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Sample records for anti-cancer drug infusion

  1. A combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Yumiko; Zaitsu, Masayoshi; Mikami, Koji; Takeuchi, Takumi; Matsuda, Izuru; Arahira, Satoko

    2017-01-01

    The gold standard for the treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer Without metastasis is radical cystectomy. However, there increase patients very elderly and with serious complications. They are not good candidates for invasive surgical operation. Intraarterial infusion of 70 mg/m"2 of cisplatin and 30 mg/m"2 of pirarubicin into bilateral bladder arteries was conducted for 5 patients diagnosed with muscle invasive bladder cancers without distant metastasis. Right and left distribution of anti-cancer drugs was determined based on the location of bladder tumor(s). External beam radiation therapy was commenced immediately following intraarterial infusion. The patients were followed up with clinical and radiographic investigations and bladderbiopsy was performed as needed. Patients were all males who are smoking or with smoking history ranging from 73 to 85 years of age (median 82). The duration between transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TUR-Bt) and intraarterial infusion of anti-cancer drugs was 47.4 days (range 26-68), the median follow-up period after intraarterial infusion was 21.5 months (range 87-547) without death. Total radiation dose was 59.2 ±3.0 Gy. Complete remission was accomplished in all cases. One patient showed intravesical recurrence of non muscle-invasive tumors 45.8 months following intraarterial infusion and underwent TUR-Bt. Two cases underwent bladder biopsies showing no tumors. All patients but one case with bladder recurrence were free of tumor recurrence with radiographic investigation. For adverse events, acute renal failure was in one case and leukocytopenia was in all 5 cases, Grade 2 for one and Grade 3 for 4 cases. Follow-up periods are not long enough, but early results of a combination therapy of selective intraarterial anti-cancer drug infusion and radiation therapy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer were good. (author)

  2. Drug selection principles in intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Gefang; Cheng Yongde

    2009-01-01

    The intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy is an effective treatment for malignant tumors. The following ten principles should be taken into account when the choice of infusion medication is to be made. (1) The tumor-sensitive drugs should be selected. (2) Pay attention to the compatibility of medicines. (3) Select the type of drug compatibility and drug interactions. (4) Concentration-dependent drugs are the drugs of first choice. (5) Pay attention to side effects when anti-cancer drug compatibility is considered.(6) The perfusion anti-cancer drugs exert their killing effect on the tumor cells in their prototype. (7) Pay attention to the administration order of the drugs and the intervals of treatment. (8) The medication should be individualized as the physical condition and tumor's heterogeneity are different from patient to patient. It is one of the fundamental principles to formulate a specific scheme for every given patient. (9) Make full use of the pharmacokinetics features of the anti-cancer drugs in clinical practice. (10) To be familiar with commonly used drugs and common tumor chemotherapeutic formulae is a matter of cardinal significance. (authors)

  3. Theoretical, clinical and pharmacokinetic aspects of cancer chemotherapy administered by continuous infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikic, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter reviews some of the theoretical and empirical aspects of the administration of anti-cancer drugs by continuous intravenous infusion in conjunction with radiation therapy. The variables contributing to schedule dependence of anti-cancer drugs are discussed. A table shows the improved therapeutic index of Bleomycin by continuous infusion in mice. The use of Cytarabine, a pyrimidine anti-metabolite which kills cells during S-phase or DNA synthesis, is examined. Fluorouracil and Doxorubicin are examined and several other drugs including vincristine, vinblastine, etoposide, and cisplatin are discussed

  4. Optimal Anti-cancer Drug Profiles for Effective Penetration of the Anti-cancer Drug Market by Generic Drugs in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shoyo; Matsushita, Maiko; Saito, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    The increased use of generic drugs is a good indicator of the need to reduce the increasing costs of prescription drugs. Since there are more expensive drugs compared with other therapeutic areas, "oncology" is an important one for generic drugs. The primary objective of this article was to quantify the extent to which generic drugs in Japan occupy each level of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification system. The dataset used in this study was created from publicly available information obtained from the IMS Japan Pharmaceutical Market database. Data on the total amount of sales and number of prescriptions for anti-cancer drugs between 2010 and 2016 in Japan were selected. The data were categorized according to the third level of the ATC classification system. All categories of the ATC classification system had increased market shares in Japan between 2010 and 2016. The barriers to market entry were relatively low in L01F (platinum anti-neoplastics), L01C (plant-based neoplastics), L02B (cytostatic hormone antagonists), and L01D (anti-neoplastic antibiotics) but were high in L02A (cytostatic hormones), L01H (protein kinase inhibitors), and L01B (anti-metabolites). Generic cancer drugs could bring savings to Japanese health care systems. Therefore, their development should be directed toward niche markets, such as L02A, L01H, and L01B, and not competitive markets.

  5. Observation and Analysis of Anti-cancer Drug Use and Dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As all anti-cancer drugs are of narrow therapeutic window so dose individualization is required to be done. A study was conducted to check the use of anti-cancer drugs in the local anti-cancer facility of Bahawalpur i.e. Bahawalpur Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (BINO). In this study, the dose individualization ...

  6. Fascaplysin Sensitizes Anti-Cancer Effects of Drugs Targeting AKT and AMPK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taek-In Oh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Fascaplysin, a natural product isolated from marine sponges, is a potential candidate for the development of anti-cancer drugs. However, the mechanism underlying its therapeutic effect of strengthening anti-cancer efficacy of other drugs is poorly understood. Here, we found that fascaplysin increases phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB, also known as AKT, and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, which are considered therapeutic targets for cancer treatment due to their anti-apoptotic or pro-survival functions in cancer. A cell viability assay revealed that pharmacological suppression of AKT using LY294002 enhanced the anti-cancer effect of fascaplysin in various cancer cells. Similarly, fascaplysin was observed to have improved anti-cancer effects in combination with compound C, a selective AMPK inhibitor. Another challenge showed that fascaplysin increased the efficacy of methotrexate (MTX-mediated cancer therapy by suppressing genes related to folate and purine metabolism. Overall, these results suggest that fascaplysin may be useful for improving the anti-cancer efficacy of targeted anti-cancer drugs, such as inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase AKT signaling, and chemotherapeutic agents, such as MTX.

  7. Proteomics of anti-cancer drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovářová, Hana; Martinková, Jiřina; Hrabáková, Rita; Skalníková, Helena; Novák, Petr; Hajdůch, M.; Gadher, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, Supplement 1 (2009), s. 84-84 E-ISSN 1742-4658. [34th FEBS Congress. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Praha] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC07017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : proteomics * anti-cancer drugs * biomarkers Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology

  8. Effect of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate and anti-inflammatory gel in infusion phlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cökmez, Atilla; Gür, Serhat; Genç, Hüdai; Deniz, Sümer; Tarcan, Ercüment

    2003-10-01

    Phlebitis is the commonest complication of intravenous infusion. It has been suggested that it is initiated by venoconstriction at the infusion site, hence treatment with a vasodilator may reduce its incidence. A prospective controlled study was carried out on the effect of transdermal glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) and topical anti-inflammatory gel (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug; NSAID) on the survival of peripheral intravenous infusion in 386 patients. A total of 34.9% (43 out of 123) of the infusions failed in the control group compared with 14.1% (18 out of 127) in the NSAID group (P NSAI gel and GTN but NSAI gel is more effective than GTN.

  9. Self-Assembled Nanocarriers Based on Amphiphilic Natural Polymers for Anti- Cancer Drug Delivery Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Sally; Abdelmoneem, Mona; Abdelwakil, Mahmoud; Mabrouk, Moustafa Taha; Anwar, Doaa; Mohamed, Rania; Khattab, Sherine; Bekhit, Adnan; Elkhodairy, Kadria; Freag, May; Elzoghby, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Micellization provides numerous merits for the delivery of water insoluble anti-cancer therapeutic agents including a nanosized 'core-shell' drug delivery system. Recently, hydrophobically-modified polysaccharides and proteins are attracting much attention as micelle forming polymers to entrap poorly soluble anti-cancer drugs. By virtue of their small size, the self-assembled micelles can passively target tumor tissues via enhanced permeation and retention effect (EPR). Moreover, the amphiphilic micelles can be exploited for active-targeted drug delivery by attaching specific targeting ligands to the outer micellar hydrophilic surface. Here, we review the conjugation techniques, drug loading methods, physicochemical characteristics of the most important amphiphilic polysaccharides and proteins used as anti-cancer drug delivery systems. Attention focuses on the mechanisms of tumor-targeting and enhanced anti-tumor efficacy of the encapsulated drugs. This review will highlight the remarkable advances of hydrophobized polysaccharide and protein micelles and their potential applications as anti-cancer drug delivery nanosystems. Micellar nanocarriers fabricated from amphiphilic natural polymers hold great promise as vehicles for anti-cancer drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. [Anti-angiogenic drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasufumi

    2010-06-01

    Angiogenesis or neovascularization, the formation of neo-vessels, is a physiological phenomenon endued in vasculature, but is involved in various pathological conditions. Angiogenesis is required for tumor growth and metastasis, and thus constitutes an important target for the control of tumor progression. Indeed, the recent development of bevacizumab, a neutralizing anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody as the first anti-angiogenic drug, legalized the clinical merit of anti-angiogenesis in cancers. Thereafter, various drugs targeting VEGF-mediated signals have been developed to control tumor angiogenesis. Thus, anti-angiogenic drugs are now recognized in the clinic as a major step forward for the treatment of cancers. This review focuses on the current status of antiangiogenesis treatment in cancers.

  11. Recent insights in nanotechnology-based drugs and formulations designed for effective anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piktel, Ewelina; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Wątek, Marzena; Wollny, Tomasz; Deptuła, Piotr; Bucki, Robert

    2016-05-26

    The rapid development of nanotechnology provides alternative approaches to overcome several limitations of conventional anti-cancer therapy. Drug targeting using functionalized nanoparticles to advance their transport to the dedicated site, became a new standard in novel anti-cancer methods. In effect, the employment of nanoparticles during design of antineoplastic drugs helps to improve pharmacokinetic properties, with subsequent development of high specific, non-toxic and biocompatible anti-cancer agents. However, the physicochemical and biological diversity of nanomaterials and a broad spectrum of unique features influencing their biological action requires continuous research to assess their activity. Among numerous nanosystems designed to eradicate cancer cells, only a limited number of them entered the clinical trials. It is anticipated that progress in development of nanotechnology-based anti-cancer materials will provide modern, individualized anti-cancer therapies assuring decrease in morbidity and mortality from cancer diseases. In this review we discussed the implication of nanomaterials in design of new drugs for effective antineoplastic therapy and describe a variety of mechanisms and challenges for selective tumor targeting. We emphasized the recent advantages in the field of nanotechnology-based strategies to fight cancer and discussed their part in effective anti-cancer therapy and successful drug delivery.

  12. Hedgehog Signals Mediate Anti-Cancer Drug Resistance in Three-Dimensional Primary Colorectal Cancer Organoid Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Usui

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer death worldwide. In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, combination treatment with several anti-cancer drugs is employed and improves overall survival in some patients. Nevertheless, most patients with metastatic disease are not cured owing to the drug resistance. Cancer stem cells are known to regulate resistance to chemotherapy. In the previous study, we established a novel three-dimensional organoid culture model from tumor colorectal tissues of human patients using an air–liquid interface (ALI method, which contained numerous cancer stem cells and showed resistance to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and Irinotecan. Here, we investigate which inhibitor for stem cell-related signal improves the sensitivity for anti-cancer drug treatment in tumor ALI organoids. Treatment with Hedgehog signal inhibitors (AY9944, GANT61 decreases the cell viability of organoids compared with Notch (YO-01027, DAPT and Wnt (WAV939, Wnt-C59 signal inhibitors. Combination treatment of AY9944 or GANT61 with 5-FU, Irinotecan or Oxaliplatin decreases the cell viability of tumor organoids compared with each anti-cancer drug alone treatment. Treatment with AY9944 or GANT61 inhibits expression of stem cell markers c-Myc, CD44 and Nanog, likely through the decrease of their transcription factor, GLI-1 expression. Combination treatment of AY9944 or GANT61 with 5-FU or Irinotecan also prevents colony formation of colorectal cancer cell lines HCT116 and SW480. These findings suggest that Hedgehog signals mediate anti-cancer drug resistance in colorectal tumor patient-derived ALI organoids and that the inhibitors are useful as a combinational therapeutic strategy against colorectal cancer.

  13. Effects of radiolabelled monoclonal antibody infusion on blood leukocytes in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gridley, D.S.; Slater, J.M.; Stickney, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of a single infusion of radiolabelled murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) on peripheral blood leukocytes in cancer patients. Eleven patients with disseminated colon cancer, malignant melanoma, or lung adenocarcinoma were infused with 111In-labelled anti-ZCE 025, anti-p97 type 96.5c, or LA 20207 MAb, respectively. Blood samples were obtained before infusion, immediately after infusion (1 hr), and at 4 and 7 days postinfusion. Flow cytometry analysis of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD16+, and CD19+ lymphocytes showed increasing CD4:CD8 ratios in seven patients after infusion. This phenomenon was not restricted to antibody subclass or to type of cancer. Two of the remaining patients exhibited a marked post-infusion increase in CD8+ cells. In all three patients with malignant melanoma, decreasing levels of CD16+ lymphocytes were noted after infusion and natural killer cell cytotoxicity showed fluctuations which paralleled the changes in the CD16+ subpopulation. Oxygen radical production by phagocytic cells was markedly affected in three subjects. These results suggest that a single infusion of radiolabelled murine MAb may alter the balance of critical lymphocyte subpopulations and modulate other leukocyte responses in cancer patients

  14. Ethnobotany and ethnopharmacy--their role for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Michael; Bremner, Paul

    2006-03-01

    Local and traditional knowledge has been the starting point for many successful drug development projects over the last decades. Here we discuss some examples of anti-cancer drugs which have had enormous impact as anti-cancer agents (camptothecan, taxol and derivatives) and a few examples of drugs currently under various stages of preclinical development. Ethnobotanists investigate the relationship between humans and plants in all its complexity, and such research is generally based on a detailed observation and study of the use a society makes of plants. The requirements of modern research on natural products as, for example, outlined in the Convention on Biological Diversity (Rio Convention) and the overall approach in ethnobotanical research are also discussed. Selected phytochemical-pharmacological studies based on traditional plant use are used to highlight the potential of ethnobotany driven anti-cancer research. The link between traditionally used plants and targets of the NF-kappaB pathway is discussed using on an EU-funded, multidisciplinary project as an example. Lastly the potential of chemopreventive agents derived from traditional food plants is briefly addressed.

  15. Complications Following Balloon-Occluded Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Pelvic Malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Koji; Hirota, Shozo; Imanaka, Kazufumi; Kawabe, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Yoshiharu; Takeuchi, Yasuhito

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and causes of complications associated with balloon-occluded arterial infusion chemotherapy (BOAI) for pelvic malignancies. Methods: In 34 courses of BOAI in 22 patients with pelvic malignancies, we analyzed the incidence of complications as well as the effect of the dose of the anticancer drugs, the infusion site, and the number of BOAI administrations on these complications. Complications were divided into two categories: cystitis-like symptoms and neurological complications such as pain, numbness, and paresthesia of the lower extremities and the hip. Results: Eleven patients (50%) suffered from complications, seven (31.8%) from neurological complications and four (18.2%) from cystitis-like symptoms. The complications appeared in 14 courses (42.4%) of BOAI, neurological complications in 10 (30.3%) and cystitis-like symptoms in four (12.1%). A high dose of anti-cancer drugs and infusion from the anterior division tended to induce neurological complications more frequently; however, the cystitis-like symptoms were not related to any factors. Conclusion: Our results indicate that a smaller dose of anti-cancer drugs should be infused from the bilateral internal iliac arteries for safer pelvic BOAI

  16. Use of paracoxib by continuous subcutaneous infusion for cancer pain in a hospice population

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, Peter; Wilkinson, Pauline; McCorry, Noleen

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To characterise the use of the parenteral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug parecoxib when given by continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) in a hospice population. Clinical experience suggests parecoxib CSCI may be of benefit in this population, but empirical evidence in relation to its safety and efficacy is lacking.Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients with a cancer diagnosis receiving parecoxib CSCI from 2008 to 2013 at the Marie Curie Hospice, Belfast. Data were ...

  17. Cytotoxicity Enhancement in Breast Cancer Cells with Carbonate Apatite-Facilitated Intracellular Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemian, Tahereh; Chowdhury, Ezharul Hoque

    2018-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy as the mainstay in the management of breast cancer has demonstrated various drawbacks, including non-targeted bio distribution and narrow therapeutic and safety windows. Thus, enhancements in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of the classical anti-cancer drugs could lead to improved efficacy against cancer cells. Therefore, inorganic pH-dependent carbonate apatite (CA) nanoparticles were utilized to efficiently deliver various drugs into cancer cells. Following characterization and various modifications in the structure of CA complexes with different drugs, lifted outcomes were achieved. Markedly, complexing paclitaxel with CA resulted in 20.71 ± 4.34% loading efficiency together with 24.14 ± 2.21% enhancement in cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells plus superior in vivo anti-tumour efficacy compared to free paclitaxel. PMID:29401738

  18. Cytotoxicity Enhancement in Breast Cancer Cells with Carbonate Apatite-Facilitated Intracellular Delivery of Anti-Cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh Fatemian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacotherapy as the mainstay in the management of breast cancer has demonstrated various drawbacks, including non-targeted bio distribution and narrow therapeutic and safety windows. Thus, enhancements in pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles of the classical anti-cancer drugs could lead to improved efficacy against cancer cells. Therefore, inorganic pH-dependent carbonate apatite (CA nanoparticles were utilized to efficiently deliver various drugs into cancer cells. Following characterization and various modifications in the structure of CA complexes with different drugs, lifted outcomes were achieved. Markedly, complexing paclitaxel with CA resulted in 20.71 ± 4.34% loading efficiency together with 24.14 ± 2.21% enhancement in cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cells plus superior in vivo anti-tumour efficacy compared to free paclitaxel.

  19. Robust prediction of anti-cancer drug sensitivity and sensitivity-specific biomarker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heewon Park

    Full Text Available The personal genomics era has attracted a large amount of attention for anti-cancer therapy by patient-specific analysis. Patient-specific analysis enables discovery of individual genomic characteristics for each patient, and thus we can effectively predict individual genetic risk of disease and perform personalized anti-cancer therapy. Although the existing methods for patient-specific analysis have successfully uncovered crucial biomarkers, their performance takes a sudden turn for the worst in the presence of outliers, since the methods are based on non-robust manners. In practice, clinical and genomic alterations datasets usually contain outliers from various sources (e.g., experiment error, coding error, etc. and the outliers may significantly affect the result of patient-specific analysis. We propose a robust methodology for patient-specific analysis in line with the NetwrokProfiler. In the proposed method, outliers in high dimensional gene expression levels and drug response datasets are simultaneously controlled by robust Mahalanobis distance in robust principal component space. Thus, we can effectively perform for predicting anti-cancer drug sensitivity and identifying sensitivity-specific biomarkers for individual patients. We observe through Monte Carlo simulations that the proposed robust method produces outstanding performances for predicting response variable in the presence of outliers. We also apply the proposed methodology to the Sanger dataset in order to uncover cancer biomarkers and predict anti-cancer drug sensitivity, and show the effectiveness of our method.

  20. Biodegradable polymers for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppalapudi, Sindhu; Jain, Anjali; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2016-06-01

    Biodegradable polymers have been used for more than three decades in cancer treatment and have received increased interest in recent years. A range of biodegradable polymeric drug delivery systems designed for localized and systemic administration of therapeutic agents as well as tumor-targeting macromolecules has entered into the clinical phase of development, indicating the significance of biodegradable polymers in cancer therapy. This review elaborates upon applications of biodegradable polymers in the delivery and targeting of anti-cancer agents. Design of various drug delivery systems based on biodegradable polymers has been described. Moreover, the indication of polymers in the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs via passive, active targeting, and localized drug delivery are also covered. Biodegradable polymer-based drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver the payload to the target and can enhance drug availability at desired sites. Systemic toxicity and serious side effects observed with conventional cancer therapeutics can be significantly reduced with targeted polymeric systems. Still, there are many challenges that need to be met with respect to the degradation kinetics of the system, diffusion of drug payload within solid tumors, targeting tumoral tissue and tumor heterogeneity.

  1. PhytoNanotechnology: Enhancing Delivery of Plant Based Anti-cancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabassum Khan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural resources continue to be an invaluable source of new, novel chemical entities of therapeutic utility due to the vast structural diversity observed in them. The quest for new and better drugs has witnessed an upsurge in exploring and harnessing nature especially for discovery of antimicrobial, antidiabetic, and anticancer agents. Nature has historically provide us with potent anticancer agents which include vinca alkaloids [vincristine (VCR, vinblastine, vindesine, vinorelbine], taxanes [paclitaxel (PTX, docetaxel], podophyllotoxin and its derivatives [etoposide (ETP, teniposide], camptothecin (CPT and its derivatives (topotecan, irinotecan, anthracyclines (doxorubicin, daunorubicin, epirubicin, idarubicin, and others. In fact, half of all the anti-cancer drugs approved internationally are either natural products or their derivatives and were developed on the basis of knowledge gained from small molecules or macromolecules that exist in nature. Three new anti-cancer drugs introduced in 2007, viz. trabectedin, epothilone derivative ixabepilone, and temsirolimus were obtained from microbial sources. Selective drug targeting is the need of the current therapeutic regimens for increased activity on cancer cells and reduced toxicity to normal cells. Nanotechnology driven modified drugs and drug delivery systems are being developed and introduced in the market for better cancer treatment and management with good results. The use of nanoparticulate drug carriers can resolve many challenges in drug delivery to the cancer cells that includes: improving drug solubility and stability, extending drug half-lives in the blood, reducing adverse effects in non-target organs, and concentrating drugs at the disease site. This review discusses the scientific ventures and explorations involving application of nanotechnology to some selected plant derived molecules. It presents a comprehensive review of formulation strategies of phytoconstituents in

  2. Nanotech revolution for the anti-cancer drug delivery through blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraglia, M; De Rosa, G; Salzano, G; Santini, D; Lamberti, M; Sperlongano, P; Lombardi, A; Abbruzzese, A; Addeo, R

    2012-03-01

    Nanotechnology-based drug delivery was born as a chance for pharmaceutical weapons to be delivered in the body sites where drug action is required. Specifically, the incorporation of anti-cancer agents in nanodevices of 100-300 nm allows their delivery in tissues that have a fenestrated vasculature and a reduced lymphatic drainage. These two features are typical of neoplastic tissues and, therefore, allow the accumulation of nanostructured devices in tumours. An important issue of anti-cancer pharmacological strategies is the overcoming of anatomical barriers such as the bloodbrain- barrier (BBB) that protects brain from toxicological injuries but, at the same time, makes impossible for most of the pharmacological agents with anti-cancer activity to reach tumour cells placed in the brain and derived from either primary tumours or metastases. In fact, only highly lipophilic molecules can passively diffuse through BBB to reach central nervous system (CNS). Another possibility is to use nanotechnological approaches as powerful tools to across BBB, by both prolonging the plasma half-life of the drugs and crossing fenestrations of BBB damaged by brain metastases. Moreover, modifications of nanocarrier surface with specific endogenous or exogenous ligands can promote the crossing of intact BBB as in the case of primary brain tumours. This aim can be achieved through the binding of the nanodevices to carriers or receptors expressed by the endothelial cells of BBB and that can favour the internalization of the nanostructured devices delivering anti-cancer drugs. This review summarizes the most meaningful advances in the field of nanotechnologies for brain delivery of drugs.

  3. Molecular chess? Hallmarks of anti-cancer drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, Ian A; Charlton, Peter

    2017-01-05

    The development of resistance is a problem shared by both classical chemotherapy and targeted therapy. Patients may respond well at first, but relapse is inevitable for many cancer patients, despite many improvements in drugs and their use over the last 40 years. Resistance to anti-cancer drugs can be acquired by several mechanisms within neoplastic cells, defined as (1) alteration of drug targets, (2) expression of drug pumps, (3) expression of detoxification mechanisms, (4) reduced susceptibility to apoptosis, (5) increased ability to repair DNA damage, and (6) altered proliferation. It is clear, however, that changes in stroma and tumour microenvironment, and local immunity can also contribute to the development of resistance. Cancer cells can and do use several of these mechanisms at one time, and there is considerable heterogeneity between tumours, necessitating an individualised approach to cancer treatment. As tumours are heterogeneous, positive selection of a drug-resistant population could help drive resistance, although acquired resistance cannot simply be viewed as overgrowth of a resistant cancer cell population. The development of such resistance mechanisms can be predicted from pre-existing genomic and proteomic profiles, and there are increasingly sophisticated methods to measure and then tackle these mechanisms in patients. The oncologist is now required to be at least one step ahead of the cancer, a process that can be likened to 'molecular chess'. Thus, as well as an increasing role for predictive biomarkers to clinically stratify patients, it is becoming clear that personalised strategies are required to obtain best results.

  4. Adjuvant Anti-Angiogenesis Drugs Are No Benefit in Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from a recent clinical trial show that post-surgical therapy with two anti-angiogenesis drugs does not improve progression-free survival for patients with kidney cancer and may cause serious side effects.

  5. International comparison of the factors influencing reimbursement of targeted anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Carol Sunghye; Lee, Yun-Gyoo; Koh, Youngil; Heo, Dae Seog

    2014-11-29

    Reimbursement policies for anti-cancer drugs vary among countries even though they rely on the same clinical evidence. We compared the pattern of publicly funded drug programs and analyzed major factors influencing the differences. We investigated reimbursement policies for 19 indications with targeted anti-cancer drugs that are used variably across ten countries. The available incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) data were retrieved for each indication. Based on the comparison between actual reimbursement decisions and the ICERs, we formulated a reimbursement adequacy index (RAI): calculating the proportion of cost-effective decisions, either reimbursement of cost-effective indications or non-reimbursement of cost-ineffective indications, out of the total number of indications for each country. The relationship between RAI and other indices were analyzed, including governmental dependency on health technology assessment, as well as other parameters for health expenditure. All the data used in this study were gathered from sources publicly available online. Japan and France were the most likely to reimburse indications (16/19), whereas Sweden and the United Kingdom were the least likely to reimburse them (5/19 and 6/19, respectively). Indications with high cost-effectiveness values were more likely to be reimbursed (ρ = -0.68, P = 0.001). The three countries with high RAI scores each had a healthcare system that was financed by general taxation. Although reimbursement policies for anti-cancer drugs vary among countries, we found a strong correlation of reimbursements for those indications with lower ICERs. Countries with healthcare systems financed by general taxation demonstrated greater cost-effectiveness as evidenced by reimbursement decisions of anti-cancer drugs.

  6. In Silico Identification and In Vitro and In Vivo Validation of Anti-Psychotic Drug Fluspirilene as a Potential CDK2 Inhibitor and a Candidate Anti-Cancer Drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Nan Shi

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Surgical resection and conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy ultimately fail due to tumor recurrence and HCC's resistance. The development of novel therapies against HCC is thus urgently required. The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK pathways are important and well-established targets for cancer treatment. In particular, CDK2 is a key factor regulating the cell cycle G1 to S transition and a hallmark for cancers. In this study, we utilized our free and open-source protein-ligand docking software, idock, prospectively to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 FDA-approved small molecule drugs using a repurposing strategy and an ensemble docking methodology. Sorted by average idock score, nine compounds were purchased and tested in vitro. Among them, the anti-psychotic drug fluspirilene exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effect in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 and Huh7 cells. We demonstrated for the first time that fluspirilene treatment significantly increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase, and decreased the expressions of CDK2, cyclin E and Rb, as well as the phosphorylations of CDK2 on Thr160 and Rb on Ser795. We also examined the anti-cancer effect of fluspirilene in vivo in BALB/C nude mice subcutaneously xenografted with human hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells. Our results showed that oral fluspirilene treatment significantly inhibited tumor growth. Fluspirilene (15 mg/kg exhibited strong anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of the leading cancer drug 5-fluorouracil (10 mg/kg. Moreover, the cocktail treatment with fluspirilene and 5-fluorouracil exhibited the highest therapeutic effect. These results suggested for the first time that fluspirilene is a potential CDK2 inhibitor and a candidate anti-cancer drug for the treatment of human hepatocellular carcinoma. In view of the fact that fluspirilene has a long history

  7. Digital subtraction angiography of inferior gluteal artery through the infusion catheter of chemotherapy for bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Satoru; Noguchi, Ryosuke; Kanoh, Shori; Shimazui, Toru; Uchida, Katsunori; Nemoto, Ryosuke; Koiso, Kenkichi

    1987-01-01

    More than fifty patients of invasive bladder cancer had been treated by selective intra-arterial chemotherapy through the inferior or superior gluteal arteries. The distribution of infused drugs had been evaluated by RI-angiography through a thin arterial infusion catheter. This time we performed digital subtraction angiography (DSA) through an infusion catheter in order to know the precise distribution of infused materials in seven patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. Pharmaco-DSA with norepinephrine was also done in four patients. Satisfactory spatial and contrast resolution were gained in four patients and pharmaco-DSA showed better quality. In our experience DSA through intra-arterial infusion catheter was a useful procedure in the evaluation of distribution of infused drugs. (author)

  8. Pricing appraisal of anti-cancer drugs in the South East Asian, Western Pacific and East Mediterranean Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, Shahrzad; Lee, Kah Seng; Ming, Long Chiau; Neoh, Chin Fen; Elrggal, Mahmoud E; Babar, Zaheer-Ud- Din; Khan, Tahir Mehmood; Hadi, Muhammad Abdul

    2017-12-28

    Globally, cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality. High treatment cost, partly owing to higher prices of anti-cancer drugs, presents a significant burden on patients and healthcare systems. The aim of the present study was to survey and compare retail prices of anti-cancer drugs between high, middle and low income countries in the South-East Asia, Western Pacific and Eastern Mediterranean regions. Cross-sectional survey design was used for the present study. Pricing data from ten counties including one from South-East Asia, two from Western Pacific and seven from Eastern Mediterranean regions were used in this study. Purchasing power parity (PPP)-adjusted mean unit prices for 26 anti-cancer drug presentations (similar pharmaceutical form, strength, and pack size) were used to compare prices of anti-cancer drugs across three regions. A structured form was used to extract relevant data. Data were entered and analysed using Microsoft Excel®. Overall, Taiwan had the lowest mean unit prices while Oman had the highest prices. Six (23.1%) and nine (34.6%) drug presentations had a mean unit price below US$100 and between US$100 and US$500 respectively. Eight drug presentations (30.7%) had a mean unit price of more than US$1000 including cabazitaxel with a mean unit price of $17,304.9/vial. There was a direct relationship between income category of the countries and their mean unit price; low-income countries had lower mean unit prices. The average PPP-adjusted unit prices for countries based on their income level were as follows: low middle-income countries (LMICs): US$814.07; high middle income countries (HMICs): US$1150.63; and high income countries (HICs): US$1148.19. There is a great variation in pricing of anticancer drugs in selected countires and within their respective regions. These findings will allow policy makers to compare prices of anti-cancer agents with neighbouring countries and develop policies to ensure accessibility and affordability of

  9. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishii, Isao [Department of Biochemistry, Keio University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Harada, Yasuo [Fujii Memorial Research Institute, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Shiga (Japan); Kasahara, Tadashi, E-mail: isao-ishii@umin.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Keio University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2012-10-02

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration.

  10. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao eIshii

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pyrvinium pamoate (PP is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration.

  11. Reprofiling a classical anthelmintic, pyrvinium pamoate, as an anti-cancer drug targeting mitochondrial respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Isao; Harada, Yasuo; Kasahara, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    Pyrvinium pamoate (PP) is an FDA-approved classical anthelmintic, but is now attracting particular attention as an anti-cancer drug after recent findings of its potent cytotoxicity against various cancer cell lines only during glucose starvation, as well as its anti-tumor activity against hypovascular pancreatic cancer cells transplanted in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which PP promotes such preferential toxicity against cancer cells are currently under extensive investigation. PP suppressed the NADH-fumarate reductase system that mediates a reverse reaction of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex II in anaerobic organisms such as parasitic helminthes or mammalian cells under tumor microenvironment-mimicking hypoglycemic/hypoxic conditions, thereby inhibiting efficient ATP production. PP also inhibited the unfolded protein response induced by glucose starvation, thereby inhibiting the proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells. Even under normoglycemic/normoxic conditions, PP suppressed the mitochondrial electron-transport chain complex I and thereby STAT3, inhibiting the proliferation of myeloma/erythroleukemia cells. Here, we review accumulating knowledge on its working mechanisms and evaluate PP as a novel anti-cancer drug that targets mitochondrial respiration.

  12. Curcumin as a clinically-promising anti-cancer agent: pharmacokinetics and drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwidjaja, Jeffry; McLachlan, Andrew J; Boddy, Alan V

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin has been extensively studied for its anti-cancer properties. While a diverse array of in vitro and preclinical research support the prospect of curcumin use as an anti-cancer therapeutic, most human studies have failed to meet the intended clinical expectation. Poor systemic availability of orally-administered curcumin may account for this disparity. Areas covered: This descriptive review aims to concisely summarise available clinical studies investigating curcumin pharmacokinetics when administered in different formulations. A critical analysis of pharmacokinetic- and pharmacodynamic-based interactions of curcumin with concomitantly administered drugs is also provided. Expert opinion: The encouraging clinical results of curcumin administration are currently limited to people with colorectal cancer, given that sufficient curcumin concentrations persist in colonic mucosa. Higher parent curcumin systemic exposure, which can be achieved by several newer formulations, has important implications for optimal treatment of cancers other than those in gastrointestinal tract. Curcumin-drug pharmacokinetic interactions are also almost exclusively in the enterocytes, owing to extensive first pass metabolism and poor curcumin bioavailability. Greater scope of these interactions, i.e. modulation of the systemic elimination of co-administered drugs, may be expected from more-bioavailable curcumin formulations. Further studies are still warranted, especially with newer formulations to support the inclusion of curcumin in cancer therapy regimens.

  13. Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yasuaki; Kido, Choichiro

    1987-01-01

    Some techniques of the most recent interventional radiology are very useful for the treatment of metastatic liver cancer and changing the style of hepatic infusion chemotherapy. This report shows our latest results and methods of hepatic infusion chemotherapy for metastatic liver cancer. 1. For the catheter placement, a new catheterization route via the left subclavian artery into the hepatic artery was developed and performed in 132 cases. Superselective catheterization succeeded in 123 cases (93.2 %). This procedure is less invasive than laparotomy and less troublesome than other percutaneous routes. 2. For useful infusion system, an implantable injection port ''Reservoir'' was developed and it was used in 87 cases. This method makes arterial infusion chemotherapy easy, and imploves their quality of life. 3. To acquire adequate drug delivery, arterial redistribution by steel coils was done, and 109 arteries in 80 cases were occluded. This method is very useful to make multiple hepatic artery single and it is important to avoid gasroduodenal complications. 4. Now, using these techniques, the phase II study of 5FU, ADM, MMC combined hepatic infusion in patients with non-resectable metastatic liver cancer is done. Up to this time, such a phase study on arterial infusion chemotherapy was difficult because of technical problems, but these new techniques make it possible. In conclusion, these new methods change the style and conception of hepatic infusion, and these make much progress on the treatment of patients with metastatic liver cancer. (author)

  14. When ubiquitin meets NF-κB: a trove for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Yuling

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades, the studies on ubiquitination in regulating transcription factor NF-κB activation have elucidated the expanding role of ubiquitination in modulating cellular events by non-proteolytic mechanisms, as well as by proteasomal degradation. The significance of ubiquitination has also been recognized in regulating gene transcription, epigenetic modifications, kinase activation, DNA repair and subcellular translocation. This progress has been translated into novel strategies for developing anti-cancer therapeutics, exemplified by the success of the first FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor drug Bortezomib. Here we discuss the current understanding of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and how it is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling pathways in response to a variety of stimuli. We also focus on the recent progress of anti-cancer drug development targeting various steps of ubiquitination process, and the potential of these drugs in cancer treatment as related to their impact on NF-κB activation.

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdoodt, Freija; Friis, Søren; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use has been linked to a reduction in the risk of several cancer types. For endometrial cancer, however, results have been inconsistent. To summarize the available evidence on the risk of endometrial cancer associated with use of aspirin...... a random effects model. RESULTS: Six case-control and seven cohort studies were found eligible for our meta-analysis. We observed risk reductions in endometrial cancer associated with regular use of aspirin (case-control: 11%, cohort: 8%) and NA-NSAIDs (case-control: 9%, cohort: 6%), compared to non...

  16. Data of a fluorescent imaging-based analysis of anti-cancer drug effects on three-dimensional cultures of breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junji Itou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional (3D cell culture is a powerful tool to study cell growth under 3D condition. To perform a simple test for anti-cancer drugs in 3D culture, visualization of non-proliferated cells is required. We propose a fluorescent imaging-based assay to analyze cancer cell proliferation in 3D culture. We used a pulse-labeling technique with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede to identify non-proliferated cells. This assay allows us to observe change in cell proliferation in 3D culture by simple imaging. Using this assay, we obtained the data of the effects of anti-cancer drugs, 5-fluorouracil and PD0332991 in a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7.

  17. The impact of anti-diabetic drugs on colorectal cancer risk in a large ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    risk of cancers (1Б4). In Decensi et al.'s meta-analysis, a. 31% reduction of overall cancer risk (95% CI00.61Б0.79) is found in patients using metformin compared with the other anti-diabetic drugs (2). The present study also showed women with ever-use of metformin could have a. 58% reduced risk of colorectal cancer.

  18. Clinical nursing of pelvic neoplasm treated with infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Li; Yuan Chanjuan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical nursing care for patients with pelvic neoplasm who were treated with infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system. Methods: After the implantation of an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system was successfully completed, intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy was carried out in 17 patients with pelvic neoplasm and the infusion chemotherapy was repeated for several times. The pre-procedural clinical nursing care was well done and the technique of proper placement was well grasped. The side effects of chemotherapy drugs and complications were dealt with in time. Medical orientation at discharge time included the protection methods for port-catheter system. Results: Seventeen patients received infusion chemotherapy successfully several times (ranged from 3 to 8 times) with a scheduled regular interval time. No severe complications occurred. No catheter leakage nor obvious irritation and compression symptoms of local skin developed during infusion period. Of the 17 patients, 6 had a complete response, 9 achieved a partial response, while the remaining 2 failed to respond. Conclusion: In accordance with characteristics of infusion chemotherapy by using an anti-reflux arterial port-catheter system, the reasonable and effective nursing care is important to guarantee the achievement of a successful performance and a satisfactory therapeutic result. (authors)

  19. Mitochondrial DNA is a direct target of anti-cancer anthracycline drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashley, Neil; Poulton, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    The anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DXR), are potent anti-cancer drugs but they are limited by their clinical toxicity. The mechanisms involved remain poorly understood partly because of the difficulty in determining sub-cellular drug localisation. Using a novel method utilising the fluorescent DNA dye PicoGreen, we found that anthracyclines intercalated not only into nuclear DNA but also mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Intercalation of mtDNA by anthracyclines may thus contribute to the marked mitochondrial toxicity associated with these drugs. By contrast, ethidium bromide intercalated exclusively into mtDNA, without interacting with nuclear DNA, thereby explaining why mtDNA is the main target for ethidium. By exploiting PicoGreen quenching we also developed a novel assay for quantification of mtDNA levels by flow-cytometry, an approach which should be useful for studies of mitochondrial dysfunction. In summary our PicoGreen assay should be useful to study drug/DNA interactions within live cells, and facilitate therapeutic drug monitoring and kinetic studies in cancer patients.

  20. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Raj [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Advanced Material Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Siril, Prem Felix, E-mail: prem@iitmandi.ac.in [School of Basic Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Advanced Material Research Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Mandi, Mandi, Himachal Pradesh 175005 (India); Javid, Farideh [School of Applied Science, University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield HD1 3DH (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30 nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared. • Particle sizes were

  1. Unusual anti-leukemia activity of nanoformulated naproxen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Raj; Siril, Prem Felix; Javid, Farideh

    2016-01-01

    The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most widely used pharmaceuticals worldwide. Interestingly, many of them have significant anticancer properties too. However, the poor water solubility of certain NSAIDs limits their application for cancer treatment. Nanosizing of such drugs can help to improve the solubility and this may result in enhanced anticancer activities too. Moreover, over dosages and the accompanying side effects of NSAIDs can be minimized by improving their solubility and bioavailability. Successful nanoformulation of three NSAIDs: ibuprofen (IBP), ketoprufen (KP) and naproxen (NAP) using a novel evaporation assisted solvent-antisolvent interaction (EASAI) method is reported here. Three water soluble and biocompatible polymers: polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were used to stabilize the drug nanoparticles. Particles having spherical morphology with average size below 30 nm were thoroughly characterized using dynamic light scattering and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) imaging. The nanoformulation resulted in ten to fifteen fold improvements in the solubility and significant enhancement in the in-vitro drug release profiles of the NSAIDs. Anticancer screening of the nanoformulated NSAIDs against five different cancer cell lines such as MCF-7 (Human breast cancer cell line), (Human pancreatic cancer cell line) MIA-PA-CA-2, (Human colon cancer cell line) HT-29, (Human leukemia cell line) Jurkat and (human ovarian carcinoma cell line) A2780 was performed. All the nanoformulated samples showed improved anticancer activity against the Leukemia cancer cell line, out of which NAP-PVP showed the highest anti-cancer activity. The anti-Leukemia activity of NAP-PVP was more than twice that of doxorubicin which is a standard anticancer drug. - Highlights: • Nanoparticles of three non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared. • Particle sizes were

  2. Guide to intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for pancreatic cancers (draft text)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of most malignant solid tumors. Trans-arterial infusion chemotherapy has been used for the inoperable pancreatic cancers. The local drug concentration in intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy is much higher than that in intravenous chemotherapy. Thus, a better therapeutic effect can be surely achieved, the disease-related symptoms can be well improved, the patient's survival time can be markedly prolonged, and the liver metastases can be effectively reduced. This paper aims to suggest a more detailed and standardized therapeutic scheme to perform intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for inoperable pancreatic cancers, focusing on the relevant concept, contraindications, indications, preoperative preparation, methods of operation, postoperative treatment, the prevention and treatment of complications, etc. The scheme will help domestic interventional physicians to make reasonable decisions in their clinical practice. Of course, the scheme proposed here is not a mandatory standard, and it can not resolve all the problems which might be encountered in employing intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy for patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. Therefore, the interventional physicians should fully understand the most useful medical evidence of a given patient and sincerely take the patient's own will into consideration before an individualized and reasonable therapeutic plan is able to be worked out. (authors)

  3. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 10"8 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer. (paper)

  4. Optimization of anti-cancer drugs and a targeting molecule on multifunctional gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, Nahla; Christoforou, Nicolas; Lee, Sungmun

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most common and deadly cancer among women worldwide. Currently, nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems are useful for cancer treatment; however, strategic planning is critical in order to enhance the anti-cancer properties and reduce the side effects of cancer therapy. Here, we designed multifunctional gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) conjugated with two anti-cancer drugs, TGF-β1 antibody and methotrexate, and a cancer-targeting molecule, folic acid. First, optimum size and shape of AuNPs was selected by the highest uptake of AuNPs by MDA-MB-231, a metastatic human breast cancer cell line. It was 100 nm spherical AuNPs (S-AuNPs) that were used for further studies. A fixed amount (900 μl) of S-AuNP (3.8 × 108 particles/ml) was conjugated with folic acid-BSA or methotrexate-BSA. Methotrexate on S-AuNP induced cellular toxicity and the optimum amount of methotrexate-BSA (2.83 mM) was 500 μl. Uptake of S-AuNPs was enhanced by folate conjugation that binds to folate receptors overexpressed by MDA-MB-231 and the optimum uptake was at 500 μl of folic acid-BSA (2.83 mM). TGF-β1 antibody on S-AuNP reduced extracellular TGF-β1 of cancer cells by 30%. Due to their efficacy and tunable properties, we anticipate numerous clinical applications of multifunctional gold nanospheres in treating breast cancer.

  5. An in vivo C. elegans model system for screening EGFR-inhibiting anti-cancer drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ki Bae

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a well-established target for cancer treatment. EGFR tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitors, such as gefinitib and erlotinib, have been developed as anti-cancer drugs. Although non-small cell lung carcinoma with an activating EGFR mutation, L858R, responds well to gefinitib and erlotinib, tumors with a doubly mutated EGFR, T790M-L858R, acquire resistance to these drugs. The C. elegans EGFR homolog LET-23 and its downstream signaling pathway have been studied extensively to provide insight into regulatory mechanisms conserved from C. elegans to humans. To develop an in vivo screening system for potential cancer drugs targeting specific EGFR mutants, we expressed three LET-23 chimeras in which the TK domain was replaced with either the human wild-type TK domain (LET-23::hEGFR-TK, a TK domain with the L858R mutation (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R], or a TK domain with the T790M-L858R mutations (LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] in C. elegans vulval cells using the let-23 promoter. The wild-type hEGFR-TK chimeric protein rescued the let-23 mutant phenotype, and the activating mutant hEGFR-TK chimeras induced a multivulva (Muv phenotype in a wild-type C. elegans background. The anti-cancer drugs gefitinib and erlotinib suppressed the Muv phenotype in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[L858R]-expressing transgenic animals, but not in LET-23::hEGFR-TK[T790M-L858R] transgenic animals. As a pilot screen, 8,960 small chemicals were tested for Muv suppression, and AG1478 (an EGFR-TK inhibitor and U0126 (a MEK inhibitor were identified as potential inhibitors of EGFR-mediated biological function. In conclusion, transgenic C. elegans expressing chimeric LET-23::hEGFR-TK proteins are a model system that can be used in mutation-specific screens for new anti-cancer drugs.

  6. Palliation of inoperable head and neck cancer: combined intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, A.L.; Meeker, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Palliation of unresectable head and neck cancer remains a difficult problem. Because of excellent results reported by others with infusion of vinblastine, methotrexate, and 5-fluorouracil into the external carotid artery followed by irradiation before curative surgery, we applied this technic to 22 patients with advanced head and neck cancer. Fifteen patients from this group who had chemotherapy infusion followed by radiation therapy are compared with 21 patients who received radiation therapy alone. Both groups were similar in distribution of primary site, histology, and TNM stage. Of 15 patients, 14 (93%) had partial or complete tumor regression after both arterial chemotherapy infusion and irradiation, while 14 of 17 patients (82%) receiving primary irradiation had partial or complete response. Drug toxicity and complications related to infusion occurred in all patients. Most patients in both groups had short survivals (mean of 14.1 months in infusion chemotherapy and radiation vs 9.1 months in primary irradiation). One patient remains alive in the infusion group and two in the control group; however, all have recurrent disease. Results indicate a slight increase in survival time with the addition of infusion chemotherapy to irradiation in palliative treatment of head and neck cancer

  7. COX-independent mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention by anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim eGurpinar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, including cyclooxygenase (COX-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention.

  8. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, Variation in Inflammatory Genes, and Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S. Witte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that prostatic inflammation plays a key role in the development of prostate cancer. It remains controversial whether non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Here, we investigate how a previously reported inverse association between NSAID use and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer is modulated by variants in several inflammatory genes. We found that NSAIDs may have differential effects on prostate cancer development, depending on one’s genetic makeup. Further study of these inflammatory pathways may clarify the mechanisms through which NSAIDs impact prostate cancer risk.

  9. Prospect of drug distribution to hepatic cancer in intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy. Examination by infusion of sup(81m)Kr and /sup 133/Xe via catheter into hepatic artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Y; Imaoka, S; Matsui, Y; Ishikawa, O; Taniguchi, K [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan)

    1982-04-01

    Cannulation into the hepatic artery under laparotomy was performed to nine patients of non-resectable hepatic cancer (eight of hepatocellular carcinoma, and one of cholangiocellular carcinoma), and injected sup(81m)Kr (Tsub(1/2) = 13 sec.) continuously via catheter into hepatic artery as the model of continuous intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy, and /sup 133/Xe (Tsub(1/2) = 5.3 days) by bolus injection as the model of one-shot ones. During and immediately after injection, sequential scintigrams were carried out and simultaneously images were acquired on a medical computer. Higher radioactivities of both sup(81m)Kr and /sup 133/Xe were observed in tumor than non-tumor region in seven of eight patients of hepatocellular carcinoma. The radioactive ratio of tumor to non-tumor (T/C ratio) was over 1.0 in these cases. This result indicated that there was more arterial blood flow in tumor than non-tumor region, and it could be expected to obtain higher distribution of drugs in tumor on both continuous and one-shot infusion chemotherapy. The pattern of distribution of sup(81m)Kr changed according to positions of patients, and in some cases T/C ratio was higher in other positions than supine position. The most effective position of the intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy could be selected by this method. This technique seems to make it possible to prospect the arrival of drugs to the tumor and presume the effectiveness of intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy.

  10. Rational drug design for anti-cancer chemotherapy: multi-target QSAR models for the in silico discovery of anti-colorectal cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Luan, Feng; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2012-08-01

    The discovery of new and more potent anti-cancer agents constitutes one of the most active fields of research in chemotherapy. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most studied cancers because of its high prevalence and number of deaths. In the current pharmaceutical design of more efficient anti-CRC drugs, the use of methodologies based on Chemoinformatics has played a decisive role, including Quantitative-Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) techniques. However, until now, there is no methodology able to predict anti-CRC activity of compounds against more than one CRC cell line, which should constitute the principal goal. In an attempt to overcome this problem we develop here the first multi-target (mt) approach for the virtual screening and rational in silico discovery of anti-CRC agents against ten cell lines. Here, two mt-QSAR classification models were constructed using a large and heterogeneous database of compounds. The first model was based on linear discriminant analysis (mt-QSAR-LDA) employing fragment-based descriptors while the second model was obtained using artificial neural networks (mt-QSAR-ANN) with global 2D descriptors. Both models correctly classified more than 90% of active and inactive compounds in training and prediction sets. Some fragments were extracted from the molecules and their contributions to anti-CRC activity were calculated using mt-QSAR-LDA model. Several fragments were identified as potential substructural features responsible for the anti-CRC activity and new molecules designed from those fragments with positive contributions were suggested and correctly predicted by the two models as possible potent and versatile anti-CRC agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti-hypertensive drugs and skin cancer risk: a review of the literature and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Sara; Palli, Domenico; Spadola, Giuseppe; Bendinelli, Benedetta; Cocorocchio, Emilia; Stanganelli, Ignazio; Miligi, Lucia; Masala, Giovanna; Caini, Saverio

    2018-02-01

    Several anti-hypertensive drugs have photosensitizing properties, however it remains unclear whether long-term users of these drugs are also at increased risk of skin malignancies. We conducted a literature review and meta-analysis on the association between use of anti-hypertensive drugs and the risk of cutaneous melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Library, and included observational and experimental epidemiological studies published until February 28th, 2017. We calculated summary relative risk (SRR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) through random effect models to estimate the risk of skin malignancies among users of the following classes of anti-hypertensive drugs: thiazide diuretics, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB), calcium channel blockers (CCB) and β-blockers. We conducted sub-group and sensitivity analysis to explore causes of between-studies heterogeneity, and assessed publication bias using a funnel-plot based approach. Nineteen independent studies were included in the meta-analysis. CCB users were at increased skin cancer risk (SRR 1.14, 95% CI 1.07-1.21), and β-blockers users were at increased risk of developing cutaneous melanoma (SRR 1.21, 95% CI 1.05-1.40), with acceptable between-studies heterogeneity (I 2  skin cancer risk. We found no evidence of publication bias affecting the results. Family doctors and clinicians should inform their patients about the increased risk of skin cancer associated with the use of CCB and β-blockers and instruct them to perform periodic skin self-examination. Further studies are warranted to elucidate the observed associations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs and Cancer Death in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thea Veitonmäki

    Full Text Available Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, especially aspirin, have been associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality. We examined overall cancer mortality and mortality from specific cancer sites among the 80,144 men in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial. Information on prescription drug use was acquired from the national drug reimbursement database. Over-the-counter use information was gathered by a questionnaire. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI by prescription and over-the-counter NSAID use for overall and specific cancer deaths were calculated using Cox regression. During the median follow-up time of 15 years, 7,008 men died from cancer. Men with prescription NSAID use had elevated cancer mortality (HR 2.02 95% CI 1.91-2.15 compared to non-users. The mortality risk was increased for lung, colorectal and pancreas cancer mortality (HR 2.68, 95%CI 2.40-2.99, HR 1.91, 95% CI 1.57-2.32 and HR 1.93, 95% CI 1.58-2.37, respectively. The increased risk remained in competing risks regression (HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.05-1.18. When the usage during the last three years of follow-up was excluded, the effect was reversed (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65-0.73. Cancer mortality was not decreased for prescription or over-the-counter aspirin use. However, in the competing risk regression analysis combined prescription and over-the-counter aspirin use was associated with decreased overall cancer mortality (HR 0.76, 95% CI 0.70-0.82. Cancer mortality was increased for NSAID users. However, the risk disappeared when the last 3 years were excluded.

  13. Selected Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy Combined with Target Drugs 
for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Multiple Brain Metastase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinduo LI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of selected arterial infusion chemotherapy in treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with multiple brain metastases and corresponding factors to influencing prognosis. Methods From September 2008 to October 2011, a total of 31 patients of NSCLC with multiple brain metastases (≥3 received selected incranial, bronchial and corresponding target arterial infusion chemotherapy combined with EGFR-TKIs. Interventional treatment was performed every four weeks, two-six cycles with synchronized or sequential targeted drugs (erlotinib, gefitinib or icotinib. Follow-up CT and MRI were regularly finished at interval of four weeks after two cycles of interventional treatment were finished or during taking targeted drugs in order to evaluate efficacy of the therapy. The procedure was stopped for the tumor disease was worse or the patient could not tolerate the toxity of drugs any longer. Results 31 patients was performed two to six cycles of interventional therapy, 3cycles at average. Response assessment showed that 5 (16.1% patients got a complete response (CR, 7 (22.6% had a partial response (PR, 11 (35.5% had a stable disease (SD and 8 (25.8% had a progressive disease (PD. The objective response rate (ORR was 38.7%, and the disease control rate was 74.2%. The median progression free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were 13.1 months and 15.1 months. The 6-month survival rate, one-year survival rate and two-year survival rate were 79%, 61.1%, and 31.1%, respectively. The patients’ OS and PFS were influenced by smoking state, tumor pathology, extracranial metastases, period of targeted drug taking and performance status, not by sex, age, before therapy and the total of brain metastases. Conclusion Selected arterial infusion chemotherapy with targeted drugs is one of the most effective and safe treatment to NSCLC with multiple brain metastases. Smoking status, tumor

  14. In silico identification of anti-cancer compounds and plants from traditional Chinese medicine database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Shao-Xing; Li, Wen-Xing; Han, Fei-Fei; Guo, Yi-Cheng; Zheng, Jun-Juan; Liu, Jia-Qian; Wang, Qian; Gao, Yue-Dong; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2016-05-01

    There is a constant demand to develop new, effective, and affordable anti-cancer drugs. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a valuable and alternative resource for identifying novel anti-cancer agents. In this study, we aim to identify the anti-cancer compounds and plants from the TCM database by using cheminformatics. We first predicted 5278 anti-cancer compounds from TCM database. The top 346 compounds were highly potent active in the 60 cell lines test. Similarity analysis revealed that 75% of the 5278 compounds are highly similar to the approved anti-cancer drugs. Based on the predicted anti-cancer compounds, we identified 57 anti-cancer plants by activity enrichment. The identified plants are widely distributed in 46 genera and 28 families, which broadens the scope of the anti-cancer drug screening. Finally, we constructed a network of predicted anti-cancer plants and approved drugs based on the above results. The network highlighted the supportive role of the predicted plant in the development of anti-cancer drug and suggested different molecular anti-cancer mechanisms of the plants. Our study suggests that the predicted compounds and plants from TCM database offer an attractive starting point and a broader scope to mine for potential anti-cancer agents.

  15. Drug Repositioning for Effective Prostate Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turanli, Beste; Grøtli, Morten; Boren, Jan; Nielsen, Jens; Uhlen, Mathias; Arga, Kazim Y; Mardinoglu, Adil

    2018-01-01

    Drug repositioning has gained attention from both academia and pharmaceutical companies as an auxiliary process to conventional drug discovery. Chemotherapeutic agents have notorious adverse effects that drastically reduce the life quality of cancer patients so drug repositioning is a promising strategy to identify non-cancer drugs which have anti-cancer activity as well as tolerable adverse effects for human health. There are various strategies for discovery and validation of repurposed drugs. In this review, 25 repurposed drug candidates are presented as result of different strategies, 15 of which are already under clinical investigation for treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). To date, zoledronic acid is the only repurposed, clinically used, and approved non-cancer drug for PCa. Anti-cancer activities of existing drugs presented in this review cover diverse and also known mechanisms such as inhibition of mTOR and VEGFR2 signaling, inhibition of PI3K/Akt signaling, COX and selective COX-2 inhibition, NF-κB inhibition, Wnt/β-Catenin pathway inhibition, DNMT1 inhibition, and GSK-3β inhibition. In addition to monotherapy option, combination therapy with current anti-cancer drugs may also increase drug efficacy and reduce adverse effects. Thus, drug repositioning may become a key approach for drug discovery in terms of time- and cost-efficiency comparing to conventional drug discovery and development process.

  16. Biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy: a novel strategy in drug development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eStenvang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of mortality worldwide and matters are only set to worsen as its incidence continues to rise. Traditional approaches to combat cancer include improved prevention, early diagnosis, optimized surgery, development of novel drugs and honing regimens of existing anti-cancer drugs. Although discovery and development of novel and effective anti-cancer drugs is a major research area, it is well known that oncology drug development is a lengthy process, extremely costly and with high attrition rates. Furthermore, those drugs that do make it through the drug development mill are often quite expensive, laden with severe side-effects and, unfortunately, to date, have only demonstrated minimal increases in overall survival. Therefore, a strong interest has emerged to identify approved non-cancer drugs that possess anti-cancer activity, thus shortcutting the development process. This research strategy is commonly known as drug repurposing or drug repositioning and provides a faster path to the clinics. We have developed and implemented a modification of the standard drug repurposing strategy that we review here; rather than investigating target-promiscuous non-cancer drugs for possible anti-cancer activity, we focus on the discovery of novel cancer indications for already approved chemotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs. Clinical implementation of this strategy is normally commenced at clinical phase II trials and includes pre-treated patients. As the response rates to any non-standard chemotherapeutic drug will be relatively low in such a patient cohort it is a pre-requisite that such testing is based on predictive biomarkers. This review describes our strategy of biomarker-guided repurposing of chemotherapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, taking the repurposing of topoisomerase I inhibitors and topoisomerase I as a potential predictive biomarker as case in point.

  17. Tumor and liver drug uptake following hepatic artery and portal vein infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurdson, E.R.; Ridge, J.A.; Kemeny, N.; Daly, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Anatomic dye injection studies of the blood supply of colorectal hepatic metastases suggest that tumors are supplied predominantly by the hepatic artery. Using 13 N amino acids with dynamic gamma camera imaging in patients with colorectal hepatic metastases, it has been shown that hepatic artery infusion results in a significantly greater nutrient delivery to tumor compared with portal vein infusion. However, direct measurements of drug levels in tumor following hepatic artery and portal vein infusion in humans have not previously been reported. Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer confined to the liver received fluorodeoxyuridine (FUdR) through the hepatic artery or through the portal vein. All patients had previously failed systemic chemotherapy. Five patients with hepatic artery catheters were matched (by age, serum lactic dehydrogenase levels, percent hepatic replacement, and tumor size) with five patients with portal vein catheters. At operation, 3 H-FUdR (1 microCi/kg) and /sup 99m/Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) (6 mCi) were injected into the hepatic artery or portal vein. Liver and tumor biopsies were obtained two and five minutes later. 3 H and /sup 99m/Tc were measured per gram tissue by scintillation and gamma counting. The mean liver levels following hepatic artery infusion (23.9 +/- 11.4 nmol/g) and portal vein infusion (18.4 +/- 14.5 nmol/g) did not differ. However, the mean tumor FUdR level following hepatic artery infusion was 12.4 +/- 12.2 nmol/g, compared with a mean tumor FUdR level following portal vein infusion of 0.8 +/- 0.7 nmol/g (P less than .01). This low level of tumor drug uptake after portal vein infusion of FUdR predicts minimal tumor response to treatment via this route. Thus, regional chemotherapy for established colorectal hepatic metastases should be administered through the hepatic artery

  18. Chemical dissection of the cell cycle: probes for cell biology and anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senese, S; Lo, Y C; Huang, D; Zangle, T A; Gholkar, A A; Robert, L; Homet, B; Ribas, A; Summers, M K; Teitell, M A; Damoiseaux, R; Torres, J Z

    2014-10-16

    Cancer cell proliferation relies on the ability of cancer cells to grow, transition through the cell cycle, and divide. To identify novel chemical probes for dissecting the mechanisms governing cell cycle progression and cell division, and for developing new anti-cancer therapeutics, we developed and performed a novel cancer cell-based high-throughput chemical screen for cell cycle modulators. This approach identified novel G1, S, G2, and M-phase specific inhibitors with drug-like properties and diverse chemotypes likely targeting a broad array of processes. We further characterized the M-phase inhibitors and highlight the most potent M-phase inhibitor MI-181, which targets tubulin, inhibits tubulin polymerization, activates the spindle assembly checkpoint, arrests cells in mitosis, and triggers a fast apoptotic cell death. Importantly, MI-181 has broad anti-cancer activity, especially against BRAF(V600E) melanomas.

  19. Effect of heterogeneous microvasculature distribution on drug delivery to solid tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Wenbo; Xu, Xiao Yun; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw

    2014-01-01

    Most of the computational models of drug transport in vascular tumours assume a uniform distribution of blood vessels through which anti-cancer drugs are delivered. However, it is well known that solid tumours are characterized by dilated microvasculature with non-uniform diameters and irregular branching patterns. In this study, the effect of heterogeneous vasculature on drug transport and uptake is investigated by means of mathematical modelling of the key physical and biochemical processes in drug delivery. An anatomically realistic tumour model accounting for heterogeneous distribution of blood vessels is reconstructed based on magnetic resonance images of a liver tumour. Numerical simulations are performed for different drug delivery modes, including direct continuous infusion and thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery, and the anti-cancer effectiveness is evaluated through changes in tumour cell density based on predicted intracellular concentrations. Comparisons are made between regions of different vascular density, and between the two drug delivery modes. Our numerical results show that both extra- and intra-cellular concentrations in the liver tumour are non-uniform owing to the heterogeneous distribution of tumour vasculature. Drugs accumulate faster in well-vascularized regions, where they are also cleared out more quickly, resulting in less effective tumour cell killing in these regions. Compared with direct continuous infusion, the influence of heterogeneous vasculature on anti-cancer effectiveness is more pronounced for thermosensitive liposome-mediated delivery. (paper)

  20. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Nanna; Baandrup, Louise; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: We examined the association between use of low-dose aspirin and non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and endometrial cancer risk in a nationwide case-control study. METHODS: Cases were all women in Denmark diagnosed with endometrial cancer during 2000-2009. Age...... with use of low-dose aspirin (OR 0.97, 95 % CI 0.89-1.05) or non-aspirin NSAIDs (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.91-1.02) compared with nonuse. The ORs did not vary with increasing duration or intensity of NSAID use or with type of endometrial cancer. Interaction analyses showed reduced endometrial cancer risk...... associated with low-dose aspirin use among nulliparous women (OR 0.82, 95 % CI 0.70-0.95) and with non-aspirin NSAID use among women having used HRT (OR 0.90, 95 % CI 0.82-0.99). CONCLUSIONS: We found no association between use of NSAIDs and endometrial cancer risk overall, although there were some...

  1. Anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives and analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Minneman, Kenneth P.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2010-01-01

    Natural products have played a vital role in drug discovery and development process for cancer. Diospyrin, a plant based bisnaphthoquinonoid, has been used as a lead molecule in an effort to develop anti-cancer drugs. Several derivatives/analogues have been synthesized and screened for their pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities so far. Our review is focused on the pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives/analogues and the different mechanisms potentially involved in the bioactivity of these compounds. Particular focus has been placed on the different mechanisms (both chemical and molecular) thought to underlie the bioactivity of these compounds. A brief bioinformatics analysis at the end of the article provides novel insights into the new potential mechanisms and pathways by which these compounds might exert their effects and lead to a better realization of the full therapeutic potential of these compounds as anti-cancer drugs. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives and analogues

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2010-09-01

    Natural products have played a vital role in drug discovery and development process for cancer. Diospyrin, a plant based bisnaphthoquinonoid, has been used as a lead molecule in an effort to develop anti-cancer drugs. Several derivatives/analogues have been synthesized and screened for their pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities so far. Our review is focused on the pro-apoptotic/anti-cancer activities of diospyrin, its derivatives/analogues and the different mechanisms potentially involved in the bioactivity of these compounds. Particular focus has been placed on the different mechanisms (both chemical and molecular) thought to underlie the bioactivity of these compounds. A brief bioinformatics analysis at the end of the article provides novel insights into the new potential mechanisms and pathways by which these compounds might exert their effects and lead to a better realization of the full therapeutic potential of these compounds as anti-cancer drugs. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Model-based global sensitivity analysis as applied to identification of anti-cancer drug targets and biomarkers of drug resistance in the ErbB2/3 network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, Galina; Sorokin, Anatoly; Faratian, Dana; Mullen, Peter; Goltsov, Alexey; Langdon, Simon P.; Harrison, David J.; Goryanin, Igor

    2012-01-01

    High levels of variability in cancer-related cellular signalling networks and a lack of parameter identifiability in large-scale network models hamper translation of the results of modelling studies into the process of anti-cancer drug development. Recently global sensitivity analysis (GSA) has been recognised as a useful technique, capable of addressing the uncertainty of the model parameters and generating valid predictions on parametric sensitivities. Here we propose a novel implementation of model-based GSA specially designed to explore how multi-parametric network perturbations affect signal propagation through cancer-related networks. We use area-under-the-curve for time course of changes in phosphorylation of proteins as a characteristic for sensitivity analysis and rank network parameters with regard to their impact on the level of key cancer-related outputs, separating strong inhibitory from stimulatory effects. This allows interpretation of the results in terms which can incorporate the effects of potential anti-cancer drugs on targets and the associated biological markers of cancer. To illustrate the method we applied it to an ErbB signalling network model and explored the sensitivity profile of its key model readout, phosphorylated Akt, in the absence and presence of the ErbB2 inhibitor pertuzumab. The method successfully identified the parameters associated with elevation or suppression of Akt phosphorylation in the ErbB2/3 network. From analysis and comparison of the sensitivity profiles of pAkt in the absence and presence of targeted drugs we derived predictions of drug targets, cancer-related biomarkers and generated hypotheses for combinatorial therapy. Several key predictions have been confirmed in experiments using human ovarian carcinoma cell lines. We also compared GSA-derived predictions with the results of local sensitivity analysis and discuss the applicability of both methods. We propose that the developed GSA procedure can serve as a

  4. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil; Kaur, Mandeep; Esau, Luke E.

    2014-01-01

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  5. Anti-cancer Lead Molecule

    KAUST Repository

    Sagar, Sunil

    2014-04-17

    Derivatives of plumbagin can be selectively cytotoxic to breast cancer cells. Derivative `A` (Acetyl Plumbagin) has emerged as a lead molecule for testing against estrogen positive breast cancer and has shown low hepatotoxicity as well as overall lower toxicity in nude mice model. The toxicity of derivative `A` was determined to be even lower than vehicle control (ALT and AST markers). The possible mechanism of action identified based on the microarray experiments and pathway mapping shows that derivative `A` could be acting by altering the cholesterol-related mechanisms. The low toxicity profile of derivative `A` highlights its possible role as future anti-cancer drug and/or as an adjuvant drug to reduce the toxicity of highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs

  6. Marine Microalgae with Anti-Cancer Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Andrade, Kevin A; Lauritano, Chiara; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna

    2018-05-15

    Cancer is the leading cause of death globally and finding new therapeutic agents for cancer treatment remains a major challenge in the pursuit for a cure. This paper presents an overview on microalgae with anti-cancer activities. Microalgae are eukaryotic unicellular plants that contribute up to 40% of global primary productivity. They are excellent sources of pigments, lipids, carotenoids, omega-3 fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and other fine chemicals, and there is an increasing demand for their use as nutraceuticals and food supplements. Some microalgae are also reported as having anti-cancer activity. In this review, we report the microalgal species that have shown anti-cancer properties, the cancer cell lines affected by algae and the concentrations of compounds/extracts tested to induce arrest of cell growth. We also report the mediums used for growing microalgae that showed anti-cancer activity and compare the bioactivity of these microalgae with marine anticancer drugs already on the market and in phase III clinical trials. Finally, we discuss why some microalgae can be promising sources of anti-cancer compounds for future development.

  7. Alleviating Promotion of Inflammation and Cancer Induced by Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M. Kyriakopoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Relevance. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs including aspirin are of intensive use nowadays. These drugs exert their activity via the metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA by cyclooxygenase inhibition. Though beneficial for health in some instances, both unspecific and specific cyclooxygenase inhibitor activity interfere with AA metabolism producing also proinflammatory lipids that may promote cancer. Materials and Methods. This review is based on available literature on clinical uses, biochemical investigations, molecular medicine, pharmacology, toxicity, and epidemiology-clinical studies on NSAIDs and other drugs that may be used accordingly, which was collected from electronic (SciFinder, Medline, Science Direct, and ACS among others and library searches of books and journals. Results. Relevant literature supports the notion that NDSAID use may also promote proinflammatory biochemical events that are also related to precancerous predisposition. Several agents are proposed that may be employed in immediate future to supplement and optimize treatment with NSAIDs. In this way serious side effects arising from promotion of inflammation and cancer, especially in chronic NSAID users and high risk groups of patients, could be avoided.

  8. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and breast cancer risk: a Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren; Thomassen, Lars; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies investigating the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on breast cancer have yielded conflicting results. We examined the association between use of aspirin and nonaspirin NSAIDs and breast cancer risk among 28 695 women in the Danish Diet, Cancer...... and Health cohort. Information on NSAID and paracetamol use was obtained from a self-administered questionnaire completed at baseline (1993-1997) and updated through 2003 using a nationwide prescription database. Detailed information on breast cancer incidence and tumour characteristics was obtained from...... nationwide health registers. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to compute incidence rate ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We identified 847 breast cancer cases over an average follow-up period of 7.5 years. Any NSAID use at baseline was associated with an increased incidence...

  9. Ceramic core with polymer corona hybrid nanocarrier for the treatment of osteosarcoma with co-delivery of protein and anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram Prasad, S.; Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Jayakrishnan, A.

    2018-01-01

    For the treatment of metastatic bone cancer, local delivery of therapeutic agents is preferred compared to systemic administration. Delivery of an anti-cancer drug and a protein that helps in bone regeneration simultaneously is a challenging approach. In this study, a nanoparticulate carrier which delivers a protein and an anti-cancer drug is reported. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a model protein was loaded into hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles (NPs) and methotrexate (MTX) conjugated to poly(vinyl alcohol) was coated onto BSA-loaded HA NPs. Coating efficiency was in the range of 10-17 wt%. In vitro drug release showed that there was a steady increase in the release of both BSA and MTX with 76% of BSA and 88% of MTX being released in 13 days. Cytotoxicity studies of the NPs performed using human osteosarcoma (OMG-63) cell line showed the NPs were highly biocompatible and exhibited anti-proliferative activity in a concentration-dependent manner.

  10. Gold-Based Medicine: A Paradigm Shift in Anti-Cancer Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Chien Ing; Ooi, Kah Kooi; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2018-06-11

    A new era of metal-based drugs started in the 1960s, heralded by the discovery of potent platinum-based complexes, commencing with cisplatin [(H₃N)₂PtCl₂], which are effective anti-cancer chemotherapeutic drugs. While clinical applications of gold-based drugs largely relate to the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, attention has turned to the investigation of the efficacy of gold(I) and gold(III) compounds for anti-cancer applications. This review article provides an account of the latest research conducted during the last decade or so on the development of gold compounds and their potential activities against several cancers as well as a summary of possible mechanisms of action/biological targets. The promising activities and increasing knowledge of gold-based drug metabolism ensures that continued efforts will be made to develop gold-based anti-cancer agents.

  11. Preclinical optimization of a broad-spectrum anti-bladder cancer tri-drug regimen via the Feedback System Control (FSC) platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Cheng; Ding, Xianting; Deng, Hui; Zhang, Daming; Cui, Wei; Xu, Hongwei; Wang, Yingwei; Xu, Wanhai; Lv, Lei; Zhang, Hongyu; He, Yinghua; Wu, Qiong; Szyf, Moshe; Ho, Chih-Ming; Zhu, Jingde

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic outcomes of combination chemotherapy have not significantly advanced during the past decades. This has been attributed to the formidable challenges of optimizing drug combinations. Testing a matrix of all possible combinations of doses and agents in a single cell line is unfeasible due to the virtually infinite number of possibilities. We utilized the Feedback System Control (FSC) platform, a phenotype oriented approach to test 100 options among 15,625 possible combinations in four rounds of assaying to identify an optimal tri-drug combination in eight distinct chemoresistant bladder cancer cell lines. This combination killed between 82.86% and 99.52% of BCa cells, but only 47.47% of the immortalized benign bladder epithelial cells. Preclinical in vivo verification revealed its markedly enhanced anti-tumor efficacy as compared to its bi- or mono-drug components in cell line-derived tumor xenografts. The collective response of these pathways to component drugs was both cell type- and drug type specific. However, the entire spectrum of pathways triggered by the tri-drug regimen was similar in all four cancer cell lines, explaining its broad spectrum killing of BCa lines, which did not occur with its component drugs. Our findings here suggest that the FSC platform holdspromise for optimization of anti-cancer combination chemotherapy.

  12. [Effect of anti-cancer drugs on the expression of BIC/miR-155 in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qi-sheng; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Sun, Li; Chen, Rui; Motoo, Yoshiharu

    2010-01-12

    To investigate the effect of anti-cancer drugs on the expression of B-cell integration cluster (BIC) RNA/miRNA-155 in human pancreatic cancer PANC-1 cells. PANC-1 cells were treated with different concentrations of anti-cancer drugs. Total RNA of the treated cells were harvested and the expression levels of BIC RNA and mature miR-155 were quantified by using Taqman FAM/MGB probes on a real-time PCR system. Relative quantification was carried out using the DeltaDeltaCt method. A PI3K-related kinases inhibitor was used to determine whether these kinases were involved in the regulation of BIC RNA. The expression of BIC RNA was strongly induced by anti-cancer drugs. When PANC-1 cells were treated by gemcitabine with concentrations of 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 mg/L for 48 h and 72 h, the level of BIC RNA (48 h: 37.1 +/- 4.1, 29.0 +/- 5.7, 21.0 +/- 7.6, 40.4 +/- 9.0, 72 h: 27.7 +/- 3.1, 43.1 +/- 1.2, 31.8 +/- 5.4, 23.1 +/- 1.4) were significantly higher than that of the control (48 h: 1.6 +/- 1.1, 72 h: 1.0 +/- 0.1, all P PANC-1 cells treated with 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0 mg/L gemcitabine for 72 h, the level of miR-155 (2.21 +/- 0.40, 1.86 +/- 0.03, 2.47 +/- 0.04, 3.24 +/- 0.05) also higher than that of the control (1.11 +/- 0.09, P PANC-1 cells and the levels of miR-155 also slightly increase. PI3K pathway is involved in gemcitabine-induced BIC RNA up-regulation.

  13. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin–graphene oxide conjugates: Carriers for anti-cancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jingting; Meng, Na; Fan, Yunting; Su, Yutian; Zhang, Ming [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Xiao, Yinghong, E-mail: yhxiao@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zhou, Ninglin, E-mail: zhouninglin@njnu.edu.cn [Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Biological Functional Materials, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center of Biomedical Functional Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Biofunctional Materials, Jiangsu Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Function Materials, Nanjing 210023 (China); Nanjing Zhou Ninglin Advanced Materials Technology Company Limited, Nanjing 211505 (China)

    2016-04-01

    A novel drug carrier based on hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed to incorporate anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX). The formulated nanomedicines were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Results showed that PTX can be incorporated into GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres successfully, with an average diameter of about 100 nm. The solubility and stability of PTX-loaded GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres in aqueous media were greatly enhanced compared with the untreated PTX. The results of hemolysis test demonstrated that the drug-loaded nanospheres were qualified with good blood compatibility for intravenous use. In vitro anti-tumor activity was measured and results demonstrated that the incorporation of PTX into the newly developed GO-COO-HP-β-CD carrier could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity to the nanosystem against tumor cells than single application of PTX. GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres may represent a promising formulation platform for a broad range of therapeutic agent, especially those with poor solubility. - Highlights: • Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) modified carboxylated graphene oxide (GO-COOH) was designed as a drug carrier. • The prepared PTX-loaded nanospheres can be dispersed in aqueous medium stably. • The GO-COO-HP-β-CD nanospheres are safe for blood-contact applications. • This newly developed PTX-delivery system could confer significantly improved cytotoxicity against tumor cells.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF DOMESTIC INFUSION DRUGS BASED ON PARACETAMOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almakaeva L.G.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The intravenous form of paracetamol compared with oral more reliably supports effective drug concentration in blood plasma that promotes a higher therapeutic effect. Recent studies have confirmed that the use of the intravenous form of paracetamol to deal with postoperative pain multimodal analgesia modes results in reducing the frequency and quantity of opioids administered , and, as a consequence, its associated side effects. The drug Paracetamol , infusion solution 10 mg / ml to 100 ml glass bottles is a drug - generic . His qualitative and quantitative composition is developed from the study of literature data about the drug - similar to " Perfalhan , 10 mg / ml solution for infusion in 100 mL " company Bristol - Myers Squibb, France and experimental work. The aim of our study is development and support of the national composition of the infusion of the drug on the basis of paracetamol, selection of excipients that provide stability of the active substances. Materials and methods. The object of the study was the substance of paracetamol manufactured by Zhejiang Kangle Pharmaceutical Co. , Ltd, China. During the work conducted qualitative and quantitative monitoring sample preparation for indicators of stability: pH content of the active ingredient , transparency, color, impurities , contamination by the methods described in the SFU [and nor- ral documentation to the drug . One potential factor of instability is the effect of paracetamol oxygen, due to the presence in the molecule of paracetamol and -NH possibility of oxidation. Results and Discussion. Paracetamol is derived atsetamina . Substance acetylation are p - aminophenol with acetic anhydride . Saturated aqueous solution has a pH of paracetamol - ment about 6 . Paracetamol is a crystalline white powder , sparingly soluble in water, soluble in 96% alcohol, very slightly soluble in metilenhloride . . Active substance enters in comparison drug in the concentration of 10 mg/ml. Stable

  15. Development of anti-drug antibodies is associated with shortened survival in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with ipilimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kverneland, Anders H.; Enevold, Christian; Donia, Marco

    2018-01-01

    significantly with a shorter OS (p = 0.01) and PFS (p = 0.02). Eight patients (26%) were ADA-positive at either timepoint. ADA positivity correlated significantly with a shorter OS (p = 0.03) with a hazard ratio (HR) of 3.0 (95% CI: 1.2-7.8). Four of 8 ADA-positive patients (50%) discontinued therapy before......Introduction: Checkpoint inhibitors, including the CTLA-4 blocking antibody ipilimumab, have become the new standard therapy for many metastatic cancers. Development of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs) after treatment with other biopharmaceuticals has been thoroughly described, but the induction of ADAs...... for serum levels of ipilimumab and ADAs to ipilimumab at baseline, and before the 2nd and 4th infusion using an in-house bead-based assay. The results were correlated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Low serum levels of ipilimumab before the 2nd infusion correlated...

  16. Subcutaneous drug infusions: a review of problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitten, T

    2001-02-01

    Subcutaneous drug infusion using a portable syringe driver has had a significant impact on patient comfort in palliative care. It permits the continuous delivery of a range of drug therapies, so bypassing problems of dysphagia, weakness and the inability of many patients in the terminal phase to take oral medication. The devices are not problem-free, however. Mechanical problems, reactions at the infusion site and difficulties with the mixing of drugs in the syringe are all widely recognized. This article reviews some general issues with the operation of portable syringe drivers, and discusses a range of potential problems and their solutions.

  17. Virtual Dual inhibition of COX-2 / 5-LOX enzymes based on binding properties of alpha-amyrins, the anti-inflammatory compound as a promising anti-cancer drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Mehdi; Assadolahi, Vahideh; Yazdani, Mohsen; Nikaein, Donya; Rashidieh, Behnam

    2016-01-01

    Hydro-alcoholic fruit extract of Cordia myxa was considerably effective on curing acute inflammation in mouse model. Previous studies suggested significant anti-inflammatory activities as well as potential anticancer agent of α-amyrins in seeds. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipooxygenase (5-LOX) is significant in cancer prevention and therapeutics although this inhibition with chemo-drugs has its own side-effects. It is shown that these enzymes pathways are related to several cancers including colon, breast and lung cancer. This study was conducted based on Cordia species' α-amyrins as a safer natural anti-cancer compound for inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes by molecular docking. The X-ray crystal structure of COX2 / 5-LOX enzymes and α-amyrins was retrieved and energetically minimized respectively. The binding site and surface of enzymes were detected. Docking studies were performed by AutoDock 4.2 using Lamarckian genetic algorithm (LGA). Finally drug likeness, molecular pharmacokinetic properties and toxicity of α-amyrins was calculated. Molecular Docking revealed hydrogen and hydrophobic interactions between α-amyrins with both active sites of COX-2 and 5-LOX enzymes. Interestingly, it covalently bonded to Fe cofactor of 5-LOX enzyme and chelated this molecule. Base on binding energies (∆G) α-amyrin has more inhibitory effects on 5-LOX (-10.45 Kcal/mol) than COX-2 (-8.02 Kcal/mol). Analysis of molecular pharmacokinetic parameters suggested that α-amyrins complied with most sets of Lipinski's rules, and so it could be a suitable ligand for docking studies. Eventually, bioactivity score showed α-amyrins possess considerable biological activities as nuclear receptor, enzyme inhibitor, GPCR and protease inhibitor ligand. These results clearly demonstrate that α-amyrins could act as potential highly selective COX-/5-LOX inhibitor. Also, it is a safe compound in comparison with classical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs

  18. Low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and prostate cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Charlotte; Dehlendorff, Christian; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Increasing evidence suggests that aspirin use may protect against prostate cancer. In a nationwide case-control study, using Danish high-quality registry data, we evaluated the association between the use of low-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs......) and the risk of prostate cancer. METHODS: We identified 35,600 patients (cases) with histologically verified prostate cancer during 2000-2012. Cases were matched to 177,992 population controls on age and residence by risk-set sampling. Aspirin and nonaspirin NSAID exposure was defined by type, estimated dose......, duration, and consistency of use. We used conditional logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs), with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs), for prostate cancer associated with low-dose aspirin (75-150 mg) or nonaspirin NSAID use, adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Use of low-dose aspirin...

  19. Glycaemic adverse drug reactions from anti-neoplastics used in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    235625 records ... Glycaemic adverse drug reactions from anti-neoplastics used in treating pancreatic cancer. ... Based on the emphasized nine antineoplastic drugs with high hyperglycemic ADR incidence, we found: fluorouracil, sorafenib and pemetrexed with high ADR record of metabolism and nutrition disorders; ...

  20. Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and risk of colorectal cancer: A Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren; Poulsen, Aslak H; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2009-01-01

    The optimal duration and dose of aspirin and non-aspirin non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the potential prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) have not been established. We examined this issue in the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study. Self-reported NSAID use at entry (January...... a protective effect against CRC. Further studies of the effective dose of aspirin and the potential interaction between NSAID use and BMI are warranted....

  1. Continuous infusion of chemotherapy: focus on 5-fluorouracil and fluorodeoxyuridine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, R. L.; Bakker, P. J.; Veenhof, C. H.

    1998-01-01

    Continuous infusion of chemotherapy is one of the developments to try to improve the treatment of metastatic cancer. There is a sound theoretical rationale to deliver cytotoxic drugs as a continuous infusion. Furthermore, the development of reliable venous access devices and portable infusion pumps

  2. Current advances in mathematical modeling of anti-cancer drug penetration into tumor tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Munju; Gillies, Robert J; Rejniak, Katarzyna A

    2013-11-18

    Delivery of anti-cancer drugs to tumor tissues, including their interstitial transport and cellular uptake, is a complex process involving various biochemical, mechanical, and biophysical factors. Mathematical modeling provides a means through which to understand this complexity better, as well as to examine interactions between contributing components in a systematic way via computational simulations and quantitative analyses. In this review, we present the current state of mathematical modeling approaches that address phenomena related to drug delivery. We describe how various types of models were used to predict spatio-temporal distributions of drugs within the tumor tissue, to simulate different ways to overcome barriers to drug transport, or to optimize treatment schedules. Finally, we discuss how integration of mathematical modeling with experimental or clinical data can provide better tools to understand the drug delivery process, in particular to examine the specific tissue- or compound-related factors that limit drug penetration through tumors. Such tools will be important in designing new chemotherapy targets and optimal treatment strategies, as well as in developing non-invasive diagnosis to monitor treatment response and detect tumor recurrence.

  3. Auspicious role of the steroidal heterocyclic derivatives as a platform for anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantawy, Mohamed A; Nafie, Mohamed S; Elmegeed, Gamal A; Ali, Ibrahim A I

    2017-08-01

    Steroids are polycyclic compounds that have a wide range of biological activities. They are bio-synthesized from cholesterol through a series of enzyme-mediated transformations, so they are highly lipophilic and readily enter most cells to interact with intracellular receptors, making them ideal vehicles for targeting a broad array of pathologies. New curative agents for cancers have been developed from several steroidal derivatives. Some biologically important properties of modified steroids are dependent on structural features of the steroid moiety and their side chains. Therefore, chemical derivatization of steroids provides a way to modify their function, and many structure-activity relationships have been confirmed by such synthetic modifications. Several studies demonstrate that steroidal heterocyclic derivatives can be effective in the prevention and treatment of many types of hormone-dependent cancers. The present review is a concise report on steroidal heterocyclic derivatives, with special emphasis on steroid heterocyclic derivatives with 5 membered rings or six-membered rings having interesting therapeutic potential as enzyme inhibitors and cytotoxic drugs to be used as candidates for anti-cancer drug development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspirin and its related non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid has been utilised by physicians for hundreds of years as an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic (1). Derived from plant sources, such as the willow tree, it has the ability to induce apoptosis in cancer cells and stimulate.

  5. Phyto-metals screening of selected anti-diabetic herbs and infused concoctions

    OpenAIRE

    Olanrewaju O. Olujimi; Olusegun N. Onifade; Adeleke T. Towolawi; Temilade F. Akinhanmi; Adeniyi A. Afolabi; Kabir A. Olanite

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine the levels of some selected heavy metals in both the selected anti-diabetic herbal plants and infused concoctions for diabetes treatment. Methods: Ten anti-diabetic plant samples: pawpaw leaves (Carica papaya), bitter melon leaves (Momordica charantia), holy basil leaves (Ocimum sanctum), bitter leaf (Vernonia amygdalina), ginger rhizome (Zingiber officinale), garlic (Allium sativum), African red pepper fruits (Capsicum frutescens), negro pepper grain (Xylopia aethi...

  6. Changes in distribution of hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II in human hepatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Imaoka, S.; Hasegawa, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Changes in the distribution of the hepatic blood flow induced by intra-arterial infusion of angiotensin II (AT-II) were studied in human hepatic cancers using extremely short-lived radioisotope (RI) (krypton 81 m [/sup 81m/Kr]; half-life, 13 seconds). After the start of continuous infusion of AT-II, the radioactivity of the tumor showed about a two-fold increase, whereas that of the nontumor region decreased to about one half as much as the level before the infusion. Consequently, the mean ratio of the arterial blood flow in the tumor region to that in the nontumor region (T/N ratio) increased to 3.30 (P less than 0.001). The T/N ratio showed a peak before the peripheral blood pressure reached the maximum, and thereafter tended to decrease. Intra-arterial infusion of AT-II raised the T/N ratio more obviously than did intravenous infusion of the drug, with less rise in the peripheral blood pressure. It is believed that intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy with local use of AT-II enables better accessibility of chemotherapeutic drugs to tumors

  7. Understanding drugs in breast cancer through drug sensitivity screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhr, Katharina; Prager-van der Smissen, Wendy J C; Heine, Anouk A J; Ozturk, Bahar; Smid, Marcel; Göhlmann, Hinrich W H; Jager, Agnes; Foekens, John A; Martens, John W M

    2015-01-01

    With substantial numbers of breast tumors showing or acquiring treatment resistance, it is of utmost importance to develop new agents for the treatment of the disease, to know their effectiveness against breast cancer and to understand their relationships with other drugs to best assign the right drug to the right patient. To achieve this goal drug screenings on breast cancer cell lines are a promising approach. In this study a large-scale drug screening of 37 compounds was performed on a panel of 42 breast cancer cell lines representing the main breast cancer subtypes. Clustering, correlation and pathway analyses were used for data analysis. We found that compounds with a related mechanism of action had correlated IC50 values and thus grouped together when the cell lines were hierarchically clustered based on IC50 values. In total we found six clusters of drugs of which five consisted of drugs with related mode of action and one cluster with two drugs not previously connected. In total, 25 correlated and four anti-correlated drug sensitivities were revealed of which only one drug, Sirolimus, showed significantly lower IC50 values in the luminal/ERBB2 breast cancer subtype. We found expected interactions but also discovered new relationships between drugs which might have implications for cancer treatment regimens.

  8. A targeted proteomics approach to the quantitative analysis of ERK/Bcl-2-mediated anti-apoptosis and multi-drug resistance in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ting; Xu, Feifei; Sheng, Yuan; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yun

    2016-10-01

    Apoptosis suppression caused by overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins is a central factor to the acquisition of multi-drug resistance (MDR) in breast cancer. As a highly conserved anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2 can initiate an anti-apoptosis response via an ERK1/2-mediated pathway. However, the details therein are still far from completely understood and a quantitative description of the associated proteins in the biological context may provide more insights into this process. Following our previous attempts in the quantitative analysis of MDR mechanisms, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted proteomics was continually employed here to describe ERK/Bcl-2-mediated anti-apoptosis. A targeted proteomics assay was developed and validated first for the simultaneous quantification of ERK1/2 and Bcl-2. In particular, ERK isoforms (i.e., ERK1 and ERK2) and their differential phosphorylated forms including isobaric ones were distinguished. Using this assay, differential protein levels and site-specific phosphorylation stoichiometry were observed in parental drug-sensitive MCF-7/WT cancer cells and drug-resistant MCF-7/ADR cancer cells and breast tissue samples from two groups of patients who were either suspected or diagnosed to have drug resistance. In addition, quantitative analysis of the time course of both ERK1/2 and Bcl-2 in doxorubicin (DOX)-treated MCF-7/WT cells confirmed these findings. Overall, we propose that targeted proteomics can be used generally to resolve more complex cellular events.

  9. [Home anti-cancer therapy with a venous port].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, A; Ashino, Y; Miyazawa, M; Sato, M; Kanno, A; Kawahara, Y; Fujita, Y; Matsushiro, T

    2000-12-01

    Home anti-cancer chemotherapy and palliation in the terminal stage were performed for patients with advanced cancer of the digestive system, using a venous port implanted beneath the skin via the subclavian vein. Patients under 75 years of age (5 with esophageal, 61 gastric, 59 colorectal, 5 cholangio, 5 pancreatic, 1 hepatic and 1 ileal cancer) were treated. With two portable balloon pumps, continuous intravenous infusion of 5-FU (300 or 400 mg/body/day) combined low-dose injection of cisplatin (5 mg/body/day) was continued for 10 days, and repeated 3 times for 6 weeks. The response rate was 17.9% in 78 patients according to valuation of the tumor mass. In 119 patients also undergoing a tumor marker evaluation, an effect was seen in 26.1%. No severe side effects such as renal dysfunction or bone marrow suppression were seen, and no special infusion was needed. Therefore, such treatment can be continued for a long time. Use of a venous port should make easy the switchover to HPN and the amelioration of the symptoms of the terminal stage, such as pain, and helps patients cope with the worry. Therefore, the present technique is useful in a series of cancer treatments including surgery, chemotherapy and the amelioration of symptoms.

  10. Infusion MR arteriography during hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. Evaluation of clinical usefulness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Minako; Takizawa, Kenji

    2003-01-01

    We developed a new method of infusion MR arteriography (IMRA) via an implantable port system using an infusion pump for the evaluation of drug distribution during hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. The purposes of this study were to optimize the method and evaluate its clinical usefulness. We used 3D-T1 turbo field echo (TFE) as the most suitable sequence for IMRA according to the results of a phantom model experiment. We examined 33 cases of liver cancer that had been treated by arterial infusion chemotherapy via the port system. The following investigations were performed: degree of tumor enhancement, intra- and extra- hepatic perfusion abnormality, and related toxicity. The evaluation of images was performed separately by two radiologists. IMRA provided good images of contrast enhancement, to reveal the perfusion patterns. The treatment response rate in the tumor group with well enhancement was higher than that of the group with poor enhancement (p<0.0001). Extrahepatic perfusion was well visualized and was correlated with toxicity (p<0.0001). IMRA is a useful method to evaluate drug perfusion for the optimization of arterial infusion chemotherapy. (author)

  11. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solé Ricard V

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since existent SL data is mainly restricted to yeast screenings, the road towards human SL candidates is limited to inference methods. Results In the present work, we use phylogenetic analysis and database manipulation (BioGRID for interactions, Ensembl and NCBI for homology, Gene Ontology for GO attributes in order to reconstruct the phylogenetically-inferred SL gene network for human. In addition, available data on cancer mutated genes (COSMIC and Cancer Gene Census databases as well as on existent approved drugs (DrugBank database supports our selection of cancer-therapy candidates. Conclusions Our work provides a complementary alternative to the current methods for drug discovering and gene target identification in anti-cancer research. Novel SL screening analysis and the use of highly curated databases would contribute to improve the results of this methodology.

  12. Dose critical in-vivo detection of anti-cancer drug levels in blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly H.; Hirschfeld, deceased, Tomas B.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the in vivo and in vitro detection and measurement of dose critical levels of DNA-binding anti-cancer drug levels in biological fluids. The apparatus comprises a laser based fiber optic sensor (optrode) which utilizes the secondary interactions between the drug and an intercalating fluorochrome bound to a probe DNA, which in turn is attached to the fiber tip at one end thereof. The other end of the optical fiber is attached to an illumination source, detector and recorder. The fluorescence intensity is measured as a function of the drug concentration and its binding constant to the probe DNA. Anticancer drugs which lend themselves to analysis by the use of the method and the optrode of the present invention include doxorubicin, daunorubicin, carminomycin, aclacinomycin, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, 5-uracil, arabinosyl cytosine, mitomycin, cis-platinum 11 diamine dichloride procarbazine, vinblastine vincristine and the like. The present method and device are suitable for the continuous monitoring of the levels of these and other anticancer drugs in biological fluids such as blood, serum, urine and the like. The optrode of the instant invention also enables the measurement of the levels of these drugs from a remote location and from multiple samples.

  13. A screen to identify drug resistant variants to target-directed anti-cancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Mohammad

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of oncogenes and signal transduction pathways important for mitogenesis has triggered the development of target-specific small molecule anti-cancer compounds. As exemplified by imatinib (Gleevec, a specific inhibitor of the Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML-associated Bcr-Abl kinase, these agents promise impressive activity in clinical trials, with low levels of clinical toxicity. However, such therapy is susceptible to the emergence of drug resistance due to amino acid substitutions in the target protein. Defining the spectrum of such mutations is important for patient monitoring and the design of next-generation inhibitors. Using imatinib and BCR/ABL as a paradigm for a drug-target pair, we recently reported a retroviral vector-based screening strategy to identify the spectrum of resistance-conferring mutations. Here we provide a detailed methodology for the screen, which can be generally applied to any drug-target pair.

  14. Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion for advanced gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-yu CAO

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the clinical effects of chemotherapy via arterial infusion in treatment of advanced gastric cancer.Methods Forty-seven patients with advanced gastric cancer were given chemotherapy via arterial infusion.Chemotherapy plan was as follows: 5-Fluorouracil(Fu 500mg/m2,cyclophosphamide(MMX 10mg/m2,Hydroxycamptothecin(HPT 20mg/m2,once per week,2 weeks as a course,a total of 2-3 courses.Results After chemotherapy via arterial infusion,complete remission(CR was achieved in 1 case,partial remission(PR in 28 cases,stabilization of disease(SD in 16 cases,progression of disease(PD was found in 2 cases,and rate with response(CR+PR was 61.7%.Four of 28 PR patients underwent tumorectomy,the pathology revealed the presence of cancer cells around the vascular vessels,manifesting karyopyknosis,karyorrhexis,coagulation and necrosis of cytoplasm,intercellular edema,hyperplasia of fibroblasts,inflammatory cell infiltration,thickening of endothelium,and thrombosis.One,two and three-year survival rates were 70.2%,14.9% and 2.1%,respectively.The average survival period was 17.2 months.Conclusion Targeting chemotherapy via arterial infusion,as a part of the combined treatment,is beneficial to the patients with unresectable advanced gastric cancer.

  15. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and breast cancer risk in a European prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cairat, Manon; Fournier, Agnès; Murphy, Neil

    2018-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown a protective effect of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) on breast cancer development. However, results from epidemiological cohort studies are less consistent. Our objective was to assess the association between NSAID use and breast cancer risk within...... effect modification of MHT use on the association between use of NSAIDs and breast cancer risk which deserves in-depth investigation in studies with accurate data on both NSAID and MHT use. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....... the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). EPIC is a prospective cohort study initiated in 1992 in 10 European countries. Self-reported information on NSAID use at baseline has been collected in five EPIC countries. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate hazard...

  16. Aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and acetaminophen use and risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trabert, Britton; Ness, Roberta B; Lo-Ciganic, Wei-Hsuan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regular aspirin use is associated with reduced risk of several malignancies. Epidemiologic studies analyzing aspirin, nonaspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and acetaminophen use and ovarian cancer risk have been inconclusive. METHODS: We analyzed pooled data from 12...... population-based case-control studies of ovarian cancer, including 7776 case patients and 11843 control subjects accrued between 1992 and 2007. Odds ratios (ORs) for associations of medication use with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were estimated in individual studies using logistic regression...... and combined using random effects meta-analysis. Associations between frequency, dose, and duration of analgesic use and risk of ovarian cancer were also assessed. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.91; 95% confidence interval...

  17. Supermolecular drug challenge to overcome drug resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Yasuhiko; Eshita, Yuki; Ji, Rui-Cheng; Kobayashi, Takashi; Onishi, Masayasu; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun; Kubota, Naoji

    2018-06-04

    Overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells can be accomplished using drug delivery systems in large-molecular-weight ATP-binding cassette transporters before entry into phagolysosomes and by particle-cell-surface interactions. However, these hypotheses do not address the intratumoral heterogeneity in cancer. Anti-MDR must be related to alterations of drug targets, expression of detoxification, as well as altered proliferation. In this study, it is shown that the excellent efficacy and sustainability of anti-MDR is due to a stable ES complex because of the allosteric facilities of artificial enzymes when they are used as supramolecular complexes. The allosteric effect of supermolecular drugs can be explained by the induced-fit model and can provide stable feedback control systems through the loop transfer function of the Hill equation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Metastasis and Potential Anti-metastatic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tungsukruthai, Sucharat; Petpiroon, Nalinrat; Chanvorachote, Pithi

    2018-05-01

    Throughout the world, breast cancer is among the major causes of cancer-related death and is the most common cancer found in women. The development of cancer molecular knowledge has surpassed the novel concept of cancer biology and unraveled principle targets for anticancer drug developments and treatment strategies. Metastatic breast cancer cells acquire their aggressive features through several mechanisms, including augmentation of survival, proliferation, tumorigenicity, and motility-related cellular pathways. Clearly, natural product-derived compounds have since long been recognized as an important source for anticancer drugs, several of which have been shown to have promising anti-metastasis activities by suppressing key molecular features supporting such cell aggressiveness. This review provides the essential details of breast cancer, the molecular-based insights into metastasis, as well as the effects and mechanisms of potential compounds for breast cancer therapeutic approaches. As the abilities of cancer cells to invade and metastasize are addressed as the hallmarks of cancer, compounds possessing anti-metastatic effects, together with their defined molecular drug action could benefit the development of new drugs as well as treatment strategies. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-15

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017.

  20. Commercialization strategy of the herbal composition HemoHIM as a complementary drug for anti-cancer therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Park, Haeran

    2013-01-01

    Ο Purpose - Establishment of strategy for the development of HemoHIM as a complementary drug for cancer therapies including non-clinical data preparation, obtainment of a research project grant, base of manufacturing process and raw material standardization Ο Research Results - Examination and confirmation of the essential requirements to develop the complementary drug for anticancer therapies by consulting with Korea FDA, and clinical CRO, and medical experts (animal efficacy study, toxicological safety test, standard analytical method, raw material standardization) - Obtainment of a governmental research project for 3 years from Ministry of Health and Welfare to develop HemoHIM as an complementary herbal drug for anti-cancer therapies - Acquisition of fundamental data on the manufacturing process and the raw material standardization for the optimal efficacy of HemoHIM Ο Expected benefit - Planning to get the approval of IND from Korea FDA by 2015 after completing the non-clinical study through the on-going project from Ministry of Health and Welfare - Planning to commercialize the product by 2017

  1. The impact of quality-of-life data in relative effectiveness assessments of new anti-cancer drugs in European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Sarah; Meneses Leonardo Alves, Teresa; Meijboom, Kim; Lipska, Iga; De Boer, Anthonius; Leufkens, Hubertus G; Goettsch, Wim G

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to investigate the role of health-related quality-of-life (QoL) data in relative effectiveness assessments (REAs) of new anti-cancer drugs across European jurisdictions, during health technology assessment procedures. METHODS: Comparative analysis of guidelines and

  2. Anti-metastatic Action of Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chun Hung

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs reduce the incidence and mortality of several types of human cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their chemopreventive and anticancer effects are not fully understood. Cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1 and COX-2 are the main targets for NSAIDs. Recent studies demonstrate that COX-2 is overexpressed in many human cancers and may promote tumorigenesis via: (1 stimulation of cancer cell proliferation; (2 increase of tumor angiogenesis; (3 prevention of cancer cell apoptosis; (4 modulation of immunoregulatory reactions; and (5 enhancement of tumor metastasis. NSAIDs may target the signaling molecules (from upstream activators to downstream effectors involved in these mechanisms to attenuate the development and progression of cancer. In this review, we discuss the recent findings with regard to the mechanisms by which NSAIDs inhibit tumorigenesis and will specifically focus on the elucidation of NSAID-induced inhibition of tumor metastasis.

  3. Study of Malformin C, a Fungal Source Cyclic Pentapeptide, as an Anti-Cancer Drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available Malformin C, a fungal cyclic pentapeptide, has been claimed to have anti-cancer potential, but no in vivo study was available to substantiate this property. Therefore, we conducted in vitro and in vivo experiments to investigate its anti-cancer effects and toxicity. Our studies showed Malformin C inhibited Colon 38 and HCT 116 cell growth dose-dependently with an IC50 of 0.27±0.07μM and 0.18±0.023μM respectively. This inhibition was explicated by Malformin C's effect on G2/M arrest. Moreover, we observed up-regulated expression of phospho-histone H2A.X, p53, cleaved CASPASE 3 and LC3 after Malformin C treatment, while the apoptosis assay indicated an increased population of necrotic and late apoptotic cells. In vivo, the pathological study exhibited the acute toxicity of Malformin C at lethal dosage in BDF1 mice might be caused by an acute yet subtle inflammatory response, consistent with elevated IL-6 in the plasma cytokine assay. Further anti-tumor and toxicity experiments proved that 0.3mg/kg injected weekly was the best therapeutic dosage of Malformin C in Colon 38 xenografted BDF1 mice, whereas 0.1mg/kg every other day showed no effect with higher resistance, and 0.9mg/kg per week either led to fatal toxicity in seven-week old mice or displayed no advantage over 0.3mg/kg group in nine-week old mice. Overall, we conclude that Malformin C arrests Colon 38 cells in G2/M phase and induces multiple forms of cell death through necrosis, apoptosis and autophagy. Malformin C has potent cell growth inhibition activity, but the therapeutic index is too low to be an anti-cancer drug.

  4. Percutaneous implantation of intra-arterial port system for regional drug infusion: results and complications in 110 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, Je Hwan; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Ko, Kyung Hee; Won, Jong Yoon; Park, Sung Il; Lee, Do Yun; Kang, Byung Chul

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility and complications of a percutaneously implantable port system for regional drug infusion. For intra-arterial drug infusion, a 5.8 or 5-F pediatric venous port system was implanted in 110 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (n=79), liver metastasis (n=16), gallbladder cancer (n=4), stomach cancer (n=3), pancreatic cancer (n=3), Burger's diseases mellitus (n=2), or lymphoma (n=1). All intra-arterial port implantations were performed percutaneously in an angiographic ward through the common femoral artery (n=98), left subclavian artery (n=10), or left superficial femoral artery (n=2). Complications were evaluated during the follow-up period, which ranged from 21 to 530 (mean, 163) days. The technical success rate for percutaneous implantation of the system was 97.3% (107 of 110 patients). The tips of the port catheter were located in the common hepatic artery (n=34), proper hepatic artery (n=49), right hepatic artery quick resulthepatic artery (n=1), descending aorta at T9 level (n=10), left popliteal artery (n=2), right external iliac artery (n=1), left external iliac artery (n=1), or left deep femoral artery (n=1). Complications were encountered in 24 patients (22.4%), namely chamber site infection (n=7), catheter dislodgement (n=7), catheter occlusion (n=3), migration of coil (n=2), disconnection between chamber and catheter (n=1), kinking of catheter (n=1), arterial occlusion (n=1), necrosis of overlying skin (n=1), and leakage around port chamber (n=1). Outcomes of complications included removal of port systems or cessation of therapy in 12 cases (11.2%), correction of catheter location using a guide wire in five (4.7%), thrombolysis with urokinase in three (2.8%), and straightening using a snare in one (0.9%). In three patients, the port system was used without reintervention. Percutaneous implantation of an intra-arterial port system showed a high technical success rate and a low rate of serious complications. The method may be

  5. Low-dose aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, selective COX-2 inhibitors and breast cancer recurrence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre P; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Ahern, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and selective COX-2 inhibitors may improve outcomes in breast cancer patients. We investigated the association of aspirin, NSAIDs, and use of selective COX-2 inhibitors with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: We identified incident...... stage I-III Danish breast cancer patients in the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group registry, who were diagnosed during 1996-2008. Prescriptions for aspirin (>99% low-dose aspirin), NSAIDs, and selective COX-2 inhibitors were ascertained from the National Prescription Registry. Follow-up began....... RESULTS: We identified 34,188 breast cancer patients with 233,130 person-years of follow-up. Median follow-up was 7.1 years; 5,325 patients developed recurrent disease. Use of aspirin, NSAIDs, or selective COX-2 inhibitors was not associated with the rate of recurrence (HRadjusted aspirin = 1.0, 95% CI...

  6. Exosomes in development, metastasis and drug resistance of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan-dan; Wu, Ying; Shen, Hong-yu; Lv, Meng-meng; Chen, Wei-xian; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhong, Shan-liang; Tang, Jin-hai; Zhao, Jian-hua

    2015-08-01

    Transport through the cell membrane can be divided into active, passive and vesicular types (exosomes). Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles released by a variety of cells. Emerging evidence shows that exosomes play a critical role in cancers. Exosomes mediate communication between stroma and cancer cells through the transfer of nucleic acid and proteins. It is demonstrated that the contents and the quantity of exosomes will change after occurrence of cancers. Over the last decade, growing attention has been paid to the role of exosomes in the development of breast cancer, the most life-threatening cancer in women. Breast cancer could induce salivary glands to secret specific exosomes, which could be used as biomarkers in the diagnosis of early breast cancer. Exosome-delivered nucleic acid and proteins partly facilitate the tumorigenesis, metastasis and resistance of breast cancer. Exosomes could also transmit anti-cancer drugs outside breast cancer cells, therefore leading to drug resistance. However, exosomes are effective tools for transportation of anti-cancer drugs with lower immunogenicity and toxicity. This is a promising way to establish a drug delivery system. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. Clinical evaluation of preoperative arterial infusion chemotherapy and surgical operation for colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianhua; Zhao Zhongsheng; Deng Gaoli; Hu Tingyang; Yu Wenqiang; Chen Fanghong; Luo Zuyan; Ru Guoqing; Dong Quanjin; Tu Shiliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical values of preoperative arterial infusion chemotherapy and surgical operation for colorectal carcinoma. Methods: 66 patients with colorectal carcinoma were subjected to percutaneous femoral artery catheterization by Seldinger's technique with infusion of anti-cancer drugs. The resection was performed 5-30 days after the arterial infusion (mean 12 days). In 50 surgical specimens of the 66 cases, histological findings were evaluated including the density and distribution of the apoptosis cells under the observation by DNA nick end labelling technique. Of which 22 specimens before arterial infusion chemotherapy (got from biopsy of preoperation) and 25 normal mucosa (got from normal surgical specimens) were used as controls. Results: The total histological response rate was 100% with grade I in 20 cases, grade II in 21 cases, grade III in 9 cases. The densities of the apoptosis cells were 31.47 ± 5.58 before arterial infusion chemotherapy, 76.69 ± 17.12 after arterial infusion chemotherapy and 8.01 ± 3.39 in normal mucosa. The density of the apoptosis cells after arterial infusion chemotherapy was significantly higher than that before arterial infusion chemotherapy (P 2 =4.696, P>0.30). There were no significant differences in the apoptosis of adenocarcinoma during different pathological stages (F=0.001376, P>0.05). Conclusions: Peroperative transcatheter arterial infusion chemotherapy resulting in apoptosis of adenocarcinoma, can raise the radical operation rate, and prolong survival rate for colorectal carcinoma patients

  8. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dong, L. F.; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 199-208 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitocans * Anti-cancer therapeutics * Classification Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.524, year: 2013

  9. 5-FU Metabolism in Cancer and Orally-Administrable 5-FU Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwao Sasaki

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU is a key anticancer drug that for its broad antitumor activity, as well as for its synergism with other anticancer drugs, has been used to treat various types of malignancies. In chemotherapeutic regimens, 5-FU has been combined with oxaliplatin, irinotecan and other drugs as a continuous intravenous infusion. Recent clinical chemotherapy studies have shown that several of the regimens with oral 5-FU drugs are not inferior compared to those involving continuous 5-FU infusion chemotherapy, and it is probable that in some regimens continuous 5-FU infusion can be replaced by oral 5-FU drugs. Historically, both the pharmaceutical industry and academia in Japan have been involved in the development of oral 5-FU drugs, and this review will focus on the current knowledge of 5-FU anabolism and catabolism, and the available information about the various orally-administrable 5-FU drugs, including UFT, S-1 and capecitabine. Clinical studies comparing the efficacy and adverse events of S-1 and capecitabine have been reported, and the accumulated results should be utilized to optimize the treatment of cancer patients. On the other hand, it is essential to elucidate the pharmacokinetic mechanism of each of the newly-developed drugs, to correctly select the drugs for each patient in the clinical setting, and to further develop optimized drug derivatives.

  10. Design and synthesis of prostate cancer antigen-1 (PCA-1/ALKBH3) inhibitors as anti-prostate cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Syuhei; Mabuchi, Miyuki; Shimizu, Tadashi; Itoh, Yoshihiro; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ueda, Masahiro; Mizuno, Hiroaki; Shigi, Naoko; Ohshio, Ikumi; Jinguji, Kentaro; Ueda, Yuko; Yamamoto, Masatatsu; Furukawa, Tatsuhiko; Aoki, Shunji; Tsujikawa, Kazutake; Tanaka, Akito

    2014-02-15

    A series of 1-aryl-3,4-substituted-1H-pyrazol-5-ol derivatives was synthesized and evaluated as prostate cancer antigen-1 (PCA-1/ALKBH3) inhibitors to obtain a novel anti-prostate cancer drug. After modifying 1-(1H-benzimidazol-2-yl)-3,4-dimethyl-1H-pyrazol-5-ol (1), a hit compound found during random screening using a recombinant PCA-1/ALKBH3, 1-(1H-5-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)-4-benzyl-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-5-ol (35, HUHS015), was obtained as a potent PCA-1/ALKBH3 inhibitor both in vitro and in vivo. The bioavailability (BA) of 35 was 7.2% in rats after oral administration. As expected, continuously administering 35 significantly suppressed the growth of DU145 cells, which are human hormone-independent prostate cancer cells, in a mouse xenograft model without untoward effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Classification of mitocans, anti-cancer drugs acting on mitochondria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neužil, Jiří; Dong, L. F.; Rohlena, Jakub; Truksa, Jaroslav; Ralph, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2013), s. 199-208 ISSN 1567-7249 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : Mitocans * Anti-cancer therapeutics * Classification Subject RIV: EB - Gene tics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.524, year: 2013

  12. Continuous DC-CIK infusions restore CD8+ cellular immunity, physical activity and improve clinical efficacy in advanced cancer patients unresponsive to conventional treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan-Jie; Jiang, Ni; Song, Qing-Kun; Wu, Jiang-Ping; Song, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Chen, Feng; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Li; Zhou, Xin-Na; Yang, Hua-Bing; Ren, Jun; Lyerly, Herbert Kim

    2015-01-01

    There are few choices for treatment of advanced cancer patients who do not respond to or tolerate conventional anti-cancer treatments. Therefore this study aimed to deploy the benefits and clinical efficacy of continuous dendritic cell-cytokine induced killer cell infusions in such patients. A total of 381 infusions (from 67 advanced cases recruited) were included in this study. All patients underwent peripheral blood mononuclear cell apheresis for the following cellular therapy and dendritic cells-cytokine induced killer cells were expanded in vitro. Peripheral blood T lymphocyte subsets were quantified through flow cytometry to address the cellular immunity status. Clinical efficacy and physical activities were evaluated by RECIST criteria and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group scores respectively. Logistic regression model was used to estimate the association between cellular infusions and clinical benefits. An average of 5.7±2.94x10(9) induced cells were infused each time and patients were exposed to 6 infusions. Cellular immunity was improved in that cytotoxic CD8+CD28+T lymphocytes were increased by 74% and suppressive CD8+CD28-T lymphocytes were elevated by 16% (p<0.05). Continuous infusion of dendritic cells-cytokine induced killer cells was associated with improvement of both patient status and cellular immunity. A median of six infusions were capable of reducing risk of progression by 70% (95%CI 0.10-0.91). Every elevation of one ECOG score corresponded to a 3.90-fold higher progression risk (p<0.05) and 1% increase of CD8+CD28- T cell proportion reflecting a 5% higher risk of progression (p<0.05). In advanced cancer patients, continuous dendritic cell-cytokine induced killer cell infusions are capable of recovering cellular immunity, improving patient status and quality of life in those who are unresponsive to conventional cancer treatment.

  13. Human Albumin Fragments Nanoparticles as PTX Carrier for Improved Anti-cancer Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ge

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available For enhanced anti-cancer performance, human serum albumin fragments (HSAFs nanoparticles (NPs were developed as paclitaxel (PTX carrier in this paper. Human albumins were broken into fragments via degradation and crosslinked by genipin to form HSAF NPs for better biocompatibility, improved PTX drug loading and sustained drug release. Compared with crosslinked human serum albumin NPs, the HSAF-NPs showed relative smaller particle size, higher drug loading, and improved sustained release. Cellular and animal results both indicated that the PTX encapsulated HSAF-NPs have shown good anti-cancer performance. And the anticancer results confirmed that NPs with fast cellular internalization showed better tumor inhibition. These findings will not only provide a safe and robust drug delivery NP platform for cancer therapy, but also offer fundamental information for the optimal design of albumin based NPs.

  14. Anti-Aging Drugs - Prospect of Longer Life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimova, Blanka; Novotny, Michal; Kuca, Kamil

    2017-11-29

    Aging is a natural part of human life. However, recent discoveries indicate that pharmacological approaches used for the improvement and possibly, for the delay of the aging process, might shed a new light on this topic. This might obviously contribute to the extension of the active life of older people and maintenance of their quality of life, which could consequently reduce both social and economic burden of each country, especially the developed ones. The purpose of this study is to explore pharmacological discoveries which may help to the delay or improvement of the aging process. More specifically, the authors focus on three anti-aging drugs candidates: metformin, rapamycin and resveratrol and one anti-aging component NAD+ precursors whose randomized control trials on animals have appeared to provide some efficacy in this respect and they seem to be promising in the aging process of human beings. This was done by conducting a literature review of available sources describing the issue of aging process with special focus on those anti-aging drug candidates. The results of this study indicate that promising anti-aging candidates seem to be metformin, especially as far as cardiovascular or cancer mortality is concerned, and NAD+ precursors since they appear to promote better organ function, increased physical resistance, disease resistance and prolonged life expectancy. There is a call for more longitudinal clinical trials, which would prove the efficacy of the promising anti-aging drugs candidates in humans. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and prostate cancer risk: a population-based nested case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaheddin M Mahmud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite strong laboratory evidence that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs could prevent prostate cancer, epidemiological studies have so far reported conflicting results. Most studies were limited by lack of information on dosage and duration of use of the different classes of NSAIDs. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study using data from Saskatchewan Prescription Drug Plan (SPDP and Cancer Registry to examine the effects of dose and duration of use of five classes of NSAIDs on prostate cancer risk. Cases (N = 9,007 were men aged ≥40 years diagnosed with prostatic carcinoma between 1985 and 2000, and were matched to four controls on age and duration of SPDP membership. Detailed histories of exposure to prescription NSAIDs and other drugs were obtained from the SPDP. RESULTS: Any use of propionates (e.g., ibuprofen, naproxen was associated with a modest reduction in prostate cancer risk (Odds ratio = 0.90; 95%CI 0.84-0.95, whereas use of other NSAIDs was not. In particular, we did not observe the hypothesized inverse association with aspirin use (1.01; 0.95-1.07. There was no clear evidence of dose-response or duration-response relationships for any of the examined NSAID classes. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest modest benefits of at least some NSAIDs in reducing prostate cancer risk.

  16. Smart Drug Delivery Systems in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsoy, Gozde; Gunduz, Ufuk

    2018-02-08

    Smart nanocarriers have been designed for tissue-specific targeted drug delivery, sustained or triggered drug release and co-delivery of synergistic drug combinations to develop safer and more efficient therapeutics. Advances in drug delivery systems provide reduced side effects, longer circulation half-life and improved pharmacokinetics. Smart drug delivery systems have been achieved successfully in the case of cancer. These nanocarriers can serve as an intelligent system by considering the differences of tumor microenvironment from healthy tissue, such as low pH, low oxygen level, or high enzymatic activity of matrix metalloproteinases. The performance of anti-cancer agents used in cancer diagnosis and therapy is improved by enhanced cellular internalization of smart nanocarriers and controlled drug release. Here, we review targeting, cellular internalization; controlled drug release and toxicity of smart drug delivery systems. We are also emphasizing the stimulus responsive controlled drug release from smart nanocarriers. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  17. Experimental Treatment of Bladder Cancer with Bi-213-anti-EGFR MAb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, Christof; Pfost, Birgit; Müller, Felix

    2013-01-01

    Therapy of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (carcinoma in situ) comprises transurethral resection of the tumour and subsequent instillation of the chemotherapeutic drug mitomycin C in order to eradicate remaining tumour cells. Yet 15 – 40% of treated patients relapse within 5 years. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies to combat tumour recurrence are needed. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides efficiently kill single tumour cells or small tumour cell clusters. Because the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed on bladder cancer cells, conjugates composed of the alpha-emitter Bi-213 and the anti-EGFR antibody matuzumab should provide a powerful drug to eliminate disseminated bladder cancer cells. Therefore, the aims of our study were (i) to analyse the cytotoxic effects of Bi-213-anti-EGFR radioimmunoconjugates at the cellular level, (ii) to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of intravesically applied Bi-213- anti-EGFR-Mab in a nude mouse model with intravesical human bladder cancer xenografts, (iii) to compare Bi- 213-anti-EGFR-Mab efficacy with chemotherapy using mitomycin C and (iv) to demonstrate that radioimmunotherapy is not toxic to cells of the bladder wall and of the kidneys

  18. Apoptosis and histological response of preoperative intraarterial chemotherapy infusion for colorectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Jianhua; Hu Tingyang; Yu Wenqiang; Chen Fanghong; Luo Zuyan; Mao Yinmin; Zhao Zhongsheng; Ru Guoqing; Deng Gaoli; Dong Quanjin; Tu Shiliang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate apoptosis and histological response of preoperative intraarterial chemotherapy infusion for colorectal carcinoma. Methods: Fifty patients with colorectal carcinoma were treated by intraarterial infusion of anti-cancer drugs. Surgical resection of the tumor was performed 5-30 days after the intraarterial infusion (mean 12 days). The histological response was evaluated. The density and distribution of the apoptosis cells were observed by DNA nick end labelling technique. 22 biopsy specimens before the intraarterial chemotherapy and 25 normal mucosa (obtained from surgery specimen) were used as controls. Results: The total histological response rate was 100% with grade I in 20 cases, grade II in 21 cases, and grade III in 9 cases. The density of the apoptosis cells was 31.47±5.58 before and 76.69±17.12 after the intraarterial chemotherapy infusion, and 8.01±3.39 in normal mucosa, respectively. The density of the apoptosis cells after the intraarterial chemotherapy was significantly higher than that before the intraarterial chemotherapy (t=13.701, P 2 =4.696, P>0.30). The apoptosis of adenocarcinoma was significantly different with different histological response (F=7.73, P 0.05) and for adenocarcinoma with different pathological stages (F=0.001376, P>0.05). Conclusion: As an effective and safe procedure, preoperative transcatheter intraarterial chemotherapy infusion achieves a significant histological response and apoptosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma

  19. Combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizoguchi, Hiroaki; Nomura, Yoshio; Terada, Katsuhiko; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ogata, Jiro

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-three patients with invasive bladder cancer (T2 in 17, T3 in 6) were treated initially with combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy. Cisplatin (50 mg) was infused into the internal iliac artery through a subcutaneous reservoir twice a week over three weeks while concurrent radiation therapy with 30 Gy, delivered in 15 fractions, was given. In 23 patients, 6 received additional cisplatin infusion and the other 17 had transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT). Two of the patients undergoing total cystectomy exhibited a complete response (CR). Thus overall response rate was 87% (CR in 13 and partial response in 7). CR was achieved in 53% for T2 patients and 67% for T3 patients. CR was slightly higher in patients with non-papillary cancer than those with papillary one. Toxic reaction included a decrease in bladder capacity in 2 patients and severe diarrhea due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colitis in one. The other toxicities, including nausea, vomiting, neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, were tolerable. All except for one are alive. Seven patients had a local recurrence of bladder cancer. One patient developed invasive bladder cancer reaching the prostatic urethra. One other patient had recurrence at the same site as the previous tumor. Five others had superficial bladder cancer and were managed by TURBT. Bladder function was preserved in 65% at a mean follow-up of 29 months. In conclusion, the combined intraarterial cisplatin infusion and radiation therapy is useful for the initial treatment of invasive bladder cancer. (N.K.)

  20. The application of hazard analysis and critical control points and risk management in the preparation of anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Brigitte; Martelli, Nicolas; Berhoune, Malik; Maestroni, Marie-Laure; Havard, Laurent; Prognon, Patrice

    2009-02-01

    To apply the Hazard analysis and Critical Control Points method to the preparation of anti-cancer drugs. To identify critical control points in our cancer chemotherapy process and to propose control measures and corrective actions to manage these processes. The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points application began in January 2004 in our centralized chemotherapy compounding unit. From October 2004 to August 2005, monitoring of the process nonconformities was performed to assess the method. According to the Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points method, a multidisciplinary team was formed to describe and assess the cancer chemotherapy process. This team listed all of the critical points and calculated their risk indexes according to their frequency of occurrence, their severity and their detectability. The team defined monitoring, control measures and corrective actions for each identified risk. Finally, over a 10-month period, pharmacists reported each non-conformity of the process in a follow-up document. Our team described 11 steps in the cancer chemotherapy process. The team identified 39 critical control points, including 11 of higher importance with a high-risk index. Over 10 months, 16,647 preparations were performed; 1225 nonconformities were reported during this same period. The Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points method is relevant when it is used to target a specific process such as the preparation of anti-cancer drugs. This method helped us to focus on the production steps, which can have a critical influence on product quality, and led us to improve our process.

  1. Novel Drug Delivery Technique for Breast Cancer Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Esenaliev, Rinat O

    2004-01-01

    .... We proposed to complete Task 3 and to implement Task 4 in the third year of the project. Task 3 focuses on in vivo studies of efficacy of cancer therapy with the use of ultrasound-enhanced delivery of anti-cancer drug 5-FU...

  2. Phenotyping and Visualizing Infusion-Related Reactions for Breast Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Deyu; Sarda, Gopal; Skube, Steven J.; Blaes, Anne H.; Khairat, Saif; Melton, Genevieve B.; Zhang, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Infusion-related reactions (IRRs) are typical adverse events for breast cancer patients. Detecting IRRs and visualizing their occurance associated with the drug treatment would potentially assist clinicians to improve patient safety and help researchers model IRRs and analyze their risk factors. We developed and evaluated a phenotyping algorithm to detect IRRs for breast cancer patients. We also designed a visualization prototype to render IRR patients’ medications, lab tests and vital signs over time. By comparing with the 42 randomly selected doses that are manually labeled by a domain expert, the sensitivity, positive predictive value, specificity, and negative predictive value of the algorithms are 69%, 60%, 79%, and 85%, respectively. Using the algorithm, an incidence of 6.4% of patients and 1.8% of doses for docetaxel, 8.7% and 3.2% for doxorubicin, 10.4% and 1.2% for paclitaxel, 16.1% and 1.1% for trastuzumab were identified retrospectively. The incidences estimated are consistent with related studies. PMID:29295166

  3. Anti-cancer natural products isolated from chinese medicinal herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Guosheng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, a number of natural products isolated from Chinese herbs have been found to inhibit proliferation, induce apoptosis, suppress angiogenesis, retard metastasis and enhance chemotherapy, exhibiting anti-cancer potential both in vitro and in vivo. This article summarizes recent advances in in vitro and in vivo research on the anti-cancer effects and related mechanisms of some promising natural products. These natural products are also reviewed for their therapeutic potentials, including flavonoids (gambogic acid, curcumin, wogonin and silibinin, alkaloids (berberine, terpenes (artemisinin, β-elemene, oridonin, triptolide, and ursolic acid, quinones (shikonin and emodin and saponins (ginsenoside Rg3, which are isolated from Chinese medicinal herbs. In particular, the discovery of the new use of artemisinin derivatives as excellent anti-cancer drugs is also reviewed.

  4. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoby Iftach

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates.

  5. Killing cancer cells by targeted drug-carrying phage nanomedicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Hagit; Yacoby, Iftach; Benhar, Itai

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic administration of chemotherapeutic agents, in addition to its anti-tumor benefits, results in indiscriminate drug distribution and severe toxicity. This shortcoming may be overcome by targeted drug-carrying platforms that ferry the drug to the tumor site while limiting exposure to non-target tissues and organs. Results We present a new form of targeted anti-cancer therapy in the form of targeted drug-carrying phage nanoparticles. Our approach is based on genetically-modified and chemically manipulated filamentous bacteriophages. The genetic manipulation endows the phages with the ability to display a host-specificity-conferring ligand. The phages are loaded with a large payload of a cytotoxic drug by chemical conjugation. In the presented examples we used anti ErbB2 and anti ERGR antibodies as targeting moieties, the drug hygromycin conjugated to the phages by a covalent amide bond, or the drug doxorubicin conjugated to genetically-engineered cathepsin-B sites on the phage coat. We show that targeting of phage nanomedicines via specific antibodies to receptors on cancer cell membranes results in endocytosis, intracellular degradation, and drug release, resulting in growth inhibition of the target cells in vitro with a potentiation factor of >1000 over the corresponding free drugs. Conclusion The results of the proof-of concept study presented here reveal important features regarding the potential of filamentous phages to serve as drug-delivery platform, on the affect of drug solubility or hydrophobicity on the target specificity of the platform and on the effect of drug release mechanism on the potency of the platform. These results define targeted drug-carrying filamentous phage nanoparticles as a unique type of antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:18387177

  6. Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells as an Anti-Cancer Trojan Horse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Adam; Drela, Katarzyna; Rozycka, Justyna; Janowski, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based gene therapy holds a great promise for the treatment of human malignancy. Among different cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are emerging as valuable anti-cancer agents that have the potential to be used to treat a number of different cancer types. They have inherent migratory properties, which allow them to serve as vehicles for delivering effective therapy to isolated tumors and metastases. MSCs have been engineered to express anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, and anti-angiogenic agents that specifically target different cancers. Another field of interest is to modify MSCs with the cytokines that activate pro-tumorigenic immunity or to use them as carriers for the traditional chemical compounds that possess the properties of anti-cancer drugs. Although there is still controversy about the exact function of MSCs in the tumor settings, the encouraging results from the preclinical studies of MSC-based gene therapy for a large number of tumors support the initiation of clinical trials. PMID:27460260

  7. A synthetic cryptochrome inhibitor induces anti-proliferative effects and increases chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Sung Kook [Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology, Daegu, 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Sooyoung [Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hee-Dae [Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ju Hyung [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jaebong [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeongah; Kim, Doyeon [Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Daegu-Gyeongbuk Institute of Science & Technology, Daegu, 711-873 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Gi Hoon [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Korea University, Seoul, 136-705 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young J. [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Young-Ger [College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Cheol Soon [Gachon Clinical Trials Center, Gachon University, Incheon, 417-842 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2015-11-13

    Disruption of circadian rhythm is a major cause of breast cancer in humans. Cryptochrome (CRY), a circadian transcription factor, is a risk factor for initiation of breast cancer, and it is differentially expressed between normal and breast cancer tissues. Here, we evaluated the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of KS15, a recently discovered small-molecule inhibitor of CRY, in human breast cancer cells. First, we investigated whether KS15 treatment could promote E-box-mediated transcription by inhibiting the activity of CRY in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Protein and mRNA levels of regulators of cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as core clock genes, were differentially modulated in response to KS15. Next, we investigated whether KS15 could inhibit proliferation and increase sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in MCF-7 cells. We found that KS15 decreased the speed of cell growth and increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 cells to doxorubicin and tamoxifen, but had no effect on MCF-10A cells. These findings suggested that pharmacological inhibition of CRY by KS15 exerts an anti-proliferative effect and increases sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in a specific type of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Cryptochrome inhibitor (KS15) has anti-tumor activity to human breast cancer cells. • KS15 induces differential changes in cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. • KS15 inhibits MCF-7 cell growth and enhances susceptibility to anti-tumor drugs.

  8. A synthetic cryptochrome inhibitor induces anti-proliferative effects and increases chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Sung Kook; Chung, Sooyoung; Kim, Hee-Dae; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jang, Jaebong; Kim, Jeongah; Kim, Doyeon; Son, Gi Hoon; Oh, Young J.; Suh, Young-Ger; Lee, Cheol Soon

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythm is a major cause of breast cancer in humans. Cryptochrome (CRY), a circadian transcription factor, is a risk factor for initiation of breast cancer, and it is differentially expressed between normal and breast cancer tissues. Here, we evaluated the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity of KS15, a recently discovered small-molecule inhibitor of CRY, in human breast cancer cells. First, we investigated whether KS15 treatment could promote E-box-mediated transcription by inhibiting the activity of CRY in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Protein and mRNA levels of regulators of cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as core clock genes, were differentially modulated in response to KS15. Next, we investigated whether KS15 could inhibit proliferation and increase sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in MCF-7 cells. We found that KS15 decreased the speed of cell growth and increased the chemosensitivity of MCF-7 cells to doxorubicin and tamoxifen, but had no effect on MCF-10A cells. These findings suggested that pharmacological inhibition of CRY by KS15 exerts an anti-proliferative effect and increases sensitivity to anti-tumor drugs in a specific type of breast cancer. - Highlights: • Cryptochrome inhibitor (KS15) has anti-tumor activity to human breast cancer cells. • KS15 induces differential changes in cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. • KS15 inhibits MCF-7 cell growth and enhances susceptibility to anti-tumor drugs.

  9. Challenges and strategies in anti-cancer nanomedicine development : An industry perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hare, Jennifer I.; Lammers, Twan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824577; Ashford, Marianne B.; Puri, Sanyogitta; Storm, G|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073356328; Barry, Simon T.

    2017-01-01

    Successfully translating anti-cancer nanomedicines from pre-clinical proof of concept to demonstration of therapeutic value in the clinic is challenging. Having made significant advances with drug delivery technologies, we must learn from other areas of oncology drug development, where patient

  10. Challenges and strategies in anti-cancer nanomedicine development: An industry perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hare, J.I.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria; Ashford, M.B.; Puri, S.; Storm, Gerrit; Barry, S.T.

    2017-01-01

    Successfully translating anti-cancer nanomedicines from pre-clinical proof of concept to demonstration of therapeutic value in the clinic is challenging. Having made significant advances with drug delivery technologies, we must learn from other areas of oncology drug development, where patient

  11. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug use and risk of bladder cancer: a population based case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heaney John

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Use of phenacetin and other analgesic and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs potentially influences bladder cancer incidence, but epidemiologic evidence is limited. Methods We analyzed data from 376 incident bladder cancer cases and 463 controls from a population-based case-control study in New Hampshire on whom regular use of analgesic drugs and NSAIDs was obtained. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were computed using logistic regression with adjustment for potentially confounding factors. Separate models by tumor stage, grade and TP53 status were conducted. Results We found an elevated odds ratio (OR associated with reported use of phenacetin-containing medications, especially with longer duration of use (OR >8 years = 3.00, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.4–6.5. In contrast, use of paracetamol did not relate overall to risk of bladder cancer. We also found that regular use of any NSAID was associated with a statistically significant decrease in bladder cancer risk (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4–0.9, and specifically use of aspirin. Further, the association with NSAID use was largely among invasive, high grade and TP53 positive tumors. Conclusion While these agents have been investigated in several studies, a number of questions remain regarding the effects of analgesic and NSAID use on risk of bladder cancer.

  12. Cannabis and Anti-Cancer Drugs: Societal Usage and Expected Pharmacological Interactions - A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquié, Régis; Deslandes, Guillaume; Mazaré, Hélène; Cogné, Marion; Mahé, Julien; Grégoire, Matthieu; Jolliet, Pascale

    2018-04-16

    Cannabis is a plant that has been used for centuries to relieve a wide range of symptoms. Since the 1960s, interest in medical research into this plant has grown steadily. Already very popular for recreational use, a growing number of consumers not accustomed to using cannabis for psychoactive purposes, have begun to use it as an alternative or complement to mainstream pharmaceutical medicines. The principal unsubstantiated or "social" uses of cannabis are based mainly on data that is at best controversial, but usually not scientifically proven. The aim of this review is to identify the scientific basis and reasons that lead patients with cancer to consume cannabis, and also to identify whether there is a risk of interaction between cannabis and anti-cancer medicines through drug transporters (P-glycoprotein and other ABC-superfamily members) Cytochromes P450 (3A, 1A, 2B, 2C 2D families…) and glucuronyl-transferases. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Biliary stenting and anti-cancer therapy for unresectable hilar bile duct carcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroya; Hokotate, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Shyuhei; Takamura, Akio

    2007-01-01

    At present, although imaging diagnosis has been developed, most hilar bile duct cancer is still diagnosed at an advanced stage and its prognosis is generally poor. In hilar bile duct cancer, radiotherapy and other several therapies, for example-chemotherapy, arterial-infusion chemotherapy, photodynamic therapy, etc-are being performed for non-operative cases. But standard therapies for this cancer has not been established yet. On the other hand, metallic stents (MS) have been widely used to relieve biliary obstructions as an alternative to plastic prostheses and conventional drainage. The use of MS offers good palliation in hilar bile duct cancer, but patients selection is a key to obtain good results. In this article we reviewed previous studies and clinical trials regarding the anti-cancer therapy and biliary stenting for unresectable hilar bile duct cancer. And optimal therapeutic strategy for hilar bile duct cancer is proposed, primarily based on present views. (author)

  14. Effects of dietary anticarcinogens and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on rat gastrointestinal UDP-glucuronosyltransferases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logt, E.M.J. van der; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Lieshout, E.M.M. van; Nagengast, F.M.; Peters, W.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dietary compounds or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) may reduce cancer rates. Elevation of phase II detoxification enzymes might be one of the mechanisms leading to cancer prevention. We investigated the effects of dietary anticarcinogens and NSAIDs on rat gastrointestinal

  15. Novel anti-Sialyl-Tn monoclonal antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates demonstrate tumor specificity and anti-tumor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Jillian M; Galvao da Silva, Ana Paula; Eavarone, David A; Ghaderi, Darius; Zhang, Mai; Brady, Dane; Wicks, Joan; DeSander, Julie; Behrens, Jeff; Rueda, Bo R

    Targeted therapeutics that can differentiate between normal and malignant tumor cells represent the ideal standard for the development of a successful anti-cancer strategy. The Sialyl-Thomsen-nouveau antigen (STn or Sialyl-Tn, also known as CD175s) is rarely seen in normal adult tissues, but it is abundantly expressed in many types of human epithelial cancers. We have identified novel antibodies that specifically target with high affinity the STn glycan independent of its carrier protein, affording the potential to recognize a wider array of cancer-specific sialylated proteins. A panel of murine monoclonal anti-STn therapeutic antibodies were generated and their binding specificity and efficacy were characterized in vitro and in in vivo murine cancer models. A subset of these antibodies were conjugated to monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE) to generate antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). These ADCs demonstrated in vitro efficacy in STn-expressing cell lines and significant tumor growth inhibition in STn-expressing tumor xenograft cancer models with no evidence of overt toxicity.

  16. The availability of DSA used continuous intraarterial infusion tubes founded various malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minakuchi, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Tetsuya

    1987-01-01

    DSA was employed using continuous intraarterial infusion tubes for various malignancies (73 cases) which were examined a total of 135 times. In head and neck malignancy (50 cases), the general position of the infusion tube had been determined beforehand by dye infusion, but DSA from the tube showed that the tubes in 24 cases (48 %) were located in the wrong position, especially in tongue cancer (21 cases) where many tubes were discovered to be in an erroreous position (71 %) such as the common carotid artery. We were unable to determine the effect of chemotherapy and radiation using DSA only. In 9 cases of breast cancer for which fixation of the tube was not attempted under X-ray fluoroscopy, 7 (78 %) showed an unusual tube position such as the intraaortic arch. In 5 cases of abdominal malignancy, only the tube position for sigmoid colon cancer was unusual. We were able to observe the effect of chemotherapy by DSA in 2 cases. For DSA in one out of 3 hepatomas using a Port-A-Cath, we observed that infusion of anticancer drug with degradable starch microspheres caused a reduction in tumor size. However, in the two remaining cases, we were unable to observe any effect of infusion of these drugs by DSA for various mechanical reasons. DSA from an infusion tube revealed not only the location of the tube accurately and promptly, but also the effect of chemotherapy. (author)

  17. Curcumin-docetaxel co-loaded nanosuspension for enhanced anti-breast cancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bhanu P; Hazarika, Hemanga; Bharadwaj, Rituraj; Loying, Pojul; Baishya, Rinku; Dash, Suvakanta; Das, Malay K

    2016-08-01

    A curcumin-docetaxel co-loaded nanosuspension with increased anti-breast cancer activity was developed. Curcumin is a potential anticancer agent with p-glycoprotein (p-gp) inhibiting activity may be co-administered with docetaxel as a nanosuspension to enhance its anticancer effect by increasing the oral bioavailability and decreasing drug efflux. Nanosuspensions of curcumin and docetaxel were prepared by precipitation-homozenisation technique and evaluated for particle size, polydispersity, zeta potential and drug release. The in vitro MTT assay was conducted using MCF-7 for anti-breast cancer activity. The in vivo biodistribution by radiolabeling and tumor inhibition study was conducted in mice. Homogenous nanosuspensions of 80 ± 20 nm were obtained with increased solubility. The drugs as nanosuspensions showed higher cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cell line compared to their suspensions due to the increased in vitro cellular uptake. Due to this increased solubility, sensitization of tumor cells and inhibition of p-gp the in-vivo results showed greater tumor inhibition rate of up to 70% in MCF-7 treated mice. Histopathological results showed higher apoptotic activity and reduced level of angiogenesis. The in vitro and in vivo study of the nanosuspensions has shown that Co-administration of Curcumin as a p-gp inhibitor with docetaxel may have the potential to increase the anti-breast cancer efficacy of both drugs.

  18. Continuous Drug Infusion for Diabetes Therapy: A Closed-Loop Control System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiming Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available While a typical way for diabetes therapy is discrete insulin infusion based on long-time interval measurement, in this paper, we design a closed-loop control system for continuous drug infusion to improve the traditional discrete methods and make diabetes therapy automatic in practice. By exploring the accumulative function of drug to insulin, a continuous injection model is proposed. Based on this model, proportional-integral-derivative (PID and fuzzy logic controllers are designed to tackle a control problem of the resulting highly nonlinear plant. Even with serious disturbance of glucose, such as nutrition absorption at meal time, the proposed scheme can perform well in simulation experiments.

  19. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decrease E2F1 expression and inhibit cell growth in ovarian cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca L Valle

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown that the regular use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAIDs drugs is associated with a reduced risk of various cancers. In addition, in vitro and experiments in mouse models have demonstrated that NSAIDs decrease tumor initiation and/or progression of several cancers. However, there are limited preclinical studies investigating the effects of NSAIDs in ovarian cancer. Here, we have studied the effects of two NSAIDs, diclofenac and indomethacin, in ovarian cancer cell lines and in a xenograft mouse model. Diclofenac and indomethacin treatment decreased cell growth by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In addition, diclofenac and indomethacin reduced tumor volume in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer. To identify possible molecular pathways mediating the effects of NSAID treatment in ovarian cancer, we performed microarray analysis of ovarian cancer cells treated with indomethacin or diclofenac. Interestingly, several of the genes found downregulated following diclofenac or indomethacin treatment are transcriptional target genes of E2F1. E2F1 was downregulated at the mRNA and protein level upon treatment with diclofenac and indomethacin, and overexpression of E2F1 rescued cells from the growth inhibitory effects of diclofenac and indomethacin. In conclusion, NSAIDs diclofenac and indomethacin exert an anti-proliferative effect in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo and the effects of NSAIDs may be mediated, in part, by downregulation of E2F1.

  20. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmari, Abdulrahman Khazim; Albalawi, Sulaiman Mansour; Athar, Md Tanwir; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Al-Shahrani, Hamoud; Islam, Mozaffarul

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90%) in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold) indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for treatment of breast

  1. Anaphylaxis after intravenous infusion of dexketoprofen trometamol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertac Guler

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dexketoprofen trometamol (DT, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is a highly water-soluble salt and active enantiomer of rac-ketoprofen. Its parenteral form is commonly used for acute pain management in emergency departments of our country. Side effects such as diarrhea, indigestion, nausea, stomach pain, and vomiting may be seen after the use of DT. Anaphylactic shock (AS secondary to infusion of DT is very rare and, to our knowledge, it is the first case report describing this side effect. This case report was presented to emphasize that AS may be seen after the use of DT. Keywords: Anaphylactic shock, Dexketoprofen trometamol, Intravenous infusion (MeSH database

  2. Epifluorescent imaging study of the effect of anti-diabetic drug metformin on colorectal cancer cell lines in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatasubramani P

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metformin, a widely used anti-diabetic drug, has recently been associated with inhibition of cell proliferation in multiple cancers. However, it is not clear if the reduction in proliferation on treatment with metformin is a result of cell death or slowdown in the rate of growth of cancer cells, because cell viability assays measure only the number of cells at the beginning and end of the experiment. The aim of this study is to utilize a fluorescent imaging technique to directly follow cell death overtime in order to investigate the effect of metformin on colorectal cancer cells HCT116 and SW480. Epifluorescent imaging analysis carried out using ImageXpress Micro XLS High-Content Imaging System show that there is no significant change in cell death observed in the cancer cell lines, as compared to the control, over multiple closely spaced time points, suggesting that metformin in pharmacological doses may not be an effective inducer of cell death in these colon cancer cell lines.

  3. Imidazoles and benzimidazoles as tubulin-modulators for anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Fernando C; García-Rubiño, M Eugenia; Lozano-López, César; Kawano, Daniel F; Eifler-Lima, Vera L; von Poser, Gilsane L; Campos, Joaquín M

    2015-01-01

    Imidazoles and benzimidazoles are privileged heterocyclic bioactive compounds used with success in the clinical practice of innumerous diseases. Although there are many advancements in cancer therapy, microtubules remain as one of the few macromolecular targets validated for planning active anti-cancer compounds, and the design of drugs that modulate microtubule dynamics in unknown sites of tubulin is one of the goals of the medicinal chemistry. The discussion of the role of new and commercially available imidazole and benzimidazole derivatives as tubulin modulators is scattered throughout scientific literature, and indicates that these compounds have a tubulin modulation mechanism different from that of tubulin modulators clinically available, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel, vincristine and vinblastine. In fact, recent literature indicates that these derivatives inhibit microtubule formation binding to the colchicine site, present good pharmacokinetic properties and are capable of overcoming multidrug resistance in many cell lines. The understanding of the mechanisms involved in the imidazoles/benzimidazoles modulation of microtubule dynamics is very important to develop new strategies to overcome the resistance to anti-cancer drugs and to discover new biomarkers and targets for cancer chemotherapy.

  4. Anti-tumor effects of everolimus and metformin are complementary and glucose-dependent in breast cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariaans, Gerke; Jalving, Mathilde; de Vries, Emma Geertruida Elisabeth; de Jong, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Background: Clinical efficacy of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus is limited in breast cancer and regularly leads to side-effects including hyperglycemia. The AMPK inhibitor and anti-diabetic drug metformin may counteract everolimus-induced hyperglycemia, as well as enhancing anti-cancer efficacy. We

  5. Use of parecoxib by continuous subcutaneous infusion for cancer pain in a hospice population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Peter; Wilkinson, Pauline; McCorry, Noleen K

    2018-03-01

    To characterise the use of the parenteral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug parecoxib when given by continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) in a hospice population. Clinical experience suggests parecoxib CSCI may be of benefit in this population, but empirical evidence in relation to its safety and efficacy is lacking. Retrospective chart review of patients with a cancer diagnosis receiving parecoxib CSCI from 2008 to 2013 at the Marie Curie Hospice, Belfast. Data were collected on treatment regime, tolerability and, in patients receiving at least 7 days treatment, baseline opioid dose and changes in pain scores or opioid rescue medication requirements. Parecoxib CSCI was initiated in 80 patients with a mean administration of 17.9 days (median 11, range 1-94). When used for a period of 7 days, there was a statistically significant reduction in pain scores (p=0.002) and in the number of rescue opioid doses required (p=0.001), but no statistically significant opioid-sparing effect (p=0.222). It was generally well tolerated, although gastrointestinal, renal adverse effects and local site irritation were reported. Parecoxib may have a valuable place in the management of cancer pain, especially towards the end of life when oral administration is no longer possible and CSCI administration is relied on. Further studies into the efficacy and tolerability of parecoxib CSCI are merited. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Postulating a dermal pathway for exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs among hospital workers. Applying a conceptual model to the results of three workplace surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kromhout, H.; Hoek, F.; Uitterhoeve, R.; Huijbers, R.; Overmars, R.F.; Anzion, R.; Vermeulen, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dermal exposure to anti-neoplastic drugs has been suggested as a potentially important route of exposure of hospital workers. Three small-scale workplace surveys were carried out in several hospitals focusing on contamination by leakage from IV infusion systems; contamination by spilled urine of

  7. Analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with radiotherapy or arterial infusion chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izutu, Toshihiko; Nishiya, Iwao

    1995-01-01

    The present study was designed to analyze cervical cancer cells treated with radiotherapy or intraarterial infusion of CDDP using image analysis. Total nuclear extinction (TE), 5 N-exceeding rate (5 NER) and nuclear area (NA) gradually increased following irradiation, in cervical cancer cases. TE and 5 NER increased markedly following radiotherapy in good response cases. TE, 5 NER and NA were not-changed following irradiation in poor response cases. 5 NER, in good prognostic cases was higher than in poor prognostic cases, significantly among cervical cancer cases treated with radiotherapy. 5 NER and NA increased dramatically in good response cases treated with intraarterial infusion of CDDP. (author)

  8. The impact of cancer drug wastage on economic evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Judy; Cheung, Matthew C; Mai, Helen; Letargo, Jessa; Chambers, Alexandra; Sabharwal, Mona; Trudeau, Maureen E; Chan, Kelvin K W

    2017-09-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of modeling cancer drug wastage in economic evaluations because wastage can result from single-dose vials on account of body surface area- or weight-based dosing. Intravenous chemotherapy drugs were identified from the pan-Canadian Oncology Drug Review (pCODR) program as of January 2015. Economic evaluations performed by drug manufacturers and pCODR were reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analyses and budget impact analyses were conducted for no-wastage and maximum-wastage scenarios (ie, the entire unused portion of the vial was discarded at each infusion). Sensitivity analyses were performed for a range of body surface areas and weights. Twelve drugs used for 17 indications were analyzed. Wastage was reported (ie, assumptions were explicit) in 71% of the models and was incorporated into 53% by manufacturers; this resulted in a mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio increase of 6.1% (range, 1.3%-14.6%). pCODR reported and incorporated wastage for 59% of the models, and this resulted in a mean incremental cost-effectiveness ratio increase of 15.0% (range, 2.6%-48.2%). In the maximum-wastage scenario, there was a mean increase in the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 24.0% (range, 0.0%-97.2%), a mean increase in the 3-year total incremental budget costs of 26.0% (range, 0.0%-83.1%), and an increase in the 3-year total incremental drug budget cost of approximately CaD $102 million nationally. Changing the mean body surface area or body weight caused 45% of the drugs to have a change in the vial size and/or quantity, and this resulted in increased drug costs. Cancer drug wastage can increase drug costs but is not uniformly modeled in economic evaluations. Cancer 2017;123:3583-90. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Benefit and harms of new anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Badillo, Francisco E; Al-Mubarak, Mustafa; Templeton, Arnoud J; Amir, Eitan

    2013-06-01

    Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assess clinically important differences in endpoints that reflect benefit to and harm of patients. Defining benefit of cancer drugs can be difficult. Overall survival and quality of life are the most relevant primary endpoints, but difficulty in measuring these mean that other endpoints are often used, although their surrogacy or clinical relevance has not always been established. In general, advances in drug development have led to numerous new drugs to enter the market. Pivotal RCT of several new drugs have shown that benefit appeared greater for targeted anticancer agents than for chemotherapeutic agents. This effect seems particularly evident with targeted agents evaluated in biomarker-driven studies. Unfortunately, new therapies have also shown an increase in toxicity. Such toxicity is not always evident in the initial reports of RCTs. This may be a result of a statistical inability to detect differences between arms of RCTs, or occasionally due to biased reporting. There are several examples where reports of new toxicities could only be found in drug labels. In some cases, the small improvement in survival has come at a cost of substantial excess toxicity, leading some to consider such therapy as having equipoise.

  10. Mixing in the human carotid artery during carotid drug infusion studied with PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junck, L.; Koeppe, R.A.; Greenberg, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    The safety and efficacy of drug infusion into the carotid artery require adequate mixing of the infused solution with carotid blood. Using positron emission tomography (PET), we studied the mixing of solutions infused into the human carotid artery in seven patients by analyzing the distribution of [15O]H2O infused into the carotid artery and by vein. At four infusion rates ranging from 0.5 to 10 ml/min, the variability in distribution averaged 16.5-17.8% among the pixels in a large volume of interest, without dependence on the infusion rate. The overall correlation between [15O]H2O influx with arterial infusion and [15O]H2O influx with venous injection was 0.78-0.82 at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward higher correlations at the faster infusion rates. The distribution into the anterior, middle, and posterior cerebral artery territories differed from distribution throughout the entire carotid territory by an average of 6.2-9.6% at the four infusion rates, with no trend toward smaller differences at the faster infusion rates. Infusions performed into a vinyl tube simulating the carotid artery indicated that at 0.5 ml/min, the velocity of fluid exiting the catheter makes no apparent contribution to mixing. We conclude that with infusions at the carotid bifurcation, mixing in the human carotid artery is complete or nearly complete over a wide range of infusion rates. The mixing appears to result from the patterns of blood flow within the artery, and not from jet effects at the catheter tip

  11. Electrochemical approach for monitoring the effect of anti tubulin drugs on breast cancer cells based on silicon nanograss electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanganeh, Somayeh; Khosravi, Safoora; Namdar, Naser; Amiri, Morteza Hassanpour; Gharooni, Milad; Abdolahad, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    One of the most interested molecular research in the field of cancer detection is the mechanism of drug effect on cancer cells. Translating molecular evidence into electrochemical profiles would open new opportunities in cancer research. In this manner, applying nanostructures with anomalous physical and chemical properties as well as biocompatibility would be a suitable choice for the cell based electrochemical sensing. Silicon based nanostructure are the most interested nanomaterials used in electrochemical biosensors because of their compatibility with electronic fabrication process and well engineering in size and electrical properties. Here we apply silicon nanograss (SiNG) probing electrodes produced by reactive ion etching (RIE) on silicon wafer to electrochemically diagnose the effect of anticancer drugs on breast tumor cells. Paclitaxel (PTX) and mebendazole (MBZ) drugs have been used as polymerizing and depolymerizing agents of microtubules. PTX would perturb the anodic/cathodic responses of the cell-covered biosensor by binding phosphate groups to deformed proteins due to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK"1"/"2) pathway. MBZ induces accumulation of Cytochrome C in cytoplasm. Reduction of the mentioned agents in cytosol would change the ionic state of the cells monitored by silicon nanograss working electrodes (SiNGWEs). By extending the contacts with cancer cells, SiNGWEs can detect minor signal transduction and bio recognition events, resulting in precise biosensing. Effects of MBZ and PTX drugs, (with the concentrations of 2 nM and 0.1 nM, respectively) on electrochemical activity of MCF-7 cells are successfully recorded which are corroborated by confocal and flow cytometry assays. - Highlights: • Electrochemical effect of MBZ and PTX (anti tubulin drugs) on breast cancer cells was detected. • Detection was carried by silicon nanograss electrodes(SiNGEs). • Signaling pathways activated in the cells by drug treatment, change the anodic

  12. Electrochemical approach for monitoring the effect of anti tubulin drugs on breast cancer cells based on silicon nanograss electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanganeh, Somayeh; Khosravi, Safoora; Namdar, Naser; Amiri, Morteza Hassanpour; Gharooni, Milad [Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Eng, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nanoelectronic Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Eng, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolahad, Mohammad, E-mail: m.abdolahad@ut.ac.ir [Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Nano Bio Electronic Devices Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Eng, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Electronic Center of Excellence, Thin Film and Nanoelectronic Lab, School of Electrical and Computer Eng, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 14395/515, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-28

    One of the most interested molecular research in the field of cancer detection is the mechanism of drug effect on cancer cells. Translating molecular evidence into electrochemical profiles would open new opportunities in cancer research. In this manner, applying nanostructures with anomalous physical and chemical properties as well as biocompatibility would be a suitable choice for the cell based electrochemical sensing. Silicon based nanostructure are the most interested nanomaterials used in electrochemical biosensors because of their compatibility with electronic fabrication process and well engineering in size and electrical properties. Here we apply silicon nanograss (SiNG) probing electrodes produced by reactive ion etching (RIE) on silicon wafer to electrochemically diagnose the effect of anticancer drugs on breast tumor cells. Paclitaxel (PTX) and mebendazole (MBZ) drugs have been used as polymerizing and depolymerizing agents of microtubules. PTX would perturb the anodic/cathodic responses of the cell-covered biosensor by binding phosphate groups to deformed proteins due to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK{sup 1/2}) pathway. MBZ induces accumulation of Cytochrome C in cytoplasm. Reduction of the mentioned agents in cytosol would change the ionic state of the cells monitored by silicon nanograss working electrodes (SiNGWEs). By extending the contacts with cancer cells, SiNGWEs can detect minor signal transduction and bio recognition events, resulting in precise biosensing. Effects of MBZ and PTX drugs, (with the concentrations of 2 nM and 0.1 nM, respectively) on electrochemical activity of MCF-7 cells are successfully recorded which are corroborated by confocal and flow cytometry assays. - Highlights: • Electrochemical effect of MBZ and PTX (anti tubulin drugs) on breast cancer cells was detected. • Detection was carried by silicon nanograss electrodes(SiNGEs). • Signaling pathways activated in the cells by drug treatment, change the

  13. Anti-cancer effect of HIV-1 viral protein R on doxorubicin resistant neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Y Zhao

    Full Text Available Several unique biological features of HIV-1 Vpr make it a potentially powerful agent for anti-cancer therapy. First, Vpr inhibits cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle G2 arrest. Second, it induces apoptosis through multiple mechanisms, which could be significant as it may be able to overcome apoptotic resistance exhibited by many cancerous cells, and, finally, Vpr selectively kills fast growing cells in a p53-independent manner. To demonstrate the potential utility of Vpr as an anti-cancer agent, we carried out proof-of-concept studies in vitro and in vivo. Results of our preliminary studies demonstrated that Vpr induces cell cycle G2 arrest and apoptosis in a variety of cancer types. Moreover, the same Vpr effects could also be detected in some cancer cells that are resistant to anti-cancer drugs such as doxorubicin (DOX. To further illustrate the potential value of Vpr in tumor growth inhibition, we adopted a DOX-resistant neuroblastoma model by injecting SK-N-SH cells into C57BL/6N and C57BL/6J-scid/scid mice. We hypothesized that Vpr is able to block cell proliferation and induce apoptosis regardless of the drug resistance status of the tumors. Indeed, production of Vpr via adenoviral delivery to neuroblastoma cells caused G2 arrest and apoptosis in both drug naïve and DOX-resistant cells. In addition, pre-infection or intratumoral injection of vpr-expressing adenoviral particles into neuroblastoma tumors in SCID mice markedly inhibited tumor growth. Therefore, Vpr could possibly be used as a supplemental viral therapeutic agent for selective inhibition of tumor growth in anti-cancer therapy especially when other therapies stop working.

  14. The anti-cancerous drug doxorubicin decreases the c-di-GMP content in Pseudomonas aeruginosa but promotes biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groizeleau, Julie; Rybtke, Morten; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Current antibiotic treatments are insufficient in eradicating bacterial biofilms, which represent the primary cause of chronic bacterial infections. Thus, there is an urgent need for new strategies to eradicate biofilm infections. The second messenger c-di-GMP is a positive regulator of biofilm...... formation in many clinically relevant bacteria. It is hypothesized that drugs lowering the intracellular level of c-di-GMP will force biofilm bacteria into a more treatable planktonic lifestyle. To identify compounds capable of lowering c-di-GMP levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we screened 5000 compounds...... for their potential c-di-GMP-lowering effect using a recently developed c-di-GMP biosensor strain. Our screen identified the anti-cancerous drug doxorubicin as a potent c-di-GMP inhibitor. In addition, the drug decreased the transcription of many biofilm-related genes. However, despite its effect on the c-di-GMP...

  15. Interaction of anthraquinone anti-cancer drugs with DNA:Experimental and computational quantum chemical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Jamelah S.; Teesdale Spittle, Paul; El Gogary, Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthraquinones form the basis of several anticancer drugs. Anthraquinones anticancer drugs carry out their cytotoxic activities through their interaction with DNA, and inhibition of topoisomerase II activity. Anthraquinones (AQ4 and AQ4H) were synthesized and studied along with 1,4-DAAQ by computational and experimental tools. The purpose of this study is to shade more light on mechanism of interaction between anthraquinone DNA affinic agents and different types of DNA. This study will lead to gain of information useful for drug design and development. Molecular structures were optimized using DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G(d). Depending on intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions two conformers of AQ4 were detected and computed as 25.667 kcal/mol apart. Molecular reactivity of the anthraquinone compounds was explored using global and condensed descriptors (electrophilicity and Fukui functions). Molecular docking studies for the inhibition of CDK2 and DNA binding were carried out to explore the anti cancer potency of these drugs. NMR and UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra of anthraquinones/DNA were investigated at the physiological pH. The interaction of the three anthraquinones (AQ4, AQ4H and 1,4-DAAQ) were studied with three DNA (calf thymus DNA, (Poly[dA].Poly[dT]) and (Poly[dG].Poly[dC]). NMR study shows a qualitative pattern of drug/DNA interaction in terms of band shift and broadening. UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra were employed to measure the affinity constants of drug/DNA binding using Scatchard analysis.

  16. Identification of the non-ribosomal peptide synthetase responsible for biosynthesis of the potential anti-cancer drug sansalvamide in Fusarium solani

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romans-Fuertes, Patricia; Sondergaard, Teis Esben; Sandmann, Manuela Ilse Helga

    2016-01-01

    Sansalvamide is a cyclic pentadepsipeptide produced by Fusarium solani and has shown promising results as potential anti-cancer drug. The biosynthetic pathway has until now remained unidentified, but here we used an Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) approach to generate kno...... and Trichoderma virens, which suggests that the ability to produce compounds related to destruxin and sansalvamide is widespread....

  17. Curcumin: an anti-inflammatory molecule from a curry spice on the path to cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Purusotam; Skalko-Basnet, Natasa

    2011-06-03

    Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer's disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice) showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  18. Curcumin: An Anti-Inflammatory Molecule from a Curry Spice on the Path to Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purusotam Basnet

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage and inflammation have been pointed out in preclinical studies as the root cause of cancer and other chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, Alzheimer’s disease, etc. Epidemiological and clinical studies have suggested that cancer could be prevented or significantly reduced by treatment with anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory drugs, therefore, curcumin, a principal component of turmeric (a curry spice showing strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, might be a potential candidate for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer and other chronic diseases. However, curcumin, a highly pleiotropic molecule with an excellent safety profile targeting multiple diseases with strong evidence on the molecular level, could not achieve its optimum therapeutic outcome in past clinical trials, largely due to its low solubility and poor bioavailability. Curcumin can be developed as a therapeutic drug through improvement in formulation properties or delivery systems, enabling its enhanced absorption and cellular uptake. This review mainly focuses on the anti-inflammatory potential of curcumin and recent developments in dosage form and nanoparticulate delivery systems with the possibilities of therapeutic application of curcumin for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer.

  19. Newly engineered magnetic erythrocytes for sustained and targeted delivery of anti-cancer therapeutic compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Cinti

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic chemotherapy of cancer is limited by serious, sometimes life-threatening, side effects that arise from toxicities to sensitive normal cells because the therapies are not selective for malignant cells. So how can they be selectively improved? Alternative pharmaceutical formulations of anti-cancer agents have been investigated in order to improve conventional chemotherapy treatment. These formulations are associated with problems like severe toxic side effects on healthy organs, drug resistance and limited access of the drug to the tumor sites suggested the need to focus on site-specific controlled drug delivery systems. In response to these concerns, we have developed a new drug delivery system based on magnetic erythrocytes engineered with a viral spike fusion protein. This new erythrocyte-based drug delivery system has the potential for magnetic-controlled site-specific localization and highly efficient fusion capability with the targeted cells. Here we show that the erythro-magneto-HA virosomes drug delivery system is able to attach and fuse with the target cells and to efficiently release therapeutic compounds inside the cells. The efficacy of the anti-cancer drug employed is increased and the dose required is 10 time less than that needed with conventional therapy.

  20. Newly Engineered Magnetic Erythrocytes for Sustained and Targeted Delivery of Anti-Cancer Therapeutic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranta, Monia; Naldi, Ilaria

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy of cancer is limited by serious, sometimes life-threatening, side effects that arise from toxicities to sensitive normal cells because the therapies are not selective for malignant cells. So how can they be selectively improved? Alternative pharmaceutical formulations of anti-cancer agents have been investigated in order to improve conventional chemotherapy treatment. These formulations are associated with problems like severe toxic side effects on healthy organs, drug resistance and limited access of the drug to the tumor sites suggested the need to focus on site-specific controlled drug delivery systems. In response to these concerns, we have developed a new drug delivery system based on magnetic erythrocytes engineered with a viral spike fusion protein. This new erythrocyte-based drug delivery system has the potential for magnetic-controlled site-specific localization and highly efficient fusion capability with the targeted cells. Here we show that the erythro-magneto-HA virosomes drug delivery system is able to attach and fuse with the target cells and to efficiently release therapeutic compounds inside the cells. The efficacy of the anti-cancer drug employed is increased and the dose required is 10 time less than that needed with conventional therapy. PMID:21373641

  1. Influence of family history, irradiation and anti-cancer drug (mitomycin C) on the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms in breast carcinoma patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Masataka; Sakamoto, Goi; Sugano, Haruo; Kasumi, Fujio; Fukami, Atsuo; Kuno, Keijiro.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of family history, irradiation and anti-cancer drug (Mitomycin C) on the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms was analysed using the person-year method in 1359 Japanese breast carcinoma patients. There were 111 multiple primary neoplasms, including bilaterl breast cancer, in 109 patients; the incidence rate was 0.0072 per person-year. The incidence rate in patients with a family history of cancer was 1.29 times higher than in those without. In the bilateral breast cancer group there was about a 3 times higher frequency of family history of breast cancer. Irradiation therapy raised the occurrence of multiple primary neoplasms 1.28 fold, and Mitomycin C (40 mg) had no effect on the occurrence of neoplasms during a 10-year observation period. (author)

  2. Using anti-muscarinic drugs in the management of death rattle: evidence-based guidelines for palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Mike; Lucas, Viv; Brennan, Mary; Hughes, Andrew; O'Donnell, Valerie; Wee, Bee

    2002-09-01

    The management of 'death rattle' was reviewed by a task group on behalf of the Association for Palliative Medicine's Science Committee. Evidence was searched for the effectiveness of various anti-muscarinic drugs in drying oropharyngeal and bronchial secretions in dying patients. Clinical guidelines were constructed based on evidence from volunteer and clinical studies. Death rattle occurs in half of all dying patients and some response occurs in around 80% of treated patients. Clinical studies demonstrate that subcutaneous hyoscine hydrobromide 400 microg is more effective at improving symptoms at 30 min than glycopyrronium 200 microg by the same route. Volunteer studies demonstrate that intramuscular glycopyrronium 400 microg is as effective in drying secretions at 30 min as a dose of 200 microg given intravenously. Duration of response is shortest for hyoscine butylbromide (1 h) and longest for glycopyrronium (more than 6 h). There is insufficient evidence to support the use of one drug over another in a continuous infusion and prescribers should base decisions on different characteristics of each anti-muscarinic drug.

  3. External influences and priority-setting for anti-cancer agents: a case study of media coverage in adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fralick John

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Setting priorities for the funding of new anti-cancer agents is becoming increasingly complex. The funding of adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer has brought this dilemma to the fore. In this paper we review external factors that may influence decision-making bodies and present a case study of media response in Ontario, Canada to adjuvant trastuzumab for breast cancer. Methods A comprehensive search of the databases of Canadian national and local newspapers and television was performed. Articles pertaining to trastuzumab in adjuvant breast cancer as well as 17 other anti-cancer drugs and indications were retrieved. The search period was from the date when individual trial results were announced to the date funding was made available in Ontario. Results During the 2.6 months between the release of the trastuzumab results to funding approval in Ontario, we identified 51 episodes of media coverage. For the 17 other drugs/indications (7 breast and 10 non-breast, the median time to funding approval was 31 months (range 14–46. Other recent major advances in oncology such as adjuvant vinorelbine/cisplatin for resected NSCLC and docetaxel for advanced prostate cancer received considerably less media attention (17 media reports for each than trastuzumab. The median number of media reports for breast cancer drugs was 4.5 compared to 2.5 for non-breast cancer drugs (p = 0.56. Conclusion Priority-setting for novel anti-cancer agents is a complex process that tries to ensure fair use of constrained resources to fund therapies with the best evidence of clinical benefit. However, this process is subject to external factors including the influence of media, patient advocates, politicians, and industry. The data in this case study serve to illustrate the significant involvement one (or all of these external factors may play in the debate over priority-setting.

  4. Association between frequent use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Raghu

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eighty percent of all breast cancers and almost 90% of breast cancer deaths occur among post-menopausal women. We used a nested case control design to examine the association between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use and breast cancer occurrence among women over 65 years of age. The cyclooxygenase (COX-2 enzyme is expressed more in breast cancers than in normal breast tissue. COX-2 inhibition may have a role in breast cancer prevention. Methods In the Canadian province of Quebec, physician services are covered through a governmental insurance plan. Medication costs are covered for those ≥ 65 years of age and a publicly funded screening program for breast cancer targets all women 50 years of age or older. We obtained encrypted data from these insurance databases on all women ≥ 65 years of age who filled a prescription for COX-2 inhibitors, non-selective NSAIDs (ns-NSAIDs, aspirin, or acetaminophen between January 1998 and December 2002. Cases were defined as those women who have undergone mammography between April 2001 and June 2002 and had a diagnosis of breast cancer within six months following mammography. Controls included those who have undergone mammography between April 2001 and June 2002 without a diagnosis of any cancer during the six months following mammography. The exposure of interest, frequent NSAID use, was defined as use of ns-NSAIDs and/or COX-2 inhibitors for ≥ 90 days during the year prior to mammography. Frequent use served as a convenient proxy for long term chronic use. Results We identified 1,090 cases and 44,990 controls. Cases were older and more likely to have breast cancer risk factors. Logistic regression models adjusting for potential confounders showed that frequent use of ns-NSAIDs and/or COX-2 inhibitors was associated with a lower risk of breast cancer (OR: 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.64–0.89. Results were similar for COX-2 inhibitors (0.81, 0.68–0.97 and ns-NSAIDs (0

  5. Interaction of celecoxib with different anti-cancer drugs is antagonistic in breast but not in other cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Awady, Raafat A.; Saleh, Ekram M.; Ezz, Marwa; Elsayed, Abeer M.

    2011-01-01

    Celecoxib, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, is being investigated for enhancement of chemotherapy efficacy in cancer clinical trials. This study investigates the ability of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to sensitize cells from different origins to several chemotherapeutic agents. The effect of the drug's mechanism of action and sequence of administration are also investigated. The sensitivity, cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA damage of five different cancer cell lines (HeLa, HCT116, HepG2, MCF7 and U251) to 5-FU, cisplatin, doxorubicin and etoposide ± celecoxib following different incubation schedules were analyzed. We found antagonism between celecoxib and the four drugs in the breast cancer cells MCF7 following all incubation schedules and between celecoxib and doxorubicin in all cell lines except for two combinations in HCT116 cells. Celecoxib with the other three drugs in the remaining four cell lines resulted in variable interactions. Mechanistic investigations revealed that celecoxib exerts different molecular effects in different cells. In some lines, it abrogates the drug-induced G2/M arrest enhancing pre-mature entry into mitosis with damaged DNA thus increasing apoptosis and resulting in synergism. In other cells, it enhances drug-induced G2/M arrest allowing time to repair drug-induced DNA damage before entry into mitosis and decreasing cell death resulting in antagonism. In some synergistic combinations, celecoxib-induced abrogation of G2/M arrest was not associated with apoptosis but permanent arrest in G1 phase. These results, if confirmed in-vivo, indicate that celecoxib is not a suitable chemosensitizer for breast cancer or with doxorubicin for other cancers. Moreover, combination of celecoxib with other drugs should be tailored to the tumor type, drug and administration schedule. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: → Celecoxib may enhance effects of anticancer drugs. → Its combination with four drugs was tested in five cancer cell

  6. Tumor-targeted Nanobullets: Anti-EGFR nanobody-liposomes loaded with anti-IGF-1R kinase inhibitor for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meel, Roy; Oliveira, Sabrina; Altintas, Isil; Haselberg, Rob; van der Veeken, Joris; Roovers, Rob C; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Kok, Robbert J

    2012-04-30

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target for anti-cancer therapy and several EGFR inhibitors are used in the clinic. Over the years, an increasing number of studies have reported on the crosstalk between EGFR and other receptors that can contribute to accelerated cancer development or even acquisition of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies. Combined targeting of EGFR and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a rational strategy to potentiate anti-cancer treatment and possibly retard resistance development. In the present study, we have pursued this by encapsulating the kinase inhibitor AG538 in anti-EGFR nanobody-liposomes. The thus developed dual-active nanobody-liposomes associated with EGFR-(over)expressing cells in an EGFR-specific manner and blocked both EGFR and IGF-1R activation, due to the presence of the EGFR-blocking nanobody EGa1 and the anti-IGF-1R kinase inhibitor AG538 respectively. AG538-loaded nanobody-liposomes induced a strong inhibition of tumor cell proliferation even upon short-term exposure followed by a drug-free wash-out period. Therefore, AG538-loaded nanobody-liposomes are a promising anti-cancer formulation due to efficient intracellular delivery of AG538 in combination with antagonistic and downregulating properties of the EGa1 nanobody-liposomes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-VEGF drugs: evidence for effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Jennifer; Virgili, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Anti-vascular endothelial growth factors (anti-VEGF) are targeted biological drugs (e.g. monoclonal antibodies) that prevent the growth of new vessels by inhibiting VEGF. VEGF is a cytokine (cell-signalling protein) that promotes the growth of, and leakage from, new vessels. Currently there are three anti-VEGF drugs licensed for use in eye disease: pegaptanib, aflibercept, ranibizumab and one that is not licensed but is commonly used off-label (bevacizumab).

  8. An Aptamer Bio-barCode (ABC) assay using SPR, RNase H, and probes with RNA and gold-nanorods for anti-cancer drug screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Jacky Fong-Chuen; Yang, Chengbin; Tsang, Hing Lun; Lau, Pui Man; Yong, Ken-Tye; Ho, Ho Pui; Kong, Siu Kai

    2017-10-07

    With modifications to an ultra-sensitive bio-barcode (BBC) assay, we have developed a next generation aptamer-based bio-barcode (ABC) assay to detect cytochrome-c (Cyto-c), a cell death marker released from cancer cells, for anti-cancer drug screening. An aptamer is a short single-stranded DNA selected from a synthetic DNA library that is capable of binding to its target with high affinity and specificity based on its unique DNA sequence and 3D structure after folding. Similar to the BBC assay, Cyto-c is captured by a micro-magnetic particle (MMP) coated with capturing antibodies (Ab) and an aptamer specifically against Cyto-c to form sandwich structures ([MMP-Ab]-[Cyto-c]-[Aptamer]). After washing and melting, our aptamers, acting as a DNA bio-barcode, are released from the sandwiches and hybridized with the probes specially designed for RNase H for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing. In an aptamer-probe duplex, RNase H digests the RNA in the probe and releases the intact aptamer for another round of hybridization and digestion. With signal enhancement effects from gold-nanorods (Au-NRs) on probes for SPR sensing, the detection limit was found to be 1 nM for the aptamer and 80 pM for Cyto-c. Without the time-consuming DNA amplification steps by PCR, the detection process of this new ABC assay can be completed within three hours. As a proof-of-concept, phenylarsine oxide was found to be a potent agent to kill liver cancer cells with multi-drug resistance at the nano-molar level. This approach thus provides a fast, sensitive and robust tool for anti-cancer drug screening.

  9. Model-based drug administration : current status of target-controlled infusion and closed-loop control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuizenga, Merel H.; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.

    Purpose of review Drug administration might be optimized by incorporating pharmacokinetic-dynamic (PK/PD) principles and control engineering theories. This review gives an update of the actual status of target-controlled infusion (TCI) and closed-loop computer-controlled drug administration and the

  10. Cancer Drug Development: New Targets for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curt

    1996-01-01

    cancer drug screening and cancer drug development. At the NCI, for example, the old in vivo mouse screen using mouse lymphomas has been shelved; it discovered compounds with some activity in lymphomas, but not the common solid tumors of adulthood. It has been replaced with an initial in vitro screen of some sixty cell lines, representing the common solid tumors-ovary, G.I., lung, breast, CNS, melanoma and others. The idea was to not only discover new drugs with specific anti-tumor activity but also to use the small volumes required for in vitro screening as a medium to screen for new natural product compounds, one of the richest sources of effective chemotherapy. The cell line project had an unexpected dividend. The pattern of sensitivity in the panel predicted the mechanism of action of unknown compounds. An antifolate suppressed cell growth of the different lines like other antifolates, anti-tubulin compounds suppressed like other anti-tubulins, and so on. It now became possible, at a very early stage of cancer drug screening, to select for drugs with unknown-and potentially novel-mechanisms of action. The idea was taken to the next logical step, and that was to characterize the entire panel for important molecular properties of human malignancy: mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53, expression of important oncogenes like ras or myc, the gp170 gene which confers multiple drug resistance, protein-specific kinases, and others. It now became possible to use the cell line panel as a tool to detect new drugs which targeted a specific genetic property of the tumor cell. Researchers can now ask whether a given drug is likely to inhibit multiple drug resistance or kill cells which over-express specific oncogenes at the earliest phase of drug discovery. In this issue of The Oncologist, Tom Connors celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of cancer chemotherapy. His focus is on the importance of international collaboration in clinical trials and the negative impact of

  11. Safety of Therapeutic Fever Induction in Cancer Patients Using Approved PAMP Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Rudolf Max Reuter

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available William Coley, between 1895 and 1936, treated hundreds of cancer patients using infusions of fever inducing bacerial extracts. Similar experiments were done by Klyuyeva and co-workers in the 1940ies in Russia using trypanosoma extracts. Many remissions and cures were reported. We have conjectured that pathogen associated molecular pattern substances (PAMP are the molecular explanation for the beneficial treatments in both groups. We could show that a combination of PAMP can eradicate solid tumours in cancer mice if applied several times. Accordingly, we suggested to combine PAMP containing approved drugs to treat cancer patients using a protocol similar to the old fever induction regimen. In this retrospective phase-1 study we report on the fever induction capacity and safety of applications of bacterial extracts, combinations of bacterial extracts with approved drugs, and combinations of approved drugs in 131 mainly cancer patients. Adverse reactions were those which can be expected during a feverish infection and mild. Over 523 fever inductions, no severe adverse reaction was observed.

  12. The transport of nifurtimox, an anti-trypanosomal drug, in an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier: evidence for involvement of breast cancer resistance protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christopher P; Dogruel, Murat; Mihoreanu, Larisa; Begley, David J; Weksler, Babette B; Couraud, Pierre O; Romero, Ignacio A; Thomas, Sarah A

    2012-02-03

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a parasitic disease affecting sub-Saharan Africa. The parasites are able to traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which marks stage 2 (S2) of the disease. Delivery of anti-parasitic drugs across the BBB is key to treating S2 effectively and the difficulty in achieving this goal is likely to be a reason why some drugs require highly intensive treatment regimes to be effective. This study aimed to investigate not only the drug transport mechanisms utilised by nifurtimox at the BBB, but also the impact of nifurtimox-eflornithine combination therapy (NECT) and other anti-HAT drug combination therapies (CTs) on radiolabelled-nifurtimox delivery in an in vitro model of drug accumulation and the human BBB, the hCMEC/D3 cell line. We found that nifurtimox appeared to use several membrane transporters, in particular breast-cancer resistance protein (BCRP), to exit the BBB cells. The addition of eflornithine caused no change in the accumulation of nifurtimox, nor did the addition of clinically relevant doses of the other anti-HAT drugs suramin, nifurtimox or melarsoprol, but a significant increase was observed with the addition of pentamidine. The results provide evidence that anti-HAT drugs are interacting with membrane transporters at the human BBB and suggest that combination with known transport inhibitors could potentially improve their efficacy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of intra-hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for patients with liver metastasis from breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dezhong; Li Huai; Zeng Huiying; Yang Ling

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of intra-hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy for patients with liver metastasis from breast cancer. Methods: 1993-1998 years, Thirty four patients with liver metastasis from breast cancer had received epi-adriamycin, cisplatin, mitomycin and 5-fluorouracil by intrahepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. Twelve patients had received embolization. Results: Six patients (17.65%) had a complete response, 12 patients (35.29%) had a partial response. The overall response rate was 52.94%. Cumulative survival rates at 1, 2, 3 and 4 years were 56.90%, 25.00%, 5.00% and 5.00% respectively (Kaplan-Meier method). The median overall survival time was 11.5 months. Conclusion: Intra-hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy is safe and effective for liver metastasis from breast cancer and should be the first choice of treatment for these patients

  14. Antibiotic and anti-inflammatory use and the risk of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bent Stephen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate inflammation or infection may increase the risk of prostate cancer. Antibiotics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are used to treat prostatitis and urinary tract infections (UTIs. The objective of our study was to assess whether their use decreases the risk of prostate cancer. Methods We conducted a case-control study among men with incident prostate cancer (N = 65 cases and without prostate cancer (N = 195 controls at the San Francisco Veteran Affairs medical center (VAMC between June 1996 and June 2006. Cases were all patients who had prostate biopsies positive for cancer. We matched controls to cases on age group and race at a 3:1 ratio, and each matched pair was given an identical index date. Total antibiotic, aspirin, and NSAID use (number of prescriptions was computed for each participant by drug type and was restricted to a fill date at least 1 year before the index date. Logistic regression was used for analysis. We adjusted for the matching variables (age group and race and potential confounders (years of VAMC enrollment and number of clinic visits. Results Neither total antibiotic use nor total anti-inflammatory use reduces the risk of prostate cancer (P > 0.05. Conclusion Our analysis did not reveal a relation between use of antibiotics, aspirin, or NSAIDs and the risk of prostate cancer.

  15. Chloroquine potentiates the anti-cancer effect of 5-fluorouracil on colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kazuhito; Hiyoshi, Masaya; Kaneko, Manabu; Kitayama, Joji; Takahashi, Koki; Nagawa, Hirokazu; Tsuno, Nelson H; Sunami, Eiji; Tsurita, Giichiro; Kawai, Kazushige; Okaji, Yurai; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Shuno, Yasutaka; Hongo, Kumiko

    2010-01-01

    Chloroquine (CQ), the worldwide used anti-malarial drug, has recently being focused as a potential anti-cancer agent as well as a chemosensitizer when used in combination with anti-cancer drugs. It has been shown to inhibit cell growth and/or to induce cell death in various types of cancer. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the chemotherapeutic agent of first choice in colorectal cancer, but in most cases, resistance to 5-FU develops through various mechanisms. Here, we focused on the combination of CQ as a mechanism to potentiate the inhibitory effect of 5-FU on human colon cancer cells. HT-29 cells were treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, and their proliferative ability, apoptosis and autophagy induction effects, and the affection of the cell cycle were evaluated. The proliferative ability of HT-29 was analyzed by the MTS assay. Apoptosis was quantified by flow-cytometry after double-staining of the cells with AnnexinV/PI. The cell cycle was evaluated by flow-cytometry after staining of cells with PI. Autophagy was quantified by flow-cytometry and Western blot analysis. Finally, to evaluate the fate of the cells treated with CQ and/or 5-FU, the colony formation assay was performed. 5-FU inhibited the proliferative activity of HT-29 cells, which was mostly dependent on the arrest of the cells to the G0/G1-phase but also partially on apoptosis induction, and the effect was potentiated by CQ pre-treatment. The potentiation of the inhibitory effect of 5-FU by CQ was dependent on the increase of p21 Cip1 and p27 Kip1 and the decrease of CDK2. Since CQ is reported to inhibit autophagy, the catabolic process necessary for cell survival under conditions of cell starvation or stress, which is induced by cancer cells as a protective mechanism against chemotherapeutic agents, we also analyzed the induction of autophagy in HT-29. HT-29 induced autophagy in response to 5-FU, and CQ inhibited this induction, a possible mechanism of the potentiation of the anti-cancer effect of 5-FU. Our

  16. Intra-arterial and intraportal infusion liver scintigraphy using 99mTc-labeled colloid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Ohtake, Tohru; Momose, Toshimitsu; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Kosaka, Noboru; Nishikawa, Jun-ichi; Sasaki, Yasuhito; Sawada, Toshio; Muto, Tetsuichiro

    1991-01-01

    Intra-arterial infusion liver scintigraphy was performed in 11 patients with primary or metastatic liver tumor. and intraportal infusion liver scintigraphy was performed in 6 patients for prophylaxis of liver metastasis from colorectal cancer. 99m Tc-Sn colloid or 99m Tc-phytate was administered through the catheter of which tip was placed in the portal vein or the hepatic artery, and then liver image was obtained. When 99m Tc-phytate was infused intra-arterially, significant amount of the infused tracer passed through the liver and we could not get sufficient information to assess the distribution of drug administered through the catheter. On the other hand, intraportal infusion liver scintigraphy using 99m Tc-Sn colloid or 99m Tc-phytate and intra-arterial infusion liver scintigraphy using 99m Tc-Sn colloid revealed heterogenity of liver uptake, tracer uptake in spleen, low uptake area corresponding to the liver tumor and high uptake area around it. The findings will be clinically useful, and these methods are thought to be helpful to confirm the satisfactory drug distribution. (author)

  17. Phase I and II trial of five-day infused 5-fluorouracil and radiation in advanced cancer of the head and neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byfield, J.E.; Sharp, T.R.; Frankel, S.S.; Tang, S.G.; Callipari, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    Eighteen patients with advanced epithelial cancers of the head and neck region were studied for their tolerance and response to combined cycles of 120-hour infused 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and external-beam radiation therapy. 5-FU infusions were given under conditions where radiosensitization would be expected at the higher infusion doses. Coincident radiation treatments were given as four sequential daily fractions of 250 rad each administered during days 1 through 4 of each five-day infusion cycle. The patients were rested for at least nine days after each cycle or longer until toxicity was resolved. The regimen was then repeated in each patient for a total of five treatment cycles. Thereafter therapy was consolidated, usually by boost radiation without drug. In sequential patient subsets the infusion load was progressively escalated in a phase I format. The complete response rate for stage IV patients was 75% with survival benefit compared to prior results. 5-FU dose-dependent combined modality loco-regional toxicity was demonstrated without significant enhancement of systemic toxicity of any form; 5-FU dose-dependent enhanced responsiveness and survival benefit is also suggested. Further scheduling and response studies of 5-FU under radiosensitizing conditions appear warranted

  18. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues.

  19. Weekly ascorbic acid infusion in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben K.; Højgaard, Martin; Andersen, Jon T.

    2017-01-01

    of this treatment.  Methods: This non-comparative, single-center, phase II trial included patients with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) from an outpatient clinic to evaluate the efficacy and safety of IV AA therapy. Patients received weekly infusions of AA (week 1, 5 g...... μg/L was recorded at week 12. Among the secondary endpoints, no signs of disease remission were observed. In total, 53 adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Eleven were graded as "serious". Three AEs were directly related to AA, and all of which were related to fluid load.  Conclusions: Infusion...

  20. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    -cancer drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms...... design is potentially safer to healthy cells....

  1. Mesua beccariana (Clusiaceae, A Source of Potential Anti-cancer Lead Compounds in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soek Sin Teh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An investigation on biologically active secondary metabolites from the stem bark of Mesua beccariana was carried out. A new cyclodione, mesuadione (1, along with several known constituents which are beccamarin (2, 2,5-dihydroxy-1,3,4-trimethoxy anthraquinone (3, 4-methoxy-1,3,5-trihydroxyanthraquinone (4, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 were obtained from this ongoing research. Structures of these compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D-NMR, GC-MS, IR and UV techniques. Preliminary tests of the in vitro cytotoxic activities of all the isolated metabolites against a panel of human cancer cell lines Raji (lymphoma, SNU-1 (gastric carcinoma, K562 (erythroleukemia cells, LS-174T (colorectal adenocarcinoma, HeLa (cervical cells, SK-MEL-28 (malignant melanoma cells, NCI-H23 (lung adenocarcinoma, IMR-32 (neuroblastoma and Hep-G2 (hepatocellular liver carcinoma were carried out using an MTT assay. Mesuadione (1, beccamarin (2, betulinic acid (5 and stigmasterol (6 displayed strong inhibition of Raji cell proliferation, while the proliferation rate of SK-MEL-28 and HeLa were strongly inhibited by stigmasterol (6 and beccamarin (2, indicating these secondary metabolites could be anti-cancer lead compounds in drug discovery.

  2. Liposomal delivery systems for anti-cancer analogues of vitamin E

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, S.; Knotigova, P.T.; Masek, J.; Prochazka, L.; Lukac, R.; Miller, A.D.; Neužil, Jiří; Turanek, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 207, Jun 10 (2015), s. 59-69 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Alpha-tocopheryl succinate * Analogues of vitamin E * Anti-cancer drugs Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.441, year: 2015

  3. Plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity: from folklore to practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo eFridlender

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants have had an essential role in the folklore of ancient cultures. In addition to the use as food and spices, plants have also been utilized as medicines for over 5000 years. It is estimated that 70-95% of the population in developing countries continues to use traditional medicines even today. A new trend, that involved the isolation of plant active compounds begun during the early 19th century. This trend led to the discovery of different active compounds that are derived from plants. In the last decades, more and more new materials derived from plants have been authorized and subscribed as medicines, including those with anti-cancer activity. Cancer is among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The number of new cases is expected to rise by about 70% over the next 2 decades. Thus, there is a real need for new efficient anti-cancer drugs with reduced side effects, and plants are a promising source for such entities. Here we focus on some plant-derived substances exhibiting anti-cancer and chemoprevention activity, their mode of action and bioavailability. These include paclitaxel, curcumin and cannabinoids. In addition, development and use of their synthetic analogs, and those of strigolactones, are discussed. Also discussed are commercial considerations and future prospects for development of plant derived substances with anti-cancer activity.

  4. Use of anti-obesity drugs among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria do Carmo de Carvalho e; Souza Filho, Manoel Dias de; Moura, Felipe Scipião; Carvalho, Juliana de Sousa Ribeiro de; Müller, Marina Costa; Neves, Rebeka Valença; Mousinho, Patrícia Coelho; Lima, Iúri Paz

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the use of anti-obesity drugs among students attending a public university. This was a cross sectional random study of 664 college students. Drug use, socioeconomic, and anthropometric variables were observed. Body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were classified according to World Health Organization criteria. Current or previous use of anti-obesity drugs was reported by 6.8% of students. Amphetamine and sympathomimetic amines (40.5%) were the most commonly used drugs. Among those who reported use of anti-obesity agents, 62.2% were female. Only 31.1% of medications were prescribed by doctors. Mean BMI and WC were higher among students reporting the use of such drugs, but 47% of them were classified as eutrophic by BMI, and 76.5% had normal WC measure. The use of anti-obesity drugs among college students is of concern, particularly due to the high proportion of drug use without indication or prescription.

  5. Inhalation of nanoparticle-based drug for lung cancer treatment: Advantages and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Hin Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the success of developing inhalable insulin, drug delivery via pulmonary administration has become an attractive route to treat chronic diseases. Pulmonary delivery system for nanotechnology is a relatively new concept especially when applicable to lung cancer therapy. Nano-based systems such as liposome, polymeric nanoparticles or micelles are strategically designed to enhance the therapeutic index of anti-cancer drugs through improvement of their bioavailability, stability and residency at targeted lung regions. Along with these benefits, nano-based systems also provide additional diagnostic advantages during lung cancer treatment, including imaging, screening and drug tracking. Nevertheless, delivery of nano-based drugs via pulmonary administration for lung cancer therapy is still in its infancy and numerous challenges are expected. Pharmacology, immunology, toxicology and large-scale manufacturing (stability and activity of drugs are some aspects in nanotechnology that should be taken into consideration for the development of inhalable nano-based chemotherapeutic drugs. This review will focus on the current inhalable nano-based drugs for lung cancer treatment.

  6. Preparation and anti-cancer activity of polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Phuong Thu; Tran, Dai Lam; Nguyen, Xuan Phuc; Le, Mai Huong; Ha Tran, Thi Hong; Hoang, Thi My Nhung; Huong Le, Thi Thu; Duong, Tuan Quang

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (Cur) is a yellow compound isolated from rhizome of the herb curcuma longa. Curcumin possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and antimicrobial properties, and suppresses proliferation of many tumor cells. However, the clinical application of curcumin in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its serious poor delivery characteristics. In order to increase the hydrophilicity and drug delivery capability, we encapsulated curcumin into copolymer PLA-TPGS, 1,3-beta-glucan (Glu), O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCs) and folate-conjugated OCMCs (OCMCs-Fol). These polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-PLA-TPGS, Cur-Glu, Cur-OCMCs and Cur-OCMCs-Fol) were characterized by infrared (IR), fluorescence (FL), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and found to be spherical particles with an average size of 50–100 nm, being suitable for drug delivery applications. They were much more soluble in water than not only free curcumin but also other biodegradable polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles. The anti-tumor promoting assay was carried out, showing the positive effects of Cur-Glu and Cur-PLA-TPGS on tumor promotion of Hep-G2 cell line in vitro. Confocal microscopy revealed that the nano-sized curcumin encapsulated by polymers OCMCs and OCMCs-Fol significantly enhanced the cellular uptake (cancer cell HT29 and HeLa). (paper)

  7. Preparation and anti-cancer activity of polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Ha, Phuong; Huong Le, Mai; Nhung Hoang, Thi My; Thu Huong Le, Thi; Quang Duong, Tuan; Tran, Thi Hong Ha; Tran, Dai Lam; Phuc Nguyen, Xuan

    2012-09-01

    Curcumin (Cur) is a yellow compound isolated from rhizome of the herb curcuma longa. Curcumin possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic and antimicrobial properties, and suppresses proliferation of many tumor cells. However, the clinical application of curcumin in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its serious poor delivery characteristics. In order to increase the hydrophilicity and drug delivery capability, we encapsulated curcumin into copolymer PLA-TPGS, 1,3-beta-glucan (Glu), O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCs) and folate-conjugated OCMCs (OCMCs-Fol). These polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles (Cur-PLA-TPGS, Cur-Glu, Cur-OCMCs and Cur-OCMCs-Fol) were characterized by infrared (IR), fluorescence (FL), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), and found to be spherical particles with an average size of 50-100 nm, being suitable for drug delivery applications. They were much more soluble in water than not only free curcumin but also other biodegradable polymer-encapsulated curcumin nanoparticles. The anti-tumor promoting assay was carried out, showing the positive effects of Cur-Glu and Cur-PLA-TPGS on tumor promotion of Hep-G2 cell line in vitro. Confocal microscopy revealed that the nano-sized curcumin encapsulated by polymers OCMCs and OCMCs-Fol significantly enhanced the cellular uptake (cancer cell HT29 and HeLa).

  8. Chemotherapy by superselective intraarterial infusion of nedaplatin combined with radiotherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Yoshio; Goto, Masaaki; Katsuki, Takeshi

    2002-01-01

    Nedaplatin (CDGP), which is a CDDP derivative, has been reported to be an effective anticancer agent for head and neck cancer. This study was performed to assess the feasibility of chemotherapy by superselective intraarterial infusion of nedaplatin (CDGP) in patients with oral cancers. Ten patients were treated with chemotherapy by superselective intraarterial infusion of CDGP combined with radiotherapy. The complete and partial response rates were 7/10 (70%) and 3/10 (30%), respectively. Nine patients showed grade 1-2 hematological toxicity including leukocytopenia and anemia. Thrombocytopenia of grade 4 was seen in only one patient. However, all the patients were free from renal dysfunction. From these results, it is suggested that this combination therapy might be quite effective and safe. Further study will be needed to determine its efficacy against oral cancer. (author)

  9. Chemotherapy by superselective intraarterial infusion of nedaplatin combined with radiotherapy for oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Yoshio; Goto, Masaaki; Katsuki, Takeshi [Saga Medical School (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    Nedaplatin (CDGP), which is a CDDP derivative, has been reported to be an effective anticancer agent for head and neck cancer. This study was performed to assess the feasibility of chemotherapy by superselective intraarterial infusion of nedaplatin (CDGP) in patients with oral cancers. Ten patients were treated with chemotherapy by superselective intraarterial infusion of CDGP combined with radiotherapy. The complete and partial response rates were 7/10 (70%) and 3/10 (30%), respectively. Nine patients showed grade 1-2 hematological toxicity including leukocytopenia and anemia. Thrombocytopenia of grade 4 was seen in only one patient. However, all the patients were free from renal dysfunction. From these results, it is suggested that this combination therapy might be quite effective and safe. Further study will be needed to determine its efficacy against oral cancer. (author)

  10. Theobroma cacao: Review of the Extraction, Isolation, and Bioassay of Its Potential Anti-cancer Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharum, Zainal; Akim, Abdah Md; Hin, Taufiq Yap Yun; Hamid, Roslida Abdul; Kasran, Rosmin

    2016-01-01

    Plants have been a good source of therapeutic agents for thousands of years; an impressive number of modern drugs used for treating human diseases are derived from natural sources. The Theobroma cacao tree, or cocoa, has recently garnered increasing attention and become the subject of research due to its antioxidant properties, which are related to potential anti-cancer effects. In the past few years, identifying and developing active compounds or extracts from the cocoa bean that might exert anti-cancer effects have become an important area of health- and biomedicine-related research. This review provides an updated overview of T. cacao in terms of its potential anti-cancer compounds and their extraction, in vitro bioassay, purification, and identification. This article also discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the techniques described and reviews the processes for future perspectives of analytical methods from the viewpoint of anti-cancer compound discovery. PMID:27019680

  11. Local NSAID infusion inhibits satellite cell proliferation in human skeletal muscle after eccentric exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, U R; Langberg, H; Helmark, I C

    2009-01-01

    Despite the widespread consumption of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the influence of these drugs on muscle satellite cells is not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a local NSAID infusion on satellite cells after unaccustomed eccentric...... exercise in vivo in human skeletal muscle. Eight young healthy males performed 200 maximal eccentric contractions with each leg. An NSAID was infused via a microdialysis catheter into the vastus lateralis muscle of one leg (NSAID leg) before, during, and for 4.5 h after exercise, with the other leg working...... cells (CD68(+) or CD16(+) cells) was not significantly increased in either of the legs 8 days after exercise and was unaffected by the NSAID. The main finding in the present study was that the NSAID infusion for 7.5 h during the exercise day suppressed the exercise-induced increase in the number...

  12. Weekly ascorbic acid infusion in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben K.; Højgaard, Martin; Andersen, Jon T.

    2017-01-01

    of this treatment. Methods: This non-comparative, single-center, phase II trial included patients with chemotherapy-naïve, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) from an outpatient clinic to evaluate the efficacy and safety of IV AA therapy. Patients received weekly infusions of AA (week 1, 5 g....../L was recorded at week 12. Among the secondary endpoints, no signs of disease remission were observed. In total, 53 adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Eleven were graded as "serious". Three AEs were directly related to AA, and all of which were related to fluid load. Conclusions: Infusion with 60 g of AA did...

  13. Anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity of mulberry (Morus alba L.) root bark

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Root bark of mulberry (Morus alba L.) has been used in herbal medicine as anti-phlogistic, liver protective, kidney protective, hypotensive, diuretic, anti-cough and analgesic agent. However, the anti-cancer activity and the potential anti-cancer mechanisms of mulberry root bark have not been elucidated. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether mulberry root bark extract (MRBE) shows anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Methods In anti-inflammatory activity, NO was measured using the griess method. iNOS and proteins regulating NF-κB and ERK1/2 signaling were analyzed by Western blot. In anti-cancer activity, cell growth was measured by MTT assay. Cleaved PARP, ATF3 and cyclin D1 were analyzed by Western blot. Results In anti-inflammatory effect, MRBE blocked NO production via suppressing iNOS over-expression in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, MRBE inhibited NF-κB activation through p65 nuclear translocation via blocking IκB-α degradation and ERK1/2 activation via its hyper-phosphorylation. In anti-cancer activity, MRBE deos-dependently induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells, SW480. MRBE treatment to SW480 cells activated ATF3 expression and down-regulated cyclin D1 level. We also observed that MRBE-induced ATF3 expression was dependent on ROS and GSK3β. Moreover, MRBE-induced cyclin D1 down-regulation was mediated from cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation, which was dependent on ROS. Conclusions These findings suggest that mulberry root bark exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. PMID:24962785

  14. Screening the Drug Sensitivity Genes Related to GEM and CDDP in the Lung Cancer Cell-lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu YANG

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Screening of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC cell lines with gemcitabine hydrochloride (GEM and cisplatin (CDDP related to drug sensitivity gene might clarify the action mechanism of anti-cancer drugs and provide a new clue for overcoming drug resistance and the development of new anti-cancer drugs, and also provide theoretical basis for the clinical treatment of individual. Methods The drug sensitivity of CDDP and GEM in 4 SCLC cell lines and 6 NSCLC cell lines was determined using MTT colorimetric assay, while the cDNA macroarray was applied to detect the gene expression state related to drug sensitivity of 10 lung cancer cell line in 1 291, and the correlation between the two was analysized. Results There were 6 genes showing significant positive correlation (r≥0.632, P < 0.05 with GEM sensitivity; 45 genes positively related to CDDP; another 41 genes related to both GEM and CDDP (r≥± 0.4. Lung cancer with GEM and CDDP sensitivity of two types of drugs significantly related genes were Metallothinein (Signal transduction molecules, Cathepsin B (Organization protease B and TIMP1 (Growth factor; the GEM, CDDP sensitivity associated genes of lung cancer cell lines mainly distributed in Metallothinein, Cathepsin B, growth factor TIMP1 categories. Conclusion There existed drug-related sensitive genes of GEM, CDDP in SCLC and NSCLC cell lines; of these genes, Metallothinein, Cathepsin B and TIMP1 genes presented a significant positive correlation with GEM drug sensitivity, a significant negative correlation with CDDP drug sensitivity.

  15. NPACT: Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Manu; Sagar, Parul; Singh, Harinder; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Agarwal, Subhash M

    2013-01-01

    Plant-derived molecules have been highly valued by biomedical researchers and pharmaceutical companies for developing drugs, as they are thought to be optimized during evolution. Therefore, we have collected and compiled a central resource Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database (NPACT, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/npact/) that gathers the information related to experimentally validated plant-derived natural compounds exhibiting anti-cancerous activity (in vitro and in vivo), to complement the other databases. It currently contains 1574 compound entries, and each record provides information on their structure, manually curated published data on in vitro and in vivo experiments along with reference for users referral, inhibitory values (IC(50)/ED(50)/EC(50)/GI(50)), properties (physical, elemental and topological), cancer types, cell lines, protein targets, commercial suppliers and drug likeness of compounds. NPACT can easily be browsed or queried using various options, and an online similarity tool has also been made available. Further, to facilitate retrieval of existing data, each record is hyperlinked to similar databases like SuperNatural, Herbal Ingredients' Targets, Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, PubChem and NCI-60 GI(50) data.

  16. NPACT: Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Manu; Sagar, Parul; Singh, Harinder; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.; Agarwal, Subhash M.

    2013-01-01

    Plant-derived molecules have been highly valued by biomedical researchers and pharmaceutical companies for developing drugs, as they are thought to be optimized during evolution. Therefore, we have collected and compiled a central resource Naturally Occurring Plant-based Anti-cancer Compound-Activity-Target database (NPACT, http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/npact/) that gathers the information related to experimentally validated plant-derived natural compounds exhibiting anti-cancerous activity (in vitro and in vivo), to complement the other databases. It currently contains 1574 compound entries, and each record provides information on their structure, manually curated published data on in vitro and in vivo experiments along with reference for users referral, inhibitory values (IC50/ED50/EC50/GI50), properties (physical, elemental and topological), cancer types, cell lines, protein targets, commercial suppliers and drug likeness of compounds. NPACT can easily be browsed or queried using various options, and an online similarity tool has also been made available. Further, to facilitate retrieval of existing data, each record is hyperlinked to similar databases like SuperNatural, Herbal Ingredients’ Targets, Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, PubChem and NCI-60 GI50 data. PMID:23203877

  17. Biological anti-TNF drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado, Mônica Simon; Bendtzen, Klaus; Andrade, Luis Eduardo Coelho

    2017-01-01

    practice shows a significant percentage of individuals who do not exhibit the desired response. Loss of therapeutic benefit after initial successful response is designated secondary failure. Immune-biological agents are not self-antigens and are therefore potentially immunogenic. Secondary failure...... is frequently caused by antibodies against immune-biologicals, known as anti-drug antibodies (ADA). ADA that neutralize circulating immune-biologicals and/or promote their clearance can reduce treatment efficacy. Furthermore, ADA can induce adverse events by diverse immunological mechanisms. This review...... provides a comprehensive overview of ADA in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with anti-TNF immune-biologicals, and explores the concept of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) as an effective strategy to improve therapeutic management. Expert opinion: Monitoring circulating ADA and therapeutic immune-biological...

  18. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use is associated with reduced risk of inflammation-associated cancers: NIH-AARP study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma M Shebl

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation has been linked to cancers, and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs has been associated with reduced risk of several cancers. To further refine the magnitude of NSAID-related associations, in particular for cancers related to inflammation, such as alcohol-, infection-, obesity-, and smoking-related cancers, as well as for less common cancers, we evaluated the use of NSAIDs and cancer risk in a very large cohort. We used propensity scores to account for potential selection bias and hypothesized that NSAID use is associated with decreased cancer incidence.We conducted a prospective study among 314,522 participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. Individuals who completed the lifestyle questionnaire, which included NSAID use, in 1996-1997 were followed through 2006. Information on cancer incidence was ascertained by linking to cancer registries and vital status databases.During 2,715,994 person-years of follow-up (median 10.1 person-years, there were 51,894 incident cancers. Compared with non-users of NSAIDs, individuals who reported use in the 12 months prior to interview had a significantly lower risk of all inflammation-related cancer, alcohol-related, infection-related, obesity-related, and smoking-related cancers [hazard ratio (HR (95% CI 0.90 (0.87-0.93, 0.80 (0.74-0.85, 0.82 (0.78-0.87, 0.88 (0.84-0.92, and 0.88 (0.85-0.92 respectively].After accounting for potential selection bias, our data showed an inverse association between NSAID use and alcohol-related, infection-related, obesity-related, and smoking-related cancers and support the hypothesis that inflammation is related to an increased risk of certain cancers.

  19. Therapeutic effect of transcatheter arterial infusion chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Junhua; Song Mingzhi; Zhang Yuanyuan; Xu Yiyu; Chen Jing

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of transcatheter arterial infusion (TAI) or transcatheter arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) in the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: 36 cases of advanced pancreatic cancer were divided into two groups, 18 cases were treated with TAI or TACE (group A), other 18 cases were treated with systemic chemotherapy (group B). Results: The clinical benefit response rate of the group A was 55.6% (10/18) and that of the group B was 16.7%(3/18), respectively (P 0.05). Conclusions: In the transcatheter arterial infusion group, no survival advantage could be demonstrated when compared with the controls, but TAI could effectively increase clinical benefit response and improve the quality of life of advanced pancreatic cancer

  20. Study of phytochemical, anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, and anti-cancer properties of Allium wallichii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Jaya; Muhammad, BushraTaj; Thapa, Pratiksha; Shrestha, Bhupal Govinda

    2017-02-08

    There is growing interest in the use of plants for the treatment and prevention of cancer. Medicinal plants are currently being evaluated as source of promising anticancer agents. In this paper, we have investigated the anticancer potential of plant Allium wallichii, a plant native to Nepal and growing at elevations of 2300-4800 m. This is the first study of its kind for the plant mentioned. The dried plant was extracted in aqueous ethanol. Phytochemical screening, anti-microbial assay, anti-oxidant assay, cytotoxicity assay and the flow-cytometric analysis were done for analyzing different phytochemicals present, anti-microbial activity, anti-oxidant activity and anti-cancer properties of Allium wallichii. We observed the presence of steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, reducing sugars and glycosides in the plant extract and the plant showed moderate anti-microbial and anti-oxidant activity. The IC 50 values of Allium wallichii in different cancer cell lines are 69.69 μg/ml for Prostate cancer (PC3) cell line, 55.29 μg/ml for Breast Cancer (MCF-7) cell line and 46.51 μg/ml for cervical cancer (HeLa) cell line as compared to Doxorubicin (0.85 μg/ml). The cell viability assay using FACS showed that the IC 50 value of Allium wallichii for Burkitt's lymphoma (B-Lymphoma) cell line was 3.817 ± 1.99 mg/ml. Allium wallichii can be an important candidate to be used as an anticancer agent. Separation of pure compounds with bioassay guided extraction, spectrometric analysis and subsequent cytotoxicity assay of the pure bioactive compounds from Allium wallichii is highly recommended as the crude extract itself showed promising cytotoxicity.

  1. Symptomatic improvement reported after receiving Reiki at a cancer infusion center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Blazek-O'Neill, Betsy; Kopar, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate patient-perceived benefits from receiving Reiki at a cancer infusion center. During a 6-month period, adults at a university hospital receiving Reiki through volunteer services were invited to complete a survey asking about perceived changes after Reiki. Changes in pain, mood, distress, sleep, and appetite were rated on a 5-point scale from no benefit to great benefit. Surveys were distributed after completing treatment and were returned in postage-paid envelops. A total of 145 surveys were completed (34.5% response rate), with 47 participants seen in the cancer infusion center and 98 in other areas of the hospital. Reiki was rated as a positive experience by 94% at the cancer center and 93% of others, with 92% at the cancer center and 86% of others interested in receiving additional Reiki sessions. Symptomatic improvement was similar for people at the cancer center and others, respectively, with much to great improvement for 89% and 86% for relaxation, 75% and 75% for anxiety/worry, 81% and 78% for improved mood, 43% and 35% for improved sleep, 45% and 49% for reduced pain, 38% and 43% for reduced isolation/loneliness, 75% and 63% for improved attitude, and 30% and 30% for improved appetite. Response was unaffected by previous exposure to Reiki, massage, or other touch therapy. Reiki results in a broad range of symptomatic benefits, including improvements in common cancer-related symptoms.

  2. Anti-EGFR Therapy: Mechanism and Advances in Clinical Efficacy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Flynn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will focus on recent advances in the application of antiepidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR for the treatment of breast cancer. The choice of EGFR, a member of the ErbB tyrosine kinase receptor family, stems from evidence pinpointing its role in various anti-EGFR therapies. Therefore, an increase in our understanding of EGFR mechanism and signaling might reveal novel targets amenable to intervention in the clinic. This knowledge base might also improve existing medical treatment options and identify research gaps in the design of new therapeutic agents. While the approved use of drugs like the dual kinase inhibitor Lapatinib represents significant advances in the clinical management of breast cancer, confirmatory studies must be considered to foster the use of anti-EGFR therapies including safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy.

  3. Intravenous lignocaine infusion for intractable pain in Ewing's sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Page

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 23-year-old female presented to our palliative care center with Ewing's sarcoma of the humerus with lung metastases. Pain in her arm was unrelieved by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, neuropathic medication as well as morphine. She could not tolerate any further increase in opioid dose but was so distraught due to the pain that she wanted to die. An intravenous lignocaine infusion in a dose of 2 mg/kg was given over an hour for three successive days. This successfully relieved her pain after which she was settled with her original medication. We feel that in palliative care settings, where intractable pain and tolerance to morphine are so common, intravenous lignocaine infusions could provide a safe and effective tool for pain relief.

  4. Biomarkers for Anti-Angiogenic Therapy in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Wehland

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, the development of new vessels from existing vasculature, plays a central role in tumor growth, survival, and progression. On the molecular level it is controlled by a number of pro- and anti-angiogenic cytokines, among which the vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs, together with their related VEGF-receptors, have an exceptional position. Therefore, the blockade of VEGF signaling in order to inhibit angiogenesis was deemed an attractive approach for cancer therapy and drugs interfering with the VEGF-ligands, the VEGF receptors, and the intracellular VEGF-mediated signal transduction were developed. Although promising in pre-clinical trials, VEGF-inhibition proved to be problematic in the clinical context. One major drawback was the generally high variability in patient response to anti-angiogenic drugs and the rapid development of therapy resistance, so that, in total, only moderate effects on progression-free and overall survival were observed. Biomarkers predicting the response to VEGF-inhibition might attenuate this problem and help to further individualize drug and dosage determination. Although up to now no definitive biomarker has been identified for this purpose, several candidates are currently under investigation. This review aims to give an overview of the recent developments in this field, focusing on the most prevalent tumor species.

  5. Body mass index influences infliximab post-infusion levels and correlates with prospective loss of response to the drug in a cohort of inflammatory bowel disease patients under maintenance therapy with Infliximab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Scaldaferri

    Full Text Available Infliximab is an effective treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Studies differ regarding the influence of body mass index (BMI on the response to infliximab, with the majority of studies indicating that increased BMI may be associated with a poorer response to Infliximab. However, the pharmacokinetic mechanisms causing this have not yet been reported.Examine the correlation between BMI/immunosuppressant use with clinical response, trough and post-infusion levels of infliximab, tumour necrosis factor-α(TNF-α and anti-drug antibodies(ATI, and determine if these factors can predict future response.We collected serum from 24 patients receiving Infliximab before and 30 minutes following infusion. Clinical parameters were collected retrospectively and prospectively. ELISA measurements of infliximab, TNF-α and ATI were performed.We confirmed that patients with higher infliximab trough levels have a better response rate and that patients with an elevated BMI display a higher rate of loss of response (20%. Patients with a higher BMI had elevated post-infusion levels of infliximab. Additionally, the ratio of IFX/TNF-α trough levels correlated with clinical response to the following infusion.This study confirms that an elevated BMI is associated with a poorer response to infliximab. For the first time, we describe that a higher BMI correlates with higher post-infusion levels, however this does not correlate with a higher rate of response to the drug, suggesting that circulating drug levels do not correlate with tissue levels. Furthermore, in our small cohort of patients, we identified a possible predictive marker of future response to treatment which may be used to guide dose escalation and predict non-response to infliximab.

  6. Combined antiretroviral and anti- tuberculosis drug resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    these epidemics, many challenges remain.[3] Antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance pose considerable threats to the control of these epidemics.[4,5]. The breakdown in HIV/TB control within prisons is another emerging threat.[6,7] We describe one of the first reports of combined antiretroviral and anti-TB drug resistance ...

  7. Thyroid hormone synthesis and anti-thyroid drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The inhibition of thyroid hormone synthesis is required for the treatment of hyperthyroidism and this can be achieved by one or more anti-thyroid drugs. The most widely used anti-thyroid drug methimazole (MMI) inhibits the production of thyroid hormones by irreversibly inactivating the enzyme TPO. Our studies show that the ...

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eccleston, Christopher; Cooper, Tess E; Fisher, Emma; Anderson, Brian; Wilkinson, Nick Mr

    2017-08-02

    Pain is a common feature of childhood and adolescence around the world, and for many young people, that pain is chronic. The World Health Organization guidelines for pharmacological treatments for children's persisting pain acknowledge that pain in children is a major public health concern of high significance in most parts of the world. While in the past pain was largely dismissed and was frequently left untreated, views on children's pain have changed over time, and relief of pain is now seen as important.We designed a suite of seven reviews on chronic non-cancer pain and cancer pain (looking at antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and paracetamol) in order to review the evidence for children's pain utilising pharmacological interventions.As the leading cause of morbidity in the world today, chronic disease (and its associated pain) is a major health concern. Chronic pain (that is pain lasting three months or longer) can arise in the paediatric population in a variety of pathophysiological classifications (nociceptive, neuropathic, or idiopathic) from genetic conditions, nerve damage pain, chronic musculoskeletal pain, and chronic abdominal pain, as well as for other unknown reasons.Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to treat pain, reduce fever, and for their anti-inflammation properties. They are commonly used within paediatric pain management. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are currently licensed for use in Western countries, however they are not approved for infants under three months old. The main adverse effects include renal impairment and gastrointestinal issues. Common side effects in children include diarrhoea, headache, nausea, constipation, rash, dizziness, and abdominal pain. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of NSAIDs used to treat chronic non-cancer pain in children and adolescents aged between birth and 17 years, in any setting. We searched the Cochrane

  9. Direct anti-atherosclerotic therapy; development of natural anti-atherosclerotic drugs preventing cellular cholesterol retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orekhov, Alexander N

    2013-01-01

    The results of numerous clinical trials with statins and other drugs have demonstrated the principal possibility of the prevention and regression of atherosclerosis by pharmacotherapy. This review describes the use of cultured human arterial cells for the mass screening of anti-atherosclerotic substances, the investigation of the mechanisms responsible for their atherosclerosis-related effects, and the optimization of anti-atherosclerotic and anti-atherogenic drug and dietary therapies. Natural products can be considered promising drugs for anti-atherosclerotic therapy. Our basic studies have shown that cellular lipidosis is the principal event in the genesis of atherosclerotic lesions. Using cellular models and natural products, we have developed an approach to prevent lipid accumulation in arterial cells. Based on our knowledge of atherosclerosis, we developed drugs that possess direct anti-atherosclerotic activity. Two-year treatment with allicor (garlic powder) has a direct anti-atherosclerotic effect on carotid atherosclerosis in asymptomatic men. Inflaminat (calendula, elder, and violet), which possesses anti-cytokine activity, has been shown to cause the regression of carotid atherosclerosis following the treatment of asymptomatic men for one year. The phytoestrogen-rich drug karinat (garlic powder, extract of grape seeds, green tea leaves, hop cones, β-carotene, α-tocopherol, and ascorbic acid) prevents the development of carotid atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Thus, our basic findings were successfully translated into clinical practice. Because of this translation, a novel approach to antiatherosclerotic therapy was developed. Our clinical trial confirmed the efficacy of both the novel approach and the novel drugs.

  10. Anti-cancer activity of compounds from Bauhinia strychnifolia stem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuenyongsawad, Supreeya; Bunluepuech, Kingkan; Wattanapiromsakul, Chatchai; Tewtrakul, Supinya

    2013-11-25

    The stem and root of Bauhinia strychnifolia Craib (Fabaceae family) have been traditionally used in Thailand to treat fever, alcoholic toxication, allergy and cancer. An EtOH extract of Bauhinia strychnifolia showed good inhibitory activity against several cancer cell lines including HT-29, HeLa, MCF-7 and KB. As there has been no previous reports on chemical constituents of Bauhinia strychnifolia, this study is aimed to isolate the pure compounds with anti-cancer activity. Five pure compounds were isolated from EtOH extract of Bauhinia strychnifolia stem using silica gel, dianion HP-20 and sephadex LH-20 column chromatography and were tested for their cytotoxic effects against HT-29, HeLa, MCF-7 and KB cell lines using the Sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Among five compounds, 3,5,7,3',5'-pentahydroxyflavanonol-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (2) possessed very potent activity against KB (IC₅₀=0.00054μg/mL), HT-29 (IC₅₀=0.00217 μg/mL), MCF-7 (IC₅₀=0.0585 μg/mL) and HeLa cells (IC₅₀=0.0692 μg/mL). 3,5,7-Trihydroxychromone-3-O-α-l-rhamnopyranoside (3) also showed good activity against HT-29 (IC₅₀=0.02366 μg/mL), KB (IC₅₀=0.0412 μg/mL) and MCF-7 (IC₅₀=0.297 μg/mL), respectively. The activity of 2 (IC₅₀=0.00054 μg/mL) against KB cell was ten times higher than that of the positive control, Camptothecin (anti-cancer drug, IC₅₀=0.0057 μg/mL). All compounds did not show any cytotoxicity with normal cells at the concentration of 1 μg/mL. This is the first report of compounds 2 and 3 on anti-cancer activity and based on the anti-cancer activity of extracts and pure compounds isolated from Bauhinia strychnifolia stem, it might be suggested that this plant could be useful for treatment of cancer. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Combinatorial effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and NF-κB inhibitors in ovarian cancer therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz F Zerbini

    Full Text Available Several epidemiological studies have correlated the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID with reduced risk of ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecological cancer, diagnosed usually in late stages of the disease. We have previously established that the pro-apoptotic cytokine melanoma differentiation associated gene-7/Interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL-24 is a crucial mediator of NSAID-induced apoptosis in prostate, breast, renal and stomach cancer cells. In this report we evaluated various structurally different NSAIDs for their efficacies to induce apoptosis and mda-7/IL-24 expression in ovarian cancer cells. While several NSAIDs induced apoptosis, Sulindac Sulfide and Diclofenac most potently induced apoptosis and reduced tumor growth. A combination of these agents results in a synergistic effect. Furthermore, mda-7/IL-24 induction by NSAIDs is essential for programmed cell death, since inhibition of mda-7/IL-24 by small interfering RNA abrogates apoptosis. mda-7/IL-24 activation leads to upregulation of growth arrest and DNA damage inducible (GADD 45 α and γ and JNK activation. The NF-κB family of transcription factors has been implicated in ovarian cancer development. We previously established NF-κB/IκB signaling as an essential step for cell survival in cancer cells and hypothesized that targeting NF-κB could potentiate NSAID-mediated apoptosis induction in ovarian cancer cells. Indeed, combining NSAID treatment with NF-κB inhibitors led to enhanced apoptosis induction. Our results indicate that inhibition of NF-κB in combination with activation of mda-7/IL-24 expression may lead to a new combinatorial therapy for ovarian cancer.

  12. Chemoradiotherapy using retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion for advanced oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsudo, Kenji; Iwai, Toshinori; Mitsunaga, Sachiyo

    2011-01-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy using retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion demonstrates good local control and overall survival rates due to the advantage of simultaneous infusion of anticancer agent with the synergistic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. This study evaluated the therapeutic results, overall survival and local control rates in patients with advanced oral cancer treated with definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy using retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion. A total of 688 patients with carcinoma of the head and neck were referred to our institution between January 2001 and December 2006. Among them, 175 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity underwent definitive concurrent chemoradiotherapy using retrograde superselective intra-arterial infusion. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial infusions (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m 2 , cisplatin, total 125-150 mg/m 2 ) and daily concurrent radiotherapy (total 50-60 Gy) for 5-6 weeks. Four weeks after the completion of all treatments, patients underwent biopsy of the primary lesion and radiological examinations. Complete response (CR) of the primary site was achieved in 160 (91.4%) of the 175 patients. Residual disease at the primary site was seen in 15 patients (8.6%), and 14 patients (8.0%) showed local recurrence during follow-up. Five-year survival and local control rates were 71.6% and 82.2%, respectively. (author)

  13. A novel compound NSC745885 exerts an anti-tumor effect on tongue cancer SAS cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Wu Chen

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is a prevalent cancer, especially in developing countries. Anthracyclines and their anthraquinone derivatives, such as doxorubicin, exhibit a cell growth inhibitory effect and have been used as anti-cancer drugs for many years. However, the cardiotoxicity of anthracycline antibiotics is a major concern in their clinical application. NSC745885 is a novel compound synthesized from 1,2-diaminoanthraquinone, which subsequently reacts with thionyl chloride and triethylamine. The present study aimed to investigate the anti-oral cancer potential and the safety of NSC745885.We investigated the anti-cancer potential of NSC745885 in oral squamous carcinoma cell lines and in an in vivo oral cancer xenograft mouse model. The expression of apoptotic related genes were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR and western bloting, and the in vivo assessment of apoptotic marker were measured by immunohistochemical staining. The anti-tumor efficiency and safety between doxorubicin and NSC745885 were also compared.Our results demonstrated that NSC745885 exhibits anti-oral cancer activity through the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells and in tumor-bearing mice, and this treatment did not induce marked toxicity in experimental mice. This compound also exhibits a comparable anti-tumor efficiency and a higher safety in experimental mice when compared to doxorubicin.The data of this study provide evidence for NSC745885 as a potential novel therapeutic drug for the treatment of human OSCC.

  14. Anti-malarial Drug Design by Targeting Apicoplasts: New Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinaba Mukherjee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Malaria has been a major global health problem in recent times with increasing mortality. Current treatment methods include parasiticidal drugs and vaccinations. However, resistance among malarial parasites to the existing drugs has emerged as a significant area of concern in anti-malarial drug design. Researchers are now desperately looking for new targets to develop anti-malarials drug which is more target specific. Malarial parasites harbor a plastid-like organelle known as the ‘apicoplast’, which is thought to provide an exciting new outlook for the development of drugs to be used against the parasite. This review elaborates on the current state of development of novel compounds targeted againstemerging malaria parasites. Methods: The apicoplast, originates by an endosymbiotic process, contains a range of metabolic pathways and housekeeping processes that differ from the host body and thereby presents ideal strategies for anti-malarial drug therapy. Drugs are designed by targeting the unique mechanism of the apicoplasts genetic machinery. Several anabolic and catabolic processes, like fatty acid, isopenetyl diphosphate and heme synthess in this organelle, have also been targeted by drugs. Results: Apicoplasts offer exciting opportunities for the development of malarial treatment specific drugs have been found to act by disrupting this organelle’s function, which wouldimpede the survival of the parasite. Conclusion: Recent advanced drugs, their modes of action, and their advantages in the treatment of malaria by using apicoplasts as a target are discussed in this review which thought to be very useful in desigining anti-malarial drugs. Targetting the genetic machinery of apicoplast shows a great advantange regarding anti-malarial drug design. Critical knowledge of these new drugs would give a healthier understanding for deciphering the mechanism of action of anti-malarial drugs when targeting apicoplasts to overcome drug

  15. African medicinal plants and their derivatives: Current efforts towards potential anti-cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbele, Mzwandile; Hull, Rodney; Dlamini, Zodwa

    2017-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide and second only to cardiovascular diseases. Cancer is a challenge in African countries because generally there is limited funding available to deal with the cancer epidemic and awareness and this should be prioritised and all possible resources should be utilized to prevent and treat cancer. The current review reports on the role of African medicinal plants in the treatment of cancer, and also outlines methodologies that can also be used to achieve better outcomes for cancer treatment. This review outlines African medicinal plants, isolated compounds and technologies that can be used to advance cancer research. Chemical structures of isolated compounds have an important role in anti-cancer treatments; new technologies and methods may assist to identify more properties of African medicinal plants and the treatment of cancer. In conclusion, African medicinal plants have shown their potential as enormous resources for novel cytotoxicity compounds. Finally it has been noted that the cytotoxicity depends on the chemical structural arrangements of African medicinal plants compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The study of combination therapy for arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy in unresectable gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Takuma; Saito, Hiroya; Yanagawa, Nobuyuki; Fujinaga, Akihiro; Saito, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated an effective strategy of treatment for unresectable gallbladder cancer (GBC) by the retrospective analysis of prognostic factors and anti-tumor therapies, especially combination therapy of arterial infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy (AI+PT). Forty-three patients with unresectable GBC were enrolled, and prognostic factors were investigated by multivariate analysis using a proportional hazard model. In addition, we examined the indication and after-therapy by analyzing the each factor cumulative survival rates and anti-tumor effect about the AI + RT group (n=24). AI + RT and the responders to the first-line therapy were significant prognostic factors. In AI + RT group, median survival time, progression-free survival and the 1-year survival rate, the response and disease control rates was 15.5 months, 7.1 months, 62.5%. 54.2% and 95.8%, respectively; which suggested prolonged survival and high anti-tumor effect. Cumulative survival rate was significantly shorter in cases with distant metastasis except liver metastases, and has been tendency to extend in the group who underwent systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy. The treatment strategy, using the Al + RT as first-line with the systemic chemotherapy as after-therapy, suggested contribute to the prolonged survival in locally advanced and liver metastases cases of GBC. (author)

  17. Drug withdrawal symptoms in children after continuous infusions of fentanyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J P; Nocera, M

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the extent to which critically ill infants exhibited signs and symptoms of narcotic withdrawal after receiving continuous infusions of fentanyl. The convenience sample consisted of 12 pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients under 25 months of age who received fentanyl infusions for at least 24 hours. Drug withdrawal symptoms were monitored using the Neonatal Abstinence Score Tool (NAST), which assigns a score to each behavior indicative of withdrawal. A score of 8 or greater indicates Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). Scoring began 4 hours after discontinuation of fentanyl and was conducted once per hour for 8 hours. Six subjects had a NAST score exceeding 8; these infants frequently exhibited tremors with or without stimulation, increased muscle tone, insomnia, and increased respiratory rate and effort. There were significant correlations between fentanyl dosage and NAST score (r = .76, p observation protocol and a possible weaning regimen after fentanyl is discontinued.

  18. Influence of companion diagnostics on efficacy and safety of targeted anti-cancer drugs: systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocana, Alberto; Ethier, Josee-Lyne; Díez-González, Laura; Corrales-Sánchez, Verónica; Srikanthan, Amirrtha; Gascón-Escribano, María J; Templeton, Arnoud J; Vera-Badillo, Francisco; Seruga, Bostjan; Niraula, Saroj; Pandiella, Atanasio; Amir, Eitan

    2015-11-24

    Companion diagnostics aim to identify patients that will respond to targeted therapies, therefore increasing the clinical efficacy of such drugs. Less is known about their influence on safety and tolerability of targeted anti-cancer agents. Randomized trials evaluating targeted agents for solid tumors approved by the US Food and Drug Administration since year 2000 were assessed. Odds ratios (OR) and and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed for treatment-related death, treatment-discontinuation related to toxicity and occurrence of any grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs). The 12 most commonly reported individual AEs were also explored. ORs were pooled in a meta-analysis. Analysis comprised 41 trials evaluating 28 targeted agents. Seventeen trials (41%) utilized companion diagnostics. Compared to control groups, targeted drugs in experimental arms were associated with increased odds of treatment discontinuation, grade 3/4 AEs, and toxic death irrespective of whether they utilized companion diagnostics or not. Compared to drugs without available companion diagnostics, agents with companion diagnostics had a lower magnitude of increased odds of treatment discontinuation (OR = 1.12 vs. 1.65, p diagnostics were greatest for diarrhea (OR = 1.29 vs. 2.43, p diagnostics are associated with improved safety, and tolerability. Differences were most marked for gastrointestinal, cutaneous and neurological toxicity.

  19. Anti-CD40-mediated cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Sufia Butt; Sørensen, Jesper Freddie; Olsen, Barbara Nicola

    2014-01-01

    activation and thus enhancement of immune responses. Treatment with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibodies has been exploited in several cancer immunotherapy studies in mice and led to the development of anti-CD40 antibodies for clinical use. Here, Dacetuzumab and Lucatumumab are in the most advanced stage...... with other cancer immunotherapies, in particular interleukin (IL)-2. An in-depth analysis of this immunotherapy is provided elsewhere. In the present review, we provide an update of the most recent clinical trials with anti-CD40 antibodies. We present and discuss recent and ongoing clinical trials...... in this field, including clinical studies which combine anti-CD40 treatment with other cancer-treatments, such as Rituximab and Tremelimumab....

  20. Beliefs Underlying Messages of Anti-Cancer-Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhara, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Okada, Masahumi; Kato, Mio; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2018-02-26

    Background: Cancer screening rates are lower in Japan than in Western countries. Meanwhile, anti-cancer-screening activists take to the internet to spread their messages that cancer screening has little or no efficacy, poses substantial health risks such as side effects from radiation exposure, and that people should forgo cancer screening. We applied a qualitative approach to explore the beliefs underlying the messages of anti-cancer-screening websites, by focusing on perceived value the beliefs provided to those who held them. Methods: We conducted online searches using Google Japan and Yahoo! Japan, targeting websites we classified as “pro,” “anti,” or “neutral” depending on their claims. We applied a dual analytic approach- inductive thematic analysis and deductive interpretative analysis- to the textual data of the anti websites. Results: Of the 88 websites analyzed, five themes that correspond to beliefs were identified: destruction of common knowledge, denial of standard cancer control, education about right cancer control, education about hidden truths, and sense of superiority that only I know the truth. Authors of anti websites ascribed two values (“safety of people” and “self-esteem”) to their beliefs. Conclusion: The beliefs of authors of anti-cancer-screening websites were supposed to be strong. It would be better to target in cancer screening promotion not outright screening refusers but screening hesitant people who are more amenable to changing their attitudes toward screening. The possible means to persuade them were discussed. Creative Commons Attribution License

  1. Carnosol: a promising anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy J

    2011-06-01

    The Mediterranean diet and more specifically certain meats, fruits, vegetables, and olive oil found in certain parts of the Mediterranean region have been associated with a decreased cardiovascular and diabetes risk. More recently, several population based studies have observed with these lifestyle choices have reported an overall reduced risk for several cancers. One study in particular observed an inverse relationship between consumption of Mediterranean herbs such as rosemary, sage, parsley, and oregano with lung cancer. In light of these findings there is a need to explore and identify the anti-cancer properties of these medicinal herbs and to identify the phytochemicals therein. One agent in particular, carnosol, has been evaluated for anti-cancer property in prostate, breast, skin, leukemia, and colon cancer with promising results. These studies have provided evidence that carnosol targets multiple deregulated pathways associated with inflammation and cancer that include nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), apoptotic related proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 K)/Akt, androgen and estrogen receptors, as well as molecular targets. In addition, carnosol appears to be well tolerated in that it has a selective toxicity towards cancer cells versus non-tumorigenic cells and is well tolerated when administered to animals. This mini-review reports on the pre-clinical studies that have been performed to date with carnosol describing mechanistic, efficacy, and safety/tolerability studies as a cancer chemoprevention and anti-cancer agent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of anti-factor Xa activity of heparin in binary parenteral nutrition admixtures for premature neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foinard, A; Perez, M; Barthélémy, C; Lannoy, D; Flamein, F; Storme, L; Tournoys, A; Décaudin, B; Odou, P

    2015-07-01

    An in vitro study was carried out to determine the anti-Xa activity of heparin in binary parenteral nutrition (BPN) admixtures for premature neonates in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) after a 24-hour infusion, as well as to assess drug interaction with a 50% glucose solution. Two types of bags were prepared: (1) BPN admixtures (composition defined in the NICU) including sodium heparin at 77 UI/mL and (2) bags containing only G50% with sodium heparin at 193 UI/mL. The anti-Xa activity of heparin was measured in bags at T0, after the 24-hour infusion and in eluates at the outlet of the infusion line after 24hours, using a validated chromogenic anti-Xa method. Comparisons of the mean concentration observed with the theoretical value for anti-Xa activity were performed with the Student t-test. Mean values of anti-Xa activity do not differ significantly from the values expected for all conditions. We found a slight variation in anti-Xa activity when infused over 24hours for both types of bags, with and without in-line filtration, showing that heparin remains stable during this infusion period in both BPN admixtures and G50%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Advanced generation anti-prostate specific membrane antigen designer T cells for prostate cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiangzhong; Gomes, Erica M; Lo, Agnes Shuk-Yee; Junghans, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy by infusion of designer T cells (dTc) engineered with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for tumoricidal activity represents a potentially highly specific modality for the treatment of cancer. In this study, 2nd generation (gen) anti-prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) dTc were developed for improving the efficacy of previously developed 1st gen dTc for prostate cancer immunotherapy. The 1st gen dTc are modified with chimeric immunoglobulin-T cell receptor (IgTCR) while the 2nd gen dTc are engineered with an immunoglobulin-CD28-T cell receptor (IgCD28TCR), which incorporates a CD28 costimulatory signal for optimal T cell activation. A 2nd gen anti-PSMA IgCD28TCR CAR was constructed by inserting the CD28 signal domain into the 1st gen CAR. 1st and 2nd gen anti-PSMA dTc were created by transducing human T cells with anti-PSMA CARs and their antitumor efficacy was compared for specific activation on PSMA-expressing tumor contact, cytotoxicity against PSMA-expressing tumor cells in vitro, and suppression of tumor growth in an animal model. The 2nd gen dTc can be optimally activated to secrete larger amounts of cytokines such as IL2 and IFNγ than 1st gen and to proliferate more vigorously on PSMA-expressing tumor contact. More importantly, the 2nd gen dTc preserve the PSMA-specific cytotoxicity in vitro and suppress tumor growth in animal models with significant higher potency. Our results demonstrate that 2nd gen anti-PSMA designer T cells exhibit superior antitumor functions versus 1st gen, providing a rationale for advancing this improved agent toward clinical application in prostate cancer immunotherapy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya, E-mail: inagaki@metab.kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2015-05-15

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action.

  5. DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in human liver cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obara, Akio; Fujita, Yoshihito; Abudukadier, Abulizi; Fukushima, Toru; Oguri, Yasuo; Ogura, Masahito; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2015-01-01

    Metformin, one of the most commonly used drugs for patients with type 2 diabetes, recently has received much attention regarding its anti-cancer action. It is thought that the suppression of mTOR signaling is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action. Although liver cancer is one of the most responsive types of cancer for reduction of incidence by metformin, the molecular mechanism of the suppression of mTOR in liver remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation using human liver cancer cells. Metformin suppressed phosphorylation of p70-S6 kinase, and ribosome protein S6, downstream targets of mTOR, and suppressed cell proliferation. We found that DEPTOR, an endogenous substrate of mTOR suppression, is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation in human liver cancer cells. Metformin increases the protein levels of DEPTOR, intensifies binding to mTOR, and exerts a suppressing effect on mTOR signaling. This increasing effect of DEPTOR by metformin is regulated by the proteasome degradation system; the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling and cell proliferation is in a DEPTOR-dependent manner. Furthermore, metformin exerts a suppressing effect on proteasome activity, DEPTOR-related mTOR signaling, and cell proliferation in an AMPK-dependent manner. We conclude that DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action in liver, and could be a novel target for anti-cancer therapy. - Highlights: • We elucidated a novel pathway of metformin's anti-cancer action in HCC cells. • DEPTOR is involved in the suppressing effect of metformin on mTOR signaling. • Metformin increases DEPTOR protein levels via suppression of proteasome activity. • DEPTOR-related mTOR suppression is involved in metformin's anti-cancer action

  6. Prolonged local persistence of cisplatin-loaded gelatin microspheres and their chemoembolic anti-cancer effect in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Shinichi; Nitta, Norihisa; Sonoda, Akinaga; Seko, Ayumi; Tanaka, Toyohiko; Takahashi, Masashi; Takemura, Shizuki; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Murata, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To confirm prolonged cisplatin release from drug-loaded gelatin microspheres (GMSs) and their improved chemoembolic anti-cancer effect against VX2 liver tumors in rabbits. Materials and methods: Two groups of twelve rabbits each were treated intraarterially either with 2 mg/kg cisplatin-loaded GMSs (=0.04 mg/kg cisplatin) or 0.04 mg/kg cisplatin solution by administering them into the right renal artery. Platinum concentrations within the renal parenchyma were analyzed immediately following infusion (day 0) and on days 1, 3, and 7 using the atomic absorption method. In a second experiment four groups of five rabbits each with implanted VX2 liver tumors were treated intraarterially through the hepatic artery with the following drugs: 2 mg/kg cisplatin-loaded GMSs (=0.04 mg/kg cisplatin) (group I), 2 mg/kg GMSs without any drug (group II), 1.5 mg/kg cisplatin solution (group III) and saline (group IV). Tumor volumes were analyzed pre-injection and 7 days after with MRI allowing calculating the relative tumor growth rate (%). Degree of liver cell necrosis was assessed on the histopathological specimens. Results: The renal parenchymal platinum concentrations (μg/ml) with 4.51 ± 2.25 (day 0), 1.59 ± 0.70 (day 1), 0.72 ± 0.10 (day 3) and 0.20 ± 0.06 (day 7) were significantly more pronounced after cisplatin-loaded GMS on days one and three compared to cisplatin with 1.99 ± 0.55, 0.08 ± 0.03, 0.18 ± 0.01 and 0.10 ± 0.07, respectively. Relative tumor growth rates resulted in 84.5% ± 26.4 (group I); 241.4% ± 145.1 (II); 331.9% ± 72.2 (III), and 413.6% ± 103.6 (IV) with statistical significant differences between groups I and III, and groups I and IV. Similar degrees of necrosis were observed in both GMSs treated groups, while ballooning of hepatocytes was highest in cisplatin-loaded GMSs. Conclusions: With cisplatin-loaded GMSs more pronounced and prolonged local parenchymal cisplatin concentrations may be achieved offering the advantage of an

  7. Delivery interaction between co-infused medications: an in vitro modeling study of microinfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Amy C; Lovich, Mark A; Parker, Michael J; Zheng, Hui; Peterfreund, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that steady-state drug delivery by continuous infusion is predictably affected by a second drug infusion in the same lumen. Clinicians commonly administer two drugs by continuous infusion through one central venous catheter lumen (co-infusion). To limit fluid delivery, low flow rate carriers transport concentrated drug solutions; a method called microinfusion. How microinfusion delivery of one drug is affected by a second drug infusion has not been explored. Two water-soluble dyes, tartrazine and erioglaucine, infused at 3 ml · h(-1), modeled drug delivery through a four stopcock linear manifold and catheter lumen. A pump drove a carrier fluid (10 ml · h(-1)). After tartrazine reached steady-state delivery, erioglaucine entered downstream or upstream of the tartrazine infusion. Quantitative spectrophotometry measured dye delivery. Starting erioglaucine's infusion upstream of tartrazine's entry caused a transient tartrazine bolus (duration 10 min, peak drug delivery 20% higher than target levels). Starting erioglaucine's infusion downstream produced a similar amplitude, briefer, bolus. Stopping the erioglaucine infusion caused a transient reduction in tartrazine delivery. Measured delivery profiles were comparable to prediction models. We confirmed the hypothesis that delivery of one infused drug is transiently affected by starting or stopping a second drug infusion in the same line. The magnitude of the changes can be estimated quantitatively. The clinical impact depends on the drugs being co-infused and patient sensitivity, but could be clinically important; the findings have safety implications for infused medication delivery to critically ill or anesthetized children. We recommend minimizing infusion system dead volumes, connecting the most essential infusion(s) to the main fluid pathway as close as possible to the patient, and recognizing the potential for unintended alterations in delivery when multiple drugs co-infuse. © 2012

  8. Anti-cancer vaccination by transdermal delivery of antigen peptide-loaded nanogels via iontophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Mao; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-04-10

    Transdermal vaccination with cancer antigens is expected to become a useful anti-cancer therapy. However, it is difficult to accumulate enough antigen in the epidermis for effective exposure to Langerhans cells because of diffusion into the skin and muscle. Carriers, such as liposomes and nanoparticles, may be useful for the prevention of antigen diffusion. Iontophoresis, via application of a small electric current, is a noninvasive and efficient technology for transdermal drug delivery. Previously, we succeeded in the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of liposomes encapsulating insulin, and accumulation of polymer-based nanoparticle nanogels in the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the use of iontophoresis with cancer antigen gp-100 peptide KVPRNQDWL-loaded nanogels for anti-cancer vaccination. Iontophoresis resulted in the accumulation of gp-100 peptide and nanogels in the epidermis, and subsequent increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels. Thus, iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels may serve as an effective transdermal delivery system for anti-cancer vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of steel and teflon infusion catheters on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and infusion counter pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Lise; Skov-Jensen, Camilla; Kaastrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous tissue is an important target for drug deposition or infusion. A local trauma may induce alterations in local microcirculation and diffusion barriers with consequences for drug bioavailability. We examined the influence of infusion catheters' wear time on local...... microcirculation and infusion counter pressure. METHODS: One steel catheter and one Teflon (Dupont, Wilmington, DE) catheter were inserted in subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) in 10 healthy, lean men. The catheters were infused with isotonic saline at a rate of 10 microL/h for 48 h. Another steel...... catheter and a Teflon catheter were inserted contralateral to the previous catheters after 48 h. The infusion counter pressure was measured during a basal infusion rate followed by a bolus infusion. The measurements during a basal rate infusion were repeated after the bolus infusion. Adipose tissue blood...

  10. Current therapeutic strategies of anti-HER2 treatment in advanced breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Huszno

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The HER2/neu ( ERBB2 oncogene is amplified and/or overexpressed in approximately 20% of breast cancers, and is a strong prognostic factor for relapse and poor overall survival, particularly in node-positive patients. It is also an important predictor for response to trastuzumab, which has established efficacy against breast cancer with overexpression or amplification of the HER2 oncogene. Treatment with the anti-HER2 humanized monoclonal antibody – trastuzumab significantly improves progression-free and overall survival among patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, in most patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, the disease progresses occurred, what cause the need for new targeted therapies for advanced disease. In clinical trials, there are tested new drugs to improve the results of treatment for this group of patients. This paper presents new drugs introduced into clinical practice for treatment of advanced breast cancer, whose molecular target are receptors of the HER2 family. In addition, new therapeutic strategies and drugs that are currently in clinical researches are discussed.

  11. Fibrocytes: A Novel Stromal Cells to Regulate Resistance to Anti-Angiogenic Therapy and Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hisatsugu; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2017-12-29

    An adequate blood supply is essential for cancer cells to survive and grow; thus, the concept of inhibiting tumor angiogenesis has been applied to cancer therapy, and several drugs are already in clinical use. It has been shown that treatment with those anti-angiogenic drugs improved the response rate and prolonged the survival of patients with various types of cancer; however, it is also true that the effect was mostly limited. Currently, the disappointing clinical results are explained by the existence of intrinsic or acquired resistance to the therapy mediated by both tumor cells and stromal cells. This article reviews the mechanisms of resistance mediated by stromal cells such as endothelial cells, pericytes, fibroblasts and myeloid cells, with an emphasis on fibrocytes, which were recently identified as the cell type responsible for regulating acquired resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy. In addition, the other emerging role of fibrocytes as mediator-producing cells in tumor progression is discussed.

  12. Saudi anti-human cancer plants database (SACPD): A collection of plants with anti-human cancer activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Ateeq Ahmed

    2018-01-30

    Several anticancer drugs have been developed from natural products such as plants. Successful experiments in inhibiting the growth of human cancer cell lines using Saudi plants were published over the last three decades. Up to date, there is no Saudi anticancer plants database as a comprehensive source for the interesting data generated from these experiments. Therefore, there was a need for creating a database to collect, organize, search and retrieve such data. As a result, the current paper describes the generation of the Saudi anti-human cancer plants database (SACPD). The database contains most of the reported information about the naturally growing Saudi anticancer plants. SACPD comprises the scientific and local names of 91 plant species that grow naturally in Saudi Arabia. These species belong to 38 different taxonomic families. In Addition, 18 species that represent16 family of medicinal plants and are intensively sold in the local markets in Saudi Arabia were added to the database. The website provides interesting details, including plant part containing the anticancer bioactive compounds, plants locations and cancer/cell type against which they exhibit their anticancer activity. Our survey revealed that breast, liver and leukemia were the most studied cancer cell lines in Saudi Arabia with percentages of 27%, 19% and 15%, respectively. The current SACPD represents a nucleus around which more development efforts can expand to accommodate all future submissions about new Saudi plant species with anticancer activities. SACPD will provide an excellent starting point for researchers and pharmaceutical companies who are interested in developing new anticancer drugs. SACPD is available online at https://teeqrani1.wixsite.com/sapd.

  13. Circumvention of multi-drug resistance of cancer cells by Chinese herbal medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Stella; To, Kenneth Kw; Lin, Ge

    2010-07-25

    Multi-drug resistance (MDR) of cancer cells severely limits therapeutic outcomes. A proposed mechanism for MDR involves the efflux of anti-cancer drugs from cancer cells, primarily mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC) membrane transporters including P-glycoprotein. This article reviews the recent progress of using active ingredients, extracts and formulae from Chinese medicine (CM) in circumventing ABC transporters-mediated MDR. Among the ABC transporters, Pgp is the most extensively studied for its role in MDR reversal effects. While other MDR reversal mechanisms remain unclear, Pgp inhibition is a criterion for further mechanistic study. More mechanistic studies are needed to fully establish the pharmacological effects of potential MDR reversing agents.

  14. Anti-mitotic potential of 7-diethylamino-3(2′-benzoxazolyl)-coumarin in 5-fluorouracil-resistant human gastric cancer cell line SNU620/5-FU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam Hyun; Kim, Su-Nam; Oh, Joa Sub; Lee, Seokjoon; Kim, Yong Kee

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► DBC exerts antiproliferative potential against 5FU-resistant human gastric cancer cells. ► This effect is mediated by destabilization of microtubules and subsequent mitotic arrest. ► DBC enhances apoptosis via caspase activation and downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. -- Abstract: In this study, we investigate an anti-mitotic potential of the novel synthetic coumarin-based compound, 7-diethylamino-3(2′-benzoxazolyl)-coumarin, in 5-fluorouracil-resistant human gastric cancer cell line SNU-620-5FU and its parental cell SNU-620. It exerts the anti-proliferative effects with similar potencies against both cancer cells, which is mediated by destabilization of microtubules and subsequent mitotic arrest. Furthermore, this compound enhances caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death via decreased expression of anti-apoptotic genes. Taken together, our data strongly support anti-mitotic potential of 7-diethylamino-3(2′-benzoxazolyl)-coumarin against drug-resistant cancer cells which will prompt us to further develop as a novel microtubule inhibitor for drug-resistant cancer chemotherapy.

  15. Anaphylaxis after intravenous infusion of dexketoprofen trometamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Sertac; Ertok, Ilyas; Sahin, Nurdan Yilmaz; Ramadan, Hayri; Katirci, Yavuz

    2016-09-01

    Dexketoprofen trometamol (DT), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is a highly water-soluble salt and active enantiomer of rac-ketoprofen. Its parenteral form is commonly used for acute pain management in emergency departments of our country. Side effects such as diarrhea, indigestion, nausea, stomach pain, and vomiting may be seen after the use of DT. Anaphylactic shock (AS) secondary to infusion of DT is very rare and, to our knowledge, it is the first case report describing this side effect. This case report was presented to emphasize that AS may be seen after the use of DT.

  16. Molecular mechanisms and theranostic potential of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanli; Ma, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Wei; Cao, Bo; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Zhiping; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhao, Qingchuan; Fan, Daiming; Hong, Liu

    2017-11-01

    Systemic chemotherapy is a curative approach to inhibit gastric cancer cells proliferation. Despite the great progress in anti-cancer treatment achieved during the last decades, drug resistance and treatment refractoriness still extensively persists. Recently, accumulating studies have highlighted the role of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancers by modulating some drug resistance-related proteins and genes expression. Pre-clinical reports indicate that miRNAs might serve as ideal biomarkers and potential targets, thus holding great promise for developing targeted therapy and personalized treatment for the patients with gastric cancer. Areas covered: This review provide a comprehensive overview of the current advances of miRNAs and molecular mechanisms underlying miRNA-mediated drug resistance in gastric cancer. We particularly focus on the potential values of drug resistance-related miRNAs as biomarkers and novel targets in gastric cancer therapy and envisage the future research developments of these miRNAs and challenges in translating the new findings into clinical applications. Expert opinion: Although the concrete mechanisms of miRNAs in drug resistance of gastric cancer have not been fully clarified, miRNA may be a promising theranostic approach. Further studies are still needed to facilitate the clinical applications of miRNAs in drug resistant gastric cancer.

  17. Different activities of Schinus areira L.: anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davicino, R; Mattar, A; Casali, Y; Anesini, C; Micalizzi, B

    2010-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory drugs possess many serious side effects at doses commonly prescribed. It is really important to discover novel regulators of inflammation from natural sources with minimal adverse effects. Schinus areira L. is a plant native from South America and is used in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory herb. For this study, the activity of aqueous extracts on inflammation and the effect on superoxide anion production in mice macrophages were assayed. Aqueous extracts were prepared by soaking herbs in cold water (cold extract), boiling water (infusion), and simmering water (decoction). Cold extract possess an anti-inflammatory activity. Decoction and infusion showed pro-inflammatory activity. Cold extract increased the production of superoxide anion. It has been proposed to use diverse methods to obtain extracts of S. areira L. with different effects. Cold extract, decoction, and infusion could be utilized as extracts or as pharmacological preparations for topical application.

  18. The History of Target-Controlled Infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struys, Michel M. R. F.; De Smet, Tom; Glen, John (Iain) B.; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Schnider, Thomas W.

    Target-controlled infusion (TCI) is a technique of infusing IV drugs to achieve a user-defined predicted (target) drug concentration in a specific body compartment or tissue of interest. In this review, we describe the pharmacokinetic principles of TCI, the development of TCI systems, and technical

  19. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on cancer sites other than the colon and rectum: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Rodríguez Luis A

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observational studies have consistently shown that aspirin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID use is associated with a close to 50% reduced risk of colorectal cancer. Studies assessing the effects of NSAIDs on other cancers have shown conflicting results. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the relationship between NSAID use and cancer other than colorectal. Methods We performed a search in Medline (from 1966 to 2002 and identified a total of 47 articles (13 cohort and 34 case-control studies. Overall estimates of the relative risk (RR were calculated for each cancer site using random effects models. Results Aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk of cancer of the esophagus and the stomach (RR, 0.51; 95%CI (0.38–0.69, and 0.73; 95%CI (0.63–0.84. Use of NSAIDs was similarly associated with a lower risk of esophageal and gastric cancers (RR,0.65; 95% CI(0.46–0.92 and RR,0.54; 95%CI (0.39–0.75. Among other cancers, only the results obtained for breast cancer were fairly consistent in showing a slight reduced risk among NSAID and aspirin users (RR, 0.77; 95%CI (0.66–0.88, and RR, 0.77; 95%CI (0.69–0.86 respectively. Conclusions The results of this meta-analysis show that the potential chemopreventive role of NSAIDs in colorectal cancer might be extended to other gastrointestinal cancers such as esophagus and stomach. Further research is required to evaluate the role of NSAIDs at other cancers sites.

  20. A global comparison of the cost of patented cancer drugs in relation to global differences in wealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Daniel A; Clark, Jonathon; Tu, Yifan; Zhang, Jie; Fang, Fenqi; Goldstein, Robert; Stemmer, Salomon M; Rosenbaum, Eli

    2017-09-22

    There are major differences in cancer drug prices around the world. However, the patterns of affordability of these drugs are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to compare patterns of affordability of cancer drugs in Australia, China, India, Israel, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Cancer drug prices are highest in the United States. Cancer drugs are the least affordable in India by a large margin. Despite lower prices than in the USA, cancer drugs are less affordable in middle-income countries than in high-income countries. We obtained the prices of a basket of cancer drugs in all 7 countries, and converted the prices to US$ using both foreign exchange rates and purchasing power parity. We assessed international differences in wealth by collecting values for gross domestic product (GDP) per capita in addition to average salaries. We compared patterns of affordability of cancer drugs by dividing the drug prices by the markers of wealth. Cancer drugs are less affordable in middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Differential pricing may be an acceptable policy to ensure global affordability and access to highly active anti-cancer therapies.

  1. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi H.J. Kao

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides being widely known as the major active ingredients, the different biological pathways by which they exert their anti-cancer effect remain poorly defined. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of action may lead to more widespread use of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.The aim of this paper is to summarise the various bioactive mechanisms that have been proposed for the anti-cancer properties of triterpenes and polysaccharides extracted from G. lucidum. A literature search of published papers on NCBI with keywords “Ganoderma” and “cancer” was performed. Among those, studies which specifically examined the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides were selected to be included in this paper.We have found five potential mechanisms which are associated with the anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma triterpenes and three potential mechanisms for Ganoderma polysaccharides. In addition, G. lucidum has been used in combination with known anti-cancer agents to improve the anti-cancer efficacies. This suggests Ganoderma’s bioactive pathways may compliment that of anti-cancer agents. In this paper we present several potential anti-cancer mechanisms of Ganoderma triterpenes and polysaccharides which can be used for the development of Ganoderma as an anti-cancer agent.

  2. Successful drug desensitization in patients with delayed-type allergic reactions to anti-tuberculosis drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krittaecho Siripassorn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the outcomes of anti-tuberculosis drug desensitization. Methods: This was a retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were as follows: age >18 years, documented tuberculosis infection, a previous cutaneous allergic reaction to anti-tuberculosis drugs, and having undergone drug desensitization between January 2003 and March 2014. The definition of allergic reaction to anti-tuberculosis drugs included (1 a temporal relationship between drug use and the allergic reaction; (2 improvement in the allergic reaction after drug withdrawal; (3 recurrence of the allergic reaction after reintroduction of only the offending drug; and (4 absence of other causes. Results: A total of 19 desensitization procedures were performed. The drugs used for these procedures were isoniazid (n = 7, rifampicin (n = 6, or ethambutol (n = 6. Of note, severe allergic reactions (Stevens–Johnson syndrome (n = 4, erythema multiforme (n = 3, and drug rash with eosinophilia and systemic syndrome (n = 1 were included. All patients underwent resolution of the previous allergic reactions before desensitization. The median duration of desensitization was 18 days. The success rate was 78.9%. The allergic reactions following failed desensitization were not severe; most were maculopapular rashes. Conclusions: The desensitization protocol for anti-tuberculosis drugs was associated with a high success rate, and the individuals who failed desensitization experienced mild allergic reactions. Keywords: Desensitization, Antituberculosis, Steven-Johnson syndrome, Allergic drug reaction, Tolerance induction, Drug allergy

  3. Landscape of Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Synergies in Melanoma Identifies a Novel BRAF-VEGFR/PDGFR Combination Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A Friedman

    Full Text Available A newer generation of anti-cancer drugs targeting underlying somatic genetic driver events have resulted in high single-agent or single-pathway response rates in selected patients, but few patients achieve complete responses and a sizeable fraction of patients relapse within a year. Thus, there is a pressing need for identification of combinations of targeted agents which induce more complete responses and prevent disease progression. We describe the results of a combination screen of an unprecedented scale in mammalian cells performed using a collection of targeted, clinically tractable agents across a large panel of melanoma cell lines. We find that even the most synergistic drug pairs are effective only in a discrete number of cell lines, underlying a strong context dependency for synergy, with strong, widespread synergies often corresponding to non-specific or off-target drug effects such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1 transporter inhibition. We identified drugs sensitizing cell lines that are BRAFV600E mutant but intrinsically resistant to BRAF inhibitor PLX4720, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor/kinase insert domain receptor (VEGFR/KDR and platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR family inhibitor cediranib. The combination of cediranib and PLX4720 induced apoptosis in vitro and tumor regression in animal models. This synergistic interaction is likely due to engagement of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs, demonstrating the potential of drug- rather than gene-specific combination discovery approaches. Patients with elevated biopsy KDR expression showed decreased progression free survival in trials of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK kinase pathway inhibitors. Thus, high-throughput unbiased screening of targeted drug combinations, with appropriate library selection and mechanistic follow-up, can yield clinically-actionable drug combinations.

  4. Anti-inflammatory drugs in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, K D

    2007-01-01

    physiological processes whose inhibition was considered a major factor in development of adverse reactions, including those in the GI tract. At the turn of this century, there was enormous commercial development following the introduction of two new highly selective COX-2 inhibitors, known as coxibs (celecoxib and rofecoxib) which were claimed to have low GI side effects. While found to have fulfilled these aims in part, an alarming turn of events took place in the late 2004 period when rofecoxib was withdrawn worldwide because of serious cardiovascular events and other coxibs were subsequently suspected to have this adverse reaction, although to a varying degree. Major efforts are currently underway to discover why cardiovascular reactions took place with coxibs, identify safer coxibs, as well as elucidate the roles of COX-2 and COX-1 in cardiovascular diseases and stroke in the hope that there may be some basis for developing newer agents (e.g. nitric oxide-donating NSAIDs) to control these conditions. The discovery of the COX isoforms led to establishing their importance in many non-arthritic or non-pain states where there is an inflammatory component to pathogenesis, including cancer, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. The applications of NSAIDs and the coxibs in the prevention and treatment of these conditions as well as aspirin and other analogues in the prevention of thrombo-embolic diseases now constitute one of the major therapeutic developments of the this century. Moreover, new anti-inflammatory drugs are being discovered and developed based on their effects on signal transduction and as anti-cytokine agents and these drugs are now being heralded as the new therapies to control those diseases where cytokines and other nonprostaglandin components of chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases are manifest. To a lesser extent safer application of corticosteroids and the applications of novel drug delivery systems for use with these drugs as well

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Anti-Epileptic Drugs and their Clinical Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svein I. Johannessen

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The serum concentration achieved and maintained following the administration of a fixed drug dosage is a direct consequence of the interactions of a wide variety of interrelated processes, including drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, and the physiological status of the patient. These interrelationships are reviewed with specific reference to the major anti-epileptic drugs, phenobarbitone, phenytoin, sodium valproate, and carbamazepine, as well as a new first-line antiepileptic, oxcarbazepine. Both older drugs, such as phenobarbitone and phenytoin, and newer drugs, such as carbamazepine (CBZ and sodium valproate, have been studied extensively over the past years giving valuable information for drug treatment. An important feature of oxcarbazepine (OXC , which was developed through minimal changes in the structure of CBZ in order to improve on the tolerability of CBZ without sacrificing efficacy, is that its metabolites do not include the 11-epoxide which has been implicated in the side-effects of CBZ. In man, OXC is metabolized to a monohydroxy derivative which has independent anti-epileptic properties. OXC seems to lack several disadavantageous pharmacokinetic properties common to other major anti-epileptic drugs. OXC does not influence its own metabolism after repeated administration, in contrast to the auto-induction displayed by CBZ. The metabolism of OXC is not influenced by anti-epileptic co-medication and does not influence the kinetics of other anti-epileptic drugs – or if it does, then to a lesser extent than CBZ.

  6. Prostaglandin synthesis can be inhibited locally by infusion of NSAIDS through microdialysis catheters in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Helmark, Ida Carøe; Kjaer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, to study the local role of prostaglandins, the formation of prostaglandins within the tissue must be controlled. Microdialysis enables determination of local concentrations of water-soluble substances within the tissue. In the present study......, the microdialysis method was used to infuse NSAIDs locally into human skeletal muscles producing a local block of prostaglandin formation. In addition, the graded blockade at various distances from the infusion site within the muscle during rest, exercise and recovery was determined. Microdialysis was performed...... in thigh muscles (vastus lateralis muscle) in six healthy men. One of the microdialysis catheters was used to block prostaglandin synthesis by infusion of the NSAID indomethacin. Additional catheters were placed 1 and 4 cm away from the infusion and in the contralateral leg (working control). Following 2 h...

  7. Nature is the best source of anti-inflammatory drugs: indexing natural products for their anti-inflammatory bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswad, Miran; Rayan, Mahmoud; Abu-Lafi, Saleh; Falah, Mizied; Raiyn, Jamal; Abdallah, Ziyad; Rayan, Anwar

    2018-01-01

    The aim was to index natural products for less expensive preventive or curative anti-inflammatory therapeutic drugs. A set of 441 anti-inflammatory drugs representing the active domain and 2892 natural products representing the inactive domain was used to construct a predictive model for bioactivity-indexing purposes. The model for indexing the natural products for potential anti-inflammatory activity was constructed using the iterative stochastic elimination algorithm (ISE). ISE is capable of differentiating between active and inactive anti-inflammatory molecules. By applying the prediction model to a mix set of (active/inactive) substances, we managed to capture 38% of the anti-inflammatory drugs in the top 1% of the screened set of chemicals, yielding enrichment factor of 38. Ten natural products that scored highly as potential anti-inflammatory drug candidates are disclosed. Searching the PubMed revealed that only three molecules (Moupinamide, Capsaicin, and Hypaphorine) out of the ten were tested and reported as anti-inflammatory. The other seven phytochemicals await evaluation for their anti-inflammatory activity in wet lab. The proposed anti-inflammatory model can be utilized for the virtual screening of large chemical databases and for indexing natural products for potential anti-inflammatory activity.

  8. Frondoside A Enhances the Anti-Cancer Effects of Oxaliplatin and 5-Fluorouracil on Colon Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Attoub

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, we have demonstrated that Frondoside A, a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from an Atlantic sea cucumber, has potent in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer effects against human pancreatic, breast, and lung cancer. We have also demonstrated that Frondoside A is able to potentiate and/or synergize the anti-cancer effects of major classical cytotoxic agents, namely, gemcitabine, paclitaxel, and cisplatin, in the treatment of pancreatic, breast, and lung cancer, respectively. This study evaluates the impact of Frondoside A alone and in combination with the standard cytotoxic drugs oxaliplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU in the treatment of colon cancer using three human colon cancer cell lines, namely, HT-29, HCT-116, and HCT8/S11. We demonstrate that Frondoside A, oxaliplatin, and 5-FU cause a concentration- and time-dependent reduction in the number of HT-29 colon cancer cells. A concentration of 2.5 µM of Frondoside A led to almost 100% inhibition of cell numbers at 72 h. A similar effect was only observed with a much higher concentration (100 µM of oxaliplatin or 5-FU. The reduction in cell numbers by Frondoside A, oxaliplatin, and 5-FU was also confirmed in two other colon cancer cell lines, namely, HCT8/S11 and HCT-116, treated for 48 h. The combinations of low concentrations of these drugs for 48 h in vitro clearly demonstrated that Frondoside A enhances the inhibition of cell numbers induced by oxaliplatin or 5-FU. Similarly, such a combination also efficiently inhibited colony growth in vitro. Interestingly, we found that the inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation was significantly enhanced when Frondoside A was used in combination treatments. Moreover, we show that Frondoside A and 5-FU, when used alone, induce a concentration-dependent induction of apoptosis and that their pro-apoptotic effect is dramatically enhanced when used in combination. We further demonstrate that apoptosis induction upon the treatment of colon cancer

  9. Aspirin exerts high anti-cancer activity in PIK3CA-mutant colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Mancang; Nishihara, Reiko; Chen, Yang; Li, Wanwan; Shi, Yan; Masugi, Yohei; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Kosumi, Keisuke; Liu, Li; da Silva, Annacarolina; Nowak, Jonathan A; Twombly, Tyler; Du, Chunxia; Koh, Hideo; Li, Wenbin; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Wolpin, Brian M; Giannakis, Marios; Aguirre, Andrew J; Bass, Adam J; Drew, David A; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Qian, Zhi Rong; Ogino, Shuji

    2017-10-20

    Evidence suggests that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) may improve patient survival in PIK3CA -mutant colorectal carcinoma, but not in PIK3CA -wild-type carcinoma. However, whether aspirin directly influences the viability of PIK3CA -mutant colon cancer cells is poorly understood. We conducted in vitro experiments to test our hypothesis that the anti-proliferative activity of aspirin might be stronger for PIK3CA -mutant colon cancer cells than for PIK3CA -wild-type colon cancer cells. We measured the anti-proliferative effect of aspirin at physiologic concentrations in seven PIK3CA -mutant and six PIK3CA -wild-type human colon cancer cell lines. After exposure to aspirin, the apoptotic index and cell cycle phase of colon cancer cells were assessed. In addition, the effect of aspirin was examined in parental SW48 cells and SW48 cell clones with individual knock-in PIK3CA mutations of either c.3140A>G (p.H1047R) or c.1633G>A (p.E545K). Aspirin induced greater dose-dependent loss of cell viability in PIK3CA -mutant cells than in PIK3CA -wild-type cells after treatment for 48 and 72 hours. Aspirin treatment also led to higher proportions of apoptotic cells and G0/G1 phase arrest in PIK3CA -mutant cells than in PIK3CA -wild-type cells. Aspirin treatment of isogenic SW48 cells carrying a PIK3CA mutation, either c.3140A>G (p.H1047R) or c.1633G>A (p. E545K), resulted in a more significant loss of cell viability compared to wild-type controls. Our findings indicate that aspirin causes cell cycle arrest, induces apoptosis, and leads to loss of cell viability more profoundly in PIK3CA -mutated colon cancer cells than in PIK3CA -wild-type colon cancer cells. These findings support the use of aspirin to treat patients with PIK3CA -mutant colon cancer.

  10. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Drugs Approved for Testicular Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for testicular cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  12. Preclinical evaluation of the imipridone family, analogs of clinical stage anti-cancer small molecule ONC201, reveals potent anti-cancer effects of ONC212.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jessica; Kline, Christina Leah; Ralff, Marie D; Lev, Avital; Lulla, Amriti; Zhou, Lanlan; Olson, Gary L; Nallaganchu, Bhaskara Rao; Benes, Cyril H; Allen, Joshua E; Prabhu, Varun V; Stogniew, Martin; Oster, Wolfgang; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2017-10-02

    Anti-cancer small molecule ONC201 upregulates the integrated stress response (ISR) and acts as a dual inactivator of Akt/ERK, leading to TRAIL gene activation. ONC201 is under investigation in multiple clinical trials to treat patients with cancer. Given the unique imipridone core chemical structure of ONC201, we synthesized a series of analogs to identify additional compounds with distinct therapeutic properties. Several imipridones with a broad range of in vitro potencies were identified in an exploration of chemical derivatives. Based on in vitro potency in human cancer cell lines and lack of toxicity to normal human fibroblasts, imipridones ONC206 and ONC212 were prioritized for further study. Both analogs inhibited colony formation, and induced apoptosis and downstream signaling that involves the integrated stress response and Akt/ERK, similar to ONC201. Compared to ONC201, ONC206 demonstrated improved inhibition of cell migration while ONC212 exhibited rapid kinetics of activity. ONC212 was further tested in >1000 human cancer cell lines in vitro and evaluated for safety and anti-tumor efficacy in vivo. ONC212 exhibited broad-spectrum efficacy at nanomolar concentrations across solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Skin cancer emerged as a tumor type with improved efficacy relative to ONC201. Orally administered ONC212 displayed potent anti-tumor effects in vivo, a broad therapeutic window and a favorable PK profile. ONC212 was efficacious in vivo in BRAF V600E melanoma models that are less sensitive to ONC201. Based on these findings, ONC212 warrants further development as a drug candidate. It is clear that therapeutic utility extends beyond ONC201 to include additional imipridones.

  13. Circumvention of multi-drug resistance of cancer cells by Chinese herbal medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ge

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multi-drug resistance (MDR of cancer cells severely limits therapeutic outcomes. A proposed mechanism for MDR involves the efflux of anti-cancer drugs from cancer cells, primarily mediated by ATP-binding cassette (ABC membrane transporters including P-glycoprotein. This article reviews the recent progress of using active ingredients, extracts and formulae from Chinese medicine (CM in circumventing ABC transporters-mediated MDR. Among the ABC transporters, Pgp is the most extensively studied for its role in MDR reversal effects. While other MDR reversal mechanisms remain unclear, Pgp inhibition is a criterion for further mechanistic study. More mechanistic studies are needed to fully establish the pharmacological effects of potential MDR reversing agents.

  14. Non-cancer drug consumption during the early trajectory of lymphoma survivorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioufol, Catherine; Lamy, Sébastien; Conte, Cécile; Jeanneau, Pauline; Compaci, Giselle; Delpierre, Cyrille; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Laurent, Guy; Despas, Fabien

    2017-11-22

    This study explored the use of non-cancer drugs in lymphoma survivors during the early trajectory (0 to 2 years) of cancer survivorship and determined the factors that influenced this consumption. Between January and March 2014, a cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess drug consumption in adult lymphoma survivors at the Toulouse University Hospital. This study was based on a questionnaire consisting of ten open questions related to medical prescription and/or self-medication occurring within the last 3 months. A total of 83/103 lymphoma survivors returned the questionnaire. This study showed that 91.6% of patients were drug consumers (about twice more than the general French population). Twenty percent of patients were treated with≥5 drugs. Overall drug consumption mainly concerned analgesics, anti-inflammatory drugs and psychotropics. The presence of comorbidity, urban residence and female gender were associated with overall drug consumption. Moreover, half of survivors required at least one self-medication. Finally, only seven survivors (8.4%) reported no use of any medication. This study shows that, at least during the early trajectory of cancer survivorship, lymphoma patients are heavily treated with non-cancer drug therapy. This drug consumption profile may have serious implications in terms of safety, overall benefit and health economics. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  16. Drugs Approved for Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for skin cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  17. Drugs Approved for Vulvar Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for vulvar cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  18. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Drugs Approved for Endometrial Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for endometrial cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  20. Drugs Approved for Liver Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for liver cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. Drugs Approved for Penile Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for penile cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  2. Bi-Functionalized Clay Nanotubes for Anti-Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Grimes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Systemic toxicity is an undesired consequence of the majority of chemotherapeutic drugs. Multifunctional nanoparticles with combined diagnostic and therapeutic functions show great promise towards personalized nanomedicine. Halloysite clay nanotubes (HNTs have shown potential as a drug delivery vehicle, and its surface can be modified and tailored as a targeted drug delivery system. In this short report, we modified the HNT surface by covalently bonding folic acid (FA and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. The modification of HNTs with folic acid imparts the potential to target tumor cells selectively. The addition of FITC offers a method for quantifying the effectiveness of the FA tagged HNTs ability to target tumor cells. We documented cell uptake of our bi-functionalized HNT (bHNT through phase contrast and epi-fluorescent microscopy. bHNTs showed no signs of cytotoxicity up to a concentration of 150 µg/mL. The increase in cell death with increased bHNT concentration may be due to induced cytotoxicity resulting from intracellular bHNT accumulation that disrupts cellular function leading to cell death. With HNTs recognized as having the ability to serve as both a nanocontainer and nanocarrier, we envision our construct as a potential modular platform for potential use in cancer therapeutics. The HNT interior can be loaded with a variety of anti-cancer drugs (or other chemotherapeutics and serve as a “death cargo” designed to kill cancer cells while providing feedback imaging data on drug efficacy. The surface of the HNT can be modified with gold or silver nanoparticles and used in photothermal therapy by converting light to heat inside tumors. Our HNT-based drug delivery system has the potential to provide localized and targeted therapies that limit or reduce side effects, reduce patient costs and length of hospital stays, and improve quality of life. However, further research is needed to validate the potential of this new

  3. Synergistic anti-proliferative effects of gambogic acid with docetaxel in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Zhengyun

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary Background Gambogic acid has a marked anti-tumor effect for gastric and colorectal cancers in vitro and in vivo. However, recent investigations on gambogic acid have focused mainly on mono-drug therapy, and its potential role in cancer therapy has not been comprehensively illustrated. This study aimed to assess the interaction between gambogic acid and docetaxel on human gastrointestinal cancer cells and to investigate the mechanism of gambogic acid plus docetaxel treatment-induced apoptotic cell death. Methods MTT assay was used to determine IC50 values in BGC-823, MKN-28, LOVO and SW-116 cells after gambogic acid and docetaxel administration. Median effect analysis was applied for determination of synergism and antagonism. Synergistic interaction between gambogic acid and docetaxel was evaluated using the combination index (CI method. Furthermore, cellular apoptosis was analyzed by Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI double staining. Additionally, mRNA expression of drug-associated genes, i.e., β-tublin III and tau, and the apoptosis-related gene survivin, were measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Results Gambogic acid provided a synergistic effect on the cytotoxicity induced by docetaxel in all four cell lines. The combined application of gambogic acid and docetaxel enhanced apoptosis in gastrointestinal cancer cells. Moreover, gambogic acid markedly decreased the mRNA expression of docetaxel-related genes, including β-tubulin III, tau and survivin, in BGC-823 cells. Conclusions Gambogic acid plus docetaxel produced a synergistic anti-tumor effect in gastrointestinal cancer cells, suggesting that the drug combination may offer a novel treatment option for patients with gastric and colorectal cancers.

  4. Drugs Approved for Vaginal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to prevent vaginal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Raloxifene Hydrochloride Tamoxifen Citrate Drugs ...

  6. Clinical applications of continuous infusion chemotherapy ahd concomitant radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, C.J.; Rotman, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: theoretical basis and clinical applications of 5-FU as a radiosensitizer; treatment of hepatic metastases from gastro intestingal primaries with split course radiation therapy; combined modality therapy with 5-FU, Mitomycin-C and radiation therapy for sqamous cell cancers; treatment of bladder carcinoma with concomitant infusion chemotherapy and irradiation; a treatment of invasiv bladder cancer by the XRT/5FU protocol; concomitant radiation therapy and doxorubicin by continuous infusion in advanced malignancies; cis platin by continuous infusion with concurrent radiation therapy in malignant tumors; combination of radiation with concomitant continuous adriamycin infusion in a patient with partially excised pleomorphic soft tissue sarcoma of the lower extremeity; treatment of recurrent carcinoma of the paranasal sinuses using concomitant infusion cis-platinum and radiation therapy; hepatic artery infusion for hepatic metastases in combination with hepatic resection and hepatic radiation; study of simultaneous radiation therapy, continuous infusion, 5FU and bolus mitomycin-C; cancer of the esophagus; continuous infusion VP-16, bolus cis-platinum and simultaneous radiation therapy as salvage therapy in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma; and concomitant radiation, mitomycin-C and 5-FU infusion in gastro intestinal cancer

  7. Anti-osteoporosis drug use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, M.; Skurtveit, S.; Meyer, H. E.

    2018-01-01

    Summary: Use of anti-osteoporotic drugs (AODs) was examined in a Norwegian population 50–85 years. Among them with Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX) score for major osteoporotic fracture ≥ 20, 25% of the women and 17% of the men received AODs. The strongest predictors for AODs were high age in...

  8. A global comparison of the cost of patented cancer drugs in relation to global differences in wealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Daniel A.; Clark, Jonathon; Tu, Yifan; Zhang, Jie; Fang, Fenqi; Goldstein, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There are major differences in cancer drug prices around the world. However, the patterns of affordability of these drugs are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to compare patterns of affordability of cancer drugs in Australia, China, India, Israel, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Results Cancer drug prices are highest in the United States. Cancer drugs are the least affordable in India by a large margin. Despite lower prices than in the USA, cancer drugs are less affordable in middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Materials and Methods We obtained the prices of a basket of cancer drugs in all 7 countries, and converted the prices to US$ using both foreign exchange rates and purchasing power parity. We assessed international differences in wealth by collecting values for gross domestic product (GDP) per capita in addition to average salaries. We compared patterns of affordability of cancer drugs by dividing the drug prices by the markers of wealth. Conclusions Cancer drugs are less affordable in middle-income countries than in high-income countries. Differential pricing may be an acceptable policy to ensure global affordability and access to highly active anti-cancer therapies. PMID:29069727

  9. Requirement for aspartate-cleaved bid in apoptosis signaling by DNA-damaging anti-cancer regimens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werner, Arlette B.; Tait, Stephen W. G.; de Vries, Evert; Eldering, Eric; Borst, Jannie

    2004-01-01

    Lymphoid malignancies can escape from DNA-damaging anti-cancer drugs and gamma-radiation by blocking apoptosis-signaling pathways. How these regimens induce apoptosis is incompletely defined, especially in cells with nonfunctional p53. We report here that the BH3-only Bcl-2 family member Bid is

  10. Quantity and economic value of unused oral anti-cancer and biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs among outpatient pharmacy patients who discontinue therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, C L; Melis, E J; Egberts, A C G; Bouvy, M L; Gardarsdottir, H; van den Bemt, B J F

    2018-03-24

    Patients sometimes discontinue the use of expensive oral anti-cancer drug (OACD) or biological disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug (bDMARD) therapies early, leading to medication waste if the patient has not used all dispensed medication. To determine the proportion of patients who have unused OACDs or bDMARDs after therapy discontinuation, and the quantity and economic value of these unused medications. Furthermore, patients' reasons for therapy discontinuation and their disposal method for unused medications were determined. In a retrospective follow-up study using a Dutch outpatient pharmacy database, patients (≥18 years) who did not refill an OACD or bDMARD prescription, dispensed between November 2015 and February 2016, within two weeks of the prescription end date were contacted by phone and asked about their unused medication and reasons thereof. The economic value was calculated using Dutch medication prices. Data were descriptively analyzed in STATA13. The database included 1173 patients, of whom 159 likely had discontinued therapy and were contacted. Of these, 88 patients were excluded (39 refilled, 47 missing, and 2 other). Of the 71 patients who had discontinued therapy, 39 (54.9%) had unused medications, comprising 22 OACD users (mean age 63.0 (SD ± 15.9) years, 50.0% female) and 17 bDMARD users (mean age 50.7 (SD ± 13.5) years, 47.1% female). A total of 59 packages were unused, with a total value of €60,341. Unused OACD packages and bDMARD packages had median values of €179 (IQR €24-2487) and €992 (IQR €681-1093), respectively. Patients primarily discontinued therapy due to adverse or insufficient effects. This study illustrates that more than half of patients discontinuing OACD or bDMARD therapies have unused medication. This emphasizes the need for waste-reducing interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasound contrast-enhanced study as an imaging biomarker for anti-cancer drug treatment: preliminary study with paclitaxel in a xenograft mouse tumor model (secondary publication)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hak Jong; Hwang, Sung Il; Jung, Hyun Sook; Kang, Mi Ra [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine and Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Jong Hoe; Kong, Hoon Young [Dept. of Molecular Biology, Dankook University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess tumor angiogenesis using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) of human prostate cancer cells (PC3) that were implanted in mice before and after paclitaxel injection. Twelve mice were injected with human PC3. The mice were grouped into two groups; one was the paclitaxel-treated group (n=6) and the other was the control group (n=6). Before administering paclitaxel into the peritoneal cavity, baseline CEUS was performed after the administration of 500 μL (1×108 microbubbles) of contrast agent. The area under the curve (AUC) up to 50 seconds after injection was derived from the time-intensity curves. After injection of paclitaxel or saline, CEUS studies were performed at the 1-week follow-up. Changes in tumor volume and the AUC in both two groups were evaluated. After CEUS, the microvessel density (MVD) was compared between the groups. In the paclitaxel-treated group, the AUC from CEUS showed a significant decrease 1-week after paclitaxel administration (P=0.030), even though the tumor volume showed no significant changes (P=0.116). In the control group, there was no significant decrease of the AUC (P=0.173). Pathologically, there was a significant difference in MVD between both groups (P=0.002). The AUC from the time intensity curve derived from CEUS showed an early change in response to the anti-cancer drug treatment that preceded the change in tumor size. The findings of CEUS could serve as an imaging biomarker for assessing tumor responses to anti-cancer drug treatment.

  12. Assessment of the systemic distribution of a bioconjugated anti-Her2 magnetic nanoparticle in a breast cancer model by means of magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta-Núñez, L. F. E., E-mail: lidi-huerta@hotmail.com [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico); Villanueva-Lopez, G. Cleva, E-mail: villanuevacleva3@gmail.com [Instituto Politécnico Nacional-Escuela Superior de Medicina-Sección Investigación y Posgrado (Mexico); Morales-Guadarrama, A., E-mail: amorales@ci3m.mx [Centro Nacional de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica-Universidad Autónoma (Mexico); Soto, S., E-mail: cuadrosdobles@hotmail.com; López, J., E-mail: jaimelocr@hotmail.com; Silva, J. G., E-mail: gabrielsilva173@gmail.com [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico); Perez-Vielma, N., E-mail: nadiampv@gmail.com [Instituto Politécnico Nacional - Centro Interdisciplinario de Ciencias de la Salud Unidad Santo Tomás (CICS-UST) (Mexico); Sacristán, E., E-mail: esacristan@ci3m.mx [Centro Nacional de Investigacion en Imagenologia e Instrumentacion Medica-Universidad Autónoma (Mexico); Gudiño-Zayas, Marco E., E-mail: gudino@unam.mx [UNAM, Departamento de Medicina Experimental, Facultad de Medicina (Mexico); González, C. A., E-mail: cgonzalezd@ipn.mx [Universidad del Ejercito y FAM/EMGS-Laboratorio Multidisciplinario de Investigación (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the systemic distribution of magnetic nanoparticles of 100 nm diameter (MNPs) coupled to a specific monoclonal antibody anti-Her2 in an experimental breast cancer (BC) model. The study was performed in two groups of Sprague–Dawley rats: control (n = 6) and BC chemically induced (n = 3). Bioconjugated “anti-Her2-MNPs” were intravenously administered, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) monitored its systemic distribution at seven times after administration. Non-heme iron presence associated with the location of the bioconjugated anti-Her2-MNPs in splenic, hepatic, cardiac and tumor tissues was detected by Perl’s Prussian blue (PPB) stain. Optical density measurements were used to semiquantitatively determine the iron presence in tissues on the basis of a grayscale values integration of T1 and T2 MRI sequence images. The results indicated a delayed systemic distribution of MNPs in cancer compared to healthy conditions with a maximum concentration of MNPs in cancer tissue at 24 h post-infusion.

  13. Substandard anti-malarial drugs in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sie Ali

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is concern about an increasing infiltration of markets by substandard and fake medications against life-threatening diseases in developing countries. This is particularly worrying with regard to the increasing resistance development of Plasmodium falciparum against affordable anti-malarial medications, which has led to a change to more expensive drugs in most endemic countries. Methods A representative sample of modern anti-malarial medications from licensed (public and private pharmacies, community health workers and illicit (market and street vendors, shops sources has been collected in the Nouna Health District in north-western Burkina Faso in 2006. All drugs were tested for their quality with the standard procedures of the German Pharma Health Fund-Minilab. Detected low standard drugs were re-tested with European Pharmacopoeia 2.9.1 standards for disintegration and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy at the laboratory of the Heidelberg University for confirmation. Results Overall, 86 anti-malarial drug samples were collected, of which 77 samples have been included in the final analysis. The sample consisted of 39/77 (50% chloroquine, 10/77 (13% pyrimethamine-sulphadoxine, 9/77 (12% quinine, 6/77 (8% amodiaquine, 9/77 (12% artesunate, and 4/77 (5% artemether-lumefantrine. 32/77 (42% drug samples were found to be of poor quality, of which 28 samples failed the visual inspection, nine samples had substandard concentrations of the active ingredient, four samples showed poor disintegration, and one sample contained non of the stated active ingredient. The licensed and the illicit market contributed 5/47 (10.6% and 27/30 (90.0% samples of substandard drugs respectively. Conclusion These findings provide further evidence for the wide-spread existence of substandard anti-malarial medications in Africa and call for strengthening of the regulatory and quality control capacity of affected countries, particularly in view of the

  14. Non-Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs Usage In Orthopaedics And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs NSAIDs) are a group of heterogeneous compounds with nti inflammatory, analgesic and often times anti pyretic roperties. They are weak organic acids and are the most commonly used drugs in Orthopaedic/Trauma practice. hey provide mild to moderate pain relief.

  15. Liquid-liquid displacement in slippery liquid-infused membranes (SLIMs)

    OpenAIRE

    Bazyar, Hanieh; Lv, Pengyu; Wood, Jeffery A.; Porada, Slawomir; Lohse, Detlef; Lammertink, Rob G. H.

    2018-01-01

    Liquid-infused membranes inspired by slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS) have been recently introduced to membrane technology. The gating mechanism of these membranes is expected to give rise to anti-fouling properties and multi-phase transport capabilities. However, the long-term retention of the infusion liquid has not yet been explored. To address this issue, we investigate the retention of the infusion liquid in slippery liquid-infused membranes (SLIMs) via liquid-liquid displ...

  16. Comprehensive two-dimensional PC-3 prostate cancer cell membrane chromatography for screening anti-tumor components from Radix Sophorae flavescentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Xu, Junnan; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Dawei; Han, Yong; Zhang, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Radix Sophorae flavescentis is generally used for the treatment of different stages of prostate cancer in China. It has ideal effects when combined with surgical treatment and chemotherapy. However, its active components are still ambiguous. We devised a comprehensive two-dimensional PC-3 prostate cancer cell membrane chromatography system for screening anti-prostate cancer components in Radix Sophorae flavescentis. Gefitinib and dexamethasone were chosen as positive and negative drugs respectively for validation and optimization the selectivity and suitability of the comprehensive two-dimensional chromatographic system. Five compounds, sophocarpine, matrine, oxymatrine, oxysophocarpine, and xanthohumol were found to have significant retention behaviors on the PC-3 cell membrane chromatography and were unambiguously identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Cell proliferation and apoptosis assays confirmed that all five compounds had anti-prostate cancer effects. Matrine and xanthohumol had good inhibitory effects, with half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 0.893 and 0.137 mg/mL, respectively. Our comprehensive two-dimensional PC-3 prostate cancer cell membrane chromatographic system promotes the efficient recognition and rapid analysis of drug candidates, and it will be practical for the discovery of prostate cancer drugs from complex traditional Chinese medicines. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Continuous-infusion adriamycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, R.S.; Chawla, S.P.; Ewer, M.S.; Hortobagyi, G.N.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter discusses the diminished cardiotoxicity as well as diminished nausea and vomiting with continuous infusions of adriamycin to patients undergoing radiation therapy, particularly with infusions of 48 hours or longer, and best with 96-hour infusions, the longest duration that has been studied systematically. In breast cancer, data show that more adriamycin is better, but only for a selected subgroup of patients: those with complete remission. The diminished cardiotoxicity makes the use of adriamycin more attractive in the adjuvant situation, where increased safety will decrease the chances of long-term complications and make retreatment easy for cured patients who develop second malignancies

  18. Poisoning by anti-malarial drugs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    had taken chloroquine: no other anti-malarial drugs were involved [1]. ... and angio-oedema have been described. Itching without a ... 15mg/L the risk of permanent visual damage and cardiac dysrhythmias is ... to use an alternative method.

  19. Behavioral and neural effects of intra-striatal infusion of anti-streptococcal antibodies in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotan, Dafna; Benhar, Itai; Alvarez, Kathy; Mascaro-Blanco, Adita; Brimberg, Lior; Frenkel, Dan; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Joel, Daphna

    2014-01-01

    Group A β-hemolytic streptococcal (GAS) infection is associated with a spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. The leading hypothesis regarding this association proposes that a GAS infection induces the production of auto-antibodies, which cross-react with neuronal determinants in the brain through the process of molecular mimicry. We have recently shown that exposure of rats to GAS antigen leads to the production of anti-neuronal antibodies concomitant with the development of behavioral alterations. The present study tested the causal role of the antibodies by assessing the behavior of naïve rats following passive transfer of purified antibodies from GAS-exposed rats. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) purified from the sera of GAS-exposed rats was infused directly into the striatum of naïve rats over a 21-day period. Their behavior in the induced-grooming, marble burying, food manipulation and beam walking assays was compared to that of naïve rats infused with IgG purified from adjuvant-exposed rats as well as of naïve rats. The pattern of in vivo antibody deposition in rat brain was evaluated using immunofluorescence and colocalization. Infusion of IgG from GAS-exposed rats to naïve rats led to behavioral and motor alterations partially mimicking those seen in GAS-exposed rats. IgG from GAS-exposed rats reacted with D1 and D2 dopamine receptors and 5HT-2A and 5HT-2C serotonin receptors in vitro. In vivo, IgG deposits in the striatum of infused rats colocalized with specific brain proteins such as dopamine receptors, the serotonin transporter and other neuronal proteins. Our results demonstrate the potential pathogenic role of autoantibodies produced following exposure to GAS in the induction of behavioral and motor alterations, and support a causal role for autoantibodies in GAS-related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:24561489

  20. Molecular targeting of growth factor receptor-bound 2 (Grb2) as an anti-cancer strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmawardana, Pathirage G; Peruzzi, Benedetta; Giubellino, Alessio; Burke, Terrence R; Bottaro, Donald P

    2006-01-01

    Growth factor receptor-bound 2 (Grb2) is a ubiquitously expressed adapter protein that provides a critical link between cell surface growth factor receptors and the Ras signaling pathway. As such, it has been implicated in the oncogenesis of several important human malignancies. In addition to this function, research over the last decade has revealed other fundamental roles for Grb2 in cell motility and angiogenesis--processes that also contribute to tumor growth, invasiveness and metastasis. This functional profile makes Grb2 a high priority target for anti-cancer drug development. Knowledge of Grb2 protein structure, its component Src homology domains and their respective structure-function relationships has facilitated the rapid development of sophisticated drug candidates that can penetrate cells, bind Grb2 with high affinity and potently antagonize Grb2 signaling. These novel compounds offer considerable promise in our growing arsenal of rationally designed anti-cancer therapeutics.

  1. Evolutionary relationships of Aurora kinases: Implications for model organism studies and the development of anti-cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Denis R

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As key regulators of mitotic chromosome segregation, the Aurora family of serine/threonine kinases play an important role in cell division. Abnormalities in Aurora kinases have been strongly linked with cancer, which has lead to the recent development of new classes of anti-cancer drugs that specifically target the ATP-binding domain of these kinases. From an evolutionary perspective, the species distribution of the Aurora kinase family is complex. Mammals uniquely have three Aurora kinases, Aurora-A, Aurora-B, and Aurora-C, while for other metazoans, including the frog, fruitfly and nematode, only Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases are known. The fungi have a single Aurora-like homolog. Based on the tacit assumption of orthology to human counterparts, model organism studies have been central to the functional characterization of Aurora kinases. However, the ortholog and paralog relationships of these kinases across various species have not been rigorously examined. Here, we present comprehensive evolutionary analyses of the Aurora kinase family. Results Phylogenetic trees suggest that all three vertebrate Auroras evolved from a single urochordate ancestor. Specifically, Aurora-A is an orthologous lineage in cold-blooded vertebrates and mammals, while structurally similar Aurora-B and Aurora-C evolved more recently in mammals from a duplication of an ancestral Aurora-B/C gene found in cold-blooded vertebrates. All so-called Aurora-A and Aurora-B kinases of non-chordates are ancestral to the clade of chordate Auroras and, therefore, are not strictly orthologous to vertebrate counterparts. Comparisons of human Aurora-B and Aurora-C sequences to the resolved 3D structure of human Aurora-A lends further support to the evolutionary scenario that vertebrate Aurora-B and Aurora-C are closely related paralogs. Of the 26 residues lining the ATP-binding active site, only three were variant and all were specific to Aurora-A. Conclusions In

  2. Phase I Trial of Anti-PSMA Designer CAR-T Cells in Prostate Cancer: Possible Role for Interacting Interleukin 2-T Cell Pharmacodynamics as a Determinant of Clinical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Richard P; Ma, Qiangzhong; Rathore, Ritesh; Gomes, Erica M; Bais, Anthony J; Lo, Agnes S Y; Abedi, Mehrdad; Davies, Robin A; Cabral, Howard J; Al-Homsi, A Samer; Cohen, Stephen I

    2016-10-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified "designer" T cells (dTc, CAR-T) against PSMA selectively target antigen-expressing cells in vitro and eliminate tumors in vivo. Interleukin 2 (IL2), widely used in adoptive therapies, was proven essential in animal models for dTc to eradicate established solid tumors. Patients under-went chemotherapy condi-tion-ing, followed by dTc dosing under a Phase I escalation with continuous infusion low dose IL2 (LDI). A target of dTc escalation was to achieve ≥20% engraftment of infused activated T cells. Six patients enrolled with doses prepared of whom five were treated. Patients received 10(9) or 10(10) autologous T cells, achieving expansions of 20-560-fold over 2 weeks and engraftments of 5-56%. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses established the impact of conditioning to promote expansion and engraftment of the infused T cells. Unexpectedly, administered IL2 was depleted up to 20-fold with high engraftments of activated T cells (aTc) in an inverse correlation (P < 0.01). Clinically, no anti-PSMA toxicities were noted, and no anti-CAR reactivities were detected post-treatment. Two-of-five patients achieved clinical partial responses (PR), with PSA declines of 50% and 70% and PSA delays of 78 and 150 days, plus a minor response in a third patient. Responses were unrelated to dose size (P = 0.6), instead correlating inversely with engraftment (P = 0.06) and directly with plasma IL2 (P = 0.03), suggesting insufficient IL2 with our LDI protocol to support dTc anti-tumor activity under optimal (high) dTc engraftments. Under a Phase I dose escalation in prostate cancer, a 20% engraftment target was met or exceeded in three subjects with adequate safety, leading to study conclusion. Clinical responses were obtained but were suggested to be restrained by low plasma IL2 when depleted by high levels of engrafted activated T cells. This report presents a unique example of how the pharmaco-dynamics of "drug-drug

  3. A Case Report: Subanesthetic Ketamine Infusion for Treatment of Cancer-Related Pain Produces Urinary Urge Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Barbara A; Lee, Wayne; Hunsberger, Joann

    2017-05-01

    Oncology patients undergoing treatment can experience substantial pain related to their disease or prescribed therapy. Ketamine infusions at subanesthetic doses have been used at our institution to supplement the pain management regimens of 262 patients. We present 2 cases in which young adult patients being treated with subanesthetic ketamine for cancer-related pain experienced urinary urgency and incontinence after initiation or increase of the ketamine infusion. This adverse effect has not been reported previously at this dosing range. These case reports suggest that subanesthetic ketamine infusions may cause side effects that previously have been reported only at anesthetic or abuse doses.

  4. pH-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles employed in controlled drug delivery systems for cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ke-Ni; Zhang, Chun-Qiu; Wang, Wei; Wang, Paul C.; Zhou, Jian-Ping; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-01-01

    In the fight against cancer, controlled drug delivery systems have emerged to enhance the therapeutic efficacy and safety of anti-cancer drugs. Among these systems, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with a functional surface possess obvious advantages and were thus rapidly developed for cancer treatment. Many stimuli-responsive materials, such as nanoparticles, polymers, and inorganic materials, have been applied as caps and gatekeepers to control drug release from MSNs. This review presents an overview of the recent progress in the production of pH-responsive MSNs based on the pH gradient between normal tissues and the tumor microenvironment. Four main categories of gatekeepers can respond to acidic conditions. These categories will be described in detail

  5. Clinical application of radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel in treating non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xiong; Chen Fang; Lin Yun; Tan Taikang; Wei Wei

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical application of radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel in treating non-small cell lung cancer and to summarize the experience of using this therapy in clinical practice. Methods: Radiofrequency ablation was performed in twenty-one patients with lung cancer. The diagnosis was confirmed by CT-guided percutaneous needle biopsy or bronchoscopic biopsy in all patients. One week after radiofrequency ablation treatment, bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel was conducted. The therapeutic results were observed and evaluated. Results: After the treatment, the lesion's size was markedly reduced and the clinical symptoms were dramatically improved in all patients. Conclusion: Radiofrequency ablation combined with bronchial artery infusion of docetaxel is a safe, effective and simple technique with excellent therapeutic results for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. It is really worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  6. Serological analysis of human anti-human antibody responses in colon cancer patients treated with repeated doses of humanized monoclonal antibody A33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, G; Cohen, L S; Williams, C; Richards, E C; Old, L J; Welt, S

    2001-09-15

    Mouse monoclonal antibody A33 (mAb A33) recognizes a M(r) 43,000 cell surface glycoprotein (designated A33) expressed in human colonic epithelium and colon cancer but absent from most other normal tissues. In patients, mAb A33 localizes with high specificity to colon cancer and is retained for up to 6 weeks in the cancer but cleared rapidly from normal colon (5-6 days). As a carrier of (125)I or (131)I, mAb A33 has shown antitumor activity. Induction of strong human anti-mouse antibody (immunoglobulin; HAMA) responses in patients, however, limits the use of the murine mAb A33 to very few injections. A humanized version of this antibody (huAb A33) has been prepared for Phase I and II clinical studies in patients with colon cancer. In those studies, immunogenicity of huAb A33 has been monitored using a novel, highly sensitive BIACORE method, which allows measurement of human anti-human antibodies (HAHAs) without the use of secondary reagents. We found that 63% (26 of 41) of the patients treated with repeated doses of huAb A33 developed HAHAs against a conformational antigenic determinant located in the V(L) and V(H) regions of huAb A33. Detailed serological analysis showed two distinct types of HAHAs. HAHA of type I (49% of patients) was characterized by an early onset with peak HAHA levels after 2 weeks of treatment, which declined with ongoing huAb A33 treatment. HAHA of type II (17% of patients) was characterized by a typically later onset of HAHA than in type I and by progressively increasing HAHA levels with each subsequent huAb A33 administration. Colon cancer patients with type I HAHAs did not develop infusion-related adverse events. In contrast, HAHA of type II was indicative of infusion-related adverse events. By using this new method, we were able to distinguish these two types of HAHAs in patients while on antibody treatment, allowing patients to be removed from study prior to the onset of severe infusion-related adverse events.

  7. Classifying new anti-tuberculosis drugs: rationale and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Tiberi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The classification of anti-tuberculosis (TB drugs is important as it helps the clinician to build an appropriate anti-TB regimen for multidrug-resistant (MDR and extensively drug-resistant (XDR TB cases that do not fulfil the criteria for the shorter MDR-TB regimen. The World Health Organization (WHO has recently approved a revision of the classification of new anti-TB drugs based on current evidence on each drug. In the previous WHO guidelines, the choice of drugs was based on efficacy and toxicity in a step-down manner, from group 1 first-line drugs and groups 2–5 second-line drugs, to group 5 drugs with potentially limited efficacy or limited clinical evidence. In the revised WHO classification, exclusively aimed at managing drug-resistant cases, medicines are again listed in hierarchical order from group A to group D. In parallel, a possible future classification is independently proposed. The aim of this viewpoint article is to describe the evolution in WHO TB classification (taking into account an independently proposed new classification and recent changes in WHO guidance, while commenting on the differences between them. The latest evidence on the ex-group 5 drugs is also discussed.

  8. Radiation therapy and arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokodate, Hirofumi; Saito, Hiroya; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Horikawa, Masahiro; Takamura, Akio

    2009-01-01

    The standard therapy is not yet established for the unresectable advanced gallbladder cancer (AGC). Here described is the outcome of authors' therapeutic protocol for AGC during the time Jan., 1989-Dec., 2008. Subjects are 73 patients (M 32/F 41, average age 65 y) with AGC of Stage IV. One shot arterial infusion (AI) of EEP regimen (etoposide (VP16)/4'epiadriamycin (EPIR)/cisplatin (CDDP)) is conducted via hepatic artery proper or common at the first angiography and one week later, external radiation therapy (RT), with about 30-50 Gy/6 fractions (actually, 12-61.6 Gy). AI is weekly done with FP regimen (CDDP/5-fluorouracil (FU)) through the reservoir indwelled in the gastroduodenal artery for 6 months where a metal stent for the stegnosis of bile duct is used if necessary after RT, and in recent days, additionally with biweekly CDDP/gemcitabin (GEM) regimen depending on patient's state after FP. As a result, RT is conducted to 62 cases (RT alone 8 cases), AI, 64 (alone, 10), and RT+AI, 54. Response is found to be 49% (CR 7 cases and PR, 28). Survivals 1- and 3-year are 39 and 6%, respectively, and average survival time, 408 days. Survival rate in (RT+AI) is significantly superior to that in AI alone and in RT alone. Prognosis in patients with jaundice, hepatic or duodenal invasion is significantly inferior to those without the symptom, and in non-responded cases, to responded cases. Complications like hepatic abscess are seen in 4 cases at 6 months after treatment. Four actual case-reports are presented in details with their images. Combination of RT+AI is suggested to be of utility for AGC, of which multi-center trial is awaited with addition of newer anti-cancers developed recently. (K.T.)

  9. Nutritional Interventions for Cancer-induced Cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullett, Norleena P.; Mazurak, Vera; Hebbar, Gautam; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer-induced cachexia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer treatment. Cancer research and development continues at an aggressive pace and yet a degree of cancer-induced cachexia is experienced by up to 80% of advanced stage cancer patients. Unfortunately, there are no established treatment regimens for this condition. Weight loss and fatigue consistently appear in patient oncologic histories and progress notes. However, few oncologists fully understand the pathologic mechanisms causing cachexia resulting in well-meaning advice to increase caloric intake with minimal results. Our goal is to describe the pathologic basis of cancer-induced cachexia and to detail accompanying metabolic derangements. Understanding the causes of cachexia sheds light on the subsequent need for multi-modality therapy including clinical intervention with specialized nutrition support, drug therapy, lifestyle and diet changes. In addition to nutrition support modalities, practicing oncologists may prescribe medical therapies designed to increase body weight and lean body mass, including megestrol acetate, tetrahydrocannibinol, oxandrolone, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. A variety of experimental therapies are also being investigated for cancer-induced cachexia including tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors and ghrelin infusions. We review the available data to support nutrition-oriented interventions in cancer-induced cachexia, including omega-3 fatty acids, amino-acid loading/protein supplementation, parenteral and enteral nutrition support, and food-derived compounds such as curcumin, reservatrol, and pomegranate. PMID:21420558

  10. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Thyroid Cancer Cabozantinib-S-Malate Caprelsa (Vandetanib) Cometriq (Cabozantinib-S-Malate) Doxorubicin ...

  11. In vitro and in vivo assessment of anti-hyperglycemic and antioxidant effects of Oak leaves (Quercus convallata and Quercus arizonica) infusions and fermented beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Gómez, Claudia I; Simental-Mendía, Luis E; González-Laredo, Rubén F; Alcantar-Orozco, Esteban J; Monserrat-Juarez, Victor H; Ramírez-España, Julio C; Gallegos-Infante, Jose Alberto; Moreno-Jiménez, Martha R; Rocha-Guzmán, Nuria E

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-hyperglycemic and antioxidant effects of oak leaves infusions and fermented beverages from Quercus convallata and Q. arizonica in vitro and in vivo. Female C57BL/6 mice fed with high saturated fat and fructose diet-induced obesity were treated with oak leaves beverages (200 μL/per day equivalent to 15mg of lyophilized sample/Kg of body weight for infusions and 31mg of lyophilized sample/Kg of body weight for fermented beverages) for 3months and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was performed. Blood plasma was obtained for determination of glucose, lipid profile, and oxidative stress markers (ABTS, nitric oxide, and ORAC assays). Insulin resistance was estimated using the product of triglycerides and glucose (TyG). Oak leaves infusions and fermented beverages exhibited exerted inhibition of α-amylase (8-15% and 5-9%, respectively) and α-glucosidase (98% and 99%, respectively) enzymes. After OGTT, the groups treated with either oak leaves infusions or fermented beverages showed lower glucose levels compared with the obesity control group (18%) and a similar glucose tolerance to healthy control group. On long-term evaluation, intervention groups showed a significant reduction in fasting glucose concentrations (41-50% for oak leaves infusions and 52-66% for fermented beverages) and TyG index (4.2-4.6% for oak leaves infusions and 5.9-7.5% for fermented beverages) compared with the obese control group. Oak leaves infusions and fermented beverages had antioxidant potential in vitro and scavenging activity for radicals such as peroxyl and peroxynitrite anions. Our results suggest anti-hyperglycemic and antioxidant effects of beverages prepared with leaves of Quercus species in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Through the Looking Glass: Time-lapse Microscopy and Longitudinal Tracking of Single Cells to Study Anti-cancer Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Russell T; Orth, James D

    2016-05-14

    The response of single cells to anti-cancer drugs contributes significantly in determining the population response, and therefore is a major contributing factor in the overall outcome. Immunoblotting, flow cytometry and fixed cell experiments are often used to study how cells respond to anti-cancer drugs. These methods are important, but they have several shortcomings. Variability in drug responses between cancer and normal cells, and between cells of different cancer origin, and transient and rare responses are difficult to understand using population averaging assays and without being able to directly track and analyze them longitudinally. The microscope is particularly well suited to image live cells. Advancements in technology enable us to routinely image cells at a resolution that enables not only cell tracking, but also the observation of a variety of cellular responses. We describe an approach in detail that allows for the continuous time-lapse imaging of cells during the drug response for essentially as long as desired, typically up to 96 hr. Using variations of the approach, cells can be monitored for weeks. With the employment of genetically encoded fluorescent biosensors numerous processes, pathways and responses can be followed. We show examples that include tracking and quantification of cell growth and cell cycle progression, chromosome dynamics, DNA damage, and cell death. We also discuss variations of the technique and its flexibility, and highlight some common pitfalls.

  13. MEDICI: Mining Essentiality Data to Identify Critical Interactions for Cancer Drug Target Discovery and Development | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the transmission and regulation of oncogenic signals that are essential to cellular proliferation and survival, and thus represent potential targets for anti-cancer therapeutic discovery. Despite their significance, there is no method to experimentally disrupt and interrogate the essentiality of individual endogenous PPIs. The ability to computationally predict or infer PPI essentiality would help prioritize PPIs for drug discovery and help advance understanding of cancer biology.

  14. Minimalism in fabrication of self-organized nanogels holding both anti-cancer drug and targeting moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungwon; Park, Kyong Mi; Ko, Jin Young; Kwon, Ick Chan; Cho, Hyeon Geun; Kang, Dongmin; Yu, In Tag; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Na, Kun

    2008-05-01

    Recent researches to develop nano-carrier systems in anti-cancer drug delivery have focused on more complicated design to improve therapeutic efficacy and to reduce side effects. Although such efforts have great impact to biomedical science and engineering, the complexity has been a huddle because of clinical and economic problems. In order to overcome the problems, a simplest strategy to fabricate nano-carriers to deliver doxorubicin (DOX) was proposed in the present study. Two significant subjects (i) formation of nanoparticles loading and releasing DOX and (ii) binding specificity of them to cells, were examined. Folic acid (FA) was directly coupled with pullulan (Pul) backbone by ester linkage (FA/Pul conjugate) and the degree of substitution (DS) was varied, which were confirmed by 1H NMR and UV spectrophotometry. Light scattering results revealed that the nanogels possessed two major size distributions around 70 and 270 nm in an aqueous solution. Their critical aggregation concentrations (CACs) were less than 10 microg/mL, which are lower than general critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of low-molecular-weight surfactants. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed well-dispersed nanogel morphology in a dried state. Depending on the DS, the nanogels showed different DOX-loading and releasing profiles. The DOX release rate from FA8/Pul (with the highest DS) for 24h was slower than that from FA4/or FA6/Pul, indicating that the FA worked as a hydrophobic moiety for drug holding. Cellular uptake of the nanogels (KB cells) was also monitored by confocal microscopy. All nanogels were internalized regardless of the DS of FA. Based on the results, the objectives of this study, to suggest a new method overcoming the complications in the drug carrier design, were successfully verified.

  15. 21 CFR 880.5725 - Infusion pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Infusion pump. (a) Identification. An infusion pump is a device used in a health care facility to pump fluids into a patient in a controlled manner. The device may use a piston pump, a roller pump, or a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Infusion pump. 880.5725 Section 880.5725 Food and...

  16. Identification of new candidate drugs for lung cancer using chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions and a K-means clustering algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Chen, Lei; Yin, Jun; Huang, Tao; Bi, Yi; Kong, Xiangyin; Zheng, Mingyue; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer, characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in the lung tissue, is the leading cause of global cancer deaths. Until now, effective treatment of this disease is limited. Many synthetic compounds have emerged with the advancement of combinatorial chemistry. Identification of effective lung cancer candidate drug compounds among them is a great challenge. Thus, it is necessary to build effective computational methods that can assist us in selecting for potential lung cancer drug compounds. In this study, a computational method was proposed to tackle this problem. The chemical-chemical interactions and chemical-protein interactions were utilized to select candidate drug compounds that have close associations with approved lung cancer drugs and lung cancer-related genes. A permutation test and K-means clustering algorithm were employed to exclude candidate drugs with low possibilities to treat lung cancer. The final analysis suggests that the remaining drug compounds have potential anti-lung cancer activities and most of them have structural dissimilarity with approved drugs for lung cancer.

  17. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase in Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoozemans, Jeroen J. M.; Veerhuis, Robert; Rozemuller, Annemieke J. M.; Eikelenboom, Piet

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that anti-inflammatory drugs, especially the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), decrease the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Their beneficial effects may be due to interference in the chronic inflammatory reaction, that takes place in AD.

  18. The production and sales of anti-tuberculosis drugs in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang-Mu; Zhao, Qi-Peng; Ren, Qiao-Meng; Peng, Dan-Lu; Guo, Yan

    2016-10-04

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major infectious disease globally. Adequate and proper use of anti-TB drugs is essential for TB control. This study aims to study China's production capacity and sales situation of anti-TB drugs, and to further discuss the potential for China to contribute to global TB control. The production data of anti-TB drugs in China from 2011 to 2013 and the sales data from 2010 to 2014 were extracted from Ministry of Industry and Information Technology database of China and IMS Health database, respectively. The number of drugs was standardized to the molecular level of the key components before calculating. All data were described and analyzed by Microsoft Excel. First-line drugs were the majority in both sales (89.5 %) and production (92.3 %) of anti-TB drugs in China. The production of rifampicin held the majority share in active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and finished products, whilst ethambutol and pyrazinamide were the top two sales in finished products. Fixed-dose combinations only held small percentages in total production and sales weight, though a slight increase was observed. The production and sales of streptomycin showed a tendency of decrease after 2012. The trends and proportion of different anti-TB drugs were similar in production and sales, however, the production weight was much larger than that of sales, especially for rifampicin and isoniazid. First-line drugs were the predominant medicine produced and used in China. While the low production and sales of the second-line TB drugs and FDCs rose concerns for the treatment of multiple drug resistant TB. The redundant production amount, as well as the prompt influence of national policy on drug production and sales, indicated the potential for China to better contribute to global TB control.

  19. Fertility drugs and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2017-06-20

    The aetiology of ovarian cancer is multifactorial with both endogenous and exogenous risk factors playing an important role. The exact pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is still not well understood, despite the number of hypotheses published. Due to an increase in the number of women using fertility drugs, much attention has been focused on the long-term health effects of such drugs. Although fertility drugs facilitate the ovulation process, it is however associated with a significant increase in hormone concentrations, placing exposed women at increased risk of gynaecological cancer. Many clinical and epidemiological studies have examined the association between fertility drugs and ovarian cancer risk. Results from these studies have been contradictory, as some studies have reported an increased risk of ovarian cancer while others reported no increased risk. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that women who used fertility drugs and did not conceive had a higher risk of developing ovarian cancer, compared to women who used fertility drugs and conceived and delivered successfully. This review discusses the effect of fertility drugs on the risk of developing ovarian cancer, providing details on four possible scenarios associated with fertility treatment. In addition, the limitations of previous studies and their impact on our understanding of the association between fertility drugs and ovarian cancer also have been highlighted. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Doxorubicin-conjugated bacteriophages carrying anti-MHC class I chain-related A for targeted cancer therapy in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phumyen A

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Achara Phumyen,1–3 Siriporn Jantasorn,1 Amonrat Jumnainsong,1 Chanvit Leelayuwat1–4 1The Centre for Research and Development of Medical Diagnostic Laboratories (CMDL, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, 2The Liver Fluke and Cholangiocarcinoma Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, 3Research Cluster: Specific Health Problem of Grater Maekong Subregion (SHeP-GMS, 4Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Sciences, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Background: Cancer therapy by systemic administration of anticancer drugs, besides the effectiveness shown on cancer cells, demonstrated the side effects and cytotoxicity on normal cells. The targeted drug-carrying nanoparticles may decrease the required drug concentration at the site and the distribution of drugs to normal tissues. Overexpression of major histocompatibility complex class I chain–related A (MICA in cancer is useful as a targeted molecule for the delivery of doxorubicin to MICA-expressing cell lines. Methods: The application of 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide (EDC chemistry was employed to conjugate the major coat protein of bacteriophages carrying anti-MICA and doxorubicin in a mildly acid condition. Doxorubicin (Dox on phages was determined by double fluorescence of phage particles stained by M13-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC and drug autofluorescence by flow cytometry. The ability of anti-MICA on phages to bind MICA after doxorubicin conjugation was evaluated by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. One cervical cancer and four cholangiocarcinoma cell lines expressing MICA were used as models to evaluate targeting activity by cell cytotoxicity test. Results: Flow cytometry and indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated that most of the phages (82% could be conjugated with doxorubicin, and the Dox-carrying phage-displaying anti-MICA (Dox-phage remained the binding activity against MICA

  1. Clinical evaluation of internal iliac artery anticancer drug infusion for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Ye; Wang Jin; Nie Yong; Chen Hua; Huang Xinjie

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of bilateral internal iliac artery chemotherapy infusion for the treatment of androgen-independent prostate cancer (ALPC). Methods: Thirty eight eases of confirmed AIPC were randomly divided into treatment group and control group. The patients in treatment group (23 cases) were treated with androgen deprivation therapy and regular internal iliac artery chemotherapy, while patients in control group (15 cases) were only received androgen deprivation therapy. The therapeutic efficacies of the two groups were compared and analyzed after completion of the treatment. Results: The clinical symptoms and maximum urine flow rates of' treatment group were improved rapidly 6 months later. After 2 years follow-up, the total efficacies of treatment group and control group were 65.2% and 26.7% respectively, showing a significant statistical difference (P<0.05). Conclusions: The treatment of AlPC with bilateral internal iliac artery chemotherapy is effective, providing melioration the quality of life and alleviation of the symptoms. (authors)

  2. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DOI 10.1007/s12039-015-0824-z. Synthesis, structure analysis, anti-bacterial and in vitro anti-cancer activity of new Schiff base and its copper complex derived from sulfamethoxazole. I RAMA∗ and R SELVAMEENA. PG and Research Department of Chemistry, Seethalakshmi Ramaswami College,. Tiruchirappalli 620 002 ...

  3. Identification of drug combinations administered by continuous subcutaneous infusion that require analysis for compatibility and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Dickman, Andrew; Bickerstaff, Matthew; Jackson, Richard; Schneider, Jennifer; Mason, Stephen; Ellershaw, John

    2017-01-01

    Background A continuous subcutaneous infusion (CSCI) delivered via syringe pump is a method of drug administration used to maintain symptom control when a patient is no longer able to tolerate oral medication. Several classes of drugs, such as opioids, antiemetics, anticholinergics, antipsychotics and benzodiazepines are routinely administered by CSCI alone or in combinations. Previous studies attempting to identify the most-common CSCI combinations are now several years old and no longer ref...

  4. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and the risk of developing breast cancer in a population-based prospective cohort study in Washington County, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallicchio, Lisa; Visvanathan, Kala; Burke, Alyce; Hoffman, Sandra C; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use and the development of breast cancer, and to assess whether this association differed by estrogen receptor (ER) subtype. Data were analyzed from 15,651 women participating in CLUE II, a cohort study initiated in 1989 in Washington County, MD. Medication data were collected at baseline in 1989 and in 1996. Incident cases of invasive breast cancer occurring from baseline to March 27, 2006 were identified through linkage of cohort participants with the Washington County Cancer Registry and the Maryland State Cancer Registry. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to calculate the risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for breast cancer associated with medication use. Among women in the CLUE II cohort, 418 invasive breast cancer cases were identified during the follow-up period. The results showed that self-reported use of NSAIDs in both 1989 and in 1996 was associated with a 50% reduction in the risk of developing invasive breast cancer compared with no NSAID use in either 1989 or 1996 (RR = 0.50; 95% CI 0.28, 0.91). The protective association between NSAID use and the risk of developing breast cancer was consistent among ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers, although only the RR for ER-positive breast cancer was statistically significant. Overall, findings from this study indicate that NSAID use is associated with a decrease in breast cancer risk and that the reduction in risk is similar for ER-positive and ER-negative tumors.

  5. Drugs Approved for Stomach (Gastric) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for stomach (gastric) cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Pulsatile versus steady infusions for hepatic artery chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E.E.; Haynie, T.P.; Wright, K.C.; Chaynsangavej, C.; Gianturco, C.; Lamki, L.; Wallace, S.

    1984-01-01

    Hepatic artery chemotherapy for unresectable liver tumors requires an even distribution of the drugs in the tumor or vascular bed. This cannot be determined angiographically because the drugs are infused at a much lower rate than the contrast media. It is easy, however, to determine the quality of the perfusion by injecting a small volume of Tc-99m MAA in one of the side ports while chemotherapeutic agent is being infused at the same rate. Usually this shows a uniform, satisfactory distribution of isotope. Occasionally, however, some areas fail to receive Tc-99m in spite of what appears to be a good position of the catheter tip. Since ''streaming'' of the infused drugs has been blamed for their uneven distribution, the authors decided to compare the usual steady flow infusions with infusions made pulsatile by the addition of a pulsing device (Gianturco Pump) attached to the infusion tubing. Eighty-three patients were studied with steady as well as pulsatile infusions. In 16 of these patients the perfusion pattern was definitely changed by the pulsatile infusion. In one patient the pulsatile mode resulted in an unwanted gastric perfusion. In 5 patients the distribution was improved in one hepatic lobe and in 10 patients it was improved in both lobes. These results show that hepatic artery perfusions can occasionally be improved by pulsing the infusate. However, pulsing can produce the unwanted perfusion of extra-hepatic areas

  7. Systems modeling of anti-apoptotic pathways in prostate cancer: psychological stress triggers a synergism pattern switch in drug combination therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Sun

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer patients often have increased levels of psychological stress or anxiety, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between psychological stress and prostate cancer as well as therapy resistance have been rarely studied and remain poorly understood. Recent reports show that stress inhibits apoptosis in prostate cancer cells via epinephrine/beta2 adrenergic receptor/PKA/BAD pathway. In this study, we used experimental data on the signaling pathways that control BAD phosphorylation to build a dynamic network model of apoptosis regulation in prostate cancer cells. We then compared the predictive power of two different models with or without the role of Mcl-1, which justified the role of Mcl-1 stabilization in anti-apoptotic effects of emotional stress. Based on the selected model, we examined and quantitatively evaluated the induction of apoptosis by drug combination therapies. We predicted that the combination of PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and inhibition of BAD phosphorylation at S112 would produce the best synergistic effect among 8 interventions examined. Experimental validation confirmed the effectiveness of our predictive model. Moreover, we found that epinephrine signaling changes the synergism pattern and decreases efficacy of combination therapy. The molecular mechanisms responsible for therapeutic resistance and the switch in synergism were explored by analyzing a network model of signaling pathways affected by psychological stress. These results provide insights into the mechanisms of psychological stress signaling in therapy-resistant cancer, and indicate the potential benefit of reducing psychological stress in designing more effective therapies for prostate cancer patients.

  8. Modeling of hyaluronic acid containing anti-cancer drugs-loaded polylactic-co-glycolic acid bioconjugates for targeted delivery to cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul-e-Saba, Adulphakdee, A.; Madthing, A.; Zafar, M. N.; Abdullah, M. A.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular modeling of hyaluronan (HA), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), polyethylene glycol-bis-amine (PEG-bis-amine), Curcumin, Cisplatin and the conjugate HA-PEG-PLGA containing Curcumin/Cisplatin were performed using Discovery Studio 2.5 to better understand issues and constraints related to targeted delivery of potent anticancer drugs to cancer cells. HA, a versatile biopolymer is a ligand of cancer cell receptor, CD44 that can be particularly useful in a receptor-mediated cellular uptake of drug-incorporated nanoparticles. Biocompatible and biodegradable polymers, PLGA and PEG, serve as polymeric micelles for controlled-release of drug. Curcumin as a natural anticancer agent has poor solubility that limits its use in drug therapeutics, while platinum-based Cisplatin exhibits systemic cytotoxicity. These can be overcome via drug delivery in polymeric biocompatible vehicles. The PLGA-PEG-HA conjugate shows the total measurement of 105 bond length with average bond length of 1.274163 Å. The conjugation between PEG and HA occurs at C8-O1 atoms and can be manipulated to improve properties.

  9. Concanavalin A: A potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis for cancer therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wen-wen; Yu, Jia-ying; Xu, Huai-long; Bao, Jin-ku

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → ConA induces cancer cell death targeting apoptosis and autophagy. → ConA inhibits cancer cell angiogenesis. → ConA is utilized in pre-clinical and clinical trials. -- Abstract: Concanavalin A (ConA), a Ca 2+ /Mn 2+ -dependent and mannose/glucose-binding legume lectin, has drawn a rising attention for its remarkable anti-proliferative and anti-tumor activities to a variety of cancer cells. ConA induces programmed cell death via mitochondria-mediated, P73-Foxo1a-Bim apoptosis and BNIP3-mediated mitochondrial autophagy. Through IKK-NF-κB-COX-2, SHP-2-MEK-1-ERK, and SHP-2-Ras-ERK anti-angiogenic pathways, ConA would inhibit cancer cell survival. In addition, ConA stimulates cell immunity and generates an immune memory, resisting to the same genotypic tumor. These biological findings shed light on new perspectives of ConA as a potential anti-neoplastic agent targeting apoptosis, autophagy and anti-angiogenesis in pre-clinical or clinical trials for cancer therapeutics.

  10. Novel High-Throughput Drug Screening Platform for Chemotherapy-Induced Axonal Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    from anti-cancer drug therapy [1,2]. Platinum drugs, taxanes, proteasome inhibitors, vinca alkaloids, epothilones, and immunomodulators are the...and immunomodulators are the standard of anti-cancer therapies for the six most cancers. An estimated 2010 incidence of 994, 680 cases for these

  11. Dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate infusion for palliative care and pain relief in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Ba X; Le, Bao T; Tran, Hau D; Hoang, Cuong; Tran, Hung Q; Tran, Dao M; Pham, Cu Q; Pham, Tuan D; Ha, Trung V; Bui, Nga T; Shaw, D Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (adenocarcinoma of the prostate) is the most widespread cancer in men. It causes significant suffering and mortality due to metastatic disease. The main therapy for metastatic prostate cancer (MPC) includes androgen manipulation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy and/or radioisotopes. However, these therapeutic approaches are considered palliative at this stage, and their significant side effects can cause further decline in patients' quality of life and increase non-cancer-related morbidity/mortality. In this study, the authors have used the infusion of dimethyl sulfoxide-sodium bicarbonate (DMSO-SB) to treat 18 patients with MPC. The 90-day follow-up of the patients having undergone the proposed therapeutic regimen showed significant improvement in clinical symptoms, blood and biochemistry tests, and quality of life. There were no major side effects from the treatment. In searching for new and better methods for palliative treatment and pain relief, this study strongly suggested therapy with DMSO-SB infusions could provide a rational alternative to conventional treatment for patients with MPC.

  12. Regular Use of Aspirin or Non-Aspirin Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Is Not Associated With Risk of Incident Pancreatic Cancer in Two Large Cohort Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Natalia; Yuan, Chen; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Cao, Yin; Babic, Ana; Morales-Oyarvide, Vicente; Kraft, Peter; Ng, Kimmie; Giovannucci, Edward; Ogino, Shuji; Stampfer, Meir; Cochrane, Barbara B; Manson, JoAnn E; Clish, Clary B; Chan, Andrew T; Fuchs, Charles S; Wolpin, Brian M

    2018-04-01

    Use of aspirin and/or non-aspirin nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduces the risk of several cancers, but it is not clear if use of these drugs is associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated aspirin and non-aspirin NSAID use and risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 141,940 participants from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Nurses' Health Study using multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression. We considered several exposure classifications to model differing lag times between NSAID exposure and cancer development. We also conducted a nested case-control study of participants from 3 prospective cohorts using conditional logistic regression to evaluate pre-diagnosis levels of plasma salicylurate, a major metabolite of aspirin, in 396 pancreatic cancer cases and 784 matched individuals without pancreatic cancer (controls). In the prospective cohort study, 1122 participants developed pancreatic adenocarcinoma over 4.2 million person-years. Use of aspirin or non-aspirin NSAIDs was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk, even after considering several latency exposure classifications. In a pre-planned subgroup analysis, regular aspirin use was associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk among participants with diabetes (relative risk, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.54-0.94). In the nested case-control study, pre-diagnosis levels of salicylurate were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (odds ratio, 1.08; 95% CI, 0.72-1.61; P trend 0.81; comparing participants in the highest quintile with those in the lowest quintile of plasma salicylurate). Regular aspirin or non-aspirin NSAID use was not associated with future risk of pancreatic cancer in participants from several large prospective cohort studies. A possible reduction in risk for pancreatic cancer among people with diabetes who regularly use aspirin should be further examined in preclinical and human studies. Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  13. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and benign oesophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, S R; Fellows, I W; Ogilvie, A L; Atkinson, M

    1982-01-01

    Drug histories were obtained from 76 patients at the time of initial Eder-Puestow dilatation for benign oesophageal stricture. Six patients had consumed drugs known to cause oesophageal ulceration (emepronium bromide and potassium preparations). Of the remaining 70 patients, 22 had regularly taken a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug before the onset of dysphagia compared with 10 patients in a control group matched for age and sex; this difference was significant (p less than 0.02). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may have a causative role in the formation of oesophageal stricture in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux, in whom they should be prescribed with caution. PMID:6807392

  14. Anti-inflammatory drugs and psychosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laan, W.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the disorder we know as schizophrenia. Although there is treatment for schizophrenia in the form of anti-psychotic drugs, not all patients respond well to this treatment. A large part of patients will have remaining symptoms for the rest of their lives. A number of hypotheses

  15. Carbon nanotubes as carriers of Panax ginseng metabolites and enhancers of ginsenosides Rb1 and Rg1 anti-cancer activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiani, Mohamed H.; Eassa, Souzan; Parnell, Charlette; Nima, Zeid; Ghosh, Anindya; Biris, Alexandru S.; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.

    2017-01-01

    A major benefit to nanomaterial based-medicine is the ability to provide nanosized vehicles for sporadic metabolites. Here, we describe how the conjugation of valuable ginseng secondary metabolites (ginsenoside Rb1 or Rg1) with carbon nanotubes (CNT) can enhance their anti-proliferative and anti-cancer effects. Ginsenoside-CNT conjugate (Rb-CNT or Rg-CNT) permitted the ginsenosides to be used at a low dose, yet achieve a higher incidence of cancer killing. We were able to demonstrate that the ginsenoside-CNT conjugate can decrease cell viability up to 62% in breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and enhance antiproliferation of drug-resistant pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1) by 61%. The interaction of the ginsenoside-CNT conjugate with breast cancer cells was studied using Raman Spectroscopy mapping. Total transcriptome profiling (Affymetrix platform) of MCF-7 cells treated with the ginsenoside-CNT conjugate shows that a number of cellular, apoptotic and response to stimulus processes were affected. Therefore, our data confirmed the potential use of CNT as a drug delivery system.

  16. Systems analysis of apoptotic priming in ovarian cancer identifies vulnerabilities and predictors of drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Iavarone, Claudia; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Selfors, Laura M; Palakurthi, Sangeetha; Liu, Joyce F; Drapkin, Ronny; Matulonis, Ursula; Leverson, Joel D; Sampath, Deepak; Mills, Gordon B; Brugge, Joan S

    2017-08-28

    The lack of effective chemotherapies for high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGS-OvCa) has motivated a search for alternative treatment strategies. Here, we present an unbiased systems-approach to interrogate a panel of 14 well-annotated HGS-OvCa patient-derived xenografts for sensitivity to PI3K and PI3K/mTOR inhibitors and uncover cell death vulnerabilities. Proteomic analysis reveals that PI3K/mTOR inhibition in HGS-OvCa patient-derived xenografts induces both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling responses that limit cell killing, but also primes cells for inhibitors of anti-apoptotic proteins. In-depth quantitative analysis of BCL-2 family proteins and other apoptotic regulators, together with computational modeling and selective anti-apoptotic protein inhibitors, uncovers new mechanistic details about apoptotic regulators that are predictive of drug sensitivity (BIM, caspase-3, BCL-X L ) and resistance (MCL-1, XIAP). Our systems-approach presents a strategy for systematic analysis of the mechanisms that limit effective tumor cell killing and the identification of apoptotic vulnerabilities to overcome drug resistance in ovarian and other cancers.High-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGS-OvCa) frequently develop chemotherapy resistance. Here, the authors through a systematic analysis of proteomic and drug response data of 14 HGS-OvCa PDXs demonstrate that targeting apoptosis regulators can improve response of these tumors to inhibitors of the PI3K/mTOR pathway.

  17. [Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and rheumatic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossermelli, W; Pastor, E H

    1995-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) comprise an important class of medicaments that reduced the symptoms of inflamation in rheumatic disease. This article emphasizes similarities and class characteristics of the NSAID, mechanisms of action, and drug-interactions.

  18. Cancer Chemotherapy Specific to Acidic Nests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hiroshi

    2017-04-20

    The realization of cancer therapeutics specific to cancer cells with less of an effect on normal tissues is our goal. Many trials have been carried out for this purpose, but this goal is still far from being realized. It was found more than 80 years ago that solid cancer nests are acidified, but in vitro studies under acidic conditions have not been extensively studied. Recently, in vitro experiments under acidic conditions were started and anti-cancer drugs specific to acidic areas have been identified. Many genes have been reported to be expressed at a high level under acidic conditions, and such genes may be potent targets for anti-cancer drugs specific to acidic nests. In this review article, recent in vitro, in vivo, and clinical achievements in anti-cancer drugs with marked efficacy under acidic conditions are summarized, and the clinical use of anti-cancer drugs specific to acidic nests is discussed.

  19. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  20. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  1. Drugs Approved for Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bladder cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  2. Anti-obesity drugs: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. John Rodgers

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ideal anti-obesity drug would produce sustained weight loss with minimal side effects. The mechanisms that regulate energy balance have substantial built-in redundancy, overlap considerably with other physiological functions, and are influenced by social, hedonic and psychological factors that limit the effectiveness of pharmacological interventions. It is therefore unsurprising that anti-obesity drug discovery programmes have been littered with false starts, failures in clinical development, and withdrawals due to adverse effects that were not fully appreciated at the time of launch. Drugs that target pathways in metabolic tissues, such as adipocytes, liver and skeletal muscle, have shown potential in preclinical studies but none has yet reached clinical development. Recent improvements in the understanding of peptidergic signalling of hunger and satiety from the gastrointestinal tract mediated by ghrelin, cholecystokinin (CCK, peptide YY (PYY and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, and of homeostatic mechanisms related to leptin and its upstream pathways in the hypothalamus, have opened up new possibilities. Although some have now reached clinical development, it is uncertain whether they will meet the strict regulatory hurdles required for licensing of an anti-obesity drug. However, GLP-1 receptor agonists have already succeeded in diabetes treatment and, owing to their attractive body-weight-lowering effects in humans, will perhaps also pave the way for other anti-obesity agents. To succeed in developing drugs that control body weight to the extent seen following surgical intervention, it seems obvious that a new paradigm is needed. In other therapeutic arenas, such as diabetes and hypertension, lower doses of multiple agents targeting different pathways often yield better results than strategies that modify one pathway alone. Some combination approaches using peptides and small molecules have now reached clinical trials, although recent

  3. Emerging Technologies and Generic Assays for the Detection of Anti-Drug Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Partridge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-drug antibodies induced by biologic therapeutics often impact drug pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics response, clinical efficacy, and patient safety. It is critical to assess the immunogenicity risk of potential biotherapeutics in producing neutralizing and nonneutralizing anti-drug antibodies, especially in clinical phases of drug development. Different assay methodologies have been used to detect all anti-drug antibodies, including ELISA, radioimmunoassay, surface plasmon resonance, and electrochemiluminescence-based technologies. The most commonly used method is a bridging assay, performed in an ELISA or on the Meso Scale Discovery platform. In this report, we aim to review the emerging new assay technologies that can complement or address challenges associated with the bridging assay format in screening and confirmation of ADAs. We also summarize generic anti-drug antibody assays that do not require drug-specific reagents for nonclinical studies. These generic assays significantly reduce assay development efforts and, therefore, shorten the assay readiness timeline.

  4. Disulfide-crosslinked nanomicelles confer cancer-specific drug delivery and improve efficacy of paclitaxel in bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Amy; Zhang, Hongyong; Li, Yuanpei; Lin, Tzu-yin; Wang, Fuli; Lee, Joyce; Cheng, Mingshan; Dall'Era, Marc; Li, Tianhong; deVere White, Ralph; Pan, Chong-Xian; Lam, Kit S.

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy commonly used in the treatment of advanced bladder cancer is only moderately effective and associated with significant toxicity. There has been no appreciable improvement in overall survival over the last three decades. The goal of this project is to develop and characterize bladder cancer-specific nanometer-scale micelles loaded with the chemotherapeutic drug paclitaxel (PTX) and determine the anti-tumor activity and toxicity. Micelle-building-material telodendrimers were synthesized through the stepwise conjugation of eight cholic acid units at one terminus of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a bladder cancer-specific targeting peptide named PLZ4 at the other terminus. To synthesize disulfide-crosslinked PLZ4 nanomicelles (DC-PNM), cysteine was introduced between the cholic acid and PEG. DC-PNM-PTX was synthesized through the evaporation method by loading PTX in the core. The loading capacity of PTX in DC-PNM was 25% (W/W). The loading efficiency was over 99%. DC-PNM-PTX was spherical with the median size of 25 nm. The stability of DC-PNM-PTX was determined in a solution containing sodium docecyl sulfate (SDS). It was stable in a SDS solution, but dissolved within 5 min after the addition of glutathione at the physiological intracellular concentration of 10 mM. In vivo targeting and anti-tumor activity were determined in immunodeficient mice carrying patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts (PDXs). After intravenous administration, DC-PNM specifically targeted the bladder cancer PDXs, but very little to the lung cancer xenografts in the same mice (p < 0.001). DC-PNM loaded with PTX overcame cisplatin resistance, and improved the median survival from 55 d with free PTX to 69.5 d (p = 0.03) of mice carrying PDXs. In conclusion, DC-PNM remained stable in the SDS solution, specifically targeted the bladder cancer xenografts in vivo, and improved the anti-cancer efficacy of PTX.

  5. Various anti-motion sickness drugs and core body temperature changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Bob; Nakashima, Ann M; Hofer, Kevin D

    2011-04-01

    Blood flow changes and inactivity associated with motion sickness appear to exacerbate the rate of core temperature decrease during subsequent body cooling. We investigated the effects of various classes of anti-motion sickness drugs on core temperature changes. There were 12 healthy male and female subjects (20-35 yr old) who were given selected classes of anti-motion sickness drugs prior to vestibular Coriolis cross coupling induced by graded yaw rotation and periodic pitch-forward head movements in the sagittal plane. All subjects were then immersed in water at 18 degrees C for a maximum of 90 min or until their core temperature reached 35 degrees C. Double-blind randomized trials were administered, including a placebo, a non-immersion control with no drug, and six anti-motion sickness drugs: meclizine, dimenhydrinate, chlorpheniramine, promethazine + dexamphetamine, promethazine + caffeine, and scopolamine + dexamphetamine. A 7-d washout period was observed between trials. Core temperature and the severity of sickness were monitored throughout each trial. A repeated measures design was performed on the severity of sickness and core temperature changes prior to motion provocation, immediately after the motion sickness end point, and throughout the period of cold-water immersion. The most effective anti-motion sickness drugs, promethazine + dexamphetamine (with a sickness score/duration of 0.65 +/- 0.17) and scopolamine + dexamphetamine (with a sickness score/duration of 0.79 +/- 0.17), significantly attenuated the decrease in core temperature. The effect of this attenuation was lower in less effective drugs. Our results suggest that the two most effective anti-motion sickness drugs are also the most effective in attenuating the rate of core temperature decrease.

  6. Liquid Chromatography - Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry : The gold standard for quantitative bioanalysis of anti-cancer agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vainchtein, L.D.

    2008-01-01

    To understand the pharmacologic mechanisms of action, efficacy and toxicity of any anti-cancer drug it is important to know how the compound is transformed in the body: either into active metabolites or inactive and toxic (degradation) products. This information may lead to the success or failure of

  7. Evidence of vanillin binding to CAMKIV explains the anti-cancer mechanism in human hepatic carcinoma and neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Huma; Tarique, Mohd; Khan, Parvez; Luqman, Suaib; Ahamad, Shahzaib; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2018-01-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr kinase family, and is associated with different types of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Vanillin is a natural compound, a primary component of the extract of the vanilla bean which possesses varieties of pharmacological features including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial and anti-tumor. Here, we have investigated the binding mechanism and affinity of vanillin to the CAMKIV which is being considered as a potential drug target for cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. We found that vanillin binds strongly to the active site cavity of CAMKIV and stabilized by a large number of non-covalent interactions. We explored the utility of vanillin as anti-cancer agent and found that it inhibits the proliferation of human hepatocyte carcinoma (HepG2) and neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, vanillin treatment resulted into the significant reduction in the mitochondrial membrane depolarization and ROS production that eventually leads to apoptosis in HepG2 and SH-SY5Y cancer cells. These findings may offer a novel therapeutic approach by targeting the CAMKIV using natural product and its derivative with a minimal side effect.

  8. Extracellular vesicles as shuttles of tumor biomarkers and anti-tumor drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocco, Davide; Ferruzzi, Pietro; Cappello, Francesco; Kuo, Winston Patrick; Fais, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) include vesicles released by either normal or tumor cells. EV may exceed the nanometric scale (microvesicles), or to be within the nanoscale, also called exosomes. Thus, it appears that only exosomes and larger vesicles may have the size for potential applications in nanomedicine, in either disease diagnosis or therapy. This is of particular interest for research in cancer, also because the vast majority of existing data on EV are coming from pre-clinical and clinical oncology. We know that the microenvironmental features of cancer may favor cell-to-cell paracrine communication through EV, but EV have been purified, characterized, and quantified from plasma of tumor patients as well, thus suggesting that EV may have a role in promoting and maintaining cancer dissemination and progression. These observations are prompting research efforts to evaluate the use of nanovesicles as tumor biomarkers. Moreover, EVs are emerging as natural delivery systems and in particular, exosomes may represent the ideal natural nanoshuttles for new and old anti-tumor drugs. However, much is yet to be understood about the role of EV in oncology and this article aims to discuss the future of EV in cancer on the basis of current knowledge.

  9. The anti-fibrotic agent pirfenidone synergizes with cisplatin in killing tumor cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mediavilla-Varela, Melanie; Boateng, Kingsley; Noyes, David; Antonia, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-fibrotic drugs such as pirfenidone have been developed for the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Because activated fibroblasts in inflammatory conditions have similar characteristics as cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and CAFs contribute actively to the malignant phenotype, we believe that anti-fibrotic drugs have the potential to be repurposed as anti-cancer drugs. The effects of pirfenidone alone and in combination with cisplatin on human patient-derived CAF cell lines and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines were examined. The impact on cell death in vitro as well as tumor growth in a mouse model was determined. Annexin V/PI staining and Western blot analysis were used to characterize cell death. Synergy was assessed with the combination index method using Calcusyn software. Pirfenidone alone induced apoptotic cell death in lung CAFs at a high concentration (1.5 mg/mL). However, co-culture in vitro experiments and co-implantation in vivo experiments showed that the combination of low doses of cisplatin (10 μM) and low doses of pirfenidone (0.5 mg/mL), in both CAFs and tumors, lead to increased cell death and decreased tumor progression, respectively. Furthermore, the combination of cisplatin and pirfenidone in NSCLC cells (A549 and H157 cells) leads to increased apoptosis and synergistic cell death. Our studies reveal for the first time that the combination of cisplatin and pirfenidone is active in preclinical models of NSCLC and therefore may be a new therapeutic approach in this disease. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2162-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  10. Biosimilar Drugs for Cancer Emerge

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the patents on widely used biological drugs to treat cancer expire, biosimilar drugs are being developed for the treatment of patients with cancer. You can learn how biosimilars may expand treatment options in this Cancer Currents blog post.

  11. Factors influencing anti-asthmatic generic drug consumption in Morocco: 1999-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanname, Imane; Ahid, Samir; Berrada, Ghizlane; Belaiche, Abdelmjid; Hassar, Mohammed; Cherrah, Yahia

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of generic drugs (GD) resulted in a remarkable reduction in treatment costs that allowed a better access to health care.The aim of this study is to evaluate the share of anti-asthmatic generic drugs during the period 1999-2010 in Morocco and to look at the factors influencing generic development. In this study, we used Moroccan sales data from IMS Health (Intercontinental Marketing Services). The consumption of the drugs was expressed in DDD/1000 inhabitants/day according to the WHO ATC/DDD methodology. Between 1999 and 2010, anti-asthmatic consumption increased from 3.91 to 14.43 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day. The market of anti-asthmatic generic drugs progressed from 1.83 (47%) to 2.18 (23%) DDD/1000 inhabitants/day from 1999 to 2010. In 2010, inhaled glucocorticosteroids ranked first (0.83 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day), followed by inhaled short acting beta agonists (0.73 DDD/1000 inhabitants/day). The number of brands went from 27 in 1999 to 34 in 2010, with a generic share increasing from 55.55% to 70.59%. The number of anti-asthmatic pharmaceutical preparations increased from 57 to 64 during the same period, of which 31 and 42 were generic preparations. In 2010, the total cost of anti-asthmatic dugs was about 22 million euro, the generics representing 14 million euro. Despite the introduction of a compulsory insurance scheme called "AMO", that allows a refund for 69.5% of anti-asthmatic specialties marketed in Morocco, anti-asthmatic generic drug consumption remains limited. The Moroccan market is still largely dominated by the originator drugs with still valid patents.

  12. Erlotinib augmentation with dapsone for rash mitigation and increased anti-cancer effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, R E

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib has failed in many ways to be as potent in the anti-cancer role as pre-clinical studies would have suggested. This paper traces some aspects of this failure to a compensatory erlotinib-mediated increase in interleukin-8. Many other-but not all- cancer chemotherapeutic cytotoxic drugs also provoke a compensatory increase in a malignant clone's interleukin-8 synthesis. Untreated glioblastoma and other cancer cells themselves natively synthesize interleukin-8. Interleukin-8 has tumor growth promoting, mobility and metastasis formation enhancing, effects as well as pro-angiogenesis effects. The old sulfone antibiotic dapsone- one of the very first antibiotics in clinical use- has demonstrated several interleukin-8 system inhibiting actions. Review of these indicates dapsone has potential to augment erlotinib effectiveness. Erlotinib typically gives a rash that has recently been proven to come about via an erlotinib triggered up-regulated keratinocyte interleukin-8 synthesis. The erlotinib rash shares histological features reminiscent of typical neutrophilic dermatoses. Dapsone has an established therapeutic role in current treatment of other neutrophilic dermatoses. Thus, dapsone has potential to both improve the quality of life in erlotinib treated patients by amelioration of rash as well as to short-circuit a growth-enhancing aspect of erlotinib when used in the anti-cancer role.

  13. Anti-cancer and anti-oxidant efficacies of wild ginseng and cultivated wild ginseng of Korea and China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Min,Ahn

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : The aim of this study was to verify anti-cancer and anti-oxidant efficacies of Korean wild ginseng and cultivated wild ginseng of Korea and China. Methods : For the measurement of anti-oxidation, SOD-like activity was evaluated using xanthine oxidase reduction method under in vitro environment. Subcutaneous and abdominal cancer were induced using CT-26 human colon cancer cells for the measurement of growth inhibition of cancer cells and differences in survival rate. Results : 1. Measurement of anti-oxidant activity of ginseng, Chinese and Korean cultivated wild ginseng, and natural wild ginseng samples showed concentration dependent anti-oxidant activity in HX/XOD system. Anti-oxidant activity showed drastic increase at 1mg/ml in all samples. 2. For the evaluation of growth inhibition of cancer cells after hypodermic implantation of CT-26 cancer cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice, Chinese and Korean cultivated wild ginseng and natural wild ginseng groups showed significant inhibition of tumor growth from the 12th day compared to the control group. Similar inhibitory effects were also shown on the 15th and 18th days. But there was no significant difference between the experiment groups. 3. For the observation of increase in survival rate of the natural wild ginseng group, CT-26 cancer cells were implanted in the peritoneal cavity of mice.

  14. Azithromycin Synergistically Enhances Anti-Proliferative Activity of Vincristine in Cervical and Gastric Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xuezhang; Zhang, Yuyan; Li, Yong; Hao, Xiujing; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Yujiong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the anti-proliferative and anticancer activity of azithromycin (AZM) was examined. In the presence of AZM, cell growth was inhibited more effectively in Hela and SGC-7901 cancer cells, relative to transformed BHK-21 cells. The respective 50% inhibition of cell growth (IC 50 ) values for Hela, SGC-7901 and BHK-21 were 15.66, 26.05 and 91.00 µg/mL at 72 h post incubation, indicative of a selective cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Cell apoptosis analysis using Hoechst nuclear staining and annexin V-FITC binding assay further demonstrated that AZM was capable of inducing apoptosis in both cancer cells and transformed cells. The apoptosis induced by AZM was partly through a caspase-dependent mechanism with an up-regulation of apoptotic protein cleavage PARP and caspase-3 products, as well as a down-regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, Mcl-1, bcl-2 and bcl-X1. More importantly, a combination of AZM and a low dose of the common anti-cancer chemotherapeutic agent vincristine (VCR), produced a selectively synergistic effect on apoptosis of Hela and SGC-7901 cells, but not BHK-21 cells. In the presence of 12.50 μg/mL of VCR, the respective IC 50 values of Hela, SGC-7901 and BHK-21 cells to AZM were reduced to 9.47 µg/mL, 8.43 µg/mL and 40.15 µg/mL at 72 h after the incubation, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of AZM had a selective anti-cancer effect on cancer over transformed cells in vitro. These results imply that AZM may be a potential anticancer agent for use in chemotherapy regimens, and it may minimize side effects via reduction of dosage and enhancing the effectiveness common chemotherapeutic drugs

  15. Novel histone deacetylase inhibitors in clinical trials as anti-cancer agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrillo Richard L

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Histone deacetylases (HDACs can regulate expression of tumor suppressor genes and activities of transcriptional factors involved in both cancer initiation and progression through alteration of either DNA or the structural components of chromatin. Recently, the role of gene repression through modulation such as acetylation in cancer patients has been clinically validated with several inhibitors of HDACs. One of the HDAC inhibitors, vorinostat, has been approved by FDA for treating cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL for patients with progressive, persistent, or recurrent disease on or following two systemic therapies. Other inhibitors, for example, FK228, PXD101, PCI-24781, ITF2357, MGCD0103, MS-275, valproic acid and LBH589 have also demonstrated therapeutic potential as monotherapy or combination with other anti-tumor drugs in CTCL and other malignancies. At least 80 clinical trials are underway, testing more than eleven different HDAC inhibitory agents including both hematological and solid malignancies. This review focuses on recent development in clinical trials testing HDAC inhibitors as anti-tumor agents.

  16. Application of magnetic liposomes for magnetically guided transport of muscle relaxants and anti-cancer photodynamic drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Alyautdin, Renat N.; Torshina, N.L.; Kuznetsov, O.A. E-mail: oleg@louisiana.edu

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic liposomes containing submicron-sized ferromagnetic particles were prepared encapsulating the muscle relaxant drugs, diadony or diperony, for local anesthesia. Alternatively, metal phthalocyanines (Photosense or Teraphthal), sensitizers for photodynamic or catalytic cancer therapy were loaded into the magnetic liposomes. Animal trials demonstrated successful magnetically guided transport of the drug-loaded liposomes.

  17. Application of magnetic liposomes for magnetically guided transport of muscle relaxants and anti-cancer photodynamic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.; Filippov, Victor I.; Alyautdin, Renat N.; Torshina, N.L.; Kuznetsov, O.A.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic liposomes containing submicron-sized ferromagnetic particles were prepared encapsulating the muscle relaxant drugs, diadony or diperony, for local anesthesia. Alternatively, metal phthalocyanines (Photosense or Teraphthal), sensitizers for photodynamic or catalytic cancer therapy were loaded into the magnetic liposomes. Animal trials demonstrated successful magnetically guided transport of the drug-loaded liposomes

  18. Targeted delivery of anti-tuberculosis drugs to macrophages: targeting mannose receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatova, L. Yu; Klyachko, N. L.; Kudryashova, E. V.

    2018-04-01

    The development of systems for targeted delivery of anti-tuberculosis drugs is a challenge of modern biotechnology. Currently, these drugs are encapsulated in a variety of carriers such as liposomes, polymers, emulsions and so on. Despite successful in vitro testing of these systems, virtually no success was achieved in vivo, because of low accessibility of the foci of infection located in alveolar macrophage cells. A promising strategy for increasing the efficiency of therapeutic action of anti-tuberculosis drugs is to encapsulate the agents into mannosylated carriers targeting the mannose receptors of alveolar macrophages. The review addresses the methods for modification of drug substance carriers, such as liposomes and biodegradable polymers, with mannose residues. The use of mannosylated carriers to deliver anti-tuberculosis agents increases the drug circulation time in the blood stream and increases the drug concentration in alveolar macrophage cells. The bibliography includes 113 references.

  19. Tocopheryl pullulan-based self assembling nanomicelles for anti-cancer drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingyun, E-mail: wangjingyun67@dlut.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Cui, Shuang [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Bao, Yongming, E-mail: biosci@dlut.edu.cn [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Xing, Jishuang [School of Life Science and Biotechnology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Hao, Wenbo [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Heihe University, Heihe 164300 (China)

    2014-10-01

    Amphiphilic α-tocopherol pullulan polymers (PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3) with different degrees of substitution were synthesized as new carriers for anticancer drugs. The polymers easily self-assembled into nanomicelles through dialysis method. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) were 38.0, 8.0, and 4.3 mg/L for PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3, respectively. 10-Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) used as a model drug was successfully loaded into the PUTC nanomicelles. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that HCPT-loaded PUTC nanomicelles were almost spherical and had sizes ranging within 171.5–257.8 nm that increased with increased HCPT-loading content, as determined by dynamic laser scattering. The highest encapsulation efficiency of HCPT in PUTC nanomicelles reached 98.3%. The in vitro release of HCPT from PUTC micelles demonstrated sustained release for over 80 h. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assays showed that blank PUTC micelles were nontoxic to normal cells and that the HCPT-loaded PUTC2 nanomicelles showed higher cytotoxicity than the free drug, which was attributed to the enhanced cellular uptake of drug-loaded nanomicelles. Biodistribution experiments showed that PUTC micelles provided an excellent approach to rapid drug transport into cell nuclei. Moreover, the cellular uptake of micelles was found to be an energy-dependent and actin polymerization-associated endocytic process by endocytosis inhibition experiments. These results suggested that PUTC nanomicelles had considerable potential as a drug carrier for drug intracellular delivery in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Tocopheryl pullulan-based (PUTC) self-assembling nanomicelles were fabricated. • These micelles showed low CMC and dispersed uniformly with regular spherical shape. • High entrapment efficiency and in vitro sustained release of HCPT in PUTC micelles • HCPT–PUTC micelles accumulated in cell nuclei and showed higher anticancer activity.

  20. Tocopheryl pullulan-based self assembling nanomicelles for anti-cancer drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jingyun; Cui, Shuang; Bao, Yongming; Xing, Jishuang; Hao, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    Amphiphilic α-tocopherol pullulan polymers (PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3) with different degrees of substitution were synthesized as new carriers for anticancer drugs. The polymers easily self-assembled into nanomicelles through dialysis method. The critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) were 38.0, 8.0, and 4.3 mg/L for PUTC1, PUTC2, and PUTC3, respectively. 10-Hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT) used as a model drug was successfully loaded into the PUTC nanomicelles. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that HCPT-loaded PUTC nanomicelles were almost spherical and had sizes ranging within 171.5–257.8 nm that increased with increased HCPT-loading content, as determined by dynamic laser scattering. The highest encapsulation efficiency of HCPT in PUTC nanomicelles reached 98.3%. The in vitro release of HCPT from PUTC micelles demonstrated sustained release for over 80 h. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assays showed that blank PUTC micelles were nontoxic to normal cells and that the HCPT-loaded PUTC2 nanomicelles showed higher cytotoxicity than the free drug, which was attributed to the enhanced cellular uptake of drug-loaded nanomicelles. Biodistribution experiments showed that PUTC micelles provided an excellent approach to rapid drug transport into cell nuclei. Moreover, the cellular uptake of micelles was found to be an energy-dependent and actin polymerization-associated endocytic process by endocytosis inhibition experiments. These results suggested that PUTC nanomicelles had considerable potential as a drug carrier for drug intracellular delivery in cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Tocopheryl pullulan-based (PUTC) self-assembling nanomicelles were fabricated. • These micelles showed low CMC and dispersed uniformly with regular spherical shape. • High entrapment efficiency and in vitro sustained release of HCPT in PUTC micelles • HCPT–PUTC micelles accumulated in cell nuclei and showed higher anticancer activity.

  1. Fertility drugs and cancer: a guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Methodological limitations in studying the association between the use of fertility drugs and cancer include the inherent increased risk of cancer in women who never conceive, the low incidence of most of these cancers, and that the age of diagnosis of cancer typically is many years after fertility drug use. Based on available data, there does not appear to be a meaningful increased risk of invasive ovarian cancer, breast cancer, or endometrial cancer following the use of fertility drugs. Several studies have shown a small increased risk of borderline ovarian tumors; however, there is insufficient consistent evidence that a particular fertility drug increases the risk of borderline ovarian tumors, and any absolute risk is small. Given the available literature, patients should be counseled that infertile women may be at an increased risk of invasive ovarian, endometrial, and breast cancer; however, use of fertility drugs does not appear to increase this risk. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Dual Drug Loaded Biodegradable Nanofibrous Microsphere for Improving Anti-Colon Cancer Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rangrang; Li, Xiaoling; Deng, Jiaojiao; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Liangxue; Zheng, Yu; Tong, Aiping; Zhang, Xiaoning; You, Chao; Guo, Gang

    2016-06-01

    One of the approaches being explored to increase antitumor activity of chemotherapeutics is to inject drug-loaded microspheres locally to specific anatomic sites, providing for a slow, long term release of a chemotherapeutic while minimizing systemic exposure. However, the used clinically drug carriers available at present have limitations, such as their low stability, renal clearance and residual surfactant. Here, we report docetaxel (DOC) and curcumin (CUR) loaded nanofibrous microspheres (DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres), self-assembled from biodegradable PLA-PEO-PPO-PEO-PLA polymers as an injectable drug carrier without adding surfactant during the emulsification process. The obtained nanofibrous microspheres are composed entirely of nanofibers and have an open hole on the shell without the assistance of a template. It was shown that these DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres could release curcumin and docetaxel slowly in vitro. The slow, sustained release of curcumin and docetaxel in vivo may help maintain local concentrations of active drug. The mechanism by which DOC + CUR/nanofibrous microspheres inhibit colorectal peritoneal carcinomatosis might involve increased induction of apoptosis in tumor cells and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. In vitro and in vivo evaluations demonstrated efficacious synergistic antitumor effects against CT26 of curcumin and docetaxel combined nanofibrous microspheres. In conclusion, the dual drug loaded nanofibrous microspheres were considered potentially useful for treating abdominal metastases of colorectal cancer.

  3. Colloidal silver nanoparticles improve anti-leukemic drug efficacy via amplification of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Junren; Huang, Zhihai; Jiang, Shanxiang; Gu, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Recently, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and altered redox status in cancer cells have become a novel therapeutic strategy to improve cancer selectivity over normal cells. It has been known that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) display anti-leukemic activity via ROS overproduction. Hence, we hypothesized that AgNPs could improve therapeutic efficacy of ROS-generating agents against leukemia cells. In the current study, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR), a synthetic retinoid, was used as a drug model of ROS induction to investigate its synergistic effect with AgNPs. The data exhibited that AgNPs with uniform size prepared by an electrochemical method could localize in the lysosomes, mitochondria and cytoplasm of SHI-1 cells. More importantly, AgNPs together with 4-HPR could exhibit more cytotoxicity and apoptosis via overproduction of ROS in comparison with that alone. Taken together, these results reveal that AgNPs combined with ROS-generating drugs could potentially enhance therapeutic efficacy against leukemia cells, thereby providing a novel strategy for AgNPs in leukemia therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of chronic aspirin on brain arachidonic acid metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basselin, Mireille; Ramadan, Epolia; Chen, Mei; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2010-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators derived from arachidonic acid (AA) modulate peripheral inflammation and its resolution. Aspirin (ASA) is a unique non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, which switches AA metabolism from prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and 15-epi-LXA4. However it is unknown whether chronic therapeutic doses of ASA are anti-inflammatory in the brain. We hypothesized that ASA would dampen increases in brain concentrations of AA metabolites in a rat model of neuroinflammation, produced by a 6-day intracerebroventricular infusion of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In rats infused with LPS (0.5 ng/h) and given ASA-free water to drink, concentrations in high-energy microwaved brain of PGE2, TXB2 and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were elevated. In rats infused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid, 6 weeks of treatment with a low (10 mg/kg/day) or high (100 mg/kg/day) ASA dose in drinking water decreased brain PGE2, but increased LTB4, LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 concentrations. Both doses attenuated the LPS effects on PGE2, and TXB2. The increments in LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 caused by high-dose ASA were significantly greater in LPS-infused rats. The ability of ASA to increase anti-inflammatory LXA4 and 15-epi-LXA4 and reduce pro-inflammatory PGE2 and TXB2 suggests considering aspirin further for treating clinical neuroinflammation. PMID:20981485

  5. Urinary excretion of platinum, arsenic and selenium of cancer patients from the Antofagasta region in Chile treated with platinum-based drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Román Domingo A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic exposure increases the risk of non-cancerous and cancerous diseases. In the Antofagasta region in Chile, an established relationship exists between arsenic exposure and the risk of cancer of the bladder, lung and skin. Platinum-based drugs are first-line treatments, and many works recognise selenium as a cancer-fighting nutrient. We characterised the short-term urinary excretion amounts of arsenic, selenium and platinum in 24-h urine samples from patients with lung cancer and those with cancer other than lung treated with cisplatin or/and carboplatin. As - Se - Pt inter-element relationships were also investigated. Results The amounts of platinum excreted in urine were not significantly different between patients with lung cancer and those with other cancers treated with cisplatin, despite the significant variation in platinum amounts supplied from platinum-based drugs. In general, the analytical amounts of excreted selenium were greater than those for arsenic, which could imply that platinum favours the excretion of selenium. For other types of cancers treated with drugs without platinum, excretion of selenium was also greater than that of arsenic, suggesting an antagonist selenium-anti-cancer drug relationship. Conclusions Regards the baseline status of patients, the analytical amounts of excreted Se is greater than those for As, particularly, for cisplatin chemotherapy. This finding could imply that for over the As displacement Pt favours the excretion of Se. The analytical amounts of excreted Se were greater than those for As, either with and without Pt-containing drugs, suggesting an antagonist Se-anti-cancer drug relationship. However, it seemed that differences existed between As - Se - Pt inter-element associations in patients treated for lung cancer in comparison with those treated for cancer other than lung. Therefore, knowledge obtained in this work, can contribute to understanding the arsenic cancer

  6. Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of continuously infused nitroimidazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eifel, P.J.; Brown, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and toxicology of misonidazole (MISO) and SR-2508 given by continuous intraperitoneal infusion were studied in female C 3 H mice. The survival (time to death) of animals receiving continuous infusions of SR-2508 and MISO was compared and related to plasma concentration, rate of infusion and total amount of drug delivered. Brain and plasma concentrations were determined by HPLC. For SR-2508, plasma concentration was directly proportional to the infusion rate. However, as the infusion rate of MISO was doubled, the plasma concentration of MISO increased approximately 6-fold, reflecting a substantial increase in the apparent half-life. The brain/plasma concentration ratio in animals infused for up to 6 days with SR-2508 remained constant, at approximately 0.09. At plasma concentrations of 0.08-1.5 mM, animals receiving SR-2508 survived approximately 3 times as long as animals exposed to a comparable plasma concentration of MISO. Even at the lowest infusion rates employed in this study, the survival of mice receiving SR-2508 was much shorter than would have been predicted if the toxicity of these two drugs were solely related to the integral brain exposure. The low brain/plasma concentration ratio of SR-2508 was maintained throughout long continuous exposures

  7. Texosome-based drug delivery system for cancer therapy: from past to present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoodzadeh Hosseini, Hamideh; Halabian, Raheleh; Amin, Mohsen; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali

    2015-01-01

    Rising worldwide cancer incidence and resistance to current anti-cancer drugs necessitate the need for new pharmaceutical compounds and drug delivery system. Malfunction of the immune system, particularly in the tumor microenvironment, causes tumor growth and enhances tumor progression. Thus, cancer immunotherapy can be an appropriate approach to provoke the systemic immune system to combat tumor expansion. Texosomes, which are endogenous nanovesicles released by all tumor cells, contribute to cell-cell communication and modify the phenotypic features of recipient cells due to the texosomes’ ability to transport biological components. For this reason, texosome-based delivery system can be a valuable strategy for therapeutic purposes. To improve the pharmaceutical behavior of this system and to facilitate its use in medical applications, biotechnology approaches and mimetic techniques have been utilized. In this review, we present the development history of texosome-based delivery systems and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each system

  8. Fluorouracil continuous infusion plus alfa interferon plus oral folinic acid in advanced colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, C. J.; de Mulder, P. H.; Burghouts, J. T.; Wagener, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Several reports on fluorouracil (5-FU) and alfa interferon (IFN-alpha) combination therapy in patients with advanced colorectal cancer have been published. In our study high-dose continuous infusion 5-FU (60 mg/kg per 48 hours), oral folinic acid (FA) (8 x 90 mg during 5-FU), and IFN-alpha three

  9. The role of miRNA regulation in cancer progression and drug resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Tejal

    RNAs in the context of cancer biology, drug resistance and disease progression. The first project described in Chapter 6 addresses the problem of tamoxifen resistance, an anti-estrogen drug that is generally highly effective in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancers. The underlying molecular mechanisms...... to the disease transformation. In summary, this thesis focuses on regulatory role of miRNAs in drug resistance and disease progression. The findings provide hints toward various biologically and perhaps therapeutically relevant gene regulatory events. This thesis demonstrates the right choice of data analysis...... for the acquired resistance to tamoxifen are not very well understood. Therefore, with the aid of miRNA and gene expression profiles for MCF7/S0.5 (tamoxifen sensitive) and three MCF7/S0.5 derived tamoxifen resistant cell lines, we obtained several miRNA-mediated regulatory events in the tamoxifen resistant cell...

  10. Financial Burden of Cancer Drug Treatment in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Fadia; Khuri, Fadlo R; Adib, Salim M; Karam, Rita; Harb, Hilda; Awar, May; Zalloua, Pierre; Ammar, Walid

    2016-01-01

    The Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) in Lebanon provides cancer drugs free of charge for uninsured patients who account for more than half the total caseload. Other categories of cancer care are subsidized under more stringent eligibility criteria. MOPH's large database offers an excellent opportunity to analyze the cost of cancer treatment in Lebanon. Using utilization and spending data accumulated at MOPH during 20082013, the cost to the public budget of cancer drugs was assessed per case and per drug type. The average annual cost of cancer drugs was 6,475$ per patient. Total cancer drug costs were highest for breast cancer, followed by chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and NonHodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), which together represented 74% of total MOPH cancer drug expenditure. The annual average cancer drug cost per case was highest for CML ($31,037), followed by NHL ($11,566). Trastuzumab represented 26% and Imatinib 15% of total MOPH cancer drug expenditure over six years. Sustained increase in cancer drug cost threatens the sustainability of MOPH coverage, so crucial for socially vulnerable citizens. To enhance the bargaining position with pharmaceutical firms for drug cost containment in a small market like Lebanon, drug price comparisons with neighboring countries which have already obtained lower prices may succeed in lowering drug costs.

  11. Understanding Infusion Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Jeff E

    2018-04-01

    Infusion systems are complicated electromechanical systems that are used to deliver anesthetic drugs with moderate precision. Four types of systems are described-gravity feed, in-line piston, peristaltic, and syringe. These systems are subject to a number of failure modes-occlusion, disconnection, siphoning, infiltration, and air bubbles. The relative advantages of the various systems and some of the monitoring capabilities are discussed. A brief example of the use of an infusion system during anesthetic induction is presented. With understanding of the functioning of these systems, users may develop greater comfort.

  12. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  13. InFusion: Advancing Discovery of Fusion Genes and Chimeric Transcripts from Deep RNA-Sequencing Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Okonechnikov

    Full Text Available Analysis of fusion transcripts has become increasingly important due to their link with cancer development. Since high-throughput sequencing approaches survey fusion events exhaustively, several computational methods for the detection of gene fusions from RNA-seq data have been developed. This kind of analysis, however, is complicated by native trans-splicing events, the splicing-induced complexity of the transcriptome and biases and artefacts introduced in experiments and data analysis. There are a number of tools available for the detection of fusions from RNA-seq data; however, certain differences in specificity and sensitivity between commonly used approaches have been found. The ability to detect gene fusions of different types, including isoform fusions and fusions involving non-coding regions, has not been thoroughly studied yet. Here, we propose a novel computational toolkit called InFusion for fusion gene detection from RNA-seq data. InFusion introduces several unique features, such as discovery of fusions involving intergenic regions, and detection of anti-sense transcription in chimeric RNAs based on strand-specificity. Our approach demonstrates superior detection accuracy on simulated data and several public RNA-seq datasets. This improved performance was also evident when evaluating data from RNA deep-sequencing of two well-established prostate cancer cell lines. InFusion identified 26 novel fusion events that were validated in vitro, including alternatively spliced gene fusion isoforms and chimeric transcripts that include intergenic regions. The toolkit is freely available to download from http:/bitbucket.org/kokonech/infusion.

  14. Treating tuberculosis with high doses of anti-TB drugs: mechanisms and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuhui; Wu, Jianan; Liao, Sha; Sun, Zhaogang

    2017-10-03

    Tuberculosis (TB) is considered as one of the most serious threats to public health in many parts of the world. The threat is even more severe in the developing countries where there is a lack of advanced medical amenities and contemporary anti-TB drugs. In such situations, dosage optimization of existing medication regimens seems to be the only viable option. Therapeutic drug monitoring study results suggest that high-dose treatment regimens can compensate the low serum concentration of anti-TB drugs and shorten the therapy duration. The article presents a critical review on the possible changes that occur in the host and the pathogen upon the administration of standard and high-dose regimens. Some of the most common factors that are responsible for low anti-TB drug concentrations in the serum are differences in hosts' body weight, metabolic processing of the drug, malabsorption and/or drug-drug interaction. Furthermore, failure to reach the cavitary pulmonary and extrapulmonary tissues also contributes to the therapeutic inefficiency of the drugs. In such conditions, administration of higher doses can help in compensating the pathogenic outcomes of enhancement of the pathogen's physical barriers, efflux pumps and genetic mutations. The present article also presents a summary of the recorded treatment outcomes of clinical trials that were conducted to test the efficacy of administration of high dose of anti-tuberculosis drugs. This review will help physicians across the globe to understand the underlying pathophysiological changes (including side effects) that dictate the clinical outcomes in patients administered with standard and/or high dose anti-TB drugs.

  15. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and the risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manthripragada, Angelika D; Schernhammer, Eva S; Qiu, Jiaheng

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD).......Experimental evidence supports a preventative role for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD)....

  16. The efficacy of superselective intra-arterial infusion in patients with T4 oral cancer. Comparison with conventional chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakaki, Keiichi; Arasaki, Akira; Kano, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Since 1985, we have applied systematic treatment to improve radicality and postoperative oral dysfunction, as well as maxillofacial deformity. However, most T4 cases of oral cancer have remained difficult to treat, and diverse methods and results for progressive cancer have been reported by many institutions. For high-grade malignancy cases, we changed the treatment from bleomycin or cisplatin in induction chemotherapy to targeted intra-arterial infusions of carboplatin with radiation-combined therapy. In this study, we compared the effects of conventional therapy with targeted intra-arterial infusions of carboplatin for T4 cases of oral cancer. In this retrospective review, we analyzed a subset of patients who were treated with induction chemotherapy using bleomycin (BLM) and targeted intra-arterial infusions of carboplatin (CBDCA) with radiation-combined therapy patients who received treatment between June 1985 and December 2006. Of the 105 patients who had T4 disease, the proportion with grade IIb to IV in the carboplatin with radiation-combined therapy (88.9%) was higher than that in induction chemotherapy (45.0%). Targeted chemoradiation therapy followed by surgical salvage is a highly effective approach for the regional control of patients with T4, although additional strategies are required to address the problem of distant metastases. (author)

  17. Evaluation of the toxic effects of four anti-cancer drugs in plant bioassays and its potency for screening in the context of waste water reuse for irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutterbeck, Carlos Alexandre; Kern, Deivid Ismael; Machado, Ênio Leandro; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Anti-cancer drugs are compounds that are of high environmental relevance because of their lack of specific mode of action. They can be extremely harmful to living organisms even at low concentrations. The present study evaluated the toxic effects of four frequently used anti-cancer drugs against plant seedlings, namely Cyclophosphamide (CP), Methotrexate (MTX), 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Imatinib (IM). The phytotoxicity experiments were performed with Lactuca sativa seedlings whereas cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and mutagenicity investigations were performed with the well-established Allium cepa assays. MTX was the most phytotoxic compound, followed by 5-FU, CP and IM. Significant differences in the Mitotic Indexes (MI) were observed in three of the studied compounds (MTX, 5-FU and CP), indicating potential cytotoxic activity of these substances. Chromosome aberrations were registered in cells that were exposed to 5-FU, CP and IM. All the four compounds caused the formation of micronucleated cells indicating mutagenic potential. Besides, the assays performed with MTX samples presented a high number of cell apoptosis (cell death). Although it is unlikely that the pharmaceuticals concentrations measured in the environment could cause lethal effects in plants, the obtained results indicate that these compounds may affect the growth and normal development of these plants. So, both tests can constitute important tools for a fast screening of environmental contamination e.g. in the context of the reuse of treated wastewater and biosolids of agricultural purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Proton pump inhibitors while belonging to the same family of generic drugs show different anti-tumor effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugini, Luana; Federici, Cristina; Borghi, Martina; Azzarito, Tommaso; Marino, Maria Lucia; Cesolini, Albino; Spugnini, Enrico Pierluigi; Fais, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    Tumor acidity represents a major cause of chemoresistance. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) can neutralize tumor acidity, sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapy. To compare the anti-tumor efficacy of different PPIs in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments PPIs anti-tumor efficacy in terms of cell proliferation and cell death/apoptosis/necrosis evaluation were performed. In vivo PPIs efficacy experiments were carried out using melanoma xenograft model in SCID mice. Lansoprazole showed higher anti-tumor effect when compared to the other PPIs. The lansoprazole effect lasted even upon drug removal from the cell culture medium and it was independent from the lipophilicity of the PPIs formulation. These PPIs have shown different anti-tumoral efficacy, and the most effective at low dose was lansoprazole. The possibility to contrast tumor acidity by off-label using PPIs opens a new field of oncology investigation.

  19. Anti-influenza drugs: the development of sialidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Itzstein, Mark; Thomson, Robin

    2009-01-01

    Viruses, particularly those that are harmful to humans, are the 'silent terrorists' of the twenty-first century. Well over four million humans die per annum as a result of viral infections alone. The scourge of influenza virus has plagued mankind throughout the ages. The fact that new viral strains emerge on a regular basis, particularly out of Asia, establishes a continual socio-economic threat to mankind. The arrival of the highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 heightened the threat of a potential human pandemic to the point where many countries have put in place 'preparedness plans' to defend against such an outcome. The discovery of the first designer influenza virus sialidase inhibitor and anti-influenza drug Relenza, and subsequently Tamiflu, has now inspired a number of continuing efforts towards the discovery of next generation anti-influenza drugs. Such drugs may act as 'first-line-of-defence' against the spread of influenza infection and buy time for necessary vaccine development particularly in a human pandemic setting. Furthermore, the fact that influenza virus can develop resistance to therapeutics makes these continuing efforts extremely important. An overview of the role of the virus-associated glycoprotein sialidase (neuraminidase) and some of the most recent developments towards the discovery of anti-influenza drugs based on the inhibition of influenza virus sialidase is provided in this chapter.

  20. A Novel Solubility-Enhanced Rubusoside-Based Micelles for Increased Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meiying; Dai, Tongcheng; Feng, Nianping

    2017-04-01

    Many anti-cancer drugs have a common problem of poor solubility. Increasing the solubility of the drugs is very important for its clinical applications. In the present study, we revealed that the solubility of insoluble drugs was significantly enhanced by adding rubusoside (RUB). Further, it was demonstrated that RUB could form micelles, which was well characterized by Langmuir monolayer investigation, transmission electron microscopy, atomic-force microscopy, and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. The RUB micelles were ellipsoid with the horizontal distance of 25 nm and vertical distance of 1.2 nm. Insoluble synergistic anti-cancer drugs including curcumin and resveratrol were loaded in RUB to form anti-cancer micelles RUB/CUR + RES. MTT assay showed that RUB/CUR + RES micelles had more significant toxicity on MCF-7 cells compared to RUB/CUR micelles + RUB/RES micelles. More importantly, it was confirmed that RUB could load other two insoluble drugs together for remarkably enhanced anti-cancer effect compared to that of RUB/one drug + RUB/another drug. Overall, we concluded that RUB-based micelles could efficiently load insoluble drugs for enhanced anti-cancer effect.

  1. Designed Synthesis of Nanostructured Magnetic Hydroxyapatite Based Drug Nanocarrier for Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery toward the Treatment of Human Epidermoid Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Govindan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles on hydroxyapatite nanorod based nanostructures (Fe3O4/HAp were synthesized using hydrothermal techniques at 180 °C for 12 h and were used as drug delivery nanocarriers for cancer cell therapeutic applications. The synthesized Fe3O4/HAp nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET-analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM. The morphologies of the Fe3O4/HAp nanocomposites show 15 nm Fe3O4 nanoparticles dispersed in the form of rods. The BET result shows that the synthesized samples have a high specific surface area of 80 m2 g−1 with mesoporous structures. Magnetic measurements revealed that the sample has high saturation magnetization of 18 emu/g with low coercivity. The Fe3O4/HAp nanocomposites had a large specific surface area (SSA, high mesoporous volume, and good magnetic property, which made it a suitable nanocarrier for targeted drug delivery systems. The chemotherapeutic agent, andrographolide, was used to investigate the drug delivery behavior of the Fe3O4/HAp nanocomposites. The human epidermoid skin cancer cells (A431 were used as the model targeting cell lines by treating with andrographolide loaded Fe3O4/HAp nanosystems and were further evaluated for their antiproliferative activities and the induction of apoptosis. Also, the present nanocomposite shows better biocompatibility, therefore it can be used as suitable drug vehicle for cancer therapy applications.

  2. Potential Anti-Cancer Activities and Mechanisms of Costunolide and Dehydrocostuslactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejing Lin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Costunolide (CE and dehydrocostuslactone (DE are derived from many species of medicinal plants, such as Saussurea lappa Decne and Laurus nobilis L. They have been reported for their wide spectrum of biological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antimicrobial, antifungal, antioxidant, antidiabetic, antiulcer, and anthelmintic activities. In recent years, they have caused extensive interest in researchers due to their potential anti-cancer activities for various types of cancer, and their anti-cancer mechanisms, including causing cell cycle arrest, inducing apoptosis and differentiation, promoting the aggregation of microtubule protein, inhibiting the activity of telomerase, inhibiting metastasis and invasion, reversing multidrug resistance, restraining angiogenesis has been studied. This review will summarize anti-cancer activities and associated molecular mechanisms of these two compounds for the purpose of promoting their research and application.

  3. Quantum-Dot-Based Theranostic Micelles Conjugated with an Anti-EGFR Nanobody for Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuyuan; Wang, Yidan; Chen, Guojun; Li, Yitong; Xu, Wei; Gong, Shaoqin

    2017-09-13

    A quantum-dot (QD)-based micelle conjugated with an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobody (Nb) and loaded with an anticancer drug, aminoflavone (AF), has been engineered for EGFR-overexpressing cancer theranostics. The near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence of the indium phosphate core/zinc sulfide shell QDs (InP/ZnS QDs) allowed for in vivo nanoparticle biodistribution studies. The anti-EGFR nanobody 7D12 conjugation improved the cellular uptake and cytotoxicity of the QD-based micelles in EGFR-overexpressing MDA-MB-468 triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. In comparison with the AF-encapsulated nontargeted (i.e., without Nb conjugation) micelles, the AF-encapsulated Nb-conjugated (i.e., targeted) micelles accumulated in tumors at higher concentrations, leading to more effective tumor regression in an orthotopic triple-negative breast cancer xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, there was no systemic toxicity observed with the treatments. Thus, this QD-based Nb-conjugated micelle may serve as an effective theranostic nanoplatform for EGFR-overexpressing cancers such as TNBCs.

  4. Addressing Cancer Drug Costs and Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    The President’s Cancer Panel has released its latest report, Promoting Value, Affordability, and Innovation in Cancer Drug Treatment. The report recommends six actions to maximize the value and affordability of cancer drug treatment.

  5. Glucose and urea kinetics in patients with early and advanced gastrointestinal cancer: the response to glucose infusion, parenteral feeding, and surgical resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, J.H.; Wolfe, R.R.

    1987-01-01

    We isotopically determined rates of glucose turnover, urea turnover, and glucose oxidation in normal volunteers (n = 16), patients with early gastrointestinal (EGI) cancer (n = 6), and patients with advanced gastrointestinal (AGI) cancer (n = 10). Studies were performed in the basal state, during glucose infusion (4 mg/kg/min), and during total parenteral feeding (patients with AGI cancer only). Patients with early stages of the disease were also studied 2 to 3 months after resection of the cancer. Basal rates of glucose turnover were similar in volunteers and in patients with EGI cancer (13.9 +/- 0.3 mumol/kg/min and 13.3 +/- 0.2 mumol/kg/min, respectively) but were significantly higher in patients with AGI cancer (17.6 +/- 1.4 mumol/kg/min). Glucose infusion resulted in significantly less suppression of endogenous production in both patient groups than that seen in the volunteers (76% +/- 6% for EGI group, 69% +/- 7% for AGI group, and 94% +/- 4% for volunteers). The rate of glucose oxidation increased progressively in proportion to the tumor bulk. In the volunteers the percent of VCO2 from glucose oxidation was 23.9% +/- 0.7%, and in EGI and AGI groups the values were 32.8% +/- 2.0% and 43.0% +/- 3.0%, respectively. After curative resection of the cancer, glucose utilization decreased significantly (p less than 0.05). The rate of urea turnover was significantly higher in the AGI group (8.4 +/- 1.0 mumol/kg/min) in comparison with the volunteer group value of 5.9 +/- 0.6 mumol/kg/min (p less than 0.03). Glucose infusion resulted in a significant suppression of urea turnover in the volunteers (p less than 0.02), but in the AGI group glucose infusion did not induce a statistically significant decrease

  6. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Hayashi, Yasushi [Nagoya Second Red Cross Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-03-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m{sup 2}) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  7. Preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Shigetomi, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-eight patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intraarterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy) and chemotherapy using CBDCA (total dose: 460 mg/m 2 ) were performed daily, followed by surgery. Catheter-insertion of 34 patients was done successfully. Four catheter insertions were not done successfully because of the anomaly of the artery such as common trunk of the lingual artery and the facial artery. The clinical effects were CR in 9 patients (26.5%) and PR in 25 (73.5%), and histopathological effects after surgery were grade III, IV in 10 (29.4%), grade IIb in 23 (67.6%), and grade IIa in 2 (5.8%). The 5-year cumulative survival rate was 67.8%. This superselective intra arterial infusion method could be the technique of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  8. Regression of sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumour following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara Yoshinori

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desmoid tumours or fibromatoses are rare entities characterized by the benign proliferation of fibroblasts, which can be life-threatening due to their locally aggressive properties. Surgery is widely accepted as the first line of treatment for extra-abdominal desmoids; however, it is not recommended for intra-abdominal desmoids because of the high-risk of recurrence and difficulties with the operation. Here, we report on a patient with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours, who showed partial response following the intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Case presentation A 73-year-old man presented with swelling and pain of the right leg. Computed tomography showed an abnormal multilocular soft-tissue mass (95 × 70 mm in the right pelvis, which was revealed by biopsy to be a desmoid tumour. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the tumour cells expressed vimentin, but not smooth-muscle actin, CD34, or desmin. Very few Ki-67-positive cells were found. Non-cytotoxic treatment with etodolac (200 mg/day was chosen because of the patient's age, lack of bowel obstruction, and the likelihood of prostate cancer. Two years after the commencement of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, computed tomography showed a decrease in tumour size (63 × 49 mm, and the disappearance of intratumoural septa. Conclusion Our case report suggests that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment should be taken into consideration for use as first-line treatment in patients with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours.

  9. Regression of sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumour following administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keita; Yoshikawa, Reigetsu; Yanagi, Hidenori; Gega, Makoto; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Hashimoto-Tamaoki, Tomoko; Hirota, Syozo; Tsujimura, Tohru; Tomita, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Background Desmoid tumours or fibromatoses are rare entities characterized by the benign proliferation of fibroblasts, which can be life-threatening due to their locally aggressive properties. Surgery is widely accepted as the first line of treatment for extra-abdominal desmoids; however, it is not recommended for intra-abdominal desmoids because of the high-risk of recurrence and difficulties with the operation. Here, we report on a patient with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours, who showed partial response following the intake of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Case presentation A 73-year-old man presented with swelling and pain of the right leg. Computed tomography showed an abnormal multilocular soft-tissue mass (95 × 70 mm) in the right pelvis, which was revealed by biopsy to be a desmoid tumour. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the tumour cells expressed vimentin, but not smooth-muscle actin, CD34, or desmin. Very few Ki-67-positive cells were found. Non-cytotoxic treatment with etodolac (200 mg/day) was chosen because of the patient's age, lack of bowel obstruction, and the likelihood of prostate cancer. Two years after the commencement of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, computed tomography showed a decrease in tumour size (63 × 49 mm), and the disappearance of intratumoural septa. Conclusion Our case report suggests that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug treatment should be taken into consideration for use as first-line treatment in patients with sporadic intra-abdominal desmoid tumours. PMID:18257933

  10. Using higher doses to compensate for tubing residuals in extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy J; Bhowmick, Tanaya; Gross, Alan; Vanschooneveld, Trevor C; Weinstein, Melvin P

    2013-06-01

    To mathematically assess drug losses due to infusion line residuals and evaluate methods to compensate for drug loss due to residual volumes in intravenous pump tubing. Literature was accessed through Ovid MEDLINE (1996-February 2013), using combinations of the search terms tubing residuals, residual volume, residual medication, intravenous infusions, intravenous injections, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, β-lactams, equipment design, infusion pumps, extended infusion, extended administration, and prolonged infusion. In addition, select reference citations from publications identified were reviewed. All articles that involved extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam implementation strategies were included in the review. Infusion pump characteristics and tubing residuals can affect extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam dosing strategies. Two studies addressing tubing residuals were identified. Both studies recommended increasing infusion volumes to compensate for tubing residuals. One study also recommended decreasing infusion-line dead space by using alternative infusion pump systems. Study calculations suggest that higher doses of piperacillin-tazobactam may be used to account for medication left in tubing residuals if alternative infusion pump systems cannot be obtained, and increased infusion volumes are not an option. Extended-infusion piperacillin-tazobactam has been used as a method of maximizing pharmacodynamic target attainment. Use of higher doses of piperacillin-tazobactam may be a reasonable method to compensate for drug loss due to residual volumes in large-bore intravenous pump tubing.

  11. Adherence to anti-retroviral drugs in pregnant and lactating HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anti-retroviral drugs reduce morbidity and mortality due to HIV and prevent transmission from mother to child. But compliance on anti-retroviral treatment is an essential element for the success of therapeutic goals. Objective: To assess the level of compliance of anti-retroviral treatment in pregnant and lactating ...

  12. Synthesis, Characterization, and Anti-Cancer Activity of Some New N′-(2-Oxoindolin-3-ylidene-2-propylpentane hydrazide-hydrazones Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Faham

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eight novel N′-(2-oxoindolin-3-ylidene-2-propylpentane hydrazide-hydrazone derivatives 4a–h were synthesized and fully characterized by IR, NMR (1H-NMR and 13C-NMR, elemental analysis, and X-ray crystallography. The cyto-toxicity and in vitro anti-cancer evaluation of the prepared compounds have been assessed against two different human tumour cell lines including human liver (HepG2 and leukaemia (Jurkat, as well as in normal cell lines derived from human embryonic kidney (HEK293 using MTT assay. The compounds 3e, 3f, 4a, 4c, and 4e revealed promising anti-cancer activities in tested human tumour cells lines (IC50 values between 3 and 7 μM as compared to the known anti-cancer drug 5-Fluorouracil (IC50 32–50 μM. Among the tested compounds, 4a showed specificity against leukaemia (Jurkat cells, with an IC50 value of 3.14 μM, but this compound was inactive in liver cancer and normal cell lines.

  13. Does anti-malarial drug knowledge predict anti-malarial dispensing practice in drug outlets? A survey of medicine retailers in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusk Andria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Kenya, where it is the fifth leading cause of death in both children and adults. Effectively managing malaria is dependent upon appropriate treatment. In Kenya, between 17 to 83 percent of febrile individuals first seek treatment for febrile illness over the counter from medicine retailers. Understanding medicine retailer knowledge and behaviour in treating suspected malaria and dispensing anti-malarials is crucial. Methods To investigate medicine retailer knowledge about anti-malarials and their dispensing practices, a survey was conducted of all retail drug outlets that sell anti-malarial medications and serve residents of the Webuye Health and Demographic Surveillance Site in the Bungoma East District of western Kenya. Results Most of the medicine retailers surveyed (65% were able to identify artemether-lumefantrine (AL as the Kenyan Ministry of Health recommended first-line anti-malarial therapy for uncomplicated malaria. Retailers who correctly identified this treatment were also more likely to recommend AL to adult and paediatric customers. However, the proportion of medicine retailers who recommend the correct treatment is disappointingly low. Only 48% would recommend AL to adults, and 37% would recommend it to children. It was discovered that customer demand has an influence on retailer behaviour. Retailer training and education were found to be correlated with anti-malarial drug knowledge, which in turn is correlated with dispensing practices. Medicine retailer behaviour, including patient referral practice and dispensing practices, are also correlated with knowledge of the first-line anti-malarial medication. The Kenya Ministry of Health guidelines were found to influence retailer drug stocking and dispensing behaviours. Conclusion Most medicine retailers could identify the recommended first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria, but the percentage that could

  14. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... not listed here. Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Afinitor (Everolimus) Aldesleukin Avastin (Bevacizumab) Axitinib Bevacizumab Cabometyx ( ...

  15. Yessotoxin, a Marine Toxin, Exhibits Anti-Allergic and Anti-Tumoural Activities Inhibiting Melanoma Tumour Growth in a Preclinical Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Tobío

    Full Text Available Yessotoxins (YTXs are a group of marine toxins produced by the dinoflagellates Protoceratium reticulatum, Lingulodinium polyedrum and Gonyaulax spinifera. They may have medical interest due to their potential role as anti-allergic but also anti-cancer compounds. However, their biological activities remain poorly characterized. Here, we show that the small molecular compound YTX causes a slight but significant reduction of the ability of mast cells to degranulate. Strikingly, further examination revealed that YTX had a marked and selective cytotoxicity for the RBL-2H3 mast cell line inducing apoptosis, while primary bone marrow derived mast cells were highly resistant. In addition, YTX exhibited strong cytotoxicity against the human B-chronic lymphocytic leukaemia cell line MEC1 and the murine melanoma cell line B16F10. To analyse the potential role of YTX as an anti-cancer drug in vivo we used the well-established B16F10 melanoma preclinical mouse model. Our results demonstrate that a few local application of YTX around established tumours dramatically diminished tumour growth in the absence of any significant toxicity as determined by the absence of weight loss and haematological alterations. Our data support that YTX may have a minor role as an anti-allergic drug, but reveals an important potential for its use as an anti-cancer drug.

  16. A short history of anti-rheumatic therapy. III. Non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Marson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The chemical advances of the 20th century led to the synthesis of non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, beginning from phenylbutazone and indomethacin and continuing with other new drugs, including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen, piroxicam and, more recently, the highly selective COX-2 inhibitors (coxibs. This progress derived from the discovery of the mechanism of action of these drugs: the inhibition of synthesis of prostaglandins due to the cycloxigenase enzyme system, according to the experimental contributions of John R. Vane.

  17. Quality-improvement analytics for intravenous infusion pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skledar, Susan J; Niccolai, Cynthia S; Schilling, Dennis; Costello, Susan; Mininni, Nicolette; Ervin, Kelly; Urban, Alana

    2013-04-15

    The implementation of a smart-pump continuous quality-improvement (CQI) program across a large health system is described, with an emphasis on key metrics for outcomes analyses and program refinement. Three years ago, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center health system launched a CQI initiative to help ensure the safe use of 6000 smart pumps in its 14 inpatient facilities. A centralized team led by pharmacists is responsible for the retrieval and interpretation of smart-pump data, which is continuously transmitted to a main server. CQI findings are regularly posted on the health system's interdisciplinary intranet. Monitored metrics include rates of compliance with preprogrammed infusion limits, the top 20 drugs involved in alerts, drugs associated with alert-override rates of ≥90%, numbers of alerts by infusion type, nurse responses to alerts, and alert rate per drug library update. Based on the collected CQI data and site-specific requests, four systemwide updates of the smart-pump drug library were performed during the first 18 months of the program, reducing "nuisance alerts" by about 10% per update cycle and enabling targeted interventions to reduce rapid-infusion errors, other adverse drug events (ADEs), and pump-programming workarounds. Over one 12-month period, bedside alerts prompted nurses to reprogram or cancel continuous infusions an average of 400 times per month, potentially averting i.v. medication ADEs. A smart-pump CQI program is an effective tool for enhancing the safety of i.v. medication administration. The ongoing refinement of the drug library through the development and implementation of key interventions promotes the growth and sustainability of the smart-pump initiative systemwide.

  18. Drugs Approved for Colon and Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in colon cancer and rectal cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  19. Remission of Grave's disease after oral anti-thyroid drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, Osama; Waseem, Sabiha; Haque, M Naeemul; Islam, Najmul; Jabbar, Abdul

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate remission rate of anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Grave's disease, and to study the factors associated with remission. A cross sectional study. The Endocrine Department of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi from 1999 to 2000. Seventy four patients of Grave's disease were recruited who were prescribed medical treatment. Grave's disease was diagnosed in the presence of clinical and biochemical hyperthyroidism along with anti-microsomal (AMA) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (ATA) and thyroid scan. These patients were prescribed oral anti-thyroid drugs using titration regime and followed at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. Patients were categorized into two groups: "remission group" and "treatment failure group" and results were compared using a chi-square test, t-test and logistic regression model with significance at p disease on initial presentation.

  20. The anti-hepatitis drug use effect and inventory management optimization from the perspective of hospital drug supply chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanyu

    2017-09-01

    By analyzing the current hospital anti hepatitis drug use, dosage, indications and drug resistance, this article studied the drug inventory management and cost optimization. The author used drug utilization evaluation method, analyzed the amount and kind distribution of anti hepatitis drugs and made dynamic monitoring of inventory. At the same time, the author puts forward an effective scheme of drug classification management, uses the ABC classification method to classify the drugs according to the average daily dose of drugs, and implements the automatic replenishment plan. The design of pharmaceutical services supply chain includes drug procurement platform, warehouse management system and connect to the hospital system through data exchange. Through the statistical analysis of drug inventory, we put forward the countermeasures of drug logistics optimization. The results showed that drug replenishment plan can effectively improve drugs inventory efficiency.

  1. Functional profiling of microtumors to identify cancer associated fibroblast-derived drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horman, Shane R; To, Jeremy; Lamb, John; Zoll, Jocelyn H; Leonetti, Nicole; Tu, Buu; Moran, Rita; Newlin, Robbin; Walker, John R; Orth, Anthony P

    2017-11-21

    Recent advances in chemotherapeutics highlight the importance of molecularly-targeted perturbagens. Although these therapies typically address dysregulated cancer cell proteins, there are increasing therapeutic modalities that take into consideration cancer cell-extrinsic factors. Targeting components of tumor stroma such as vascular or immune cells has been shown to represent an efficacious approach in cancer treatment. Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) exemplify an important stromal component that can be exploited in targeted therapeutics, though their employment in drug discovery campaigns has been relatively minimal due to technical logistics in assaying for CAF-tumor interactions. Here we report a 3-dimensional multi-culture tumor:CAF spheroid phenotypic screening platform that can be applied to high-content drug discovery initiatives. Using a functional genomics approach we systematically profiled 1,024 candidate genes for CAF-intrinsic anti-spheroid activity; identifying several CAF genes important for development and maintenance of tumor:CAF co-culture spheroids. Along with previously reported genes such as WNT, we identify CAF-derived targets such as ARAF and COL3A1 upon which the tumor compartment depends for spheroid development. Specifically, we highlight the G-protein-coupled receptor OGR1 as a unique CAF-specific protein that may represent an attractive drug target for treating colorectal cancer. In vivo , murine colon tumor implants in OGR1 knockout mice displayed delayed tumor growth compared to tumors implanted in wild type littermate controls. These findings demonstrate a robust microphysiological screening approach for identifying new CAF targets that may be applied to drug discovery efforts.

  2. Anti-leishmanial and Anti-cancer Activities of a Pentacyclic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    against promastigotes of Leishmania donovani, and anti-cancer activity on K562 leukaemic cell line. Results: A .... crisis of chronic myeloid leukemia was used for this test. The cells ... containing 1×106 cells/ml, 2 mM L-glutamine and 50 µg/ml ...

  3. Clinical benefit response of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with protracted 5-fluorouracil infusion in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okusaka, Takuji; Okada, Shuichi; Ishii, Hiroshi

    1998-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly virulent disease with a poor prognosis. Although objective tumor response to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy is low, some patients show an improvement in their symptoms after treatments, without obvious tumor regression. We assessed the clinical benefit of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with protracted 5-fluorouracil infusion in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Sixteen patients were enrolled in this study. The clinical benefit response to the chemoradiotherapy was evaluated by 2 indicators, including pain (intensity of pain and consumption of morphine) and performance status. A patient was defined to be a clinical benefit responder if 1 of these 2 variables was positive, and the other variable was positive or stable. Seven patients (44%) responded. Six patients (38%) were classified as stable, and 3 (19%) as nonresponders. The survival period in responders was significantly longer than that in nonresponders and stable patients. Concurrent external-beam radiation therapy, with protracted 5-fluorouracil infusion, may be a meaningful treatment for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. (author)

  4. Benefits of smart pumps for automated changeovers of vasoactive drug infusion pumps: a quasi-experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cour, M; Hernu, R; Bénet, T; Robert, J M; Regad, D; Chabert, B; Malatray, A; Conrozier, S; Serra, P; Lassaigne, M; Vanhems, P; Argaud, L

    2013-11-01

    Manual changeover of vasoactive drug infusion pumps (CVIP) frequently lead to haemodynamic instability. Some of the newest smart pumps allow automated CVIP. The aim of this study was to compare automated CVIP with manual 'Quick Change' relays. We performed a prospective, quasi-experimental study, in a university-affiliated intensive care unit (ICU). All adult patients receiving continuous i.v. infusion of vasoactive drugs were included. CVIP were successively performed manually (Phase 1) and automatically (Phase 2) during two 6-month periods. The primary endpoint was the frequency of haemodynamic incidents related to the relays, which were defined as variations of mean arterial pressure >15 mm Hg or heart rate >15 bpm. The secondary endpoints were the nursing time dedicated to relays and the number of interruptions in care because of CVIP. A multivariate mixed effects logistic regression was fitted for analytic analysis. We studied 1329 relays (Phase 1: 681, Phase 2: 648) from 133 patients (Phase 1: 63, Phase 2: 70). Incidents related to CVIP decreased from 137 (20%) in Phase 1 to 73 (11%) in Phase 2 (Ppumps in limiting the frequency of haemodynamic incidents related to relays and in reducing the nursing workload.

  5. Anti-topoisomerase drugs as potent inducers of chromosomal aberrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Bassi

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA topoisomerases catalyze topological changes in DNA that are essential for normal cell cycle progression and therefore they are a preferential target for the development of anticancer drugs. Anti-topoisomerase drugs can be divided into two main classes: "cleavable complex" poisons and catalytic inhibitors. The "cleavable complex" poisons are very effective as anticancer drugs but are also potent inducers of chromosome aberrations so they can cause secondary malignancies. Catalytic inhibitors are cytotoxic but they do not induce chromosome aberrations. Knowledge about the mechanism of action of topoisomerase inhibitors is important to determine the best anti-topoisomerase combinations, with a reduced risk of induction of secondary malignancies.As topoisomerases de DNA catalisam alterações topológicas no DNA que são essenciais para a progressão do ciclo celular normal e, portanto, são um alvo preferencial para o desenvolvimento de drogas anticâncer. Drogas anti-topoisomerases podem ser divididas em duas classes principais: drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" e inibidores catalíticos. As drogas anti-"complexos cliváveis" são muito eficazes como drogas anticancerígenas, mas são também potentes indutores de aberrações cromossômicas, podendo causar neoplasias malignas secundárias. Inibidores catalíticos são citotóxicos mas não induzem aberrações cromossômicas. Conhecimento a respeito do mecanismo de ação de inibidores de topoisomerases é importante para determinar as melhores combinações anti-topoisomerases, com um reduzido risco de indução de neoplasias malignas secundárias.

  6. Macrolide Hybrid Compounds: Drug Discovery Opportunities in Anti- Infective and Anti-inflammatory Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paljetak, Hana Cipcic; Tomaskovic, Linda; Matijasic, Mario; Bukvic, Mirjana; Fajdetic, Andrea; Verbanac, Donatella; Peric, Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    Macrolides, polyketide natural products, and their 15-membered semi-synthetic derivatives are composed of substituted macrocyclic lactone ring and used primarily as potent antibiotics. Recently their usefulness was extended to antimalarial and anti-inflammatory area. Hybrid macrolides presented in this article are the next generation semi-synthetic compounds that combine pharmacophores from antibacterial, antimalarial and anti-inflammatory area with 14- and 15-membered azalide scaffolds. Antibacterial azalide hybrids with sulphonamides showed improved activity against resistant streptococci while quinolone conjugates demonstrated full coverage of respiratory pathogens including macrolide resistant strains and their efficacy was confirmed in mouse pneumonia model. Antimalarial macrolide hybrids, mainly involving (chloro)quinoline pharmacophores, showed outstanding activity against chloroquine resistant strains, favourable pharmacokinetics, promising in vivo efficacy as well as encouraging developmental potential. Anti-inflammatory hybrids were obtained by combining macrolides with corticosteroid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. They were found active in in vivo animal models of locally induced inflammation, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis and demonstrated improved safety over parent steroid drugs. Overall, macrolide hybrids possess significant potential to be developed as potent novel medicines in therapeutic areas of utmost pharmaceutical interest. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Anti-idiotypic antibodies as cancer vaccines: achievements and future improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladjemi, Maha Z.

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), researchers have tried to develop immune-based anti-cancer therapies. Thanks to their specificity, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) offer the major advantage to induce fewer side effects than those caused by non-specific conventional treatments (e.g., chemotherapy, radiotherapy). Passive immunotherapy by means of mAbs or cytokines has proved efficacy in oncology and validated the use of immune-based agents as part of anti-cancer treatment options. The next step was to try to induce an active immune protection aiming to boost own’s host immune defense against TAAs. Cancer vaccines are thus developed to specifically induce active immune protection targeting only tumor cells while preserving normal tissues from a non-specific toxicity. But, as most of TAAs are self antigens, an immune tolerance against them exists representing a barrier to effective vaccination against these oncoproteins. One promising approach to break this immune tolerance consists in the use of anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) mAbs, so called Ab2, as antigen surrogates. This vaccination strategy allows also immunization against non-proteic antigens (such as carbohydrates). In some clinical studies, anti-Id cancer vaccines indeed induced efficient humoral and/or cellular immune responses associated with clinical benefit. This review article will focus on recent achievements of anti-Id mAbs use as cancer vaccines in solid tumors.

  8. Vitamin D: Pharmacokinetics and Safety When Used in Conjunction with the Pharmaceutical Drugs Used in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Deborah A.; Cooley, Kieran; Skidmore, Becky; Fritz, Heidi; Campbell, Tara; Seely, Dugald

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D has reported anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties modulated through gene transcription and non-genomic signaling cascades. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available research on interactions and pharmacokinetics between vitamin D and the pharmaceutical drugs used in patients with cancer. Hypercalcemia was the most frequently reported side effect that occurred in high dose calcitriol. The half-life of 25(OH)D 3 and/or 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 was found to be impacted by cimetidine; rosuvastatin; prednisone and possibly some chemotherapy drugs. No unusual adverse effects in cancer patients; beyond what is expected from high dose 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 supplementation, were revealed through this review. While sufficient evidence is lacking, supplementation with 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 during chemotherapy appears to have a low risk of interaction. Further interactions with vitamin D 3 have not been studied

  9. 77 FR 12063 - Joint Meeting of the Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee and the Nonprescription Drugs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Joint Meeting of the Anti-Infective Drugs Advisory Committee and the Nonprescription Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces a forthcoming meeting of a public...

  10. Stockpiling anti-viral drugs for a pandemic: the role of Manufacturer Reserve Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph E; Hsu, Edbert B

    2010-05-01

    To promote stockpiling of anti-viral drugs by non-government organizations such as hospitals, drug manufacturers have introduced Manufacturer Reserve Programs which, for an annual fee, provide the right to buy in the event of a severe outbreak of influenza. We show that these programs enhance drug manufacturer profits but could either increase or decrease the amount of pre-pandemic stockpiling of anti-viral drugs.

  11. Smart stimuli sensitive nanogels in cancer drug delivery and imaging: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya, S; Sarmento, Bruno; Nair, Amrita; Rejinold, N Sanoj; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-01-01

    Nanogels are nanosized hydrogel particles formed by physical or chemical cross-linked polymer networks. The advantageous properties of nanogels related to the ability of retaining considerable amount of water, the biocompatibility of the polymers used, the ability to encapsulate and protect a large quantity of payload drugs within the nanogel matrix, the high stability in aqueous media, their stimuli responsively behavior potential, and the versatility in release drugs in a controlled manner make them very attractive for use in the area of drug delivery. The materials used for the preparation of nanogels ranged from natural polymers like ovalbumin, pullulan, hyaluronic acid, methacrylated chondroitin sulfate and chitosan, to synthetic polymers like poly (N-isopropylacrylamide), poly (Nisopropylacrylamide- co-acrylic acid) and poly (ethylene glycol)-b-poly (methacrylic acid). The porous nanogels have been finding application as anti-cancer drug and imaging agent reservoirs. Smart nanogels responding to external stimuli such as temperature, pH etc can be designed for diverse therapeutic and diagnostic applications. The nanogels have also been surface functionalized with specific ligands aiding in targeted drug delivery. This review focus on stimuli-sensitive, multi-responsive, magnetic and targeted nanogels providing a brief insight on the application of nanogels in cancer drug delivery and imaging in detail.

  12. Benzimidazole as Novel Therapy for Hormone-Refractory Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    8 4 INTRODUCTION The focus of this project is to evaluate the anti-tumor effects of benzimidazoles as a...potential anti-metastatic prostate cancer therapy. We identified benzimidazoles , a class of anti-parasitic drug, in a drug screening process for...preferential anti-tumor activity on metastatic prostate cancer cells. We have data indicate that benzimidazoles have potent anti-tumor activities

  13. Anti-ma2 paraneoplastic encephalitis in association with recurrent cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Douglas E; Messersmith, Wells; Behbakht, Kian

    2014-07-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes are rare, and although they are frequently associated with gynecological malignancies, cervical cancer is a rare cause. The symptoms of anti-Ma2 encephalitis are diverse and often present prior to the diagnosis of malignancy. We report a case of a 37-year-old woman with a history of cervical cancer presenting with unexplained weight gain and vertical supranuclear gaze palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed lesions within the bilateral hypothalami and midbrain. Anti-Ma2 antibodies were eventually found in the serum, prompting a search for malignancy. Recurrent metastatic cervical cancer was found in the retroperitoneal lymph nodes. This is the first report of cervical cancer in association with anti-Ma2 encephalitis, and highlights the need for a high degree of suspicion in patients with a cancer history presenting with neurological symptoms. The symptoms associated with anti-Ma2 encephalitis are diverse and typically precede the diagnosis of cancer in patients, and should trigger a search for an underlying malignancy.

  14. Daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal artery. Preoperative therapy for stage III, IV oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohnai, Iwai; Mitsudo, Kenji; Nishiguchi, Hiroaki; Fukui, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Ueda, Minoru; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2005-01-01

    Recently, daily concurrent chemoradiotherapy using new superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal arterial artery is attracting attention. The catheter with curved tip is inserted superselectively to the feeding artery of the tumor via the superficial temporal artery, allowing long-term catheterization. Forty-one patients with stage III, IV oral cancer were treated. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy/4 weeks) and superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy using docetaxel (total dose: 60 mg/m 2 , 15 mg/m 2 /week) and cisplatin (total dose: 100 mg/m 2 , 5 mg/m 2 /day) were concurrently performed daily, followed by surgery. In 35 patients, intra-arterial infusion was successful (success rate: 85.4%) and no major complication was observed. The clinical effects were complete response (CR) in 29 patients (82.9%), and pathological effects of resected tumor after surgery were pathological CR in 31 (88.6%). This method promises to be a new strategy of choice for the treatment of oral cancer. (author)

  15. Osteoarthritis guidelines: a progressive role for topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanos SP

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Steven P Stanos Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago, Center for Pain Management, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Current treatment guidelines for the treatment of chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis reflect the collective clinical knowledge of international experts in weighing the benefits of pharmacologic therapy options while striving to minimize the negative effects associated with them. Consideration of disease progression, pattern of flares, level of functional impairment or disability, response to treatment, coexisting conditions such as cardiovascular disease or gastrointestinal disorders, and concomitant prescription medication use should be considered when creating a therapeutic plan for a patient with osteoarthritis. Although topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs historically have not been prevalent in many of the guidelines for osteoarthritis treatment, recent evidence-based medicine and new guidelines now support their use as a viable option for the clinician seeking alternatives to typical oral formulations. This article provides a qualitative review of these treatment guidelines and the emerging role of topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs as a therapy option for patients with localized symptoms of osteoarthritis who may be at risk for oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-related serious adverse events. Keywords: osteoarthritis, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, guidelines, topical analgesics, diclofenac

  16. Dielectric relaxation studies in super-cooled liquid and glassy phases of anti-cancerous alkaloid: Brucine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzal, Aboothahir; Shahin Thayyil, M.; Sulaiman, M. K.; Kulkarni, A. R.

    2018-05-01

    Brucine has good anti-tumor effects, on both liver cancer and breast cancer. It has bioavailability of 40.83%. Since the bioavailability of the drug is low, an alternative method to increase its bioavailability and solubility is by changing the drug into glassy form. We used Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) for studying the glass forming ability of the drug. Brucine was found to be a very good glass former glass transition temperature 365 K. Based on the DSC analysis we have used broadband dielectric spectroscopy (BDS) for studying the drug in the super cooled and glassy state. BDS is an effective tool to probe the molecular dynamics in the super cooled and glassy state. Molecular mobility is found to be present even in the glassy state of this active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) which is responsible for the instability. Our aim is to study the factors responsible for instability of this API in amorphous form. Cooling curves for dielectric permittivity and dielectric loss revealed the presence of structural (α) and secondary relaxations (β and γ). Temperature dependence of relaxation time is fitted by Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation and found the values of activation energy of the α relaxation, fragility and glass transition temperature. Paluch's anti correlation is also verified, that the width of the α-loss peak at or near the glass transition temperature Tg is strongly anticorrelated with the polarity of the molecule. The larger the dielectric relaxation strength Δɛ (Tg) of the system, the narrower is the α-loss peak (higher value of βKWW).

  17. Targeting NK cells for anti-cancer immunotherapy: clinical and pre-clinical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eCarotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of checkpoint blockade has highlighted the potential of immunotherapy approaches for cancer treatment. While the majority of approved immunotherapy drugs target T cell subsets, it is appreciated that other components of the immune system have important roles in tumor immune-surveillance as well and thus represent promising additional targets for immunotherapy. Natural killer cells are the body’s first line of defense against infected or transformed cells as they kill target cells in an antigen-independent manner. Although several studies have clearly demonstrated the active role of NK cells in cancer-immune surveillance, only few clinically approved therapies currently exist that harness their potential. Our increased understanding of NK cell biology over the past few years has renewed the interest in NK cell based anti-cancer therapies, which has lead to a steady increase of NK cell based clinical and pre-clinical trials. Here, the role of NK cells in cancer immunesurveillance is summarized and several novel approaches to enhance NK cell cytotoxicity against cancer are discussed.

  18. Context Sensitive Modeling of Cancer Drug Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Juen Chen

    Full Text Available Recent screening of drug sensitivity in large panels of cancer cell lines provides a valuable resource towards developing algorithms that predict drug response. Since more samples provide increased statistical power, most approaches to prediction of drug sensitivity pool multiple cancer types together without distinction. However, pan-cancer results can be misleading due to the confounding effects of tissues or cancer subtypes. On the other hand, independent analysis for each cancer-type is hampered by small sample size. To balance this trade-off, we present CHER (Contextual Heterogeneity Enabled Regression, an algorithm that builds predictive models for drug sensitivity by selecting predictive genomic features and deciding which ones should-and should not-be shared across different cancers, tissues and drugs. CHER provides significantly more accurate models of drug sensitivity than comparable elastic-net-based models. Moreover, CHER provides better insight into the underlying biological processes by finding a sparse set of shared and type-specific genomic features.

  19. 75 FR 21641 - Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ...] Infusion Pumps; Public Meeting; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... announcing a public meeting regarding external infusion pumps. The purpose of the meeting is to inform the public about current problems associated with external infusion pump use, to help the agency identify...

  20. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs among healthy people and specific cerebrovascular safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbøl, Emil L; Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can increase bleeding and thrombosis, but little is known about the cerebrovascular safety of these drugs, especially among healthy people. AIMS: The aim of this study was to examine the risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke associated with the use...... stroke). RESULTS: We selected 1,028,437 healthy individuals (median age 39 years). At least one nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug was claimed by 44·7% of the study population, and the drugs were generally used for a short period of time and in low doses. High-dose ibuprofen and diclofenac were......·35-3·42)]. CONCLUSIONS: In healthy individuals, use of commonly available nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, diclofenac, and naproxen was associated with increased risk of stroke....

  1. Application of a drug delivery system using ultrasound and nano/microbubbles for anti-angiogenic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horie, Sachiko; Kodama, Tetsuya; Sato, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    The drug delivery system using ultrasound and nano/microbubbles is a molecular delivery approach using the mechanism of sonoporation. With sonoporation, an endothelium-derived negative-feedback regulator of angiogenesis, Vasohibin-1 (VASH1), was introduced specifically into tumor vessels. We found VASH1 in tumor vessels induce normalization of tumor vessels and inhibited tumor growth. A recent topic regarding tumor angiogenesis is vascular normalization. Tumor vessels are abnormal or immature that cause hyperpermeability and impaired blood flow. Tumor vascular normalization improves blood flow and tissue hypoxia, which increase the effectiveness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy and reduce tumor cell malignancy. In this review, application of drug delivery system using ultrasound for an anti-angiogenic therapy, a tumor vessel normalization therapy to treat cancer, is summarized. (author)

  2. Drug delivery approaches for breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh SK

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Santosh Kumar Singh,1 Shriti Singh,2 James W Lillard Jr,1 Rajesh Singh1 1Department of Microbiology, Biochemistry and Immunology, Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA; 2Department of Kriya Sharir, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India Abstract: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting women worldwide. The controlled release of drugs to the precise site of the disease using a nanocarrier vehicle increases the therapeutic efficiency of the drugs. Nanotechnology-based approaches used to endorse clinical improvement from a disease also help to understand the interaction of malignant cells with their microenvironment. Receptor-based targeting is another approach for drug delivery which is undergoing clinical trials. Nanoparticles (NPs delivery has been proven to promise high loading capacity, less toxicity, and stability of the drugs or biomolecules compared to traditional chemotherapeutic drugs. The goal of this review is to present the current problems of breast cancer therapy and discuss the NP-based targeting to overcome the hurdles of conventional drug therapy approach. Keywords: breast cancer, nanoparticles, drug delivery systems

  3. In vitro anti-proliferative activity on colon cancer cell line (HT-29) of Thai medicinal plants selected from Thai/Lanna medicinal plant recipe database "MANOSROI III".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manosroi, Aranya; Akazawa, Hiroyuki; Akihisa, Toshihiro; Jantrawut, Pensak; Kitdamrongtham, Worapong; Manosroi, Worapaka; Manosroi, Jiradej

    2015-02-23

    Thai/Lanna region has its own folklore wisdoms including the traditional medicinal plant recipes. Thai/Lanna medicinal plant recipe database "MANOSROI III" has been developed by Prof. Dr. Jiradej Manosroi. It consists of over 200,000 recipes for all diseases including cancer. To investigate the anti-proliferative and apoptotic activities on human colon cancer cell line (HT-29) as well as the cancer cell selectivity of the methanolic extracts (MEs) and fractions of the 23 selected plants from the "MANOSROI III" database. The 23 selected plants were extracted with methanol under reflux and evaluated for their anti-proliferative activity by sulforhodamine B assay. The 5 plants (Gloriosa superba, Caesalpinia sappan, Fibraurea tinctoria, Ventilago denticulata and Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) with potent anti-proliferative activity were fractionated by liquid-liquid partition to give 4 fractions including each hexane (HF), methanol-water (MF), n-butanol (BF) and water (WF) fractions. They were tested for anti-proliferative activity and cancer cell selectivity. The ME and fractions of G. superba which showed potent anti-proliferative activity were further examined for morphological changes and apoptotic activities by acridine orange (AO)/ethidium bromide (EB) staining. The ME of G. superba root showed active with the highest anti-proliferative activity at 9.17 and 1.58 folds of cisplatin and doxorubicin, respectively. After liquid-liquid partition, HF of V. denticulata, MFs of F. tinctoria, V. denticulata and BF of P. tetragonolobus showed higher anti-proliferative activities than their MEs. The MF of G. superba indicated the highest anti-proliferative activity at 7.73 and 1.34 folds of cisplatin and doxorubicin, respectively, but only 0.86 fold of its ME. The ME and HF, MF and BF of G. superba and MF of F. tinctoria demonstrated high cancer cell selectivity. At 50 µg/ml, ME, HF, MF and BF of G. superba demonstrated higher apoptotic activities than the two standard drugs

  4. Metformin anti-tumor effect via disruption of the MID1 translational regulator complex and AR downregulation in prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demir, Ummuhan; Koehler, Andrea; Schneider, Rainer; Schweiger, Susann; Klocker, Helmut

    2014-01-01

    Metformin is an approved drug prescribed for diabetes. Its role as an anti-cancer agent has drawn significant attention because of its minimal side effects and low cost. However, its mechanism of anti-tumour action has not yet been fully clarified. The effect on cell growth was assessed by cell counting. Western blot was used for analysis of protein levels, Boyden chamber assays for analyses of cell migration and co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP) followed by western blot, PCR or qPCR for analysis of protein-protein and protein-mRNA interactions. Metformin showed an anti-proliferative effect on a wide range of prostate cancer cells. It disrupted the AR translational MID1 regulator complex leading to release of the associated AR mRNA and subsequently to downregulation of AR protein in AR positive cell lines. Inhibition of AR positive and negative prostate cancer cells by metformin suggests involvement of additional targets. The inhibitory effect of metformin was mimicked by disruption of the MID1-α4/PP2A protein complex by siRNA knockdown of MID1 or α4 whereas AMPK activation was not required. Findings reported herein uncover a mechanism for the anti-tumor activity of metformin in prostate cancer, which is independent of its anti-diabetic effects. These data provide a rationale for the use of metformin in the treatment of hormone naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer and suggest AR is an important indirect target of metformin

  5. Improved consistency in dosing anti-tuberculosis drugs in Taipei, Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chen-Yuan; Yu, Ming-Chih; Shih, Hsiu-Chen; Yen, Muh-Yong; Hsu, Yu-Ling; Yang, Shiang-Lin; Lin, Tao-Ping; Bai, Kuan-Jen

    2012-01-01

    It was reported that 35.5% of tuberculosis (TB) cases reported in 2003 in Taipei City had no recorded pre-treatment body weight and that among those who had, inconsistent dosing of anti-TB drugs was frequent. Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (CDC) have taken actions to strengthen dosing of anti-TB drugs among general practitioners. Prescribing practices of anti-TB drugs in Taipei City in 2007-2010 were investigated to assess whether interventions on dosing were effective. Lists of all notified culture positive TB cases in 2007-2010 were obtained from National TB Registry at Taiwan CDC. A medical audit of TB case management files was performed to collect pretreatment body weight and regimens prescribed at commencement of treatment. Dosages prescribed were compared with dosages recommended. The proportion of patients with recorded pre-treatment body weight was 64.5% in 2003, which increased to 96.5% in 2007-2010 (pTaipei City has remarkably improved after health authorities implemented a series of interventions.

  6. Structural and biological properties of thermosensitive chitosan-graphene hybrid hydrogels for sustained drug delivery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeednia, Leyla; Yao, Li; Berndt, Marcus; Cluff, Kim; Asmatulu, Ramazan

    2017-09-01

    Chitosan has the ability to make injectable thermosensitive hydrogels which has been highly investigated for drug delivery applications. The addition of nanoparticles is one way to increase the mechanical strength of thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel and subsequently and control the burst release of drug. Graphene nanoparticles have shown unique mechanical, optical and electrical properties which can be exploited for biomedical applications, especially in drug delivery. This study, have focused on the mechanical properties of a thermosensitive and injectable hybrid chitosan hydrogel incorporated with graphene nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used for morphological and chemical characterization of graphene infused chitosan hydrogels. The cell viability and cytotoxicity of graphene-contained hydrogels were analyzed using the alamarBlue ® technique. In-vitro methotrexate (MTX) release was investigated from MTX-loaded hybrid hydrogels as well. As a last step, to evaluate their efficiency as a cancer treatment delivery system, an in vitro anti-tumor test was also carried out using MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines. Results confirmed that a thermosensitive chitosan-graphene hybrid hydrogel can be used as a potential breast cancer therapy system for controlled delivery of methotrexate. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 2381-2390, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Anti-TIF1-γ antibody and cancer-associated myositis: A clinicohistopathologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Ayumi; Yamashita, Takenari; Hosono, Yuji; Inoue, Manami; Kaida, Kenichi; Kadoya, Masato; Miwa, Yusuke; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Maezawa, Reika; Arai, Satoko; Kurasawa, Kazuhiro; Ito, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Iwanami, Tomoko; Sonoo, Masahiro; Hatanaka, Yuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Uchibori, Ayumi; Chiba, Atsuro; Aizawa, Hitoshi; Momoo, Takayuki; Nakae, Yoshiharu; Sakurai, Yasuhisa; Shiio, Yasushi; Hashida, Hideji; Yoshizawa, Toshihiro; Sakiyama, Yoshio; Oda, Aya; Inoue, Kiyoharu; Takeuchi, Sousuke; Iwata, Nobue K; Date, Hidetoshi; Masuda, Naoki; Mikata, Takashi; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Uesaka, Yoshikazu; Maeda, Meiko Hashimoto; Nakashima, Ran; Tsuji, Shoji; Kwak, Shin; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Shimizu, Jun

    2016-07-19

    We aimed to analyze the clinical and histopathologic features of cancer-associated myositis (CAM) in relation to anti-transcriptional intermediary factor 1 γ antibody (anti-TIF1-γ-Ab), a marker of cancer association. We retrospectively studied 349 patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs), including 284 patients with pretreatment biopsy samples available. For the classification of IIMs, the European Neuromuscular Center criteria were applied. Patients with CAM with (anti-TIF1-γ-Ab[+] CAM) and without anti-TIF1-γ-Ab (anti-TIF1-γ-Ab[-] CAM) were compared with patients with IIM without cancers within and beyond 3 years of myositis diagnosis. Cancer was detected in 75 patients, of whom 36 (48%) were positive for anti-TIF1-γ-Ab. In anti-TIF1-γ-Ab(+) patients with CAM, cancers were detected within 1 year of myositis diagnosis in 35 (97%) and before 1 year of myositis diagnosis in 1. All the anti-TIF1-γ-Ab(+) patients with CAM satisfied the dermatomyositis (DM) criteria, including 2 possible DM sine dermatitis cases, and were characterized histologically by the presence of perifascicular atrophy, vacuolated fibers (VFs), and dense C5b-9 deposits on capillaries (dC5b-9). In contrast, 39 anti-TIF1-γ-Ab(-) patients with CAM were classified into various subgroups, and characterized by a higher frequency of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM). Notably, all 7 patients with CAM classified into the NAM subgroup were anti-TIF1-γ-Ab(-) and exhibited no dC5b-9 or VFs. CAM includes clinicohistopathologically heterogeneous disease entities. Among CAM entities, anti-TIF1-γ-Ab(+) CAM has characteristically shown a close temporal association with cancer detection and the histopathologic findings of dC5b-9 and VFs, and CAM with NAM is a subset of anti-TIF1-γ-Ab(-) CAM. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. An evaluation of the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of the anti-obesity drugs sibutramine and fenproporex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Cristiano José; dos Santos, José Ernesto; Satie Takahashi, Catarina

    2010-03-01

    Anti-obesity medications deserve special considerations at the present time due to an increasing number of overweight and obese people who require these therapeutic alternatives. Obesity is positively associated with several chronic illnesses, including cancer. In this work, we evaluated the possible genotoxic and/or cytotoxic actions of two drugs, sibutramine and fenproporex, in the doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight (bw), administered intraperitoneally in male Swiss mice. The genotoxic effect was analyzed by comet assay and micronucleus test. We found that both drugs increased the frequency of genotoxic damage in Swiss mice, but did not present cytotoxic activities towards the polychromatic erythrocytes of the bone marrow of these animals.

  9. Anti-HERG activity and the risk of drug-induced arrhythmias and sudden death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, M L; Pettersson, M; Meyboom, R H B

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Drug-induced QTc-prolongation, resulting from inhibition of HERG potassium channels may lead to serious ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. We studied the quantitative anti-HERG activity of pro-arrhythmic drugs as a risk factor for this outcome in day-to-day practice. METHODS...... defined as reports of cardiac arrest, sudden death, torsade de pointes, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia (n = 5591), and compared with non-cases regarding the anti-HERG activity, defined as the effective therapeutic plasma concentration (ETCPunbound) divided by the HERG IC50 value......, of suspected drugs. We identified a significant association of 1.93 (95% CI: 1.89-1.98) between the anti-HERG activity of drugs, measured as log10 (ETCPunbound/IC50), and reporting of serious ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death to the WHO-UMC database. CONCLUSION: Anti-HERG activity is associated...

  10. Electrochemical studies of ropinirole, an anti-Parkinson's disease drug

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The oxidation behaviour of a potent anti-Parkinson's disease drug ropinirole hydrochloride was investigated over a wide pH range in aqueous solution at glassy carbon electrode using cyclic and square-wave voltammetry. The oxidation of drug is a pH dependent irreversible process and occurs in two steps.

  11. Anti-Cancer Effect of Angelica Sinensis on Women’s Reproductive Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hong Zhu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Danggui, the root of Angelica Sinensis, has traditionally been used for the treatment of women’s reproductive disorders in China for thousands of years. This study was to determine whether Danggui have potential anti-cancer effect on women’s cancer and its potential mechanism. Methods: Danggui was extracted by ethanol. The Cell Titer 96® Aqueous Non-Radioactive Cell Proliferation Assay was used to compare the effects of Danggui on human breast (MCF-7 and 7368 and cervical (CaSki and SiHa cancer cells with its effects on normal fibroblasts (HTB-125. A revised Ames test was used to test for antimutagenicity. The standard strains of Salmonella typhimarium (TA 100 and 102 were used in the test. Methyl methane sulfonate (MMS and UV light were used as positive mutagen controls and ethanol and double distilled water (DDW as controls. The SAS statistical software was used to analyze the data. Results: Danggui was found to be much more toxic to all cancer cell lines tested than to normal fibroblasts. There was a significant negative dose-effect relationship between Danggui and cancer cell viability. Average viability of MCF-7 was 69.5%, 18.4%, 5.7%, 5.7%, and 5.0% of control for Danggui doses 0.07, 0.14, 0.21, 0.32, and 0.64 ug/ul, respectively, with a Ptrend < 0.0001. Half maximal inhibitory dose (ID50 of Danggui for cancer cell lines MCF-7, CaSki, SiHa and CRL-7368 was 0.10, 0.09, 0.10 and 0.07 ug/ul, Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(6:242-250respectively. For the normal fibroblasts, ID50 was 0.58 ug/ul. At a dose of 0.32 ug/ul, Danggui killed over 90% of the cells in each cancer cell line, but at the same dose, only 12.3 % of the normal HTB-125 cells were killed. Revertants per plate of TA 100 decreased with the introduction of increasing doses of Danggui extracts with a Ptrend < 0.0001 when UV light was used as a mutagen. There was no difference in revertants per plate between ethanol and DDW control groups. Conclusions

  12. Pharmacogenetics of Anti-Diabetes Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna K. DiStefano

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A variety of treatment modalities exist for individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D. In addition to dietary and physical activity interventions, T2D is also treated pharmacologically with nine major classes of approved drugs. These medications include insulin and its analogues, sulfonylureas, biguanides, thiazolidinediones (TZDs, meglitinides, α-glucosidase inhibitors, amylin analogues, incretin hormone mimetics, and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4 inhibitors. Pharmacological treatment strategies for T2D are typically based on efficacy, yet favorable responses to such therapeutics are oftentimes variable and difficult to predict. Characterization of drug response is expected to substantially enhance our ability to provide patients with the most effective treatment strategy given their individual backgrounds, yet pharmacogenetic study of diabetes medications is still in its infancy. To date, major pharmacogenetic studies have focused on response to sulfonylureas, biguanides, and TZDs. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of pharmacogenetics investigations of these specific anti-diabetes medications. We focus not only on the results of these studies, but also on how experimental design, study sample issues, and definition of ‘response’ can significantly impact our interpretation of findings. Understanding the pharmacogenetics of anti-diabetes medications will provide critical baseline information for the development and implementation of genetic screening into therapeutic decision making, and lay the foundation for “individualized medicine” for patients with T2D.

  13. Vitamin D: Pharmacokinetics and Safety When Used in Conjunction with the Pharmaceutical Drugs Used in Cancer Patients: A Systematic Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Deborah A.; Cooley, Kieran; Skidmore, Becky; Fritz, Heidi; Campbell, Tara [Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, 1255 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario, M2K 1E2 (Canada); Seely, Dugald, E-mail: dseely@ccnm.edu [Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine, 1255 Sheppard Avenue East, Toronto, Ontario, M2K 1E2 (Canada); Ottawa Integrative Cancer Centre, 29 Bayswater Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario, K1Y 2E5 (Canada)

    2013-03-11

    Vitamin D has reported anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties modulated through gene transcription and non-genomic signaling cascades. The purpose of this review was to summarize the available research on interactions and pharmacokinetics between vitamin D and the pharmaceutical drugs used in patients with cancer. Hypercalcemia was the most frequently reported side effect that occurred in high dose calcitriol. The half-life of 25(OH)D{sub 3} and/or 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} was found to be impacted by cimetidine; rosuvastatin; prednisone and possibly some chemotherapy drugs. No unusual adverse effects in cancer patients; beyond what is expected from high dose 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} supplementation, were revealed through this review. While sufficient evidence is lacking, supplementation with 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} during chemotherapy appears to have a low risk of interaction. Further interactions with vitamin D{sub 3} have not been studied.

  14. Daily concurrent preoperative chemoradiotherapy using new superselective intra-arterial infusion via superficial temporal artery for oral cancer. Cervical lymph node metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Mitsudo, Kenji; Tohnai, Iwai

    2007-01-01

    Seventeen oral cancer patients with cervical lymph node metastasis were treated by preoperative chemoradiotherapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion via the superficial temporal artery. Radiotherapy (total dose: 40 Gy/4 weeks) and superselective intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy using docetaxel (DOC) (total dose: 60 mg/m 2 , 15 mg/m 2 /week) and cisplatin (CDDP) (total dose: 100 mg/m 2 , 5 mg/m 2 /day) were performed, followed by surgery. The pathological effects of resected lymph node metastasis after surgery were grade III, IV (Oboshi-Shimosato classification) in level I, II. This method is a promising strategy for oral cancer with cervical lymph node metastasis. (author)

  15. Immunogenicity to Biotherapeutics – the role of Anti-drug Immune complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murli eKrishna

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBiologic molecules are increasingly becoming a part of the therapeutics portfolio that has been either recently approved for marketing or those that are in the pipeline of several biotech and pharmaceutical companies. This is largely based on their ability to be highly specific relative to small molecules. However by virtue of being a large protein, and having a complex structure with structural variability arising from production using recombinant gene technology in cell lines, such therapeutics run the risk of being recognized as foreign by a host immune system. Given the range of immune mediated adverse effects that have been documented to biologic drugs thus far, including infusion reactions, and the evolving therapeutic platforms in the pipeline that engineer different functional modules in a biotherapeutic, it is critical to understand the interplay of the adaptive and innate immune responses, the pathophysiology of immunogenicity to biologic drugs in instances where there have been immune mediated adverse clinical sequelae and address technical approaches for their laboratory evaluation. The current paradigm in immunogenicity evaluation has a tiered approach to the detection and characterization of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs elicited in vivo to a biotherapeutic; alongside with the structural, biophysical and molecular information of the therapeutic, these analytical assessments form the core of the immunogenicity risk assessment. However many of the immune mediated adverse effects attributed to ADAs require the formation of a drug/ADA immune complex intermediate (ICs that can have a variety of downstream effects. This review will focus on the activation of potential immunopathological pathways arising as a consequence of circulating as well as cell surface bound drug bearing-ICs, risk factors that are either intrinsic to the therapeutic molecule or to the host which might predispose to IC mediated effects, and review the recent

  16. Depressive disorders and anti-parkinson drug treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt-Christensen, M; Lopez, A G; Nilsson, F M

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the rate of treatment with anti-parkinson drugs (APD) among patients with depression. METHOD: In a nationwide case register linkage study, all persons with a main diagnosis of depression during 5 years were identified. A control group of persons with diagnoses of osteoarthr...... that prescription of APD reflects the presence of Parkinson's disease, results support a positive statistical association between depressive disorders and Parkinson's disease.......OBJECTIVE: To estimate the rate of treatment with anti-parkinson drugs (APD) among patients with depression. METHOD: In a nationwide case register linkage study, all persons with a main diagnosis of depression during 5 years were identified. A control group of persons with diagnoses...... of osteoarthritis was included. The subsequent risk of getting treatment with APD was estimated for the two groups. Statistical analyses involved Poisson's regression and competing risk models. RESULTS: A total of 14 991 persons were included. The rate of getting APD was 2.57 (95% CI: 1.46-4.52) times higher...

  17. Covalent linkage of nanodiamond-paclitaxel for drug delivery and cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Kuang-Kai; Wang, Chi-Ching; Chao, Jui-I [Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Zheng, Wen-Wei; Lo, Yu-Shiu; Chen, Chinpiao [Department of Chemistry, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Yu-Chung; Cheng, Chia-Liang, E-mail: clcheng@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: chinpiao@mail.ndhu.edu.tw, E-mail: jichao@faculty.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China)

    2010-08-06

    A nanoparticle-conjugated cancer drug provides a novel strategy for cancer therapy. In this study, we manipulated nanodiamond (ND), a carbon nanomaterial, to covalently link paclitaxel for cancer drug delivery and therapy. Paclitaxel was bound to the surface of 3-5 nm sized ND through a succession of chemical modifications. The ND-paclitaxel conjugation was measured by atomic force microscope and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and confirmed with infrared spectroscopy by the detection of deuterated paclitaxel. Treatment with 0.1-50 {mu}g ml{sup -1} ND-paclitaxel for 48 h significantly reduced the cell viability in the A549 human lung carcinoma cells. ND-paclitaxel induced both mitotic arrest and apoptosis in A549 cells. However, ND alone or denatured ND-paclitaxel (after treatment with strong alkaline solution, 1 M NaOH) did not induce the damage effects on A549 cells. ND-paclitaxel was taken into lung cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner using flow cytometer analysis. The ND-paclitaxel particles were located in the microtubules and cytoplasm of A549 cells observed by confocal microscopy. Furthermore, ND-paclitaxel markedly blocked the tumor growth and formation of lung cancer cells in xenograft SCID mice. Together, we provide a functional covalent conjugation of ND-paclitaxel, which can be delivered into lung carcinoma cells and preserves the anticancer activities on the induction of mitotic blockage, apoptosis and anti-tumorigenesis.

  18. [Dr. Sklenar's Kombucha mushroom infusion--a biological cancer therapy. Documentation No. 18].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, S P

    1990-02-27

    Kombucha, a fungal infusion, is a 'symbiotic mixture' of bacteria, yeasts, tea and sugar. A number of components are listed, but exact analyses are not published. On the basis of 'thorough detoxification', Kombucha is claimed to be a prophylactic and therapeutic agent in countless diseases, such as rheumatism, intestinal disorders, ageing and cancer. All 'stages of the Sklenar blood picture' have to be treated with Kombucha Drink, Kombucha Drops, coli preparations and Gelum oral-rd for a period of months. A litre-bottle costs 13 DM, the blood analysis 150 Sfr. In the 1960's Dr. R. Sklenar developed a 'biological cancer therapy with Kombucha as the main agent' and his own system of diagnosing cancer. Sklenar's diagnosis of cancer is based on iris diagnosis and demonstration of the causative organism by means of a 'Blood picture according to Dr. Sklenar'. He claims, on one hand, that cancer is only one of the many metabolic diseases and, on the other, that viruses, in his view parasitic microorganisms in general, are responsible for the pathogenesis of cancer. No preclinical and nor investigations are available, as 'success has proved him (Dr. Sklenar) to be right'. The seven 'case histories' described have no solid medical data. There is so far no evidence to support the claim that Kombucha offers 'effective biological treatment of cancer'.

  19. Novel Approaches to the Treatment of Cancer in London UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Black

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An intensive and in-depth two-day conference providing an advanced level updateKEY TOPICS TO BE COVERED:New paradigms for targeted therapiesNew anti-cancer agents ~ industry viewpointNovel approaches to the treatment of breast cancer, melanoma and pancreatic cancerDrug development and precision radiotherapyEuropean drug development initiativesMarket access to novel cancer drugsRegulatory issues in marketing authorisation of anti-cancer productsGene and cell therapies and trial endpointsDeveloping cancer vaccinesCLICK HERE for more information 

  20. The Role of Anti-Drug Antibodies in the Pharmacokinetics, Disposition, Target Engagement, and Efficacy of a GITR Agonist Monoclonal Antibody in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunn, Nicholas D; Mauze, Smita; Gu, Danling; Wiswell, Derek; Ueda, Roanna; Hodges, Douglas; Beebe, Amy M; Zhang, Shuli; Escandón, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    Administration of biologics to enhance T-cell function is part of a rapidly growing field of cancer immunotherapy demonstrated by the unprecedented clinical success of several immunoregulatory receptor targeting antibodies. While these biologic agents confer significant anti-tumor activity through targeted immune response modulation, they can also elicit broad immune responses potentially including the production of anti-drug antibodies (ADAs). DTA-1, an agonist monoclonal antibody against GITR, is a highly effective anti-tumor treatment in preclinical models. We demonstrate that repeated dosing with murinized DTA-1 (mDTA-1) generates ADAs with corresponding reductions in drug exposure and engagement of GITR on circulating CD3(+) CD4(+) T cells, due to rapid hepatic drug uptake and catabolism. Mice implanted with tumors after induction of preexisting mDTA-1 ADA show no anti-tumor efficacy when given 3 mg/kg mDTA-1, an efficacious dose in naive mice. Nonetheless, increasing mDTA-1 treatment to 30 mg/kg in ADA-positive mice restores mDTA-1 exposure and GITR engagement on circulating CD3(+) CD4(+) T cells, thereby partially restoring anti-tumor efficacy. Formation of anti-mDTA-1 antibodies and changes in drug exposure and disposition does not occur in GITR(-/-) mice, consistent with a role for GITR agonism in humoral immunity. Finally, the administration of muDX400, a murinized monoclonal antibody against the checkpoint inhibitor PD-1, dosed alone or combined with mDTA-1 did not result in reduced muDX400 exposure, nor did it change the nature of the anti-mDTA-1 response. This indicates that anti-GITR immunogenicity may not necessarily impact the pharmacology of coadministered monoclonal antibodies, supporting combination immunomodulatory strategies. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Considerations for Pharmacoepidemiological Studies of Drug-Cancer Associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pottegård, Anton; Friis, Søren; Stürmer, Til

    2018-01-01

    and future perspectives. Aspects of data sources include assessment of complete history of drug use and data on dose and duration of drug use, allowing estimates of cumulative exposure. Outcome data from formal cancer registries are preferable, but cancer data from other sources, for example, patient......In this MiniReview, we provide general considerations for the planning and conduct of pharmacoepidemiological studies of associations between drug use and cancer development. We address data sources, study design, assessment of drug exposure, ascertainment of cancer outcomes, confounder adjustment...... or pathology registries, medical records or claims are also suitable. The two principal designs for observational studies evaluating drug-cancer associations are the cohort and case-control designs. A key challenge in studies of drug-cancer associations is the exposure assessment due to the typically long...

  2. Anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma lucidum: active ingredients and pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Chi H.J. Kao; Amalini C. Jesuthasan; Karen S. Bishop; Marcus P. Glucina; Lynnette R. Ferguson

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACTGanoderma lucidum, commonly referred to as Lingzhi, has been used in Asia for health promotion for centuries. The anti-cancer effects of G. lucidum have been demonstrated in both in vitro and in vivo studies. In addition, the observed anti-cancer activities of Ganoderma have prompted its usage by cancer patients alongside chemotherapy.The main two bioactive components of G. lucidum can be broadly grouped into triterpenes and polysaccharides. Despite triterpenes and polysaccharides bei...

  3. Hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Christoffer V; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Mørtz, Charlotte G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are reported to be the second most common cause of drug hypersensitivity. In 2011, experts from the EAACI/ENDA group and GA(2)LEN proposed a new classification system for NSAID hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to classify...... responders reacted to non-pyrazolone drugs. Only one patient could not be classified according to the EAACI/ENDA system. An overlap between respiratory and cutaneous symptoms was found in 15/39 (38%) of patients. CONCLUSIONS: All but one of our patients could be classified according to the EAACI...

  4. Measured density and calculated baricity of custom-compounded drugs for chronic intrathecal infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejtmanek, Michael R; Harvey, Tracy D; Bernards, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    To minimize the frequency that intrathecal pumps require refilling, drugs are custom compounded at very high concentrations. Unfortunately, the baricity of these custom solutions is unknown, which is problematic, given baricity's importance in determining the spread of intrathecally administered drugs. Consequently, we measured the density and calculated the baricity of clinically relevant concentrations of multiple drugs used for intrathecal infusion. Morphine, clonidine, bupivacaine, and baclofen were weighed to within 0.0001 g and diluted in volumetric flasks to produce solutions of known concentrations (morphine 1, 10, 25, and 50 mg/mL; clonidine 0.05, 0.5, 1, and 3 mg/mL; bupivacaine 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mg/mL; baclofen 1, 1.5, 2, and 4 mg/mL). The densities of the solutions were measured at 37°C using the mechanical oscillation method. A "best-fit" curve was calculated for plots of concentration versus density for each drug. All prepared solutions of clonidine and baclofen were hypobaric. Higher concentrations of morphine and bupivacaine were hyperbaric, whereas lower concentrations were hypobaric. The relationship between concentration and density is linear for morphine (r > 0.99) and bupivacaine (r > 0.99) and logarithmic for baclofen (r = 0.96) and clonidine (r = 0.98). This is the first study to examine the relationship between concentration and density for custom drug concentrations commonly used in implanted intrathecal pumps. We calculated an equation that defines the relationship between concentration and density for each drug. Using these equations, clinicians can calculate the density of any solution made from the drugs studied here.

  5. Essential drugs for cancer chemotherapy. WHO consultation.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The WHO recommendation on essential drugs for cancer chemotherapy has been updated. General principles on the proper role of cancer chemotherapeutic agents in relation to efficacy and on the classification of tumours with respect to their curative potential are discussed. Curable cancers and those cancers where the cost-benefit ratio clearly favours drug treatment can be managed appropriately based on only 24 drugs. Fourteen of them should ideally be available for the treatment of the ten mos...

  6. uPAR as anti-cancer target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ida K; Illemann, Martin; Thurison, Tine

    2011-01-01

    , and a potential diagnostic and predictive impact of the different uPAR forms has been reported. Hence, pericellular proteolysis seems to be a suitable target for anti-cancer therapy and numerous approaches have been pursued. Targeting of this process may be achieved by preventing the binding of uPA to u...... using mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mouse uPA or uPAR. These reagents will target uPA and uPAR in both stromal cells and cancer cells, and their therapeutic potential can now be assessed in syngenic mouse cancer models....

  7. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, R. W. F.; Brundel, D. H. S.; Neef, C.; van Gelder, T.; Mathijssen, R. H. J.; Burger, D. M.; Jansman, F. G. A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment. Methods: A

  8. Prevalence of potential drug-drug interactions in cancer patients treated with oral anticancer drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.F. van Leeuwen (Roelof); D.H.S. Brundel (D. H S); C. Neef (Cees); T. van Gelder (Teun); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); D.M. Burger (David); F.G.A. Jansman (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) in patients with cancer are common, but have not previously been quantified for oral anticancer treatment. We assessed the prevalence and seriousness of potential PDDIs among ambulatory cancer patients on oral anticancer treatment.

  9. Novel approaches in anti-arenaviral drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Andrew M.; Pasquato, Antonella; Kunz, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Hemorrhagic fevers caused by arenaviruses are among the most devastating emerging human diseases. Considering the number of individuals affected, the current lack of a licensed vaccine, and the limited therapeutic options, arenaviruses are arguably among the most neglected tropical pathogens and the development of efficacious anti-arenaviral drugs is of high priority. Over the past years significant efforts have been undertaken to identify novel potent inhibitors of arenavirus infection. High throughput screening of small molecule libraries employing pseudotype platforms led to the discovery of several potent and broadly active inhibitors of arenavirus cell entry that are effective against the major hemorrhagic arenaviruses. Mechanistic studies revealed that these novel entry inhibitors block arenavirus membrane fusion and provided novel insights into the unusual mechanism of this process. The success of these approaches highlights the power of small molecule screens in antiviral drug discovery and establishes arenavirus membrane fusion as a robust drug target. These broad screenings have been complemented by strategies targeting cellular factors involved in productive arenavirus infection. Approaches targeting the cellular protease implicated in maturation of the fusion-active viral envelope glycoprotein identified the proteolytic processing of the arenavirus glycoprotein precursor as a novel and promising target for anti-arenaviral strategies.

  10. Modeling of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug effect within signaling pathways and miRNA-regulation pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    Full Text Available To date, it is widely recognized that Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs can exert considerable anti-tumor effects regarding many types of cancers. The prolonged use of NSAIDs is highly associated with diverse side effects. Therefore, tailoring down the NSAID application onto individual patients has become a necessary and relevant step towards personalized medicine. This study conducts the systemsbiological approach to construct a molecular model (NSAID model containing a cyclooxygenase (COX-pathway and its related signaling pathways. Four cancer hallmarks are integrated into the model to reflect different developmental aspects of tumorigenesis. In addition, a Flux-Comparative-Analysis (FCA based on Petri net is developed to transfer the dynamic properties (including drug responsiveness of individual cellular system into the model. The gene expression profiles of different tumor-types with available drug-response information are applied to validate the predictive ability of the NSAID model. Moreover, two therapeutic developmental strategies, synthetic lethality and microRNA (miRNA biomarker discovery, are investigated based on the COX-pathway. In conclusion, the result of this study demonstrates that the NSAID model involving gene expression, gene regulation, signal transduction, protein interaction and other cellular processes, is able to predict the individual cellular responses for different therapeutic interventions (such as NS-398 and COX-2 specific siRNA inhibition. This strongly indicates that this type of model is able to reflect the physiological, developmental and pathological processes of an individual. The approach of miRNA biomarker discovery is demonstrated for identifying miRNAs with oncogenic and tumor suppressive functions for individual cell lines of breast-, colon- and lung-tumor. The achieved results are in line with different independent studies that investigated miRNA biomarker related to diagnostics of cancer

  11. Availability, price and affordability of anti-tuberculosis drugs in Europe: a TBNET survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günther, Gunar; Gomez, Gabriela B.; Lange, Christoph; Rupert, Stephan; van Leth, Frank; Andrejak, Claire; Pieridou-Bagatzouni, Despo; Anderson, Aase Bengard; Bojovic, Olivera; Bothamley, Graham; Bruchfeld, Judith; Codecasa, Luigi R.; Danilovits, Manfred; Davidaviciene, Edita; Dalemo, Paulina; Dimopoulos, Giorgos; Duarte, Raquel; Hafizi, Hasan; Horvath, Ildiko; Eyuboglu, Fusun; Ibraim, Elmira; Jankovic, Mateja; Kan, Boris; Kopecka, Emilia; Kruczak, Katarzyna; Kutsyna, Galyna; de lange, Wiel; Leimane, Vaira; Mack, Ulrich; Manzano, Juan Ruiz; Markova, Roumania; McDonald, Colm; McLaughlin, Anne-Marie; Mulliqi, Gjyle; Muylle, Inge; Pesut, Dragica; Polcova, Veronika; Rumetshofer, Rudolf; Rusu, Doina; Skrahina, Alena; Spiric, Nicolina; Solovic, Ivan; Svetina-Sorli, Petra; Vasakova, Martina; Vasankari, Tuula; Viiklepp, Piret; Wirz, Gil; Zakoska, Maja; Zellweger, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Data on availability and cost of anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs in relation to affordability at national level are scarce. We performed a cross-sectional study on availability and cost of anti-TB drugs at major TB-reference centres in 37 European countries. Costs of standardised treatment regimens

  12. DNA-dependent protein kinase modulates the anti-cancer properties of silver nanoparticles in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hui Kheng; Gurung, Resham Lal; Hande, M Prakash

    2017-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) were reported to be toxic to eukaryotic cells. These potentially detrimental effects of Ag-np can be advantageous in experimental therapeutics. They are currently being employed to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cancer drugs. In this study, we demonstrate that Ag-np treatment trigger the activation of DNA-PKcs and JNK pathway at selected doses, presumably as a physiologic response to DNA damage and repair in normal and malignant cells. Ag-np altered the telomere dynamics by disrupting the shelterin complex located at the telomeres and telomere lengths. The genotoxic effect of Ag-np was not restricted to telomeres but the entire genome as Ag-np induced γ-H2AX foci formation, an indicator of global DNA damage. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity sensitised the cancer cells towards the cytotoxicity of Ag-np and substantiated the damaging effect of Ag-np at telomeres in human cancer cells. Abrogation of JNK mediated DNA repair and extensive damage of telomeres led to greater cell death following Ag-np treatment in DNA-PKcs inhibited cancer cells. Collectively, this study suggests that improved anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of Ag-np treatment in cancer cells can be achieved by the inhibition of DNA-PKcs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Quorum sensing Inhibitors as anti-pathogenic drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Givskov, Michael Christian

    2006-01-01

    as well as elevated tolerance to the activity of the innate immune system. Gram-negative bacteria commonly use N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) as QS signal molecules. The use of signal molecule based drugs to attenuate bacterial pathogenecity rather than bacterial growth is attractive for several reasons......, particularly considering the emergence of increasingly antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Compounds capable of this type of interference have been termed anti-pathogenic drugs. A large variety of synthetic AHL analogues and natural products libraries have been screened and a number of QS inhibitors (QSI) have been...

  14. Intraarterial infusion of cisplatin with and without preoperative concurrent radiation for urinary bladder cancer. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzen, Yoshio; Mori, Hiromu; Matsumoto, Shunro

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical efficacy of treating urinary bladder cancer by intraarterial infusion of cisplatin using an implanted reservoir with and without preoperative concurrent radiation. No previous reports have compared the results obtained by these two methods of treatment. Twenty-three patients with bladder cancer were treated by intraarterial infusion of cisplatin using an implanted reservoir with (n=13) and without (n=10) concurrent radiation. The cisplatin plus radiation group received intraarterial cisplatin at a total dose of 200-400 mg and concurrent radiation to a total dose to 30 Gy. The cisplatin group received intraarterial cisplatin at a total dose of 100-600 mg. In the cisplatin plus radiation group, the overall tumor response rate was 92%. Seven of 13 (53%) patients obtained complate response (CR), and the 2-year actuarial survival rate was 92%. Only one of the seven complete responders has had a local recurrence. In the cisplatin group, the overall tumor response rate was 90%. Four of 10 (40%) patients obtained CR, and median survival was 8 months. Three of the four complete responders have had local recurrence. There was no significant difference between these two groups in the frequency of side effects. Concurrent radiation therapy with intraarterial cisplatin resulted in a very low rate of recurrence of bladder cancer compared with intraarterial cisplatin therapy alone. This method was useful for urinary bladder cancer and may become the treatment of choice for this type of cancer. (author)

  15. Pathogenesis of Brain Edema and Investigation into Anti-Edema Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michinaga, Shotaro; Koyama, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological state that occurs after brain injuries such as stroke and head trauma. In the edematous brain, excess accumulation of extracellular fluid results in elevation of intracranial pressure, leading to impaired nerve function. Despite the seriousness of brain edema, only symptomatic treatments to remove edema fluid are currently available. Thus, the development of novel anti-edema drugs is required. The pathogenesis of brain edema is classified as vasogenic or cytotoxic edema. Vasogenic edema is defined as extracellular accumulation of fluid resulting from disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and extravasations of serum proteins, while cytotoxic edema is characterized by cell swelling caused by intracellular accumulation of fluid. Various experimental animal models are often used to investigate mechanisms underlying brain edema. Many soluble factors and functional molecules have been confirmed to induce BBB disruption or cell swelling and drugs targeted to these factors are expected to have anti-edema effects. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and involvement of factors that induce brain edema formation, and the possibility of anti-edema drugs targeting them. PMID:25941935

  16. Cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelle, Sven; Reichenbach, Stephan; Wandel, Simon; Hildebrand, Pius; Tschannen, Beatrice; Villiger, Peter M; Egger, Matthias; Jüni, Peter

    2011-01-11

    To analyse the available evidence on cardiovascular safety of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Network meta-analysis. Bibliographic databases, conference proceedings, study registers, the Food and Drug Administration website, reference lists of relevant articles, and reports citing relevant articles through the Science Citation Index (last update July 2009). Manufacturers of celecoxib and lumiracoxib provided additional data. All large scale randomised controlled trials comparing any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or placebo. Two investigators independently assessed eligibility. The primary outcome was myocardial infarction. Secondary outcomes included stroke, death from cardiovascular disease, and death from any cause. Two investigators independently extracted data. 31 trials in 116 429 patients with more than 115 000 patient years of follow-up were included. Patients were allocated to naproxen, ibuprofen, diclofenac, celecoxib, etoricoxib, rofecoxib, lumiracoxib, or placebo. Compared with placebo, rofecoxib was associated with the highest risk of myocardial infarction (rate ratio 2.12, 95% credibility interval 1.26 to 3.56), followed by lumiracoxib (2.00, 0.71 to 6.21). Ibuprofen was associated with the highest risk of stroke (3.36, 1.00 to 11.6), followed by diclofenac (2.86, 1.09 to 8.36). Etoricoxib (4.07, 1.23 to 15.7) and diclofenac (3.98, 1.48 to 12.7) were associated with the highest risk of cardiovascular death. Although uncertainty remains, little evidence exists to suggest that any of the investigated drugs are safe in cardiovascular terms. Naproxen seemed least harmful. Cardiovascular risk needs to be taken into account when prescribing any non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug.

  17. Anti-cancer evaluation of quercetin embedded PLA nanoparticles synthesized by emulsified nanoprecipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sanjeev K; Patel, Dinesh K; Thakur, Ravi; Mishra, Durga P; Maiti, Pralay; Haldar, Chandana

    2015-04-01

    This study was carried out to synthesize quercetin (Qt) embedded poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanoparticles (PLA-Qt) and to evaluate anti-cancer efficacy of PLA-Qt by using human breast cancer cells. PLA-Qt were synthesized by using novel emulsified nanoprecipitation technique with varying dimension of 32 ± 8 to 152 ± 9 nm of PLA-Qt with 62 ± 3% (w/w) entrapment efficiency by varying the concentration of polymer, emulsifier, drug and preparation temperature. The dimension of PLA-Qt was measured through transmission electron microscopy indicating larger particle size at higher concentration of PLA. The release rate of Qt from PLA-Qt was found to be more sustained for larger particle dimension (152 ± 9 nm) as compared to smaller particle dimension (32 ± 8 nm). Interaction between Qt and PLA was verified through spectroscopic and calorimetric methods. Delayed diffusion and stronger interaction in PLA-Qt caused the sustained delivery of Qt from the polymer matrix. In vitro cytotoxicity study indicate the killing of ∼ 50% breast cancer cells in two days at 100 μg/ml of drug concentration while the ∼ 40% destruction of cells require 5 days for PLA-Qt (46 ± 6 nm; 20mg/ml of PLA). Thus our results propose anticancer efficacy of PLA-Qt nanoparticles in terms of its sustained release kinetics revealing novel vehicle for the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 880.2420 - Electronic monitor for gravity flow infusion systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Personal Use Monitoring Devices § 880.2420 Electronic monitor for gravity flow infusion systems. (a) Identification. An electronic monitor for gravity flow infusion systems is a device used to... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic monitor for gravity flow infusion...

  19. A prodrug-doped cellular Trojan Horse for the potential treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Oren; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Han, Edward; Rosen, David Marc; Musabeyezu, Juliet; Safaee, Helia; Ranganath, Sudhir; Ngai, Jessica; Heinelt, Martina; Milton, Yuka; Wang, Hao; Bhagchandani, Sachin H; Joshi, Nitin; Bhowmick, Neil; Denmeade, Samuel R; Isaacs, John T; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Despite considerable advances in prostate cancer research, there is a major need for a systemic delivery platform that efficiently targets anti-cancer drugs to sites of disseminated prostate cancer while minimizing host toxicity. In this proof-of-principle study, human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were loaded with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microparticles (MPs) that encapsulate the macromolecule G114, a thapsigargin-based prostate specific antigen (PSA)-activated prodrug. G114-particles (∼950 nm in size) were internalized by MSCs, followed by the release of G114 as an intact prodrug from loaded cells. Moreover, G114 released from G114 MP-loaded MSCs selectively induced death of the PSA-secreting PCa cell line, LNCaP. Finally, G114 MP-loaded MSCs inhibited tumor growth when used in proof-of-concept co-inoculation studies with CWR22 PCa xenografts, suggesting that cell-based delivery of G114 did not compromise the potency of this pro-drug in-vitro or in-vivo. This study demonstrates a potentially promising approach to assemble a cell-based drug delivery platform, which inhibits cancer growth in-vivo without the need of genetic engineering. We envision that upon achieving efficient homing of systemically infused MSCs to cancer sites, this MSC-based platform may be developed into an effective, systemic 'Trojan Horse' therapy for targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to sites of metastatic PCa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identifying novel drug indications through automated reasoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Tari

    Full Text Available With the large amount of pharmacological and biological knowledge available in literature, finding novel drug indications for existing drugs using in silico approaches has become increasingly feasible. Typical literature-based approaches generate new hypotheses in the form of protein-protein interactions networks by means of linking concepts based on their cooccurrences within abstracts. However, this kind of approaches tends to generate too many hypotheses, and identifying new drug indications from large networks can be a time-consuming process.In this work, we developed a method that acquires the necessary facts from literature and knowledge bases, and identifies new drug indications through automated reasoning. This is achieved by encoding the molecular effects caused by drug-target interactions and links to various diseases and drug mechanism as domain knowledge in AnsProlog, a declarative language that is useful for automated reasoning, including reasoning with incomplete information. Unlike other literature-based approaches, our approach is more fine-grained, especially in identifying indirect relationships for drug indications.To evaluate the capability of our approach in inferring novel drug indications, we applied our method to 943 drugs from DrugBank and asked if any of these drugs have potential anti-cancer activities based on information on their targets and molecular interaction types alone. A total of 507 drugs were found to have the potential to be used for cancer treatments. Among the potential anti-cancer drugs, 67 out of 81 drugs (a recall of 82.7% are indeed known cancer drugs. In addition, 144 out of 289 drugs (a recall of 49.8% are non-cancer drugs that are currently tested in clinical trials for cancer treatments. These results suggest that our method is able to infer drug indications (original or alternative based on their molecular targets and interactions alone and has the potential to discover novel drug indications for

  1. Melatonin as a multifunctional anti-cancer molecule: Implications in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Mohammad Hossein; Moloudizargari, Milad; Ghobadi, Emad; Fallah, Marjan; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-09-15

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a predominant malignancy with a high mortality rate affecting a large population worldwide. The etiology of GC is multifactorial spanning from various genetic determinants to different environmental causes. Current tretaments of GC are not efficient enough and require improvements to minimize the adverse effects. Melatonin, a naturally occurring compound with known potent inhibitory effects on cancer cells is one of the major candidates which can be recruited herein. Here we reviewed the articles conducted on the therapeutic effects of melatonin in gastric cancer in various models. The results are classified according to different aspects of cancer pathogenesis and the molecular mechanisms by which melatonin exerts its effects. Melatonin could be used to combat GC exploiting its effects on multiple aspects of its pathogenesis, including formation of cancer cells, tumor growth and angiogenesis, differentiation and metastasis as well as enhancing the anti-tumor immunity. Melatonin is a pleiotropic anti-cancer molecule that affects malignant cells via multiple mechanisms. It has been shown to benefit cancer patients indirectly by reducing side effects of current therapies which have been discussed in this review. This field of research is still underdeveloped and may serve as an interesting subject for further studies aiming at the molecular mechanisms of melatonin and novel treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The vitamin E analog, alpha-tocopheryloxyacetic acid enhances the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab against HER2/neu-expressing breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penichet Manuel L

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HER2/neu is an oncogene that facilitates neoplastic transformation due to its ability to transduce growth signals in a ligand-independent manner, is over-expressed in 20-30% of human breast cancers correlating with aggressive disease and has been successfully targeted with trastuzumab (Herceptin®. Because trastuzumab alone achieves only a 15-30% response rate, it is now commonly combined with conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. While the combination of trastuzumab plus chemotherapy has greatly improved response rates and increased survival, these conventional chemotherapy drugs are frequently associated with gastrointestinal and cardiac toxicity, bone marrow and immune suppression. These drawbacks necessitate the development of new, less toxic drugs that can be combined with trastuzumab. Recently, we reported that orally administered alpha-tocopheryloxyacetic acid (α-TEA, a novel ether derivative of alpha-tocopherol, dramatically suppressed primary tumor growth and reduced the incidence of lung metastases both in a transplanted and a spontaneous mouse model of breast cancer without discernable toxicity. Methods In this study we examined the effect of α-TEA plus HER2/neu-specific antibody treatment on HER2/neu-expressing breast cancer cells in vitro and in a HER2/neu positive human xenograft tumor model in vivo. Results We show in vitro that α-TEA plus anti-HER2/neu antibody has an increased cytotoxic effect against murine mammary tumor cells and human breast cancer cells and that the anti-tumor effect of α-TEA is independent of HER2/neu status. More importantly, in a human breast cancer xenograft model, the combination of α-TEA plus trastuzumab resulted in faster tumor regression and more tumor-free animals than trastuzumab alone. Conclusion Due to the cancer cell selectivity of α-TEA, and because α-TEA kills both HER2/neu positive and HER2/neu negative breast cancer cells, it has the potential to be effective and

  3. The fourth national anti-tuberculosis drug resistance survey in Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhung, N V; Hoa, N B; Sy, D N; Hennig, C M; Dean, A S

    2015-06-01

    Viet Nam's Fourth National Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Survey was conducted in 2011. To determine the prevalence of resistance to the four main first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs in Viet Nam. Eighty clusters were selected using a probability proportion to size approach. Drug susceptibility testing (DST) against the four main first-line anti-tuberculosis drugs was performed. A total of 1629 smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) patients were eligible for culture. Of these, DST results were available for 1312 patients, including 1105 new TB cases, 195 previously treated TB cases and 12 cases with an unknown treatment history. The proportion of cases with resistance to any drug was 32.7% (95%CI 29.1-36.5) among new cases and 54.2% (95%CI 44.3-63.7) among previously treated cases. The proportion of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases was 4.0% (95%CI 2.5-5.4) in new cases and 23.3 (95%CI 16.7-29.9) in previously treated cases. The fourth drug resistance survey in Viet Nam found that the proportion of MDR-TB among new and previously treated cases was not significantly different from that in the 2005 survey. The National TB Programme should prioritise the detection and treatment of MDR-TB to reduce transmission of MDR-TB in the community.

  4. National anti-tuberculosis drug resistance study in Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chonde, T. M.; Basra, D.; Mfinanga, S. G. M.; Range, N.; Lwilla, F.; Shirima, R. P.; van Deun, A.; Zignol, M.; Cobelens, F. G.; Egwaga, S. M.; van Leth, F.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in a national representative sample of tuberculosis (TB) patients in Tanzania according to recommended methodology. DESIGN: Cluster survey, with 40 clusters sampled proportional to size, of notified TB patients from all

  5. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaoguang [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Department of Medical Microbiology, Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150086 (China); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Qian, Hua [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Center for AIDS Research, Kumamoto University, 2-2-1 Honjo, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Miyamoto, Fusako [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Naito, Takeshi [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Kawaji, Kumi [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kajiwara, Kazumi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); JST Innovation Plaza Kyoto, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Nishigyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8245 (Japan); Hattori, Toshio [Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine/Division of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Matsuoka, Masao [Laboratory of Virus Control, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaramachi, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1{sub IIIB} and HIV-1{sub BaL} as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1{sub IIIB} and anti-HIV-1{sub BaL} activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, 'phenotypic drug evaluation', may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  6. A simple, rapid, and sensitive system for the evaluation of anti-viral drugs in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Qian, Hua; Miyamoto, Fusako; Naito, Takeshi; Kawaji, Kumi; Kajiwara, Kazumi; Hattori, Toshio; Matsuoka, Masao; Watanabe, Kentaro; Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We established a novel, simple and rapid in vivo system for evaluation of anti-HIV-1 drugs with rats. ► The system may be applicable for other antiviral drugs, and/or useful for initial screening in vivo. ► In this system, TRI-1144 displayed the most potent anti-HIV-1 activity in vivo. -- Abstract: The lack of small animal models for the evaluation of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) agents hampers drug development. Here, we describe the establishment of a simple and rapid evaluation system in a rat model without animal infection facilities. After intraperitoneal administration of test drugs to rats, antiviral activity in the sera was examined by the MAGI assay. Recently developed inhibitors for HIV-1 entry, two CXCR4 antagonists, TF14016 and FC131, and four fusion inhibitors, T-20, T-20EK, SC29EK, and TRI-1144, were evaluated using HIV-1 IIIB and HIV-1 BaL as representative CXCR4- and CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains, respectively. CXCR4 antagonists were shown to only possess anti-HIV-1 IIIB activity, whereas fusion inhibitors showed both anti-HIV-1 IIIB and anti-HIV-1 BaL activities in rat sera. These results indicate that test drugs were successfully processed into the rat sera and could be detected by the MAGI assay. In this system, TRI-1144 showed the most potent and sustained antiviral activity. Sera from animals not administered drugs showed substantial anti-HIV-1 activity, indicating that relatively high dose or activity of the test drugs might be needed. In conclusion, the novel rat system established here, “phenotypic drug evaluation”, may be applicable for the evaluation of various antiviral drugs in vivo.

  7. Use of biomarkers in the discovery of novel anti-schizophrenia drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Jens D; Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by a diverse symptomatology that often includes positive, cognitive and negative symptoms. Current anti-schizophrenic drugs act at multiple receptors, but little is known about how each of these receptors contributes to their mechanisms of action. Screening of novel...... anti-schizophrenic drug candidates targeting single receptors will be based on biomarker assays that measure signalling pathways, transcriptional factors, epigenetic mechanisms and synaptic function and translate these effects to behavioural effects in animals and humans. This review discusses current...

  8. NK-1 receptor antagonists as anti-cancer drugs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the proliferation of tumour cells, angiogenesis and the migration of tumour cells. We review the involvement of SP, the NK-1 receptor and NK-1 receptor antagonists in cancer. Tumour cells overexpress NK-1 receptors, ...

  9. Absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG): An updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ren-You; Li, Hua-Bin; Sui, Zhong-Quan; Corke, Harold

    2018-04-13

    Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world, especially in Asian countries. Consumption of green tea has been demonstrated to possess many health benefits, which mainly attributed to the main bioactive compound epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a flavone-3-ol polyphenol, in green tea. EGCG is mainly absorbed in the intestine, and gut microbiota play a critical role in its metabolism prior to absorption. EGCG exhibits versatile bioactivities, with its anti-cancer effect most attracting due to the cancer preventive effect of green tea consumption, and a great number of studies intensively investigated its anti-cancer effect. In this review, we therefore, first stated the absorption and metabolism process of EGCG, and then summarized its anti-cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, including its manifold anti-cancer actions and mechanisms, especially its anti-cancer stem cell effect, and next highlighted its various molecular targets involved in cancer inhibition. Finally, the anti-cancer effect of EGCG analogs and nanoparticles, as well as the potential cancer promoting effect of EGCG were also discussed. Understanding of the absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of EGCG can be of importance to better utilize it as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent.

  10. Nose-to-brain drug delivery: An update on clinical challenges and progress towards approval of anti-Alzheimer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Mukta; Saraf, Swarnlata; Saraf, Shailendra; Antimisiaris, Sophia G; Chougule, Mahavir Bhupal; Shoyele, Sunday A; Alexander, Amit

    2018-05-23

    According to the Alzheimer Association Report (2017), Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the 6th primary cause of death in the USA, which affects nearly 5.5 million people. In the year 2017 itself, the cost of AD treatment in the USA has been reported to rise to $259 billion. This statistic shows the severity of the disease in the USA which is very much similar across the globe. On the other hand, the treatment remains limited to a few conventional oral medications (approved by FDA). These are mainly acting superficially from mild to the moderate AD. The therapeutic efficacy of the drug is not only affected by its reduced concentration in the brain owing to the existence of blood-brain-barrier (BBB) but also due to its low brain permeability. In this context, the intranasal (IN) route of drug administration has emerged as an alternative route over the systemic (oral and parenteral) drug delivery to the brain. The delivery of the drug via an IN route offers various advantages over systemic drug delivery system, as it directly delivers the drug into the brain via olfactory route. Presence of drug in the olfactory bulb, in turn, increases the drug bioavailability in the brain and reduces the drug degradation as well as wastage of the drug through` systemic clearance. However, there is also some limitation associated with IN like poor drug permeation through the nasal mucosa and mucociliary clearance. The delivery system various through novel strategies (nano drug carrier system, colloidal carriers, mucoadhesive devices, controlled delivery system, pro-drug, etc.) are adapted to overcome the above-stated limitations. Although, after all, such successful research claims, very few of the nose-to-brain drug delivery of anti-AD drugs have gained market approval due to lack of sufficient clinical evidence. Onzetra Xsail® is one such marketed preparations approved for IN delivery used for the treatment of a brain disorder; migraine. In the field of patents also, no work is found

  11. In vitro anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities of Cuscuta reflexa Roxb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, V; Sruthi, V; Padmaja, B; Asha, V V

    2011-04-12

    To determine anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities of Cuscuta reflexa in cell lines (in vitro). Anti-inflammatory activity of the water extract was analysed in vitro using lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced inflammatory reactions in murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7. The expression of COX-2 and TNF-α genes involved in inflammation was analysed by SQ RT-PCR. EMSA was conducted to analyse the influence of the extract on NF-κB signalling. Anti-cancer activity was analysed on Hep3B cells by MTT assay, DAPI staining, annexin V staining and SQ-RT PCR analysis of BAX, Bcl-2, p53 and survivin. The extract down regulated LPS induced over expression of TNF-α and COX-2 in RAW264.7 cells; blocked NF-κB binding to its motifs and induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells as evidenced from MTT, DAPI staining and annexin V staining assays. The extract up regulated pro-apoptotic factors BAX and p53, and down regulated anti-apoptotic factors Bcl-2 and survivin. The study showed that Cuscuta reflexa inhibits LPS induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells through interplay of TNF-α, COX-2 and NF-κB signalling. It induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells through the up regulation of p53, BAX and down regulation of Bcl-2 and survivin. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of macro and microminerals in crude drugs and infusions of five herbs widely used as sedatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E. Petenatti

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been determined the concentration of fourteen micro and macrominerals (Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Se, and Zn in both crude drugs and infusions of Melissa officinalis L., Lamiaceae, Nepeta cataria L., Lamiaceae, Passiflora caerulea L., Passifloraceae, Tilia x moltkei Späth ex C.K. Schneid., Tiliaceae, and Valeriana officinalis L., Caprifoliaceae. These herbs are widely consumed by its sedative properties, either alone or in herb mixtures. All measurements were performed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES. The products were obtained from regional markets, mainly in San Luis province (Argentina. The estimated daily intake was compared with current recommendations. All products and its infusions were included within the upper tolerable limits for minerals, in trace elements such as toxic elements present at low levels.

  13. Evaluation of macro and microminerals in crude drugs and infusions of five herbs widely used as sedatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta E. Petenatti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been determined the concentration of fourteen micro and macrominerals (Al, Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Se, and Zn in both crude drugs and infusions of Melissa officinalis L., Lamiaceae, Nepeta cataria L., Lamiaceae, Passiflora caerulea L., Passifloraceae, Tilia x moltkei Späth ex C.K. Schneid., Tiliaceae, and Valeriana officinalis L., Caprifoliaceae. These herbs are widely consumed by its sedative properties, either alone or in herb mixtures. All measurements were performed using an inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES. The products were obtained from regional markets, mainly in San Luis province (Argentina. The estimated daily intake was compared with current recommendations. All products and its infusions were included within the upper tolerable limits for minerals, in trace elements such as toxic elements present at low levels.

  14. In Silico-Based Repositioning of Phosphinothricin as a Novel Technetium-99m Imaging Probe with Potential Anti-Cancer Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, Tamer M; Khedr, Mohammed A; Rashed, Hassan M; Mohamed, Maged E

    2018-02-23

    l-Phosphinothricin (glufosinate or 2-amino-4-((hydroxy(methyl) phosphinyl) butyric acid ammonium salt (AHPB)), which is a structural analog of glutamate, is a recognized herbicide that acts on weeds through inhibition of glutamine synthetase. Due to the structural similarity between phosphinothricin and some bisphosphonates (BPs), this study focuses on investigating the possibility of repurposing phosphinothricin as a bisphosphonate analogue, particularly in two medicine-related activities: image probing and as an anti-cancer drug. As BP is a competitive inhibitor of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (HFPPS), in silico molecular docking and dynamic simulations studies were established to evaluate the binding and stability of phosphinothricin with HFPPS, while the results showed good binding and stability in the active site of the enzyme in relation to alendronate. For the purpose of inspecting bone-tissue accumulation of phosphinothricin, a technetium ( 99m Tc)-phosphinothricin complex was developed and its stability and tissue distribution were scrutinized. The radioactive complex showed rapid, high and sustained uptake into bone tissues. Finally, the cytotoxic activity of phosphinothricin was tested against breast and lung cancer cells, with the results indicating cytotoxic activity in relation to alendronate. All the above results provide support for the use of phosphinothricin as a potential anti-cancer drug and of its technetium complex as an imaging probe.

  15. Advancing medication infusion safety through the clinical integration of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, Donald; O'Shea, Kristen; Muller, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Adverse drug events resulting from errors in prescribing or administering medications are preventable. Within a hospital system, numerous technologies are employed to address the common sources of medication error, including the use of electronic medical records, physician order entry, smart infusion pumps, and barcode medication administration systems. Infusion safety is inherently risky because of the high-risk medications administered and the lack of integration among the stand-alone systems in most institutions. Intravenous clinical integration (IVCI) is a technology that connects electronic medical records, physician order entry, smart infusion pumps, and barcode medication administration systems. It combines the safety features of an automatically programmed infusion pump (drug, concentration, infusion rate, and patient weight, all auto-programmed into the device) with software that provides visibility to real-time clinical infusion data. Our article describes the characteristics of IVCI at WellSpan Health and its impact on patient safety. The integrated infusion system has the capability of reducing medication errors, improving patient care, reducing in-facility costs, and supporting asset management. It can enhance continuous quality improvement efforts and efficiency of clinical work flow. After implementing IVCI, the institution realized a safer patient environment and a more streamlined work flow for pharmacy and nursing.

  16. Microencapsulation of anti-tumor, antibiotic and thrombolytic drugs in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Mosier, Benjamin; Cassanto, John

    1994-01-01

    Encapsulation of cytotoxic or labile drugs enables targeted delivery and sustained release kinetics that are not available with intravenous injection. A new liquid-liquid diffusion process has been developed for forming unique microcapsules that contain both aqueous and hydrocarbon soluble drugs. Microgravity experiments, on sounding rockets (1989-92) and Shuttle missions STS-52 (1992) and STS-56 (1993) using an automated Materials Dispersion Apparatus, produced multi-lamellar microcapsules containing both Cis-platinum (anti-tumor drug) and iodinated poppy seed oil (a radiocontrast medium), surrounded by a polyglyceride skin. Microcapsules formed with amoxicillin (antibiotic) or urokinase (a clot dissolving enzyme), co-encapsulated with IPO, are still intact after two years. Microcapsules were formed with the drug so concentrated that crystals formed inside. Multi-layered microspheres, with both hydrophobic drug compartments, can enable diffusion of complementary drugs from the same microcapsule, e.g. antibiotics and immuno-stimulants to treat resistant infections or multiple fibrinolytic drugs to dissolve emboli. Co-encapsulation of enough radio-contrast medium enables oncologists to monitor the delivery of anti-tumor microcapsules to target tumors using computerized tomography and radiography that would track the distribution of microcapsules after release from the intra-arterial catheter. These microcapsules could have important applications in chemotheraphy of certain liver, kidney, brain and other tumors.

  17. Promoting Value, Affordability, and Innovation in Cancer Drug Treatment - The Rising Cost of Cancer Drugs: Impact on Patients and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innovative new drugs have improved outcomes for many cancer patients. But spending on cancer drugs has increased dramatically in recent years, placing a burden on cancer patients and a strain on health system and societal resources.

  18. Anti-Angiogenics: Current Situation and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirlik, Katja; Duyster, Justus

    2018-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the process leading to the formation of new blood vessels, is one of the hallmarks of cancer. Extensive studies established that i) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key driver of sprouting angiogenesis, ii) VEGF is overexpressed in most solid cancers, and iii) inhibition of VEGF can suppress tumor growth in animal models. This has led to the development of pharmacological agents for anti-angiogenesis to disrupt the vascular supply and starve the tumor of nutrients and oxygen, primarily through the blockade of VEGF/VEGF receptor signaling. This effort has resulted in 11 anti-VEGF drugs approved for certain advanced cancers, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy and other targeted therapies. However, inhibition of VEGF signaling is not effective in all cancers, and anti-angiogenics have often only limited impact on overall survival of cancer patients. This review focuses on the current status of FDA-approved anti-angiogenic antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors and summarizes the progress and future directions of VEGF-targeted therapy. © 2018 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  19. Systematic comparison of drug-tolerant assays for anti-drug antibodies in a cohort of adalimumab-treated rheumatoid arthritis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloem, Karien; van Leeuwen, Astrid; Verbeek, Gerrit; Nurmohamed, Michael T.; Wolbink, Gerrit Jan; van der Kleij, Desiree; Rispens, Theo

    2015-01-01

    Drug interference complicates assessment of immunogenicity of biologicals and results in an underestimation of anti-drug antibody (ADA) formation. Drug-tolerant assays have the potential to overcome such limitations. However, to which extent drug-tolerant assays provide an unbiased picture of the

  20. Efeito anti-proliferativo das infusões de Achyrocline satureioides DC (Asteraceae sobre o ciclo celular de Allium cepa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M. Fachinetto

    Full Text Available Achyrocline satureioides (marcela é utilizada na medicina popular brasileira, na forma de chá, como tratamento de patologias digestivas e inflamatórias. O efeito anti-proliferativo de infusões de marcela sobre o ciclo celular da cebola foi avaliado, utilizando-se inflorescências de marcela recém coletadas (2005 e após armazenamento por 30 meses (2003. Preparou-se as infusões em duas concentrações: 5,0 mg/mL (concentração usual como chá e 20 mg/mL. Utilizaram-se 3 grupos de 6 bulbos de cebola para cada população de marcela. Retirou-se um grupo de bulbos controle de cada população. Todos os bulbos enraizados em água destilada foram transferidos para os extratos de marcela e permaneceram por 24 horas, (os bulbos controle permaneceram em água. As radículas foram coletadas, fixadas em etanol-ácido acético (3:1 por 24 h e estocadas em álcool 70%. Foram analisadas 6000 células por grupo de bulbos, e os índices mitóticos calculados submetidos a análise estatística pelo teste chi2 a 5%. Conclui-se que as infusões de marcela possuem ação antiproliferativa sobre o ciclo celular da cebola e que essa ação inibitória da divisão celular aumenta conforme aumento da concentração, bem como após o armazenamento.

  1. Mathematical modeling for novel cancer drug discovery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Brusic, Vladimir

    2014-10-01

    Mathematical modeling enables: the in silico classification of cancers, the prediction of disease outcomes, optimization of therapy, identification of promising drug targets and prediction of resistance to anticancer drugs. In silico pre-screened drug targets can be validated by a small number of carefully selected experiments. This review discusses the basics of mathematical modeling in cancer drug discovery and development. The topics include in silico discovery of novel molecular drug targets, optimization of immunotherapies, personalized medicine and guiding preclinical and clinical trials. Breast cancer has been used to demonstrate the applications of mathematical modeling in cancer diagnostics, the identification of high-risk population, cancer screening strategies, prediction of tumor growth and guiding cancer treatment. Mathematical models are the key components of the toolkit used in the fight against cancer. The combinatorial complexity of new drugs discovery is enormous, making systematic drug discovery, by experimentation, alone difficult if not impossible. The biggest challenges include seamless integration of growing data, information and knowledge, and making them available for a multiplicity of analyses. Mathematical models are essential for bringing cancer drug discovery into the era of Omics, Big Data and personalized medicine.

  2. Protective Effect of Caffeic Acid on Paclitaxel Induced Anti-Proliferation and Apoptosis of Lung Cancer Cells Involves NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Fong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeic acid (CA, a natural phenolic compound, is abundant in medicinal plants. CA possesses multiple biological effects such as anti-bacterial and anti-cancer growth. CA was also reported to induce fore stomach and kidney tumors in a mouse model. Here we used two human lung cancer cell lines, A549 and H1299, to clarify the role of CA in cancer cell proliferation. The growth assay showed that CA moderately promoted the proliferation of the lung cancer cells. Furthermore, pre-treatment of CA rescues the proliferation inhibition induced by a sub-IC50 dose of paclitaxel (PTX, an anticancer drug. Western blot showed that CA up-regulated the pro-survival proteins survivin and Bcl-2, the down-stream targets of NF-κB. This is consistent with the observation that CA induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. Our study suggested that the pro-survival effect of CA on PTX-treated lung cancer cells is mediated through a NF-κB signaling pathway. This may provide mechanistic insights into the chemoresistance of cancer calls.

  3. Pathogenesis of Brain Edema and Investigation into Anti-Edema Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shotaro Michinaga

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain edema is a potentially fatal pathological state that occurs after brain injuries such as stroke and head trauma. In the edematous brain, excess accumulation of extracellular fluid results in elevation of intracranial pressure, leading to impaired nerve function. Despite the seriousness of brain edema, only symptomatic treatments to remove edema fluid are currently available. Thus, the development of novel anti-edema drugs is required. The pathogenesis of brain edema is classified as vasogenic or cytotoxic edema. Vasogenic edema is defined as extracellular accumulation of fluid resulting from disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB and extravasations of serum proteins, while cytotoxic edema is characterized by cell swelling caused by intracellular accumulation of fluid. Various experimental animal models are often used to investigate mechanisms underlying brain edema. Many soluble factors and functional molecules have been confirmed to induce BBB disruption or cell swelling and drugs targeted to these factors are expected to have anti-edema effects. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms and involvement of factors that induce brain edema formation, and the possibility of anti-edema drugs targeting them.

  4. 49 CFR 655.12 - Required elements of an anti-drug use and alcohol misuse program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Required elements of an anti-drug use and alcohol... and alcohol misuse program. An anti-drug use and alcohol misuse program shall include the following: (a) A statement describing the employer's policy on prohibited drug use and alcohol misuse in the...

  5. Cycloartane-3,24,25-triol inhibits MRCKα kinase and demonstrates promising anti prostate cancer activity in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Henry I C; Watson, Charah T; Badal, Simone; Toyang, Ngeh J; Bryant, Joseph

    2012-11-14

    Given the high occurrence of prostate cancer worldwide and one of the major sources of the discovery of new lead molecules being medicinal plants, this research undertook to investigate the possible anti-cancer activity of two natural cycloartanes; cycloartane-3,24,25-diol (extracted in our lab from Tillandsia recurvata) and cycloartane-3,24,25-triol (purchased). The inhibition of MRCKα kinase has emerged as a potential solution to restoring the tight regulation of normal cellular growth, the loss of which leads to cancer cell formation. Kinase inhibition was investigated using competition binding (to the ATP sites) assays which have been previously established and authenticated and cell proliferation was measured using the WST-1 assay. Cycloartane-3,24,25-triol demonstrated strong selectivity towards the MRCKα kinase with a Kd50 of 0.26 μM from a total of 451 kinases investigated. Cycloartane-3,24,25-triol reduced the viability of PC-3 and DU145 cell lines with IC50 values of 2.226 ± 0.28 μM and 1.67 ± 0.18 μM respectively. These results will prove useful in drug discovery as Cycloartane-3,24,25-triol has shown potential for development as an anti-cancer agent against prostate cancer.

  6. Inhaled Micro/Nanoparticulate Anticancer Drug Formulations: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery Strategy for Lung Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Nazrul; Richard, Derek

    2018-05-24

    Local delivery of drug to the target organ via inhalation offers enormous benefits in the management of many diseases. Lung cancer is the most common of all cancers and it is the leading cause of death worldwide. Currently available treatment systems (intravenous or oral drug delivery) are not efficient in accumulating the delivered drug into the target tumor cells and are usually associated with various systemic and dose-related adverse effects. The pulmonary drug delivery technology would enable preferential accumulation of drug within the cancer cell and thus be superior to intravenous and oral delivery in reducing cancer cell proliferation and minimising the systemic adverse effects. Site-specific drug delivery via inhalation for the treatment of lung cancer is both feasible and efficient. The inhaled drug delivery system is non-invasive, produces high bioavailability at low dose and avoids first pass metabolism of the delivered drug. Various anticancer drugs including chemotherapeutics, proteins and genes have been investigated for inhalation in lung cancers with significant outcomes. Pulmonary delivery of drugs from dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation is stable and has high patient compliance. Herein, we report the potential of pulmonary drug delivery from dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations inhibiting lung cancer cell proliferation at very low dose with reduced unwanted adverse effects. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Development of anti-inflammatory drugs - the research and development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Richard Graham

    2014-01-01

    The research and development process for novel drugs to treat inflammatory diseases is described, and several current issues and debates relevant to this are raised: the decline in productivity, attrition, challenges and trends in developing anti-inflammatory drugs, the poor clinical predictivity of experimental models of inflammatory diseases, heterogeneity within inflammatory diseases, 'improving on the Beatles' in treating inflammation, and the relationships between big pharma and biotechs. The pharmaceutical research and development community is responding to these challenges in multiple ways which it is hoped will lead to the discovery and development of a new generation of anti-inflammatory medicines. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Regulatory aspects of oncology drug safety evaluation: Past practice, current issues, and the challenge of new drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenfeldt, Hans; Kropp, Timothy; Benson, Kimberly; Ricci, M. Stacey; McGuinn, W. David; Verbois, S. Leigh

    2010-01-01

    The drug development of new anti-cancer agents is streamlined in response to the urgency of bringing effective drugs to market for patients with limited life expectancy. FDA's regulation of oncology drugs has evolved from the practices set forth in Arnold Lehman's seminal work published in the 1950s through the current drafting of a new International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH) safety guidance for anti-cancer drug nonclinical evaluations. The ICH combines the efforts of the regulatory authorities of Europe, Japan, and the United States and the pharmaceutical industry from these three regions to streamline the scientific and technical aspects of drug development. The recent development of new oncology drug classes with novel mechanisms of action has improved survival rates for some cancers but also brings new challenges for safety evaluation. Here we present the legacy of Lehman and colleagues in the context of past and present oncology drug development practices and focus on some of the current issues at the center of an evolving harmonization process that will generate a new safety guidance for oncology drugs, ICH S9. The purpose of this new guidance will be to facilitate oncology drug development on a global scale by standardizing regional safety requirements.

  9. [Anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-pyretic activities of a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate, in experimental animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Imazu, C; Ishii, K; Yokoyama, Y; Seto, Y; Kadokawa, T; Shimizu, M

    1982-08-01

    Anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities of orally administered etofenamate, the diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, were investigated in experimental animals. Against acetic acid-induced vascular permeability in mice and ultra-violet light-induced erythema in guinea pigs, etofenamate produced a dose related inhibition at doses of 40--320 mg/kg and 5--20 mg/kg, respectively. In rats, felt-pellet-induced granuloma formation and adjuvant-induced arthritis were significantly inhibited by repeated administration of etofenamate at doses of 20 mg/kg/day for 5 days and 40 mg/kg/day for 21 days, respectively. Etofenamate showed an inhibitory activity on the squeak response caused by flexing and extending the silver nitrate-induced arthritic joint in rats; and it produced a dose related anti-writhing activity at doses of 50--300 mg/kg and 10--80 mg/kg in mice and rats, respectively, in the acetic acid-induced writhing test. Etofenamate showed a significant anti-pyretic activity at doses of 0.2 mg/kg or more. These potencies of etofenamate were 0.5 to 1.6 times those of flufenamic acid. In particular, the anti-erythema, anti-arthritis, and anti-pyretic activities of etofenamate were approximately equivalent to or superior to those of flufenamic acid. From these results, it was suggested that etofenamate given orally, like other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, showed anti-inflammatory, analgesic, and anti-pyretic activities in experimental animals.

  10. Drug-induced liver injury due to antimicrobials, central nervous system agents, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarbhavi, Harshad; Andrade, Raúl J

    2014-05-01

    Antimicrobial agents including antituberculosis (anti-TB) agents are the most common cause of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) and drug-induced liver failure across the world. Better molecular and genetic biomarkers are acutely needed to help identify those at risk of liver injury particularly for those needing antituberculosis therapy. Some antibiotics such as amoxicillin-clavulanate and isoniazid consistently top the lists of agents in retrospective and prospective DILI databases. Central nervous system agents, particularly antiepileptics, account for the second most common class of agents implicated in DILI registries. Hepatotoxicity from older antiepileptics such as carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital are often associated with hypersensitivity features, whereas newer antiepileptic drugs have a more favorable safety profile. Antidepressants and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs carry very low risk of significant liver injury, but their prolific use make them important causes of DILI. Early diagnosis and withdrawal of the offending agent remain the mainstays of minimizing hepatotoxicity. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Use of Fixed Dose Combination (FDC) Drugs in India: Central Regulatory Approval and Sales of FDCs Containing Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs), Metformin, or Psychotropic Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettigan, Patricia; Roderick, Peter; Mahajan, Rushikesh; Kadam, Abhay; Pollock, Allyson M.

    2015-01-01

    Background In 2012, an Indian parliamentary committee reported that manufacturing licenses for large numbers of fixed dose combination (FDC) drugs had been issued by state authorities without prior approval of the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) in violation of rules, and considered that some ambiguity until 1 May 2002 about states’ powers might have contributed. To our knowledge, no systematic enquiry has been undertaken to determine if evidence existed to support these findings. We investigated CDSCO approvals for and availability of oral FDC drugs in four therapeutic areas: analgesia (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), diabetes (metformin), depression/anxiety (anti-depressants/benzodiazepines), and psychosis (anti<