Sarcophyton sp. extracts indicated the induction of concentration-dependent cell death. Ultrastructural analysis highlighted the presence of nuclear fragmentation, membrane protrusion, blebbing and chromatic segregation at the nuclear membrane, which are typical characteristics of cell death by apoptosis induction. Some Omani marine organisms showed high anti-cancer potential. The efficacy, specificity and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer compounds from Omani marine organisms on various cancer models should be investigated in future in vitro and in vivo studies.

  9. Screening for Anti-Cancer Compounds in Marine Organisms in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Dobretsov

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Marine organisms are a rich source of bioactive molecules with potential applications in medicine, biotechnology and industry; however, few bioactive compounds have been isolated from organisms inhabiting the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. This study aimed to isolate and screen the anti-cancer activity of compounds and extracts from 40 natural products of marine organisms collected from the Gulf of Oman. Methods: This study was carried out between January 2012 and December 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University, Muscat, Oman. Fungi, bacteria, sponges, algae, soft corals, tunicates, bryozoans, mangrove tree samples and sea cucumbers were collected from seawater at Marina Bandar Al-Rowdha and Bandar Al-Khayran in Oman. Bacteria and fungi were isolated using a marine broth and organisms were extracted with methanol and ethyl acetate. Compounds were identified from spectroscopic data. The anti-cancer activity of the compounds and extracts was tested in a Michigan Cancer Foundation (MCF-7 cell line breast adenocarcinoma model. Results: Eight pure compounds and 32 extracts were investigated. Of these, 22.5% showed strong or medium anti-cancer activity, with malformin A, kuanoniamine D, hymenialdisine and gallic acid showing the greatest activity, as well as the soft coral Sarcophyton sp. extract. Treatment of MCF-7 cells at different concentrations of Sarcophyton sp. extracts indicated the induction of concentration-dependent cell death. Ultrastructural analysis highlighted the presence of nuclear fragmentation, membrane protrusion, blebbing and chromatic segregation at the nuclear membrane, which are typical characteristics of cell death by apoptosis induction. Conclusion: Some Omani marine organisms showed high anti-cancer potential. The efficacy, specificity and molecular mechanisms of anti-cancer compounds from Omani marine organisms on various cancer models should be investigated in future in vitro and in vivo studies.

  10. Identification of MicroRNAs and target genes involvement in hepatocellular carcinoma with microarray data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dadong; Tan, Jingwang; Xu, Yong; Tan, Xianglong; Han, Mingming; Tu, Yuliang; Zhu, Ziman; Zen, Jianping; Dou, Chunqing; Cai, Shouwang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to identify the differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) between hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples and controls and provide new diagnostic potential miRNAs for HCC. The miRNAs expression profile data GSE20077 included 7 HCC samples, 1 HeLa sample and 3 controls. Differentially expressed miRNAs (DE-miRNAs) were identified by t-test and wilcox test. The miRNA with significantly differential expression was chosen for further analysis. Target genes for this miRNA were selected using TargetScan and miRbase database. STRING software was applied to construct the target genes interaction network and topology analysis was carried out to identify the hub gene in the network. And we identified the mechanism for affecting miRNA function. A total of 54 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified, in which there were 13 miRNAs published to be related to HCC. The differentially expressed hsa-miR-106b was chosen for further analysis and PTPRT (Receptor-type tyrosine-protein phosphatase T) was its potential target gene. The target genes interaction network was constructed among 33 genes, in which PTPRT was the hub gene. We got the conclusion that the differentially expressed hsa-miR-106b may play an important role in the development of HCC by regulating the expression of its potential target gene PT-PRT.

  11. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Ikeya, Makoto [Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Fukuta, Makoto [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Woltjen, Knut [Department of Reprogramming Sciences, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Otsuka, Takanobu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Toguchida, Junya, E-mail: togjun@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Tissue Regeneration, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  12. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulec, Cagri; Coban, Neslihan; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema; Yildirim, Ozlem; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan

    2017-01-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses.

  13. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulec, Cagri; Coban, Neslihan; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema; Yildirim, Ozlem; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of potential target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 and HUVEC cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulec, Cagri, E-mail: cagri.gulec@gmail.com; Coban, Neslihan, E-mail: neslic@istanbul.edu.tr; Ozsait-Selcuk, Bilge, E-mail: ozsaitb@istanbul.edu.tr; Sirma-Ekmekci, Sema, E-mail: semasirma@gmail.com; Yildirim, Ozlem, E-mail: ozlm-yildirim@hotmail.com; Erginel-Unaltuna, Nihan, E-mail: nihanerginel@yahoo.com

    2017-04-01

    ROR-alpha is a nuclear receptor, activity of which can be modulated by natural or synthetic ligands. Due to its possible involvement in, and potential therapeutic target for atherosclerosis, we aimed to identify ROR-alpha target genes in monocytic and endothelial cell lines. We performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by tiling array (ChIP-on-chip) for ROR-alpha in monocytic cell line THP1 and endothelial cell line HUVEC. Following bioinformatic analysis of the array data, we tested four candidate genes in terms of dependence of their expression level on ligand-mediated ROR-alpha activity, and two of them in terms of promoter occupancy by ROR-alpha. Bioinformatic analyses of ChIP-on-chip data suggested that ROR-alpha binds to genomic regions near the transcription start site (TSS) of more than 3000 genes in THP1 and HUVEC. Potential ROR-alpha target genes in both cell types seem to be involved mainly in membrane receptor activity, signal transduction and ion transport. While SPP1 and IKBKA were shown to be direct target genes of ROR-alpha in THP1 monocytes, inflammation related gene HMOX1 and heat shock protein gene HSPA8 were shown to be potential target genes of ROR-alpha. Our results suggest that ROR-alpha may regulate signaling receptor activity, and transmembrane transport activity through its potential target genes. ROR-alpha seems also to play role in cellular sensitivity to environmental substances like arsenite and chloroprene. Although, the expression analyses have shown that synthetic ROR-alpha ligands can modulate some of potential ROR-alpha target genes, functional significance of ligand-dependent modulation of gene expression needs to be confirmed with further analyses.

  15. Identification of downstream metastasis-associated target genes regulated by LSD1 in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang; Ding, Jie; Wang, Ziwei; Zhu, Jian; Wang, Xuejian; Du, Jiyi

    2017-03-21

    This study aims to identify downstream target genes regulated by lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) in colon cancer cells and investigate the molecular mechanisms of LSD1 influencing invasion and metastasis of colon cancer. We obtained the expression changes of downstream target genes regulated by small-interfering RNA-LSD1 and LSD1-overexpression via gene expression profiling in two human colon cancer cell lines. An Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 was used to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). We screened out LSD1-target gene associated with proliferation, metastasis, and invasion from DEGs via Gene Ontology and Pathway Studio. Subsequently, four key genes (CABYR, FOXF2, TLE4, and CDH1) were computationally predicted as metastasis-related LSD1-target genes. ChIp-PCR was applied after RT-PCR and Western blot validations to detect the occupancy of LSD1-target gene promoter-bound LSD1. A total of 3633 DEGs were significantly upregulated, and 4642 DEGs were downregulated in LSD1-silenced SW620 cells. A total of 4047 DEGs and 4240 DEGs were upregulated and downregulated in LSD1-overexpressed HT-29 cells, respectively. RT-PCR and Western blot validated the microarray analysis results. ChIP assay results demonstrated that LSD1 might be negative regulators for target genes CABYR and CDH1. The expression level of LSD1 is negatively correlated with mono- and dimethylation of histone H3 lysine4(H3K4) at LSD1- target gene promoter region. No significant mono-methylation and dimethylation of H3 lysine9 methylation was detected at the promoter region of CABYR and CDH1. LSD1- depletion contributed to the upregulation of CABYR and CDH1 through enhancing the dimethylation of H3K4 at the LSD1-target genes promoter. LSD1- overexpression mediated the downregulation of CABYR and CDH1expression through decreasing the mono- and dimethylation of H3K4 at LSD1-target gene promoter in colon cancer cells. CABYR and CDH1 might be potential LSD1-target genes in colon

  16. Gene-carried hepatoma targeting complex induced high gene transfection efficiency with low toxicity and significant antitumor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao QQ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Qing-Qing Zhao,1,2 Yu-Lan Hu,1 Yang Zhou,3 Ni Li,1 Min Han,1 Gu-Ping Tang,4 Feng Qiu,2 Yasuhiko Tabata,5 Jian-Qing Gao,11Institute of Pharmaceutics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 2Department of Pharmacy, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China; 3Institute of Biochemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; 4Institute of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China; 5Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, Kyoto, JapanBackground: The success of gene transfection is largely dependent on the development of a vehicle or vector that can efficiently deliver a gene to cells with minimal toxicity.Methods: A liver cancer-targeted specific peptide (FQHPSF sequence was successfully synthesized and linked with chitosan-linked polyethylenimine (CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT (CP/peptide. The structure of CPT was confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultraviolet spectrophotometry. The particle size of CPT/DNA complexes was measured using laser diffraction spectrometry and the cytotoxicity of the copolymer was evaluated by methylthiazol tetrazolium method. The transfection efficiency evaluation of the CP copolymer was performed using luciferase activity assay. Cellular internalization of the CP/DNA complex was observed under confocal laser scanning microscopy. The targeting specificity of the polymer coupled to peptide was measured by competitive inhibition transfection study. The liver targeting specificity of the CPT copolymer in vivo was demonstrated by combining the copolymer with a therapeutic gene, interleukin-12, and assessed by its abilities in suppressing the growth of ascites tumor in mouse model.Results: The results showed that the liver cancer-targeted specific peptide was successfully synthesized and linked with CP to form a new targeted gene delivery vector called CPT. The composition of CPT

  17. Stable gene replacement in barley by targeted double-strand break induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Koichi; Breier, Ulrike; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Schubert, Ingo; Reiss, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Gene targeting is becoming an important tool for precision genome engineering in plants. During gene replacement, a variant of gene targeting, transformed DNA integrates into the genome by homologous recombination (HR) to replace resident sequences. We have analysed gene targeting in barley (Hordeum vulgare) using a model system based on double-strand break (DSB) induction by the meganuclease I-SceI and a transgenic, artificial target locus. In the plants we obtained, the donor construct was inserted at the target locus by homology-directed DNA integration in at least two transformants obtained in a single experiment and was stably inherited as a single Mendelian trait. Both events were produced by one-sided integration. Our data suggest that gene replacement can be achieved in barley with a frequency suitable for routine application. The use of a codon-optimized nuclease and co-transfer of the nuclease gene together with the donor construct are probably the components important for efficient gene targeting. Such an approach, employing the recently developed synthetic nucleases/nickases that allow DSB induction at almost any sequence of a genome of interest, sets the stage for precision genome engineering as a routine tool even for important crops such as barley. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  18. Efficient four fragment cloning for the construction of vectors for targeted gene replacement in filamentous fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristensen Matilde B

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid increase in whole genome fungal sequence information allows large scale functional analyses of target genes. Efficient transformation methods to obtain site-directed gene replacement, targeted over-expression by promoter replacement, in-frame epitope tagging or fusion of coding sequences with fluorescent markers such as GFP are essential for this process. Construction of vectors for these experiments depends on the directional cloning of two homologous recombination sequences on each side of a selection marker gene. Results Here, we present a USER Friendly cloning based technique that allows single step cloning of the two required homologous recombination sequences into different sites of a recipient vector. The advantages are: A simple experimental design, free choice of target sequence, few procedures and user convenience. The vectors are intented for Agrobacterium tumefaciens and protoplast based transformation technologies. The system has been tested by the construction of vectors for targeted replacement of 17 genes and overexpression of 12 genes in Fusarium graminearum. The results show that four fragment vectors can be constructed in a single cloning step with an average efficiency of 84% for gene replacement and 80% for targeted overexpression. Conclusion The new vectors designed for USER Friendly cloning provided a fast reliable method to construct vectors for targeted gene manipulations in fungi.

  19. Gene targeting using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells: The future for behavior genetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eGerlai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior.

  20. Targeting calcium signaling in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaochu Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular calcium ions (Ca2+ act as second messenger to regulate gene transcription, cell proliferation, migration and death. Accumulating evidences have demonstrated that intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is altered in cancer cells and the alteration is involved in tumor initiation, angiogenesis, progression and metastasis. Targeting derailed Ca2+ signaling for cancer therapy has become an emerging research area. This review summarizes some important Ca2+ channels, transporters and Ca2+-ATPases, which have been reported to be altered in human cancer patients. It discusses the current research effort toward evaluation of the blockers, inhibitors or regulators for Ca2+ channels/transporters or Ca2+-ATPase pumps as anti-cancer drugs. This review is also aimed to stimulate interest in, and support for research into the understanding of cellular mechanisms underlying the regulation of Ca2+ signaling in different cancer cells, and to search for novel therapies to cure these malignancies by targeting Ca2+ channels or transporters.

  1. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  2. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  3. Targeting the ABCB4 gene to control cholesterol homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Elferink, Ronald Pj; Beuers, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Multidrug resistance 3 (MDR3) P-glycoprotein is a lipid floppase that is encoded by the ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 4 (ABCB4) gene and plays a crucial role in proper bile formation by transporting phosphatidylcholine across the canalicular plasma membrane of the hepatocyte

  4. Stripy Ftz target genes are coordinately regulated by Ftz-F1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hui Ying; Heffer, Alison; Anderson, W Ray; Liu, Jingnan; Bowler, Timothy; Pick, Leslie

    2009-11-15

    During development, cascades of regulatory genes act in a hierarchical fashion to subdivide the embryo into increasingly specified body regions. This has been best characterized in Drosophila, where genes encoding regulatory transcription factors form a network to direct the development of the basic segmented body plan. The pair-rule genes are pivotal in this process as they are responsible for the first subdivision of the embryo into repeated metameric units. The Drosophila pair-rule gene fushi tarazu (ftz) is a derived Hox gene expressed in and required for the development of alternate parasegments. Previous studies suggested that Ftz achieves its distinct regulatory specificity as a segmentation protein by interacting with a ubiquitously expressed cofactor, the nuclear receptor Ftz-F1. However, the downstream target genes regulated by Ftz and other pair-rule genes to direct segment formation are not known. In this study, we selected candidate Ftz targets by virtue of their early expression in Ftz-like stripes. This identified two new Ftz target genes, drumstick (drm) and no ocelli (noc), and confirmed that Ftz regulates a serotonin receptor (5-HT2). These are the earliest Ftz targets identified to date and all are coordinately regulated by Ftz-F1. Engrailed (En), the best-characterized Ftz/Ftz-F1 downstream target, is not an intermediate in regulation. The drm genomic region harbors two separate seven-stripe enhancers, identified by virtue of predicted Ftz-F1 binding sites, and these sites are necessary for stripe expression in vivo. We propose that pair-rule genes, exemplified by Ftz/Ftz-F1, promote segmentation by acting at different hierarchical levels, regulating first, other segmentation genes; second, other regulatory genes that in turn control specific cellular processes such as tissue differentiation; and, third, 'segmentation realizator genes' that are directly involved in morphogenesis.

  5. Targeted gene delivery in tumor xenografts by the combination of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction and polyethylenimine to inhibit survivin gene expression and induce apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Ri-Xiang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noninvasive and tissue-specific technologies of gene transfection would be valuable in clinical gene therapy. This present study was designed to determine whether it could enhance gene transfection in vivo by the combination of ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD with polyethylenimine (PEI in tumor xenografts, and illuminate the effects of gene silencing and apoptosis induction with short hairpin RNA (shRNA interference therapy targeting human survivin by this novel technique. Methods Two different expression vectors (pCMV-LUC and pSIREN were incubated with PEI to prepare cationic complexes (PEI/DNA and confirmed by the gel retardation assay. Human cervical carcinoma (Hela tumors were planted subcutaneously in both flanks of nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice were administered by tail vein with PBS, plasmid, plasmid and SonoVue microbubble, PEI/DNA and SonoVue microbubble. One tumor was exposed to ultrasound irradiation, while the other served as control. The feasibility of targeted delivery and tissue specificity facilitated by UTMD and PEI were investigated. Moreover, immunohistochemistry analyses about gene silencing and apoptosis induction were detected. Results Electrophoresis experiment revealed that PEI could condense DNA efficiently. The application of UTMD significantly increases the tissue transfection. Both expression vectors showed that gene expressions were present in all sections of tumors that received ultrasound exposure but not in control tumors. More importantly, the increases in transgene expression were related to UTMD with the presence of PEI significantly. Silencing of the survivin gene could induce apoptosis effectively by downregulating survivin and bcl-2 expression, also cause up-regulation of bax and caspase-3 expression. Conclusions This noninvasive, novel combination of UTMD with PEI could enhance targeted gene delivery and gene expression in tumor xenografts at intravenous administration

  6. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  7. Expression of RNA-interference/antisense transgenes by the cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing strategy to study gene functions in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Jiang, Dagang; Zhou, Hai; Li, Feng; Yang, Jiawei; Hong, Laifa; Fu, Xiao; Li, Zhibin; Liu, Zhenlan; Li, Jianming; Zhuang, Chuxiong

    2011-03-03

    Antisense and RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing systems are powerful reverse genetic methods for studying gene function. Most RNAi and antisense experiments used constitutive promoters to drive the expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes; however, several reports showed that constitutive promoters were not expressed in all cell types in cereal plants, suggesting that the constitutive promoter systems are not effective for silencing gene expression in certain tissues/organs. To develop an alternative method that complements the constitutive promoter systems, we constructed RNAi and/or antisense transgenes for four rice genes using a constitutive promoter or a cognate promoter of a selected rice target gene and generated many independent transgenic lines. Genetic, molecular, and phenotypic analyses of these RNAi/antisense transgenic rice plants, in comparison to previously-reported transgenic lines that silenced similar genes, revealed that expression of the cognate promoter-driven RNAi/antisense transgenes resulted in novel growth/developmental defects that were not observed in transgenic lines expressing constitutive promoter-driven gene-silencing transgenes of the same target genes. Our results strongly suggested that expression of RNAi/antisense transgenes by cognate promoters of target genes is a better gene-silencing approach to discovery gene function in rice.

  8. UP Finder: A COBRA toolbox extension for identifying gene overexpression strategies for targeted overproduction

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    Xi Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of key genes is a basic strategy for overproducing target products via metabolic engineering. Traditionally, identifying those key genes/pathways largely relies on the knowledge of biochemistry and bioinformatics. In this study, a modeling tool named UP Finder was developed to facilitate the rapid identification of gene overexpression strategies. It was based on the COBRA toolbox under MATLAB environment. All the key gene/pathway targets are identified in one click after simply loading a Systems Biology Markup Language model and specifying a metabolite as the targeted product. The outputs are also quantitatively ranked to show the preference for determining overexpression strategies in pathway design. Analysis examples for overproducing lycopene precursor in Escherichia coli and fatty acyl-ACP in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by the UP Finder showed high degree of agreement with the reported key genes in the literatures.

  9. Identification of Multiple Cryptococcal Fungicidal Drug Targets by Combined Gene Dosing and Drug Affinity Responsive Target Stability Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Dong Park

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic fungus that is responsible for up to half a million cases of meningitis globally, especially in immunocompromised individuals. Common fungistatic drugs, such as fluconazole, are less toxic for patients but have low efficacy for initial therapy of the disease. Effective therapy against the disease is provided by the fungicidal drug amphotericin B; however, due to its high toxicity and the difficulty in administering its intravenous formulation, it is imperative to find new therapies targeting the fungus. The antiparasitic drug bithionol has been recently identified as having potent fungicidal activity. In this study, we used a combined gene dosing and drug affinity responsive target stability (GD-DARTS screen as well as protein modeling to identify a common drug binding site of bithionol within multiple NAD-dependent dehydrogenase drug targets. This combination genetic and proteomic method thus provides a powerful method for identifying novel fungicidal drug targets for further development.

  10. Multi-targeted priming for genome-wide gene expression assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomas, Aleksandra B; Lopez-Giraldez, Francesc; Clark, Travis A; Wang, Zheng; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2010-08-17

    Complementary approaches to assaying global gene expression are needed to assess gene expression in regions that are poorly assayed by current methodologies. A key component of nearly all gene expression assays is the reverse transcription of transcribed sequences that has traditionally been performed by priming the poly-A tails on many of the transcribed genes in eukaryotes with oligo-dT, or by priming RNA indiscriminately with random hexamers. We designed an algorithm to find common sequence motifs that were present within most protein-coding genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of Neurospora crassa, but that were not present within their ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA genes. We then experimentally tested whether degenerately priming these motifs with multi-targeted primers improved the accuracy and completeness of transcriptomic assays. We discovered two multi-targeted primers that would prime a preponderance of genes in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa while avoiding priming ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA. Examining the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen deficiency and profiling Neurospora crassa early sexual development, we demonstrated that using multi-targeted primers in reverse transcription led to superior performance of microarray profiling and next-generation RNA tag sequencing. Priming with multi-targeted primers in addition to oligo-dT resulted in higher sensitivity, a larger number of well-measured genes and greater power to detect differences in gene expression. Our results provide the most complete and detailed expression profiles of the yeast nitrogen starvation response and N. crassa early sexual development to date. Furthermore, our multi-targeting priming methodology for genome-wide gene expression assays provides selective targeting of multiple sequences and counter-selection against undesirable sequences, facilitating a more complete and precise assay of the transcribed sequences within the genome.

  11. Multi-targeted priming for genome-wide gene expression assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adomas Aleksandra B

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary approaches to assaying global gene expression are needed to assess gene expression in regions that are poorly assayed by current methodologies. A key component of nearly all gene expression assays is the reverse transcription of transcribed sequences that has traditionally been performed by priming the poly-A tails on many of the transcribed genes in eukaryotes with oligo-dT, or by priming RNA indiscriminately with random hexamers. We designed an algorithm to find common sequence motifs that were present within most protein-coding genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of Neurospora crassa, but that were not present within their ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA genes. We then experimentally tested whether degenerately priming these motifs with multi-targeted primers improved the accuracy and completeness of transcriptomic assays. Results We discovered two multi-targeted primers that would prime a preponderance of genes in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa while avoiding priming ribosomal RNA or transfer RNA. Examining the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen deficiency and profiling Neurospora crassa early sexual development, we demonstrated that using multi-targeted primers in reverse transcription led to superior performance of microarray profiling and next-generation RNA tag sequencing. Priming with multi-targeted primers in addition to oligo-dT resulted in higher sensitivity, a larger number of well-measured genes and greater power to detect differences in gene expression. Conclusions Our results provide the most complete and detailed expression profiles of the yeast nitrogen starvation response and N. crassa early sexual development to date. Furthermore, our multi-targeting priming methodology for genome-wide gene expression assays provides selective targeting of multiple sequences and counter-selection against undesirable sequences, facilitating a more complete and

  12. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding...

  13. RYP1 gene as a target for molecular diagnosis of histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; Riello, Giovanna Barbosa; Ribeiro, Joyce Fonteles; Alencar, Lucas Pereira; Bandeira, Silviane Praciano; Castelo-Branco, Débora Souza Collares Maia; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales; Freire, Janaína Maria Maia; Mesquita, Jacó Ricarte Lima de; Camargo, Zoilo Pires de; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2016-11-01

    This study analyzed the RYP1 gene as a target for the molecular diagnosis of histoplasmosis. This assay detected fungal DNA in 13/13 blood samples from HIV/AIDS-patients with histoplasmosis. Therefore, the detection of RYP1 gene in whole blood sample is a quick and sensitive test to diagnose histoplasmosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Computational design and application of endogenous promoters for transcriptionally targeted gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Takahashi, N.; Arntz, O.J.; Gluck, A.; Bennink, M.B.; Berg, W.B. van den; Loo, F.A.J. van de

    2009-01-01

    The promoter regions of genes that are differentially regulated in the synovial membrane during the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) represent attractive candidates for application in transcriptionally targeted gene therapy. In this study, we applied an unbiased computational approach to define

  15. PDGF-receptor beta-targeted adenovirus redirects gene transfer from hepatocytes to activated stellate cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Marieke H.; Rots, Marianne G.; Beljaars, Leonie; Ypma, Arjen Y.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Poelstra, Klaas; Moshage, Albert; Haisma, Hidde J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic liver damage may lead to liver fibrosis. In this process, hepatic activated stellate cells are the key players. Thus, activated stellate cells are attractive targets for antifibrotic gene therapy. Recombinant, adenovirus is a promising vehicle for delivering therapeutic genes to liver cells.

  16. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin Boo [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lee, Seong-Ho, E-mail: slee2000@umd.edu [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  17. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. ► PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. ► PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. ► These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  18. Application of an Efficient Gene Targeting System Linking Secondary Metabolites to their Biosynthetic Genes in Aspergillus terreus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Chun-Jun; Knox, Benjamin P.; Sanchez, James F.; Chiang, Yi-Ming; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

    2013-07-19

    Nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) are natural products biosynthesized by NRP synthetases. A kusA-, pyrG- mutant strain of Aspergillusterreus NIH 2624 was developed that greatly facilitated the gene targeting efficiency in this organism. Application of this tool allowed us to link four major types of NRP related secondary metabolites to their responsible genes in A. terreus. In addition, an NRP related melanin synthetase was also identified in this species.

  19. Targeted cancer gene therapy : the flexibility of adenoviral gene therapy vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rots, MG; Curiel, DT; Gerritsen, WR; Haisma, HJ

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviral vectors are promising reagents for therapeutic interventions in humans, including gene therapy for biologically complex diseases like cancer and cardiovascular diseases. In this regard, the major advantage of adenoviral vectors is their superior in vivo gene transfer

  20. Glucose-aspirin: Synthesis and in vitro anti-cancer activity studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, James N; Tazawa, Makio J

    2012-05-01

    Glucose-aspirin (GA) was synthesized by conjugating aspirin (ASA) to glucose. The water solubility and biological activity of GA was studied in comparison to aspirin. The human serum protease activity on the ester showed a slower hydrolysis rate, compared to ASA. Glucose-aspirin was sevenfold more water soluble than aspirin and it was about 8- to 9-fold more active in inhibiting cell growth than aspirin in their anti-cancer cell culture activity on breast (SKBR3), pancreatic (PANC-1), and prostate (PC3) cell lines, whereas the activity was similar on a benign non-cancerous cell line (WI 38). In conclusion, GA is a highly water soluble derivative of aspirin. Although the serum hydrolysis for GA was slower, there was significant anti-cancer activity at the doses studied under the experimental conditions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis and biological evaluation of andrographolide analogues as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Ranjan; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Siddharth, Sumit; Mohapatra, Purusottam; Das, Dipon; Satapathy, Shakti Ranjan; Das, Supriya; Maiti, Nakul C; Maulik, Prakas R; Kundu, Chanakya Nath; Chowdhury, Chinmay

    2014-10-06

    A new family of andrographolide analogues were synthesized and screened in vitro against kidney (HEK-293) and breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. The anti-cancer effects of the active analogues (2b, 2c and 4c) were determined by multiple cell based assays such as MTT, immunostaining, FACS, western blotting and transcriptional inhibition of NF-κB activity. Importantly, these compounds were found to possess higher anti-cancer potency than andrographolide and low toxicity to normal (VERO and MCF-10A) cells. Increased level of Bax/Bcl-xL ratio, caspase 3, and sub G1 population, higher expression level of tumor suppressor protein p53 and lower expression level of NF-κB suggested potent apoptotic property of the active analogues. Data revealed that the andrographolide derivative-mediated cell death in cancer cells was p53 dependent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Biallelic targeting of expressed genes in mouse embryonic stem cells using the Cas9 system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yu; Vanoli, Fabio; LaRocque, Jeannine R.; Krawczyk, Przemek M.; Jasin, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting - homologous recombination between transfected DNA and a chromosomal locus - is greatly stimulated by a DNA break in the target locus. Recently, the RNA-guided Cas9 endonuclease, involved in bacterial adaptive immunity, has been modified to function in mammalian cells. Unlike other

  3. Manipulating the in vivo immune response by targeted gene knockdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Judy

    2015-08-01

    Aptamers, nucleic acids selected for high affinity binding to proteins, can be used to activate or antagonize immune mediators or receptors in a location and cell-type specific manner and to enhance antigen presentation. They can also be linked to other molecules (other aptamers, siRNAs or miRNAs, proteins, toxins) to produce multifunctional compounds for targeted immune modulation in vivo. Aptamer-siRNA chimeras (AsiCs) that induce efficient cell-specific knockdown in immune cells in vitro and in vivo can be used as an immunological research tool or potentially as an immunomodulating therapeutic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  5. Generation of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene-targeted pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqing; Xin, Jige; Fan, Nana; Zou, Qingjian; Huang, Jiao; Ouyang, Zhen; Zhao, Yu; Zhao, Bentian; Liu, Zhaoming; Lai, Sisi; Yi, Xiaoling; Guo, Lin; Esteban, Miguel A; Zeng, Yangzhi; Yang, Huaqiang; Lai, Liangxue

    2015-03-01

    The domestic pig has been widely used as an important large animal model. Precise and efficient genetic modification in pig provides a great promise in biomedical research. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) system has been successfully used to produce many gene-targeted animals. However, these animals have been generated by co-injection of Cas9 mRNA and single-guide RNA (sgRNA) into one-cell stage embryos, which mostly resulted in mosaicism of the modification. One or two rounds of further breeding should be performed to obtain homozygotes with identical genotype and phenotype. To address this issue, gene-targeted somatic cells can be used as donor for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) to produce gene-targeted animals with single and identical mutations. In this study, we applied Cas9/sgRNAs to effectively direct gene editing in porcine fetal fibroblasts and then mutant cell colonies were used as donor to generate homozygous gene-targeted pigs through single round of SCNT. As a result, we successfully obtained 15 tyrosinase (TYR) biallelic mutant pigs and 20 PARK2 and PINK1 double-gene knockout (KO) pigs. They were all homozygous and no off-target mutagenesis was detected by comprehensive analysis. TYR (-/-) pigs showed typical albinism and the expression of parkin and PINK1 were depleted in PARK2 (-/-)/PINK1 (-/-) pigs. The results demonstrated that single- or double-gene targeted pigs can be effectively achieved by using the CRISPR/Cas9 system combined with SCNT without mosaic mutation and detectable off-target effects. This gene-editing system provides an efficient, rapid, and less costly manner to generate genetically modified pigs or other large animals.

  6. Simple and Efficient Targeting of Multiple Genes Through CRISPR-Cas9 in Physcomitrella patens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lopez-Obando

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Powerful genome editing technologies are needed for efficient gene function analysis. The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been adapted as an efficient gene-knock-out technology in a variety of species. However, in a number of situations, knocking out or modifying a single gene is not sufficient; this is particularly true for genes belonging to a common family, or for genes showing redundant functions. Like many plants, the model organism Physcomitrella patens has experienced multiple events of polyploidization during evolution that has resulted in a number of families of duplicated genes. Here, we report a robust CRISPR-Cas9 system, based on the codelivery of a CAS9 expressing cassette, multiple sgRNA vectors, and a cassette for transient transformation selection, for gene knock-out in multiple gene families. We demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas9-mediated targeting of five different genes allows the selection of a quintuple mutant, and all possible subcombinations of mutants, in one experiment, with no mutations detected in potential off-target sequences. Furthermore, we confirmed the observation that the presence of repeats in the vicinity of the cutting region favors deletion due to the alternative end joining pathway, for which induced frameshift mutations can be potentially predicted. Because the number of multiple gene families in Physcomitrella is substantial, this tool opens new perspectives to study the role of expanded gene families in the colonization of land by plants.

  7. Evidence of vanillin binding to CAMKIV explains the anti-cancer mechanism in human hepatic carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Huma; Tarique, Mohd; Khan, Parvez; Luqman, Suaib; Ahamad, Shahzaib; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2018-01-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr kinase family, and is associated with different types of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Vanillin is a natural compound, a primary component of the extract of the vanilla bean which possesses varieties of pharmacological features including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-tumor. Here, we have investigated the binding mechanism and affinity of vanillin to the CAMKIV which is being considered as a potential drug target for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. We found that vanillin binds strongly to the active site cavity of CAMKIV and stabilized by a large number of non-covalent interactions. We explored the utility of vanillin as anti-cancer agent and found that it inhibits the proliferation of human hepatocyte carcinoma (HepG2) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, vanillin treatment resulted into the significant reduction in the mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ROS production that eventually leads to apoptosis in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cancer cells. These findings may offer a novel therapeutic approach by targeting the CAMKIV using natural product and its derivative with a minimal side effect.

  8. Recent advances on the anti-cancer properties of Nigella sativa, a widely used food additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin F. Majdalawieh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of naturally-occurring agents to regulate tumorigenesis is on the rise. Several herbal extracts, pure plant-derived active constituents, and food additives have been reported to possess potent anti-cancer properties and cancer-ameliorating effects. The wide-range anti-cancer effects of Nigella sativa, also known as black seed or black cumin, have been extensively studied using different in vitro and in vivo models. Here, we provide a comprehensive, analytical review of the reported anti-cancer properties of N. sativa seed extracts. This review focuses on analyzing experimental findings related to the ability of N. sativa to exert anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, cytotoxic, anti-mutagenic, anti-metastatic, and NK cytotoxic activity enhancing effects against various primary cancer cells and cancer cell lines. Moreover, we underline the molecular mechanisms of action and the signal transduction pathways implicated in the suppression of tumorigenesis by N. sativa. The major signaling pathway utilized by N. sativa to manifest its anti-cancer activity is the iNOS signaling pathway. This review underscores the recent developments that highlight an effective therapeutic potential of N. sativa to suppress tumor development, reduce tumor incidence, and ameliorate carcinogenesis. In sum, experimental findings reported in the last two decades strongly suggest that N. sativa fractions could serve, alone or in combination with known chemotherapeutic drugs, as effective agents to control tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis, and hence, treatment of a wide range of cancers.

  9. Nanotech revolution for the anti-cancer drug delivery through blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraglia, M; De Rosa, G; Salzano, G; Santini, D; Lamberti, M; Sperlongano, P; Lombardi, A; Abbruzzese, A; Addeo, R

    2012-03-01

    Nanotechnology-based drug delivery was born as a chance for pharmaceutical weapons to be delivered in the body sites where drug action is required. Specifically, the incorporation of anti-cancer agents in nanodevices of 100-300 nm allows their delivery in tissues that have a fenestrated vasculature and a reduced lymphatic drainage. These two features are typical of neoplastic tissues and, therefore, allow the accumulation of nanostructured devices in tumours. An important issue of anti-cancer pharmacological strategies is the overcoming of anatomical barriers such as the bloodbrain- barrier (BBB) that protects brain from toxicological injuries but, at the same time, makes impossible for most of the pharmacological agents with anti-cancer activity to reach tumour cells placed in the brain and derived from either primary tumours or metastases. In fact, only highly lipophilic molecules can passively diffuse through BBB to reach central nervous system (CNS). Another possibility is to use nanotechnological approaches as powerful tools to across BBB, by both prolonging the plasma half-life of the drugs and crossing fenestrations of BBB damaged by brain metastases. Moreover, modifications of nanocarrier surface with specific endogenous or exogenous ligands can promote the crossing of intact BBB as in the case of primary brain tumours. This aim can be achieved through the binding of the nanodevices to carriers or receptors expressed by the endothelial cells of BBB and that can favour the internalization of the nanostructured devices delivering anti-cancer drugs. This review summarizes the most meaningful advances in the field of nanotechnologies for brain delivery of drugs.

  10. Targeting fungal genes by diced siRNAs: a rapid tool to decipher gene function in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalleda, Natarajaswamy; Naorem, Aruna; Manchikatla, Rajam V

    2013-01-01

    Gene silencing triggered by chemically synthesized small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) has become a powerful tool for deciphering gene function in many eukaryotes. However, prediction and validation of a single siRNA duplex specific to a target gene is often ineffective. RNA interference (RNAi) with synthetic siRNA suffers from lower silencing efficacy, off-target effects and is cost-intensive, especially for functional genomic studies. With the explosion of fungal genomic information, there is an increasing need to analyze gene function in a rapid manner. Therefore, studies were performed in order to investigate the efficacy of gene silencing induced by RNase III-diced-siRNAs (d-siRNA) in model filamentous fungus, Aspergillus nidulans. Stable expression of heterologous reporter gene in A. nidulans eases the examination of a new RNAi-induction route. Hence, we have optimized Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) of A. nidulans for stable expression of sGFP gene. This study demonstrates that the reporter GFP gene stably introduced into A. nidulans can be effectively silenced by treatment of GFP-d-siRNAs. We have shown the down-regulation of two endogenous genes, AnrasA and AnrasB of A. nidulans by d-siRNAs. We have also elucidated the function of an uncharacterized Ras homolog, rasB gene, which was found to be involved in hyphal growth and development. Further, silencing potency of d-siRNA was higher as compared to synthetic siRNA duplex, targeting AnrasA. Silencing was shown to be sequence-specific, since expression profiles of other closely related Ras family genes in d-siRNA treated AnrasA and AnrasB silenced lines exhibited no change in gene expression. We have developed and applied a fast, specific and efficient gene silencing approach for elucidating gene function in A. nidulans using d-siRNAs. We have also optimized an efficient AMT in A. nidulans, which is useful for stable integration of transgenes.

  11. Array of translational systems pharmacodynamic models of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Oudhia, Sihem; Mager, Donald E

    2016-12-01

    Cancer is a complex disease that is characterized by an uncontrolled growth and spread of abnormal cells. Drug development in oncology is particularly challenging and is associated with one of the highest attrition rates of compounds despite substantial investments in resources. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling seeks to couple experimental data with mathematical models to provide key insights into factors controlling cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutics and cancer progression. PK/PD modeling of anti-cancer compounds is equally challenging, partly based on the complexity of biological and pharmacological systems. However, reliable mechanistic and systems PK/PD models for anti-cancer agents have been developed and successfully applied to: (1) provide insights into fundamental mechanisms implicated in tumor growth, (2) assist in dose selection for first-in-human phase I studies (e.g., effective dose, escalating doses, and maximal tolerated doses), (3) design and optimize combination drug regimens, (4) design clinical trials, and (5) establish links between drug efficacy and safety and the concentrations of measured biomarkers. In this commentary, classes of relevant mechanism-based and systems PK/PD models of anti-cancer agents that have shown promise in translating preclinical data and enhancing stages of the drug development process are reviewed. Specific features of such models are discussed including their strengths and limitations along with a prospectus of using these models alone or in combination for cancer therapy.

  12. Cytotoxic, anti-cancer, and anti-microbial effects of different extracts obtained from Artemisia rupestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokerbek, Shamshabanu; Sakipova, Zuriyadda; Chalupová, Marta; Nejezchlebová, Marcela; Hošek, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Artemisia rupestris is a part of traditional Kazakh folk medicine. Extracts obtained from this plant are used to treat various diseases, including cancer. This study evaluates the anti-microbial, cytotoxic, and anti-cancer effects of different extracts of the plant. Different extraction techniques were used and the resultant activities were compared. Extracts of A. rupestris were prepared from the flowers plus the leaves and from the stems. The antimicrobial activity against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus was quantified. Cell lines L1210 and THP-1 were used to evaluate the cytotoxic potential of these extracts in vitro. The anti-cancer effect was tested using L1210-induced tumorgenesis in mouse model. The aqueous extract of stems was the most active against C. albicans, whereas the methanolic extract of flowers plus leaves especially inhibited the growth of S. aureus. The aqueous extracts were found to be non-cytotoxic for both cell lines, whereas the lipophilic extracts showed cytotoxic effects. The extract obtained from flowers plus leaves was more cytotoxic than that from stems. The tested extracts showed no anti-cancer potential. The results obtained testify to the relatively safe consumption of aqueous extracts of A. rupestris, but lipophilic extracts showed toxic effects and their consumption should be considered more carefully.Key words: L1210 cell line THP-1 cell line microwave-assisted extraction ultrasonic-assisted extraction Candida albicans Staphylococcus aureus.

  13. Identification of target genes of transcription factor activator protein 2 gamma in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ailan, He; Shuanglin, Xiang; Xiangwen, Xiao; Daolong, Ren; Lu, Gan; Xiaofeng, Ding; Xi, Qiao; Xingwang, Hu; Rushi, Liu; Jian, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Activator protein 2 gamma (AP-2γ) is a member of the transcription factor activator protein-2 (AP-2) family, which is developmentally regulated and plays a role in human neoplasia. AP-2γ has been found to be overexpressed in most breast cancers, and have a dual role to inhibit tumor initiation and promote tumor progression afterwards during mammary tumorigensis. To identify the gene targets that mediate its effects, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to isolate AP-2γ binding sites on genomic DNA from human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-453. 20 novel DNA fragments proximal to potential AP-2γ targets were obtained. They are categorized into functional groups of carcinogenesis, metabolism and others. A combination of sequence analysis, reporter gene assays, quantitative real-time PCR, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays and immunoblot analysis further confirmed the four AP-2γ target genes in carcinogenesis group: ErbB2, CDH2, HPSE and IGSF11. Our results were consistent with the previous reports that ErbB2 was the target gene of AP-2γ. Decreased expression and overexpression of AP-2γ in human breast cancer cells significantly altered the expression of these four genes, indicating that AP-2γ directly regulates them. This suggested that AP-2γ can coordinate the expression of a network of genes, involving in carcinogenesis, especially in breast cancer. They could serve as therapeutic targets against breast cancers in the future

  14. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueng-Chuen Fan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD, Huntington’s disease (HD, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM, and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases.

  15. The MSX1 homeoprotein recruits G9a methyltransferase to repressed target genes in myoblast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiang Wang

    Full Text Available Although the significance of lysine modifications of core histones for regulating gene expression is widely appreciated, the mechanisms by which these modifications are incorporated at specific regulatory elements during cellular differentiation remains largely unknown. In our previous studies, we have shown that in developing myoblasts the Msx1 homeoprotein represses gene expression by influencing the modification status of chromatin at its target genes. We now show that genomic binding by Msx1 promotes enrichment of the H3K9me2 mark on repressed target genes via recruitment of G9a histone methyltransferase, the enzyme responsible for catalyzing this histone mark. Interaction of Msx1 with G9a is mediated via the homeodomain and is required for transcriptional repression and regulation of cellular differentiation, as well as enrichment of the H3K9me2 mark in proximity to Msx1 binding sites on repressed target genes in myoblast cells as well as the developing limb. We propose that regulation of chromatin status by Msx1 recruitment of G9a and other histone modifying enzymes to regulatory regions of target genes represents an important means of regulating the gene expression during development.

  16. Anti cancer effects of curcumin: cycle of life and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Tanya

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Increasing knowledge on the cell cycle deregulations in cancers has promoted the introduction of phytochemicals, which can either modulate signaling pathways leading to cell cycle regulation or directly alter cell cycle regulatory molecules, in cancer therapy. Most human malignancies are driven by chromosomal translocations or other genetic alterations that directly affect the function of critical cell cycle proteins such as cyclins as well as tumor suppressors, e.g., p53. In this respect, cell cycle regulation and its modulation by curcumin are gaining widespread attention in recent years. Extensive research has addressed the chemotherapeutic potential of curcumin (diferuloylmethane, a relatively non-toxic plant derived polyphenol. The mechanisms implicated are diverse and appear to involve a combination of cell signaling pathways at multiple levels. In the present review we discuss how alterations in the cell cycle control contribute to the malignant transformation and provide an overview of how curcumin targets cell cycle regulatory molecules to assert anti-proliferative and/or apoptotic effects in cancer cells. The purpose of the current article is to present an appraisal of the current level of knowledge regarding the potential of curcumin as an agent for the chemoprevention of cancer via an understanding of its mechanism of action at the level of cell cycle regulation. Taken together, this review seeks to summarize the unique properties of curcumin that may be exploited for successful clinical cancer prevention.

  17. Multiple Mechanisms of Anti-Cancer Effects Exerted by Astaxanthin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Astaxanthin (ATX is a xanthophyll carotenoid which has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA as food colorant in animal and fish feed. It is widely found in algae and aquatic animals and has powerful anti-oxidative activity. Previous studies have revealed that ATX, with its anti-oxidative property, is beneficial as a therapeutic agent for various diseases without any side effects or toxicity. In addition, ATX also shows preclinical anti-tumor efficacy both in vivo and in vitro in various cancer models. Several researches have deciphered that ATX exerts its anti-proliferative, anti-apoptosis and anti-invasion influence via different molecules and pathways including signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. Hence, ATX shows great promise as chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. Here, we review the rapidly advancing field of ATX in cancer therapy as well as some molecular targets of ATX.

  18. Enhancing potency of siRNA targeting fusion genes by optimization outside of target sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Kseniya; Seo, Young-Eun; Tietjen, Gregory T; Cui, Jiajia; Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2015-12-01

    Canonical siRNA design algorithms have become remarkably effective at predicting favorable binding regions within a target mRNA, but in some cases (e.g., a fusion junction site) region choice is restricted. In these instances, alternative approaches are necessary to obtain a highly potent silencing molecule. Here we focus on strategies for rational optimization of two siRNAs that target the junction sites of fusion oncogenes BCR-ABL and TMPRSS2-ERG. We demonstrate that modifying the termini of these siRNAs with a terminal G-U wobble pair or a carefully selected pair of terminal asymmetry-enhancing mismatches can result in an increase in potency at low doses. Importantly, we observed that improvements in silencing at the mRNA level do not necessarily translate to reductions in protein level and/or cell death. Decline in protein level is also heavily influenced by targeted protein half-life, and delivery vehicle toxicity can confound measures of cell death due to silencing. Therefore, for BCR-ABL, which has a long protein half-life that is difficult to overcome using siRNA, we also developed a nontoxic transfection vector: poly(lactic-coglycolic acid) nanoparticles that release siRNA over many days. We show that this system can achieve effective killing of leukemic cells. These findings provide insights into the implications of siRNA sequence for potency and suggest strategies for the design of more effective therapeutic siRNA molecules. Furthermore, this work points to the importance of integrating studies of siRNA design and delivery, while heeding and addressing potential limitations such as restricted targetable mRNA regions, long protein half-lives, and nonspecific toxicities.

  19. Chemical profiling of the genome with anti-cancer drugs defines target specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Baoxu; de Jong, Johann; Qiao, Xiaohang; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Neefjes, Jacques

    2015-07-01

    Many anticancer drugs induce DNA breaks to eliminate tumor cells. The anthracycline topoisomerase II inhibitors additionally cause histone eviction. Here, we performed genome-wide high-resolution mapping of chemotherapeutic effects of various topoisomerase I and II (TopoI and II) inhibitors and integrated this mapping with established maps of genomic or epigenomic features to show their activities in different genomic regions. The TopoI inhibitor topotecan and the TopoII inhibitor etoposide are similar in inducing DNA damage at transcriptionally active genomic regions. The anthracycline daunorubicin induces DNA breaks and evicts histones from active chromatin, thus quenching local DNA damage responses. Another anthracycline, aclarubicin, has a different genomic specificity and evicts histones from H3K27me3-marked heterochromatin, with consequences for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells with elevated levels of H3K27me3. Modifying anthracycline structures may yield compounds with selectivity for different genomic regions and activity for different tumor types.

  20. Fascaplysin Exerts Anti-Cancer Effects through the Downregulation of Survivin and HIF-1α and Inhibition of VEGFR2 and TRKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taek-In Oh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fascaplysin has been reported to exert anti-cancer effects by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4; however, the precise mode of action by which fascaplysin suppresses tumor growth is not clear. Here, we found that fascaplysin has stronger anti-cancer effects than other CDK4 inhibitors, including PD0332991 and LY2835219, on lung cancer cells that are wild-type or null for retinoblastoma (RB, indicating that unknown target molecules might be involved in the inhibition of tumor growth by fascaplysin. Fascaplysin treatment significantly decreased tumor angiogenesis and increased cleaved-caspase-3 in xenografted tumor tissues. In addition, survivin and HIF-1α were downregulated in vitro and in vivo by suppressing 4EBP1-p70S6K1 axis-mediated de novo protein synthesis. Kinase screening assays and drug-protein docking simulation studies demonstrated that fascaplysin strongly inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 and tropomyosin-related kinase A (TRKA via DFG-out non-competitive inhibition. Overall, these results suggest that fascaplysin inhibits TRKA and VEGFR2 and downregulates survivin and HIF-1α, resulting in suppression of tumor growth. Fascaplysin, therefore, represents a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of multiple types of solid cancer.

  1. Tumor-targeted inhibition by a novel strategy - mimoretrovirus expressing siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiqiang; Wang, Huaizhi; Jia, Zhengcai; Shi, Jinglei; Tang, Jun; Mao, Liwei; Liu, Hongli; Deng, Yijing; He, Yangdong; Ruan, Zhihua; Li, Jintao; Wu, Yuzhang; Ni, Bing

    2010-12-01

    Pokemon gene has crucial but versatile functions in cell differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenesis. It is a master regulator of the ARF-HDM2-p53 and Rb-E2F pathways. The facts that the expression of Pokemon is essential for tumor formation and many kinds of tumors over-express the Pokemon gene make it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention for cancer treatment. In this study, we used an RNAi strategy to silence the Pokemon gene in a cervical cancer model. To address the issues involving tumor specific delivery and durable expression of siRNA, we applied the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand and polylysine (K(18)) fusion peptide to encapsulate a recombinant retrovirus plasmid expressing a siRNA targeting the Pokemon gene and produced the 'mimoretrovirus'. At charge ratio 2.0 of fusion peptide/plasmid, the mimoretrovirus formed stable and homogenous nanoparticles, and provided complete DNase I protection and complete gel retardation. This nanoparticle inhibited SiHa cell proliferation and invasion, while it promoted SiHa cell apoptosis. The binding of the nanoparticle to SiHa cells was mediated via the RGD-integrin α(v)β(3) interaction, as evidenced by the finding that unconjugated RGD peptide inhibited this binding significantly. This tumor-targeting mimoretrovirus exhibited excellent anti-tumor capacity in vivo in a nude mouse model. Moreover, the mimoretrovirus inhibited tumor growth with a much higher efficiency than recombinant retrovirus expressing siRNA or the K(18)/P4 nanoparticle lacking the RGD peptide. Results suggest that the RNAi/RGD-based mimoretrovirus developed in this study represents a novel anti-tumor strategy that may be applicable to most research involving cancer therapy and, thus, has promising potential as a cervical cancer treatment.

  2. The circadian clock modulates anti-cancer properties of curcumin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarma, Ashapurna; Sharma, Vishal P.; Sarkar, Arindam B.; Sekar, M. Chandra; Samuel, Karunakar; Geusz, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Curcuminoids of the spice turmeric and their enhanced derivatives have much potential as cancer treatments. They act on a wide variety of biological pathways, including those regulating cell division and circadian rhythms. It is known that circadian clocks can modify cancer therapy effectiveness, according to studies aimed at optimizing treatments based on the circadian cycle. It is therefore important to determine whether treatments with curcumin or similar chemotherapeutic agents are regulated by circadian timing. Similarly, it is important to characterize any effects of curcumin on timing abilities of the circadian clocks within cancer cells. We examined the circadian clock’s impact on the timing of cell death and cell division in curcumin-treated C6 rat glioma cells through continuous video microscopy for several days. To evaluate its persistence and distribution in cancer cells, curcumin was localized within cell compartments by imaging its autofluorescence. Finally, HPLC and spectroscopy were used to determine the relative stabilities of the curcumin congeners demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin that are present in turmeric. Circadian rhythms in cell death were observed in response to low (5 μM) curcumin, reaching a peak several hours before the peak in rhythmic expression of mPER2 protein, a major circadian clock component. These results revealed a sensitive phase of the circadian cycle that could be effectively targeted in patient therapies based on curcumin or its analogs. Curcumin fluorescence was observed in cell compartments at least 24 h after treatment, and the two congeners displayed greater stability than curcumin in cell culture medium. We propose a mechanism whereby curcuminoids act in a sustained manner, over several days, despite their tendency to degrade rapidly in blood and other aqueous media. During cancer therapy, curcumin or its analogs should be delivered to tumor cells at the optimal phase for highest efficacy after identifying

  3. Identification of Plagl1/Zac1 binding sites and target genes establishes its role in the regulation of extracellular matrix genes and the imprinted gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrault, Annie; Dantec, Christelle; Le Digarcher, Anne; Chotard, Laëtitia; Bilanges, Benoit; Parrinello, Hugues; Dubois, Emeric; Rialle, Stéphanie; Severac, Dany; Bouschet, Tristan; Journot, Laurent

    2017-10-13

    PLAGL1/ZAC1 undergoes parental genomic imprinting, is paternally expressed, and is a member of the imprinted gene network (IGN). It encodes a zinc finger transcription factor with anti-proliferative activity and is a candidate tumor suppressor gene on 6q24 whose expression is frequently lost in various neoplasms. Conversely, gain of PLAGL1 function is responsible for transient neonatal diabetes mellitus, a rare genetic disease that results from defective pancreas development. In the present work, we showed that Plagl1 up-regulation was not associated with DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest. It was rather associated with physiological cell cycle exit that occurred with contact inhibition, growth factor withdrawal, or cell differentiation. To gain insights into Plagl1 mechanism of action, we identified Plagl1 target genes by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome-wide transcriptomics in transfected cell lines. Plagl1-elicited gene regulation correlated with multiple binding to the proximal promoter region through a GC-rich motif. Plagl1 target genes included numerous genes involved in signaling, cell adhesion, and extracellular matrix composition, including collagens. Plagl1 targets also included 22% of the 409 genes that make up the IGN. Altogether, this work identified Plagl1 as a transcription factor that coordinated the regulation of a subset of IGN genes and controlled extracellular matrix composition. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. W::Neo: a novel dual-selection marker for high efficiency gene targeting in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenke; Huang, Juan; Watson, Annie M; Hong, Yang

    2012-01-01

    We have recently developed a so-called genomic engineering approach that allows for directed, efficient and versatile modifications of Drosophila genome by combining the homologous recombination (HR)-based gene targeting with site-specific DNA integration. In genomic engineering and several similar approaches, a "founder" knock-out line must be generated first through HR-based gene targeting, which can still be a potentially time and resource intensive process. To significantly improve the efficiency and success rate of HR-based gene targeting in Drosophila, we have generated a new dual-selection marker termed W::Neo, which is a direct fusion between proteins of eye color marker White (W) and neomycin resistance (Neo). In HR-based gene targeting experiments, mutants carrying W::Neo as the selection marker can be enriched as much as fifty times by taking advantage of the antibiotic selection in Drosophila larvae. We have successfully carried out three independent gene targeting experiments using the W::Neo to generate genomic engineering founder knock-out lines in Drosophila.

  5. Novel Hematopoietic Target Genes in the NRF2-Mediated Transcriptional Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R. Campbell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear factor- (erythroid-derived 2 like 2 (NFE2L2, NRF2 is a key transcriptional activator of the antioxidant response pathway and is closely related to erythroid transcription factor NFE2. Under oxidative stress, NRF2 heterodimerizes with small Maf proteins and binds cis-acting enhancer sequences found near oxidative stress response genes. Using the dietary isothiocyanate sulforaphane (SFN to activate NRF2, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq identified several hundred novel NRF2-mediated targets beyond its role in oxidative stress. Activated NRF2 bound the antioxidant response element (ARE in promoters of several known and novel target genes involved in iron homeostasis and heme metabolism, including known targets FTL and FTH1, as well as novel binding in the globin locus control region. Five novel NRF2 target genes were chosen for followup: AMBP, ABCB6, FECH, HRG-1 (SLC48A1, and TBXAS1. SFN-induced gene expression in erythroid K562 and lymphoid cells were compared for each target gene. NRF2 silencing showed reduced expression in lymphoid, lung, and hepatic cells. Furthermore, stable knockdown of NRF2 negative regulator KEAP1 in K562 cells resulted in increased NQO1, AMBP, and TBXAS1 expression. NFE2 binding sites in K562 cells revealed similar binding profiles as lymphoid NRF2 sites in all potential NRF2 candidates supporting a role for NRF2 in heme metabolism and erythropoiesis.

  6. Yeast-based assay identifies novel Shh/Gli target genes in vertebrate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milla Luis A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing number of developmental events and molecular mechanisms associated with the Hedgehog (Hh pathway from Drosophila to vertebrates, suggest that gene regulation is crucial for diverse cellular responses, including target genes not yet described. Although several high-throughput, genome-wide approaches have yielded information at the genomic, transcriptional and proteomic levels, the specificity of Gli binding sites related to direct target gene activation still remain elusive. This study aims to identify novel putative targets of Gli transcription factors through a protein-DNA binding assay using yeast, and validating a subset of targets both in-vitro and in-vivo. Testing in different Hh/Gli gain- and loss-of-function scenarios we here identified known (e.g., ptc1 and novel Hh-regulated genes in zebrafish embryos. Results The combined yeast-based screening and MEME/MAST analysis were able to predict Gli transcription factor binding sites, and position mapping of these sequences upstream or in the first intron of promoters served to identify new putative target genes of Gli regulation. These candidates were validated by qPCR in combination with either the pharmacological Hh/Gli antagonist cyc or the agonist pur in Hh-responsive C3H10T1/2 cells. We also used small-hairpin RNAs against Gli proteins to evaluate targets and confirm specific Gli regulation their expression. Taking advantage of mutants that have been identified affecting different components of the Hh/Gli signaling system in the zebrafish model, we further analyzed specific novel candidates. Studying Hh function with pharmacological inhibition or activation complemented these genetic loss-of-function approaches. We provide evidence that in zebrafish embryos, Hh signaling regulates sfrp2, neo1, and c-myc expression in-vivo. Conclusion A recently described yeast-based screening allowed us to identify new Hh/Gli target genes, functionally important in

  7. Bacteria as vectors for gene therapy of cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Baban, Chwanrow K

    2012-01-31

    Anti-cancer therapy faces major challenges, particularly in terms of specificity of treatment. The ideal therapy would eradicate tumor cells selectively with minimum side effects on normal tissue. Gene or cell therapies have emerged as realistic prospects for the treatment of cancer, and involve the delivery of genetic information to a tumor to facilitate the production of therapeutic proteins. However, there is still much to be done before an efficient and safe gene medicine is achieved, primarily developing the means of targeting genes to tumors safely and efficiently. An emerging family of vectors involves bacteria of various genera. It has been shown that bacteria are naturally capable of homing to tumors when systemically administered resulting in high levels of replication locally. Furthermore, invasive species can deliver heterologous genes intra-cellularly for tumor cell expression. Here, we review the use of bacteria as vehicles for gene therapy of cancer, detailing the mechanisms of action and successes at preclinical and clinical levels.

  8. Concordant and discordant regulation of target genes by miR-31 and its isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tzu Chan

    Full Text Available It has been shown that imprecise cleavage of a primary or precursor RNA by Drosha or Dicer, respectively, may yield a group of microRNA (miRNA variants designated as "isomiR". Variations in the relative abundance of isoforms for a given miRNA among different species and different cell types beg the question whether these isomiRs might regulate target genes differentially. We compared the capacity of three miR-31 isoforms (miR-31-H, miR-31-P, and miR-31-M, which differ only slightly in their 5'- and/or 3'-end sequences, to regulate several known targets and a predicted target, Dicer. Notably, we found isomiR-31s displayed concordant and discordant regulation of 6 known target genes. Furthermore, we validated a predicted target gene, Dicer, to be a novel target of miR-31 but only miR-31-P could directly repress Dicer expression in both MCF-7 breast cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells, resulting in their enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin, a known attribute of Dicer knockdown. This was further supported by reporter assay using full length 3'-untranslated region (UTR of Dicer. Our findings not only revealed Dicer to be a direct target of miR-31, but also demonstrated that isomiRs displayed similar and disparate regulation of target genes in cell-based systems. Coupled with the variations in the distribution of isomiRs among different cells or conditions, our findings support the possibility of fine-tuning gene expression by miRNAs.

  9. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya

    2013-03-22

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT-SSX. Although precise function of SYT-SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT-SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT-SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT-SSX2 gene. SYT-SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT-SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT-SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT-SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly different in response to the induction of SYT-SSX, and more than half of SYT-SSX target genes in hPSCs were not induced in hMSCs. These results suggest the importance of cellular context for correct understanding of SYT-SSX function, and demonstrated how our new system will help to overcome this issue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Recurrent Fusion Genes in Leukemia: An Attractive Target for Diagnosis and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhui; Wu, Nan; Liu, Duo; Jin, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Since the first fusion gene was discovered decades ago, a considerable number of fusion genes have been detected in leukemia. The majority of them are generated through chromosomal rearrangement or abnormal transcription. With the development of techniques, high-throughput sequencing method makes it possible to detect fusion genes systematically in multiple human cancers. Owing to their biological significance and tumor-specific expression, some of the fusion genes are attractive diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) targeting BCR-ABL1 fusions have been widely used to treat CML. The combination of ATRA and ATO targeting PML-RARA fusions has proven to be effective in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Moreover, therapy with high dose cytarabine (HDAC) has significantly improved the prognosis of core binding factor (CBF) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Therefore, studies on fusion genes may benefit patients with leukemia by providing more diagnostic markers and therapies in the future. The presented review focuses on the history of fusion genes, mechanisms of formation, and treatments against specific fusion genes in leukemia.

  11. In silico prediction of novel therapeutic targets using gene-disease association data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Enrico; Dunham, Ian; Sanseau, Philippe

    2017-08-29

    Target identification and validation is a pressing challenge in the pharmaceutical industry, with many of the programmes that fail for efficacy reasons showing poor association between the drug target and the disease. Computational prediction of successful targets could have a considerable impact on attrition rates in the drug discovery pipeline by significantly reducing the initial search space. Here, we explore whether gene-disease association data from the Open Targets platform is sufficient to predict therapeutic targets that are actively being pursued by pharmaceutical companies or are already on the market. To test our hypothesis, we train four different classifiers (a random forest, a support vector machine, a neural network and a gradient boosting machine) on partially labelled data and evaluate their performance using nested cross-validation and testing on an independent set. We then select the best performing model and use it to make predictions on more than 15,000 genes. Finally, we validate our predictions by mining the scientific literature for proposed therapeutic targets. We observe that the data types with the best predictive power are animal models showing a disease-relevant phenotype, differential expression in diseased tissue and genetic association with the disease under investigation. On a test set, the neural network classifier achieves over 71% accuracy with an AUC of 0.76 when predicting therapeutic targets in a semi-supervised learning setting. We use this model to gain insights into current and failed programmes and to predict 1431 novel targets, of which a highly significant proportion has been independently proposed in the literature. Our in silico approach shows that data linking genes and diseases is sufficient to predict novel therapeutic targets effectively and confirms that this type of evidence is essential for formulating or strengthening hypotheses in the target discovery process. Ultimately, more rapid and automated target

  12. Microbial population index and community structure in saline-alkaline soil using gene targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshri, Jitendra; Mishra, Avinash; Jha, Bhavanath

    2013-03-30

    Population indices of bacteria and archaea were investigated from saline-alkaline soil and a possible microbe-environment pattern was established using gene targeted metagenomics. Clone libraries were constructed using 16S rRNA and functional gene(s) involved in carbon fixation (cbbL), nitrogen fixation (nifH), ammonia oxidation (amoA) and sulfur metabolism (apsA). Molecular phylogeny revealed the dominance of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria along with archaeal members of Halobacteraceae. The library consisted of novel bacterial (20%) and archaeal (38%) genera showing ≤95% similarity to previously retrieved sequences. Phylogenetic analysis indicated ability of inhabitant to survive in stress condition. The 16S rRNA gene libraries contained novel gene sequences and were distantly homologous with cultured bacteria. Functional gene libraries were found unique and most of the clones were distantly related to Proteobacteria, while clones of nifH gene library also showed homology with Cyanobacteria and Firmicutes. Quantitative real-time PCR exhibited that bacterial abundance was two orders of magnitude higher than archaeal. The gene(s) quantification indicated the size of the functional guilds harboring relevant key genes. The study provides insights on microbial ecology and different metabolic interactions occurring in saline-alkaline soil, possessing phylogenetically diverse groups of bacteria and archaea, which may be explored further for gene cataloging and metabolic profiling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Drug repurposing of novel quinoline acetohydrazide derivatives as potent COX-2 inhibitors and anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Chelli Sai; Manikandan, A.; Sridhar, P.; Sivakumar, A.; Siva Kumar, B.; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara

    2018-02-01

    Novel QuinolineAcetohydrazide (QAh) derivatives (9a-n) were firstly evaluated in silico to determine their anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer efficacy via the mechanisms of COX1 and COX2 inhibition, and NF-ĸB, HDAC and Human Topoisomerase I pathways respectively. In the studied set, the trifluoro substituted QAh derivatives: (E)-N'-(4-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazid and (E)-N'-(3-(trifluoro methyl) benzylidene)-2-(7-fluoro-2-methoxy quinolin-8-yl) acetohydrazide are determined to be potential leads, indicated from their best docked scores, relative ligand efficiency, and significant structural attributes evaluated by ab initio simulations. The only setback being their partition co-efficient that retrieved a red flag in the evaluation of their Lipinski parameters. The experimental in vitro studies confirmed the significant enhancement as COX-2 inhibitors and appreciable enhancement in MTT assay of breast and skin cancer cell lines. Significantly, trifluoro substituent in the quinoline scaffold can be reasoned to note the excellent binding affinity to all the evaluated drug targets.

  14. Toosendanin Exerts an Anti-Cancer Effect in Glioblastoma by Inducing Estrogen Receptor β- and p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Cao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor with median survival of approximately one year. This dismal poor prognosis is due to resistance to currently available chemotherapeutics; therefore, new cytotoxic agents are urgently needed. In the present study, we reported the cytotoxicity of toosendanin (TSN in the GBM U87 and C6 cell lines in vitro and in vivo. By using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide assay, flow cytometry analysis, and Western blot, we found that TSN inhibited U87 and C6 cell proliferation and induced apoptosis at a concentration as low as 10 nM. Administration of TSN also reduced tumor burden in a xenograft model of athymic nude mice. Pharmacological and molecular studies suggested that estrogen receptor β (ERβ and p53 were prominent targets for TSN. GBM cell apoptosis induced by TSN was a stepwise biological event involving the upregulation of ERβ and contextual activation of functional p53. Collectively, our study indicates, for the first time, that TSN is a candidate of novel anti-cancer drugs for GBM. Furthermore, ERβ and p53 could act as predictive biomarkers for the sensitivity of cancer to TSN.

  15. MEK-ERK inhibition potentiates WAY-600-induced anti-cancer efficiency in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaifeng; Fan, Yaohua; Chen, Gongying; Wang, Zhengrong; Kong, Dexin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-05-27

    The search for novel anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) agents is important. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) hyper-activation plays a pivotal role in promoting HCC tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. The current preclinical study evaluated the potential anti-HCC activity by a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor, WAY-600. We showed that WAY-600 inhibited survival and proliferation of HCC cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7) and primary human HCC cells. Caspase-dependent apoptosis was activated by WAY-600 in above HCC cells. Reversely, caspase inhibitors largely attenuated WAY-600's lethality against HCC cells. At the signaling level, WAY-600 blocked mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) assemble and activation, yet activated MEK-ERK pathway in HCC cells. MEK-ERK inhibitors, PD-98059 and MEK-162, or MEK1/2 shRNA significantly potentiated WAY-600's cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that WAY-600 intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in nude mice inhibited p-AKT Ser-473 and displayed significant anti-cancer activity against HepG2 xenografts. Remarkably, co-administration of MEK-162 further potentiated WAY-600's anti-HCC activity in vivo. These preclinical results demonstrate the potent anti-HCC activity by WAY-600, either alone or with MEK-ERK inhibitors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Significant impact of miRNA-target gene networks on genetics of human complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yukinori; Muramatsu, Tomoki; Suita, Naomasa; Kanai, Masahiro; Kawakami, Eiryo; Iotchkova, Valentina; Soranzo, Nicole; Inazawa, Johji; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-03-01

    The impact of microRNA (miRNA) on the genetics of human complex traits, especially in the context of miRNA-target gene networks, has not been fully assessed. Here, we developed a novel analytical method, MIGWAS, to comprehensively evaluate enrichment of genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals in miRNA-target gene networks. We applied the method to the GWAS results of the 18 human complex traits from >1.75 million subjects, and identified significant enrichment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), kidney function, and adult height (P impact of miRNA-target gene networks on the genetics of human complex traits, and provided resources which should contribute to drug discovery and nucleic acid medicine.

  17. Amplification of distant estrogen response elements deregulates target genes associated with tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pei-Yin; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Lan, Xun; Juan, Liran; Yan, Pearlly S; Labanowska, Jadwiga; Heerema, Nyla; Hsiao, Tzu-Hung; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Yidong; Liu, Yunlong; Li, Lang; Li, Rong; Thompson, Ian M; Nephew, Kenneth P; Sharp, Zelton D; Kirma, Nameer B; Jin, Victor X; Huang, Tim H-M

    2013-08-12

    A causal role of gene amplification in tumorigenesis is well known, whereas amplification of DNA regulatory elements as an oncogenic driver remains unclear. In this study, we integrated next-generation sequencing approaches to map distant estrogen response elements (DEREs) that remotely control the transcription of target genes through chromatin proximity. Two densely mapped DERE regions located on chromosomes 17q23 and 20q13 were frequently amplified in estrogen receptor-α-positive luminal breast cancer. These aberrantly amplified DEREs deregulated target gene expression potentially linked to cancer development and tamoxifen resistance. Progressive accumulation of DERE copies was observed in normal breast progenitor cells chronically exposed to estrogenic chemicals. These findings may extend to other DNA regulatory elements, the amplification of which can profoundly alter target transcriptome during tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of miRNAs and their target genes in developing soybean seeds by deep sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shou-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression by mediating gene silencing at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in higher plants. miRNAs and related target genes have been widely studied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and rice; however, the number of identified miRNAs in soybean (Glycine max is limited, and global identification of the related miRNA targets has not been reported in previous research. Results In our study, a small RNA library and a degradome library were constructed from developing soybean seeds for deep sequencing. We identified 26 new miRNAs in soybean by bioinformatic analysis and further confirmed their expression by stem-loop RT-PCR. The miRNA star sequences of 38 known miRNAs and 8 new miRNAs were also discovered, providing additional evidence for the existence of miRNAs. Through degradome sequencing, 145 and 25 genes were identified as targets of annotated miRNAs and new miRNAs, respectively. GO analysis indicated that many of the identified miRNA targets may function in soybean seed development. Additionally, a soybean homolog of Arabidopsis SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SLIENCING 3 (AtSGS3 was detected as a target of the newly identified miRNA Soy_25, suggesting the presence of feedback control of miRNA biogenesis. Conclusions We have identified large numbers of miRNAs and their related target genes through deep sequencing of a small RNA library and a degradome library. Our study provides more information about the regulatory network of miRNAs in soybean and advances our understanding of miRNA functions during seed development.

  19. Drosophila switch gene Sex-lethal can bypass its switch-gene target transformer to regulate aspects of female behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel S.; Cline, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    The switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) was thought to elicit all aspects of Drosophila female somatic differentiation other than size dimorphism by controlling only the switch gene transformer (tra). Here we show instead that Sxl controls an aspect of female sexual behavior by acting on a target other than or in addition to tra. We inferred the existence of this unknown Sxl target from the observation that a constitutively feminizing tra transgene that restores fertility to tra− females failed to restore fertility to Sxl-mutant females that were adult viable but functionally tra−. The sterility of these mutant females was caused by an ovulation failure. Because tra expression is not sufficient to render these Sxl-mutant females fertile, we refer to this pathway as the tra-insufficient feminization (TIF) branch of the sex-determination regulatory pathway. Using a transgene that conditionally expresses two Sxl feminizing isoforms, we find that the TIF branch is required developmentally for neurons that also sex-specifically express fruitless, a tra gene target controlling sexual behavior. Thus, in a subset of fruitless neurons, targets of the TIF and tra pathways appear to collaborate to control ovulation. In most insects, Sxl has no sex-specific functions, and tra, rather than Sxl, is both the target of the primary sex signal and the gene that maintains the female developmental commitment via positive autoregulation. The TIF pathway may represent an ancestral female-specific function acquired by Sxl in an early evolutionary step toward its becoming the regulator of tra in Drosophila. PMID:24191002

  20. Targeted sequencing of venom genes from cone snail genomes improves understanding of conotoxin molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Mark A; Mahardika, Gusti N

    2018-03-05

    To expand our capacity to discover venom sequences from the genomes of venomous organisms, we applied targeted sequencing techniques to selectively recover venom gene superfamilies and non-toxin loci from the genomes of 32 cone snail species (family, Conidae), a diverse group of marine gastropods that capture their prey using a cocktail of neurotoxic peptides (conotoxins). We were able to successfully recover conotoxin gene superfamilies across all species with high confidence (> 100X coverage) and used these data to provide new insights into conotoxin evolution. First, we found that conotoxin gene superfamilies are composed of 1-6 exons and are typically short in length (mean = ∼85bp). Second, we expanded our understanding of the following genetic features of conotoxin evolution: (a) positive selection, where exons coding the mature toxin region were often three times more divergent than their adjacent noncoding regions, (b) expression regulation, with comparisons to transcriptome data showing that cone snails only express a fraction of the genes available in their genome (24%-63%), and (c) extensive gene turnover, where Conidae species varied from 120-859 conotoxin gene copies. Finally, using comparative phylogenetic methods, we found that while diet specificity did not predict patterns of conotoxin evolution, dietary breadth was positively correlated with total conotoxin gene diversity. Overall, the targeted sequencing technique demonstrated here has the potential to radically increase the pace at which venom gene families are sequenced and studied, reshaping our ability to understand the impact of genetic changes on ecologically relevant phenotypes and subsequent diversification.

  1. SVMRFE based approach for prediction of most discriminatory gene target for type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Type II diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the way our body metabolizes sugar. The body's important source of fuel is now becoming a chronic disease all over the world. It is now very necessary to identify the new potential targets for the drugs which not only control the disease but also can treat it. Support vector machines are the classifier which has a potential to make a classification of the discriminatory genes and non-discriminatory genes. SVMRFE a modification of SVM ranks the genes based on their discriminatory power and eliminate the genes which are not involved in causing the disease. A gene regulatory network has been formed with the top ranked coding genes to identify their role in causing diabetes. To further validate the results pathway study was performed to identify the involvement of the coding genes in type II diabetes. The genes obtained from this study showed a significant involvement in causing the disease, which may be used as a potential drug target.

  2. Targeted delivery of genes to endothelial cells and cell- and gene-based therapy in pulmonary vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Colin M; Mei, Shirley H J; Kugathasan, Lakshmi; Stewart, Duncan J

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that, despite significant advances in medical therapies over the last several decades, continues to have an extremely poor prognosis. Gene therapy is a method to deliver therapeutic genes to replace defective or mutant genes or supplement existing cellular processes to modify disease. Over the last few decades, several viral and nonviral methods of gene therapy have been developed for preclinical PAH studies with varying degrees of efficacy. However, these gene delivery methods face challenges of immunogenicity, low transduction rates, and nonspecific targeting which have limited their translation to clinical studies. More recently, the emergence of regenerative approaches using stem and progenitor cells such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have offered a new approach to gene therapy. Cell-based gene therapy is an approach that augments the therapeutic potential of EPCs and MSCs and may deliver on the promise of reversal of established PAH. These new regenerative approaches have shown tremendous potential in preclinical studies; however, large, rigorously designed clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety. © 2013 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 3:1749-1779, 2013.

  3. Integrative Analysis of CRISPR/Cas9 Target Sites in the Human HBB Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR system has emerged as a powerful customizable artificial nuclease to facilitate precise genetic correction for tissue regeneration and isogenic disease modeling. However, previous studies reported substantial off-target activities of CRISPR system in human cells, and the enormous putative off-target sites are labor-intensive to be validated experimentally, thus motivating bioinformatics methods for rational design of CRISPR system and prediction of its potential off-target effects. Here, we describe an integrative analytical process to identify specific CRISPR target sites in the human β-globin gene (HBB and predict their off-target effects. Our method includes off-target analysis in both coding and noncoding regions, which was neglected by previous studies. It was found that the CRISPR target sites in the introns have fewer off-target sites in the coding regions than those in the exons. Remarkably, target sites containing certain transcriptional factor motif have enriched binding sites of relevant transcriptional factor in their off-target sets. We also found that the intron sites have fewer SNPs, which leads to less variation of CRISPR efficiency in different individuals during clinical applications. Our studies provide a standard analytical procedure to select specific CRISPR targets for genetic correction.

  4. A PCA3 gene-based transcriptional amplification system targeting primary prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Neveu, Bertrand; Jain, Pallavi; T?tu, Bernard; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Fr?d?ric

    2015-01-01

    Targeting specifically primary prostate cancer (PCa) cells for immune therapy, gene therapy or molecular imaging is of high importance. The PCA3 long non-coding RNA is a unique PCa biomarker and oncogene that has been widely studied. This gene has been mainly exploited as an accurate diagnostic urine biomarker for PCa detection. In this study, the PCA3 promoter was introduced into a new transcriptional amplification system named the 3-Step Transcriptional Amplification System (PCA3-3STA) and ...

  5. In Vivo Targeted Gene Transfer by Direct Irradiation with Nanosecond Pulsed Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Makoto; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Obara, Minoru

    2004-10-01

    We demonstrated in vivo targeted gene transfer to rat skin by direct irradiation with nanosecond laser pulses without major side effects. Expressions of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were observed only in the area irradiated with laser pulses; in the skin, epidermal cells were selectively transfected. Unlike other physical methods, this method enables noncontact gene transfer. Moreover, the laser intensity required in this method is as low as 20 MW/cm2, and thus fiber-based beam delivery is possible.

  6. Targeted Gene Delivery to Macrophages by Biodegradable Star-Shaped Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajie; Wang, Yafeng; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Jin; Pan, Dejing; Liu, Jianghuai; Feng, Fude

    2016-02-17

    In this report, two biodegradable star-shaped polyasparamide derivatives and four analogues modified with either mannose or folic acid moiety for preferential targeting of a difficult-to-transfect immune cell type, i.e., macrophage, have been synthesized. Each of the prepared star polymers complexes with plasmid DNA to form nanosized particles featuring a core-shell-like morphology. Mannose or folate functionalized star polymers can greatly improve the transfection performance on a macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. As a result, a combination of targeting ligand modification and topological structures of gene carriers is a promising strategy for immune cells-based gene therapy.

  7. Disabled-2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, N; Nguyen, H; Friedline, RH; Malhotra, N; Brehm, M; Koyonagi, M; Bix, M; Cooper, JA; Chambers, CA; Kang, J

    2009-01-01

    FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. Here we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes, the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFβ responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3 and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are fun...

  8. Cooperative interactions between CBP and TORC2 confer selectivity to CREB target gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravnskjær, Kim; Kester, Henri; Liu, Yi

    2007-01-01

    , but have minimal effects on CRE-dependent transcription. Here, we show that the latent cytoplasmic coactivator TORC2 mediates target gene activation in response to cAMP signaling by associating with CBP/p300 and increasing its recruitment to a subset of CREB target genes. TORC2 is not activated in response...... to stress signals, however; and in its absence, P-CREB is unable to stimulate CRE-dependent transcription, due to a block in CBP recruitment. The effect of TORC2 on CBP/p300 promoter occupancy appears pivotal because a gain of function mutant CREB polypeptide with increased affinity for CBP restored CRE...

  9. Inheritable Silencing of Endogenous Genes by Hit-and-Run Targeted Epigenetic Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Angelo; Migliara, Alessandro; Capasso, Paola; Biffi, Mauro; Cittaro, Davide; Naldini, Luigi; Lombardo, Angelo

    2016-09-22

    Gene silencing is instrumental to interrogate gene function and holds promise for therapeutic applications. Here, we repurpose the endogenous retroviruses' silencing machinery of embryonic stem cells to stably silence three highly expressed genes in somatic cells by epigenetics. This was achieved by transiently expressing combinations of engineered transcriptional repressors that bind to and synergize at the target locus to instruct repressive histone marks and de novo DNA methylation, thus ensuring long-term memory of the repressive epigenetic state. Silencing was highly specific, as shown by genome-wide analyses, sharply confined to the targeted locus without spreading to nearby genes, resistant to activation induced by cytokine stimulation, and relieved only by targeted DNA demethylation. We demonstrate the portability of this technology by multiplex gene silencing, adopting different DNA binding platforms and interrogating thousands of genomic loci in different cell types, including primary T lymphocytes. Targeted epigenome editing might have broad application in research and medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enteropeptidase: a gene associated with a starvation human phenotype and a novel target for obesity treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Braud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity research focuses essentially on gene targets associated with the obese phenotype. None of these targets have yet provided a viable drug therapy. Focusing instead on genes that are involved in energy absorption and that are associated with a "human starvation phenotype", we have identified enteropeptidase (EP, a gene associated with congenital enteropeptidase deficiency, as a novel target for obesity treatment. The advantages of this target are that the gene is expressed exclusively in the brush border of the intestine; it is peripheral and not redundant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Potent and selective EP inhibitors were designed around a boroarginine or borolysine motif. Oral administration of these compounds to mice restricted the bioavailability of dietary energy, and in a long-term treatment it significantly diminished the rate of increase in body weight, despite ad libitum food intake. No adverse reactions of the type seen with lipase inhibitors, such as diarrhea or steatorrhea, were observed. This validates EP as a novel, druggable target for obesity treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In vivo testing of novel boroarginine or borolysine-based EP inhibitors validates a novel approach to the treatment of obesity.

  11. A meta analysis of pancreatic microarray datasets yields new targets as cancer genes and biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalin C W Goonesekere

    Full Text Available The lack of specific symptoms at early tumor stages, together with a high biological aggressiveness of the tumor contribute to the high mortality rate for pancreatic cancer (PC, which has a five year survival rate of less than 5%. Improved screening for earlier diagnosis, through the detection of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers provides the best hope of increasing the rate of curatively resectable carcinomas. Though many serum markers have been reported to be elevated in patients with PC, so far, most of these markers have not been implemented into clinical routine due to low sensitivity or specificity. In this study, we have identified genes that are significantly upregulated in PC, through a meta-analysis of large number of microarray datasets. We demonstrate that the biological functions ascribed to these genes are clearly associated with PC and metastasis, and that that these genes exhibit a strong link to pathways involved with inflammation and the immune response. This investigation has yielded new targets for cancer genes, and potential biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. The candidate list of cancer genes includes protein kinase genes, new members of gene families currently associated with PC, as well as genes not previously linked to PC. In this study, we are also able to move towards developing a signature for hypomethylated genes, which could be useful for early detection of PC. We also show that the significantly upregulated 800+ genes in our analysis can serve as an enriched pool for tissue and serum protein biomarkers in pancreatic cancer.

  12. Detection of targeted GFP-Hox gene fusions during mouse embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, A R; Stadler, H S; Nakamura, K; Capecchi, M R

    1998-10-27

    The ability to use a vital cell marker to study mouse embryogenesis will open new avenues of experimental research. Recently, the use of transgenic mice, containing multiple copies of the jellyfish gene encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP), has begun to realize this potential. Here, we show that the fluorescent signals produced by single-copy, targeted GFP in-frame fusions with two different murine Hox genes, Hoxa1 and Hoxc13, are readily detectable by using confocal microscopy. Since Hoxa1 is expressed early and Hoxc13 is expressed late in mouse embryogenesis, this study shows that single-copy GFP gene fusions can be used through most of mouse embryogenesis. Previously, targeted lacZ gene fusions have been very useful for analyzing mouse mutants. Use of GFP gene fusions extends the benefits of targeted lacZ gene fusions by providing the additional utility of a vital marker. Our analysis of the Hoxc13(GFPneo) embryos reveals GFP expression in each of the sites expected from analysis of Hoxc13(lacZneo) embryos. Similarly, Hoxa1(GFPneo) expression was detected in all of the sites predicted from RNA in situ analysis. GFP expression in the foregut pocket of Hoxa1(GFPneo) embryos suggests a role for Hoxa1 in foregut-mediated differentiation of the cardiogenic mesoderm.

  13. Normal Collagen and Bone Production by Gene-targeted Human Osteogenesis Imperfecta iPSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyle, David R; Khan, Iram F; Ren, Gaoying; Wang, Pei-Rong; Kho, Jordan; Schwarze, Ulrike; Russell, David W

    2012-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is caused by dominant mutations in the type I collagen genes. In principle, the skeletal abnormalities of OI could be treated by transplantation of patient-specific, bone-forming cells that no longer express the mutant gene. Here, we develop this approach by isolating mesenchymal cells from OI patients, inactivating their mutant collagen genes by adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene targeting, and deriving induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) that were expanded and differentiated into mesenchymal stem cells (iMSCs). Gene-targeted iMSCs produced normal collagen and formed bone in vivo, but were less senescent and proliferated more than bone-derived MSCs. To generate iPSCs that would be more appropriate for clinical use, the reprogramming and selectable marker transgenes were removed by Cre recombinase. These results demonstrate that the combination of gene targeting and iPSC derivation can be used to produce potentially therapeutic cells from patients with genetic disease. PMID:22031238

  14. Targeted disruption of Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated gene in miniature pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young June; Ahn, Kwang Sung; Kim, Minjeong; Kim, Min Ju; Park, Sang-Min; Ryu, Junghyun; Ahn, Jin Seop; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Choi, You Jung [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong-Jun [Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Hosup, E-mail: shim@dku.edu [Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 PLUS NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Tissue Regeneration Engineering, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physiology, Dankook University School of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM gene-targeted pigs were produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. • A novel large animal model for ataxia telangiectasia was developed. • The new model may provide an alternative to the mouse model. - Abstract: Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a recessive autosomal disorder associated with pleiotropic phenotypes, including progressive cerebellar degeneration, gonad atrophy, and growth retardation. Even though A-T is known to be caused by the mutations in the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, the correlation between abnormal cellular physiology caused by ATM mutations and the multiple symptoms of A-T disease has not been clearly determined. None of the existing ATM mouse models properly reflects the extent to which neurological degeneration occurs in human. In an attempt to provide a large animal model for A-T, we produced gene-targeted pigs with mutations in the ATM gene by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The disrupted allele in the ATM gene of cloned piglets was confirmed via PCR and Southern blot analysis. The ATM gene-targeted pigs generated in the present study may provide an alternative to the current mouse model for the study of mechanisms underlying A-T disorder and for the development of new therapies.

  15. Functional characterization of endogenous siRNA target genes in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikkinen Liisa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small interfering RNA (siRNA molecules mediate sequence specific silencing in RNA interference (RNAi, a gene regulatory phenomenon observed in almost all organisms. Large scale sequencing of small RNA libraries obtained from C. elegans has revealed that a broad spectrum of siRNAs is endogenously transcribed from genomic sequences. The biological role and molecular diversity of C. elegans endogenous siRNA (endo-siRNA molecules, nonetheless, remain poorly understood. In order to gain insight into their biological function, we annotated two large libraries of endo-siRNA sequences, identified their cognate targets, and performed gene ontology analysis to identify enriched functional categories. Results Systematic trends in categorization of target genes according to the specific length of siRNA sequences were observed: 18- to 22-mer siRNAs were associated with genes required for embryonic development; 23-mers were associated uniquely with post-embryonic development; 24–26-mers were associated with phosphorus metabolism or protein modification. Moreover, we observe that some argonaute related genes associate with siRNAs with multiple reads. Sequence frequency graphs suggest that different lengths of siRNAs share similarities in overall sequence structure: the 5' end begins with G, while the body predominates with U and C. Conclusion These results suggest that the lengths of endogenous siRNA molecules are consequential to their biological functions since the gene ontology categories for their cognate mRNA targets vary depending upon their lengths.

  16. Generation of Gene-Edited Chrysanthemum morifolium Using Multicopy Transgenes as Targets and Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishi-Kaboshi, Mitsuko; Aida, Ryutaro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2017-02-01

    The most widely used gene editing technology-the CRISPR/Cas9 system-employs a bacterial monomeric DNA endonuclease known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) and single-guide RNA (sgRNA) that directs Cas9 to a complementary target DNA. However, introducing mutations into higher polyploid plant species, especially for species without genome information, has been difficult. Chrysanthemum morifolium (chrysanthemum) is one of the most important ornamental plants, but it is a hexaploid with a large genome; moreover, it lacks whole-genome information. These characteristics hinder genome editing in chrysanthemum. In the present study, we attempted to perform gene editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system to introduce mutations into chrysanthemum. We constructed transgenic chrysanthemum plants expressing the yellowish-green fluorescent protein gene from Chiridius poppei (CpYGFP) and targeted CpYGFP for gene editing. We compared the activity of a Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter and parsley ubiquitin promoter in chrysanthemum calli and chose the parsley ubiquitin promoter to drive Cas9. We selected two sgRNAs to target different positions in the CpYGFP gene and obtained transgenic calli containing mutated CpYGFP genes (CRISPR-CpYGFP-chrysanthemum). A DNA sequencing analysis and fluorescence observations indicated that cells containing the mutated CpYGFP gene grew independently of cells containing the original CpYGFP gene in one callus. We finally obtained the CRISPR-CpYGFP-chrysanthemum shoot containing a mutation in the CpYGFP sequence. This is the first report of gene editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system in chrysanthemum and sheds light on chrysanthemum genome editing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. In silico identification and characterization of microRNAs and their putative target genes in Solanaceae plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Lee, Bong-Woo; Choi, Doil; Hur, Cheol-Goo

    2011-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small, single-stranded, noncoding RNAs ranging from 19 to 25 nucleotides. The miRNA control various cellular functions by negatively regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. The miRNA regulation over their target genes has a central role in regulating plant growth and development; however, only a few reports have been published on the function of miRNAs in the family Solanaceae. We identified Solanaceae miRNAs and their target genes by analyzing expressed sequence tag (EST) data from five different Solanaceae species. A comprehensive bioinformatic analysis of EST data of Solanaceae species revealed the presence of at least 11 miRNAs and 54 target genes in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), 22 miRNAs and 221 target genes in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), 12 miRNAs and 417 target genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), 46 miRNAs and 60 target genes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), and 7 miRNAs and 28 target genes in Nicotiana benthamiana. The identified Solanaceae miRNAs and their target genes were deposited in the SolmiRNA database, which is freely available for academic research only at http://genepool.kribb.re.kr/SolmiRNA. Our data indicate that the Solanaceae family has both conserved and specific miRNAs and that their target genes may play important roles in growth and development of Solanaceae plants.

  18. Anti-cancer effect of Scutellaria baicalensis in combination with cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Yoon; Joo, Jong Cheon; Lee, Yeon Kyu; Jang, Ik-Soon; Park, Soo Jung; Park, Yoon Jung

    2017-05-25

    Ovarian cancer is one of the major causes of death among females in worldwide. Cisplatin is a primary anti-cancer drug against ovarian cancer, but the recurrent tumors after treatment frequently show acquired chemoresistance. Extract of Scutellaria baicalensis (SbE) has been reported to have functional compounds including baicalin, which has anti-cancer effects. However, the anti-cancer effects of SbE in ovarian cancer and its underlying mechanisms are elusive. We investigated that the effects of SbE and/or cisplatin on cell death in the cisplatin sensitive ovarian cancer cell line A2780 (CSC) and the counterpart cell line that has cisplatin resistance (CRC). Molecular mechanisms of the effects, focusing on apoptosis and autophagy, were examined. Treatment of cisplatin or SbE reduced cell viability significantly in CSC and too much lesser extent in CRC. Cisplatin-induced cell death in CSC was mediated by p53-induced apoptosis acompanied by expresson of damage-regulated autophagy modulator (DRAM). In CRC, decreased DRAM expression (p cisplatin resistance. Treatment of SbE also induced cell death in CSC by p53-dependent apoptosis, not in CRC. Autophagy was not induced by neither cisplatin nor SbE. Intriguingly, the combinational treatment of SbE and cisplatin significantly decreased cell viability in CRC. The cell death was mediated by autophagy with increased expression of Atg5 and Atg12 (p cisplatin was effective in CRC, leading to cell death via Beclin1-independent autophagy, suggesting that SbE treatment in combination with cisplatin has a potential as a chemotherapeutic agent in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer.

  19. Construction of a mouse model of factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, L.; Lawler, A.; Gearhart, J. [Univ. of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    To develop a small animal model of hemophilia A for gene therapy experiments, we set out to construct a mouse model for factor VIII deficiency by gene targeting. First, we screened a mouse liver cDNA library using a human FVIII cDNA probe. We cloned a 2.6 Kb partial mouse factor VIII cDNA which extends from 800 base pairs of the 3{prime} end of exon 14 to the 5{prime} end of exon 26. A mouse genomic library made from strain 129 was then screened to obtain genomic fragments covering the exons desired for homologous recombination. Two genomic clones were obtained, and one covering exon 15 through 22 was used for gene targeting. To make gene targeting constructs, a 5.8 Kb genomic DNA fragment covering exons 15 to 19 of the mouse FVIII gene was subcloned, and the neo expression cassette was inserted into exons 16 and 17 separately by different strategies. These two constructs were named MFVIIIC-16 and MFVIIIC-17. The constructs were linearized and transfected into strain 129 mouse ES cells by electroporation. Factor VIII gene-knockout ES cell lines were selected by G-418 and screened by genomic Southern blots. Eight exon 16 targeted cell lines and five exon 17 targeted cell lines were obtained. Three cell lines from each construct were injected into blastocysts and surgically transferred into foster mothers. Multiple chimeric mice with 70-90% hair color derived from the ES-cell genotype were seen with both constructs. Germ line transmission of the ES-cell genotype has been obtained for the MFVIIIC-16 construct, and multiple hemophilia A carrier females have been identified. Factor VIII-deficient males will be conceived soon.

  20. Inducing gene expression by targeting promoter sequences using small activating RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Vector-based systems comprised of exogenous nucleic acid sequences remain the standard for ectopic expression of a particular gene. Such systems offer robust overexpression, but have inherent drawbacks such the tedious process of construction, excluding sequences (e.g. introns and untranslated regions important for gene function and potential insertional mutagenesis of host genome associated with the use of viral vectors. We and others have recently reported that short double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs can induce endogenous gene expression by targeting promoter sequences in a phenomenon referred to as RNA activation (RNAa and such dsRNAs are termed small activating RNAs (saRNAs. To date, RNAa has been successfully utilized to induce the expression of different genes such as tumor suppressor genes. Here, we describe a detailed protocol for target selection and dsRNA design with associated experiments to facilitate RNAa in cultured cells. This technique may be applied to selectively activate endogenous gene expression for studying gene function, interrogating molecular pathways and reprogramming cell fate.

  1. Targeted sequencing of cancer-related genes in colorectal cancer using next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Won Han

    Full Text Available Recent advance in sequencing technology has enabled comprehensive profiling of genetic alterations in cancer. We have established a targeted sequencing platform using next-generation sequencing (NGS technology for clinical use, which can provide mutation and copy number variation data. NGS was performed with paired-end library enriched with exons of 183 cancer-related genes. Normal and tumor tissue pairs of 60 colorectal adenocarcinomas were used to test feasibility. Somatic mutation and copy number alteration were analyzed. A total of 526 somatic non-synonymous sequence variations were found in 113 genes. Among these, 278 single nucleotide variations were 232 different somatic point mutations. 216 SNV were 79 known single nucleotide polymorphisms in the dbSNP. 32 indels were 28 different indel mutations. Median number of mutated gene per tumor was 4 (range 0-23. Copy number gain (>X2 fold was found in 65 genes in 40 patients, whereas copy number loss (genes in 39 patients. The most frequently altered genes (mutation and/or copy number alteration were APC in 35 patients (58%, TP53 in 34 (57%, and KRAS in 24 (40%. Altered gene list revealed ErbB signaling pathway as the most commonly involved pathway (25 patients, 42%. Targeted sequencing platform using NGS technology is feasible for clinical use and provides comprehensive genetic alteration data.

  2. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Lu

    Full Text Available In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting "hot spots". The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model.

  3. Analysis of the siRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing Process Targeting Three Homologous Genes Controlling Soybean Seed Oil Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Sha; Yin, Xiaoyan; Spollen, William; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Dong; Schoelz, James; Bilyeu, Kristin; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade, RNA silencing has gained significant attention because of its success in genomic scale research and also in the genetic improvement of crop plants. However, little is known about the molecular basis of siRNA processing in association with its target transcript. To reveal this process for improving hpRNA-mediated gene silencing in crop plants, the soybean GmFAD3 gene family was chosen as a test model. We analyzed RNAi mutant soybean lines in which three members of the GmFAD3 gene family were silenced. The silencing levels of FAD3A, FAD3B and FAD3C were correlated with the degrees of sequence homology between the inverted repeat of hpRNA and the GmFAD3 transcripts in the RNAi lines. Strikingly, transgenes in two of the three RNAi lines were heavily methylated, leading to a dramatic reduction of hpRNA-derived siRNAs. Small RNAs corresponding to the loop portion of the hairpin transcript were detected while much lower levels of siRNAs were found outside of the target region. siRNAs generated from the 318-bp inverted repeat were found to be diced much more frequently at stem sequences close to the loop and associated with the inferred cleavage sites on the target transcripts, manifesting "hot spots". The top candidate hpRNA-derived siRNA share certain sequence features with mature miRNA. This is the first comprehensive and detailed study revealing the siRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism in crop plants using gene family GmFAD3 as a test model.

  4. Mining predicted essential genes of Brugia malayi for nematode drug targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kumar

    Full Text Available We report results from the first genome-wide application of a rational drug target selection methodology to a metazoan pathogen genome, the completed draft sequence of Brugia malayi, a parasitic nematode responsible for human lymphatic filariasis. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide are at risk of contracting lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis, a related filarial disease. Drug treatments for filariasis have not changed significantly in over 20 years, and with the risk of resistance rising, there is an urgent need for the development of new anti-filarial drug therapies. The recent publication of the draft genomic sequence for B. malayi enables a genome-wide search for new drug targets. However, there is no functional genomics data in B. malayi to guide the selection of potential drug targets. To circumvent this problem, we have utilized the free-living model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a surrogate for B. malayi. Sequence comparisons between the two genomes allow us to map C. elegans orthologs to B. malayi genes. Using these orthology mappings and by incorporating the extensive genomic and functional genomic data, including genome-wide RNAi screens, that already exist for C. elegans, we identify potentially essential genes in B. malayi. Further incorporation of human host genome sequence data and a custom algorithm for prioritization enables us to collect and rank nearly 600 drug target candidates. Previously identified potential drug targets cluster near the top of our prioritized list, lending credibility to our methodology. Over-represented Gene Ontology terms, predicted InterPro domains, and RNAi phenotypes of C. elegans orthologs associated with the potential target pool are identified. By virtue of the selection procedure, the potential B. malayi drug targets highlight components of key processes in nematode biology such as central metabolism, molting and regulation of gene expression.

  5. Evaluation of nested PCR in detection of Helicobacter pylori targeting a highly conserved gene: HSP60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Varsha; Mishra, Shrutkirti; Rao, G R K; Jain, Ashok Kumar; Dixit, V K; Gulati, Anil Kumar; Mahajan, Divya; McClelland, Michael; Nath, Gopal

    2008-02-01

    To comparatively evaluate a new nested set of primers designed for the detection of Helicobacter pylori targeting a highly conserved heat shock protein gene (Hsp60). A total of 60 subjects having peptic ulcer diseases were tested for the detection of H. pylori using rapid urease test (RUT), histology, culture, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in their antral biopsy specimens. A newly designed Hsp60 gene-based primer set was evaluated against commonly used PCR primers for detection of H. pylori. Forty-six of the 60 study subjects were found positive for culture isolation and all the 46 culture-positive specimens were also positive with Hsp60 gene PCR. Of the 46 culture-positive specimens, 44 were positive for 16S rRNA gene, ureC gene, RUT, and histology whereas only 29 were positive with ureA gene PCR. Of the 14 culture-negative subjects, 10 were positive with 16S rRNA gene, 4 were positive with ureC (glmM) gene PCR, and 2 were positive with RUT and 1 was positive on histology. This study shows that nested amplification targeting Hsp60 gene is the most sensitive and specific with LR+ and LR- values of proportional, variant and 0, respectively, when compared with the other three PCR methods. Also, HSP60 gene-specific nested protocol was the most appropriate for detection of H. pylori in clinical specimens. This is particularly valuable because it can be used as a noninvasive method for detecting H. pylori infection in young children and also, in follow-up studies with peptic ulcer patients, on samples like feces and saliva.

  6. The down regulation of target genes by photo activated DNA nanoscissors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Lin; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Tzeng, Yonhua; Htet, Khant; Chuang, Kao-Shu; Hwu, Jih Ru; Su, Wu-Chou

    2010-09-01

    An artificial, targeted, light-activated nanoscissor (ATLANS) was developed for precision photonic cleavage of DNA at selectable target sequences. The ATLANS is comprised of nanoparticle core and a monolayer of hydrazone-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), which recognize and capture the targeted DNA duplex. Upon photo-illumination (lambda = 460 nm), the attached hydrazone scissor specifically cleaves the targeted DNA at a pre-designed nucleotide pair. Electrophoretic mobility shift and co-precipitation assays revealed sequence-specific binding with the short-fragment and long-form plasmid DNA of both TFO and TFO-nanoparticle probes. Upon photo-illumination, ATLANS introduced a precise double-stranded break 12bp downstream the TFO binding sequence and down-regulated the target gene in HeLa cell system. Gold nanoparticles multiplexed the cutting efficiency and potential for simultaneous manipulation of multiple targets, as well as protected DNA from non-specific photo-damage. This photon-mediated DNA manipulation technology will facilitate high spatial and temporal precision in simultaneous silencing at the genome level, and advanced simultaneous manipulation of multiple targeted genes. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Generation of novel resistance genes using mutation and targeted gene editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classical breeding for virus resistance is a lengthy process and is restricted by the availability of resistance genes. Precise genome editing is a "dream technology" to improve plants for virus resistance and these tools have opened new and very promising ways to generate virus resistant plants by ...

  8. Multiple functions of CREB-binding protein during postembryonic development: identification of target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Amit; George, Smitha; Palli, Subba Reddy

    2017-12-29

    Juvenile hormones (JH) and ecdysteroids control postembryonic development in insects. They serve as valuable targets for pest management. Hence, understanding the molecular mechanisms of their action is of crucial importance. CREB-binding protein (CBP) is a universal transcriptional co-regulator. It controls the expression of several genes including those from hormone signaling pathways through co-activation of many transcription factors. However, the role of CBP during postembryonic development in insects is not well understood. Therefore, we have studied the role of CBP in postembryonic development in Tribolium, a model coleopteran insect. CBP is ubiquitously expressed in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. RNA interference (RNAi) mediated knockdown of CBP resulted in a decrease in JH induction of Kr-h1 gene expression in Tribolium larvae and led to a block in their development. Moreover, the injection of CBP double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) showed lethal phenotypes within 8 days of injection. RNA-seq and subsequent differential gene expression analysis identified CBP target genes in Tribolium. Knockdown of CBP caused a decrease in the expression of 1306 genes coding for transcription factors and other proteins associated with growth and development. Depletion of CBP impaired the expression of several JH response genes (e.g., Kr-h1, Hairy, early trypsin) and ecdysone response genes (EcR, E74, E75, and broad complex). Further, GO enrichment analyses of the downregulated genes showed enrichment in different functions including developmental processes, pigmentation, anatomical structure development, regulation of biological and cellular processes, etc. These data suggest diverse but crucial roles for CBP during postembryonic development in the coleopteran model insect, Tribolium. It can serve as a target for RNAi mediated pest management of this stored product pest.

  9. Gene Delivery Particle Engineering Strategies for Shape-dependent Targeting of Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, Kristen L; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    Successful gene delivery requires overcoming both systemic and intracellular obstacles before the nucleic acid cargo can successfully reach its tissue and subcellular target location. Materials & Methods: Non-viral mechanisms to enable targeting while avoiding off-target delivery have arisen via biological, chemical, and physical engineering strategies. Herein we will discuss the physical parameters in particle design that promote tissue- and cell-targeted delivery of genetic cargo. We will discuss systemic concerns, such as circulation, tissue localization, and clearance, as well as cell-scale obstacles, such as cellular uptake and nucleic acid packaging. In particular, we will focus on engineering particle shape and size in order to enhance delivery and promote precise targeting. We will also address methods to program or change particle shape in situ using environmentally triggered cues. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Principles and limitations of computational microRNA gene and target finding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindow, Morten; Gorodkin, Jan

    2007-01-01

    of sequence data being generated, the need for analysis by computational approaches is obvious. Here, we review the general principles used in computational gene and target finding, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the methods. Several methods rely on detection of evolutionary conserved candidates...

  11. A single gene target of an ETS-family transcription factor determines neuronal CO2-chemosensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Julia P; Aziz-Zaman, Sonya; Juozaityte, Vaida

    2012-01-01

    . We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO(2). The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO(2)-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient...

  12. Novel Data Fusion Method and Exploration of Multiple Information Sources for Transcription Factor Target Gene Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Yli-Harja, Olli; Lähdesmäki, Harri

    2010-12-01

    Background. Revealing protein-DNA interactions is a key problem in understanding transcriptional regulation at mechanistic level. Computational methods have an important role in predicting transcription factor target gene genomewide. Multiple data fusion provides a natural way to improve transcription factor target gene predictions because sequence specificities alone are not sufficient to accurately predict transcription factor binding sites. Methods. Here we develop a new data fusion method to combine multiple genome-level data sources and study the extent to which DNA duplex stability and nucleosome positioning information, either alone or in combination with other data sources, can improve the prediction of transcription factor target gene. Results. Results on a carefully constructed test set of verified binding sites in mouse genome demonstrate that our new multiple data fusion method can reduce false positive rates, and that DNA duplex stability and nucleosome occupation data can improve the accuracy of transcription factor target gene predictions, especially when combined with other genome-level data sources. Cross-validation and other randomization tests confirm the predictive performance of our method. Our results also show that nonredundant data sources provide the most efficient data fusion.

  13. Nonviral Gene Targeting at rDNA Locus of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    Youjin Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic modification, such as the addition of exogenous genes to the MSC genome, is crucial to their use as cellular vehicles. Due to the risks associated with viral vectors such as insertional mutagenesis, the safer nonviral vectors have drawn a great deal of attention. Methods. VEGF, bFGF, vitamin C, and insulin-transferrin-selenium-X were supplemented in the MSC culture medium. The cells’ proliferation and survival capacity was measured by MTT, determination of the cumulative number of cells, and a colony-forming efficiency assay. The plasmid pHr2-NL was constructed and nucleofected into MSCs. The recombinants were selected using G418 and characterized using PCR and Southern blotting. Results. BFGF is critical to MSC growth and it acted synergistically with vitamin C, VEGF, and ITS-X, causing the cells to expand significantly. The neomycin gene was targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs using a nonviral human ribosomal targeting vector. The recombinant MSCs retained multipotential differentiation capacity, typical levels of hMSC surface marker expression, and a normal karyotype, and none were tumorigenic in nude mice. Conclusions. Exogenous genes can be targeted to the rDNA locus of human MSCs while maintaining the characteristics of MSCs. This is the first nonviral gene targeting of hMSCs.

  14. The effect of COMT gene on the target precision of the athlete movement

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    E. V. Mikhailova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to find correlation between COMT gene alleles and the target precision of the athlete movement. 68 Russian competing athletes involved in boxing and volleyball, participated in the study. We found interrelation between COMT Met allele and a tall stature in the volleyball players.

  15. Interactome of Radiation-Induced microRNA-Predicted Target Genes

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    Tenzin W. Lhakhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The microRNAs (miRNAs function as global negative regulators of gene expression and have been associated with a multitude of biological processes. The dysfunction of the microRNAome has been linked to various diseases including cancer. Our laboratory recently reported modulation in the expression of miRNA in a variety of cell types exposed to ionizing radiation (IR. To further understand miRNA role in IR-induced stress pathways, we catalogued a set of common miRNAs modulated in various irradiated cell lines and generated a list of predicted target genes. Using advanced bioinformatics tools we identified cellular pathways where miRNA predicted target genes function. The miRNA-targeted genes were found to play key roles in previously identified IR stress pathways such as cell cycle, p53 pathway, TGF-beta pathway, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, focal adhesion pathway, MAPK signaling, thyroid cancer pathway, adherens junction, insulin signaling pathway, oocyte meiosis, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, and renal cell carcinoma pathway. Interestingly, we were able to identify novel targeted pathways that have not been identified in cellular radiation response, such as aldosterone-regulated sodium reabsorption, long-term potentiation, and neutrotrophin signaling pathways. Our analysis indicates that the miRNA interactome in irradiated cells provides a platform for comprehensive modeling of the cellular stress response to IR exposure.

  16. Problem-Solving Test: Conditional Gene Targeting Using the Cre/loxP Recombination System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberényi, József

    2013-01-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: gene targeting, knock-out mutation, bacteriophage, complementary base-pairing, homologous recombination, deletion, transgenic organisms, promoter, polyadenylation element, transgene, DNA replication, RNA polymerase, Shine-Dalgarno sequence, restriction endonuclease, polymerase chain…

  17. miRNA signatures and transcriptional regulation of their target genes in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Singh, Mala; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2016-10-01

    miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. We have earlier reported the skin miRNA expression profiling in patients with non-segmental vitiligo. In the present study, we show the expression of previously identified skin miRNAs signatures in blood and their target genes in whole blood and PBMCs as well as skin micro-environment of vitiligo patients and controls. miRNA expression profiling in whole blood was performed using customized TaqMan ® Low Density Array. We predicted the potential targets of differentially expressed miRNAs and investigated their expression levels in skin, whole blood and PBMCs from patients and controls using Real-time PCR. Our results showed miR-1, miR-184, miR-328, miR-383 and miR-577 hold similar pattern of expression as of skin, suggesting their potent eminence for being putative markers for vitiligo. In silico target prediction revealed miR-1 targets EDN1, G6PD, HSP60, HSP70, SERP1, SIRT1 & TYR; miR-184 targets EZR & LAMP1; miR-328 targets IL1B, POLH & TRPM1; miR-383 targets EDN1 & TYRP1; and miR-577 targets PTPN22 & TYRP1 which were corroborated by our validation study. In conclusion, the present study for the first time provides new insights into the crucial role of miRNA regulated gene network involved in oxidative stress, autoimmunity and ER stress mediated pathogenesis of vitiligo. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-target trapping in constrained environments using gene regulatory network-based pattern formation

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    Xingguang Peng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the morphogenesis of biological organisms, gene regulatory network-based methods have been used in complex pattern formation of swarm robotic systems. In this article, obstacle information was embedded into the gene regulatory network model to make the robots trap targets with an expected pattern while avoiding obstacles in a distributed manner. Based on the modified gene regulatory network model, an implicit function method was adopted to represent the expected pattern which is easily adjusted by adding extra feature points. Considering environmental constraints (e.g. tunnels or gaps in which robots must adjust their pattern to conduct trapping task, a pattern adaptation strategy was proposed for the pattern modeler to adaptively adjust the expected pattern. Also to trap multiple targets, a splitting pattern adaptation strategy was proposed for diffusively moving targets so that the robots can trap each target separately with split sub-patterns. The proposed model and strategies were verified through a set of simulation with complex environmental constraints and non-consensus movements of targets.

  19. Subcloning Plus Insertion (SPI) - A Novel Recombineering Method for the Rapid Construction of Gene Targeting Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Thimma R.; Kelsall, Emma J.; Fevat, Léna M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting refers to the precise modification of a genetic locus using homologous recombination. The generation of novel cell lines and transgenic mouse models using this method necessitates the construction of a ‘targeting’ vector, which contains homologous DNA sequences to the target gene, and has for many years been a limiting step in the process. Vector construction can be performed in vivo in Escherichia coli cells using homologous recombination mediated by phage recombinases using a technique termed recombineering. Recombineering is the preferred technique to subclone the long homology sequences (>4kb) and various targeting elements including selection markers that are required to mediate efficient allelic exchange between a targeting vector and its cognate genomic locus. Typical recombineering protocols follow an iterative scheme of step-wise integration of the targeting elements and require intermediate purification and transformation steps. Here, we present a novel recombineering methodology of vector assembly using a multiplex approach. Plasmid gap repair is performed by the simultaneous capture of genomic sequence from mouse Bacterial Artificial Chromosome libraries and the insertion of dual bacterial and mammalian selection markers. This subcloning plus insertion method is highly efficient and yields a majority of correct recombinants. We present data for the construction of different types of conditional gene knockout, or knock-in, vectors and BAC reporter vectors that have been constructed using this method. SPI vector construction greatly extends the repertoire of the recombineering toolbox and provides a simple, rapid and cost-effective method of constructing these highly complex vectors. PMID:25590226

  20. Analysis of Deregulated microRNAs and Their Target Genes in Gastric Cancer.

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    Simonas Juzėnas

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are widely studied non-coding RNAs that modulate gene expression. MiRNAs are deregulated in different tumors including gastric cancer (GC and have potential diagnostic and prognostic implications. The aim of our study was to determine miRNA profile in GC tissues, followed by evaluation of deregulated miRNAs in plasma of GC patients. Using available databases and bioinformatics methods we also aimed to evaluate potential target genes of confirmed differentially expressed miRNA and validate these findings in GC tissues.The study included 51 GC patients and 51 controls. Initially, we screened miRNA expression profile in 13 tissue samples of GC and 12 normal gastric tissues with TaqMan low density array (TLDA. In the second stage, differentially expressed miRNAs were validated in a replication cohort using qRT-PCR in tissue and plasma samples. Subsequently, we analyzed potential target genes of deregulated miRNAs using bioinformatics approach, determined their expression in GC tissues and performed correlation analysis with targeting miRNAs.Profiling with TLDA revealed 15 deregulated miRNAs in GC tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa. Replication analysis confirmed that miR-148a-3p, miR-204-5p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 were consistently deregulated in GC tissues. Analysis of GC patients' plasma samples showed significant down-regulation of miR-148a-3p, miR-375 and up-regulation of miR-223-3p compared to healthy subjects. Further, using bioinformatic tools we identified targets of replicated miRNAs and performed disease-associated gene enrichment analysis. Ultimately, we evaluated potential target gene BCL2 and DNMT3B expression by qRT-PCR in GC tissue, which correlated with targeting miRNA expression.Our study revealed miRNA profile in GC tissues and showed that miR-148a-3p, miR-223-3p and miR-375 are deregulated in GC plasma samples, but these circulating miRNAs showed relatively weak diagnostic performance as sole biomarkers

  1. Recombinant adeno-associated virus targets passenger gene expression to cones in primate retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Katherine; Hendrickson, Anita E.; Connor, Thomas B., Jr.; Mauck, Matthew C.; Kinsella, James J.; Hauswirth, William W.; Neitz, Jay; Neitz, Maureen

    2007-05-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) is a promising vector for gene therapy of photoreceptor-based diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that rAAV serotypes 2 and 5 can transduce both rod and cone photoreceptors in rodents and dogs, and it can target rods, but not cones in primates. Here we report that using a human cone-specific enhancer and promoter to regulate expression of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene in an rAAV-5 vector successfully targeted expression of the reporter gene to primate cones, and the time course of GFP expression was able to be monitored in a living animal using the RetCam II digital imaging system.

  2. Targeted Brain Tumor Treatment: Current Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningaraj N.S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor is associated with poor prognosis. The treatment option is severely limited for a patient with brain tumor, despite great advances in understanding the etiology and molecular biology of brain tumors that have lead to breakthroughs in developing pharmaceutical strategies, and ongoing NCI/Pharma-sponsored clinical trials. We reviewed the literature on molecular targeted agents in preclinical and clinical studies in brain tumor for the past decade, and observed that the molecular targeting in brain tumors is complex. This is because no single gene or protein can be affected by single molecular agent, requiring the use of combination molecular therapy with cytotoxic agents. In this review, we briefly discuss the potential molecular targets, and the challenges of targeted brain tumor treatment. For example, glial tumors are associated with over-expression of calcium-dependent potassium (KCa channels, and high grade glioma express specific KCa channel gene (gBK splice variants, and mutant epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRvIII. These specific genes are promising targets for molecular targeted treatment in brain tumors. In addition, drugs like Avastin and Gleevec target the molecular targets such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and BRC-ABL/Akt. Recent discovery of non-coding RNA, specifically microRNAs could be used as potential targeted drugs. Finally, we discuss the role of anti-cancer drug delivery to brain tumors by breaching the blood-brain tumor barrier. This non-invasive strategy is particularly useful as novel molecules and humanized monoclonal antibodies that target receptor tyrosine kinase receptors are rapidly being developed.

  3. Targeted Brain Tumor Treatment-Current Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Ningaraj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumor is associated with poor prognosis. The treatment option is severely limited for a patient with brain tumor, despite great advances in understanding the etiology and molecular biology of brain tumors that have lead to breakthroughs in developing pharmaceutical strategies, and ongoing NCI/Pharma-sponsored clinical trials. We reviewed the literature on molecular targeted agents in preclinical and clinical studies in brain tumor for the past decade, and observed that the molecular targeting in brain tumors is complex. This is because no single gene or protein can be affected by single molecular agent, requiring the use of combination molecular therapy with cytotoxic agents. In this review, we briefly discuss the potential molecular targets, and the challenges of targeted brain tumor treatment. For example, glial tumors are associated with over-expression of calcium-dependent potassium (K Ca channels, and high grade glioma express specific K Ca channel gene (gBK splice variants, and mutant epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRvIII. These specific genes are promising targets for molecular targeted treatment in brain tumors. In addition, drugs like Avastin and Gleevec target the molecular targets such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptors, and BRC-ABL/Akt. Recent discovery of non-coding RNA, specifically microRNAs could be used as potential targeted drugs. Finally, we discuss the role of anti-cancer drug delivery to brain tumors by breaching the blood-brain tumor barrier. This non-invasive strategy is particularly useful as novel molecules and humanized monoclonal antibodies that target receptor tyrosine kinase receptors are rapidly being developed.

  4. A novel mechanism for p53 to regulate its target gene ECK in signaling apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y Jenny; Wang, Jianli; Qiao, Changhong; Hei, Tom K; Brandt-Rauf, Paul W; Yin, Yuxin

    2006-10-01

    Transcription factor p53 regulates its target genes through binding to DNA consensus sequence and activating the promoters of its downstream genes. The conventional p53 consensus binding sequence was defined as two copies of the 10-bp motif 5'-PuPuPuC(A/T)(T/A)GPyPyPy-3' with a spacer of 0 to 13 bp, which exists in the regulatory regions of some p53 target genes. However, there is no such p53 consensus sequence in the promoters of a number of p53-responsive genes, suggesting that there might be other mechanisms whereby p53 transactivates the promoters of its target genes. We report here that p53 uses a novel binding mechanism to regulate the transcription of epithelial cell kinase (ECK), a receptor protein-tyrosine kinase implicated in signal transduction. We show that p53 binds to a 10-bp perfect palindromic decanucleotide (GTGACGTCAC) in the ECK promoter, activates the ECK promoter, and increases the transcription of ECK. This palindrome is required for p53-mediated transactivation of the ECK promoter. ECK is highly responsive to oxidative damage that leads to cell death. Ectopic expression of ECK causes spontaneous apoptosis in breast cancer cells. We found that ectopic expression of a mutant ECK fails to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Our findings show that p53 is a transcriptional regulator of ECK in mediating apoptosis. The discovery of the novel p53-binding motif in the promoter may lead to the identification of a new class of p53 target genes.

  5. Expression of target and reference genes in Daphnia magna exposed to ibuprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Connon, Richard; Hutchinson, Thomas H; Maund, Steve J; Sibly, Richard M; Callaghan, Amanda

    2006-07-07

    Transcriptomic techniques are now being applied in ecotoxicology and toxicology to measure the impact of stressors and develop understanding of mechanisms of toxicity. Microarray technology in particular offers the potential to measure thousands of gene responses simultaneously. However, it is important that microarrays responses should be validated, at least initially, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). The accurate measurement of target gene expression requires normalisation to an invariant internal control e.g., total RNA or reference genes. Reference genes are preferable, as they control for variation inherent in the cDNA synthesis and PCR. However, reference gene expression can vary between tissues and experimental conditions, which makes it crucial to validate them prior to application. We evaluated 10 candidate reference genes for QPCR in Daphnia magna following a 24 h exposure to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ibuprofen (IB) at 0, 20, 40 and 80 mg IB l-1. Six of the 10 candidates appeared suitable for use as reference genes. As a robust approach, we used a combination normalisation factor (NF), calculated using the geNorm application, based on the geometric mean of three selected reference genes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme and actin. The effects of normalisation are illustrated using as target gene leukotriene B4 12-hydroxydehydrogenase (Ltb4dh), which was up-regulated following 24 h exposure to 63-81 mg IB l-1. As anticipated, use of the NF clarified the response of Ltb4dh in daphnids exposed to sublethal levels of ibuprofen. Our findings emphasise the importance in toxicogenomics of finding and applying invariant internal QPCR control(s) relevant to the study conditions.

  6. Expression of target and reference genes in Daphnia magna exposed to ibuprofen

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    Sibly Richard M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptomic techniques are now being applied in ecotoxicology and toxicology to measure the impact of stressors and develop understanding of mechanisms of toxicity. Microarray technology in particular offers the potential to measure thousands of gene responses simultaneously. However, it is important that microarrays responses should be validated, at least initially, using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR. The accurate measurement of target gene expression requires normalisation to an invariant internal control e.g., total RNA or reference genes. Reference genes are preferable, as they control for variation inherent in the cDNA synthesis and PCR. However, reference gene expression can vary between tissues and experimental conditions, which makes it crucial to validate them prior to application. Results We evaluated 10 candidate reference genes for QPCR in Daphnia magna following a 24 h exposure to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID ibuprofen (IB at 0, 20, 40 and 80 mg IB l-1. Six of the 10 candidates appeared suitable for use as reference genes. As a robust approach, we used a combination normalisation factor (NF, calculated using the geNorm application, based on the geometric mean of three selected reference genes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, ubiquitin conjugating enzyme and actin. The effects of normalisation are illustrated using as target gene leukotriene B4 12-hydroxydehydrogenase (Ltb4dh, which was up-regulated following 24 h exposure to 63–81 mg IB l-1. Conclusions As anticipated, use of the NF clarified the response of Ltb4dh in daphnids exposed to sublethal levels of ibuprofen. Our findings emphasise the importance in toxicogenomics of finding and applying invariant internal QPCR control(s relevant to the study conditions.

  7. Global Identification of EVI1 Target Genes in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

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    Carolyn Glass

    Full Text Available The ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1 transcription factor is associated with human myeloid malignancy of poor prognosis and is overexpressed in 8-10% of adult AML and strikingly up to 27% of pediatric MLL-rearranged leukemias. For the first time, we report comprehensive genomewide EVI1 binding and whole transcriptome gene deregulation in leukemic cells using a combination of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq expression profiling. We found disruption of terminal myeloid differentiation and cell cycle regulation to be prominent in EVI-induced leukemogenesis. Specifically, we identified EVI1 directly binds to and downregulates the master myeloid differentiation gene Cebpe and several of its downstream gene targets critical for terminal myeloid differentiation. We also found EVI1 binds to and downregulates Serpinb2 as well as numerous genes involved in the Jak-Stat signaling pathway. Finally, we identified decreased expression of several ATP-dependent P2X purinoreceptors genes involved in apoptosis mechanisms. These findings provide a foundation for future study of potential therapeutic gene targets for EVI1-induced leukemia.

  8. Diverse, Biologically Relevant, and Targetable Gene Rearrangements in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer and Other Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Timothy M; Lehmann, Brian D; Beeler, J Scott; Li, Chung-I; Li, Zhu; Jin, Hailing; Stricker, Thomas P; Shyr, Yu; Pietenpol, Jennifer A

    2016-08-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and other molecularly heterogeneous malignancies present a significant clinical challenge due to a lack of high-frequency "driver" alterations amenable to therapeutic intervention. These cancers often exhibit genomic instability, resulting in chromosomal rearrangements that affect the structure and expression of protein-coding genes. However, identification of these rearrangements remains technically challenging. Using a newly developed approach that quantitatively predicts gene rearrangements in tumor-derived genetic material, we identified and characterized a novel oncogenic fusion involving the MER proto-oncogene tyrosine kinase (MERTK) and discovered a clinical occurrence and cell line model of the targetable FGFR3-TACC3 fusion in TNBC. Expanding our analysis to other malignancies, we identified a diverse array of novel and known hybrid transcripts, including rearrangements between noncoding regions and clinically relevant genes such as ALK, CSF1R, and CD274/PD-L1 The over 1,000 genetic alterations we identified highlight the importance of considering noncoding gene rearrangement partners, and the targetable gene fusions identified in TNBC demonstrate the need to advance gene fusion detection for molecularly heterogeneous cancers. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4850-60. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Oligonucleotide-based microarray analysis of retinoic acid target genes in the protochordate, Ciona intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Tomoko; Usami, Takeshi; Fujie, Manabu; Azumi, Kaoru; Satoh, Nori; Fujiwara, Shigeki

    2005-08-01

    Oligonucleotide-based microarray analyses were carried out to identify retinoic acid target genes in embryos of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Of 21,938 spots, 50 (corresponding to 43 genes) showed over twofold up-regulation in retinoic acid-treated tail bud embryos. In situ hybridization verified retinoic acid-induced up-regulation of 23 genes. Many of them were expressed in the anterior tail region, where a retinaldehyde dehydrogenase homolog is expressed. Homologs of vertebrate genes involved in neurogenesis and/or neuronal functions (e.g., COUP-TF, Ci-Hox1, and SCO-spondin) were expressed in the central nervous system of Ciona embryos, and activated by retinoic acid. Genes encoding transcription factors (e.g., Ci-lmx1.2, vitamin D receptor, and Hox proteins) and apoptosis-related proteins (e.g., transglutaminase and an apoptosis-inducing factor homolog) were also activated by retinoic acid. Simultaneous treatment of embryos with retinoic acid and puromycin revealed a few direct targets, including genes encoding Ci-Hox1, Ci-Cyp26, and an Rnf126-like ring finger protein. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Reprogramming of the ERRα and ERα target gene landscape triggers tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, Verena; Simon, Ronald; Schroeter, Petra; Schlotter, Magdalena; Anzeneder, Tobias; Büttner, Reinhard; Benes, Vladimir; Sauter, Guido; Burwinkel, Barbara; Nicholson, Robert I; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Deuschle, Ulrich; Zapatka, Marc; Heck, Stefanie; Lichter, Peter

    2015-02-15

    Endocrine treatment regimens for breast cancer that target the estrogen receptor-α (ERα) are effective, but acquired resistance remains a limiting drawback. One mechanism of acquired resistance that has been hypothesized is functional substitution of the orphan receptor estrogen-related receptor-α (ERRα) for ERα. To examine this hypothesis, we analyzed ERRα and ERα in recurrent tamoxifen-resistant breast tumors and conducted a genome-wide target gene profiling analysis of MCF-7 breast cancer cell populations that were sensitive or resistant to tamoxifen treatment. This analysis uncovered a global redirection in the target genes controlled by ERα, ERRα, and their coactivator AIB1, defining a novel set of target genes in tamoxifen-resistant cells. Beyond differences in the ERα and ERRα target gene repertoires, both factors were engaged in similar pathobiologic processes relevant to acquired resistance. Functional analyses confirmed a requirement for ERRα in tamoxifen- and fulvestrant-resistant MCF-7 cells, with pharmacologic inhibition of ERRα sufficient to partly restore sensitivity to antiestrogens. In clinical specimens (n = 1041), increased expression of ERRα was associated with enhanced proliferation and aggressive disease parameters, including increased levels of p53 in ERα-positive cases. In addition, increased ERRα expression was linked to reduced overall survival in independent tamoxifen-treated patient cohorts. Taken together, our results suggest that ERα and ERRα cooperate to promote endocrine resistance, and they provide a rationale for the exploration of ERRα as a candidate drug target to treat endocrine-resistant breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. New target genes of MITF-induced microRNA-211 contribute to melanoma cell invasion.

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    Christiane Margue

    Full Text Available The non-coding microRNAs (miRNA have tissue- and disease-specific expression patterns. They down-regulate target mRNAs, which likely impacts on most fundamental cellular processes. Differential expression patterns of miRNAs are currently being exploited for identification of biomarkers for early disease diagnosis, prediction of progression for melanoma and other cancers and as promising drug targets, since they can easily be inhibited or replaced in a given cellular context. Before successfully manipulating miRNAs in clinical settings, their precise expression levels, endogenous functions and thus their target genes have to be determined. MiR-211, a melanocyte lineage-specific small non-coding miRNA, is located in an intron of TRPM1, a target gene of the microphtalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF. By transcriptionally up-regulating TRPM1, MITF, which is critical for both melanocyte differentiation and survival and for melanoma progression, indirectly drives the expression of miR-211. Expression of this miRNA is often reduced in melanoma samples. Here, we investigated functional roles of miR-211 by identifying and studying new target genes. We show that MITF-correlated miR-211 expression levels are mostly but not always reduced in a panel of 11 melanoma cell lines and in primary and metastatic melanoma compared to normal melanocytes and nevi, respectively. MiR-211 itself only marginally impacted on cell invasion and migration, while perturbation of some new miR-211 target genes, such as AP1S2, SOX11, IGFBP5, and SERINC3 significantly increased invasion. These results and the variable expression levels of miR-211 raise serious doubts on the value of miR-211 as a melanoma tumor-suppressing miRNA and/or as a biomarker for melanoma.

  12. Efficient immunoglobulin gene disruption and targeted replacement in rabbit using zinc finger nucleases.

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    Tatiana Flisikowska

    Full Text Available Rabbits are widely used in biomedical research, yet techniques for their precise genetic modification are lacking. We demonstrate that zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs introduced into fertilized oocytes can inactivate a chosen gene by mutagenesis and also mediate precise homologous recombination with a DNA gene-targeting vector to achieve the first gene knockout and targeted sequence replacement in rabbits. Two ZFN pairs were designed that target the rabbit immunoglobulin M (IgM locus within exons 1 and 2. ZFN mRNAs were microinjected into pronuclear stage fertilized oocytes. Founder animals carrying distinct mutated IgM alleles were identified and bred to produce offspring. Functional knockout of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus was confirmed by serum IgM and IgG deficiency and lack of IgM(+ and IgG(+ B lymphocytes. We then tested whether ZFN expression would enable efficient targeted sequence replacement in rabbit oocytes. ZFN mRNA was co-injected with a linear DNA vector designed to replace exon 1 of the IgM locus with ∼1.9 kb of novel sequence. Double strand break induced targeted replacement occurred in up to 17% of embryos and in 18% of fetuses analyzed. Two major goals have been achieved. First, inactivation of the endogenous IgM locus, which is an essential step for the production of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies in the rabbit. Second, establishing efficient targeted gene manipulation and homologous recombination in a refractory animal species. ZFN mediated genetic engineering in the rabbit and other mammals opens new avenues of experimentation in immunology and many other research fields.

  13. Advances in ultrasound-targeted microbubble-mediated gene therapy for liver fibrosis

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    Cuiyuan Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis develops as a wound-healing scar in response to acute and chronic liver inflammation and can lead to cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. The condition arises due to increased synthesis and reduced degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM and is a common pathological sequela of chronic liver disease. Excessive deposition of ECM in the liver causes liver dysfunction, ascites, and eventually upper gastrointestinal bleeding as well as a series of complications. However, fibrosis can be reversed before developing into cirrhosis and has thus been the subject of extensive researches particularly at the gene level. Currently, therapeutic genes are imported into the damaged liver to delay or prevent the development of liver fibrosis by regulating the expression of exogenous genes. One technique of gene delivery uses ultrasound targeting of microbubbles combined with therapeutic genes where the time and intensity of the ultrasound can control the release process. Ultrasound irradiation of microbubbles in the vicinity of cells changes the permeability of the cell membrane by its cavitation effect and enhances gene transfection. In this paper, recent progress in the field is reviewed with emphasis on the following aspects: the types of ultrasound microbubbles, the construction of an ultrasound-mediated gene delivery system, the mechanism of ultrasound microbubble–mediated gene transfer and the application of ultrasound microbubbles in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  14. Improvement of Hydrodynamics-Based Gene Transfer of Nonviral DNA Targeted to Murine Hepatocytes

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    Shingo Nakamura

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver is an important organ for supporting the life of an individual. Gene transfer toward this organ has been attempted in many laboratories to date; however, there have been few reports on improved liver-targeted gene delivery by using a nonviral vector. In this study, we examined the effect of various types of gene delivery carriers on enhancing the uptake and gene expression of exogenous DNA in murine hepatocytes when a hydrodynamics-based gene delivery (HGD is performed via tail-vein injection. Mice were singly injected with a large amount of phosphate-buffered saline containing reporter plasmid DNA and/or with a gene delivery carrier. One day after the gene delivery, the animals' livers were dissected and subjected to biochemical, histochemical, and molecular biological analyses. The strongest signal from the reporter plasmid DNA was observed when the DNA was mixed with a polyethylenimine- (PEI- based reagent. Coinjection with pCRTEIL (a loxP-floxed reporter construct and pTR/NCre (a liver-specific Cre expression vector resulted in the liver-specific recombination of pCRTEIL. The combination of PEI with HGD would thus be a valuable tool for liver-specific manipulation to examine the function of a gene of interest in the liver and for creating liver disease models.

  15. Electrotransfer parameters as a tool for controlled and targeted gene expression in skin

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    Spela Kos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin is an attractive target for gene electrotransfer. It consists of different cell types that can be transfected, leading to various responses to gene electrotransfer. We demonstrate that these responses could be controlled by selecting the appropriate electrotransfer parameters. Specifically, the application of low or high electric pulses, applied by multi-electrode array, provided the possibility to control the depth of the transfection in the skin, the duration and the level of gene expression, as well as the local or systemic distribution of the transgene. The influence of electric pulse type was first studied using a plasmid encoding a reporter gene (DsRed. Then, plasmids encoding therapeutic genes (IL-12, shRNA against endoglin, shRNA against melanoma cell adhesion molecule were used, and their effects on wound healing and cutaneous B16F10 melanoma tumors were investigated. The high-voltage pulses resulted in gene expression that was restricted to superficial skin layers and induced a local response. In contrast, the low-voltage electric pulses promoted transfection into the deeper skin layers, resulting in prolonged gene expression and higher transgene production, possibly with systemic distribution. Therefore, in the translation into the clinics, it will be of the utmost importance to adjust the electrotransfer parameters for different therapeutic approaches and specific mode of action of the therapeutic gene.

  16. Metformin as a new anti-cancer drug in adrenocortical carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Giada; Cantini, Giulia; Armignacco, Roberta; Fucci, Rossella; Santi, Raffaella; Canu, Letizia; Nesi, Gabriella; Mannelli, Massimo; Luconi, Michaela

    2016-08-02

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare heterogeneous malignancy with poor prognosis. Since radical surgery is the only available treatment, more specific and effective drugs are urgently required. The anti-diabetic drug metformin has been associated with a decreased cancer prevalence and mortality in several solid tumors, prompting its possible use for ACC treatment.This paper evaluates the in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects of metformin using the ACC cell model H295R.Metformin treatment significantly reduces cell viability and proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner and associates with a significant inhibition of ERK1/2 and mTOR phosphorylation/activation, as well as with stimulation of AMPK activity. Metformin also triggers the apoptotic pathway, shown by the decreased expression of Bcl-2 and HSP27, HSP60 and HSP70, and enhanced membrane exposure of annexin V, resulting in activation of caspase-3 apoptotic effector. Metformin interferes with the proliferative autocrine loop of IGF2/IGF-1R, which supports adrenal cancer growth. Finally, in the ACC xenograft mouse model, obtained by subcutaneous injection of H295R cells, metformin intraperitoneal administration inhibits tumor growth, confirmed by the significant reduction of Ki67%.Our data suggest that metformin inhibits H295R cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Further preclinical studies are necessary to validate the potential anti-cancer effect of metformin in patients affected by ACC.

  17. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  18. New anti-cancer characteristics of jatrophane diterpenes from Euphorbia dendroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešić, Milica; Banković, Jasna; Aljančić, Ivana S; Todorović, Nina M; Jadranin, Milka; Vajs, Vlatka E; Tešević, Vele V; Vučković, Ivan; Momčilović, Miljana; Marković, Ivanka D; Tanić, Nikola; Ruždijić, Sabera

    2011-12-01

    Jatrophane diterpenes were shown to be inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). There are also evidences on their microtubule-interacting activity in cancer cells. We evaluated new anti-cancer characteristics of two jatrophane type compounds from Euphorbia dendroides. For that purpose, the model system of sensitive non-small cell lung cancer cell line (NCI-H460) and its resistant counterpart (NCI-H460/R) was used. Although both jatrophanes showed inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth, they were non-toxic for peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). We examined their effects in combination with paclitaxel (PTX), a well-known mitotic spindle interacting chemotherapeutic. Jatrophanes overcome PTX resistance in concentration-dependent manner in MDR cancer cell line (NCI-H460/R). We observed that this synergistic effect is not caused merely by P-gp inhibition. In combination with PTX, jatrophanes induce cell killing and change cell cycle distribution leading to G2/M arrest. Furthermore, they exert an anti-angiogenic effect by decreasing the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion. The reduction of the level of mdr1 mRNA expression in sensitive cells, suggests that these compounds could not contribute to the development of resistance. In conclusion, present study provides a rational basis for the new cancer treatment approach with jatrophanes that are non-toxic to normal cells and have new favorable anti-cancer characteristics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimizing Chemotherapeutic Anti-cancer Treatment and the Tumor Microenvironment: An Analysis of Mathematical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledzewicz, Urszula; Schaettler, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    We review results about the structure of administration of chemotherapeutic anti-cancer treatment that we have obtained from an analysis of minimally parameterized mathematical models using methods of optimal control. This is a branch of continuous-time optimization that studies the minimization of a performance criterion imposed on an underlying dynamical system subject to constraints. The scheduling of anti-cancer treatments has all the features of such a problem: treatments are administered in time and the interactions of the drugs with the tumor and its microenvironment determine the efficacy of therapy. At the same time, constraints on the toxicity of the treatments need to be taken into account. The models we consider are low-dimensional and do not include more refined details, but they capture the essence of the underlying biology and our results give robust and rather conclusive qualitative information about the administration of optimal treatment protocols that strongly correlate with approaches taken in medical practice. We describe the changes that arise in optimal administration schedules as the mathematical models are increasingly refined to progress from models that only consider the cancerous cells to models that include the major components of the tumor microenvironment, namely the tumor vasculature and tumor-immune system interactions.

  20. Anti-Cancer Potential of Homemade Fresh Garlic Extract Is Related to Increased Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voin Petrovic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of garlic and garlic-based extracts has been linked to decreased incidence of cancer in epidemiological studies. Here we examine the molecular and cellular activities of a simple homemade ethanol-based garlic extract (GE. We show that GE inhibits growth of several different cancer cells in vitro, as well as cancer growth in vivo in a syngeneic orthotopic breast cancer model. Multiple myeloma cells were found to be especially sensitive to GE. The GE was fractionated using solid-phase extractions, and we identified allicin in one GE fraction; however, growth inhibitory activities were found in several additional fractions. These activities were lost during freeze or vacuum drying, suggesting that the main anti-cancer compounds in GE are volatile. The anti-cancer activity was stable for more than six months in −20 °C. We found that GE enhanced the activities of chemotherapeutics, as well as MAPK and PI3K inhibitors. Furthermore, GE affected hundreds of proteins involved in cellular signalling, including changes in vital cell signalling cascades regulating proliferation, apoptosis, and the cellular redox balance. Our data indicate that the reduced proliferation of the cancer cells treated by GE is at least partly mediated by increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress.

  1. Design, synthesis and molecular modeling studies of novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives as potential anti-cancer agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Vivek; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A series of novel thiazolidine-2,4-dione derivatives 4a-x have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for potential anti-cancer activity. The anti-cancer activity of synthesized compounds 4a-x were evaluated against selected human cancer cell line of breast (MCF-7) using sulforhodamine B (SRB) method. Among the synthesized compounds, 4x having 2-cyano phenyl group showed significant cytotoxic activity which is comparable to that of adriamycin as standard anti-cancer drug. The SAR study revealed that the substituted phenyl group on oxadiazole ring attached to thiazolidine-2,4-dione moiety showed significant growth inhibitory activity against MCF-7 cell line. The result of molecular modeling studies showed that compounds 4f, 4o and 4x having similar structural alignment as crystal ligand of protein.

  2. Advancing drug therapy for brain tumours: a current review of the pro-inflammatory peptide Substance P and its antagonists as anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Kimberley; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Lewis, Kate M; Vink, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Evidence for the involvement of the Substance P (SP)/NK1 receptor system in the development and progression of cancer strongly supports its potential as a therapeutic target in malignancies. Novel strategies for approaching cancer treatment are urgently required particularly with regard to tumours of the central nervous system (CNS), which are notoriously difficult to effectively treat and associated with extremely poor prognosis for many patients. This is due, in part, to the presence of the highly specialised blood-brain barrier, which is known to restrict common treatments such as chemotherapy and hinder early tumour diagnosis. Additionally, tumours of the CNS are difficult to surgically resect completely, often contributing to the resurgence of the disease many years later. Interestingly, despite the presence of the blood-brain barrier, circulating tumour cells are able to gain entry to the brain and form secondary brain tumours; however, the underlying mechanisms of this process remain unclear. Tachykinins, in particular Substance P, have been implicated in early blood-brain barrier disruption via neurogenic inflammation in a number of other CNS pathologies. Recent evidence also suggests that Substance P may play a central role in the development of CNS tumours. It has been well established that a number of tumour cells express Substance P, NK1 receptors and mRNA for the tachykinin NK1 receptor. This increase in the Substance P/NK1 receptor system is known to induce proliferation and migration of tumour cells as well as stimulate angiogenesis, thus contributing to tumour progression. Accordingly, the NK1 receptor antagonist presents a novel target for anti-cancer therapy for which a number of patents have been filed. This review will examine the role of Substance P in the development of CNS tumours and its potential application as an anti-cancer agent.

  3. Prediction of novel target genes and pathways involved in irinotecan-resistant colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Precious Takondwa Makondi

    Full Text Available Acquired drug resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug irinotecan (the active metabolite of which is SN-38 is one of the significant obstacles in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC. The molecular mechanism or targets mediating irinotecan resistance are still unclear. It is urgent to find the irinotecan response biomarkers to improve CRC patients' therapy.Genetic Omnibus Database GSE42387 which contained the gene expression profiles of parental and irinotecan-resistant HCT-116 cell lines was used. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs between parental and irinotecan-resistant cells, protein-protein interactions (PPIs, gene ontologies (GOs and pathway analysis were performed to identify the overall biological changes. The most common DEGs in the PPIs, GOs and pathways were identified and were validated clinically by their ability to predict overall survival and disease free survival. The gene-gene expression correlation and gene-resistance correlation was also evaluated in CRC patients using The Cancer Genomic Atlas data (TCGA.The 135 DEGs were identified of which 36 were upregulated and 99 were down regulated. After mapping the PPI networks, the GOs and the pathways, nine genes (GNAS, PRKACB, MECOM, PLA2G4C, BMP6, BDNF, DLG4, FGF2 and FGF9 were found to be commonly enriched. Signal transduction was the most significant GO and MAPK pathway was the most significant pathway. The five genes (FGF2, FGF9, PRKACB, MECOM and PLA2G4C in the MAPK pathway were all contained in the signal transduction and the levels of those genes were upregulated. The FGF2, FGF9 and MECOM expression were highly associated with CRC patients' survival rate but not PRKACB and PLA2G4C. In addition, FGF9 was also associated with irinotecan resistance and poor disease free survival. FGF2, FGF9 and PRKACB were positively correlated with each other while MECOM correlated positively with FGF9 and PLA2G4C, and correlated negatively with FGF2 and PRKACB after doing gene-gene

  4. Integrin α3β1 as a breast cancer target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaram, Sita; Dipersio, C Michael

    2011-10-01

    Integrin receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix have important roles in all stages of cancer progression and metastasis. Since the integrin family was discovered in the early 1980's, many studies have identified critical adhesion and signaling functions for integrins expressed on tumor cells, endothelial cells and other cell types of the tumor microenvironment, in controlling proliferation, survival, migration and angiogenesis. In recent years, the laminin-binding integrin α3β1 has emerged as a potentially promising anti-cancer target on breast cancer cells. Studies from the past decade that implicate integrins as promising anti-cancer targets and the development of integrin antagonists as anti-cancer therapeutics. Recent preclinical studies that have identified the laminin-binding integrin α3β1 as an appealing anti-cancer target and the knowledge gaps that must be closed to fully exploit this integrin as a therapeutic target for breast cancer. Although the tumor-promoting functions of α3β1 implicate this integrin as a promising therapeutic target on breast cancer cells, successful exploitation of this integrin as an anti-cancer target will require a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms whereby it regulates specific tumor cell behaviors and the identification of the most appropriate α3β1 functions to antagonize on breast cancer cells.

  5. Genome-wide mapping of Polycomb target genes unravels their roles in cell fate transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Dietrich, Nikolaj; Pasini, Diego

    2006-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form chromatin-modifying complexes that are essential for embryonic development and stem cell renewal and are commonly deregulated in cancer. Here, we identify their target genes using genome-wide location analysis in human embryonic fibroblasts. We find...... that Polycomb-Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1), PRC2, and tri-methylated histone H3K27 co-occupy >1000 silenced genes with a strong functional bias for embryonic development and cell fate decisions. We functionally identify 40 genes derepressed in human embryonic fibroblasts depleted of the PRC2 components (EZH2...... that PcGs are part of a preprogrammed memory system established during embryogenesis marking certain key genes for repressive signals during subsequent developmental and differentiation processes....

  6. Analysis of a gene panel for targeted sequencing of colorectal cancer samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Klaus Højgaard; Izarzugaza, Jose M.G; Sierakowska Juncker, Agnieszka

    2018-01-01

    stratification is necessary for the identification of the subset of patients likely responding to treatment, while sparing others from pernicious treatment. Targeted sequencing approaches may help in this regard, enabling rapid genetic investigation, and at the same time easily applicable in routine diagnosis....... We propose a set of guidelines for the identification, including variant calling and filtering, of somatic mutations driving tumorigenesis in the absence of matched healthy tissue. We also discuss the inclusion criteria for the generation of our gene panel. Furthermore, we evaluate the prognostic...... impact of individual genes, using Cox regression models in the context of overall survival and disease-free survival. These analyses confirmed the role of commonly used biomarkers, and shed light on controversial genes such as CYP2C8. Applying those guidelines, we created a novel gene panel...

  7. Bookmarking target genes in mitosis: a shared epigenetic trait of phenotypic transcription factors and oncogenes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Grandy, Rodrigo A; Lopez-Camacho, Cesar; Montecino, Martin; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2014-01-15

    The regulatory information for phenotype, proliferation, and growth of normal and tumor cells must be maintained through genome replication in the S phase and cell division during mitosis. Epigenetic mechanisms that include DNA methylation, posttranslational modifications of histones, selective utilization of histone variants, and inheritable RNA molecules play pivotal roles in maintaining cellular identity through mitotic divisions. Recent studies demonstrate that mitotic occupancy of genes, which are determinants of cell fate, growth, and proliferation, by lineage-restricted transcription factors is a key epigenetic mechanism for retention and transmission of cellular expression memory. Evidence is emerging for the presence of distinct transcriptional regulatory microenvironments in mitotic chromosomes in which the genes bookmarked for reactivation postmitotically reside. Importantly, some oncoproteins are present in mitotic microenvironments where they occupy target genes during mitosis and may contribute to perpetuating the transformed phenotype. We discuss emerging regulatory implications of epigenetically bookmarking genes during mitosis for physiologic control as well as for the onset and progression of cancer.

  8. An update on targeted gene repair in mammalian cells: methods and mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolund Lars

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transfer of full-length genes including regulatory elements has been the preferred gene therapy strategy for clinical applications. However, with significant drawbacks emerging, targeted gene alteration (TGA has recently become a promising alternative to this method. By means of TGA, endogenous DNA repair pathways of the cell are activated leading to specific genetic correction of single-base mutations in the genome. This strategy can be implemented using single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ssODNs, small DNA fragments (SDFs, triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs, adeno-associated virus vectors (AAVs and zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs. Despite difficulties in the use of TGA, including lack of knowledge on the repair mechanisms stimulated by the individual methods, the field holds great promise for the future. The objective of this review is to summarize and evaluate the different methods that exist within this particular area of human gene therapy research.

  9. Evaluating Transcription Factor Activity Changes by Scoring Unexplained Target Genes in Expression Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evi Berchtold

    Full Text Available Several methods predict activity changes of transcription factors (TFs from a given regulatory network and measured expression data. But available gene regulatory networks are incomplete and contain many condition-dependent regulations that are not relevant for the specific expression measurement. It is not known which combination of active TFs is needed to cause a change in the expression of a target gene. A method to systematically evaluate the inferred activity changes is missing. We present such an evaluation strategy that indicates for how many target genes the observed expression changes can be explained by a given set of active TFs. To overcome the problem that the exact combination of active TFs needed to activate a gene is typically not known, we assume a gene to be explained if there exists any combination for which the predicted active TFs can possibly explain the observed change of the gene. We introduce the i-score (inconsistency score, which quantifies how many genes could not be explained by the set of activity changes of TFs. We observe that, even for these minimal requirements, published methods yield many unexplained target genes, i.e. large i-scores. This holds for all methods and all expression datasets we evaluated. We provide new optimization methods to calculate the best possible (minimal i-score given the network and measured expression data. The evaluation of this optimized i-score on a large data compendium yields many unexplained target genes for almost every case. This indicates that currently available regulatory networks are still far from being complete. Both the presented Act-SAT and Act-A* methods produce optimal sets of TF activity changes, which can be used to investigate the difficult interplay of expression and network data. A web server and a command line tool to calculate our i-score and to find the active TFs associated with the minimal i-score is available from https://services.bio.ifi.lmu.de/i-score.

  10. Identification of estrogen target genes during zebrafish embryonic development through transcriptomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixin Hao

    Full Text Available Estrogen signaling is important for vertebrate embryonic development. Here we have used zebrafish (Danio rerio as a vertebrate model to analyze estrogen signaling during development. Zebrafish embryos were exposed to 1 µM 17β-estradiol (E2 or vehicle from 3 hours to 4 days post fertilization (dpf, harvested at 1, 2, 3 and 4 dpf, and subjected to RNA extraction for transcriptome analysis using microarrays. Differentially expressed genes by E2-treatment were analyzed with hierarchical clustering followed by biological process and tissue enrichment analysis. Markedly distinct sets of genes were up and down-regulated by E2 at the four different time points. Among these genes, only the well-known estrogenic marker vtg1 was co-regulated at all time points. Despite this, the biological functional categories targeted by E2 were relatively similar throughout zebrafish development. According to knowledge-based tissue enrichment, estrogen responsive genes were clustered mainly in the liver, pancreas and brain. This was in line with the developmental dynamics of estrogen-target tissues that were visualized using transgenic zebrafish containing estrogen responsive elements driving the expression of GFP (Tg(5xERE:GFP. Finally, the identified embryonic estrogen-responsive genes were compared to already published estrogen-responsive genes identified in male adult zebrafish (Gene Expression Omnibus database. The expressions of a few genes were co-regulated by E2 in both embryonic and adult zebrafish. These could potentially be used as estrogenic biomarkers for exposure to estrogens or estrogenic endocrine disruptors in zebrafish. In conclusion, our data suggests that estrogen effects on early embryonic zebrafish development are stage- and tissue- specific.

  11. MicroRNA-target gene responses to lead-induced stress in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiuling; Zhu, Shuijin; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in plant responses to various metal stresses. To investigate the miRNA-mediated plant response to heavy metals, cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), the most important fiber crop in the world, was exposed to different concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 µM) of lead (Pb) and then the toxicological effects were investigated. The expression patterns of 16 stress-responsive miRNAs and 10 target genes were monitored in cotton leaves and roots by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR); of these selected genes, several miRNAs and their target genes are involved in root development. The results show a reciprocal regulation of cotton response to lead stress by miRNAs. The characterization of the miRNAs and the associated target genes in response to lead exposure would help in defining the potential roles of miRNAs in plant adaptation to heavy metal stress and further understanding miRNA regulation in response to abiotic stress.

  12. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted gene mutagenesis in Spodoptera litura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hong-Lun; Xu, Jun; Tan, An-Jiang; Huang, Yong-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Custom-designed nuclease technologies such as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated (Cas) system provide attractive genome editing tools for insect functional genetics. The targeted gene mutagenesis mediated by the CRISPR/Cas9 system has been achieved in several insect orders including Diptera, Lepidoptera and Coleoptera. However, little success has been reported in agricultural pests due to the lack of genomic information and embryonic microinjection techniques in these insect species. Here we report that the CRISPR/Cas9 system induced efficient gene mutagenesis in an important Lepidopteran pest Spodoptera litura. We targeted the S. litura Abdominal-A (Slabd-A) gene which is an important embryonic development gene and plays a significant role in determining the identities of the abdominal segments of insects. Direct injection of Cas9 messenger RNA and Slabd-A-specific single guide RNA (sgRNA) into S. litura embryos successfully induced the typical abd-A deficient phenotype, which shows anomalous segmentation and ectopic pigmentation during the larval stage. A polymerase chain reaction-based analysis revealed that the Cas9/sgRNA complex effectively induced a targeted mutagenesis in S. litura. These results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is a powerful tool for genome manipulation in Lepidopteran pests such as S. litura. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Cooperative interactions between CBP and TORC2 confer selectivity to CREB target gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Kester, Henri; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Xinmin; Lee, Dong; Yates, John R; Montminy, Marc

    2007-06-20

    A number of hormones and growth factors stimulate gene expression by promoting the phosphorylation of CREB (P-CREB), thereby enhancing its association with the histone acetylase paralogs p300 and CBP (CBP/p300). Relative to cAMP, stress signals trigger comparable amounts of CREB phosphorylation, but have minimal effects on CRE-dependent transcription. Here, we show that the latent cytoplasmic coactivator TORC2 mediates target gene activation in response to cAMP signaling by associating with CBP/p300 and increasing its recruitment to a subset of CREB target genes. TORC2 is not activated in response to stress signals, however; and in its absence, P-CREB is unable to stimulate CRE-dependent transcription, due to a block in CBP recruitment. The effect of TORC2 on CBP/p300 promoter occupancy appears pivotal because a gain of function mutant CREB polypeptide with increased affinity for CBP restored CRE-mediated transcription in cells exposed to stress signals. Taken together, these results indicate that TORC2 is one of the long sought after cofactors that mediates the differential effects of cAMP and stress pathways on CREB target gene expression.

  14. RBP-Jkappa/SHARP recruits CtIP/CtBP corepressors to silence Notch target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Franz; Winkler, Michael; Cao, Ying; Astrahantseff, Kathy; Bourteele, Soizic; Knöchel, Walter; Borggrefe, Tilman

    2005-12-01

    Notch is a transmembrane receptor that determines cell fates and pattern formation in all animal species. After ligand binding, proteolytic cleavage steps occur and the intracellular part of Notch translocates to the nucleus, where it targets the DNA-binding protein RBP-Jkappa/CBF1. In the absence of Notch, RBP-Jkappa represses Notch target genes through the recruitment of a corepressor complex. We and others have identified SHARP as a component of this complex. Here, we functionally demonstrate that the SHARP repression domain is necessary and sufficient to repress transcription and that the absence of this domain causes a dominant negative Notch-like phenotype. We identify the CtIP and CtBP corepressors as novel components of the human RBP-Jkappa/SHARP-corepressor complex and show that CtIP binds directly to the SHARP repression domain. Functionally, CtIP and CtBP augment SHARP-mediated repression. Transcriptional repression of the Notch target gene Hey1 is abolished in CtBP-deficient cells or after the functional knockout of CtBP. Furthermore, the endogenous Hey1 promoter is derepressed in CtBP-deficient cells. We propose that a corepressor complex containing CtIP/CtBP facilitates RBP-Jkappa/SHARP-mediated repression of Notch target genes.

  15. Analysis of bacterial xylose isomerase gene diversity using gene-targeted metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdiani, Dini; Ito, Michihiro; Maruyama, Toru; Terahara, Takeshi; Mori, Tetsushi; Ugawa, Shin; Takeyama, Haruko

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial xylose isomerases (XI) are promising resources for efficient biofuel production from xylose in lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we investigated xylose isomerase gene (xylA) diversity in three soil metagenomes differing in plant vegetation and geographical location, using an amplicon pyrosequencing approach and two newly-designed primer sets. A total of 158,555 reads from three metagenomic DNA replicates for each soil sample were classified into 1127 phylotypes, detected in triplicate and defined by 90% amino acid identity. The phylotype coverage was estimated to be within the range of 84.0-92.7%. The xylA gene phylotypes obtained were phylogenetically distributed across the two known xylA groups. They shared 49-100% identities with their closest-related XI sequences in GenBank. Phylotypes demonstrating soil sample were significantly smaller than they were between different soils based on a UniFrac distance analysis, suggesting soil-specific xylA genotypes and taxonomic compositions. The differences among xylA members and their compositions in the soil were strongly correlated with 16S rRNA variation between soil samples, also assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. This is the first report of xylA diversity in environmental samples assessed by amplicon pyrosequencing. Our data provide information regarding xylA diversity in nature, and can be a basis for the screening of novel xylA genotypes for practical applications. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Identification of novel target genes specifically activated by deregulated E2F in human normal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Hodaka; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Okuno, Junko; Shimizu, Emi; Kurayoshi, Kenta; Kugawa, Kazuyuki; Toh, Hiroyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The transcription factor E2F is the principal target of the tumor suppressor pRB. E2F plays crucial roles not only in cell proliferation by activating growth-related genes but also in tumor suppression by activating pro-apoptotic and growth-suppressive genes. We previously reported that, in human normal fibroblasts, the tumor suppressor genes ARF, p27(Kip1) and TAp73 are activated by deregulated E2F activity induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but not by physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. In contrast, growth-related E2F targets are activated by both E2F activities, underscoring the roles of deregulated E2F in tumor suppression in the context of dysfunctional pRB. In this study, to further understand the roles of deregulated E2F, we explored new targets that are specifically activated by deregulated E2F using DNA microarray. The analysis identified nine novel targets (BIM, RASSF1, PPP1R13B, JMY, MOAP1, RBM38, ABTB1, RBBP4 and RBBP7), many of which are involved in the p53 and RB tumor suppressor pathways. Among these genes, the BIM gene was shown to be activated via atypical E2F-responsive promoter elements and to contribute to E2F1-mediated apoptosis. Our results underscore crucial roles of deregulated E2F in growth suppression to counteract loss of pRB function. © 2015 The Molecular Biology Society of Japan and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  17. Safety assessment of liver-targeted hydrodynamic gene delivery in dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenya Kamimura

    Full Text Available Evidence in support of safety of a gene delivery procedure is essential toward gene therapy. Previous studies using the hydrodynamics-based procedure primarily focus on gene delivery efficiency or gene function analysis in mice. The current study focuses on an assessment of the safety of computer-controlled and liver-targeted hydrodynamic gene delivery in dogs as the first step toward hydrodynamic gene therapy in clinic. We demonstrate that the impacts of the hydrodynamic procedure were limited in the injected region and the influences were transient. Histological examination and the hepatic microcirculation measurement using reflectance spectrophotometry reveal that the liver-specific impact of the procedure involves a transient expansion of the liver sinusoids. No systemic damage or toxicity was observed. Physiological parameters, including electrocardiogram, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and body temperature, remained in normal ranges during and after hydrodynamic injection. Body weight was also examined to assess the long-term effects of the procedure in animals who underwent 3 hydrodynamic injections in 6 weeks with 2-week time interval in between. Serum biochemistry analysis showed a transient increase in liver enzymes and a few cytokines upon injection. These results demonstrate that image-guided, liver-specific hydrodynamic gene delivery is safe.

  18. Herbicide targets and detoxification proteins in sugarcane: from gene assembly to structure modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd Evans, Dyfed; Joshi, Shailesh Vinay

    2017-07-01

    In a genome context, sugarcane is a classic orphan crop, in that no genome and only very few genes have been assembled. We have devised a novel exome assembly methodology that has allowed us to assemble and characterize 49 genes that serve as herbicide targets, safener interacting proteins, and members of herbicide detoxification pathways within the sugarcane genome. We have structurally modelled the products of each of these genes, as well as determining allelic, genomic, and RNA-Seq based polymorphisms for each gene. This study provides the largest collection of sugarcane structures modelled to date. We demonstrate that sugarcane genes are highly polymorphic, revealing that each genotype is evolving both uniquely and independently. In addition, we present an exome assembly system for orphan crops that can be executed on commodity infrastructure, making exome assembly practical for any group. In terms of knowledge about herbicide modes of action and detoxification, we have advanced sugarcane from a crop where no information about any herbicide-associated gene was available to the situation where sugarcane is now a species with the single largest collection of known and annotated herbicide-associated genes.

  19. Targeted Editing of Myostatin Gene in Sheep by Transcription Activator-like Effector Nucleases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxia Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin (MSTN is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Gene knockout of MSTN can result in increasing muscle mass in sheep. The objectives were to investigate whether myostatin gene can be edited in sheep by transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs in tandem with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssODNs. We designed a pair of TALENs to target a highly conserved sequence in the coding region of the sheep MSTN gene. The activity of the TALENs was verified by using luciferase single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK 293T cell line. Co-transfection of TALENs and ssODNs oligonucleotides induced precise gene editing of myostatin gene in sheep primary fibroblasts. MSTN gene-edited cells were successfully used as nuclear donors for generating cloned embryos. TALENs combined with ssDNA oligonucleotides provide a useful approach for precise gene modification in livestock animals.

  20. Rational design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of third generation α-noscapine analogues as potent tubulin binding anti-cancer agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naresh Kumar Manchukonda

    Full Text Available Systematic screening based on structural similarity of drugs such as colchicine and podophyllotoxin led to identification of noscapine, a microtubule-targeted agent that attenuates the dynamic instability of microtubules without affecting the total polymer mass of microtubules. We report a new generation of noscapine derivatives as potential tubulin binding anti-cancer agents. Molecular modeling experiments of these derivatives 5a, 6a-j yielded better docking score (-7.252 to -5.402 kCal/mol than the parent compound, noscapine (-5.505 kCal/mol and its existing derivatives (-5.563 to -6.412 kCal/mol. Free energy (ΔG bind calculations based on the linear interaction energy (LIE empirical equation utilizing Surface Generalized Born (SGB continuum solvent model predicted the tubulin-binding affinities for the derivatives 5a, 6a-j (ranging from -4.923 to -6.189 kCal/mol. Compound 6f showed highest binding affinity to tubulin (-6.189 kCal/mol. The experimental evaluation of these compounds corroborated with theoretical studies. N-(3-brormobenzyl noscapine (6f binds tubulin with highest binding affinity (KD, 38 ± 4.0 µM, which is ~ 4.0 times higher than that of the parent compound, noscapine (KD, 144 ± 1.0 µM and is also more potent than that of the first generation clinical candidate EM011, 9-bromonoscapine (KD, 54 ± 9.1 µM. All these compounds exhibited substantial cytotoxicity toward cancer cells, with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 72.9 µM; compound 6f showed prominent anti-cancer efficacy with IC50 values ranging from 6.7 µM to 26.9 µM in cancer cells of different tissues of origin. These compounds perturbed DNA synthesis, delayed the cell cycle progression at G2/M phase, and induced apoptotic cell death in cancer cells. Collectively, the study reported here identified potent, third generation noscapinoids as new anti-cancer agents.

  1. Methylation of polycomb target genes in intestinal cancer is mediated by inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Maria A; Hahn, Torsten; Lee, Dong-Hyun; Esworthy, R Steven; Kim, Byung-Wook; Riggs, Arthur D; Chu, Fong-Fong; Pfeifer, Gerd P

    2008-12-15

    Epigenetic changes are strongly associated with cancer development. DNA hypermethylation is associated with gene silencing and is often observed in CpG islands. Recently, it was suggested that aberrant CpG island methylation in tumors is directed by Polycomb (PcG) proteins. However, specific mechanisms responsible for methylation of PcG target genes in cancer are not known. Chronic infection and inflammation contribute to up to 25% of all cancers worldwide. Using glutathione peroxidase, Gpx1 and Gpx2, double knockout (Gpx1/2-KO) mice as a model of inflammatory bowel disease predisposing to intestinal cancer, we analyzed genome-wide DNA methylation in the mouse ileum during chronic inflammation, aging, and cancer. We found that inflammation leads to aberrant DNA methylation in PcG target genes, with 70% of the approximately 250 genes methylated in the inflamed tissue being PcG targets in embryonic stem cells and 59% of the methylated genes being marked by H3K27 trimethylation in the ileum of adult wild-type mice. Acquisition of DNA methylation at CpG islands in the ileum of Gpx1/2-KO mice frequently correlates with loss of H3K27 trimethylation at the same loci. Inflammation-associated DNA methylation occurs preferentially in tissue-specific silent genes and, importantly, is much more frequently represented in tumors than is age-dependent DNA methylation. Sixty percent of aberrant methylation found in tumors is also present in the inflamed tissue. In summary, inflammation creates a signature of aberrant DNA methylation, which is observed later in the malignant tissue and is directed by the PcG complex.

  2. Gene silencing by RNA interference in Sarcoptes scabiei: a molecular tool to identify novel therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Deepani D; Marr, Edward J; Zakrzewski, Martha; Reynolds, Simone L; Burgess, Stewart T G; Fischer, Katja

    2017-06-10

    Scabies is one of the most common and widespread parasitic skin infections globally, affecting a large range of mammals including humans, yet the molecular biology of Sarcoptes scabiei is astonishingly understudied. Research has been hampered primarily due to the difficulty of sampling or culturing these obligatory parasitic mites. A further and major impediment to identify and functionally analyse potential therapeutic targets from the recently emerging molecular databases is the lack of appropriate molecular tools. We performed standard BLAST based searches of the existing S. scabiei genome databases using sequences of genes described to be involved in RNA interference in Drosophila and the mite model organism Tetranychus urticae. Experimenting with the S. scabiei mu-class glutathione S-transferase (SsGST-mu1) as a candidate gene we explored the feasibility of gene knockdown in S. scabiei by double-stranded RNA-interference (dsRNAi). We provide here an analysis of the existing S. scabiei draft genomes, confirming the presence of a double stranded RNA (dsRNA) - mediated silencing machinery. We report for the first time experimental gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) in S. scabiei. Non-invasive immersion of S. scabiei in dsRNA encoding an S. scabiei glutathione S-transferase mu-class 1 enzyme (SsGST-mu1) resulted in a 35% reduction in the transcription of the target gene compared to controls. A series of experiments identified the optimal conditions allowing systemic experimental RNAi without detrimental side effects on mite viability. This technique can now be used to address the key questions on the fundamental aspects of mite biology and pathogenesis, and to assess the potential therapeutic benefits of silencing S. scabiei target genes.

  3. Targeted gene expression in transgenic Xenopus using the binary Gal4-UAS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Katharine O; Nutt, Stephen L; Amaya, Enrique

    2002-02-05

    The transgenic technique in Xenopus allows one to misexpress genes in a temporally and spatially controlled manner. However, this system suffers from two experimental limitations. First, the restriction enzyme-mediated integration procedure relies on chromosomal damage, resulting in a percentage of embryos failing to develop normally. Second, every transgenic embryo has unique sites of integration and unique transgene copy number, resulting in variable transgene expression levels and variable phenotypes. For these reasons, we have adapted the Gal4-UAS method for targeted gene expression to Xenopus. This technique relies on the generation of transgenic lines that carry "activator" or "effector" constructs. Activator lines express the yeast transcription factor, Gal4, under the control of a desired promoter, whereas effector lines contain DNA-binding motifs for Gal4-(UAS) linked to the gene of interest. We show that on intercrossing of these lines, the effector gene is transcribed in the temporal and spatial manner of the activator's promoter. Furthermore, we use the Gal4-UAS system to misexpress Xvent-2, a transcriptional target of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) signaling during early embryogenesis. Embryos inheriting both the Gal4 activator and Xvent-2 effector transgenes display a consistent microcephalic phenotype. Finally, we exploit this system to characterize the neural and mesodermal defects obtained from early misexpression of Xvent-2. These results emphasize the potential of this system for the controlled analyses of gene function in Xenopus.

  4. Efficient and Heritable Gene Targeting in Tilapia by CRISPR/Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minghui; Yang, Huihui; Zhao, Jiue; Fang, Lingling; Shi, Hongjuan; Li, Mengru; Sun, Yunlv; Zhang, Xianbo; Jiang, Dongneng; Zhou, Linyan; Wang, Deshou

    2014-01-01

    Studies of gene function in non-model animals have been limited by the approaches available for eliminating gene function. The CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR associated) system has recently become a powerful tool for targeted genome editing. Here, we report the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system to disrupt selected genes, including nanos2, nanos3, dmrt1, and foxl2, with efficiencies as high as 95%. In addition, mutations in dmrt1 and foxl2 induced by CRISPR/Cas9 were efficiently transmitted through the germline to F1. Obvious phenotypes were observed in the G0 generation after mutation of germ cell or somatic cell-specific genes. For example, loss of Nanos2 and Nanos3 in XY and XX fish resulted in germ cell-deficient gonads as demonstrated by GFP labeling and Vasa staining, respectively, while masculinization of somatic cells in both XY and XX gonads was demonstrated by Dmrt1 and Cyp11b2 immunohistochemistry and by up-regulation of serum androgen levels. Our data demonstrate that targeted, heritable gene editing can be achieved in tilapia, providing a convenient and effective approach for generating loss-of-function mutants. Furthermore, our study shows the utility of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for genetic engineering in non-model species like tilapia and potentially in many other teleost species. PMID:24709635

  5. Three-cohort targeted gene screening reveals a non-synonymous TRKA polymorphism associated with schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Schijndel, Jessica E; van Loo, Karen M J; van Zweeden, Martine

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that is thought to be induced by an interaction between predisposing genes and environmental stressors. To identify predisposing genetic factors, we performed a targeted (mostly neurodevelopmental) gene approach involving the screening of 396...... selected non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in three independent Caucasian schizophrenia case-control cohorts (USA, Denmark and Norway). A meta-analysis revealed ten non-synonymous SNPs that were nominally associated with schizophrenia, nine of which have not been previously linked...... for schizophrenia....

  6. Dose-dependent regulation of target gene expression and cell proliferation by c-Myc levels

    OpenAIRE

    Schuhmacher, Marino; Eick, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc encodes a basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor (c-Myc). c-Myc plays a crucial role in cell growth and proliferation. Here, we examined how expression of c-Myc target genes and cell proliferation depend on variation of c-Myc protein levels. We show that proliferation rates, the number of cells in S-phase, and cell size increased in a dose-dependent manner in response to increasing c-Myc levels. Likewise, the mRNA levels of c-Myc responsive genes s...

  7. Novel noncontiguous duplications identified with a comprehensive mutation analysis in the DMD gene by DMD gene-targeted sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Huanhuan; Xiao, Bing; Wei, Wei; Liu, Yu; Ye, Hui; Ying, Xiaomin; Chen, Yingwei; Liu, Xiaoqing; Ji, Xing; Sun, Yu

    2018-03-01

    Genomic rearrangements, such as intragenic deletions and duplications, are the most prevalent types of mutation in the DMD gene, and DMD mutations underlie Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Using multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) and DMD gene-targeted sequencing, we performed a molecular characterization of two cases of complex noncontiguous duplication rearrangements that involved inverted duplications. The breakpoint sequences were analyzed to investigate the mechanisms of the rearrangement. The two cases shared the same duplication events (Dup-nml-Dup/inv), and both involved microhomology and small insertions at the breakpoints. Additionally, in case 1, SNP sequencing results indicated that the de novo duplication mutation arose in the allele that originated from the grandfather. This study has identified a novel type of DMD complex rearrangement and provides insight into the molecular basis of this genomic rearrangement. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Comparative gene expression analysis of Dtg, a novel target gene of Dpp signaling pathway in the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodar, Christian; Zuñiga, Alejandro; Pulgar, Rodrigo; Travisany, Dante; Chacon, Carlos; Pino, Michael; Maass, Alejandro; Cambiazo, Verónica

    2014-02-10

    In the early Drosophila melanogaster embryo, Dpp, a secreted molecule that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily of growth factors, activates a set of downstream genes to subdivide the dorsal region into amnioserosa and dorsal epidermis. Here, we examined the expression pattern and transcriptional regulation of Dtg, a new target gene of Dpp signaling pathway that is required for proper amnioserosa differentiation. We showed that the expression of Dtg was controlled by Dpp and characterized a 524-bp enhancer that mediated expression in the dorsal midline, as well as, in the differentiated amnioserosa in transgenic reporter embryos. This enhancer contained a highly conserved region of 48-bp in which bioinformatic predictions and in vitro assays identified three Mad binding motifs. Mutational analysis revealed that these three motifs were necessary for proper expression of a reporter gene in transgenic embryos, suggesting that short and highly conserved genomic sequences may be indicative of functional regulatory regions in D. melanogaster genes. Dtg orthologs were not detected in basal lineages of Dipterans, which unlike D. melanogaster develop two extra-embryonic membranes, amnion and serosa, nevertheless Dtg orthologs were identified in the transcriptome of Musca domestica, in which dorsal ectoderm patterning leads to the formation of a single extra-embryonic membrane. These results suggest that Dtg was recruited as a new component of the network that controls dorsal ectoderm patterning in the lineage leading to higher Cyclorrhaphan flies, such as D. melanogaster and M. domestica. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Targeting gene expression to specific cells of kidney tubules in vivo, using adenoviral promoter fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Sumiyo; Ogasawara, Toru; Tamura, Yoshifuru; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Nobuchika; Shimosawa, Tatsuo; Shibata, Shigeru; Chung, Ung-Il; Nangaku, Masaomi; Uchida, Shunya

    2017-01-01

    Although techniques for cell-specific gene expression via viral transfer have advanced, many challenges (e.g., viral vector design, transduction of genes into specific target cells) still remain. We investigated a novel, simple methodology for using adenovirus transfer to target specific cells of the kidney tubules for the expression of exogenous proteins. We selected genes encoding sodium-dependent phosphate transporter type 2a (NPT2a) in the proximal tubule, sodium-potassium-2-chloride cotransporter (NKCC2) in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TALH), and aquaporin 2 (AQP2) in the collecting duct. The promoters of the three genes were linked to a GFP-coding fragment, the final constructs were then incorporated into an adenovirus vector, and this was then used to generate gene-manipulated viruses. After flushing circulating blood, viruses were directly injected into the renal arteries of rats and were allowed to site-specifically expression in tubule cells, and rats were then euthanized to obtain kidney tissues for immunohistochemistry. Double staining with adenovirus-derived EGFP and endogenous proteins were examined to verify orthotopic expression, i.e. "adenovirus driven NPT2a-EGFP and endogenous NHE3 protein", "adenovirus driven NKCC2-EGFP and endogenous NKCC2 protein" and "adenovirus driven AQP2-EGFP and endogenous AQP2 protein". Owing to a lack of finding good working anti-NPT2a antibody, an antibody against a different protein (sodium-hydrogen exchanger 3 or NHE3) that is also specifically expressed in the proximal tubule was used. Kidney structures were well-preserved, and other organ tissues did not show EGFP staining. Our gene transfer method is easier than using genetically engineered animals, and it confers the advantage of allowing the manipulation of gene transfer after birth. This is the first method to successfully target gene expression to specific cells in the kidney tubules. This study may serve as the first step for safe and effective gene

  10. A comparison of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and protoplast-mediated transformation with CRISPR-Cas9 and bipartite gene targeting substrates, as effective gene targeting tools for Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyda, István; Yang, Lei; Vang, Jesper; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter S

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, versatile genetic tools have been developed and applied to a number of filamentous fungi of industrial importance. However, the existing techniques have limitations when it comes to achieve the desired genetic modifications, especially for efficient gene targeting. In this study, we used Aspergillus carbonarius as a host strain due to its potential as a cell factory, and compared three gene targeting techniques by disrupting the ayg1 gene involved in the biosynthesis of conidial pigment in A. carbonarius. The absence of the ayg1 gene leads to phenotypic change in conidia color, which facilitated the analysis on the gene targeting frequency. The examined transformation techniques included Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) and protoplast-mediated transformation (PMT). Furthermore, the PMT for the disruption of the ayg1 gene was carried out with bipartite gene targeting fragments and the recently adapted CRISPR-Cas9 system. All three techniques were successful in generating Δayg1 mutants, but showed different efficiencies. The most efficient method for gene targeting was AMT, but further it was shown to be dependent on the choice of Agrobacterium strain. However, there are different advantages and disadvantages of all three gene targeting methods which are discussed, in order to facilitate future approaches for fungal strain improvements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MEK-ERK inhibition potentiates WAY-600-induced anti-cancer efficiency in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kaifeng, E-mail: kaifeng_wangdr@sina.com [Cancer center, the Affiliated Hospital of Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China); Fan, Yaohua [Oncology Department, No. 1 Hospital of Jiaxing, Zhejiang Province, Jiaxing (China); Chen, Gongying [Oncology Department, The Affiliated Hospital Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou (China); Wang, Zhengrong [Taizhou Hospital, Zhejiang Province, Taizhou (China); Kong, Dexin; Zhang, Peng [Oncology Department, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Medical School, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2016-05-27

    The search for novel anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) agents is important. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) hyper-activation plays a pivotal role in promoting HCC tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. The current preclinical study evaluated the potential anti-HCC activity by a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor, WAY-600. We showed that WAY-600 inhibited survival and proliferation of HCC cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7) and primary human HCC cells. Caspase-dependent apoptosis was activated by WAY-600 in above HCC cells. Reversely, caspase inhibitors largely attenuated WAY-600's lethality against HCC cells. At the signaling level, WAY-600 blocked mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) assemble and activation, yet activated MEK-ERK pathway in HCC cells. MEK-ERK inhibitors, PD-98059 and MEK-162, or MEK1/2 shRNA significantly potentiated WAY-600's cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that WAY-600 intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in nude mice inhibited p-AKT Ser-473 and displayed significant anti-cancer activity against HepG2 xenografts. Remarkably, co-administration of MEK-162 further potentiated WAY-600's anti-HCC activity in vivo. These preclinical results demonstrate the potent anti-HCC activity by WAY-600, either alone or with MEK-ERK inhibitors. -- Highlights: •WAY-600 inhibits HCC cell survival and proliferation in vitro. •WAY-600 activates caspase-dependent apoptosis in HCC cells. •WAY-600 blocks mTORC1/2 activation, but activates MEK-ERK in HCC cells. •MEK-ERK inhibitors or MEK1/2 shRNA enhances WAY-600's cytotoxicity against HCC cells. •MEK-162 co-administration potentiates WAY-600-induced the anti-HepG2 tumor efficacy.

  12. MEK-ERK inhibition potentiates WAY-600-induced anti-cancer efficiency in preclinical hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Kaifeng; Fan, Yaohua; Chen, Gongying; Wang, Zhengrong; Kong, Dexin; Zhang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The search for novel anti-hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) agents is important. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) hyper-activation plays a pivotal role in promoting HCC tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. The current preclinical study evaluated the potential anti-HCC activity by a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor, WAY-600. We showed that WAY-600 inhibited survival and proliferation of HCC cell lines (HepG2 and Huh7) and primary human HCC cells. Caspase-dependent apoptosis was activated by WAY-600 in above HCC cells. Reversely, caspase inhibitors largely attenuated WAY-600's lethality against HCC cells. At the signaling level, WAY-600 blocked mTOR complex 1/2 (mTORC1/2) assemble and activation, yet activated MEK-ERK pathway in HCC cells. MEK-ERK inhibitors, PD-98059 and MEK-162, or MEK1/2 shRNA significantly potentiated WAY-600's cytotoxicity in HCC cells. Further studies showed that WAY-600 intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration in nude mice inhibited p-AKT Ser-473 and displayed significant anti-cancer activity against HepG2 xenografts. Remarkably, co-administration of MEK-162 further potentiated WAY-600's anti-HCC activity in vivo. These preclinical results demonstrate the potent anti-HCC activity by WAY-600, either alone or with MEK-ERK inhibitors. -- Highlights: •WAY-600 inhibits HCC cell survival and proliferation in vitro. •WAY-600 activates caspase-dependent apoptosis in HCC cells. •WAY-600 blocks mTORC1/2 activation, but activates MEK-ERK in HCC cells. •MEK-ERK inhibitors or MEK1/2 shRNA enhances WAY-600's cytotoxicity against HCC cells. •MEK-162 co-administration potentiates WAY-600-induced the anti-HepG2 tumor efficacy.

  13. Anti-Cancer Effect of Angelica Sinensis on Women’s Reproductive Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hong Zhu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Danggui, the root of Angelica Sinensis, has traditionally been used for the treatment of women’s reproductive disorders in China for thousands of years. This study was to determine whether Danggui have potential anti-cancer effect on women’s cancer and its potential mechanism. Methods: Danggui was extracted by ethanol. The Cell Titer 96® Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay was used to compare the effects of Danggui on human breast (MCF-7 and 7368 and cervical (CaSki and SiHa cancer cells with its effects on normal fibroblasts (HTB-125. A revised Ames test was used to test for antimutagenicity. The standard strains of Salmonella typhimarium (TA 100 and 102 were used in the test. Methyl methane sulfonate (MMS and UV light were used as positive mutagen controls and ethanol and double distilled water (DDW as controls. The SAS statistical software was used to analyze the data. Results: Danggui was found to be much more toxic to all cancer cell lines tested than to normal fibroblasts. There was a significant negative dose-effect relationship between Danggui and cancer cell viability. Average viability of MCF-7 was 69.5%, 18.4%, 5.7%, 5.7%, and 5.0% of control for Danggui doses 0.07, 0.14, 0.21, 0.32, and 0.64 ug/ul, respectively, with a Ptrend < 0.0001. Half maximal inhibitory dose (ID50 of Danggui for cancer cell lines MCF-7, CaSki, SiHa and CRL-7368 was 0.10, 0.09, 0.10 and 0.07 ug/ul, Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(6:242-250respectively. For the normal fibroblasts, ID50 was 0.58 ug/ul. At a dose of 0.32 ug/ul, Danggui killed over 90% of the cells in each cancer cell line, but at the same dose, only 12.3 % of the normal HTB-125 cells were killed. Revertants per plate of TA 100 decreased with the introduction of increasing doses of Danggui extracts with a Ptrend < 0.0001 when UV light was used as a mutagen. There was no difference in revertants per plate between ethanol and DDW control groups. Conclusions

  14. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-fluorouracil on colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Hiyoshi, Masaya; Kaneko, Manabu; Kitayama, Joji; Takahashi, Koki; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Tsuno, Nelson H; Sunami, Eiji; Tsurita, Giichiro; Kawai, Kazushige; Okaji, Yurai; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shuno, Yasutaka; Hongo, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), the worldwide used anti-malarial drug, has recently being focused as a potential anti-cancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer when used in combination with anti-cancer drugs. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cell death in various types of cancer. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice in colorectal cancer, but in most cases, resistance to 5-FU develops through various mechanisms. Here, we focused on the combination of CQ as a mechanism to potentiate the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, and their proliferative ability, apoptosis and autophagy induction effects, and the affection of the cell cycle were evaluated. The proliferative ability of HT-29 was analyzed by the MTS assay. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometry after double-staining of the cells with AnnexinV/PI. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow-cytometry after staining of cells with PI. Autophagy was quantified by flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis. Finally, to evaluate the fate of the cells treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, the colony formation assay was performed. 5-FU inhibited the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells, which was mostly dependent on the arrest of the cells to the G0/G1-phase but also partially on apoptosis induction, and the effect was potentiated by CQ pre-treatment. The potentiation of the inhibitory effect of 5-FU by CQ was dependent on the increase of p21 Cip1 and p27 Kip1 and the decrease of CDK2. Since CQ is reported to inhibit autophagy, the catabolic process necessary for cell survival under conditions of cell starvation or stress, which is induced by cancer cells as a protective mechanism against chemotherapeutic agents, we also analyzed the induction of autophagy in HT-29. HT-29 induced autophagy in response to 5-FU, and CQ inhibited this induction, a possible mechanism of the potentiation of the anti-cancer effect of 5-FU. Our

  15. Cutting edge: Dab2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitya; Nguyen, Hai; Friedline, Randall H; Malhotra, Nidhi; Brehm, Michael; Koyanagi, Madoka; Bix, Mark; Cooper, Jonathan A; Chambers, Cynthia A; Kang, Joonsoo

    2009-10-01

    FOXP3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. In this study we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFbeta responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3, and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are functionally impaired in vitro and in vivo. However, not all aspects of Treg cell function are perturbed, and DAB2 appears to be dispensable for Treg cell function in maintaining naive T cell homeostasis.

  16. Disabled-2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, N; Nguyen, H; Friedline, RH; Malhotra, N; Brehm, M; Koyonagi, M; Bix, M; Cooper, JA; Chambers, CA; Kang, J

    2010-01-01

    FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. Here we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes, the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFβ responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3 and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are functionally impaired in vitro and in vivo. However, not all aspects of Treg cell function are perturbed and DAB2 appears dispensable for Treg cell function in maintaining naïve T cell homeostasis. PMID:19767570

  17. Proviral HIV-genome-wide and pol-gene specific zinc finger nucleases: usability for targeted HIV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayengera, Misaki

    2011-07-22

    Infection with HIV, which culminates in the establishment of a latent proviral reservoir, presents formidable challenges for ultimate cure. Building on the hypothesis that ex-vivo or even in-vivo abolition or disruption of HIV-gene/genome-action by target mutagenesis or excision can irreversibly abrogate HIV's innate fitness to replicate and survive, we previously identified the isoschizomeric bacteria restriction enzymes (REases) AcsI and ApoI as potent cleavers of the HIV-pol gene (11 and 9 times in HIV-1 and 2, respectively). However, both enzymes, along with others found to cleave across the entire HIV-1 genome, slice (SX) at palindromic sequences that are prevalent within the human genome and thereby pose the risk of host genome toxicity. A long-term goal in the field of R-M enzymatic therapeutics has thus been to generate synthetic restriction endonucleases with longer recognition sites limited in specificity to HIV. We aimed (i) to assemble and construct zinc finger arrays and nucleases (ZFN) with either proviral-HIV-pol gene or proviral-HIV-1 whole-genome specificity respectively, and (ii) to advance a model for pre-clinically testing lentiviral vectors (LV) that deliver and transduce either ZFN genotype. First, we computationally generated the consensus sequences of (a) 114 dsDNA-binding zinc finger (Zif) arrays (ZFAs or ZifHIV-pol) and (b) two zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) which, unlike the AcsI and ApoI homeodomains, possess specificity to >18 base-pair sequences uniquely present within the HIV-pol gene (ZifHIV-polFN). Another 15 ZFNs targeting >18 bp sequences within the complete HIV-1 proviral genome were constructed (ZifHIV-1FN). Second, a model for constructing lentiviral vectors (LVs) that deliver and transduce a diploid copy of either ZifHIV-polFN or ZifHIV-1FN chimeric genes (termed LV- 2xZifHIV-polFN and LV- 2xZifHIV-1FN, respectively) is proposed. Third, two preclinical models for controlled testing of the safety and efficacy of either of these

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Tumor-Targeted Gene Therapy in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J.; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associa...

  19. ABCF2, an Nrf2 target gene, contributes to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Lingjie; Wu, Jianfa; Dodson, Matthew; Rojo de la Vega, Elisa Montserrat; Ning, Yan; Zhang, Zhenbo; Yao, Ming; Zhang, Donna D; Xu, Congjian; Yi, Xiaofang

    2017-06-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that NRF2 plays a key role in mediating cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. To further explore the mechanism underlying NRF2-dependent cisplatin resistance, we stably overexpressed or knocked down NRF2 in parental and cisplatin-resistant human ovarian cancer cells, respectively. These two pairs of stable cell lines were then subjected to microarray analysis, where we identified 18 putative NRF2 target genes. Among these genes, ABCF2, a cytosolic member of the ABC superfamily of transporters, has previously been reported to contribute to chemoresistance in clear cell ovarian cancer. A detailed analysis on ABCF2 revealed a functional antioxidant response element (ARE) in its promoter region, establishing ABCF2 as an NRF2 target gene. Next, we investigated the contribution of ABCF2 in NRF2-mediated cisplatin resistance using our stable ovarian cancer cell lines. The NRF2-overexpressing cell line, containing high levels of ABCF2, was more resistant to cisplatin-induced apoptosis compared to its control cell line; whereas the NRF2 knockdown cell line with low levels of ABCF2, was more sensitive to cisplatin treatment than its control cell line. Furthermore, transient overexpression of ABCF2 in the parental cells decreased apoptosis and increased cell viability following cisplatin treatment. Conversely, knockdown of ABCF2 using specific siRNA notably increased apoptosis and decreased cell viability in cisplatin-resistant cells treated with cisplatin. This data indicate that the novel NRF2 target gene, ABCF2, plays a critical role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, and that targeting ABCF2 may be a new strategy to improve chemotherapeutic efficiency. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Integrating Molecular Imaging Approaches to Monitor Prostate Targeted Suicide and Anti-angiogenic Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-01

    Bruno , M. D., Korfhagen, T. R., Liu, C., Morrisey, E. E., and Whitsett, J. A. (2000). GATA-6 activates transcription of surfactant protein A. J. Biol...the tail vein (for in- travenous administration), peritoneum, prostate, or forepaw. Before imaging, mice were anesthetized with ketamine–xy- lazine...DOTAP:cholesterol DNA complexes [Iyer et al., 2002]. In- travenous delivery of transferin-targeted DNA-PEI poly- plexes results in specific fluc gene

  1. Efficient gene targeting of the Rosa26 locus in mouse zygotes using TALE nucleases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kašpárek, Petr; Krausová, Michaela; Hanečková, Radka; Kříž, Vítězslav; Žbodáková, Olga; Kořínek, Vladimír; Sedláček, Radislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 588, č. 21 (2014), 3982-3988 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-33952S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011032 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Gene targeting * Homologous recombination * Rosa26 locus * Transgenic * Transcription activator-like effector nucleases * Zinc-finger nucleases Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.169, year: 2014

  2. Targeting gene expression to the female larval fat body of transgenic Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totten, D C; Vuong, M; Litvinova, O V; Jinwal, U K; Gulia-Nuss, M; Harrell, R A; Beneš, H

    2013-02-01

    As the fat body is a critical tissue for mosquito development, metamorphosis, immune and reproductive system function, the characterization of regulatory modules targeting gene expression to the female mosquito fat body at distinct life stages is much needed for multiple, varied strategies for controlling vector-borne diseases such as dengue and malaria. The hexameric storage protein, Hexamerin-1.2, of the mosquito Aedes atropalpus is female-specific and uniquely expressed in the fat body of fourth instar larvae and young adults. We have identified in the Hex-1.2 gene, a short regulatory module that directs female-, tissue-, and stage-specific lacZ reporter gene expression using a heterologous promoter in transgenic lines of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Male transgenic larvae and pupae of one line expressed no Escherichia coli β-galactosidase or transgene product; in two other lines reporter gene activity was highly female-biased. All transgenic lines expressed the reporter only in the fat body; however, lacZ mRNA levels were no different in males and females at any stage examined, suggesting that the gene regulatory module drives female-specific expression by post-transcriptional regulation in the heterologous mosquito. This regulatory element from the Hex-1.2 gene thus provides a new molecular tool for transgenic mosquito control as well as functional genetic analysis in aedine mosquitoes. © 2012 Royal Entomological Society.

  3. miR-370 suppresses HBV gene expression and replication by targeting nuclear factor IA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongxia; Lv, Ping; Lv, Jing; Zhao, Xiaopei; Liu, Min; Zhang, Guangling; Tang, Hua

    2017-05-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide. The roles of microRNAs in the regulation of HBV expression are being increasingly recognized. In this study, we found that overexpression of miR-370 suppressed HBV gene expression and replication in Huh7 cells, whereas antisense knockdown of endogenous miR-370 enhanced HBV gene expression and replication in Huh7 cells and HepG2.2.15 cells. Further, we identified the transcription factor nuclear factor IA (NFIA) as a new host target of miR-370. Overexpression and knockdown studies showed that NFIA stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Importantly, overexpression of NFIA counteracted the effect of miR-370 on HBV gene expression and replication. Further mechanistic studies showed that miR-370 suppressed HBV replication and gene expression by repressing HBV Enhancer I activity, and one of the NFIA binding site in the Enhancer I element was responsible for the repressive effect of miR-370 on HBV Enhancer I activity. Altogether, our results demonstrated that miR-370 suppressed HBV gene expression and replication through repressing NFIA expression, which stimulates HBV replication via direct regulation on HBV Enhancer I activities. Our findings may provide a new antiviral strategy for HBV infection. J. Med. Virol. 89:834-844, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Identification of the Drosophila Mes4 gene as a novel target of the transcription factor DREF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyari, Osamu; Ida, Hiroyuki [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuhide; Kato, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Reina [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Venture Laboratory, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Masamitsu, E-mail: myamaguc@kit.ac.jp [Department of Applied Biology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Insect Biomedical Research Center, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2009-05-01

    The Mes4 gene has been identified as one of the maternal Dorsal target genes in Drosophila. In the present study, we found a DNA replication-related element (DRE, 5'-TATCGATA) in the Mes4 promoter recognized by the DRE-binding factor (DREF). Luciferase transient expression assays in S2 cells using Mes4 promoter-luciferase fusion plasmids revealed that the DRE sequence is essential for Mes4 promoter activity. Requirement of DRE for Mes4 promoter activity was further confirmed by anti-{beta}-galactosidase antibody-staining of various tissues from transgenic flies carrying Mes4 promoter-lacZ fusion genes. Furthermore, wild type Mes4 promoter activity was decreased by 40% in DREF-depleted S2 cells. These results indicate that DREF positively regulates Mes4 gene expression. Band mobility shift analyses using Kc cell nuclear extracts further indicated that the DRE sequence in the Mes4 promoter is especially important for binding to DREF. Moreover, specific binding of DREF to the involved genomic region could be demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using anti-DREF antibodies. These results, taken together, indicate that the DRE/DREF system activates transcription of the Mes4 gene. In addition, knockdown of the Mes4 gene in wing imaginal discs using the GAL4-UAS system caused an atrophied wing phenotype, suggesting that Mes4 is required for wing morphogenesis.

  5. DNA breaks and chromatin structural changes enhance the transcription of autoimmune regulator target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Mithu; Saare, Mario; Maslovskaja, Julia; Kisand, Kai; Liiv, Ingrid; Haljasorg, Uku; Tasa, Tõnis; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Peterson, Pärt

    2017-04-21

    The autoimmune regulator (AIRE) protein is the key factor in thymic negative selection of autoreactive T cells by promoting the ectopic expression of tissue-specific genes in the thymic medullary epithelium. Mutations in AIRE cause a monogenic autoimmune disease called autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy. AIRE has been shown to promote DNA breaks via its interaction with topoisomerase 2 (TOP2). In this study, we investigated topoisomerase-induced DNA breaks and chromatin structural alterations in conjunction with AIRE-dependent gene expression. Using RNA sequencing, we found that inhibition of TOP2 religation activity by etoposide in AIRE-expressing cells had a synergistic effect on genes with low expression levels. AIRE-mediated transcription was not only enhanced by TOP2 inhibition but also by the TOP1 inhibitor camptothecin. The transcriptional activation was associated with structural rearrangements in chromatin, notably the accumulation of γH2AX and the exchange of histone H1 with HMGB1 at AIRE target gene promoters. In addition, we found the transcriptional up-regulation to co-occur with the chromatin structural changes within the genomic cluster of carcinoembryonic antigen-like cellular adhesion molecule genes. Overall, our results suggest that the presence of AIRE can trigger molecular events leading to an altered chromatin landscape and the enhanced transcription of low-expressed genes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Genome-Wide Identification of Polycomb Target Genes Reveals a Functional Association of Pho with Scm in Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhiqing; Cheng, Daojun; Mon, Hiroaki; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Zhu, Li; Xu, Jian; Lee, Jae Man; Xia, Qingyou; Kusakabe, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved chromatin modifiers and act together in three multimeric complexes, Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1), Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), and Pleiohomeotic repressive complex (PhoRC), to repress transcription of the target genes. Here, we identified Polycomb target genes in Bombyx mori with holocentric centromere using genome-wide expression screening based on the knockdown of BmSCE, BmESC, BmPHO, or BmSCM gene, which represent ...

  7. Vorinostat in combination with bortezomib in patients with advanced malignancies directly alters transcription of target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesar, Jill M; Traynor, Anne M; Holen, Kyle D; Hoang, Tien; Seo, Songwon; Kim, Kyungmann; Alberti, Dona; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Wright, John J; Wilding, George; Bailey, Howard H; Schelman, William R

    2013-09-01

    Vorinostat is a small molecule inhibitor of class I and II histone deacetylase enzymes which alters the expression of target genes including the cell cycle gene p21, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Patients enrolled in a phase I trial were treated with vorinostat alone on day 1 and vorinostat and bortezomib in combination on day 9. Paired biopsies were obtained in eleven subjects. Blood samples were obtained on days 1 and 9 of cycle 1 prior to dosing and 2 and 6 h post-dosing in all 60 subjects. Gene expression of p21, HSP70, AKT, Nur77, ERB1, and ERB2 was evaluated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and tissue samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of p21, HSP70, and Nur77 was also performed in biopsy samples. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, Nur77 was significantly and consistently decreased 2 h after vorinostat administration on both days 1 and 9, median ratio of gene expression relative to baseline of 0.69 with interquartile range 0.49-1.04 (p vorinostat and bortezomib. p21, a downstream target of Nur77, was significantly decreased on day 9, 2 and 6 h after administration of vorinostat and bortezomib, 0.67 (0.41-1.03) (p vorinostat in tissue biopsies in most patients. Vorinostat inhibits Nur77 expression, which in turn may decrease p21 and AKT expression in PBMCs. The influence of vorinostat on target gene expression in tumor tissue was variable; however, most patients demonstrated interaction of acetylated H3 with Nur77, HSP70, and p21 which provides evidence of interaction with the transcriptionally active acetylated H3.

  8. Enhancement of the photo-electric effect with pharmacological agents in synchrotron radiation based anti-cancer radiotherapy: a methodological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corde, Stephanie

    2002-01-01

    Anti-cancer therapy rests on three main principles: 1) anatomic confinement of irradiation; 2) temporal fractioning of treatment; 3) treatment of tissues that are more sensitive to radiation than surrounding healthy tissue. Under those principles hides the goal of radiotherapy: to deposit more of the X-ray energy in the tumor while preserving the surrounding healthy tissues. This goal is hard to reach since one of the causes of the failures in radiotherapy is the continuing evolution of the tumor. Could synchrotron radiation be more effective as an X-ray source for radiotherapy? The variation of the radiation-matter interaction cross-sections as a function of X-ray energy and atomic number of the medium show that certain energies and certain elements are more suitable to obtain the largest number of interactions and the largest amount of deposited energy. Synchrotron radiation allows to select precisely those energies because of its high spectral intensity. Its spectral characteristics (energy of the photons between 10 and 100 keV) allow to trigger the photoelectric effect with a maximum of probability on heavy elements introduced close to cancerous cells. It has been shown that: 1) synchrotron radiation based tomodensitometry is a quantitative imaging technique, potentially powerful for radiotherapy since it insures in-vivo the measurement of intra-tumoral concentration of contrast agent (I or Gd); 2) in the presence of iodinated contrast agent the lethal effect of X-rays on cell survival is increased and the gain in radio sensitivity depends on X-ray energy; 3) at the cellular scale the lethality of irradiation can be optimised again by transporting heavy atoms (I, Pt) inside the DNA, which is the biological target of the irradiation. This reinforcement of the killing efficiency of low energy X-rays using a physical mechanism aimed at a pharmacological agent is an original concept in anti-cancer radiotherapy. (author) [fr

  9. High-throughput gene targeting and phenotyping in zebrafish using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Gaurav K; Pei, Wuhong; LaFave, Matthew C; Idol, Jennifer; Xu, Lisha; Gallardo, Viviana; Carrington, Blake; Bishop, Kevin; Jones, MaryPat; Li, Mingyu; Harper, Ursula; Huang, Sunny C; Prakash, Anupam; Chen, Wenbiao; Sood, Raman; Ledin, Johan; Burgess, Shawn M

    2015-07-01

    The use of CRISPR/Cas9 as a genome-editing tool in various model organisms has radically changed targeted mutagenesis. Here, we present a high-throughput targeted mutagenesis pipeline using CRISPR/Cas9 technology in zebrafish that will make possible both saturation mutagenesis of the genome and large-scale phenotyping efforts. We describe a cloning-free single-guide RNA (sgRNA) synthesis, coupled with streamlined mutant identification methods utilizing fluorescent PCR and multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing. We report germline transmission data from 162 loci targeting 83 genes in the zebrafish genome, in which we obtained a 99% success rate for generating mutations and an average germline transmission rate of 28%. We verified 678 unique alleles from 58 genes by high-throughput sequencing. We demonstrate that our method can be used for efficient multiplexed gene targeting. We also demonstrate that phenotyping can be done in the F1 generation by inbreeding two injected founder fish, significantly reducing animal husbandry and time. This study compares germline transmission data from CRISPR/Cas9 with those of TALENs and ZFNs and shows that efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 is sixfold more efficient than other techniques. We show that the majority of published "rules" for efficient sgRNA design do not effectively predict germline transmission rates in zebrafish, with the exception of a GG or GA dinucleotide genomic match at the 5' end of the sgRNA. Finally, we show that predicted off-target mutagenesis is of low concern for in vivo genetic studies. © 2015 Varshney et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. VEGF targeting in mesotheliomas using an interleukin-6 signal inhibitor based on adenovirus gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yasuo; Yoshio-Hoshino, Naoko; Aoki, Chieko; Nishimoto, Norihiro

    2010-06-01

    Malignant mesotheliomas reportedly secrete interleukin-6 (IL-6) which augments production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from mesothelioma cells. We previously reported the development of a new receptor inhibitor of IL-6 (NRI) by genetically engineering tocilizumab, a humanized anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody. Since NRI is encoded on a single gene, it is easily applicable to a gene delivery system using virus vehicles. In this study, we report VEGF targeting through NRI expression based on adenovirus-mediated gene delivery in mesothelioma cells. We constructed an NRI expression vector in the context of a tropism-modified adenovirus vector that had enhanced infectivity in mesothelioma cells. This virus effectively induced NRI secretion from mesothelioma cells. This virus infection also reduced the VEGF production in mesothelioma cells. These results indicate that NRI shows potential as an agent in the treatment of mesotheliomas.

  11. Mapping of HNF4alpha target genes in intestinal epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Mette; Bressendorff, Simon; Moller, Jette

    2009-01-01

    not previously been described as being regulated by HNF4alpha. The 1,541 genes contributed significantly to gene ontology (GO) pathways categorized by lipid and amino acid transport and metabolism. An analysis of the homeodomain transcription factor Cdx-2 (CDX2), the disaccharidase trehalase (TREH......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of HNF4alpha has been extensively studied in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells, and HNF4alpha is also regarded as key regulator of intestinal epithelial cell differentiation as well. The aim of the present work is to identify novel HNF4alpha target genes...... in the human intestinal epithelial cells in order to elucidate the role of HNF4alpha in the intestinal differentiation progress. METHODS: We have performed a ChIP-chip analysis of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2 in order to make a genome-wide identification of HNF4alpha binding to promoter regions...

  12. A rapid high-resolution melting method for differentiation of Leishmania species targeting lack gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ziwei; Zhang, Chunying; Pang, Huasheng; Ma, Ying

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research is to verify that if lack gene can be used for differentiation of Leishmania under HRM assay. Two specific primers were designed targeting polymorphic sites on the lack gene sequence. DNA from promastigotes of six species of Leishmania based on reference strains were tested following a HRM protocol. We also tested ten Chinese isolates in blind to validate our method. Combined with amplicon of the two primers, the six reference strains can be easily discriminated without the effect of initial concentration of DNA templates. Ten Chinese isolates detected by our HRM method resulted in full accord with the standard identification results in previous study. HRM is a rapid and reproducible method to discriminate different Leishmania species and lack gene is a potential novel biological characteristic for easy differentiation of Leishmania isolates in China. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential effects of black raspberry and strawberry extracts on BaPDE-induced activation of transcription factors and their target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Stoner, Gary D; Huang, Chuanshu

    2008-04-01

    The chemopreventive properties of edible berries have been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo, however, the specific molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer effects are largely unknown. Our previous studies have shown that a methanol extract fraction of freeze-dried black raspberries inhibits benzoapyrene (BaP)-induced transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells. This fraction also blocks activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) induced by benzoapyrene diol-epoxide (BaPDE) in mouse epidermal JB6 Cl 41 cells. To determine if different berry types exhibit specific mechanisms for their anti-cancer effects, we compared the effects of extract fractions from both black raspberries and strawberries on BaPDE-induced activation of various signaling pathways in Cl 41 cells. Black raspberry fractions inhibited the activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) by BaPDE as well as their upstream PI-3K/Akt-p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. In contrast, strawberry fractions inhibited NFAT activation, but did not inhibit the activation of AP-1, NF-kappaB or the PI-3K/Akt-p70(S6K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Consistent with the effects on NFAT activation, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) induction by BaPDE was blocked by extract fractions of both black raspberries and strawberries, whereas vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, which depends on AP-1 activation, was suppressed by black raspberry fractions but not strawberry fractions. These results suggest that black raspberry and strawberry components may target different signaling pathways in exerting their anti-carcinogenic effects. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation: an efficient tool for targeted gene disruption in Talaromyces marneffei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xing; Feng, Jiao; Li, Yu; Chen, Zhiwen; Shi, Minglan; Xi, Liyan; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Zhang, Junmin

    2017-09-25

    Talaromyces marneffei causes life-threatening infections in immunocompromised hosts. An efficient tool for genetic manipulation of T. marneffei will allow for increased understanding of this thermally dimorphic fungus. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was optimized for targeted gene disruption in T. marneffei using the plasmid pDHt/acuD::pyrG. Molecular analyses of transformants were performed by PCR, Southern blot and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. A. tumefaciens strain EHA105 was more efficient at transformation than strain AGL-1 in ATMT via solid co-cultivation. An A. tumefaciens:T. marneffei ratio of 1000:1 in an ATMT liquid co-cultivation led to a relatively high transformation efficiency of 90 transformants per 10 6 yeast cells. Using ATMT-mediated knockout mutagenesis, we successfully deleted the acuD gene in T. marneffei. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed that acuD was disrupted and that the foreign pyrG gene was integrated into T. marneffei. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis further confirmed that pyrG was expressed normally. These results suggest that ATMT can be a potential platform for targeted gene disruption in T. marneffei and that liquid co-cultivation may provide new opportunities to develop clinical treatments.

  15. NuMA is required for the selective induction of p53 target genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohata, Hirokazu; Miyazaki, Makoto; Otomo, Ryo; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Otsubo, Chihiro; Nagase, Takahiro; Arakawa, Hirofumi; Yokota, Jun; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Taya, Yoichi; Enari, Masato

    2013-06-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a transcription factor controlling various outcomes, such as growth arrest and apoptosis, through the regulation of different sets of target genes. The nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) plays important roles in spindle pole organization during mitosis and in chromatin regulation in the nucleus during interphase. Although NuMA has been shown to colocalize with several nuclear proteins, including high-mobility-group proteins I and Y and GAS41, the role of NuMA during interphase remains unclear. Here we report that NuMA binds to p53 to modulate p53-mediated transcription. Acute and partial ablation of NuMA attenuates the induction of the proarrested p21 gene following DNA damage, subsequently causing impaired cell cycle arrest. Interestingly, NuMA knockdown had little effect on the induction of the p53-dependent proapoptotic PUMA gene. Furthermore, NuMA is required for the recruitment of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (Cdk8), a component of the Mediator complex and a promoter of p53-mediated p21 gene function. These data demonstrate that NuMA is critical for the target selectivity of p53-mediated transcription.

  16. Repression of SRF target genes is critical for Myc-dependent apoptosis of epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Katrin E; Haikala, Heidi M; von Eyss, Björn; Wolf, Elmar; Esnault, Cyril; Rosenwald, Andreas; Treisman, Richard; Klefström, Juha; Eilers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic levels of Myc expression sensitize cells to multiple apoptotic stimuli, and this protects long-lived organisms from cancer development. How cells discriminate physiological from supraphysiological levels of Myc is largely unknown. Here, we show that induction of apoptosis by Myc in breast epithelial cells requires association of Myc with Miz1. Gene expression and ChIP-Sequencing experiments show that high levels of Myc invade target sites that lack consensus E-boxes in a complex with Miz1 and repress transcription. Myc/Miz1-repressed genes encode proteins involved in cell adhesion and migration and include several integrins. Promoters of repressed genes are enriched for binding sites of the serum-response factor (SRF). Restoring SRF activity antagonizes Myc repression of SRF target genes, attenuates Myc-induced apoptosis, and reverts a Myc-dependent decrease in Akt phosphorylation and activity, a well-characterized suppressor of Myc-induced apoptosis. We propose that high levels of Myc engage Miz1 in repressive DNA binding complexes and suppress an SRF-dependent transcriptional program that supports survival of epithelial cells. PMID:25896507

  17. Anti-cancer activity of tectona hamiltoniana-an endemic plant of Myanmar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mya, K.M.; Shyaula, S.L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: The ethanolic extracts of barks and leaves of Tectona hamiltoniana (Verbenaceae) were tested for anti-cancer activity against MCF-7 (Human breast cancer) and NCI-H460 (Lung cancer) cell lines employing sulpho rhodamine B (SRB) bioassay. These extracts demonstrated cytotoxicity with GI/sub 50/ values ranging between 24-33 macro g/mL against both cell lines. Upon further fractionation, dichloromethane fraction appeared to be most active against the MCF-7 cell line (GI/sub 50/ value of 3.4+-0.9 macro g/mL) leading to the isolation of lupane type triterpenoids, betulinic acid (1), betulin aldehyde ( 2 ) and betulin (3). Compound 2 and 3, both showed significant cytotoxic effect against both cancerous cell lines (GI/sub 50/ value range 6-11 macro M). (author)

  18. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Murillo L.; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen; Watts, Benjamin; Kaneno, Ramon; Zambuzzi, Willian F.; Daemen, Luke; Saeki, Margarida J.; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2016-03-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier design is potentially safer to healthy cells.

  19. Pro-oxidant activity of dietary chemopreventive agents: an under-appreciated anti-cancer property

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Asfar S

    2013-01-01

    “ Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food” was quoted by Hippocrates more than two thousand years ago and since ancient times the health benefits of different natural agents have been exploited. In modern research, the disease preventive benefits of many such natural agents, particularly dietary compounds and their derivatives, has been attributed to their well recognized activity as the regulators of redox state of the cell. Nevertheless, most of these studies have focused on their antioxidant activity. A large body of evidence indicates that a major fraction of these agents can elicit pro-oxidant (radical generating) behavior which has been linked to their anti-cancer effects. This editorial provides an overview of the under-appreciated pro-oxidant activity of natural products, with a special focus on their ability to generate reactive oxygen species in the presence of transition metal ions, and discusses their possible use as cancer chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:24358870

  20. Marine algal natural products with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ching; Hou, Ming-Feng; Huang, Hurng-Wern; Chang, Fang-Rong; Yeh, Chi-Chen; Tang, Jen-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2013-06-03

    For their various bioactivities, biomaterials derived from marine algae are important ingredients in many products, such as cosmetics and drugs for treating cancer and other diseases. This mini-review comprehensively compares the bioactivities and biological functions of biomaterials from red, green, brown, and blue-green algae. The anti-oxidative effects and bioactivities of several different crude extracts of algae have been evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. Natural products derived from marine algae protect cells by modulating the effects of oxidative stress. Because oxidative stress plays important roles in inflammatory reactions and in carcinogenesis, marine algal natural products have potential for use in anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs.

  1. Just so stories: the random acts of anti-cancer nanomedicine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein; Farhangrazi, Zahra Shadi

    2014-11-01

    Contrary to high expectations, the majority of clinically approved anti-cancer nanomedicine, and those under clinical trials, have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in humans. So, why these nanomedicine are not delivering their promise? Here, we discuss likely factors, and call for a paradigm shift in approach and design of future cancer nanotherapeutics based on realistic cancer models representing human disease, and better understanding of integrated pathophysiological processes, including systems immunology, that modulate human tumor functionality and growth. This critical review of the current state of translational oncology research utilizing nanomedicine-based approaches provides a comprehensive discussion of the multiple factors that are responsible for poor outcomes when translating these approaches models to the actual human disease.

  2. Mitochondrial targeted neuron focused genes in hippocampus of rats with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pushpa; Su, Yan A; Barry, Erin S; Grunberg, Neil E; Lei, Zhang

    2012-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) represents a major health problem in civilian populations as well as among the military service members due to (1) lack of effective treatments, and (2) our incomplete understanding about the progression of secondary cell injury cascades resulting in neuronal cell death due to deficient cellular energy metabolism and damaged mitochondria. The aim of this study was to identify and delineate the mitochondrial targeted genes responsible for altered brain energy metabolism in the injured brain. Rats were either grouped into naïve controls or received lateral fluid percussion brain injury (2-2.5 atm) and followed up for 7 days. Rats were either grouped into naïve controls or received lateral fluid percussion brain injury (2-2.5 atm) and followed for 7 days. The severity of brain injury was evaluated by the neurological severity scale-revised (NSS-R) at 3 and 5 days post TBI and immunohistochemical analyses at 7 days post TBI. The expression profiles of mitochondrial-targeted genes across the hippocampus from TBI and naïe rats were also examined by oligo-DNA microarrays. NSS-R scores of TBI rats (5.4 ± 0.5) in comparison to naïe rats (3.9 ± 0.5) and H and E staining of brain sections suggested a mild brain injury. Bioinformatics and systems biology analyses showed 31 dysregulated genes, 10 affected canonical molecular pathways including a number of genes involved in mitochondrial enzymes for oxidative phosphorylation, mitogen-activated protein Kinase (MAP), peroxisome proliferator-activated protein (PPAP), apoptosis signaling, and genes responsible for long-term potentiation of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Our results suggest that dysregulated mitochondrial-focused genes in injured brains may have a clinical utility for the development of future therapeutic strategies aimed at the treatment of TBI.

  3. Efficient TALEN-mediated gene targeting of chicken primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lorna; Carlson, Daniel F; Nandi, Sunil; Sherman, Adrian; Fahrenkrug, Scott C; McGrew, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    In this work we use TALE nucleases (TALENs) to target a reporter construct to the DDX4 ( vasa ) locus in chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs). Vasa is a key germ cell determinant in many animal species and is posited to control avian germ cell formation. We show that TALENs mediate homology-directed repair of the DDX4 locus on the Z sex chromosome at high (8.1%) efficiencies. Large genetic deletions of 30 kb encompassing the entire DDX4 locus were also created using a single TALEN pair. The targeted PGCs were germline competent and were used to produce DDX4 null offspring. In DDX4 knockout chickens, PGCs are initially formed but are lost during meiosis in the developing ovary, leading to adult female sterility. TALEN-mediated gene targeting in avian PGCs is therefore an efficient process. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Genome-scale metabolic models as platforms for identification of novel genes as antimicrobial drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mienda, Bashir Sajo; Salihu, Rabiu; Adamu, Aliyu; Idris, Shehu

    2018-03-01

    The growing number of multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria is becoming a world leading challenge for the scientific community and for public health. However, advances in high-throughput technologies and whole-genome sequencing of bacterial pathogens make the construction of bacterial genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) increasingly realistic. The use of GEMs as an alternative platforms will expedite identification of novel unconditionally essential genes and enzymes of target organisms with existing and forthcoming GEMs. This approach will follow the existing protocol for construction of high-quality GEMs, which could ultimately reduce the time, cost and labor-intensive processes involved in identification of novel antimicrobial drug targets in drug discovery pipelines. We discuss the current impact of existing GEMs of selected multidrug-resistant pathogenic bacteria for identification of novel antimicrobial drug targets and the challenges of closing the gap between genome-scale metabolic modeling and conventional experimental trial-and-error approaches in drug discovery pipelines.

  5. DNA demethylases target promoter transposable elements to positively regulate stress responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tuan-Ngoc; Schumann, Ulrike; Smith, Neil A; Tiwari, Sameer; Au, Phil Chi Khang; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Taylor, Jennifer M; Kazan, Kemal; Llewellyn, Danny J; Zhang, Ren; Dennis, Elizabeth S; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-09-17

    DNA demethylases regulate DNA methylation levels in eukaryotes. Arabidopsis encodes four DNA demethylases, DEMETER (DME), REPRESSOR OF SILENCING 1 (ROS1), DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), and DML3. While DME is involved in maternal specific gene expression during seed development, the biological function of the remaining DNA demethylases remains unclear. We show that ROS1, DML2, and DML3 play a role in fungal disease resistance in Arabidopsis. A triple DNA demethylase mutant, rdd (ros1 dml2 dml3), shows increased susceptibility to the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum. We identify 348 genes differentially expressed in rdd relative to wild type, and a significant proportion of these genes are downregulated in rdd and have functions in stress response, suggesting that DNA demethylases maintain or positively regulate the expression of stress response genes required for F. oxysporum resistance. The rdd-downregulated stress response genes are enriched for short transposable element sequences in their promoters. Many of these transposable elements and their surrounding sequences show localized DNA methylation changes in rdd, and a general reduction in CHH methylation, suggesting that RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM), responsible for CHH methylation, may participate in DNA demethylase-mediated regulation of stress response genes. Many of the rdd-downregulated stress response genes are downregulated in the RdDM mutants nrpd1 and nrpe1, and the RdDM mutants nrpe1 and ago4 show enhanced susceptibility to F. oxysporum infection. Our results suggest that a primary function of DNA demethylases in plants is to regulate the expression of stress response genes by targeting promoter transposable element sequences.

  6. Use of designer nucleases for targeted gene and genome editing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Donald P; Spalding, Martin H; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-01

    The ability to efficiently inactivate or replace genes in model organisms allowed a rapid expansion of our understanding of many of the genetic, biochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms that support life. With the advent of new techniques for manipulating genes and genomes that are applicable not only to single-celled organisms, but also to more complex organisms such as animals and plants, the speed with which scientists and biotechnologists can expand fundamental knowledge and apply that knowledge to improvements in medicine, industry and agriculture is set to expand in an exponential fashion. At the heart of these advancements will be the use of gene editing tools such as zinc finger nucleases, modified meganucleases, hybrid DNA/RNA oligonucleotides, TAL effector nucleases and modified CRISPR/Cas9. Each of these tools has the ability to precisely target one specific DNA sequence within a genome and (except for DNA/RNA oligonucleotides) to create a double-stranded DNA break. DNA repair to such breaks sometimes leads to gene knockouts or gene replacement by homologous recombination if exogenously supplied homologous DNA fragments are made available. Genome rearrangements are also possible to engineer. Creation and use of such genome rearrangements, gene knockouts and gene replacements by the plant science community is gaining significant momentum. To document some of this progress and to explore the technology's longer term potential, this review highlights present and future uses of designer nucleases to greatly expedite research with model plant systems and to engineer genes and genomes in major and minor crop species for enhanced food production. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Anti-cancer properties and mechanisms of action of thymoquinone, the major active ingredient of Nigella sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalawieh, Amin F; Fayyad, Muneera W; Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2017-12-12

    Over the past two decades, studies have documented the wide-range anti-cancer effects of Nigella sativa, known as black seed or black cumin. Thymoquinone (TQ), its major active ingredient, has also been extensively studied and reported to possess potent anti-cancer properties. Herein, we provide a comprehensive review of the findings related to the anti-cancer activity of TQ. The review focuses on analyzing experimental studies performed using different in vitro and in vivo models to identify the anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-oxidant, cytotoxic, anti-metastatic, and NK-dependent cytotoxic effects exerted by TQ. In addition, we pinpoint the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects and the signal transduction pathways implicated by TQ. Our analysis show that p53, NF-κB, PPARγ, STAT3, MAPK, and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways are among the most significant pathways through which TQ mediates its anti-cancer activity. Experimental findings and recent advances in the field highlight TQ as an effective therapeutic agent for the suppression of tumor development, growth and metastasis for a wide range of tumors.

  8. NOVEL HYDROXAMIC ACIDS HAVING HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITING ACTIVITY AND ANTI-CANCER COMPOSITION COMPRISING THE SAME AS AN ACTIVE INGREDIENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a pharmaceutical composition for anticancer including novel hydroxamic acid with histone deacetylase inhibiting activity as an active ingredient. Hydroxamic acid compound of the present invention has inhibitory activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and shows...... cytotoxicity to a variety of cancer cells, being useful in strong anti-cancer drug....

  9. Requirement for aspartate-cleaved bid in apoptosis signaling by DNA-damaging anti-cancer regimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Arlette B.; Tait, Stephen W. G.; de Vries, Evert; Eldering, Eric; Borst, Jannie

    2004-01-01

    Lymphoid malignancies can escape from DNA-damaging anti-cancer drugs and gamma-radiation by blocking apoptosis-signaling pathways. How these regimens induce apoptosis is incompletely defined, especially in cells with nonfunctional p53. We report here that the BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bid is

  10. Liquid Chromatography - Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry : The gold standard for quantitative bioanalysis of anti-cancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vainchtein, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the pharmacologic mechanisms of action, efficacy and toxicity of any anti-cancer drug it is important to know how the compound is transformed in the body: either into active metabolites or inactive and toxic (degradation) products. This information may lead to the success or failure of

  11. Anti-cancer capacity of plasma-treated PBS: effect of chemical composition on cancer cell cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Boxem, Wilma; Van der Paal, Jonas; Gorbanev, Yury; Vanuytsel, Steven; Smits, Evelien; Dewilde, Sylvia; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-11-28

    We evaluate the anti-cancer capacity of plasma-treated PBS (pPBS), by measuring the concentrations of NO 2 - and H 2 O 2 in pPBS, treated with a plasma jet, for different values of gas flow rate, gap and plasma treatment time, as well as the effect of pPBS on cancer cell cytotoxicity, for three different glioblastoma cancer cell lines, at exactly the same plasma treatment conditions. Our experiments reveal that pPBS is cytotoxic for all conditions investigated. A small variation in gap between plasma jet and liquid surface (10 mm vs 15 mm) significantly affects the chemical composition of pPBS and its anti-cancer capacity, attributed to the occurrence of discharges onto the liquid. By correlating the effect of gap, gas flow rate and plasma treatment time on the chemical composition and anti-cancer capacity of pPBS, we may conclude that H 2 O 2 is a more important species for the anti-cancer capacity of pPBS than NO 2 - . We also used a 0D model, developed for plasma-liquid interactions, to elucidate the most important mechanisms for the generation of H 2 O 2 and NO 2 - . Finally, we found that pPBS might be more suitable for practical applications in a clinical setting than (commonly used) plasma-activated media (PAM), because of its higher stability.

  12. Metformin and Anti-Cancer Therapeutics: Hopes for a More Enhanced Armamentarium Against Human Neoplasias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulou, Maria-Ioanna; Scorilas, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Metformin, a natural product from Galega officinalis, is an oral drug, now in the forefront of the therapeutic management of type-2 diabetes mellitus. A series of clinical observations of the last decades, support that metformin may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer development in diabetic patients, and also to improvement of response-to-therapy and survival in individuals with certain types of malignancies. Moreover, several preclinical in vitro and in vivo data indicate that metformin indeed exerts anti-proliferative capacities upon tumor cells mediated through a variety of mechanisms. Interestingly, metformin has been shown to act in synergy with certain anti-cancer agents and also to overcome chemo- and/or radio-resistance of various types of tumors, providing a hopeful rationale for novel therapeutic strategies against cancer development and progression. However, this remains an issue of controversy, since significant contradictions exist among the available data. Limitations of preclinical studies and caveats of epidemiological works, together with significant variances among the several types of cancer and the fact that the mode of metformin's action is largely unknown, make longitudinal surveys urgently needed. Now, a plethora of large clinical trials are active worldwide, aiming at determining the effect of metformin in the prevention or prognosis of a variety of human cancers. If encouraging results arise, metformin will be an attractive candidate adjuvant in the management of human neoplasias, due to its safety, tolerability and low-cost, expected to mitigate adverse effects and no-response parameters of current anti-cancer therapeutics, thus improving the quality of life and survival of cancer patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Target genes of myostatin loss-of-function in muscles of late bovine fetuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hocquette Jean-François

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myostatin, a muscle-specific member of the Transforming Growth Factor beta family, negatively regulates muscle development. Double-muscled (DM cattle have a loss-of-function mutation in their myostatin gene responsible for the hypermuscular phenotype. Thus, these animals are a good model for understanding the mechanisms underpinning muscular hypertrophy. In order to identify individual genes or networks that may be myostatin targets, we looked for genes that were differentially expressed between DM and normal (NM animals (n = 3 per group in the semitendinosus muscle (hypertrophied in DM animals at 260 days of fetal development (when the biochemical differentiation of muscle is intensive. A heterologous microarray (human and murine oligonucleotide sequences of around 6,000 genes expressed in muscle was used. Results Many genes were found to be differentially expressed according to genetic type (some with a more than 5-fold change, and according to the presence of one or two functional myostatin allele(s. They belonged to various functional categories. The genes down-regulated in DM fetuses were mainly those encoding extracellular matrix proteins, slow contractile proteins and ribosomal proteins. The genes up-regulated in DM fetuses were mainly involved in the regulation of transcription, cell cycle/apoptosis, translation or DNA metabolism. These data highlight features indicating that DM muscle is shifted towards a more glycolytic metabolism, and has an altered extracellular matrix composition (e.g. down-regulation of COL1A1 and COL1A2, and up-regulation of COL4A2 and decreased adipocyte differentiation (down-regulation of C1QTNF3. The altered gene expression in the three major muscle compartments (fibers, connective tissue and intramuscular adipose tissue is consistent with the well-known characteristics of DM cattle. In addition, novel potential targets of the myostatin gene were identified (MB, PLN, troponins, ZFHX1B

  14. Adenovirus carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin induces cancer cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinyan; Wu, Liqin; Duan, Xuemei; Cui, Lianzhen; Luo, Jingjing; Li, Gongchu

    2014-06-30

    Lectins exist widely in marine bioresources such as bacteria, algae, invertebrate animals and fishes. Some purified marine lectins have been found to elicit cytotoxicity to cancer cells. However, there are few reports describing the cytotoxic effect of marine lectins on cancer cells through virus-mediated gene delivery. We show here that a replication-deficient adenovirus-carrying gene encoding Haliotis discus discus sialic acid binding lectin (Ad.FLAG-HddSBL) suppressed cancer cell proliferation by inducing apoptosis, as compared to the control virus Ad.FLAG. A down-regulated level of anti-apoptosis factor Bcl-2 was suggested to be responsible for the apoptosis induced by Ad.FLAG-HddSBL infection. Further subcellular localization studies revealed that HddSBL distributed in cell membrane, ER, and the nucleus, but not in mitochondria and Golgi apparatus. In contrast, a previously reported mannose-binding lectin Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin entered the nucleus as well, but did not distribute in inner membrane systems, suggesting differed intracellular sialylation and mannosylation, which may provide different targets for lectin binding. Further cancer-specific controlling of HddSBL expression and animal studies may help to provide insights into a novel way of anti-cancer marine lectin gene therapy. Lectins may provide a reservoir of anti-cancer genes.

  15. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin{sup S45F}-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  16. High-efficiency gene targeting in hexaploid wheat using DNA replicons and CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Humanes, Javier; Wang, Yanpeng; Liang, Zhen; Shan, Qiwei; Ozuna, Carmen V; Sánchez-León, Susana; Baltes, Nicholas J; Starker, Colby; Barro, Francisco; Gao, Caixia; Voytas, Daniel F

    2017-03-01

    The ability to edit plant genomes through gene targeting (GT) requires efficient methods to deliver both sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) and repair templates to plant cells. This is typically achieved using Agrobacterium T-DNA, biolistics or by stably integrating nuclease-encoding cassettes and repair templates into the plant genome. In dicotyledonous plants, such as Nicotinana tabacum (tobacco) and Solanum lycopersicum (tomato), greater than 10-fold enhancements in GT frequencies have been achieved using DNA virus-based replicons. These replicons transiently amplify to high copy numbers in plant cells to deliver abundant SSNs and repair templates to achieve targeted gene modification. In the present work, we developed a replicon-based system for genome engineering of cereal crops using a deconstructed version of the wheat dwarf virus (WDV). In wheat cells, the replicons achieve a 110-fold increase in expression of a reporter gene relative to non-replicating controls. Furthermore, replicons carrying CRISPR/Cas9 nucleases and repair templates achieved GT at an endogenous ubiquitin locus at frequencies 12-fold greater than non-viral delivery methods. The use of a strong promoter to express Cas9 was critical to attain these high GT frequencies. We also demonstrate gene-targeted integration by homologous recombination (HR) in all three of the homoeoalleles (A, B and D) of the hexaploid wheat genome, and we show that with the WDV replicons, multiplexed GT within the same wheat cell can be achieved at frequencies of ~1%. In conclusion, high frequencies of GT using WDV-based DNA replicons will make it possible to edit complex cereal genomes without the need to integrate GT reagents into the genome. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin S45F -dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer

  18. Dnmts and Tet target memory-associated genes after appetitive olfactory training in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biergans, Stephanie D; Giovanni Galizia, C; Reinhard, Judith; Claudianos, Charles

    2015-11-04

    DNA methylation and demethylation are epigenetic mechanisms involved in memory formation. In honey bees DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt) function is necessary for long-term memory to be stimulus specific (i.e. to reduce generalization). So far, however, it remains elusive which genes are targeted and what the time-course of DNA methylation is during memory formation. Here, we analyse how DNA methylation affects memory retention, gene expression, and differential methylation in stimulus-specific olfactory long-term memory formation. Out of 30 memory-associated genes investigated here, 9 were upregulated following Dnmt inhibition in trained bees. These included Dnmt3 suggesting a negative feedback loop for DNA methylation. Within these genes also the DNA methylation pattern changed during the first 24 hours after training. Interestingly, this was accompanied by sequential activation of the DNA methylation machinery (i.e. Dnmts and Tet). In sum, memory formation involves a temporally complex epigenetic regulation of memory-associated genes that facilitates stimulus specific long-term memory in the honey bee.

  19. Gene expression levels are a target of recent natural selection in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudaravalli, Sridhar; Veyrieras, Jean-Baptiste; Stranger, Barbara E; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2009-03-01

    Changes in gene expression may represent an important mode of human adaptation. However, to date, there are relatively few known examples in which selection has been shown to act directly on levels or patterns of gene expression. In order to test whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that affect gene expression in cis are frequently targets of positive natural selection in humans, we analyzed genome-wide SNP and expression data from cell lines associated with the International HapMap Project. Using a haplotype-based test for selection that was designed to detect incomplete selective sweeps, we found that SNPs showing signals of selection are more likely than random SNPs to be associated with gene expression levels in cis. This signal is significant in the Yoruba (which is the population that shows the strongest signals of selection overall) and shows a trend in the same direction in the other HapMap populations. Our results argue that selection on gene expression levels is an important type of human adaptation. Finally, our work provides an analytical framework for tackling a more general problem that will become increasingly important: namely, testing whether selection signals overlap significantly with SNPs that are associated with phenotypes of interest.

  20. Potential translational targets revealed by linking mouse grooming behavioral phenotypes to gene expression using public databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Andrew; Kyzar, Evan J; Cachat, Jonathan; Stewart, Adam Michael; Green, Jeremy; Gaikwad, Siddharth; O'Leary, Timothy P; Tabakoff, Boris; Brown, Richard E; Kalueff, Allan V

    2013-01-10

    Rodent self-grooming is an important, evolutionarily conserved behavior, highly sensitive to pharmacological and genetic manipulations. Mice with aberrant grooming phenotypes are currently used to model various human disorders. Therefore, it is critical to understand the biology of grooming behavior, and to assess its translational validity to humans. The present in-silico study used publicly available gene expression and behavioral data obtained from several inbred mouse strains in the open-field, light-dark box, elevated plus- and elevated zero-maze tests. As grooming duration differed between strains, our analysis revealed several candidate genes with significant correlations between gene expression in the brain and grooming duration. The Allen Brain Atlas, STRING, GoMiner and Mouse Genome Informatics databases were used to functionally map and analyze these candidate mouse genes against their human orthologs, assessing the strain ranking of their expression and the regional distribution of expression in the mouse brain. This allowed us to identify an interconnected network of candidate genes (which have expression levels that correlate with grooming behavior), display altered patterns of expression in key brain areas related to grooming, and underlie important functions in the brain. Collectively, our results demonstrate the utility of large-scale, high-throughput data-mining and in-silico modeling for linking genomic and behavioral data, as well as their potential to identify novel neural targets for complex neurobehavioral phenotypes, including grooming. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Simultaneous Targeting of Multiple Gene Homeologs to Alter Seed Oil Production in Camelina sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar-Moreno, J A; Durrett, T P

    2017-07-01

    The ability to transform Camelina sativa easily with biosynthetic enzymes derived from other plants has made this oil seed crop an ideal platform for the production of unusual lipids valuable for different applications. However, in addition to expressing transgenic enzymes, the suppression of endogenous enzyme activity to reduce competition for common substrates or cofactors is also required to enhance the production of target compounds. As camelina possesses a relatively undifferentiated hexaploid genome, up to three gene homeologs can code for any particular enzymatic activity, complicating efforts to alter endogenous biosynthetic pathways. New genome editing technologies, such as that offered by the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein) system, offer the capability to introduce mutations into specifically targeted genomic sites. Here, by using a carefully designed guide RNA identical to all three homeologs, we demonstrate the ability of the CRISPR/Cas genome editing system to introduce mutations in all three CsDGAT1 or CsPDAT1 homeologous genes important for triacylglycerol (TAG) synthesis in developing seeds. Sequence analysis from transgenic T1 plants revealed that each CsDGAT1 or each CsPDAT1 homeolog was altered by multiple mutations, resulting in a genetic mosaic in the plants. Interestingly, seed harvested from both CsDGAT1- and CsPDAT1-targeted lines was often shrunken and wrinkled. Further, lipid analysis revealed that many lines produced seed with reduced oil content and altered fatty acid composition, consistent with the role of the targeted genes in seed oil biosynthesis. The CRISPR/Cas system therefore represents a useful method to alter endogenous biosynthetic pathways efficiently in polyploid species such as camelina. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Linda J; Imre, Kathleen M; Hall, David A; Last, Robert L

    2013-01-01

    The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/) identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/). Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles were identified.

  3. Common target genes of palatal and gingival fibroblasts for EMD: the microarray approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, R; Stähli, A; Miron, R J; Bosshardt, D D; Sculean, A

    2015-02-01

    Connective tissue grafts are frequently applied, together with Emdogain(®) , for root coverage. However, it is unknown whether fibroblasts from the gingiva and from the palate respond similarly to Emdogain. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the effect of Emdogain(®) on fibroblasts from palatal and gingival connective tissue using a genome-wide microarray approach. Human palatal and gingival fibroblasts were exposed to Emdogain(®) and RNA was subjected to microarray analysis followed by gene ontology screening with Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery functional annotation clustering, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis and the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/Proteins functional protein association network. Microarray results were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. The transcription levels of 106 genes were up-/down-regulated by at least five-fold in both gingival and palatal fibroblasts upon exposure to Emdogain(®) . Gene ontology screening assigned the respective genes into 118 biological processes, six cellular components, eight molecular functions and five pathways. Among the striking patterns observed were the changing expression of ligands targeting the transforming growth factor-beta and gp130 receptor family as well as the transition of mesenchymal epithelial cells. Moreover, Emdogain(®) caused changes in expression of receptors for chemokines, lipids and hormones, and for transcription factors such as SMAD3, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and those of the ETS family. The present data suggest that Emdogain(®) causes substantial alterations in gene expression, with similar patterns observed in palatal and gingival fibroblasts. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Analysis of essential Arabidopsis nuclear genes encoding plastid-targeted proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda J Savage

    Full Text Available The Chloroplast 2010 Project (http://www.plastid.msu.edu/ identified and phenotypically characterized homozygous mutants in over three thousand genes, the majority of which encode plastid-targeted proteins. Despite extensive screening by the community, no homozygous mutant alleles were available for several hundred genes, suggesting that these might be enriched for genes of essential function. Attempts were made to generate homozygotes in ~1200 of these lines and 521 of the homozygous viable lines obtained were deposited in the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center (http://abrc.osu.edu/. Lines that did not yield a homozygote in soil were tested as potentially homozygous lethal due to defects either in seed or seedling development. Mutants were characterized at four stages of development: developing seed, mature seed, at germination, and developing seedlings. To distinguish seed development or seed pigment-defective mutants from seedling development mutants, development of seeds was assayed in siliques from heterozygous plants. Segregating seeds from heterozygous parents were sown on supplemented media in an attempt to rescue homozygous seedlings that could not germinate or survive in soil. Growth of segregating seeds in air and air enriched to 0.3% carbon dioxide was compared to discover mutants potentially impaired in photorespiration or otherwise responsive to CO2 supplementation. Chlorophyll fluorescence measurements identified CO2-responsive mutants with altered photosynthetic parameters. Examples of genes with a viable mutant allele and one or more putative homozygous-lethal alleles were documented. RT-PCR of homozygotes for potentially weak alleles revealed that essential genes may remain undiscovered because of the lack of a true null mutant allele. This work revealed 33 genes with two or more lethal alleles and 73 genes whose essentiality was not confirmed with an independent lethal mutation, although in some cases second leaky alleles

  5. Late multiple organ surge in interferon-regulated target genes characterizes staphylococcal enterotoxin B lethality.

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    Gabriela A Ferreyra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial superantigens are virulence factors that cause toxic shock syndrome. Here, the genome-wide, temporal response of mice to lethal intranasal staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB challenge was investigated in six tissues. RESULTS: The earliest responses and largest number of affected genes occurred in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, spleen, and lung tissues with the highest content of both T-cells and monocyte/macrophages, the direct cellular targets of SEB. In contrast, the response of liver, kidney, and heart was delayed and involved fewer genes, but revealed a dominant genetic program that was seen in all 6 tissues. Many of the 85 uniquely annotated transcripts participating in this shared genomic response have not been previously linked to SEB. Nine of the 85 genes were subsequently confirmed by RT-PCR in every tissue/organ at 24 h. These 85 transcripts, up-regulated in all tissues, annotated to the interferon (IFN/antiviral-response and included genes belonging to the DNA/RNA sensing system, DNA damage repair, the immunoproteasome, and the ER/metabolic stress-response and apoptosis pathways. Overall, this shared program was identified as a type I and II interferon (IFN-response and the promoters of these genes were highly enriched for IFN regulatory matrices. Several genes whose secreted products induce the IFN pathway were up-regulated at early time points in PBMCs, spleen, and/or lung. Furthermore, IFN regulatory factors including Irf1, Irf7 and Irf8, and Zbp1, a DNA sensor/transcription factor that can directly elicit an IFN innate immune response, participated in this host-wide SEB signature. CONCLUSION: Global gene-expression changes across multiple organs implicated a host-wide IFN-response in SEB-induced death. Therapies aimed at IFN-associated innate immunity may improve outcome in toxic shock syndromes.

  6. Spontaneous autoimmunity in 129 and C57BL/6 mice-implications for autoimmunity described in gene-targeted mice.

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    Anne E Bygrave

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a multisystem autoimmune disorder in which complex genetic factors play an important role. Several strains of gene-targeted mice have been reported to develop SLE, implicating the null genes in the causation of disease. However, hybrid strains between 129 and C57BL/6 mice, widely used in the generation of gene-targeted mice, develop spontaneous autoimmunity. Furthermore, the genetic background markedly influences the autoimmune phenotype of SLE in gene-targeted mice. This suggests an important role in the expression of autoimmunity of as-yet-uncharacterised background genes originating from these parental mouse strains. Using genome-wide linkage analysis, we identified several susceptibility loci, derived from 129 and C57BL/6 mice, mapped in the lupus-prone hybrid (129 x C57BL/6 model. By creating a C57BL/6 congenic strain carrying a 129-derived Chromosome 1 segment, we found that this 129 interval was sufficient to mediate the loss of tolerance to nuclear antigens, which had previously been attributed to a disrupted gene. These results demonstrate important epistatic modifiers of autoimmunity in 129 and C57BL/6 mouse strains, widely used in gene targeting. These background gene influences may account for some, or even all, of the autoimmune traits described in some gene-targeted models of SLE.

  7. Targeted Gene-Silencing Reveals the Functional Significance of Myocardin Signaling in the Failing Heart

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    Torrado, Mario; Iglesias, Raquel; Centeno, Alberto; López, Eduardo; Mikhailov, Alexander T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Myocardin (MYOCD), a potent transcriptional coactivator of smooth muscle (SM) and cardiac genes, is upregulated in failing myocardium in animal models and human end-stage heart failure (HF). However, the molecular and functional consequences of myocd upregulation in HF are still unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings The goal of the present study was to investigate if targeted inhibition of upregulated expression of myocd could influence failing heart gene expression and function. To this end, we used the doxorubicin (Dox)-induced diastolic HF (DHF) model in neonatal piglets, in which, as we show, not only myocd but also myocd-dependent SM-marker genes are highly activated in failing left ventricular (LV) myocardium. In this model, intra-myocardial delivery of short-hairpin RNAs, designed to target myocd variants expressed in porcine heart, leads on day 2 post-delivery to: (1) a decrease in the activated expression of myocd and myocd-dependent SM-marker genes in failing myocardium to levels seen in healthy control animals, (2) amelioration of impaired diastolic dysfunction, and (3) higher survival rates of DHF piglets. The posterior restoration of elevated myocd expression (on day 7 post-delivery) led to overexpression of myocd-dependent SM-marker genes in failing LV-myocardium that was associated with a return to altered diastolic function. Conclusions/Significance These data provide the first evidence that a moderate inhibition (e.g., normalization) of the activated MYOCD signaling in the diseased heart may be promising from a therapeutic point of view. PMID:22028870

  8. Targeted gene-silencing reveals the functional significance of myocardin signaling in the failing heart.

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    Mario Torrado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardin (MYOCD, a potent transcriptional coactivator of smooth muscle (SM and cardiac genes, is upregulated in failing myocardium in animal models and human end-stage heart failure (HF. However, the molecular and functional consequences of myocd upregulation in HF are still unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The goal of the present study was to investigate if targeted inhibition of upregulated expression of myocd could influence failing heart gene expression and function. To this end, we used the doxorubicin (Dox-induced diastolic HF (DHF model in neonatal piglets, in which, as we show, not only myocd but also myocd-dependent SM-marker genes are highly activated in failing left ventricular (LV myocardium. In this model, intra-myocardial delivery of short-hairpin RNAs, designed to target myocd variants expressed in porcine heart, leads on day 2 post-delivery to: (1 a decrease in the activated expression of myocd and myocd-dependent SM-marker genes in failing myocardium to levels seen in healthy control animals, (2 amelioration of impaired diastolic dysfunction, and (3 higher survival rates of DHF piglets. The posterior restoration of elevated myocd expression (on day 7 post-delivery led to overexpression of myocd-dependent SM-marker genes in failing LV-myocardium that was associated with a return to altered diastolic function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the first evidence that a moderate inhibition (e.g., normalization of the activated MYOCD signaling in the diseased heart may be promising from a therapeutic point of view.

  9. Constraints on the evolution of a doublesex target gene arising from doublesex’s pleiotropic deployment

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    Luo, Shengzhan D.; Baker, Bruce S.

    2015-01-01

    “Regulatory evolution,” that is, changes in a gene’s expression pattern through changes at its regulatory sequence, rather than changes at the coding sequence of the gene or changes of the upstream transcription factors, has been increasingly recognized as a pervasive evolution mechanism. Many somatic sexually dimorphic features of Drosophila melanogaster are the results of gene expression regulated by the doublesex (dsx) gene, which encodes sex-specific transcription factors (DSXF in females and DSXM in males). Rapid changes in such sexually dimorphic features are likely a result of changes at the regulatory sequence of the target genes. We focused on the Flavin-containing monooxygenase-2 (Fmo-2) gene, a likely direct dsx target, to elucidate how sexually dimorphic expression and its evolution are brought about. We found that dsx is deployed to regulate the Fmo-2 transcription both in the midgut and in fat body cells of the spermatheca (a female-specific tissue), through a canonical DSX-binding site in the Fmo-2 regulatory sequence. In the melanogaster group, Fmo-2 transcription in the midgut has evolved rapidly, in contrast to the conserved spermathecal transcription. We identified two cis-regulatory modules (CRM-p and CRM-d) that direct sexually monomorphic or dimorphic Fmo-2 transcription, respectively, in the midguts of these species. Changes of Fmo-2 transcription in the midgut from sexually dimorphic to sexually monomorphic in some species are caused by the loss of CRM-d function, but not the loss of the canonical DSX-binding site. Thus, conferring transcriptional regulation on a CRM level allows the regulation to evolve rapidly in one tissue while evading evolutionary constraints posed by other tissues. PMID:25675536

  10. p53 gene targeting by homologous recombination in fish ES cells.

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    Yan Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene targeting (GT provides a powerful tool for the generation of precise genetic alterations in embryonic stem (ES cells to elucidate gene function and create animal models for human diseases. This technology has, however, been limited to mouse and rat. We have previously established ES cell lines and procedures for gene transfer and selection for homologous recombination (HR events in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report HR-mediated GT in this organism. We designed a GT vector to disrupt the tumor suppressor gene p53 (also known as tp53. We show that all the three medaka ES cell lines, MES1∼MES3, are highly proficient for HR, as they produced detectable HR without drug selection. Furthermore, the positive-negative selection (PNS procedure enhanced HR by ∼12 folds. Out of 39 PNS-resistant colonies analyzed, 19 (48.7% were positive for GT by PCR genotyping. When 11 of the PCR-positive colonies were further analyzed, 6 (54.5% were found to be bona fide homologous recombinants by Southern blot analysis, sequencing and fluorescent in situ hybridization. This produces a high efficiency of up to 26.6% for p53 GT under PNS conditions. We show that p53 disruption and long-term propagation under drug selection conditions do not compromise the pluripotency, as p53-targeted ES cells retained stable growth, undifferentiated phenotype, pluripotency gene expression profile and differentiation potential in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate that medaka ES cells are proficient for HR-mediated GT, offering a first model organism of lower vertebrates towards the development of full ES cell-based GT technology.

  11. Rapid and targeted introgression of genes into popular wheat cultivars using marker-assisted background selection.

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    Harpinder S Randhawa

    Full Text Available A marker-assisted background selection (MABS-based gene introgression approach in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. was optimized, where 97% or more of a recurrent parent genome (RPG can be recovered in just two backcross (BC generations. A four-step MABS method was developed based on 'Plabsim' computer simulations and wheat genome structure information. During empirical optimization of this method, double recombinants around the target gene were selected in a step-wise fashion during the two BC cycles followed by selection for recurrent parent genotype on non-carrier chromosomes. The average spacing between carrier chromosome markers was <4 cM. For non-carrier chromosome markers that flanked each of the 48 wheat gene-rich regions, this distance was approximately 12 cM. Employed to introgress seedling stripe rust (Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici resistance gene Yr15 into the spring wheat cultivar 'Zak', marker analysis of 2,187 backcross-derived progeny resulted in the recovery of a BC(2F(2ratio3 plant with 97% of the recurrent parent genome. In contrast, only 82% of the recurrent parent genome was recovered in phenotypically selected BC(4F(7 plants developed without MABS. Field evaluation results from 17 locations indicated that the MABS-derived line was either equal or superior to the recurrent parent for the tested agronomic characteristics. Based on these results, MABS is recommended as a strategy for rapidly introgressing a targeted gene into a wheat genotype in just two backcross generations while recovering 97% or more of the recurrent parent genotype.

  12. Nebulisation of receptor-targeted nanocomplexes for gene delivery to the airway epithelium.

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    Maria D I Manunta

    Full Text Available Gene therapy mediated by synthetic vectors may provide opportunities for new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF via aerosolisation. Vectors for CF must transfect the airway epithelium efficiently and not cause inflammation so they are suitable for repeated dosing. The inhaled aerosol should be deposited in the airways since the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR is expressed predominantly in the epithelium of the submucosal glands and in the surface airway epithelium. The aim of this project was to develop an optimised aerosol delivery approach applicable to treatment of CF lung disease by gene therapy.The vector suspension investigated in this study comprises receptor-targeting peptides, cationic liposomes and plasmid DNA that self-assemble by electrostatic interactions to form a receptor-targeted nanocomplex (RTN of approximately 150 nm with a cationic surface charge of +50 mV. The aerodynamic properties of aerosolised nanocomplexes produced with three different nebulisers were compared by determining aerosol deposition in the different stages of a Next Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI. We also investigated the yield of intact plasmid DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis and densitometry, and transfection efficacies in vitro and in vivo.RTNs nebulised with the AeroEclipse II BAN were the most effective, compared to other nebulisers tested, for gene delivery both in vitro and in vivo. The biophysical properties of the nanocomplexes were unchanged after nebulisation while the deposition of RTNs suggested a range of aerosol aerodynamic sizes between 5.5 µm-1.4 µm cut off (NGI stages 3-6 compatible with deposition in the central and lower airways.RTNs showed their ability at delivering genes via nebulisation, thus suggesting their potential applications for therapeutic interventions of cystic fibrosis and other respiratory disorders.

  13. Stem cells’ guided gene therapy of cancer: New frontier in personalized and targeted therapy

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    Mavroudi M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and therapy of cancer remain to be the greatest challenges for all physicians working in clinical oncology and molecular medicine. The grim statistics speak for themselves with reports of 1,638,910 men and women diagnosed with cancer and nearly 577,190 patients passed away due to cancer in the USA in 2012. For practicing clinicians, who treat patients suffering from advanced cancers with contemporary systemic therapies, the main challenge is to attain therapeutic efficacy, while minimizing side effects. Unfortunately, all contemporary systemic therapies cause side effects. In treated patients, these side effects may range from nausea to damaged tissues. In cancer survivors, the iatrogenic outcomes of systemic therapies may include genomic mutations and their consequences. Therefore, there is an urgent need for personalized and targeted therapies. Recently, we reviewed the current status of suicide gene therapy for cancer. Herein, we discuss the novel strategy: genetically engineered stem guided gene therapy. Stem cells have the unique potential for self-renewal and differentiation. This potential is the primary reason for introducing them into medicine to regenerate injured or degenerated organs, as well as to rejuvenate aging tissues. Recent advances in genetic engineering and stem cell research have created the foundations for genetic engineering of stem cells as the vectors for delivery of therapeutic transgenes. Specifically in oncology, the stem cells are genetically engineered to deliver the cell suicide inducing genes selectively to the cancer cells. Expression of the transgenes kills the cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells unaffected. Herein, we present various strategies to bioengineer suicide inducing genes and stem cell vectors. Moreover, we review results of the main preclinical studies and clinical trials. However, the main risk for therapeutic use of stem cells is their cancerous transformation. Therefore, we

  14. Efficient in planta gene targeting in tomato using geminiviral replicons and the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan-Meir, Tal; Filler-Hayut, Shdema; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Bocobza, Samuel; Czosnek, Henryk; Aharoni, Asaph; Levy, Avraham A

    2018-04-18

    Current breeding relies mostly on random mutagenesis and recombination to generate novel genetic variation. However, targeted genome editing is becoming an increasingly important tool for precise plant breeding. Using the CRISPR-Cas system combined with the bean yellow dwarf virus rolling circle replicon we optimized a method for targeted mutagenesis and gene replacement in tomato. The carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO) and phytoene synthase 1 (PSY1) genes from the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway were chosen as targets due to their easily detectable change of phenotype. We took advantage of the geminiviral replicon amplification as a mean to provide a large amount of donor template for the repair of a CRISPR-Cas-induced DNA double strand break (DSB) in the target gene, via homologous recombination. Mutagenesis experiments, performed in the Micro-Tom variety achieved precise modification of the CRTISO and PSY1 loci at an efficiency of up to 90%. In the gene targeting experiments, our target was a fast-neutron-induced crtiso allele that contained a 281bp deletion. This deletion was repaired with the wildtype sequence through homologous recombination between the CRISPR-Cas-induced DSB in the crtiso target and the amplified donor in 25% of the plants transformed. This shows that efficient gene targeting can be achieved in the absence of selection markers or reporters using a single and modular construct that is adaptable to other tomato targets and other crops. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. ARNetMiT R Package: association rules based gene co-expression networks of miRNA targets.

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    Özgür Cingiz, M; Biricik, G; Diri, B

    2017-03-31

    miRNAs are key regulators that bind to target genes to suppress their gene expression level. The relations between miRNA-target genes enable users to derive co-expressed genes that may be involved in similar biological processes and functions in cells. We hypothesize that target genes of miRNAs are co-expressed, when they are regulated by multiple miRNAs. With the usage of these co-expressed genes, we can theoretically construct co-expression networks (GCNs) related to 152 diseases. In this study, we introduce ARNetMiT that utilize a hash based association rule algorithm in a novel way to infer the GCNs on miRNA-target genes data. We also present R package of ARNetMiT, which infers and visualizes GCNs of diseases that are selected by users. Our approach assumes miRNAs as transactions and target genes as their items. Support and confidence values are used to prune association rules on miRNA-target genes data to construct support based GCNs (sGCNs) along with support and confidence based GCNs (scGCNs). We use overlap analysis and the topological features for the performance analysis of GCNs. We also infer GCNs with popular GNI algorithms for comparison with the GCNs of ARNetMiT. Overlap analysis results show that ARNetMiT outperforms the compared GNI algorithms. We see that using high confidence values in scGCNs increase the ratio of the overlapped gene-gene interactions between the compared methods. According to the evaluation of the topological features of ARNetMiT based GCNs, the degrees of nodes have power-law distribution. The hub genes discovered by ARNetMiT based GCNs are consistent with the literature.

  16. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

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    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  17. Viral Etiology Relationship between Human Papillomavirus and Human Breast Cancer and Target of Gene Therapy.

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    Yan, Chen; Teng, Zhi Ping; Chen, Yun Xin; Shen, Dan Hua; Li, Jin Tao; Zeng, Yi

    2016-05-01

    To explore the viral etiology of human breast cancer to determine whether there are novel molecular targets for gene therapy of breast cancer and provide evidence for the research of gene therapy and vaccine development for breast cancer. PCR was used to screen HPV16 and HPV18 oncogenes E6 and E7 in the SKBR3 cell line and in 76 paraffin embedded breast cancer tissue samples. RNA interference was used to knock down the expression of HPV18 E6 and E7 in SKBR3 cells, then the changes in the expression of cell-cycle related proteins, cell viability, colony formation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression were determined. HPV18 oncogenes E6 and E7 were amplified and sequenced from the SKBR3 cells. Of the patient samples, 6.58% and 23.68% were tested to be positive for HPV18 E6 and HPV18 E7. In the cell culture models, the knockdown of HPV18 E6 and E7 inhibited the proliferation, metastasis, and cell cycle progression of SKBR3 cell. The knockdown also clearly affected the expression levels of cell cycle related proteins. HPV was a contributor to virus caused human breast cancer, suggesting that the oncogenes in HPV were potential targets for gene therapy of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  18. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families.

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    Voloshanenko, Oksana; Gmach, Philipp; Winter, Jan; Kranz, Dominique; Boutros, Michael

    2017-11-01

    Signaling pathway modules are often encoded by several closely related paralogous genes that can have redundant roles and are therefore difficult to analyze by loss-of-function analysis. A typical example is the Wnt signaling pathway, which in mammals is mediated by 19 Wnt ligands that can bind to 10 Frizzled (FZD) receptors. Although significant progress in understanding Wnt-FZD receptor interactions has been made in recent years, tools to generate systematic interaction maps have been largely lacking. Here we generated cell lines with multiplex mutant alleles of FZD1 , FZD2 , and FZD7 and demonstrate that these cells are unresponsive to canonical Wnt ligands. Subsequently, we performed genetic rescue experiments with combinations of FZDs and canonical Wnts to create a functional ligand-receptor interaction map. These experiments showed that whereas several Wnt ligands, such as Wnt3a, induce signaling through a broad spectrum of FZD receptors, others, such as Wnt8a, act through a restricted set of FZD genes. Together, our results map functional interactions of FZDs and 10 Wnt ligands and demonstrate how multiplex targeting by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 can be used to systematically elucidate the functions of multigene families.-Voloshanenko, O., Gmach, P., Winter, J., Kranz, D., Boutros, M. Mapping of Wnt-Frizzled interactions by multiplex CRISPR targeting of receptor gene families. © The Author(s).

  19. Targeted gene delivery in the cricket brain, using in vivo electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Chihiro Sato; Shidara, Hisashi; Matsuda, Koji; Nakamura, Taro; Mito, Taro; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Oka, Kotaro; Ogawa, Hiroto

    2013-12-01

    The cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus) is a hemimetabolous insect that is emerging as a model organism for the study of neural and molecular mechanisms of behavioral traits. However, research strategies have been limited by a lack of genetic manipulation techniques that target the nervous system of the cricket. The development of a new method for efficient gene delivery into cricket brains, using in vivo electroporation, is described here. Plasmid DNA, which contained an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) gene, under the control of a G. bimaculatus actin (Gb'-act) promoter, was injected into adult cricket brains. Injection was followed by electroporation at a sufficient voltage. Expression of eGFP was observed within the brain tissue. Localized gene expression, targeted to specific regions of the brain, was also achieved using a combination of local DNA injection and fine arrangement of the electroporation electrodes. Further studies using this technique will lead to a better understanding of the neural and molecular mechanisms that underlie cricket behaviors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Properties of a Telomerase-Specific Cre/Lox Switch for Transcriptionally Targeted Cancer Gene Therapy

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    Alan E. Bilsland

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Telomerase expression represents a good target for cancer gene therapy. The promoters of the core telomerase catalytic [human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT] and RNA [human telomerase RNA (hTR] subunits show selective activity in cancer cells but not in normal cells. This property can be harnessed to express therapeutic transgenes in a wide range of cancer cells. Unfortunately, weak hTR and hTERT promoter activities in some cancer cells could limit the target cell range. Therefore, strategies to enhance telomerasespecific gene therapy are of interest. We constructed a Cre/Lox reporter switch coupling telomerase promoter specificity with Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter activity, which is generally considered to be constitutively high. In this approach, a telomerase-specific vector expressing Cre recombinase directs excisive recombination on a second vector, removing a transcriptional blockade to CMV-dependent luciferase expression. We tested switch activation in cell lines over a wide range of telomerase promoter activities. However, Cre/Lox-dependent luciferase expression was not enhanced relative to expression using hTR or hTERT promoters directly. Cell-specific differences between telomerase and CMV promoter activities and incomplete sigmoid switch activation were limiting factors. Notably, CMV activity was not always significantly stronger than telomerase promoter activity. Our conclusions provide a general basis for a more rational design of novel recombinase switches in gene therapy.

  1. Inactivation and inducible oncogenic mutation of p53 in gene targeted pigs.

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    Simon Leuchs

    Full Text Available Mutation of the tumor suppressor p53 plays a major role in human carcinogenesis. Here we describe gene-targeted porcine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and live pigs carrying a latent TP53(R167H mutant allele, orthologous to oncogenic human mutant TP53(R175H and mouse Trp53(R172H, that can be activated by Cre recombination. MSCs carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele were analyzed in vitro. Homozygous cells were p53 deficient, and on continued culture exhibited more rapid proliferation, anchorage independent growth, and resistance to the apoptosis-inducing chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin, all characteristic of cellular transformation. Cre mediated recombination activated the latent TP53(R167H allele as predicted, and in homozygous cells expressed mutant p53-R167H protein at a level ten-fold greater than wild-type MSCs, consistent with the elevated levels found in human cancer cells. Gene targeted MSCs were used for nuclear transfer and fifteen viable piglets were produced carrying the latent TP53(R167H mutant allele in heterozygous form. These animals will allow study of p53 deficiency and expression of mutant p53-R167H to model human germline, or spontaneous somatic p53 mutation. This work represents the first inactivation and mutation of the gatekeeper tumor suppressor gene TP53 in a non-rodent mammal.

  2. Patient mutation in AIRE disrupts P-TEFb binding and target gene transcription

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    Plemenitaš, Ana; Saksela, Kalle; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a transcription factor that induces the expression of a large subset of otherwise strictly tissue restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells, thereby enabling their presentation to developing T cells for negative selection. Mutations in AIRE lead to autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED), a rare monogenetic disease. Although it has been reported that AIRE interacts with proteins involved in nuclear transport, DNA-damage response, chromatin remodeling, transcription and pre-mRNA-splicing, the precise mechanism of AIRE-induced tissue restricted antigen expression has remained elusive. In this study, we investigated an APECED patient mutation that causes the loss of the extreme C-terminus of AIRE and found that this mutant protein is transcriptionaly inactive. When tethered heterologously to DNA, this domain could stimulate transcription and splicing by itself. Moreover, the loss of this C-terminus disrupted interactions with the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Via P-TEFb, AIRE increased levels of RNA polymerase II on and enhanced pre-mRNA splicing of heterologous and endogenous target genes. Indeed, the inhibition of CDK9, the kinase subunit of P-TEFb, inhibited AIRE-induced pre-mRNA splicing of these genes. Thus, AIRE requires P-TEFb to activate transcription elongation and co-transcriptional processing of target genes. PMID:21724609

  3. Hypoxia targeted bifunctional suicide gene expression enhances radiotherapy in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Deng, Xuelong; Hsiao, Hung Tsung; Manami, Akiko; Koutcher, Jason A.; Clifton Ling, C.; Li, Gloria C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether hypoxia targeted bifunctional suicide gene expression-cytosine deaminase (CD) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) with 5-FC treatments can enhance radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Stable transfectants of R3327-AT cells were established which express a triple-fusion-gene: CD, UPRT and monomoric DsRed (mDsRed) controlled by a hypoxia inducible promoter. Hypoxia-induced expression/function of CDUPRTmDsRed was verified by western blot, flow cytometry, fluorescent microscopy, and cytotoxicity assay of 5-FU and 5-FC. Tumor-bearing mice were treated with 5-FC and local radiation. Tumor volume was monitored and compared with those treated with 5-FC or radiation alone. In addition, the CDUPRTmDsRed distribution in hypoxic regions of tumor sections was visualized with fluorescent microscopy. Results: Hypoxic induction of CDUPRTmDsRed protein correlated with increased sensitivity to 5-FC and 5-FU. Significant radiosensitization effects were detected after 5-FC treatments under hypoxic conditions. In the tumor xenografts, the distribution of CDUPRTmDsRed expression visualized with fluorescence microscopy was co-localized with the hypoxia marker pimonidazole positive staining cells. Furthermore, administration of 5-FC to mice in combination with local irradiation resulted in significant tumor regression, as in comparison with 5-FC or radiation treatments alone. Conclusions: Our data suggest that the hypoxia-inducible CDUPRT/5-FC gene therapy strategy has the ability to specifically target hypoxic cancer cells and significantly improve the tumor control in combination with radiotherapy.

  4. HAND2 Target Gene Regulatory Networks Control Atrioventricular Canal and Cardiac Valve Development.

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    Laurent, Frédéric; Girdziusaite, Ausra; Gamart, Julie; Barozzi, Iros; Osterwalder, Marco; Akiyama, Jennifer A; Lincoln, Joy; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Visel, Axel; Zuniga, Aimée; Zeller, Rolf

    2017-05-23

    The HAND2 transcriptional regulator controls cardiac development, and we uncover additional essential functions in the endothelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) underlying cardiac cushion development in the atrioventricular canal (AVC). In Hand2-deficient mouse embryos, the EMT underlying AVC cardiac cushion formation is disrupted, and we combined ChIP-seq of embryonic hearts with transcriptome analysis of wild-type and mutants AVCs to identify the functionally relevant HAND2 target genes. The HAND2 target gene regulatory network (GRN) includes most genes with known functions in EMT processes and AVC cardiac cushion formation. One of these is Snai1, an EMT master regulator whose expression is lost from Hand2-deficient AVCs. Re-expression of Snai1 in mutant AVC explants partially restores this EMT and mesenchymal cell migration. Furthermore, the HAND2-interacting enhancers in the Snai1 genomic landscape are active in embryonic hearts and other Snai1-expressing tissues. These results show that HAND2 directly regulates the molecular cascades initiating AVC cardiac valve development. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Advances in plant gene-targeted and functional markers: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poczai Péter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Public genomic databases have provided new directions for molecular marker development and initiated a shift in the types of PCR-based techniques commonly used in plant science. Alongside commonly used arbitrarily amplified DNA markers, other methods have been developed. Targeted fingerprinting marker techniques are based on the well-established practices of arbitrarily amplified DNA methods, but employ novel methodological innovations such as the incorporation of gene or promoter elements in the primers. These markers provide good reproducibility and increased resolution by the concurrent incidence of dominant and co-dominant bands. Despite their promising features, these semi-random markers suffer from possible problems of collision and non-homology analogous to those found with randomly generated fingerprints. Transposable elements, present in abundance in plant genomes, may also be used to generate fingerprints. These markers provide increased genomic coverage by utilizing specific targeted sites and produce bands that mostly seem to be homologous. The biggest drawback with most of these techniques is that prior genomic information about retrotransposons is needed for primer design, prohibiting universal applications. Another class of recently developed methods exploits length polymorphism present in arrays of multi-copy gene families such as cytochrome P450 and β-tubulin genes to provide cross-species amplification and transferability. A specific class of marker makes use of common features of plant resistance genes to generate bands linked to a given phenotype, or to reveal genetic diversity. Conserved DNA-based strategies have limited genome coverage and may fail to reveal genetic diversity, while resistance genes may be under specific evolutionary selection. Markers may also be generated from functional and/or transcribed regions of the genome using different gene-targeting approaches coupled with the use of RNA information

  6. Advances in plant gene-targeted and functional markers: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Public genomic databases have provided new directions for molecular marker development and initiated a shift in the types of PCR-based techniques commonly used in plant science. Alongside commonly used arbitrarily amplified DNA markers, other methods have been developed. Targeted fingerprinting marker techniques are based on the well-established practices of arbitrarily amplified DNA methods, but employ novel methodological innovations such as the incorporation of gene or promoter elements in the primers. These markers provide good reproducibility and increased resolution by the concurrent incidence of dominant and co-dominant bands. Despite their promising features, these semi-random markers suffer from possible problems of collision and non-homology analogous to those found with randomly generated fingerprints. Transposable elements, present in abundance in plant genomes, may also be used to generate fingerprints. These markers provide increased genomic coverage by utilizing specific targeted sites and produce bands that mostly seem to be homologous. The biggest drawback with most of these techniques is that prior genomic information about retrotransposons is needed for primer design, prohibiting universal applications. Another class of recently developed methods exploits length polymorphism present in arrays of multi-copy gene families such as cytochrome P450 and β-tubulin genes to provide cross-species amplification and transferability. A specific class of marker makes use of common features of plant resistance genes to generate bands linked to a given phenotype, or to reveal genetic diversity. Conserved DNA-based strategies have limited genome coverage and may fail to reveal genetic diversity, while resistance genes may be under specific evolutionary selection. Markers may also be generated from functional and/or transcribed regions of the genome using different gene-targeting approaches coupled with the use of RNA information. Such techniques have the

  7. Riboswitches: discovery of drugs that target bacterial gene-regulatory RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deigan, Katherine E.; Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R.

    2011-01-01

    Conspectus Riboswitches, which were discovered in the first years of the XXI century, are gene-regulatory mRNA domains that respond to the intracellular concentration of a variety of metabolites and second messengers. They control essential genes in many pathogenic bacteria, and represent a new class of biomolecular target for the development of antibiotics and chemical-biological tools. Five mechanisms of gene regulation are known for riboswitches. Most bacterial riboswitches modulate transcription termination or translation initiation in response to ligand binding. All known examples of eukaryotic riboswitches and some bacterial riboswitches control gene expression by alternative splicing. The glmS riboswitch, widespread in Gram-positive bacteria, is a catalytic RNA activated by ligand binding. Its self-cleavage destabilizes the mRNA of which it is part. Finally, one example of trans-acting riboswitch is known. Three-dimensional (3D) structures have been determined of representatives of thirteen structurally distinct riboswitch classes, providing atomic-level insight into their mechanisms of ligand recognition. While cellular and viral RNAs in general have attracted interest as potential drug targets, riboswitches show special promise due to the diversity and sophistication of small molecule recognition strategies on display in their ligand binding pockets. Moreover, uniquely among known structured RNA domains, riboswitches evolved to recognize small molecule ligands. Structural and biochemical advances in the study of riboswitches provide an impetus for the development of methods for the discovery of novel riboswitch activators and inhibitors. Recent rational drug design efforts focused on select riboswitch classes have yielded a small number of candidate antibiotic compounds, including one active in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. The development of high-throughput methods suitable for riboswitch-specific drug discovery is ongoing. A fragment

  8. Phospho switch triggers Brd4 chromatin binding and activator recruitment for gene-specific targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Lee, A-Young; Lai, Hsien-Tsung; Zhang, Hong; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2013-03-07

    Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (Brd4) is an epigenetic reader and transcriptional regulator recently identified as a cancer therapeutic target for acute myeloid leukemia, multiple myeloma, and Burkitt's lymphoma. Although chromatin targeting is a crucial function of Brd4, there is little understanding of how bromodomains that bind acetylated histones are regulated, nor how the gene-specific activity of Brd4 is determined. Via interaction screen and domain mapping, we identified p53 as a functional partner of Brd4. Interestingly, Brd4 association with p53 is modulated by casein kinase II (CK2)-mediated phosphorylation of a conserved acidic region in Brd4 that selectively contacts either a juxtaposed bromodomain or an adjacent basic region to dictate the ability of Brd4 binding to chromatin and also the recruitment of p53 to regulated promoters. The unmasking of bromodomains and activator recruitment, concurrently triggered by the CK2 phospho switch, provide an intriguing mechanism for gene-specific targeting by a universal epigenetic reader. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Scaling the Drosophila Wing: TOR-Dependent Target Gene Access by the Hippo Pathway Transducer Yorkie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joseph; Struhl, Gary

    2015-10-01

    Organ growth is controlled by patterning signals that operate locally (e.g., Wingless/Ints [Wnts], Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [BMPs], and Hedgehogs [Hhs]) and scaled by nutrient-dependent signals that act systemically (e.g., Insulin-like peptides [ILPs] transduced by the Target of Rapamycin [TOR] pathway). How cells integrate these distinct inputs to generate organs of the appropriate size and shape is largely unknown. The transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki, a YES-Associated Protein, or YAP) acts downstream of patterning morphogens and other tissue-intrinsic signals to promote organ growth. Yki activity is regulated primarily by the Warts/Hippo (Wts/Hpo) tumour suppressor pathway, which impedes nuclear access of Yki by a cytoplasmic tethering mechanism. Here, we show that the TOR pathway regulates Yki by a separate and novel mechanism in the Drosophila wing. Instead of controlling Yki nuclear access, TOR signaling governs Yki action after it reaches the nucleus by allowing it to gain access to its target genes. When TOR activity is inhibited, Yki accumulates in the nucleus but is sequestered from its normal growth-promoting target genes--a phenomenon we term "nuclear seclusion." Hence, we posit that in addition to its well-known role in stimulating cellular metabolism in response to nutrients, TOR also promotes wing growth by liberating Yki from nuclear seclusion, a parallel pathway that we propose contributes to the scaling of wing size with nutrient availability.

  10. HDAC4 regulates satellite cell proliferation and differentiation by targeting P21 and Sharp1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroncelli, Nicoletta; Bianchi, Marzia; Bertin, Marco; Consalvi, Silvia; Saccone, Valentina; De Bardi, Marco; Puri, Pier Lorenzo; Palacios, Daniela; Adamo, Sergio; Moresi, Viviana

    2018-02-22

    Skeletal muscle exhibits a high regenerative capacity, mainly due to the ability of satellite cells to replicate and differentiate in response to appropriate stimuli. Epigenetic control is effective at different stages of this process. It has been shown that the chromatin-remodeling factor HDAC4 is able to regulate satellite cell proliferation and commitment. However, its molecular targets are still uncovered. To explain the signaling pathways regulated by HDAC4 in satellite cells, we generated tamoxifen-inducible mice with conditional inactivation of HDAC4 in Pax7 + cells (HDAC4 KO mice). We found that the proliferation and differentiation of HDAC4 KO satellite cells were compromised, although similar amounts of satellite cells were found in mice. Moreover, we found that the inhibition of HDAC4 in satellite cells was sufficient to block the differentiation process. By RNA-sequencing analysis we identified P21 and Sharp1 as HDAC4 target genes. Reducing the expression of these target genes in HDAC4 KO satellite cells, we also defined the molecular pathways regulated by HDAC4 in the epigenetic control of satellite cell expansion and fusion.

  11. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as a direct downstream target gene of Hoxc8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Hyehyun; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Bok, Jinwoong; Chung, Hyun Joo [Department of Anatomy, Embryology Laboratory, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Hee, E-mail: mhkim1@yuhs.ac [Department of Anatomy, Embryology Laboratory, Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-19

    Hoxc8 is a member of Hox family transcription factors that play crucial roles in spatiotemporal body patterning during embryogenesis. Hox proteins contain a conserved 61 amino acid homeodomain, which is responsible for recognition and binding of the proteins onto Hox-specific DNA binding motifs and regulates expression of their target genes. Previously, using proteome analysis, we identified Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Pcna) as one of the putative target genes of Hoxc8. Here, we asked whether Hoxc8 regulates Pcna expression by directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Pcna. In mouse embryos at embryonic day 11.5, the expression pattern of Pcna was similar to that of Hoxc8 along the anteroposterior body axis. Moreover, Pcna transcript levels as well as cell proliferation rate were increased by overexpression of Hoxc8 in C3H10T1/2 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Characterization of 2.3 kb genomic sequence upstream of Pcna coding region revealed that the upstream sequence contains several Hox core binding sequences and one Hox-Pbx binding sequence. Direct binding of Hoxc8 proteins to the Pcna regulatory sequence was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our data suggest that Pcna is a direct downstream target of Hoxc8.

  12. Oligopeptide complex for targeted non-viral gene delivery to adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Young-Wook; Adhikary, Partho Protim; Lim, Kwang Suk; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Commercial anti-obesity drugs acting in the gastrointestinal tract or the central nervous system have been shown to have limited efficacy and severe side effects. Anti-obesity drug development is thus focusing on targeting adipocytes that store excess fat. Here, we show that an adipocyte-targeting fusion-oligopeptide gene carrier consisting of an adipocyte-targeting sequence and 9-arginine (ATS-9R) selectively transfects mature adipocytes by binding to prohibitin. Injection of ATS-9R into obese mice confirmed specific binding of ATS-9R to fat vasculature, internalization and gene expression in adipocytes. We also constructed a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for silencing fatty-acid-binding protein 4 (shFABP4), a key lipid chaperone in fatty-acid uptake and lipid storage in adipocytes. Treatment of obese mice with ATS-9R/shFABP4 led to metabolic recovery and body-weight reduction (>20%). The ATS-9R/shFABP4 oligopeptide complex could prove to be a safe therapeutic approach to regress and treat obesity as well as obesity-induced metabolic syndromes.

  13. Knockout of targeted gene in porcine somatic cells using zinc-finger nuclease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamatsu, Shin; Sakaue, Motoharu; Takizawa, Akiko; Kato, Tsubasa; Kamoshita, Maki; Ito, Junya; Kashiwazaki, Naomi

    2015-02-01

    Targeted genome editing is a widely applicable approach for efficiently modifying any sequence of interest in animals. It is very difficult to generate knock-out and knock-in animals except for mice up to now. Very recently, a method of genome editing using zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) has been developed to produce knockout rats. Since only injection of ZFNs into the pronuclear (PN) embryo is required, it seems to be useful for generating gene-targeted animals, including domestic species. However, no one has reported the successful production of knockout pigs by direct injection of ZFNs into PN embryos. We examined whether ZFN works on editing the genome of porcine growth hormone receptor in two kinds of cell lines (ST and PT-K75) derived from the pig as a preliminary study. Our data showed that pZFN1/2 vectors were efficiently transfected into both ST and PT-K75 cells. In both cell lines, results from Cel-I assay showed that modification of the targeted gene was confirmed. We injected ZFN1/2 mRNAs into the nucleus of PN stage embryos and then they were transferred to the recipients. However, pups were not delivered. Taken together, ZFN can be an available technology of genome editing even in the pig but further improvement will be required for generating genome-modified pigs. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  14. Evolutionarily Dynamic, but Robust, Targeting of Resistance Genes by the miR482/2118 Gene Family in the Solanaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sophie; Kloesges, Thorsten; Rose, Laura E

    2015-11-19

    Plants are exposed to pathogens around the clock. A common resistance response in plants upon pathogen detection is localized cell death. Given the irreversible nature of this response, multiple layers of negative regulation are present to prevent the untimely or misexpression of resistance genes. One layer of negative regulation is provided by a recently discovered microRNA (miRNA) gene family, miR482/2118. This family targets the transcripts of resistance genes in plants. We investigated the evolutionary history and specificity of this miRNA gene family within the Solanaceae. This plant family includes many important crop species, providing a set of well-defined resistance gene repertoires. Across 14 species from the Solanaceae, we identified eight distinct miR482/2118 gene family members. Our studies show conservation of miRNA type and number in the group of wild tomatoes and, to a lesser extent, throughout the Solanaceae. The eight orthologous miRNA gene clusters evolved under different evolutionary constraints, allowing for individual subfunctionalization of the miRNAs. Despite differences in the predicted targeting behavior of each miRNA, the miRNA-R-gene network is robust due to its high degree of interconnectivity and redundant targeting. Our data suggest that the miR482/2118 gene family acts as an evolutionary buffer for R-gene sequence diversity. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Precise Genome Modification via Sequence-Specific Nucleases-Mediated Gene Targeting for Crop Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongwei; Li, Jingying; Xia, Lanqin

    2016-01-01

    Genome editing technologies enable precise modifications of DNA sequences in vivo and offer a great promise for harnessing plant genes in crop improvement. The precise manipulation of plant genomes relies on the induction of DNA double-strand breaks by sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) to initiate DNA repair reactions that are based on either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR). While complete knock-outs and loss-of-function mutations generated by NHEJ are very valuable in defining gene functions, their applications in crop improvement are somewhat limited because many agriculturally important traits are conferred by random point mutations or indels at specific loci in either the genes' encoding or promoter regions. Therefore, genome modification through SSNs-mediated HDR for gene targeting (GT) that enables either gene replacement or knock-in will provide an unprecedented ability to facilitate plant breeding by allowing introduction of precise point mutations and new gene functions, or integration of foreign genes at specific and desired "safe" harbor in a predefined manner. The emergence of three programmable SSNs, such as zinc finger nucleases, transcriptional activator-like effector nucleases, and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) systems has revolutionized genome modification in plants in a more controlled manner. However, while targeted mutagenesis is becoming routine in plants, the potential of GT technology has not been well realized for traits improvement in crops, mainly due to the fact that NHEJ predominates DNA repair process in somatic cells and competes with the HDR pathway, and thus HDR-mediated GT is a relative rare event in plants. Here, we review recent research findings mainly focusing on development and applications of precise GT in plants using three SSNs systems described above, and the potential mechanisms underlying HDR events in plant

  16. AAV-Mediated Gene Targeting Is Significantly Enhanced by Transient Inhibition of Nonhomologous End Joining or the Proteasome In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulk, Nicole K.; Loza, Laura Marquez; Finegold, Milton J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have clear potential for use in gene targeting but low correction efficiencies remain the primary drawback. One approach to enhancing efficiency is a block of undesired repair pathways like nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) to promote the use of homologous recombination. The natural product vanillin acts as a potent inhibitor of NHEJ by inhibiting DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Using a homology containing rAAV vector, we previously demonstrated in vivo gene repair frequencies of up to 0.1% in a model of liver disease hereditary tyrosinemia type I. To increase targeting frequencies, we administered vanillin in combination with rAAV. Gene targeting frequencies increased up to 10-fold over AAV alone, approaching 1%. Fah−/−Ku70−/− double knockout mice also had increased gene repair frequencies, genetically confirming the beneficial effects of blocking NHEJ. A second strategy, transient proteasomal inhibition, also increased gene-targeting frequencies but was not additive to NHEJ inhibition. This study establishes the benefit of transient NHEJ inhibition with vanillin, or proteasome blockage with bortezomib, for increasing hepatic gene targeting with rAAV. Functional metabolic correction of a clinically relevant disease model was demonstrated and provided evidence for the feasibility of gene targeting as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:22486314

  17. Identification of highly effective target genes for RNAi-mediated control of emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Thais B; Duan, Jian J; Palli, Subba R; Rieske, Lynne K

    2018-03-22

    Recent study has shown that RNA interference (RNAi) is efficient in emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, and that ingestion of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting specific genes causes gene silencing and mortality in neonates. Here, we report on the identification of highly effective target genes for RNAi-mediated control of EAB. We screened 13 candidate genes in neonate larvae and selected the most effective target genes for further investigation, including their effect on EAB adults and on a non-target organism, Tribolium castaneum. The two most efficient target genes selected, hsp (heat shock 70-kDa protein cognate 3) and shi (shibire), caused up to 90% mortality of larvae and adults. In EAB eggs, larvae, and adults, the hsp is expressed at higher levels when compared to that of shi. Ingestion of dsHSP and dsSHI caused mortality in both neonate larvae and adults. Administration of a mixture of both dsRNAs worked better than either dsRNA by itself. In contrast, injection of EAB.dsHSP and EAB.dsSHI did not cause mortality in T. castaneum. Thus, the two genes identified cause high mortality in the EAB with no apparent phenotype effects in a non-target organism, the red flour beetle, and could be used in RNAi-mediated control of this invasive pest.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of PDX1 target genes in human pancreatic progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianming Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene coding for the homeobox transcription factor (TF PDX1 leads to pancreatic agenesis, whereas heterozygous mutations can cause Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young 4 (MODY4. Although the function of Pdx1 is well studied in pre-clinical models during insulin-producing β-cell development and homeostasis, it remains elusive how this TF controls human pancreas development by regulating a downstream transcriptional program. Also, comparative studies of PDX1 binding patterns in pancreatic progenitors and adult β-cells have not been conducted so far. Furthermore, many studies reported the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and T2DM, and it has been shown that islet enhancers are enriched in T2DM-associated SNPs. Whether regions, harboring T2DM-associated SNPs are PDX1 bound and active at the pancreatic progenitor stage has not been reported so far. Methods: In this study, we have generated a novel induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line that efficiently differentiates into human pancreatic progenitors (PPs. Furthermore, PDX1 and H3K27ac chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq was used to identify PDX1 transcriptional targets and active enhancer and promoter regions. To address potential differences in the function of PDX1 during development and adulthood, we compared PDX1 binding profiles from PPs and adult islets. Moreover, combining ChIP-seq and GWAS meta-analysis data we identified T2DM-associated SNPs in PDX1 binding sites and active chromatin regions. Results: ChIP-seq for PDX1 revealed a total of 8088 PDX1-bound regions that map to 5664 genes in iPSC-derived PPs. The PDX1 target regions include important pancreatic TFs, such as PDX1 itself, RFX6, HNF1B, and MEIS1, which were activated during the differentiation process as revealed by the active chromatin mark H3K27ac and mRNA expression profiling, suggesting that auto-regulatory feedback regulation

  19. Mapping calcium phosphate activated gene networks as a strategy for targeted osteoinduction of human progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyckmans, Jeroen; Roberts, Scott J; Bolander, Johanna; Schrooten, Jan; Chen, Christopher S; Luyten, Frank P

    2013-06-01

    Although calcium phosphate-containing biomaterials are promising scaffolds for bone regenerative strategies, the osteoinductive capacity of such materials is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous mechanisms of in vivo calcium phosphate-driven, ectopic bone formation could be identified and used to induce enhanced differentiation in vitro of the same progenitor population. To accomplish this, human periosteum derived cells (hPDCs) were seeded on hydroxyapatite/collagen scaffolds (calcium phosphate rich matrix or CPRM), or on decalcified scaffolds (calcium phosphate depleted matrix or CPDM), followed by subcutaneous implantation in nude mice to trigger ectopic bone formation. In this system, osteoblast differentiation occurred in CPRM scaffolds, but not in CPDM scaffolds. Gene expression was assessed by human full-genome microarray at 20 h after seeding, and 2, 8 and 18 days after implantation. In both matrices, implantation of the cell constructs triggered a similar gene expression cascade, however, gene expression dynamics progressed faster in CPRM scaffolds than in CPDM scaffolds. The difference in gene expression dynamics was associated with differential activation of hub genes and molecular signaling pathways related to calcium signaling (CREB), inflammation (TNFα, NFkB, and IL6) and bone development (TGFβ, β-catenin, BMP, EGF, and ERK signaling). Starting from this set of pathways, a growth factor cocktail was developed that robustly enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data demonstrate that through the identification and subsequent stimulation of genes, proteins and signaling pathways associated with calcium phosphate mediated osteoinduction, a focused approach to develop targeted differentiation protocols in adult progenitor cells can be achieved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A double-mutant collection targeting MAP kinase related genes in Arabidopsis for studying genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Shih-Heng; Krysan, Patrick J

    2016-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades are conserved in all eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis thaliana there are approximately 80 genes encoding MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K), 10 genes encoding MAP kinase kinases (MAP2K), and 20 genes encoding MAP kinases (MAPK). Reverse genetic analysis has failed to reveal abnormal phenotypes for a majority of these genes. One strategy for uncovering gene function when single-mutant lines do not produce an informative phenotype is to perform a systematic genetic interaction screen whereby double-mutants are created from a large library of single-mutant lines. Here we describe a new collection of 275 double-mutant lines derived from a library of single-mutants targeting genes related to MAP kinase signaling. To facilitate this study, we developed a high-throughput double-mutant generating pipeline using a system for growing Arabidopsis seedlings in 96-well plates. A quantitative root growth assay was used to screen for evidence of genetic interactions in this double-mutant collection. Our screen revealed four genetic interactions, all of which caused synthetic enhancement of the root growth defects observed in a MAP kinase 4 (MPK4) single-mutant line. Seeds for this double-mutant collection are publicly available through the Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center. Scientists interested in diverse biological processes can now screen this double-mutant collection under a wide range of growth conditions in order to search for additional genetic interactions that may provide new insights into MAP kinase signaling. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A single gene target of an ETS-family transcription factor determines neuronal CO2-chemosensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia P Brandt

    Full Text Available Many animals possess neurons specialized for the detection of carbon dioxide (CO(2, which acts as a cue to elicit behavioral responses and is also an internally generated product of respiration that regulates animal physiology. In many organisms how such neurons detect CO(2 is poorly understood. We report here a mechanism that endows C. elegans neurons with the ability to detect CO(2. The ETS-5 transcription factor is necessary for the specification of CO(2-sensing BAG neurons. Expression of a single ETS-5 target gene, gcy-9, which encodes a receptor-type guanylate cyclase, is sufficient to bypass a requirement for ets-5 in CO(2-detection and transforms neurons into CO(2-sensing neurons. Because ETS-5 and GCY-9 are members of gene families that are conserved between nematodes and vertebrates, a similar mechanism might act in the specification of CO(2-sensing neurons in other phyla.

  2. Isolation and characterization of DUSP11, a novel p53 target gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caprara, Greta; Zamponi, Raffaella; Melixetian, Marina

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT p53 regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis and DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that DUSP11 (Dual Specificity Phosphatase 11), a member of the Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase family that binds to RNA-RNP complexes and RNA splicing factors, is a p53...... target gene. Consistent with this, the expression of DUSP11 is induced in a p53-dependent manner after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that p53 binds to 2 putative p53 DNA binding sites in the promoter region of DUSP11. Colony formation and proliferation...... (Src-Associated protein in Mitotic cells) binds to DUSP11 in vitro and in vivo. Taken together these results suggest that DUSP11 contributes to p53-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation and that it might be involved in regulating RNA splicing through SAM68....

  3. Hes1 potentiates T cell lymphomagenesis by up-regulating a subset of notch target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryll D Dudley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hairy/Enhancer of Split (Hes proteins are targets of the Notch signaling pathway and make up a class of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins that function to repress transcription. Data from Hes1 deficient mice suggested that Hes1, like Notch1, is necessary for the progression of early T cell progenitors. Constitutive activation of Notch is known to cause T cell leukemia or lymphoma but whether Hes1 has any oncogenic activity is not known.We generated mice carrying a Hes1 transgene under control of the proximal promote of the lck gene. Hes1 expression led to a reduction in numbers of total thymocytes, concomitant with the increased percentage and number of immature CD8+ (ISP T cells and sustained CD25 expression in CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP thymocytes. Hes1 transgenic mice develop thymic lymphomas at about 20 weeks of age with a low penetrance. However, expression of Hes1 significantly shortens the latency of T cell lymphoma developed in Id1 transgenic mice, where the function of bHLH E proteins is inhibited. Interestingly, Hes1 increased expression of a subset of Notch target genes in pre-malignant ISP and DP thymocytes, which include Notch1, Notch3 and c-myc, thus suggesting a possible mechanism for lymphomagenesis.We have demonstrated for the first time that Hes1 potentiates T cell lymphomagenesis, by up-regulating a subset of Notch target genes and by causing an accumulation of ISP thymocytes particularly vulnerable to oncogenic transformation.

  4. Viral small interfering RNAs target host genes to mediate disease symptoms in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil A Smith

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat has a small non-protein-coding RNA genome that induces yellowing symptoms in infected Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco. How this RNA pathogen induces such symptoms has been a longstanding question. We show that the yellowing symptoms are a result of small interfering RNA (siRNA-directed RNA silencing of the chlorophyll biosynthetic gene, CHLI. The CHLI mRNA contains a 22-nucleotide (nt complementary sequence to the Y-Sat genome, and in Y-Sat-infected plants, CHLI expression is dramatically down-regulated. Small RNA sequencing and 5' RACE analyses confirmed that this 22-nt sequence was targeted for mRNA cleavage by Y-Sat-derived siRNAs. Transformation of tobacco with a RNA interference (RNAi vector targeting CHLI induced Y-Sat-like symptoms. In addition, the symptoms of Y-Sat infection can be completely prevented by transforming tobacco with a silencing-resistant variant of the CHLI gene. These results suggest that siRNA-directed silencing of CHLI is solely responsible for the Y-Sat-induced symptoms. Furthermore, we demonstrate that two Nicotiana species, which do not develop yellowing symptoms upon Y-Sat infection, contain a single nucleotide polymorphism within the siRNA-targeted CHLI sequence. This suggests that the previously observed species specificity of Y-Sat-induced symptoms is due to natural sequence variation in the CHLI gene, preventing CHLI silencing in species with a mismatch to the Y-Sat siRNA. Taken together, these findings provide the first demonstration of small RNA-mediated viral disease symptom production and offer an explanation of the species specificity of the viral disease.

  5. Gene Expression Profile of Glioblastoma Multiforme Invasive Phenotype Points to New Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique B. Hoelzinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The invasive phenotype of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a hallmark of malignant process, yet molecular mechanisms that dictate this locally invasive behavior remain poorly understood. Gene expression profiles of human glioma cells were assessed from laser capture-microdissected GBM cells collected from paired patient tumor cores and white matterinvading cell populations. Changes in gene expression in invading GBM cells were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QRTPCR and immunohistochemistry in an independent sample set. QRT-PCR confirmed the differential expression in 19 of 21 genes tested. Immunohistochemical analyses of autotaxin (ATX, ephrin 133, B-cell lymphoma-w (BCLW, and protein tyrosine kinase 2 beta showed them to be expressed in invasive glioma cells. The known GBM markers, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 and vimentin, were robustly expressed in the tumor core. A glioma invasion tissue microarray confirmed the expression of ATX and BCLW in invasive cells of tumors of various grades. GBM phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity is well documented. In this study, we show an additional layer of complexity: transcriptional differences between cells of tumor core and invasive cells located in the brain parenchyma. Gene products supporting invasion may be novel targets for manipulation of brain tumor behavior with consequences on treatment outcome.

  6. The Human Paraoxonase Gene Cluster As a Target in the Treatment of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Zhi-Gang; Chen, Hou-Zao; Yan, Yunfei; Li, Hongliang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The paraoxonase (PON) gene cluster contains three adjacent gene members, PON1, PON2, and PON3. Originating from the same fungus lactonase precursor, all of the three PON genes share high sequence identity and a similar β propeller protein structure. PON1 and PON3 are primarily expressed in the liver and secreted into the serum upon expression, whereas PON2 is ubiquitously expressed and remains inside the cell. Each PON member has high catalytic activity toward corresponding artificial organophosphate, and all exhibit activities to lactones. Therefore, all three members of the family are regarded as lactonases. Under physiological conditions, they act to degrade metabolites of polyunsaturated fatty acids and homocysteine (Hcy) thiolactone, among other compounds. By detoxifying both oxidized low-density lipoprotein and Hcy thiolactone, PONs protect against atherosclerosis and coronary artery diseases, as has been illustrated by many types of in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence. Clinical observations focusing on gene polymorphisms also indicate that PON1, PON2, and PON3 are protective against coronary artery disease. Many other conditions, such as diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and aging, have been shown to relate to PONs. The abundance and/or activity of PONs can be regulated by lipoproteins and their metabolites, biological macromolecules, pharmacological treatments, dietary factors, and lifestyle. In conclusion, both previous results and ongoing studies provide evidence, making the PON cluster a prospective target for the treatment of atherosclerosis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 597–632. PMID:21867409

  7. Wnt target genes and where to find them [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravinda-Bharathi Ramakrishnan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin signaling is highly conserved throughout metazoans, is required for numerous essential events in development, and serves as a stem cell niche signal in many contexts. Misregulation of the pathway is linked to several human pathologies, most notably cancer. Wnt stimulation results in stabilization and nuclear import of β-catenin, which then acts as a transcriptional co-activator. Transcription factors of the T-cell family (TCF are the best-characterized nuclear binding partners of β-catenin and mediators of Wnt gene regulation. This review provides an update on what is known about the transcriptional activation of Wnt target genes, highlighting recent work that modifies the conventional model. Wnt/β-catenin signaling regulates genes in a highly context-dependent manner, and the role of other signaling pathways and TCF co-factors in this process will be discussed. Understanding Wnt gene regulation has served to elucidate many biological roles of the pathway, and we will use examples from stem cell biology, metabolism, and evolution to illustrate some of the rich Wnt biology that has been uncovered.

  8. Fusion gene transcripts and Ig/TCR gene rearrangements are complementary but infrequent targets for PCR-based detection of minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeckx, N.; M.J. Willemse; T. Szczepanski (Tomasz); V.H.J. van der Velden (Vincent); A.W. Langerak (Anton); P. Vandekerckhove (Philippe); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPCR-based monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) in acute leukemias can be achieved via detection of fusion gene transcripts of chromosome aberrations or detection of immunoglobulin (lg) and T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements. We wished to assess whether both PCR targets are

  9. Proviral HIV-genome-wide and pol-gene specific Zinc Finger Nucleases: Usability for targeted HIV gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayengera Misaki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with HIV, which culminates in the establishment of a latent proviral reservoir, presents formidable challenges for ultimate cure. Building on the hypothesis that ex-vivo or even in-vivo abolition or disruption of HIV-gene/genome-action by target mutagenesis or excision can irreversibly abrogate HIV's innate fitness to replicate and survive, we previously identified the isoschizomeric bacteria restriction enzymes (REases AcsI and ApoI as potent cleavers of the HIV-pol gene (11 and 9 times in HIV-1 and 2, respectively. However, both enzymes, along with others found to cleave across the entire HIV-1 genome, slice (SX at palindromic sequences that are prevalent within the human genome and thereby pose the risk of host genome toxicity. A long-term goal in the field of R-M enzymatic therapeutics has thus been to generate synthetic restriction endonucleases with longer recognition sites limited in specificity to HIV. We aimed (i to assemble and construct zinc finger arrays and nucleases (ZFN with either proviral-HIV-pol gene or proviral-HIV-1 whole-genome specificity respectively, and (ii to advance a model for pre-clinically testing lentiviral vectors (LV that deliver and transduce either ZFN genotype. Methods and Results First, we computationally generated the consensus sequences of (a 114 dsDNA-binding zinc finger (Zif arrays (ZFAs or ZifHIV-pol and (b two zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs which, unlike the AcsI and ApoI homeodomains, possess specificity to >18 base-pair sequences uniquely present within the HIV-pol gene (ZifHIV-polFN. Another 15 ZFNs targeting >18 bp sequences within the complete HIV-1 proviral genome were constructed (ZifHIV-1FN. Second, a model for constructing lentiviral vectors (LVs that deliver and transduce a diploid copy of either ZifHIV-polFN or ZifHIV-1FN chimeric genes (termed LV- 2xZifHIV-polFN and LV- 2xZifHIV-1FN, respectively is proposed. Third, two preclinical models for controlled testing of

  10. Comparative study of candidate housekeeping genes for quantification of target gene messenger RNA expression by real-time PCR in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamias, Giorgos; Goukos, Dimitris; Laoudi, Eyfrosyni; Balla, Iliana G; Siakavellas, Spyros I; Daikos, George L; Ladas, Spiros D

    2013-12-01

    Mucosal expression of immunological mediators is modified in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Quantification of target gene messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts depends on the normalization to a housekeeping or reference gene. Stability of housekeeping gene expression is critical for the accurate measurement of transcripts of the target gene. No studies have addressed the optimization of reference gene performance for mRNA studies in healthy intestinal mucosa and during mucosal inflammation. RNA was extracted from endoscopically obtained intestinal biopsies from healthy control subjects and patients with active IBD or non-IBD inflammatory diseases. Comparative analysis of 10 candidate housekeeping genes for quantitative real-time PCR was carried out according to predefined criteria, including use of the Web-based RefFinder platform. We demonstrate that intestinal inflammation may significantly affect the stability of mucosal expression of housekeeping genes. Commonly used controls, such as gly